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Sample records for bentonite slurry

  1. Soil-bentonite design mix for slurry cutoff walls used as containment barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rad, N.S.; Bachus, R.C.; Jacobson, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, soil-bentonite slurry cutoff walls have been increasingly used as containment barriers around contaminated soils to impede or, in some cases, nearly eliminate the off-site migration of contaminated ground water or other potentially hazardous liquids. The paper presents the procedures used and the results obtained during an extensive laboratory testing program performed to select varying soil-bentonite slurry mix components for a soil-bentonite slurry cutoff wall constructed around an old landfill at a former oil refinery. The landfill is underlain to varying depths by a coarse granular soils that has been exposed to oil-products. Compatibility of three commercially available bentonite products with the free oil-products and the oil-contaminated ground water found at some locations in the landfill was initially investigated. Based on the test results, one of the bentonite products was selected for use in the soil-bentonite slurry testing program. A clayey soil from a borrow source, potable water from the site, and subsurface soils from the proposed soil-bentonite slurry wall alignment were used to form different soil-bentonite slurry mixes. Slump tests were performed to evaluate the workability of the mixes. Based on the test results, a single mix was selected for further study, including permeability/compatibility testing. The results of the compatibility testing program are presented and discussed in the paper. A specific design mix methodology for evaluating the chemical compatibility of soil-bentonite slurry mixes with permeants is proposed

  2. Field test of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting into rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoyuki Asada; Hitoshi Nakashima; Takashi Ishii; Sumio Horiuchi

    2006-01-01

    Crystalline rocks have fractures which may cause unexpected routes of groundwater seepage. Cement grouting is one of the most effective methods to minimize seepage; however, cement materials may not be suitable for the purpose of extra-long durability, because cement is neutralized or degraded by chemical and physical influence of chemical reaction. Natural clay like bentonite is one of the most promising materials for seepage barrier; however, water/bentonite grout is so viscous that enough amount of bentonite can not be grouted into rock fractures. To increase bentonite content in grout with low viscosity, the utilization of ethanol as a mixing liquid was studied. Ethanol suppresses bentonite swelling, and more bentonite can be injected more than that of water/bentonite slurry. In this paper, grouting into in-situ rock mass fracture from the ground surface was tested to investigate the barrier performance and workability of ethanol/bentonite slurry as a grouting material. (author)

  3. One-dimensional contaminant transport model for the design of soil-bentonite slurry walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khandelwal, A.; Rabideau, A.; Su, J.

    1997-01-01

    A user oriented computer model (TRANS1D) was developed for application to the analysis and design of vertical soil-bentonite barriers. TRANS1D is a collection of analytical and numerical solutions to the one dimensional advective-dispersive-reactive (ADR) equation. The primary objective in developing TRANS1D was to enable the designer of a barrier system to evaluate the potential system performance with respect to contaminant transport, without performing difficult and time consuming field or laboratory experiments. Several issues related to model application are discussed, including identification of governing transport processes, specification of boundary conditions, and parameter estimation. Model predictions are compared with the results of laboratory column experiments conducted with soil bentonite barrier material under diffusion-dominated conditions. Good agreement between model calibrations and experimental results was noted, with calibrated diffusion coefficients for organic contaminants consistent with literature values

  4. The origins of the slurry trench cut-off and a review of cement-bentonite cut-off walls in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferis, S.A.

    1997-01-01

    On the occasion of the first International Containment Technology Conference it is appropriate to look back to the origins of containment walls as well as forward to the new technologies that we may need for the complex chemical and physical environments in which containment may be employed in the future. This paper looks at the development of slurry trench technology from the first concepts in 1938, the first field trials in 1945 and on to the cement-bentonite walls used in the UK today and the issues associated with defining appropriate materials performance

  5. Rheology Modifiers Applied to Kaolin-Bentonite Slurries for SRNL WTP Pulse Jets Tank Pilot Work in Support of RPP at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILLIAM, DANIEL

    2005-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked to find and characterize the impact of rheological modifiers to a clay (Kaolin-Bentonite) slurry having 23.1 total wt percent solids, 1.165 g/ml, and Bingham Plastic yield stress of 13 Pa and plastic viscosity of 24 mPa-sec. The primary objective was to find rheological modifiers when blended with this clay slurry that would provide a vane yield stress of 300 Pa when the slurry was undisturbed for 24 hours. A secondary objective was to find a modifier that after shearing would produce a Bingham Plastic yield stress of 30 Pa and plastic viscosity of 30 mPa-sec. Two parallel paths were chosen with one examining a variety of organic/inorganic modifiers and another using just the inorganic modifier Laponite (R). The addition of organic modifiers hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, and hydroxypropylcellulose at a target 0.50 wt percent dramatically increased the vane yield stress over the range 311 - 724 Pa, and also increased the Bingham plastic yield stress and plastic viscosities over the range 33-112 Pa and 27-166 mPa-sec, respectively. The organic modifiers also showed elastic behavior, yielding a very unpredictable up flow curve. The 0.50 wt percent addition of inorganic modifiers magnesium aluminum silicate and hydrate magnesium aluminum silicate only increased the vane yield stress to 36-46 Pa and had little impact on the Bingham Plastic parameters. A range of an inorganic (2-4 wt percent magnesium aluminum silicate) and combination of a range of an inorganic (2-3 wt percent magnesium aluminum silicate) and organic (0.03-0.05 wt percent sodium carboxymethylcellulose) modifiers were then tested. These results showed that the target vane yield stress could be obtained but the Bingham Plastic yield stress and plastic viscosity were 3 times too high. Reducing the organic modifier weight percent by a few hundredths, the Bingham Plastic yield stress could be obtained, but then the vane yield stress

  6. Slurry walls and slurry trenches - construction quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletto, R.J.; Good, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Slurry (panel) walls and slurry trenches have become conventional methods for construction of deep underground structures, interceptor trenches and hydraulic (cutoff) barriers. More recently polymers mixed with water are used to stabilize the excavation instead of bentonite slurry. Slurry walls are typically excavated in short panel segments, 2 to 7 m (7 to 23 ft) long, and backfilled with structural materials; whereas slurry trenches are fairly continuous excavations with concurrent backfilling of blended soils, or cement-bentonite mixtures. Slurry trench techniques have also been used to construct interceptor trenches. Currently no national standards exist for the design and/or construction of slurry walls/trenches. Government agencies, private consultants, contractors and trade groups have published specifications for construction of slurry walls/trenches. These specifications vary in complexity and quality of standards. Some place excessive emphasis on the preparation and control of bentonite or polymer slurry used for excavation, with insufficient emphasis placed on quality control of bottom cleaning, tremie concrete, backfill placement or requirements for the finished product. This has led to numerous quality problems, particularly with regard to identification of key depths, bottom sediments and proper backfill placement. This paper will discuss the inspection of slurry wall/trench construction process, identifying those areas which require special scrutiny. New approaches to inspection of slurry stabilized excavations are discussed

  7. BENTONITE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Kutlić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite has vide variety of uses. Special use of bentonite, where its absorbing properties are employed to provide water-tight sealing is for an underground repository in granites In this paper, bentonite processing and beneficiation are described.

  8. Metals attenuation in minerally-enhanced slurry walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Prince, M.J.; Adams, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    In current practice, a soil-bentonite slurry trench cutoff wall is a mixture of water, soil, and bentonite that is designed to serve as a passive barrier to ground water and contaminant transport. This study evaluated the transformation of a passive slurry trench cutoff wall barrier to an active barrier system. Conventional soil-bentonite vertical barriers presently serve as passive barriers to contaminated ground water. An active barrier will not only fulfill the functions of the present passive barrier system, but also retard contaminant transport by adsorptive processes. Attapulgite, Na-chabazite, and Ca-chabazite were added to open-quotes activateclose quotes the conventional soil-bentonite backfill. Batch extraction tests were performed to determine the partitioning coefficients of cadmium and zinc between the liquid and solid phase when in contact with the backfill mixes. Batch extraction and mathematical modeling results demonstrate the ability of an active barrier to retard the transport of cadmium and zinc. The reactivity of the soil-bentonite vertical barrier depends heavily on the inorganic being adsorbed. The reactivity of the barrier also depends on the adsorptive capabilities of the clay minerals added to the conventional soil-bentonite vertical barrier. The results of laboratory studies suggest that passive barrier systems can be transformed to active systems. Further, the data suggests that although conventional soil-bentonite vertical barriers are presently designed as passive barriers, they already have adsorptive capacity associated with active barriers

  9. Small-scale bentonite injection test on rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1978-03-01

    When radiactive waste is disposed a sealing of the rock is very valuable since it reduces the rate of water percolation and diffusion. In an earlier report injection of bentonite gels by means of over-pressure and subsequent electrophoresis has been suggested. The present report describes a rock test series where bentonite injection was applied. For the test an approximately cubical block of about 1 m 3 was selected. The rock type was diorite with a fairly high frequency of quartz denses. The block was kept in a basin during the test in order to maintain the water saturation. Holes were bored in the block. A bentonite slurry with 1000 percent water content was injected. It was shown that the bentonite had a sealing effect but the depth of extrusion into rock joints was not large because of gelation. Electro-Kinetic injection of montmorillonite was found to be a more promising technique for rock lightening

  10. Slurry reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  11. Slurry explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1973-08-23

    A slurry explosive is comprised of (1) a composition consisting of ammonium nitrate or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and an alkali metal nitrate; or an alkaline earth metal nitrate; or an alkali metal nitrate and an alkaline earth metal nitrate; at least one member selected from the group consisting of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, aluminum, smokeless powder and fuels; and water; (2) 0.1 to 2.0% of guar gum; (3) between 0% and 0.3% of a sodium, potassium, calcium or magnesium borate; and greater than 0% but not more than 20% of hexamethylene tetramine; and (4) 0.02 to 2.0% of antimony potassium tartarate, antimony trioxide, antimony trisulfide or a mixture of these antimony compounds, % by wt.

  12. Rheology of sludge-slurry grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, E.W.

    1980-10-01

    A series of rheograms was developed that relates the critical velocity (velocity where flow changes from laminar to turbulent) of a cementitious grout that incorporates a suspended sludge-slurry to the critical velocity of a reference grout made with a simulated waste solution. The sludge that is now in the Gunite waste tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be suspended and pumped to the new waste storage tanks in Melton Valley. The sludge will then be blended with a cement mix base to form a grout which will be injected underground by the shale fracturing process. This report describes the materials, equipment, and techniques used in the laboratory studies to suspend sludges and mix sludge-slurry grouts that have flow properties similar to those of current shale fracturing grouts. Bentonite clay is an effective suspender in dilute NaNO 3 solutions; 15 wt % solids can be suspended with 2.0 wt % bentonite in a 0.1 M NaNO 3 solution. Other suspending materials were evaluated, but bentonite gave the best results. If a slurry grout becomes too viscous to pump, methods must be available to thin the mixture. A number of thinners, friction reducers, and plasticizers were examined. Q-Broxin, a thinner supplied by Baroid, reduced the velocity of a grout required for turbulent flow in a 5.0-cm (2-in.)-diam tube from 1.76 to 1.20 m/s (5.79 to 3.95 ft/s); FX-32C, a plasticizer supplied by Fox Industries, Inc., reduced the velocity from 1.76 to 0.75 m/s

  13. Bentonite erosion - Laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite clay is proposed as buffer material in the KBS-3 concept of storing spent nuclear fuel. Since the clay is plastic it will protect the canisters containing the spent fuel from movements in the rock. Furthermore, the clay will expand when taking up water, become very compact and hence limit the transport of solutes to and from the canister to only diffusion. The chemical stability of the bentonite barrier is of vital importance. If much material would be lost the barrier will lose its functions. As a side effect, lots of colloids will be released which may facilitate radionuclide transport in case of a breach in the canister. There are scenarios where during an ice age fresh melt water may penetrate down to repository depths with relatively high flow rates and not mix with older waters of high salinity. Under such conditions bentonite colloids will be more stable and there is a possibility that the bentonite buffer would start to disperse and bentonite colloids be carried away by the passing water. This work is a part of a larger project called Bentonite Erosion, initiated and supported by SKB. In this work several minor experiments have been performed in order to investigate the influence of for instance di-valent cations, gravity, etc. on the dispersion behaviour of bentonite and/or montmorillonite. A bigger experiment where the real situation was simulated using an artificial fracture was conducted. Two Plexiglas slabs were placed on top of each other, separated by plastic spacers. Bentonite was placed in a container in contact with a fracture. The bentonite was water saturated before deionized water was pumped through the fracture. The evolution of the bentonite profile in the fracture was followed visually. The eluate was collected in five different slots at the outlet side and analyzed for colloid concentration employing Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS) and a Single Particle Counter (SPC). Some

  14. Porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In this study, the porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite, considered as an engineered barrier in the repository of spent fuel, has been studied in interaction experiments. Many parameters, like the composition and density of bentonite, composition of the solution, bentonite-to-water ratio (B/W), surrounding conditions and experimental time have been varied in the experiments. At the end of the interaction the equilibrating solution, the porewaters squeezed out of the bentonite samples, and bentonites themselves were analyzed to give information for the interpretation and modelling of the interaction. Equilibrium modelling was performed with the HYDRAQL/CE computer code 33 refs.

  15. Utilization technology on slurried ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Yoshio; Yasuda, Minoru; Furuki, Yasuhiko [The Coal Mining Research Centre, Japan, Tokyo, Japan; Electric Power Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1987-08-01

    Three research results of the utilization technology on slurried ash were reported. As for the utilization as the fly ash quick setting (FQS) backfill grout for tail void in shield works of tunneling, grout blending was simplified, the blended solution of cement, clay, additives and water was stabilized, and a favorable workability and long term durability were obtained. As for the utilization as the material of a SMW (soil mixing wall) method for continuous walls in long shaft digging, a fly ash-gypsum-cement (FGC) stabilizer showed an excellent workability and remarkably high water-tightness as compared with conventional cement bentonite. As for the utilization as the material of an injection method of overlay mats in foundation works of light weight structures on the sea bed mud foundation, since a FGC concrete weight in water was remarkably light as 0.7t/m{sup 3}, no both large mold form strength and vibration compacting were required. 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Gas Transport in Bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Gutierre-Rodrigo, V.; Martin, P. I.; Romero, F. J.; Barcala, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The gas permeability of the Spanish FEBEX bentonite compacted at dry densities of between 1.4 and 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} with high water contents was measured for different confining, injection and back pressures. The results were compared with results obtained in previous investigations for lower degrees of saturation. It was checked that gas permeability was greatly affected by dry density, decreasing about three orders of magnitude when it increased from 1.5 to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} for similar water content. The increase of water content caused also a decrease in gas permeability. It was found that both gas permeability and the relative gas permeability were mainly related to the accessible porosity. These relationships could be fitted to potential expressions with exponents between 3 and 4, as well as the relationship between intrinsic permeability and void ratio. For gas pressures below 1.2 MPa no effect of the injection or confining pressures on the value of permeability was detected. For a given confining pressure the permeability value decreased as the effective pressure increased, especially if the increase in effective pressure was due to a decrease in gas back pressure. It was checked that the Klinkenberg effect was not significant for this material in the range of pressures applied in the tests. The gas breakthrough pressure values in FEBEX saturated bentonite were determined for different dry densities. They increased clearly with dry density and were always higher than the swelling pressure of the bentonite. In high density samples gas flow tended to stop abruptly after breakthrough, whereas in lower density samples gas flow decreased gradually until a given pressure gradient was reached. The permeabilities computed after breakthrough (which usually did not stabilise) were inversely related to dry density. This would indicate that, even if the flow took place predominantly through preferential pathways that sometimes closed quickly after breakthrough and others

  17. Gas Transport in Bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, M. V.; Gutierrez-Rodrigo, V.; Martin, P. L.; Romero, F. J.; Barcala, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The gas permeability of the Spanish FEBEX bentonite compacted at dry densities of between 1.4 and 1.8 g/cm 3 with high water contents was measured for different confining, injection and back pressures. The results were compared with results obtained in previous investigations for lower degrees of saturation. It was checked that gas permeability was greatly affected by dry density, decreasing about three orders of magnitude when it increased from 1.5 to 1.8 g/cm 3 for similar water content. The increase of water content caused also a decrease in gas permeability. It was found that both gas permeability and the relative gas permeability were mainly related to the accessible porosity. These relationships could be fitted to potential expressions with exponents between 3 and 4, as well as the relationship between intrinsic permeability and void ratio. For gas pressures below 1.2 MPa no effect of the injection or confining pressures on the value of permeability was detected. For a given confining pressure the permeability value decreased as the effective pressure increased, especially if the increase in effective pressure was due to a decrease in gas back pressure. It was checked that the Klinkenberg effect was not significant for this material in the range of pressures applied in the tests. The gas breakthrough pressure values in FEBEX saturated bentonite were determined for different dry densities. They increased clearly with dry density and were always higher than the swelling pressure of the bentonite. In high density samples gas flow tended to stop abruptly after breakthrough, whereas in lower density samples gas flow decreased gradually until a given pressure gradient was reached. The permeabilities computed after breakthrough (which usually did not stabilise) were inversely related to dry density. This would indicate that, even if the flow took place predominantly through preferential pathways that sometimes closed quickly after breakthrough and others remained

  18. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  19. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf

    2009-12-01

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  20. Ice slurry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffeld, M. [Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Moltkestr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wang, M.J.; Goldstein, V. [Sunwell Technologies Inc., 180 Caster Avenue, Woodbridge, L4L 5Y (Canada); Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single-phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. (author)

  1. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  2. The Use of Modified Bentonite for Removal of Aromatic Organics from Contaminated Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitipour; Bowers; Bodocsi

    1997-12-15

    This study investigates the clay-aromatic interactions with a view to the use of bentonite clay for binding benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX compounds) in contaminated soils. BTEX compounds are the most toxic aromatic constituents of gasoline present in many underground storage tanks. Modified (organophilic) and ordinary bentonites are used to remove these organics. The organophilic bentonites are prepared by replacing the exchangeable inorganic cations present in bentonite particles with a quaternary ammonium salt. Various clay-to-soil ratios were applied to determine the efficiency of the modified bentonite in enhancing the cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) of BTEX contaminated soils. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) tests were performed on soil samples to evaluate the leaching of the organics. In addition, X-ray diffraction analyses were conducted to assess the changes in the basal spacing of the clays as a result of their interaction with BTEX compounds. The findings of this study reveal that organophilic bentonite can act as a successful adsorbent for removing the aromatic organics from contaminated soil. Thus, this material is viable for enhancing the performance of cement-based S/S processes, as an adsorbent for petroleum spills, and for landfill liners and slurry walls. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  3. The use of modified bentonite for removal of aromatic organics from contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitipour, S.; Bowers, M.T.; Bodocsi, A.

    1997-01-01

    This study investigates the clay-aromatic interactions with a view to the use of bentonite clay for binding benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and o-xylene (BTEX compounds) in contaminated soils. BTEX compounds are the most toxic aromatic constituents of gasoline present in many underground storage tanks. Modified (organophilic) and ordinary bentonites are used to remove these organics. The organophilic bentonites are prepared by replacing the exchangeable inorganic cations present in bentonite particles with a quaternary ammonium salt. Various clay-to-soil ratios were applied to determine the efficiency of the modified bentonite in enhancing the cement-based solidification/stabilization (S/S) of BTEX contaminated soils. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) tests were performed on soil samples to evaluate the leaching of the organics. In addition, X-ray diffraction analyses were conducted to assess the changes in the basal spacing of the clays as a result of their interaction with BTEX compounds. The findings of this study reveal that organophilic bentonite can act as a successful adsorbent for removing the aromatic organics from contaminated soil. Thus, this material is viable for enhancing the performance of cement-based S/S processes, as an adsorbent for petroleum spills, and for landfill liners and slurry walls

  4. Very low conductivity self-hardening slurry for permanent enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallard, G.

    1997-01-01

    Attapulgite clay and ground blast furnace slag cement can form a low solids slurry which, after setting and curing, exhibits very low permeability and substantial strength. Compared to better known cement bentonite slurries, the conductivity is 3 orders of magnitude lower and the strength is four times higher at a similar solids content. Coefficients of permeability have been measured in the 10 -10 cm/sec. range. As a containment barrier, no chemical compound has had detrimental effects on the integrity of the material. Compatibility with leachates at a pH under 2 has been demonstrated. Compared to leachable Ordinary Portland Cement and to bentonite gel shrinkage in the presence of certain organic compounds, the attapulgite clay and the selected slag cement behave as remarkably inert. A number of successful applications as vertical barriers, trenched and by the vibrated beam method, have been installed at remedial sites. Applications by jet grouting have been implemented under utilities to provide continuity. The potential for placement of such materials to form horizontal barriers by jet grouting or frac-grouting/mud jacking techniques, offers the possibility of creating complete enclosures in soils. The purely mineral nature of these slurries ensures long term chemical stability necessary for permanent containment

  5. Pressurized Vessel Slurry Pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pound, C.R.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes testing of an alternate ''pressurized vessel slurry pumping'' apparatus. The principle is similar to rural domestic water systems and ''acid eggs'' used in chemical laboratories in that material is extruded by displacement with compressed air

  6. Slurry pipeline design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betinol, Roy; Navarro R, Luis [Brass Chile S.A., Santiago (Chile)

    2009-12-19

    Compared to other engineering technologies, the design of a commercial long distance Slurry Pipeline design is a relatively new engineering concept which gained more recognition in the mid 1960 's. Slurry pipeline was first introduced to reduce cost in transporting coal to power generating units. Since then this technology has caught-up worldwide to transport other minerals such as limestone, copper, zinc and iron. In South America, the use of pipeline is commonly practiced in the transport of Copper (Chile, Peru and Argentina), Iron (Chile and Brazil), Zinc (Peru) and Bauxite (Brazil). As more mining operations expand and new mine facilities are opened, the design of the long distance slurry pipeline will continuously present a commercially viable option. The intent of this paper is to present the design process and discuss any new techniques and approach used today to ensure a better, safer and economical slurry pipeline. (author)

  7. Overview of slurry pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, R L

    1982-01-01

    Slurry pipelines have proven to be a technically feasible, environmentally attractive and economic method of transporting finely divided particles over long distances. A pipeline system normally consists of preparation, pipeline and utilization facilities and requires optimization of all three components taken together. A considerable amount of research work has been done to develop hydraulic design of a slurry pipeline. Equipment selection and estimation of corrosion-erosion are considered to be as important as the hydraulic design. Future applications are expected to be for the large-scale transport of coal and for the exploitation of remotely located mineral deposits such as iron ore and copper. Application of slurry pipelines for the exploitation of remotely located mineral deposits is illustrated by the Kudremukh iron concentrate slurry pipeline in India.

  8. Design and construction of a deep slurry trench barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deming, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    A 24 m (80 ft) deep slurry trench surrounding a former chromium manufacturing facility on the Patapsco River in Baltimore, Maryland was constructed in 1995 to contain groundwater and site Soils, and to reduce the volume of groundwater extracted to maintain an inward gradient. In 1992, an embankment made of crushed stone was constructed in the Patapsco River to make land for barrier construction outboard of the bulkheads, and to protect the barrier. Stability of the slurry-supported trench excavation in the embankment required construction from an elevated work platform. An extended reach backhoe was used to excavate the deep slurry trench and to clean the trench bottom. Soil-Bentonite backfill was prepared at a central mixing area and transported by truck to the perimeter barrier. A synthetic membrane was inserted partially into the backfill for connection to a multimedia cap, and for redundancy and erosion control in the tidal zone. Hydraulic testing of the aquitard contained by the barrier demonstrated excellent performance of the barrier and bottom closure. Detailed definition of subsurface conditions and the closure stratum was necessary for the design and successful construction of the barrier, and is recommended for comparable slurry trench construction projects

  9. Interim solidification of SRP waste with silica, bentonite, or phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.H.

    1976-03-01

    One option for interim waste management at the Savannah River Plant is in-tank solidification of the liquid waste solutions. This would reduce the mobility of these highly radioactive solutions until techniques for their long-term immobilization and storage are developed and implemented. Interim treatments must permit eventual retrieval of waste and subsequent incorporation into a high-integrity form. This study demonstrated the solidification of simulated alkaline waste solutions by reaction with silica, bentonite, and phosphoric acid. Alkaline waste can be solidified by reaction with silica gel, silica flour, or sodium silicate solution. Solidified products containing waste salt can be retrieved by slurrying with water. Alkaline supernate (solution in equilibrium with alkaline sludge in SRP waste tanks) can be solidified by reaction with bentonite to form cancrinite powder. The solidified waste can be retrieved by slurrying with water. Alkaline supernate can be solidified by partial evaporation and reaction with phosphoric acid. Water is incorporated into hydrated complexes of trisodium phosphate. The product is soluble, but actual plant waste would not solidify completely because of decay heat. Reaction of simulated alkaline waste solutions with silica gel, silica flour, or bentonite increases the volume by a factor of approximately 6 over that of evaporated waste; reaction with phosphoric acid results in a volume 1.5 times that of evaporated waste. At present, the best method for in-tank solidification is by evaporation, a method that contributes no additional solids to the waste and does not compromise any waste management options

  10. Prediction for swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, H.; Ogata, N.

    1996-01-01

    Compacted bentonites are attracting greater attention as back-filling (buffer) materials for high-level nuclear waste repositories. For this purpose, it is very important to quantitatively evaluate the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite. New equations for evaluating the relationship between the swelling deformation of compacted bentonite and the distance between two montmorillonite layers are derived. New equations for evaluating the ion concentration of pore water and the specific surface of bentonite, which significantly influence the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite, are proposed. Furthermore, a prediction method for the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite is presented by combining the new equations with the well-known theoretical equations of repulsive and attractive forces between two montmorillonite layers. The applicability of this method was investigated by comparing the predicted results with laboratory test results on the swelling deformation and swelling pressure of compacted bentonites. (author) 31 refs., 8 tabs., 12 figs

  11. System and method for slurry handling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Raymond Douglas; Oppenheim, Judith Pauline

    2015-12-29

    A system includes a slurry depressurizing system that includes a liquid expansion system configured to continuously receive a slurry at a first pressure and continuously discharge the slurry at a second pressure. For example, the slurry depressurizing system may include an expansion turbine to expand the slurry from the first pressure to the second pressure.

  12. Organophilic bentonites based on Argentinean and Brazilian bentonites: part 2: potential evaluation to obtain nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Paiva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the preparation of composites of polypropylene and organophilic bentonites based on Brazilian and Argentinean bentonites. During the processing of the samples in a twin screw microextruder, torque and pressures of the extruder were accompanied and the viscosity values were calculated. No significant changes in the torque, pressure and viscosity were found for composites prepared with different bentonites. The samples were characterized by XRD and TEM to evaluate the structure and dispersion of the organophilic bentonites. Composites with exfoliated, partially exfoliated and intercalated structures were obtained and correlations between the intrinsic properties of the sodium clays and organophilic bentonites and their influence on the composites were studied. The cation exchange capacity of the sodium bentonites and the swelling capacity of the organophilic bentonites were the most important properties to obtain exfoliated structures in composites. All bentonites showed the potential to obtain polymer nanocomposites, but the ones from Argentina displayed the best results.

  13. Bentonite in the repository - Manufacture of bentonite blocks. A literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.

    1995-09-01

    Activities in nuclear power countries are reviewed, concerning developments in the use of bentonite for backfilling in nuclear waste repositories, in particular regarding manufacture of bentonite-blocks. Only one report was found which in detail describes the manufacture of highly compacted blocks of bentonite. Use of bentonite for sealing boreholes etc in the oil- and gas industry was also covered in the literature study. 19 refs, 3 tabs

  14. Roles of bentonite in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    Bentonite is used in radioactive waste disposal from the following points; (1) properties (2) now utilization fields (3) how to use in radioactive waste disposal (4) how much consumption and deposits as source at the present time. Bentonite is produced as alteration products from pyroclastic rocks such as volcanic ash and ryolite, and is clay composed mainly smectite (montmorillonite in general). Therefore, special properties of bentonite such as swelling potential, rheological property, bonding ability, cation exchange capacity and absorption come mainly from properties of montmorillonite. Bentonite has numerous uses such as iron ore pelleizing, civil engineering, green sand molding, cat litter, agricultural chemicals and drilling mud. Consumption of bentonite is about 600-700 x 10 3 tons in Japan and about 10 x 10 6 tons in the world. Roles of bentonite to be expected in radioactive waste disposal are hydraulic conductivity, swelling potential, absorption, mechanical strength, ion diffusion capacity and long-term durability. These properties come from montmorillonite. (author)

  15. Diffusion of uranium in compacted sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1992-09-01

    In the study the diffusion of uranium dissolved from uranium oxide fuel was studied experimentally in compacted sodium bentonite (Wyoming bentonite MX-80). The experiments were carried out by the through-diffusion method. The parameters varied in the study were the density of bentonite, salt content of the solution and redox conditions. Uranium was dissolved under aerobic conditions in order to simulate oxic conditions possibly caused by radiolysis in the repository

  16. Rheology of oil sands slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, R.; Zhou, J. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Mineral Oil Sands Unit; Wallace, D. [Dean Wallace Consulting Inc., Beaumont, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This study focused on integrating rheology and colloid science to improve recovery of bitumen in surface mined oil sands. Factors that influence recovery, such as conditions of particle interaction, solids concentration and shear rate, were reviewed. In an effort to understand the rheological behaviour of clay-in-water suspensions, an elaborate procedure was developed to separate an inter-bedded clay layer from a site at Albian Sands Energy Inc. The variables were water chemistry, solids concentration, and shear rate. The research study was conducted at the Alberta Research Council with the support of the CONRAD Extraction Group. A controlled stress rheometer was used to provide the quantitative evaluations of the clay slurry properties. The research results indicate that the viscoelastic properties of the slurry are highly influenced by the shear history of the slurry, solids content, calcium concentration, and sample aging. Shear thinning behaviour was observed in all slurry samples, but the slurry viscosity increased with test time for a given shear rate. In order to classify the slurries, a method was developed to distinguish the gel strength. The slurries were then classified into 3 distinct patterns, including no gel, weak gel and strong gel. The evolution of the experimental protocols were described along with the current stability maps that correlate the domains of the gel strength according to the solids concentration, calcium ion content, and shear rate. It was concluded that the rheological properties of oil sands slurries influence bitumen recovery in commercial surface-mined oil sands operations. tabs., figs.

  17. Bentonite Permeability at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Daniels

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Repository designs frequently favour geological disposal of radioactive waste with a backfill material occupying void space around the waste. The backfill material must tolerate the high temperatures produced by decaying radioactive waste to prevent its failure or degradation, leading to increased hydraulic conductivity and reduced sealing performance. The results of four experiments investigating the effect of temperature on the permeability of a bentonite backfill are presented. Bentonite is a clay commonly proposed as the backfill in repository designs because of its high swelling capacity and very low permeability. The experiments were conducted in two sets of purpose-built, temperature controlled apparatus, designed to simulate isotropic pressure and constant volume conditions within the testing range of 4–6 MPa average effective stress. The response of bentonite during thermal loading at temperatures up to 200 °C was investigated, extending the previously considered temperature range. The results provide details of bentonite’s intrinsic permeability, total stress, swelling pressure and porewater pressure during thermal cycles. We find that bentonite’s hydraulic properties are sensitive to thermal loading and the type of imposed boundary condition. However, the permeability change is not large and can mostly be accounted for by water viscosity changes. Thus, under 150 °C, temperature has a minimal impact on bentonite’s hydraulic permeability.

  18. Bentonite erosion by dilute waters in initially saturated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olin, Markus; Seppaelae, Anniina; Laurila, Teemu; Koskinen, Kari

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. One scenario of interest for the long-term safety assessment of a spent nuclear fuel repository involves the loss of bentonite buffer material through contact with dilute groundwater at a transmissive fracture interface (SKB 2011, Posiva 2012a). The scenario is based on the stable colloids at low ionic strength: - the cohesive forces of bentonite decrease in low-salinity conditions, and colloids start to dominate and are able to leave the gel-like bentonite on the groundwater bentonite boundary; - after colloid formation, groundwater may carry away the only just released clay colloids; - low-salinity events are most probable during post-glacial conditions, when also pressure gradients are high, causing elevated flow velocity, which may enhance colloidal transport. Therefore, it is very important from the point of view of repository safety assessment to be able to estimate how much bentonite may be lost during a post-glacial event, when the groundwater salinity and velocity, as well as the duration of the event are fixed. It is possible that more than one event will hit the same canister and buffer, and that several canisters and buffers may be jeopardized. The results in the issue so far may be divided into modelling attempts and experimental work. The modelling has been based on two main guidelines: external (Birgersson et al., 2009) and internal friction models (Neretnieks et al., 2009). However, these models have not been validated for erosion, probably due to lack of suitable laboratory data. The latter approach is more ambitious due to lack of fitting parameters, though the internal friction model itself may be varied. The internal friction model has proven to be time-consuming to solve numerically. This work indicates that experiments carried out by Schatz et al. (2012) differ significantly from the predictions obtained from Neretnieks' model. We present our numerical modelling results based on a set of

  19. The bentonite industry in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.A.; Hnatiw, D.S.J.; Walker, B.T.

    1992-11-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is studying a concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the surface in stable crystalline rock of the Canadian Shield. The waste containers would be surrounded by a clay-based buffer material, composed of equal proportions of bentonite clay and silica sand. In the reference disposal concept, some 1.9 x 10 5 Mg of used fuel would be emplaced. This would require 2.5 x 10 6 Mg of bentonite. A review of the bentonite industry in North America was carried out to establish the availability of sufficient high-quality material. There are proven reserves of sodium bentonite clay in excess of 1.5 x 10 8 Mg, and vast supplies are known to exist but not yet proven. The Canadian conceptual disposal vault would require 6 x 10 4 Mg of sodium bentonite each year for 40 years. The bentonite industry of North America has an installed annual production capacity of 2 x 10 7 Mg. A disposal vault would therefore require approximately 2% of the industry capacity. A number of commercial products have been screened for potential suitability for use as a component of the buffer. Ten currently marketed bentonite products have been identified as meeting the initial quality standards for the buffer, and two non-commercial bentonites have been identified as having the potential for use in a disposal vault. (Author) (14 figs., 7 tabs., 18 refs.)

  20. Slurry pipeline technology: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jay P. [Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Rafael; Pinto, Daniel; Vidal, Alisson [Ausenco do Brasil Engenharia Ltda., Nova Lima, MG (Brazil). PSI Div.

    2009-12-19

    Slurry pipelines represent an economical and environmentally friendly transportation means for many solid materials. This paper provides an over-view of the technology, its evolution and current Brazilian activity. Mineral resources are increasingly moving farther away from ports, processing plants and end use points, and slurry pipelines are an important mode of solids transport. Application guidelines are discussed. State-of-the-Art technical solutions such as pipeline system simulation, pipe materials, pumps, valves, automation, telecommunications, and construction techniques that have made the technology successful are presented. A discussion of where long distant slurry pipelines fit in a picture that also includes thickened and paste materials pipe lining is included. (author)

  1. Slurry flow principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shook, C A; Brenner, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Slurry Flow: Principles and Practice describes the basic concepts and methods for understanding and designing slurry flow systems, in-plan installations, and long-distance transportation systems. The goal of this book is to enable the design or plant engineer to derive the maximum benefit from a limited amount of test data and to generalize operating experience to new situations. Design procedures are described in detail and are accompanied by illustrative examples needed by engineers with little or no previous experience in slurry transport.The technical literature in this field is extensive:

  2. Permeability of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1980-12-01

    The object of the study was the water flow through the bentonite which is caused by hydraulic gradients. The study comprised laboratory tests and theoretical considerations. It was found that high bulk densities reduced the permeability to very low values. It was concluded that practically impervious conditions prevail when the gradients are low. Thus with a regional gradient of 10 -2 and a premeability of 10 -13 m/s the flow rate will not be higher than approximately 1 mm in 30 000 years. (G.B.)

  3. Medical ice slurry production device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL; Oras, John [Des Plaines, IL; Son, HyunJin [Naperville, IL

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  4. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.; Anderson, M.S.; Van Essen, D.C.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses

  5. Rheology of tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, I.D.; Martin, H.D.; McLain, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The rheological properties of tetraphenylborate precipitate slurry were determined. This nonradioactive slurry simulates the radioactive tetraphenylborate precipitate generated at the Savannah River Plant by the In-Tank Precipitation Process. The data obtained in this study was applied in the design of slurry pumps, transfer pumps, transfer lines, and vessel agitation for the Defense Waste Processing Facility and other High Level Waste treatment projects. The precipitate slurry behaves as a Bingham plastic. The yield stress is directly proportional to the concentration of insoluble solids over the range of concentrations studied. The consistency is also a linear function of insoluble solids over the same concentration range. Neither the yield stress nor the consistency was observed to be affected by the presence of the soluble solids. Temperature effects on flow properties of the slurry were also examined: the yield stress is inversely proportional to temperature, but the consistency of the slurry is independent of temperature. No significant time-dependent effects were found. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  6. Assessment Criteria of Bentonite Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Żymankowska-Kumon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The criteria, with which one should be guided at the assessment of the binding properties of bentonites used for moulding sands, areproposed in the paper. Apart from the standard parameter which is the active bentonite content, the unrestrained growth indicator should be taken into account since it seems to be more adequate in the estimation of the sand compression strength. The investigations performed for three kinds of bentonites, applied in the Polish foundry plants, subjected to a high temperature influences indicate, that the pathway of changes of the unrestrained growth indicator is very similar to the pathway of changes of the sand compression strength. Instead, the character of changes of the montmorillonite content in the sand in dependence of the temperature is quite different. The sand exhibits the significant active bentonite content, and the sand compression strength decreases rapidly. The montmorillonite content in bentonite samples was determined by the modern copper complex method of triethylenetetraamine (Cu(II-TET. Tests were performed for bentonites and for sands with those bentonites subjected to high temperatures influences in a range: 100-700ºC.

  7. Rheological Behavior of Bentonite-Polyester Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Al-Omari, Salah Addin

    2013-07-01

    The rheological behavior of a bentonite clay dispersed in unsaturated polyester was investigated. The effects of the solid content and particle size on the steady and transient rheological properties of the dispersions were studied. In addition, two types of bentonite with different Na+/Ca+2 ratio were used in this study. The Herschel-Bulkley and the Weltman models were used to describe the apparent viscosity of the bentonite-polyester composite in relation to the shear rate and shearing time. The bentonite-polyester dispersions were found to exhibit both Newtonian and non-Newtonian behavior. The transition from a Newtonian to a Bingham plastic and then to a shear-thinning material with a yield stress was found to depend on the solid concentration, the particle size, and the type of bentonite. At a low solid content, the apparent viscosity of the bentonite dispersion increased linearly with solid concentration. But a dramatic increase in the apparent viscosity beyond a solid content of 20 wt.% was observed. On the other hand, a thixotropic behavior was detected in bentonite-polyester dispersions with a high solid content and a low particle size. However, this behavior was more pronounced in dispersions with a high Na+/Ca+2 ratio.

  8. Quality assurance of the bentonite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, L.; Korkeakoski, P.; Tiljander, M.; Kivikoski, H.; Laaksonen, R.

    2008-05-01

    This report describes a quality assurance chain for the bentonite material acquisition for a nuclear waste disposal repository. Chemical, mineralogical and geotechnical methods, which may be applied in quality control of bentonite are shortly reviewed. As a case study, many of the presented control studies were performed for six different bentonite samples. Chemical analysis is a very reliable research method to control material homogeneity, because the accuracy and repeatability of the study method is extremely good. Accurate mineralogical study of bentonite is a complicated task. X-ray diffractometry is the best method to identify smectite minerals, but quantitative analysis of smectite content remains uncertain. To obtain a better quantitative analysis, development of techniques based on automatic image analysis of SEM images is proposed. General characteristics of bentonite can be obtained by rapid indicator tests, which can be done on the place of reception. These tests are methylene blue test giving information on the cation exchange capacity, swelling index and determination of water absorption. Different methods were used in the determination of cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bentonite. The results indicated differences both between methodologies and between replicate determinations for the same material and method. Additional work should be done to improve the reliability and reproducibility of the methodology. Bentonite contains water in different modes. Thus, different determination methods are used in bentonite studies and they give somewhat dissimilar results. Clay research use frequently the so-called consistency tests (liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index). This study method does, however, not seem to be very practical in quality control of bentonite. Therefore, only the determination of liquid limit with fall-cone method is recommended for quality control. (orig.)

  9. Activation of wine bentonite with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranov, N.; Antonov, M.

    1997-01-01

    The action of gamma rays on wine bentonite as well as influence of its adsorption and technologic qualities on the composition and stability of wines against protein darkening and precipitation has been studied. The experiments were carried out with wine bentonite produced in the firm Bentonite and irradiated with doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 MR. White and red wines have been treated with irradiated bentonite under laboratory conditions at 1.0 g/dm 3 . All samples are treated at the same conditions. The flocculation rate of the sediment was determined visually. Samples have been taken 24 h later from the cleared wine layers. The following parameters have been determined: clarification, filtration rate, phenolic compounds, calcium, colour intensity, total extracted substances, etc. The volume of the sediment has been determined also. The control samples have been taken from the same unirradiated wines. The results showed better and faster clarification in on the third, the 20th and the 24th hours with using of gamma-irradiated at doses 0.8 and 1.0 MR. The sediment was the most compact and its volume - the smallest compared to the samples treated with bentonite irradiated with doses of 0.6 and 0.4 MR. This ensures a faster clarification and better filtration of treated wines. The bentonite activated with doses of 0.8 and 1.0 MR adsorbs the phenolic compounds and the complex protein-phenolic molecules better. In the same time it adsorbs less extracted substances compared to untreated bentonite and so preserves all organoleptic properties of wine. The irradiated bentonite adsorbs less the monomers of anthocyan compounds which ensures brighter natural colour of wine. The gamma-rays activation consolidates calcium in the crystal lattice of bentonite particles and in this way eliminates the formation of crystal precipitates

  10. Organophilization and characterization of commercial bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, B.B. da; Lima, J.C.C.; Alves, A.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite clay is a plastic changes resulting from volcanic ash, consisting mostly of montmorillonite. The state of Paraiba is a major source of bentonite clay from Brazil, where the main oil fields are located in Boa Vista and represents the largest national production of raw and beneficiated bentonite. Aimed at the commercial value of this type of clay and its high applicability in the polls, this article aims to make a comparison between two kinds of clay, a national (Brasgel) and other imported (Cloisite) from organophilization of two commercial bentonite, ionic surfactant with Praepagem WB, and characterize them by XRD, FTIR and TG / DTG. We observe that despite getting inferior properties, the clay presents national values very similar to those presented by imported clay. (author)

  11. Quality control and characterization of bentonite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiviranta, L.; Kumpulainen, S.

    2011-12-01

    Before bentonite material is taken into use in performance testing, the quality of the material needs to be checked. Three high grade bentonite materials: two natural Nabentonites from Wyoming, and one natural Ca-bentonite from Milos, were characterized. Each material was characterized using duplicate or triplicate samples in order to study variability in material quality in batches. The procedure consisted of basic acceptance testing (water ratio, CEC, swelling index, liquid limit, and granule size distribution), advanced acceptance testing (exchangeable cations, chemical and mineralogical composition, density, swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity) and complementary testing (herein surface area, water absorption capacity, montmorillonite composition, grain size distribution and plastic limit). All three materials qualified the requirements set for buffer bentonite for CEC, smectite content, swelling pressure, and hydraulic conductivity. Wyoming bentonites contained approximately 88 wt.% of smectite, and Milos bentonite 79 wt.% of smectite and 3 wt.% of illite. Precision of smectite analyses was ±2 %, and variances in composition of parallel samples within analytical errors, at least for Wyoming bentonites. Accuracy of quantitative analyses for trace minerals such as gypsum, pyrite or carbonates, was however low. As the concentrations of these trace minerals are important for Eh or pH buffering reactions or development of bentonite pore water composition, normative concentrations are recommended to be used instead of mineralogically determined concentrations. The swelling pressures and hydraulic conductivities of different materials were compared using EMDD. Swelling pressure was relatively higher for studied Cabentonite than for the studied Na-bentonites and the difference could not be explained with different smectite contents. Hydraulic conductivities seemed to be similar for all materials. The results of index tests correlated with the smectite content

  12. Calculation of saturated hydraulic conductivity of bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jun

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic conductivity test has some defects such as weak repeatability, time-consuming. Taking bentonite as dual porous media, the calculation formula of the distance, d 2 , between montmorillonite in intraparticle pores is deduced. Improved calculated method of hydraulic conductivity is obtained using d 2 and Poiseuille law. The method is valid through the comparison with results of test and other methods. The method is very convenient to calculate hydraulic conductivity of bentonite of certain montmorillonite content and void ratio. (authors)

  13. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha D.

    2016-01-01

    sections with 30-32 pigs with or without daily adjustment of slurry pH to below 6. Ammonia losses from reference sections with untreated slurry were between 9.5 and 12.4% of N excreted, and from sections with acidified slurry between 3.1 and 6.2%. Acidification reduced total emissions of NH3 by 66 and 71......% in spring and autumn experiments, and by 44% in the summer experiment. Regression models were used to investigate sources and controls of NH3 emissions. There was a strong relationship between NH3 emissions and ventilation rate during spring and autumn, but less so during summer where ventilation rates were...

  14. Optimization of bentonite pellet properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Torbjoern; Andersson, Linus; Jonsson, Esther; Fritzell, Anni

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. SKB in Sweden is developing and implementing concepts for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. A KBS-3V repository consists of a deposition tunnel with copper canisters containing spent fuel placed in vertical deposition holes. The canisters are embedded in highly compacted bentonite. After emplacement of canisters and bentonite blocks, the tunnels will be backfilled and sealed with an in-situ cast plug at the entrance. The main concept for backfilling the deposition tunnels imply pre compacted blocks of bentonite stacked on a bed of bentonite pellet. The remaining slot between blocks and rock will be filled with bentonite pellets. The work described in this abstract is a part of the ASKAR-project which main goal is to make a system design based on the selected concept for backfilling. Immediately after starting the backfill installation, inflowing water from the rock will come in contact with the pellet filling and thereby influence the characteristics of the pellet filling. The pellet filling helps to increase the average density of the backfill, but one of the most important properties beside this is the water storing capacity which will prevent water from reaching the backfill front where it would disturb and influence the quality of the installation. If water flows through the pellet filling out to the backfilling front, there will be erosion of material which also will affect the quality of the installed backfill. In order to optimize the properties regarding water storing capacity and sensitivity for erosion a number of tests have been made with different pellet types. The tests were made in different scales and with equipment specially designed for the purpose. The performed tests can be divided in four parts: 1. Standard tests (determining water content and density of pellet fillings and individual pellets, compressibility of the pellet fillings and strength of the individual pellets); 2. Erosion

  15. Removal of oil from water by bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moazed, H.; Viraraghavan, T.

    1999-01-01

    Many materials, included activated carbon, peat, coal, fiberglass, polypropylene, organoclay and bentonite have been used for removing oils and grease from water. However, bentonite has been used only rarely for this purpose. In this study Na-bentonite was used to remove oil from oil-in-water emulsions of various kinds such as standard mineral oil, cutting oils, refinery effluent and produced water from production wells at Estevan, Saskatchewan. Removal efficiencies obtained were 85 to 96 per cent for cutting oils, 84 to 86 per cent for produced water and 54 to 87 per cent for refinery effluent. Bentonite proved to be more effective in the removal of oil from oil-in-water emulsions than from actual waste waters; up to 96 percent from oil-in-water emulsions to only 87 per cent from actual waste water. The percentage of oil removed was found to be a function of the amount of bentonite added and the adsorption time up to the equilibrium time. Result also showed that the Langmuir, Freundlich and BET isotherms are well suited to describe the adsorption of oil by bentonite from the various oily waters employed in this study. 15 refs

  16. Hydraulic conductivity of some bentonites in artificial seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Murakami, Satoshi; Yasuhara, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    A high-level radioactive waste disposal facility might be built in a coastal area in Japan from the viewpoint of feasible transportation of waste. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of seawater on a bentonite-based buffer. This study investigated the influence of seawater on hydraulic conductivity of three common sodium-types of bentonite and one calcium-type bentonite by the laboratory experiments. >From the results of laboratory experiment, this study discussed the influence of seawater on hydraulic conductivity of bentonites from the viewpoints of kinds of bentonite such as exchangeable-cation type and montmorillonite content and dry density of bentonite-based buffer. (author)

  17. Exchangeability of bentonite buffer and backfill materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, D. [Savage Earth Associates Ltd, Bournemouth (United Kingdom); Arthur, R. [Intera Inc, Ottawa, ON, (Canada); Luukkonen, A.

    2012-08-15

    Clay-based buffer and tunnel backfill materials are important barriers in the KBS-3 repository concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. One issue that is relevant to material properties is the degree to which different bentonite compositions can be regarded as interchangeable. In Posiva's current repository design, the reference bentonite composition is MX-80, a sodium montmorillonite dominated clay. Posiva would like to be able to use bentonite with Ca-montmorillonite as the dominant clay mineral. However, at this stage, it is not clear what supporting data need to be acquired/defined to be able to place the state of knowledge of Ca-bentonite at the same level as that of Na-bentonite. In this report, the concept of bentonite exchangeability has been evaluated through consideration of how bentonite behaviour may be affected in six key performance-relevant properties, namely (1) mineralogical composition and availability of materials, (2) hydraulic conductivity, (3) mechanical and rheological properties, (4) long-term alteration, (5) colloidal properties, and (6) swelling pressure. The report evaluates implications for both buffer and backfill. Summary conclusions are drawn from these sections to suggest how bentonite exchangeability may be addressed in regulatory assessments of engineered barrier design for a future geological repository for spent fuel in Finland. Some important conclusions are: (a) There are some fundamental differences between Ca- and Na-bentonites such as colloidal behaviour, pore structure and long-term alteration that could affect the exchangeability of these materials as buffer or backfill materials and which should be further evaluated; (b) Additional experimental data are desirable for some issues such as long-term alteration, hydraulic properties and swelling behaviour, (c) The minor mineral content of bentonites is very variable, both between different bentonites and within the same bentonite type, it is not clear

  18. Fabrication and handling of bentonite blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    In accordance with the project for the final storage of spent nuclear fuel, the waste will be encapsulated into copper canisters, which will be deposited in a final repository located in rock 500 m below ground level. The canisters will be placed in vertical holes in the bottoms of the tunnels, where the copper cylinders will be surrounded by blocks of highly compacted bentonite. When the blocks are saturated with water and expansion is essentially retained as in the actual case, a very high swelling pressure will arise. The bentonite will be extremely impermeable and thus it will form a barrier against transport of corrosive matters to the canister. The blocks are fabricated by means of cold isostatic pressing of bentonite powder. The base material in the form of powder is enclosed in flexible forms, which are introduced into pressure vessels where the forms are surrounded by oil or water. Thus the powder is compacted into rigid bodies with a bulk density of about 2.2 t/m 3 for ''air dry'' bentonite, which might be compared with a specific density of about 2.7 t/m 3 . The placing of a canister is preceded by piling up bentonite blocks to a level just below the canister lid position, after which the slot around the blocks is filled with bentonite powder. The rest of the blocks are mounted after filling bentonite powder into the inner slot around the canister as well. Finally the storage tunnels will be sealed by filling them with a mixture o02067NRM 0000181 45

  19. Microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, M.; Itavaara, M.

    2012-07-01

    The proposed disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes involves storing the wastes underground in copper-iron containers embedded in buffer material of compacted bentonite. Hydrogen sulphide production by sulphate-reducing prokaryotes is a potential mechanism that could cause corrosion of waste containers in repository conditions. The prevailing conditions in compacted bentonite buffer will be harsh. The swelling pressure is 7-8 MPa, the amount of free water is low and the average pore and pore throat diameters are small. This literature study aims to assess the potential of microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature on the environmental limits of microbial life in extreme conditions and the occurrence of sulphatereducing prokaryotes in extreme environments is reviewed briefly and the results of published studies characterizing microbes and microbial processes in repository conditions or in relevant subsurface environments are presented. The presence of bacteria, including SRBs, has been confirmed in deep groundwater and bentonite-based materials. Sulphate reducers have been detected in various high-pressure environments, and sulphate-reduction based on hydrogen as an energy source is considered a major microbial process in deep subsurface environments. In bentonite, microbial activity is strongly suppressed, mainly due to the low amount of free water and small pores, which limit the transport of microbes and nutrients. Spore-forming bacteria have been shown to survive in compacted bentonite as dormant spores, and they are able to resume a metabolically active state after decompaction. Thus, microbial sulphide production may increase in repository conditions if the dry density of the bentonite buffer is locally reduced. (orig.)

  20. Simulation of bentonite colloid migration through granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosicka, Dana; Hokr, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloidal bentonite particles generate at the interface of buffer and host rock in spent nuclear fuel repository due to an erosion process and migrate through granite by the water flow. Stability of these colloids and their migration possibilities have been studied on account of radionuclide transport possibility as colloid could carry adsorbed radionuclides in groundwater through granite. That is why a simulation of bentonite colloid migration in the surrounding of a repository might be requested. According to chemical condition as ionic strength and pH, the colloidal particles coagulate into clusters and that influence the migration of particles. The coagulation kinetics of natural bentonite colloids were experimentally studied in many articles, for example by light scattering techniques. We created a model of coagulation of bentonite colloids and simulation of a chosen experiment with use of the multicomponent reactive transport equation. The coagulation model describes clustering of particles due to attractive van der Waals forces as result of collision of particles due to heat fluctuation and different velocity of particles during sedimentation and velocity gradient of water flow. Next, the model includes influence of repulsive electrostatic forces among colloidal particles leading to stability of particles provided high surface charge of colloids. In the model, each group of clusters is transported as one solution component and the kinetics of coagulation are implemented as reactions between the components: a shift of particles among groups of particles with similar migration properties, according to size of the clusters of colloids. The simulation of migration of bentonite colloid through granite using the coagulation model was calibrated according to experiment results. On the basis of the simulation, one can estimate the basic processes that occur during bentonite colloid

  1. Chemical interaction of fresh and saline waters with compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.; Melamed, A.; Pitkaenen, P.

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of compacted sodium bentonite with fresh and saline ground-water simulant was studied. The parameters varied in the experiments were the compositions of the solutions and oxygen and carbon dioxide content in the surroundings. The main interests of the study were the chemical changes in the experimental solution, bentonite porewater and bentonite together with the microstructural properties of bentonite. The major processes with fresh water were the diffusion of sodium, potassium, sulphate, bicarbonate and chloride from bentonite to the solution, and the diffusion of calcium and magnesium from the solution into bentonite. The major processes in the experiments with saline water were the diffusion of the sodium, magnesium, sulphate and bicarbonate from bentonite into the solution, and the diffusion of calcium from the solution into bentonite

  2. Evaluation of gas migration characteristics of compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2014-01-01

    In the current concept of subsurface disposal and near-surface pit disposal for low level radioactive waste, compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides, respectively. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier of subsurface disposal facilities mainly by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. Hydrogen gas can be also generated inside the engineered barrier of near-surface pit disposal facilities mainly by the chemical interaction between aluminum and the alkaline component of cement, or water. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules inside of the compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture until breakthrough occurs. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the compacted bentonite mixture as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of the compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture is so minute. Therefore in this study, the gas migration characteristics and the effect of gas migration on the hydraulic conductivity of the compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture are investigated by the gas migration tests. The applicability of the two phase flow model without considering deformability of the specimen is investigated. The applicability of the model of two phase flow through deformable porous media, which was originally developed by CRIEPI, is also investigated. Results of this study imply that : (1) Gas migration mechanism of the compacted bentonite and Ca-bentonite mixture is revealed through gas migration test. (2) Hydraulic conductivity measured after the large gas breakthrough is substantially the same that measured before the gas migration test. (3) Stress change, pore-water pressure change and volume change of the specimen during the gas migration test can be reproduced by the numerical

  3. Sorption behavior of cesium onto bentonite colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, Kazuki; Masuda, Tsuguya; Tomura, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    It is considered that bentonite colloid might be generated from bentonite which will be used as buffer material in geological disposal system, and can facilitate the migration of radionuclides by means of sorption. In order to examine this characteristic, sorption and desorption experiments of Cs onto bentonite colloid were carried out to obtain its distribution coefficient (Kd) and information on the reversibility of its sorption. In addition, particle size distribution and shape of colloid were investigated and their effect on the sorption behavior was discussed. Kds for Cs were around 20 m 3 /kg for sorption and 30 m 3 /kg for desorption, in which sorbed Cs was desorbed by 8.4x10 -4 mol/l of NaCl solution. These values did not show any dependencies on Cs concentration and duration of sorption and desorption. The first 20% of sorbed Cs was desorbed reversibly at least. Most of colloidal particles were larger than 200 nm and TEM micrographs showed they had only several sheets of the clay crystal. Obtained Kds for colloidal bentonite were larger than those for powdered bentonite. This can be caused by difference of competing ions in the solution, characteristics of contained smectite, or sorption site density. (author)

  4. Bentonite-amended soil special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This special study was conducted to assess the viability of soil with a high percentage of bentonite added as an infiltration barrier in the cover of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. To achieve maximum concentration limits (MCLs) at several UMTRA Project sites, covers with a very low permeability are needed. If alternate concentration limits (ACLs) are the appropriate site groundwater compliance strategy, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to demonstrate, among other things, that the infiltration to the disposal cell is as low as reasonably achievable, and hence that the cover has a very low permeability. When the study discussed here was begun, the lowest permeability element available was CLAYMAX R , a manufactured liner material constructed of natural material (bentonite clay) between two geosynthetics.The strength of soil-bentonite mixes was measured to see if they could be placed on sideslopes and not pose stability problems. Also evaluated were the hydraulic conductivities of soil-bentonite mixes. If the strengths and permeabilities of soils with a high percentage of bentonite are favorable, the soils may be used as infiltration barriers in current cover designs without changing pile geometries. The scope of work for this study called for a literature review and a two-phased laboratory testing program. This report presents the results of the literature review and the first phase of the testing program

  5. BaM bentonite and some of its properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, Oldřich; Vávra Michal; Kachlík, Martin; Maca, Karel; Kotnour, Petr; Pospíšková, Ilona

    2018-01-01

    BaM bentonite is lime-magnesium bentonite of domestic origin. Its properties were measured experimentally with focus on the following parameters: composition, morphology and particle size distribution, powder bulk density, powder pressing parameters, shear strength, and water saturation. The findings will find use in nuclear safety assessments of engineered bentonite barriers in underground nuclear waste disposal facilities. (orig.)

  6. Bentonite-amended soils special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    This report presents the results of a two-phased special study to evaluate the viability of soil amended with a high percentage of bentonite as an infiltration barrier in the cover of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cells. Phase I of the study was initiated in order to examine the feasibility of using bentonite-amended soils as a cover component on sideslopes and topslopes. The Phase I objectives were to test a variety of materials to determine if low hydraulic conductivities were achievable in materials exhibiting sufficient strength and to select suitable materials for further testing. Phase II objectives were to (1) optimize designs -- test materials with various percentages of bentonite added; (2) provide design recommendations; (3) address constructibility concerns; and (4) evaluate long-term performance with respect to desiccation effects on the amended materials

  7. SAXS and TEM Investigation of Bentonite Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusewicz, Michal; Liljestroem, Ville; Muurinen, Arto; Serimaa, Ritva

    2013-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of bentonite structure using Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is presented. Three types of clay were used: unchanged MX-80 bentonite and purified clays with sodium or calcium ions. Quantitative information in nano-scale - basal spacing, mean crystallite size - was obtained from SAXS, which was complemented by TEM to give qualitative information from micron to nanometre scale. SAXS seems to be a more reliable source of quantitative data than TEM. SAXS gives the averaged information about basal spacing. TEM in this study gives more qualitative information, but in a greater resolution range. The presented work is a starting point to combine more methods to obtain a better idea of bentonite structure. (authors)

  8. MANU. Purchase of Bentonite. Process Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the entire bentonite purchasing process accurately. This will enable efficient and focused use of information related to the purchasing phase and to each individual bentonite batch. This work continues from the work started in the report by Ahonen et al. (2008), Quality Assurance of the Bentonite Material, Posiva Working Report 2008-33. The current work includes a short enquiry for all relevant and at the time known producers or re-sellers of bentonite. Questions about relevant products suitable for civil engineering use, more specifically nuclear waste disposal site use, were asked together with test methods, typical test results and test standards. The following aspects and opinions have been processed from the results that were obtained during the project. Each seller/producer has a quality management system, QMS (typically ISO 9001), and ability to perform the basic tests, but there is not an established common set of properties to be tested. Some producers are willing to test according to customers' specifications. Posiva could arrange a network of capable laboratories to carry out tests according to its selected standards. This activity should then be accredited with a reasonable testing volume. Before starting the purchase of bentonite at a large scale, Posiva should go through negotiations and audits with each seller in order to make sure that both parties are testing with the same methods and both understand the range where the values of key parameters may lie. A database is needed for gathering statistically relevant information from the bentonite material parameters over the long run. This is needed for determining the limits within which the material parameters should remain in order to be acceptable. Posiva is encouraged to create a process to optimize the test types and the amount of tests should be identified for immediate and long term use. This process ensures the required quality and costs involved. (orig.)

  9. Fluidization mechanisms in slurry flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    There are two mechanisms by which heavy settling particles may be suspended in a horizontal slurry flow: (1) by particle-particle interactions (e.g. Bagnold dispersive stresses) and (2) by particle-fluid interactions (e.g. entrainment of the particles by turbulent eddies.) The purpose of this investigation is to determine to what extent each fluidization mechanism is active and the effect of the fluidization mechanism on the global properties of the slurry. The technique employs the understanding that the particles entrained in the turbulence of the fluid will appear as an increased hydrostatic head across the channel. This may be directly measured and can be related to the fraction of the mass of particles that are supported by fluid-particle forces. (The rest must therefore be supported by particle-particle forces.) 17 refs., 26 figs.

  10. FY 1974 Report on results of Sunshine Project. Research and development of slurry serviceable under geothermal conditions; 1974 nendo chinetsu kankyoka de shiyo kanona deisui no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-30

    Summarized herein are the results of (1) surveys on autoclaves, (2) researches on water/clay-based slurry materials, and (3) surveys on and designs of spent slurry treatment test systems. For the item (1), the autoclaves serviceable at normal working temperature of 250 degrees C and pressure of 500 kg/cm{sup 2} for testing slurry materials were surveyed, to set the maximum temperature of 300 degrees C and pressure of 300 kg/cm{sup 2} and volume of 200 cc. The autoclave satisfying the above conditions is to be purchased. For the item (2), surveys are still underway on agents, e.g., dispersantsand and deflocculants currently available both in Japan and abroad as the slurry components. Several types of dispersants and deflocculants were tested with slurries of low-solid suspensions containing 3 to 5 wt.% of bentonite, to follow their properties changing with content of the agent by a viscometer serviceable at high temperature and pressure, when the slurries are thermally treated at 150 to 200 degrees C. At the same time, the dispersants and deflocculants currently used were tested by an autoclave to follow thermal changes at 200 degrees C by an infrared spectrophotometer. For the item (3), surveys were conducted on spent slurry treatment test systems necessary for studying treatment of spent water/clay-based slurries. (NEDO)

  11. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  12. Sorption of natural uranium by algerian bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megouda, N.; Kadi, H.; Hamla, M.S.; Brahimi, H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.Batch sorption experiments have been used to assess the sorption behaviour of uranium onto natural and drilling bentonites. The operating parameters (pH, aolis-liquid ratio, particle size, time and initial uranium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption. The distribution coefficient (Kd) range values at equilibrium time are 45.95-1079.26 ml/g and 32.81-463053 ml/g for the drilling and natural bentonites respectively. The equilibrium isotherms show that the data correlate with both Freundlich and Langmuir models

  13. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K{sub d}, unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.) 45 refs.

  14. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, J.

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K d , unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.)

  15. Coal slurries: An environmental bonus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basta, N.; Moore, S.; Ondrey, G.

    1994-01-01

    Developers and promoters of coal-water slurries and similar CWF (coal-water fuel) technologies have had a hard time winning converts since they unveiled their first commercial processes in the 1970s. The economic appeal of such processes, marginal at best, varies with the price of oil. Nevertheless, the technology is percolating, as geopolitics and environmental pressures drive new processes. Such fuels are becoming increasingly important to coal-rich, oil-poor nations such as China, as they attempt to build an onshore fuel supply. Meanwhile, improvements are changing the way coal-fired processes are viewed. Where air pollution regulations once discouraged the use of coal fuels, new coal processes have been developed that cut nitrous oxides (NOx) emissions and provide a use for coal fines, previously viewed as waste. The latest developments in the field were all on display at the 19th International Technical Conference on Coal Utilization and Fuel Systems, held in Clearwater, Fla., on March 21--24. At this annual meeting, sponsored by the Coal and Slurry Technology Association, (Washington, D.C.) and the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Dept. of Energy (PETC), some 200 visitors from around the work gathered to discuss the latest developments in coal slurry utilization--new and improved processes, and onstream plants. This paper presents highlights from the conference

  16. Selfinjection of highly compacted bentonite into rock joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1978-02-01

    When radioactive waste is disposed in bore holes in rocks there will be some space between rock and canister. Other investigations have suggested that the space could be filled with highly compacted bentonite. In this report it is discussed if open joints formed or widened in the surrounding rock after the deposition will be sealed by self-injecting bentonite. Bentonite in contact with water will swell. The flow pattern and properties of the swelling bentonite, the permeability of the extruded bentonite and the viscosity of the extruded bentonite have been investigated. The following statements are done. In the narrow joints that can possibly be opened by various processes, the rate of bentonite extrusion will be very slow except for the first few centimeter move, which may take place in a few mounths. The swelling pressure of the extruded bentonite will decrease rapidly with the distance from the deposition hole. The loss of bentonite extruded through the narrow joints will be negligible. In the outer part of the bentonite zone there will be a successive transition to a very soft, dilute bentonite suspension. It will consist of fairly large particle aggregates which will be stuck where the joint width decreases

  17. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites

  18. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.

  19. Egyptian diatomite as high fluid loss squeeze slurry in sealing fractures and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Sabagh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation is the most costly mud related drilling problem, and induced fracture. Water slurry of diatomite is used as the high fluid loss squeeze slurry in the treatment of lost circulation and in decreasing fluid loss. Egypt has diatomite deposits, especially in El-Fayuom Depression. Fourteen samples were collected from Qasr El-Sagha at the northern shore of Birket Qarun. Samples were examined to identify the diatom species then subjected to X-ray fluorescence, XRD and grain size distribution tests. A total of 38 species related to 13 diatom genera were identified. Cocconeis, Epithemia and Rhopalodia were the predominant genera. The diatomaceous earth which acts as a filter aid material was tested with different additives; bentonite, lime, finely divided paper, polymer, barite and different concentrations with different types of lost circulation materials (LCM to form a high fluid loss squeeze slurry. As a result the required time for collecting the filtrate was decreased to be in the range of 50 s to 1 min and 49 s comparing with the international standard which recommended the filtrate should be collected maximum within 2–3 min.

  20. Sealing performance assessments of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Shoung.

    1990-01-01

    Bentonite and mixtures of bentonite and crushed rock are potential sealing materials for high level nuclear waste repositories. The materials have been used to form cap layers to reduce infiltration for mined waste tailings and can also be used to construct clay liners for municipal as well as industrial waste managements. American Colloid C/S granular dentonite and Apache Leap tuff have been mixed to prepare samples for laboratory flow testing. Bentonite weight percent and crushed tuff gradation are the major variables studied. The sealing performance assessments include high injection pressure flow tests, polyaxial flow tests, high temperature flow tests, and piping tests. The results indicate that an appropriate composition would have at least 25% bentonite by weight mixed with well-graded crushed rock. Hydraulic properties of the mixture plugs may be highly anisotropic if significant particle segregation occurs during sample installation and compaction. Temperature has no negative effects on the sealing performance within the test range from room temperature to 60C. The piping damage to the sealing performance is small if the maximum hydraulic gradient does not exceed 120 and 280 for 25 and 35% bentonite content, respectively. The hydraulic gradients above which flow of bentonite may take place are deemed critical. Analytical work includes the introduction of bentonite occupancy percentage and water content at saturation as two major parameters for the plug design. A permeability model developed is useful for the prediction of permeability in clays. A piping model permits the estimation of critical hydraulic gradient allowed before the flow of bentonite takes place. It can also be used to define the maximum allowable pore diameter of a protective filter layer

  1. Characterization of natural bentonite by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Sidnei Q.M.; Dieguez, Lidia C.; Menezes, Sonia M.C.; San Gil, Rosane A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Solid state NMR as well as several other instrumental chemical analysis techniques were used in order to characterize two natural occurring bentonite. The methodology is described. The NMR spectra, together with the other used techniques suggest that the observed differences are due to iron inclusions in tetrahedral and octahedral sites

  2. Pemanfaatan Bentonite sebagai Media Pembumian Elektroda Batang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winanda Riga Tamma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sistem pentanahan merupakan suatu sistem yang bertujuan untuk mengamankan sistem tenaga listrik dari gangguan ke tanah maupun gangguan hubung singkat. Pada sistem pentanahan yang baik, resistansi pentanahan harus bernilai dibawah lima ohm. Resistansi pentanahan bergantung pada berbagai aspek antara lain yaitu struktur tanah, kelembapan tanah, dan kandungan yang ada dalam tanah itu sendiri. Dalam pengujian pada penelitian ini akan dilakukan perbaikan pada tanah dengan mencampurkan bentonite ke dalam tanah sebagai media pentanahan. Pencampuran bentonite bertujuan agar mendapatkan nilai resistansi pentanahan yang baik sesuai dengan standar sistem pentanahan. Pengujian dilakukan menggunakan elektroda batang dan alat earth resistance tester dengan metode tiga titik dimana elektroda utama atau elektroda pengukuran diberikan treatment sesuai dengan kondisi yang telah ditentukan. Diharapkan pada pengujian ini akan diketahui dampak dari bentonite terhadap penurunan nilai resistansi pentanahan. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa dengan mencampurkan bentonite pada media pentanahan, resistansi pentanahan menjadi lebih baik. Meskipun tidak terlalu signifikan, rata-rata penurunan dari setiap masing-masing treatment adalah sebesar 2 ohm.

  3. Fe-bentonite. Experiments and modelling of the interactions of bentonites with iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Horst-Juergen; Xie, Mingliang [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Kasbohm, Joern; Lan, Nguyen T. [Greifswald Univ. (Germany); Hoang Thi Minh Thao [Hanoi Univ. of Science (Viet Nam)

    2011-11-15

    The main objectives of this study were to enhance the understanding of the interactions of bentonites with steel containers in the near field of a repository in salt formations and to determine missing experimental thermo-hydraulical-chemical and mineralogical data needed for the THC modelling of the interactions of bentonites with iron. At the beginning of this project a literature review helped to clarify the state of the art regarding the above mentioned objectives prior to the start of the experimental work. In the following experimental programme the hydraulic changes in the pore space of compacted MX80 bentonites containing metallic iron powder and in contact with three solutions of different ionic strength containing different concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} have been investigated. The alterations of MX80 and several other bentonites have been assessed in contact with the low ionic strength Opalinus Clay Pore Water (OCPW) and the saturated salt solutions NaCl solution and IP21 solution. Under repository relevant boundary conditions we determined on compacted MX80 samples with the raw density of 1.6 g/cm{sup 3} simultaneously interdependent properties like swelling pressures, hydraulic parameters (permeabilities and porosities), mineralogical data (changes of the smectite composition and iron corrosion products), transport parameters (diffusion coefficients) and thermal data (temperature dependent reaction progresses). The information and data resulting from the experiments have been used in geochemical modelling calculations and the existing possibilities and limitations to simulate these very complex near field processes were demonstrated. The main conclusion of this study is that the alteration of bentonites in contact with iron is accentuated and accelerated. Alterations in contact with solutions of different ionic strength identified by the authors in previous studies were found be much more intensive in contact with metallic iron and at elevated

  4. Experimental characterization of cement-bentonite interaction using core infiltration techniques coupled with 4D X-ray tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolder, F.; Maeder, U.; Jenni, A.

    2012-01-01

    (Fig. 3). The resulting micrographs describe the density distribution in three dimensions and as a function of time. Densities are calibrated with reference samples mounted in an identical apparatus. After 1-2 years we will stop the experiment and subject the rock samples to post-mortem mineralogical and petrophysical analysis. Finally, it should be possible to describe and model cement/bentonite skin effects and possibly further develop this new method. In Figure 3, an example is given where a shear zone in granite was impregnated with cement slurry and stabilized with resin as a test on a medical scanner, with densities in the range anticipated for our work. In the current experiment a compacted and saturated MX-80 bentonite is used as starting material. A confining pressure of 40 bar is applied,. The infiltration fluid pressure is 20 bar, and outflow is into a syringe at ambient pressure. The infiltrating fluid represents an ordinary Portland cement pore-water after a hydration time of 623 days. The first data in Figure 2 show a compaction of the bentonite core after insertion into the infiltration apparatus. The decrease in hydraulic conductivity can be interpreted as an adjustment of compaction of the bentonite sample to the boundary conditions. (authors)

  5. Corrosion of carbon steel in contact with bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, D.; Vokal, A.; Bruha, P.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Carbon steel canisters were chosen in a number of disposal concepts as reference material for disposal canisters. The corrosion rates of carbon steels in water solution both in aerobic and anaerobic conditions are well known, but only scarce data are available for corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in contact with bentonite. A special apparatus, which enables to measure corrosion rate of carbon steels under conditions simulating conditions in a repository, namely in contact with bentonite under high pressure and elevated temperatures was therefore prepared to study: - Corrosion rate of carbon steels in direct contact with bentonite in comparison with corrosion rate of carbon steels in synthetic bentonite pore water. - Influence of corrosion products on bentonite. The apparatus is composed of corrosion chamber containing a carbon steel disc in direct contact with compacted bentonite. Synthetic granitic water is above compacted bentonite under high pressure (50 - 100 bar) to simulate hydrostatic pressure in a repository. The experiments can be carried out under various temperatures. Bentonites used for experiments were Na-type of bentonite Volclay KWK 80 - 20 and Ca-Mg Czech bentonite from deposit Rokle. Before adding water into corrosion system the corrosion chamber was purged by nitrogen gas. The saturation of bentonite and corrosion rate were monitored by measuring consumption of water, pressure increase caused by swelling pressure of bentonite and by generation of hydrogen. Corrosion rate was also determined after corrosion experiments from weight loss of samples. The results of experiments show that the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in contact with bentonite is very different from corrosion of carbon steels in water simulating bentonite pore water solution. The corrosion rates of carbon steel in contact with bentonite reached after 30 days of corrosion the values approaching 40 mm/yr contrary to values

  6. Single stage high pressure centrifugal slurry pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John W.; Bonin, John H.; Daniel, Arnold D.

    1984-03-27

    Apparatus is shown for feeding a slurry to a pressurized housing. An impeller that includes radial passages is mounted in the loose fitting housing. The impeller hub is connected to a drive means and a slurry supply means which extends through the housing. Pressured gas is fed into the housing for substantially enveloping the impeller in a bubble of gas.

  7. Slurry discharge management-beach profile prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, R.; Nawrot, J.R. [Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1996-11-01

    Mine tailings dams are embankments used by the mining industry to retain the tailings products after the mineral preparation process. Based on the acid-waste stereotype that all coal slurry is acid producing, current reclamation requires a four foot soil cover for inactive slurry disposal areas. Compliance with this requirement is both difficult and costly and in some case unnecessary, as not all the slurry, or portions of slurry impoundments are acid producing. Reduced costs and recent popularity of wetland development has prompted many operators to request reclamation variances for slurry impoundments. Waiting to address slurry reclamation until after the impoundment is full, limits the flexibility of reclamation opportunities. This paper outlines a general methodology to predict the formation of the beach profile for mine tailings dams, by the discharge volume and location of the slurry into the impoundment. The review is presented under the perspective of geotechnical engineering and waste disposal management emphasizing the importance of pre-planning slurry disposal land reclamation. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Comparison and analysis of organic components of biogas slurry from eichhornia crassipes solms and corn straw biogas slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Li, Y. B.; Liu, Z. H.; Min, J.; Cui, Y.; Gao, X. H.

    2017-11-01

    Biogas slurry is one of anaerobic fermentations, and biomass fermentation biogas slurries with different compositions are different. This paper mainly presents through the anaerobic fermentation of Eichhornia crassipes solms biogas slurry and biogas slurry of corn straw, the organic components of two kinds of biogas slurry after extraction were compared by TLC, HPLC and spectrophotometric determination of nucleic acid and protein of two kinds of biogas slurry organic components, and analyzes the result of comparison.

  9. STUDY OF THERMAL AND ACID STABILITY OF BENTONITE CLAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karna Wijaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal and acid stability of the bentonite clays (Na- and Ca-bentonite have been tested. The thermal stability testing has been carried out by heating 5 gram of the clays  for five hours at 200, 300 and 500 °C respectively, meanwhile acid stability testing was performed by immersing 5 gram clays into 100 mL sulphuric acid 1M, 2M and 3M for 24 hours. The tested clays, then were characterized by means of X-Ray difractometry and IR-spectroscopy methods. The characterization results showed that upon heating, both Ca- and Na-bentonites indicated same thermal stability. However, upon acid treatment, Na-bentonite was found relatively stabiler and more resistance then Ca-bentonite.   Keywords: bentonite, clay, thermal stability, acid stability.

  10. Bentonite. Geotechnical barrier and source for microbial life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matschiavelli, Nicole; Kluge, Sindy; Cherkouk, Andrea [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HZDR Young Investigator Group; Steglich, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    Due to their properties, namely a high swelling capacity and a low hydraulic conductivity, Bentonites fulfil as geotechnical barrier a sealing and buffering function in the nuclear waste repository. Depending on the mineral composition Bentonites contain many suitable electron-donors and -acceptors, enabling potential microbial life. For the potential repository of highly radioactive waste the microbial mediated transformation of Bentonite could influence its properties as a barrier material. Microcosms were set up containing Bentonite and anaerobic synthetic Opalinus-clay-pore water solution under an N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}-atmosphere to elucidate the microbial potential within selected Bentonites. Substrates like acetate and lactate were supplemented to stimulate potential microbial activity. First results show that bentonites represent a source for microbial life, demonstrated by the consumption of lactate and the formation of pyruvate. Furthermore, microbial iron-reduction was determined, which plays a crucial role in Betonite-transformation.

  11. Bentonite. Geotechnical barrier and source for microbial life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matschiavelli, Nicole; Kluge, Sindy; Cherkouk, Andrea; Steglich, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Due to their properties, namely a high swelling capacity and a low hydraulic conductivity, Bentonites fulfil as geotechnical barrier a sealing and buffering function in the nuclear waste repository. Depending on the mineral composition Bentonites contain many suitable electron-donors and -acceptors, enabling potential microbial life. For the potential repository of highly radioactive waste the microbial mediated transformation of Bentonite could influence its properties as a barrier material. Microcosms were set up containing Bentonite and anaerobic synthetic Opalinus-clay-pore water solution under an N_2/CO_2-atmosphere to elucidate the microbial potential within selected Bentonites. Substrates like acetate and lactate were supplemented to stimulate potential microbial activity. First results show that bentonites represent a source for microbial life, demonstrated by the consumption of lactate and the formation of pyruvate. Furthermore, microbial iron-reduction was determined, which plays a crucial role in Betonite-transformation.

  12. An Evaluation of Models of Bentonite Pore Water Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James (Quintessa Ltd, Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)); Arthur, Randy (Monitor Scientific LLC, Denver, CO (United States))

    2010-01-15

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution of with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. The usual approach to modelling clay pore fluids is based primarily around assumed chemical equilibrium between Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ aqueous species and ion exchange sites on montmorillonite, but also includes protonation- deprotonation of clay edge surface sites, and dissolution-precipitation of the trace mineral constituents, calcite and gypsum. An essential feature of this modelling approach is that clay hydrolysis reactions (i.e. dissolution of the aluminosilicate octahedral and tetrahedral sheets of montmorillonite) are ignored. A consequence of the omission of clay hydrolysis reactions from bentonite pore fluid models is that montmorillonite is preserved indefinitely in the near-field system, even over million-year timescales. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid model, one that incorporates clay hydrolysis reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using a range of computer codes to test the applicability of this alternative model. Thermodynamic data for MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods. Simulations of 'end-point' pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO{sub 2} (log PCO{sub 2} values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second

  13. FEBEX bentonite colloid stability in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seher, H.; Schaefer, T.; Geckeis, H. [Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. e-mail: holger.seher@ine.fzk .de; Fanghaenel, T. [Ruprecht-Karls-Univ. Heidelberg, Physikalisch-Chemisches In st., D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    Coagulation experiments are accomplished to identify the geochemical conditions for the stability of Febex bentonite colloids in granite ground water. The experiments are carried out by varying pH, ionic strength and type of electrolyte. The dynamic light scattering technique (photon correlation spectroscopy) is used to measure the size evolution of the colloids with time. Agglomeration rates are higher in MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} than in NaCl solution. Relative agglomeration rates follow approximately the Schulze-Hardy rule. Increasing agglomeration rates at pH>8 are observed in experiments with MgCl{sub 2} and CaCl{sub 2} which are, however, caused by coprecipitation phenomena. Bentonite colloid stability fields derived from the colloid agglomeration experiments predict low colloid stabilization in granite ground water taken from Aespoe, Sweden, and relatively high colloid stability in Grimsel ground water (Switzerland)

  14. Swelling characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite and its prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De'an Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gaomiaozi (GMZ bentonite has been chosen as a possible matrix material of buffers/backfills in the deep geological disposal to isolate the high-level radioactive waste (HLRW in China. In the Gaomiaozi deposit area, calcium bentonite in the near surface zone and sodium bentonite in the deeper zone are observed. The swelling characteristics of GMZ sodium and calcium bentonites and their mixtures with sand wetted with distilled water were studied in the present work. The test results show that the relationship between the void ratio and swelling pressure of compacted GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures at full saturation is independent of the initial conditions such as the initial dry density and water content, but dependent on the ratio of bentonite to sand. An empirical method was accordingly proposed allowing the prediction of the swelling deformation and swelling pressure with different initial densities and bentonite-sand ratios when in saturated conditions. Finally, the swelling capacities of GMZ Na- and Ca-bentonites and Kunigel Na-bentonite are compared.

  15. Study on the basic property of Gaomiaozi bentonite, inner mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuemiao; Xu Guoqing; Liu Shufen; Chen Zhangru

    2001-01-01

    Buffer/backfill material layer is one of important engineered barriers in the HLW geological repository. The geologic setting of Gaomiaozi bentonite deposit is introduced, and the mineral composition, physical and chemical property, basic geotechnical property, swelling property and permeability of highly compacted bentonite of main ore bed has been studied. The study results show that montmorillonite content of Gaomiaozi bentonite is relatively high, physical and chemical property, geotechnical property and impermeability are good. So Gaomiaozi bentonite deposit could be regarded as supply base of buffer/backfill material for HLW geological repository

  16. Synthesis of PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite through sonication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitompul, Johnner; Setyawan, Daru; Kim, Daniel Young Joon; Lee, Hyung Woo

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns the synthesis of poly(D,L-lactic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) bentonite nanocomposites. Poly (D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) was synthesized using lactic acid through the ZnO-catalyzed direct polycondensation method at vacuum pressure and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized with L-lactide by ring-opening polymerization method. The PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were synthesized using the solvent casting method. The nanoclay, bentonite, was prepared using the solution-intercalation method by dissolving the nanoparticles into chloroform before sonication. In this study, PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were produced using variable amounts of nanoclay and sonication times during the mixing of PDLLA/PLLA and bentonite. The properties of the PDLLA/PLLA nanocomposites were then characterized using the X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Universal Testing Machine (UTM), Water Vapor Permeability (WVP) tests, and the enzymatic biodegradability test. The XRD test was used to measure the intercalation of nanoclay layers in the PDLLA/PLLA matrix and the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite intercalated nanocomposite films. It was found through these various tests that adding bentonite to the PDLLA/PLLA increases tensile strength to 56.76 MP. Furthermore, the biodegradability increases as well as the barrier properties of the polymers The different sonication time used during the mixing of the polymer solution with bentonite also affected the properties of the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films.

  17. Analysis of corrosion products of carbon steel in wet bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Kazuo; Nagano, Tetsushi; Nakayama, Shinichi; Muraoka, Susumu

    1992-02-01

    As a part of evaluation of the long-term durability for the overpack containers for high-level radioactive waste, we have conducted corrosion tests for carbon steel in wet bentonite, a candidate buffer material. The corrosion rates were evaluated by weight difference of carbon steel and corrosion products were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and colorimetry. At 40degC, the corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was smaller than that in pure water. At 95degC, however, the corrosion rate in wet bentonite was much higher than that in pure water. This high corrosion rate in wet bentonite at 95degC was considered to result from evaporation of moisture in bentonite in contact with the metal. This evaporation led to dryness and then to shrinkage of the bentonite, which generated ununiform contact of the metal with bentonite. Probably, this ununiform contact promoted the local corrosion. The locally corroded parts of specimen in wet bentonite at 95degC were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (micro-FT-IR), and lepidocrocite γ-FeO(OH) was found as well as goethite α-FeO(OH). In wet bentonite at 95degC, hematite α-Fe 2 O 3 was identified by means of colorimetry. (author)

  18. Synthesis of PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite through sonication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitompul, Johnner, E-mail: sitompul@che.itb.ac.id; Setyawan, Daru, E-mail: daru.setyawan@gmail.com; Kim, Daniel Young Joon, E-mail: daniel.kim12321@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, West Java, 40132 (Indonesia); Lee, Hyung Woo, E-mail: leehw@che.itb.ac.id [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung, West Java, 40132 (Indonesia); Research and Business Foundation, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066 Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-19

    This paper concerns the synthesis of poly(D,L-lactic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) bentonite nanocomposites. Poly (D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) was synthesized using lactic acid through the ZnO-catalyzed direct polycondensation method at vacuum pressure and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized with L-lactide by ring-opening polymerization method. The PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were synthesized using the solvent casting method. The nanoclay, bentonite, was prepared using the solution-intercalation method by dissolving the nanoparticles into chloroform before sonication. In this study, PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were produced using variable amounts of nanoclay and sonication times during the mixing of PDLLA/PLLA and bentonite. The properties of the PDLLA/PLLA nanocomposites were then characterized using the X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Universal Testing Machine (UTM), Water Vapor Permeability (WVP) tests, and the enzymatic biodegradability test. The XRD test was used to measure the intercalation of nanoclay layers in the PDLLA/PLLA matrix and the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite intercalated nanocomposite films. It was found through these various tests that adding bentonite to the PDLLA/PLLA increases tensile strength to 56.76 MP. Furthermore, the biodegradability increases as well as the barrier properties of the polymers The different sonication time used during the mixing of the polymer solution with bentonite also affected the properties of the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films.

  19. Immobilization of spent Bentonite by using cement matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isman MT; Endro-Kismolo

    1996-01-01

    Investigation of spent bentonite immobilization by using cement was done. The purpose of the investigation was to know the performance of cement in binding bentonite waste. The investigation was done by adding cement, water, and bentonite waste into a container and string until the mixture became homogenous. The mixture was put into a polyethylene tube (3.5 cm in diameter and 4 cm high) and it was cured up to 28 days. The specific weight of the monolith block was then calculated, and the compressive strength and the leaching rate in ground water and sea water was tested. The mass ratio of water to cement was 0.4. The variable investigated was the mass ratio of bentonite to cement. The immobilized bentonite waste was natural bentonite waste and activated bentonite waste. The result of the investigation showed that cement was good for binding bentonite waste. The maximum binding mass ratio of bentonite to cement was 0.4. In this condition the specific weight of the monolith block was 2.177 gram/cm 3 , its compressive strength was 22.6 N/mm 2 , and the leaching rate for 90 days in ground water and sea water was 5.7 x 10 -4 gram cm -2 day -1

  20. Borehole sealing with highly compactd Na bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1981-12-01

    This report describes the use of highly compacted Na bentonite for borehole plugging. Bentonites have an extremely low permeability and a low diffusivity, and a swelling ability which produces a nonleaching boundary between clay and rock if the initial bulk density of the bentonite is sufficiently high. The suggested technique, which is applicable to long vertical, and inclined, as well as horizontal boreholes, is based on the use of perforated copper pipes to insert elements of compacted bentonite. Such pipe segments are connected at the rock surface and successively inserted in the hole. When the hole is equipped, the clay takes up water spontaneously and swells through the perforation, and ultimately forms an almost completely homogenous clay core. It embeds the pipe which is left in the hole. Several tests were conducted in the laboratory and one field test was run in Stripa. They all showed that a gel soon fills the slot between the pipe and the confinement which had the form of metal pipes in the laboratory investigations. Subsequently, more clay migrates through the perforation and produces a stiff clay filling in the slot. The redistribution of minerals, leading ultimately to a high degree of homogeneity, can be described as a diffusion process. The rate of redistribution depends on the joint geometry and water flow pattern in the rock. In the rock with an average joint frequence of one per meter or higher, very good homogeneity and sealing ability of the clay are expected within a few months after the application of the plug. (author)

  1. Using bentonite for NPP liquid waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Dang Hanh

    2015-01-01

    During operation, nuclear power plants (NPPs) release a large quantity of water waste containing radionuclides required treatment for protection of the radiation workers and the environment. This paper introduces processes used to treat water waste from Paks NPP in Hungary and it also presents the results of a study on the use of Vietnamese bentonite to remove radioactive Caesium from a simulated water waste containing Cs. (author)

  2. Stability of bentonite gels in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1983-02-01

    The present, extended study comprises a derivation of a simple rock model as a basis for calculation of the penetration rate of bentonite and of the groundwater flow rate, which is a determinant of the erodibility of the protruding clay film. This model, which is representative of a gross permeability of about 10 -8 - 10 -9 m/s, implies a spectrum of slot-shaped joints with apertures ranging between 0.1 and 0.5 mm. It is concluded that less than 2percent of the highly compacted bentonite will be lost into traversing joints in 10 6 years. A closer analysis, in which also Poiseuille retardation and short-term experiments were taken into account, even suggests that the penetration into the considered joints will be less than that. The penetration rate is expected to be 1 decimeter in a few hundred years. The risk of erosion by flowing groundwater was estimated by comparing clay particle bond strength, evaluated from viscometer tests, and theoretically derived drag forces, the conclusion being that the maximum expected water flow rate in the widest joints of the rock model (4 times 10 -4 m/s) is not sufficient to disrupt the gel front or the large individual clay flocs that may exist at this front. The experiments support the conclusion that erosion will not be a source of bentonite loss. A worst case scenario with a shear zone being developed across deposition holes is finally considered and in addition to this, the conditions in the fracture-rich tunnel floor at the upper end of the deposition holes are also analysed. This study shows that even if the rock is much more fractured than normal conditions would imply, the bentonite loss is expected to be very moderate and without substantial effect on the barrier functions of the remaining clay cores in the deposition holes. (author)

  3. Thermal characteristics of highly compressed bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueoka, Tooru; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Imamura, S.; Ogawa, Terushige; Murata, Shigemi.

    1990-01-01

    In the disposal of high level radioactive wastes in strata, it is planned to protect the canisters enclosing wastes with buffer materials such as overpacks and clay, therefore, the examination of artificial barrier materials is an important problem. The concept of the disposal in strata and the soil mechanics characteristics of highly compressed bentonite as an artificial barrier material were already reported. In this study, the basic experiment on the thermal characteristics of highly compressed bentonite was carried out, therefore, it is reported. The thermal conductivity of buffer materials is important because the possibility that it determines the temperature of solidified bodies and canisters is high, and the buffer materials may cause the thermal degeneration due to high temperature. Thermophysical properties are roughly divided into thermodynamic property, transport property and optical property. The basic principle of measured thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, the kinds of the measuring method and so on are explained. As for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of highly compressed bentonite, the experimental setup, the procedure, samples and the results are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Hydrothermal alterations of Bentonites in Almeria (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares Gonzalez, J.; Barahona Fernandez, E.; Huertas Garcia, F.; Caballero Mesa, E.; Cuadros Ojeda, J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of bentonite as backfilling and sealing material in the high level radioactive waste disposals has been treated in previous studies accomplished by different authors. However, the use of this clayey barrier needs the resolution of different problems so that its efficiency will be enhanced. between those could be cited the study of the actual capacity of sealing the space around the canister and the accommodation to the pressure of the rocky environment; the possible variations in plasticity; the diffusion and reaction processes that can be produced through the barrier by groundwater, the capacity of radionuclides adsorption, etc. These studies, show that the bentonites with high content in smectite fulfill satisfactorily with the physical and chemical conditions to be used as sealing material, but it is known that the smectite can be unstable in diagenetic conditions similar to those are given in a deep repository of radioactive wastes, being transformed into illite. A conclusion of immediate interest is deduced from this last study. The bentonites used as sealing material in radioactive waste repositories must no contain Na as interlayer cation since it is very easily exchangeable by K. It is better to select those smectites with Ca and Mg that detain the entry of K in the interlayer and as a consequence the transformation process of smectite into illite is made more difficult. (Author)

  5. Biogas slurry utilization in Ghana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asser, C. [Ministry of Mines and Energy, Accra (Ghana)

    1999-07-01

    The biogas Technology Programme developed for villages remote from the national grid relies solely on cow-dung and human waste as raw materials for electricity generation. The technology helps control deforestation and desertification and reduces the long hours spent looking for fuelwood for cooking and the health risk that smoke from fuelwood poses. Rural electricity generation also supplies pipe-borne water, community toilets and organic fertilizer for farmers. The slurry, which is the by-product of the biogas, is an odourless, pathogen free organic fertilizer that is high in nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. It is useful for crop production, fish farming and mushroom cultivation. Farmers now realize that energy can be extracted from cowdung, human waste, agricultural residue and other biomass resources and the biomass can still maintain its function as good organic manure. (author)

  6. Oxygen transfer in slurry bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Y; Moo-Young, M

    1991-04-25

    The oxygen transfer in bioreactors with slurries having a yield stress was investigated. The volumetric mass transfer coefficients in a 40-L bubble column with simulated fermentation broths, the Theological properties of which were represented by the Casson model, were measured. Experimental data were compared with a theoretical correlation developed on the basis of a combination of Higbie's penetration theory and Kolmogoroff's theory of isotropic turbulence. Comparisons between the proposed correlation and data for the simulated broths show good agreement. The mass transfer data for actual mycelial fermentation broths reported previously by the authors were re-examined. Their Theological data was correlated by the Bingham plastic model. The oxygen transfer rate data in the mycelial fermentation broths fit the predictions of the proposed theoretical correlation.

  7. Process for heating coal-oil slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunlin, W.A.; Gorski, A.; Jaehnig, L.J.; Moskal, C.J.; Naylor, J.D.; Parimi, K.; Ward, J.V.

    1984-01-03

    Controlling gas to slurry volume ratio to achieve a gas holdup of about 0.4 when heating a flowing coal-oil slurry and a hydrogen containing gas stream allows operation with virtually any coal to solvent ratio and permits operation with efficient heat transfer and satisfactory pressure drops. The critical minimum gas flow rate for any given coal-oil slurry will depend on numerous factors such as coal concentration, coal particle size distribution, composition of the solvent (including recycle slurries), and type of coal. Further system efficiency can be achieved by operating with multiple heating zones to provide a high heat flux when the apparent viscosity of the gas saturated slurry is highest. Operation with gas flow rates below the critical minimum results in system instability indicated by temperature excursions in the fluid and at the tube wall, by a rapid increase and then decrease in overall pressure drop with decreasing gas flow rate, and by increased temperature differences between the temperature of the bulk fluid and the tube wall. At the temperatures and pressures used in coal liquefaction preheaters the coal-oil slurry and hydrogen containing gas stream behaves essentially as a Newtonian fluid at shear rates in excess of 150 sec[sup [minus]1]. The gas to slurry volume ratio should also be controlled to assure that the flow regime does not shift from homogeneous flow to non-homogeneous flow. Stable operations have been observed with a maximum gas holdup as high as 0.72. 29 figs.

  8. A comparison of nano bentonite and some nano chemical additives to improve drilling fluid using local clay and commercial bentonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada S. Al-Zubaidi

    2017-09-01

    In the second part, a commercial bentonite was used and mixed with nano commercial bentonite and nano chemical materials (MgO, TiO2, and graphene at 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 wt% concentrations. The results showed that nano commercial bentonite gives the same filtration behavior of graphene, whereas, the plastic viscosity, yield point and apparent viscosity were the same when using nano commercial bentonite, TiO2 and graphene. The best results were obtained with MgO addition, whereby the filter loss decreased to 35% with a higher value of yield point.

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of Slurry Management Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik; Petersen, Bjørn Molt

    This report contains the results of Life Cycle Assessments of two slurry management technologies - acidification and decentred incineration. The LCA foundation can be used by the contributing companies for evaluating the environmental sustainability of a specific technology from a holistic Life...... Cycle perspective. Through this the companies can evaluate the environmental benefits and disadvantages of introducing a specific technology for slurry management. From a societal perspective the results can contribute to a clarification of which slurry management technologies (or combination...... of technologies) having the largest potential for reducing the overall environmental impacts....

  10. Non-aqueous slurries used as thickeners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatfield, J C

    1982-04-07

    A non-aqueous slurry is described that is suitable for use as a thickener or viscosifier in oil or gas drilling, fracturing, flow diversion completion or workover fluids. The slurry comprises a water-soluble cellulose ether polymer, a water-insoluble liquid hydrocarbon, a non-ionic surfactant having an HLB of from 7 to 14, and an organo modified clay. There also is described a process for thickening or viscosifying a drilling, fracturing, flow diversion, completion or workover fluid. The use of the slurry prevents bumping during addition to aqueous fluids. (27 claims)

  11. Influence of selected factors on strontium sorption on bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.; Kufcakova, J.; Rajec, P.

    2007-01-01

    Sorption on bentonite will play an important role in retarding the migration of radionuclides from a waste repository. Bentonite is a natural clay and one of the most promising candidates for use as a buffer material in the geological disposal systems for high-level nuclear waste. It is intended to isolate metal canisters with highly radioactive waste products from the surrounding rocks because of its ability to retard the movement of radionuclides by sorption. Bentonite is characterized by low permeability, water swelling capability and excellent sorption potential for cationic radionuclides. To correctly assess the sorption potential of radionuclides on bentonite is essential for the development of predictive migration models. The sorption of strontium on bentonite from different Slovak deposits - Jelsovy potok, Kopernica and Lieskovec has been investigated under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, sorbate concentrations, presence of complementary cation. Sorption was studied using the batch technique. The uptake of Sr was rapid and equilibrium was reached almost instantaneously. The instantaneous uptake may be due to adsorption and/or exchange of the metal with some ions on the surface of the adsorbent. The best sorption characteristics distinguish bentonite Kopernica, sorption capacity for Sr of the fraction under 45 mm is 0,48 mmol·g -1 for Sr. The highest values of distribution coefficient were reached for the bentonite Jelsovy potok. Radiation stability has been investigated, the higher sorption parameters were observed for the irradiated bentonites, which can be explained by the increase of specific surface of the bentonite samples. The presence of complementary cations depresses the sorption of Sr on bentonite. Cations Ca 2+ exhibit higher effect on cesium sorption than the Na 2+ ions. Results indicate that the sorption of Sr 2+ on bentonite will be affected by the presence of high concentrations of various salts in the waste water

  12. MANU. Handling of bentonite prior buffer block manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the entire bentonite handling process starting from freight from harbour to storage facility and ending up to the manufacturing filling process of the bentonite block moulds. This work describes the bentonite handling prior to the process in which bentonite blocks are manufactured in great quantities. This work included a study of relevant Nordic and international well documented cases of storage, processing and techniques involving bentonite material. Information about storage and handling processes from producers or re-sellers of bentonite was collected while keeping in mind the requirements coming from the Posiva side. Also a limited experiment was made for humidification of different material types. This work includes a detailed description of methods and equipment needed for bentonite storage and processing. Posiva Oy used Jauhetekniikka Oy as a consultant to prepare handling process flow charts for bentonite. Jauhetekniikka Oy also evaluated the content of this report. The handling of bentonite was based on the assumption that bentonite process work is done in one factory for 11 months of work time while the weekly volume is around 41-45 tons. Storage space needed in this case is about 300 tons of bentonite which equals about seven weeks of raw material consumption. This work concluded several things to be carefully considered: sampling at various phases of the process, the air quality at the production/storage facilities (humidity and temperature), the level of automation/process control of the manufacturing process and the means of producing/saving data from different phases of the process. (orig.)

  13. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic description of radionuclide release from the near-field, an investigation has been initiated to quantitatively specify the chemistry of the near-field. In the Swiss case, the main components of the near-field are the glass waste-matrix, a thick steel canister horizontally emplaced in a drift, and a backfill of highly compacted sodium bentonite. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. Solubility limits and speciation of important actinides and the fission product technetium in the bentonite pore water are then calculated. The model is based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater and represents means of extrapolation from laboratory data to repository conditions. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite, as well as the various compositions resulting from the long-term extrapolation, are used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. Since the effect of calcium bentonite on the groundwater chemical composition will be considerably less marked than that of sodium bentonite, especially with respect to key parameters for the nuclide speciation like carbonate concentration and pH, the use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  14. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and

  15. Filtration behavior of organic substance through a compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaji, Mariko; Kuno, Yoshio; Yui, Mikazu

    1999-07-01

    Filtration behavior of organic substance through a compacted bentonite was investigated. Na-type bentonite containing 30wt% of quartz sand was compacted in a column and the dry density was adjusted to be 1.6 g/cm 3 . Polyacrylic acid solution (including three types of polyacrylic acid, average molecular weight 2,100, 15,000 and 450,000) was prepared and was passed through the compacted bentonite. Molecular weight distributions of polyacrylic acid in the effluent solution were analysed by GPC (Gel Permeation Chromatography). A batch type experiment was also carried out in order to examine a sorption behavior of these organic substances onto the surfaces of grains of the bentonite. The results indicated that the smaller size polyacrylic acid (molecular weight < 100,000) was passed through the compacted bentonite. On the other hand, the larger size polyacrylic acid (molecular weight ≥100,000) was mostly filtrated by the compacted bentonite. The batch type sorption tests clarified that the polyacrylic acid did not sorb onto the surfaces of minerals constituting the bentonite. Therefore it was suggested that the larger size molecules (≥100,000) of organic substances could be predominantly filtrated by the microstructure of the compacted bentonite. (author)

  16. A comparative study of the flow enhancing properties of bentonite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of granule flow enhancing property of bentonite, magnesium stearate, talc and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was undertaken. Bentonite was processed into fine powder. A 10 %w/w of starch granules was prepared and separated into different sizes (˂180, 180-500, 500-710 and 710-850 μm).

  17. Diffusion behavior for Se and Zr in sodium-bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Haruo; Yui, Mikazu; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    1995-01-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficients for Se and Zr in bentonite were measured by in-diffusion method at room temperature using water-saturated sodium-bentonite, Kunigel V1 reg-sign containing 50wt% Na-smectite as a major mineral was used as the bentonite material. The experiments were carried out in the dry density range of 400--1,800 kg/m 3 . Bentonite samples were immersed with distilled water and saturated before the experiments. The experiments for Se were carried out under N 2 atmospheric condition (O 2 : 2.5ppm). Those for Zr were carried out under aerobic condition. The apparent diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing density of the bentonite. Since dominant species of Se in the pore water is predicted to be SeO 3 2- , Se may be retarded by anion-exclusion because of negative charge on the surface of the bentonite and little sorption. The dominant species of Zr in the porewater is predicted to be Zr(OH) 5 - or HZrO 3 - . Distribution coefficient measured for Zr on the bentonite was about 1.0 m 3 /kg from batch experiments. Therefore, the retardation may be caused by combination of the sorption and the anion-exclusion. A modeling for the diffusion mechanisms in the bentonite were discussed based on an electric double layer theory. Comparison between the apparent diffusion coefficients predicted by the model and the measured ones shows a good agreement

  18. Gas migration characteristics of highly compacted bentonite ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2010-01-01

    In the current concept of repository for radioactive waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of dissolved gas inside of the engineered barrier, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the engineered barrier until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Gas migration characteristics of highly compacted powdered bentonite are already reported by CRIEPI. In this report, gas migration characteristics of bentonite ore, which is a candidate for construction material of repository for radioactive waste, is investigated. The following conclusions are obtained through the results of the gas migration tests which are conducted in this study: 1) When the total gas pressure exceeds the initial total axial stress, the total axial stress is always equal to the total gas pressure because specimens shrink in the axial direction with causing the clearance between the end of the specimen and porous metal. By increasing the gas pressure more, gas breakthrough, which defined as a sudden and sharp increase in gas flow rate out of the specimen, occurs. Therefore gas migration mechanism of compacted bentonite ore is basically identical to that of compacted powdered bentonite. 2) Hydraulic conductivity measured after the gas breakthrough is somewhat smaller than that measured before the gas migration test. This fact means that it might be possible to neglect decline of the function of bentonite as engineered barrier caused by the gas breakthrough. These characteristics of compacted bentonite ore are identical to those of

  19. Rotary drum dryers for coal slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baunack, F

    1983-04-01

    The suitability, sizing and internal equipment of rotary drum dryers for high-ash coal slurries are discussed. Rotary dryers will handle also difficult slurries; by suitable drum sizes, lifter blades and chains not only high specific evaporation capacities can be achieved but also very high throughputs of up to 400 tons/h of finished product and high evaporation capacities of 60 tons/h.

  20. Enhanced shear strength of sodium bentonite using frictional additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, K.E.; Bowders, J.J.; Gilbert, R.B.; Daniel, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    One of the most important obstacles to using geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) in landfill cover systems is the low shear strength provided by the bentonitic portion of the GCL. In this study, the authors propose that granular, frictional materials might be added to the bentonite to form an admixture that would have greater shear strength than the bentonite alone while still raining low hydraulic conductivity. Bentonite was mixed with two separate granular additives, expanded shale and recycled to form mixtures consisting of 20-70% bentonite by weight. In direct shear tests at normal stresses of 34.5-103.5 kPa, effective friction angles were measured as 45 degrees for the expanded 36 degrees for the recycled glass, and 7 degrees for the hydrated granular bentonite. The strength of the expanded shale mixtures increased nearly linearly as the percentage shale in the mixture increased, to 44 degrees for a bentonite mixture with 80% shale. The addition of recycled glass showed little effect on the shear strength of the mixtures of glass and bentonite. Hydraulic conductivity measurements for both types of mixtures indicated a linear increase with log(k) as the amount of granular additive increased. For applications involving geosynthetic clay liners for cover systems, a mixture of 40% expanded shale and 60% bentonite is recommended, although further testing must be done. The 40/60 mixture satisfies the hydraulic equivalency requirement, with k = 5.1X10 -9 cm/sec, while increasing the shear strength parameters of the bentonitic mixture to φ' = 17 degrees and c' = 0

  1. Influence factors of sand-bentonite mixtures on hydraulic conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yonggui; Ye Weimin; Chen Bao; Wan Min; Wang Qiong

    2008-01-01

    Buffer material is a very important part of the engineering barrier for geological disposal of high-level radioactive nuclear waste. Compacted bentonite is attracting greater attention as buffer and backfill material because it offer impermeability and swelling properties, but the pure compacted bentonite strength decreases with increasing hydration and these will reduce the buffer capability. To solve this problem, sand is often used to form compacted sand-bentonite mixtures (SBMs) providing high thermal conductivity, excellent compaction capacity, long-time stability, and low engineering cost. As to SBMs, hydraulic conductivity is a important index for evaluation barrier capability. Based on the review of research results, the factors affecting the hydraulic conductivity of SBMs were put forward including bentonite content, grain size distribution, moisture content, dry density, compacting method and energy, and bentonite type. The studies show that the hydraulic conductivity of SBMs is controlled by the hydraulic conductivity of the bentonite, it also decreases as dry density and bentonite content increase, but when the bentonite content reach a critical point, the influence of increasing bentonite to decrease the hydraulic conductivity is limited. A fine and well-graded SBMs is likely to have a lower hydraulic conductivity than a coarse and poorly graded material. The internal erosion or erodibility based on the grain size distribution of the SBMs has a negative effect on the final hydraulic conductivity. The lowest hydraulic conductivity is gained when the mixtures are compacted close to optimum moisture content. Also, the mixtures compacted at moisture contents slightly above optimum values give lower hydraulic conductivity than when compacted at slightly under the optimum moisture content. Finally, discussion was brought to importance of compaction method, compacting energy, and bentonite type to the hydraulic conductivity of SBMs. (authors)

  2. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. The model is based on available experimental data and describes the basic reactions between bentonite and groundwater by an ion-exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model assumes equilibrium with calcite as long as sufficient carbonates remain in the bentonite, as well as quartz saturation. The long-term situation is modelled by the assumption that the near-field of a deep repository behaves like a mixing tank. It is found that sodium bentonite will slowly be converted to calcium bentonite. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite is used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. The elements considered are: uranium, neptunium, plutonium, thorium, americium, and technetium. The redox potential in the near-field is assumed to be controlled by the corrosion products of the iron canister. Except for uranium and neptunium, radionuclide solubilities turn out to be lower under the modelled near-field conditions than in the groundwater of the surrounding granitic host rock. Uranium and neptunium solubility might be higher by orders of magnitude in the near-field than in the far-field. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. The use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  3. The differences between soil grouting with cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingting; Sui, Haitong; Yang, Honglu

    2018-01-01

    Cement slurry and cement-water glass slurry are the most widely applied for soil grouting reinforcement project. The viscosity change of cement slurry is negligible during grouting period and presumed to be time-independent while the viscosity of cement-water glass slurry increases with time quickly and is presumed to be time-dependent. Due to the significantly rheology differences between them, the grouting quality and the increasing characteristics of grouting parameters may be different, such as grouting pressure, grouting surrounding rock pressure, i.e., the change of surrounding rock pressure deduced by grouting pressure. Those are main factors for grouting design. In this paper, a large-scale 3D grouting simulation device was developed to simulate the surrounding curtain grouting for a tunnel. Two series of surrounding curtain grouting experiments under different geo-stress of 100 kPa, 150 kPa and 200 kPa were performed. The overload test on tunnel was performed to evaluate grouting effect of all surrounding curtain grouting experiments. In the present results, before 240 seconds, the grouting pressure increases slowly for both slurries; after 240 seconds the increase rate of grouting pressure for cement-water glass slurry increases quickly while that for cement slurry remains roughly constant. The increasing trend of grouting pressure for cement-water glass is similar to its viscosity. The setting time of cement-water glass slurry obtained from laboratory test is less than that in practical grouting where grout slurry solidifies in soil. The grouting effect of cement-water glass slurry is better than that of cement slurry and the grouting quality decreases with initial pressure.

  4. Antifungal activity of streptomycetes isolated bentonite clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Shirobokov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the biological activity of streptomycetes, isolated from Ukrainian bentonite clay. Methods. For identification of the investigated microorganisms there were used generally accepted methods for study of morpho-cultural and biochemical properties and sequencing of 16Ѕ rRNA producer. Antagonistic activity of the strain was determined by agar diffusion and agar block method using gram-positive, gram-negative microorganisms and fungi. Results. Research of autochthonous flora from bentonite clay of Ukrainian various deposits proved the existence of stable politaxonomic prokaryotic-eukaryotic consortia there. It was particularly interesting that the isolated microorganisms had demonstrated clearly expressed antagonistic properties against fungi. During bacteriological investigation this bacterial culture was identified like representative of the genus Streptomyces. Bentonite streptomycetes, named as Streptomyces SVP-71, inagar mediums (agar block method inhibited the growth of fungi (yeast and mold; zones of growth retardation constituted of 11-36 mm, and did not affect the growth of bacteria. There were investigated the inhibitory effects of supernatant culture fluid, ethanol and butanol extracts of biomass streptomycetes on museum and clinical strains of fungi that are pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, C. krusei, C. utilis, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. kefir, S. glabrata, C. lusitaniae, Aspergillus niger, Mucor pusillus, Fusarium sporotrichioides. It has been shown that research antifungal factor had 100% of inhibitory effect against all fungi used in experiments in vitro. In parallel, it was found that alcohol extracts hadn’t influence to the growth of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria absolutely. It was shown that the cultural fluid supernatant and alcoholic extracts of biomass had the same antagonistic effect, but with different manifestation. This evidenced about identity of antifungal substances

  5. Effect of pH to adsorption behavior of Pu on bentonite in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoqiang; Tuo Xianguo; Li Pingchuan; Leng Yangchun; Su Jilong; Yueping

    2013-01-01

    The effects of pH to the adsorption behavior of Pu in GMZ-bentonite, Lingshou Ca-bentonite, Na-bentonite and bleaching earth were tested by static adsorption experiments in aqueous environment. The results show that the adsorption equilibrium time of Pu is four days in GMZ-bentonite and 5-6 days in bleaching earth, Ca-bentonite and Na-bentonite. In aqueous environment, the adsorption capacity of bentonite to Pu increases with pH in water phase, and it is weak in acidic aqueous environment and strong in alkaline aqueous environment extremely. (authors)

  6. Studies of coal slurries property; Slurry no seijo ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, M.; Aihara, Y.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sakaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Hirosue, H. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It was previously found that the increase of slurry temperature provides a significant effect of slurry viscosity reduction for the coal slurry with high concentration of 50 wt%. To investigate the detailed influence of slurry temperature for the coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt%, influence of temperature on the successive change of apparent viscosity was observed at the constant shear rate. When the concentration of coal was increased from 45 wt% to 50 wt%, viscosity of the slurry was rapidly increased. When heated above 70{degree}C, the apparent viscosity decreased during heating to the given temperature, but it increased successively after reaching to the given temperature. The apparent viscosity showed higher value than that of the initial viscosity. The coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt% showed the fluidity of Newtonian fluid at the lower shear rate region, but showed the fluidity of pseudo-plastic fluid at the higher shear rate region. The slurry having high apparent viscosity by the successive change showed higher apparent viscosity with increasing the higher even by changing the shear rate. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  7. The effects of a spray slurry nozzle on copper CMP for reduction in slurry consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Da Sol; Jeong, Hae Do [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun Seop [Tongmyong University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The environmental impact of semiconductor manufacturing has been a big social problem, like greenhouse gas emission. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a wet process which consumes chemical slurries, seriously impacts environmental sustain ability and cost-effectiveness. This paper demonstrates the superiority of a full-cone spray slurry nozzle to the conventional tube-type slurry nozzle in Cu CMP. It was observed that the spray nozzle made a weak slurry wave at the retaining ring unlike a conventional nozzle, because the slurry was supplied uniformly in broader areas. Experiments were implemented with different slurry flow rates and spray nozzle heights. Spray nozzle performance is controlled by the spray angle and spray height. The process temperature was obtained with an infrared (IR) sensor and an IR thermal imaging camera to investigate the cooling effect of the spray. The results show that the spray nozzle provides a higher Material removal rate (MRR), lower non-uniformity (NU), and lower temperature than the conventional nozzle. Computational fluid dynamics techniques show that the turbulence kinetic energy and slurry velocity of the spray nozzle are much higher than those of the conventional nozzle. Finally, it can be summarized that the spray nozzle plays a significant role in slurry efficiency by theory of Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL).

  8. The effects of a spray slurry nozzle on copper CMP for reduction in slurry consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Da Sol; Jeong, Hae Do; Lee, Hyun Seop

    2015-01-01

    The environmental impact of semiconductor manufacturing has been a big social problem, like greenhouse gas emission. Chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a wet process which consumes chemical slurries, seriously impacts environmental sustain ability and cost-effectiveness. This paper demonstrates the superiority of a full-cone spray slurry nozzle to the conventional tube-type slurry nozzle in Cu CMP. It was observed that the spray nozzle made a weak slurry wave at the retaining ring unlike a conventional nozzle, because the slurry was supplied uniformly in broader areas. Experiments were implemented with different slurry flow rates and spray nozzle heights. Spray nozzle performance is controlled by the spray angle and spray height. The process temperature was obtained with an infrared (IR) sensor and an IR thermal imaging camera to investigate the cooling effect of the spray. The results show that the spray nozzle provides a higher Material removal rate (MRR), lower non-uniformity (NU), and lower temperature than the conventional nozzle. Computational fluid dynamics techniques show that the turbulence kinetic energy and slurry velocity of the spray nozzle are much higher than those of the conventional nozzle. Finally, it can be summarized that the spray nozzle plays a significant role in slurry efficiency by theory of Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL).

  9. Conductivity and electrochemical performance of LiFePO4 slurry in the lithium slurry battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Caimei; Chen, Yongchong; Liu, Dandan; Zhang, Ping

    2017-06-01

    Lithium slurry battery is a new type of energy storage technique which uses the slurry of solid active materials, conductive additions and liquid electrolyte as the electrode. The proportion of conductive addition and the active material has significant influence on the conductivity and electrochemical performance of the slurry electrode. In the present work, slurries with different volume ratios of LiFePO4 (LFP) and Ketjenblack (KB) were investigated by the electrochemical workstation and charge-discharge testing system (vs. Li/Li+). Results show that the conductivity of the slurry increases linearly with the addition of KB, and the measured specific capacity of the slurry reaches its theoretical value when the volume ratio of KB to LFP is around 0.2. Based on this ratio, a slurry battery with higher loading of LFP (19.1 wt.% in the slurry) was tested, and a specific capacity of 165 mAh/g at 0.2 mA/cm2 and 102 mAh/g at 5 mA/cm2 was obtained for LFP.

  10. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  11. Engineering Properties of Bentonite Stabilized with Lime and Phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sujeet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering properties such as compaction, unconfined compressive strength, consistency limits, percentage swell, free swell index, the California bearing ratio and the consolidation of bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum are presented in this paper. The content of the lime and phosphogypsum varied from 0 to 10 %. The results reveal that the dry unit weight and optimum moisture content of bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The percentage of swell increased and the free swell index decreased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum to the bentonite + 8 % lime mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum as well as an increase in the curing period up to 14 days. The liquid limit and plastic limit of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased, whereas the plasticity index remained constant with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The California bearing ratio, modulus of subgrade reaction, and secant modulus increased for the bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum. The coefficient of the consolidation of the bentonite increased with the addition of 8 % lime and no change with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum.

  12. Colloid chemical aspects of the ''confined bentonite concept''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, J.C. Le

    1978-03-01

    Measurements of the amount of particles released from a bentonite gel by light scattering and visual inspection show that while particles are released in distilled water, the gel will be coagulated if in contact with ground water and consequently the release of particles is negligibly small. Studies of sedimentation volumes by ultracentrifugation also clearly indicate that the bentonite in contact with ground water under the repository pressure will form a completely stable coagulated gel. The swelling of confined bentonite was studied in an ''artificial crack'' of width 0.5 mm. The bentonite flowed readily into this crack and into the much narrower crack formed when the cell was broken. The swelling properties of the bentonite at the repository depth are discussed. It is argued that the gel, if sufficient volume is available, will swell spontaneously to a volume that is approximately 30 % larger than the initial one and then form a stable, coagulated gel containing 30-35 % water in equilibrium with the ground water. Investigations of the diffusion of colloidal matter (sodium lignosulphonate molecules of mean diameter 6 nm) and calcium ions into a dilute bentonite gel show that colloidal matter very probably will have a negligible rate of diffusion while the calcium ions diffuse rapidly. This implies that the initial bentonite gel which is partially in its sodium form will be completely exchanged to its calcium form when brought into contact with ground water which ensures that it will remain coagulated even in its swollen state

  13. Characterization of bentonite clay from Cubati, PB, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, A.P.; Marques, L.N.; Campos, L.A.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.; Menezes, R.R.

    2009-01-01

    The bentonite of the State of Paraiba are commercially used in numerous technological sectors, particularly in oil drilling muds. However, these bentonite deposits are becoming exhausted after decades of exploitation. Thus, the aim of this work was to characterize physically, mineralogically and technologically bentonite clays from Cubati city, PB. The samples were dried at 60 deg C and characterized through X-ray fluorescence, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and gravimetric analyzes and scanning electronic microscopy. The natural bentonite clays were transformed into sodium bentonite by Na_2CO_3 solution treatment. It was estimated the rheological properties of the suspensions: apparent and plastic viscosities and water loss. The results showed that the samples are polycationic bentonite clays, containing amounts of MgO, CaO and K_2O similar to those of bentonite from Boa Vista, PB, and are composed of smectite, kaolinite and quartz. The samples presented fractions of particles size under 2 μm of 30 and 32%. The rheological properties showed that the samples presented technological potential to be used in drilling muds. (author)

  14. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, H.

    1986-04-01

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic description of radionuclide release from the near-field, an investigation has been initiated to quantitatively specify the chemistry of the near-field. In the Swiss case, the main components of the near-field are the glass waste-matrix, a thick steel canister horizontally emplaced in a drift, and a backfill of highly compacted sodium bentonite. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. Solubility limits and speciation of important actinides and the fission product technetium in the bentonite pore water are then calculated. The model is based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater and represents means of extrapolation from laboratory data to repository conditions. The basic reactions between sodium bentonite and groundwater are described by an ion-exchange model for sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. The model assumes equilibrium with calcite as long as sufficient carbonates remain in the bentonite, as well as quartz saturation. It is calculated that the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite saturated with Swiss Reference Groundwater will have a pH value of 9.7 and a free carbonate activity of 8x10 -4 M. The long-term situation is modelled by the assumption that the near-field of a deep repository behaves like a mixing tank. In this way, an attempt is made to account for the continuous water exchange between the near-field and the host rock. It is found that sodium bentonite will be slowly converted to calcium bentonite. This conversion is roughly estimated to be completed after 2 million years

  15. Investigation of the performance of cement-bentonite cut-off walls in aggressive ground at a disused gasworks site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedd, P.; Holton, I.R.; Butcher, A.P.; Wallace, S.

    1997-01-01

    There has been an increased use of cement-bentonite slurry trench cut-off walls to control the lateral migration of pollution in the UK. Concerns inevitably exist about their performance in chemically aggressive ground particularly in the long term. To address some of the uncertainties a programme of field and laboratory research is being undertaken at a disused gasworks in the UK. Elevated levels of sulphate and other contaminants are present on the site and could potentially change the properties of the cement-bentonite. Two boxes, 10m square in plan, by 5m deep have been constructed, one with and one without an HDPE membrane, to isolate parts of the site. Local hydraulic gradients across the walls have been created by pumping from within the boxes. Isolated lengths of wall have been constructed which are being used to assess and develop in-situ testing techniques such as the piezocone for measuring permeability, strength and overall integrity of the wall

  16. Rheological properties of defense waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this two-year project has been to obtain refined and reliable experimental data about the rheological properties of melter feeds. The research has involved both experimental studies and model development. Two experimental facilities have been set up to measure viscosity and pressure drop. Mathematical models have been developed as a result of experimental observation and fundamental rheological theory. The model has the capability to predict the viscosity of melter slurries in a range of experimental conditions. The final results of the investigation could be used to enhance the current design base for slurry transportation systems and improve the performance of the slurry mixing process. If successful, the cost of this waste treatment will be reduced, and disposal safety will be increased. The specific objectives for this project included: (1) the design, implementation, and validation of the experimental facility in both batch and continuous operating modes; (2) the identification and preparation of melter feed samples of both the SRS and Hanford waste slurries at multiple solids concentration levels; (3) the measurement and analysis of the melter feeds to determine the effects of the solids concentration, pH value, and other factors on the rheological properties of the slurries; (4) the correlation of the rheological properties as a function of the measured physical and chemical parameters; and (5) transmission of the experimental data and resulting correlation to the DOE site user to guide melter feed preparation and transport equipment design

  17. Bentonite chemical modification for use in industrial effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laranjeira, E.; Pinto, M.R.O.; Rodrigues, D.P.; Costa, B.P.; Guimaraes, P.L.F.

    2010-01-01

    The present work aims at synthesizing organoclays using a layered silicate of regional importance, bentonite clay, for the treatment of industrial effluents. The choice of clay to be organophilized was based on cation exchange capacity (CEC). Bentonite with higher CTC was called AN 35 (92 meq/100 g), and therefore was the one that suffered the chemical modification with salt cetyl trimethyl ammonium Cetremide, provided by Vetec.The unmodified and modified clays were characterized by FTIR and XDR. The data obtained through the characterizations confirmed the acquisition of bentonite organoclay thus suggesting its subsequent application in the treatment of industrial effluents. (author)

  18. Water uptake and stress development in bentonites and bentonite-sand buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.A.; Wan, A.W-L.; Gray, M.N.; Miller, S.H.

    1996-10-01

    The development of swelling pressure and the transfer of pore water pressures through dense bentonite and bentonite-sand materials are examined in this report. This report focuses on the swelling pressure and total pressure developed in initially unsaturated specimens allowed access to free water on one end. The bentonite in this wetted region rapidly develops its full swelling pressure and this pressure is transferred upwards through the specimen. Hence, the bentonite plug will exert a pressure approximately equivalent to the swelling pressure even though only a small region of the plug is actually saturated. A number of specimens were tested with total pressure sensors mounted normal and parallel to the axis of compaction. Lateral pressures developed long before the wetting front reached sensor locations, suggesting stress transfer through the unsaturated portions of these specimens. On achieving saturation, specimens were found to have similar swelling pressures both normal to and parallel to the axis of compaction. This indicates that there is little or no specimen anisotropy induced by the compaction process. Tests were conducted on specimens allowed only to take on a limited quantity of water and it was found that density anisotropy was induced as the result of the swelling pressures generated by the buffer. The wetted skin of buffer developed a considerable pressure and compressed a region of buffer immediately above the wetted region. The results suggest that the buffer material placed in a disposal vault will rapidly develop and transfer swelling pressures as a result of the saturation of a limited region or 'skin' within the emplacement site. The total pressure ultimately present on the container surface should be the sum of the swelling and hydraulic components. (author). 14 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  19. Heavy cement slurries; Pastas pesadas de cimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Francisco Avelar da; Conceicao, Antonio C. Farias [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Distrito de Perfuracao do Nordeste. Div. de Tecnicas de Perfuracao; Marins, Carlos Cesar Silva [PETROBRAS, XX (Brazil). Dept. de Perfuracao. Div. de Revestimento e Cimentacao

    1990-12-31

    When going deeper in a high pressure well, the only way to successfully cement your casing or linear is through the use of heavy cement slurry. In 1987 PETROBRAS geologists presented to the Drilling Department a series of deep, hot and high pressure wells to be drilled. The Casing and Cement Division of this department then started a program to face this new challenge. This paper introduces the first part of this program and shows how PETROBRAS is dealing with heavy weight slurries. We present the slurry formulations tested in laboratory, the difficulties found in mixing them in the field, rheology measurements, API free water and API fluid loss from both laboratory and field samples. (author) 3 tabs.

  20. Physico-chemical principles of slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiber, C.O.

    1984-12-01

    Spectacular accidents have occurred in mining with products considered non-explosive. In view of the disastrous consequences of these accidents, the old 'Anfo' idea has been revived (= ammonium nitrate and fuel oil). Experiments in wet wells have led to the development of a new type of non-explosive blasting agents, i.e. the so-called slurries. Detonation of these slurries is divided into an energy release process and an energy conversion process. The basic mechanisms are described with a view to practical problems, e.g. detonation control, temperature dependence of the blasting characteristics, pressure dependence of the ignition process, critical diameter, slurry state problems, and sensitivity.

  1. Effect of Particle Size Distribution on Slurry Rheology: Nuclear Waste Simulant Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Jaehun; Oh, Takkeun; Luna, Maria L.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the rheological properties of slurries has been of great interest in various industries such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. Many physicochemical parameters, such as particle size, pH, ionic strength, and mass/volume fraction of particles, can influence the rheological properties of slurry. Among such parameters, the particle size distribution of slurry would be especially important for nuclear waste treatment because most nuclear waste slurries show a broad particle size distribution. We studied the rheological properties of several different low activity waste nuclear simulant slurries having different particle size distributions under high salt and high pH conditions. Using rheological and particle size analysis, it was found that the percentage of colloid-sized particles in slurry appears to be a key factor for rheological characteristics and the efficiency of rheological modifiers. This behavior was shown to be coupled with an existing electrostatic interaction between particles under a low salt concentration. Our study suggests that one may need to implement the particle size distribution as a critical factor to understand and control rheological properties in nuclear waste treatment plants, such as the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford and Savannah River sites, because the particle size distributions significantly vary over different types of nuclear waste slurries.

  2. Comparison between uniaxially and isostatically compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalbantner, P.; Sjoeblom, R.; Boergesson, Lennart

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of the present report is to provide the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) with the knowledge base needed for their selection of reference method for manufacturing of bentonite blocks. The purpose is also to provide support for the direction of the further development work. Three types of blocks are compared in the present report: uniaxially compacted medium high blocks, isostatically compacted medium high blocks, isostatically compacted high blocks. The analyses is based on three process systems relating to the sequence of excavation of bentonite-transport-powder preparation-compaction-handling and emplacement of bentonite blocks. The need for further knowledge has been identified and documented in conjunction with these analyses. The comparison is primarily made with regard to the criteria safety/risk, quality/ technique and economy. It is carried out through identification of issues of significance and subsequent analysis and evaluation as well as more formally in a simplified AHP (AHP = Analytical Hierarchic Process). The result of the analyses is that the isostatic technique is applicable for the production of high as well as medium size blocks. The pressed blocks are assessed to fulfil the basic requirements with a very large margin. The result of the analyses is also that the uniaxial technique is applicable for the preparation of medium size blocks, which are assessed to fulfil the basic requirements with a large margin. The need for development and process control is assessed to be somewhat higher for the uniaxial technique. One example is the friction against the walls of the die during the compaction, including the significance of this friction for the development of stresses and discontinuities in the block. These results support a selection of the isostatic technique as the reference technique as it provides flexibility in the choice of block height. The uniaxial technique can form a second alternative if medium high

  3. Study on the degradation of chitosan slurries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Martini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we measured the degradation rate of different chitosan slurries. Several parameters were monitored such as temperature (25 °C, 37 °C, 50 °C; chitosan concentration (1% and 2% (w/V; and polymer molecular weight. The samples were tested in dynamic sweep test mode. This test is able to provide a reliable estimation of viscosity variations of the slurries; in turn, these variations could be related to degradation rate of the system in the considered conditions. The resulting information is particularly important especially in applications in which there is a close relationship between physical properties and molecular structure.

  4. Prospects for coal slurry pipelines in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    The coal slurry pipeline segment of the transport industry is emerging in the United States. If accepted it will play a vital role in meeting America's urgent energy requirements without public subsidy, tax relief, or federal grants. It is proven technology, ideally suited for transport of an abundant energy resource over thousands of miles to energy short industrial centers and at more than competitive costs. Briefly discussed are the following: (1) history of pipelines; (2) California market potential; (3) slurry technology; (4) environmental benefits; (5) market competition; and (6) a proposed pipeline.

  5. Polypropylene–clay composite prepared from Indian bentonite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    composites have recently found applications in packaging, automotive ... process using xylene as the solvent. Solvent ... Particle size distribution curve for clay, bentonite. Table 2. .... greater probability of debonding due to the poor interfa-.

  6. Effects of polyethyleneimine adsorption on rheology of bentonite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    XRD, zeta potential and adsorption studies were done together with rheological .... trokinetics experiments on Balikesir bentonite samples. For this reason, the ... rence between apparent and true adsorption rates, and hence swelling of clays ...

  7. Immobilization of industrial waste in cement–bentonite clay matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Immobilization of industrial waste in cement–bentonite clay matrix. I B PLECAS* and S ... high structural integrity and minimizing the risk of escape by leaching. ..... Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Fuel Cycle 14. 195. Plecas I ...

  8. Diffusion of Fission Product Elements in Compacted Bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratomo-Budiman-Sastrowardoyo; Dewi-Susilowati; Dadang-Suganda

    2000-01-01

    Study on diffusion of fission product in compacted bentonite has been conducted. The information about mobilities of these elements have been obtained from the studies resulted in many countries. It is presented that the diffusion coefficient was varied by the function of solution phase condition as well as the nature of bentonite. It is also showed that the diffusion coefficient decreased by the increasing of density, as well as the increasing of montmorillonite content in bentonite. The ratio of bentonite/silica-sand used, was related to the increasing of elements mobility. In many case variation of diffusion coefficient was related to the variation of pH, redox condition, and the presence of complex ant in solution phase. The lower diffusion coefficient could give the higher retardation factor, which is a favorable factor to retard the radionuclides release from a disposal facility to geosphere. (author)

  9. Long term mineralogical properties of bentonite/quartz buffer substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsson, A.; Pusch, R.

    1978-06-01

    This report shows results from investigations concerning properties in bentonitebased buffersubstances which are suggested to be used when high level radioactive wastes from nuclear powerplants are to be stored finally. Recommended material characteristica of the bentonite to be used are summerized. In an attempt to find geological evidence for bentonite to loose its desireable properties there were no such findings at the temperatures, groundwater situations and pressures which are to be expected at the actual depositing depth (500 m) for a considerable period of time. Concerning biological activity and then specially the mobility and activity of bacteria the conclusion is that there will be little or no influence from them either there is bentonite-sand or compacted pure bentonite in the buffer mass

  10. bentonite-sand mixture as new backfill/buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Suli; Liu Jisheng; Zhang Huyuan; Liang Jian

    2008-01-01

    The mixture of bentonite and quartz sand is suggested as a new backfill/buffer material for geological disposal of HLW. To improve the further design of underground laboratory and in-situ industrial construction test, the optimization of sand addition to bentonite is focused at present research stage. Based on summarizing the research results abroad, laboratory tests were conducted on the mixture of GMZ001 bentonite and quartz sand, such as compaction test and swelling tests etc. Test data shows that GMZ bentonite-sand mixture exhibits a favorite compaction with a 30% sand addition, a highest swelling pressure with a 20% sand addition, and a decreasing plasticity with increases in sand addition and pore liquid concentration. (authors)

  11. Simulation of Tracer Transport in Porous Media: Application to Bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.

    2001-01-01

    We present a formal framework to describe tracer transport in heterogeneous media, such as porous media like bentonites. In these media, mean field approximation is not valid because there exist some geometrical constraints and the transport is anomalous. (Author)

  12. Migration study of actinides and lanthanides in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastrowardoyo, P.B.; Susilowati, D.; Suganda, D.

    1998-01-01

    Migration study of actinide and lanthanide elements in compacted bentonite has been conducted. Data of these elements mobilities have been shown, and it is showed that the diffusion coefficient was varied as the function of solution phase condition as well as the origin/composition of bentonite. It is showed that the diffusion coefficient decreased by the increasing of density, as well as the increasing of montmorillonite content in bentonite. The ratio of bentonite/silica-sand used was related to the increasing of elements mobility. In many case the difference of diffusion coefficient was related to the variation of pH and redox condition, as well as the presence of complexant in solution phase. The Lower diffusion coefficient could give the higher retardation factor, which is a favourable factor to retard the radionuclides release from a disposal facility to geosphere. (author)

  13. Evaluation of brazilian bentonites as additive in the radwaste cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tello, C.C.O. de.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of some Brazilian bentonites has been evaluated, concerning to their use as additive in the radwaste cementation. The purpose of the bentonite is to retain the radioelements in the final product in leaching process. Experiments to determine properties such as compressive strenght, viscosity, set time leaching and cesium sorption have been carried out to this evaluation. After one-year test, the results show that the bentonites greatly reduce the cesium release. A literature survey about cementation process and plants and about the cement product characteristics has been made in order to obtain a reliable final product, able to be transported and storaged. Some leaching test methods and mathematical models, that could be applied in the evaluation of cement products with bentonite have been evaluated. (author) [pt

  14. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays. Obtained from Ashaka and ... versatile material for geotechnical engineering and as well as their demand for ..... A PhD thesis submitted to the Chemical ...

  15. Physico-chemical properties of water in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikai, Yuji; Sato, Seichi; Ohashi, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    As a part of safety analysis on ground layer disposal, in order to estimate nuclides migration behavior from engineering shielding materials, it is required to modelize migration process of nuclides in bentonite and chemical species relating to corrosion, to estimate solubility and to specify application condition of geochemical calculation code. In this study, as a part of elucidation of nuclide migration process, physico-chemical properties of water in bentonite and montmorillonite using steam pressure method were determined. As a result, following items were found: (1) Even if 1/3 of water in bentonite is near free water, it is far from a region dealable with dilute solution in the electrolyte solution theory. And, (2) the water in bentonite has generally small activity in comparison with dilute solution, then has smaller solubility than estimation value of calculation code. (G.K.)

  16. Buffer construction technique using granular bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Ryoichi; Asano, Hidekazu; Toguri, Satohito; Mori, Takuo; Shimura, Tomoyuki; Matsuda, Takeshi; Uyama, Masao; Noda, Masaru

    2007-01-01

    Buffer construction using bentonite pellets as filling material is a promising technology for enhancing the ease of repository operation. In this study, a test of such technology was conducted in a full-scale simulated disposal drift, using a filling system which utilizes a screw conveyor system. The simulated drift, which contained two dummy overpacks, was configured as a half-cross-section model with a height of 2.22 m and a length of 6.0 m. The average dry density of the buffer obtained in the test was 1.29 Mg/m 3 , with an angle of repose of 35 to 40 degrees. These test results indicate that buffer construction using a screw conveyor system for pellet emplacement in a waste disposal drift is a promising technology for repositories for high level radioactive wastes. (author)

  17. Thermally modified bentonite clay for copper removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Kleinübing, S.J.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Bentonite clay coming from Pernambuco was thermally modified in order to increase its affinity and capacity in the copper removal in porous bed. The application of this procedure is justified by the low cost of clay, their abundance and affinity for various metal ions. Thermally treatment modifies the clay adsorption properties enables its use in porous bed system, with the increase in surface area and mechanical strength. The material was characterized by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and N_2 physisorption. Then tests were carried out for adsorption of copper in various experimental conditions and evaluated the mass transfer zone, useful and total adsorbed removal amounts and total copper removal percentage. The results showed that the clay treated at higher temperature showed higher copper removal. (author)

  18. Experimental Setup to Characterize Bentonite Hydration Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D.; Pastor, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental setup to follow-up the hydration process of a bentonite. Clay samples, of 2 cm x 12 cm x 12 cm, were made and introduced in a Hele-Shaw cell with two PMM windows and two steel frames. In hydration experiments, a fluid enters by an orifice in the frame, located both at the top and the bottom of the cell, to perform hydration in both senses. To get a uniform hydration we place a diffuser near the orifice. Volume influxes in hydration cells are registered in time. The evolution of the developed interface was recorded on a videotape. The video cameras was fixed to a holder so that the vertical direction in the monitor was the same as the direction of the larger extension of the cell. (Author) 6 refs

  19. Adsorption behavior of 99Tc in Ca-bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dejun; Fan Xianhua; Zhang Yingjie; Yao Jun; Zhou Duo; Wang Yong

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of 99 Tc in bentonite were studied with batch methods under aerobic and anoxic conditions. The adsorption ratios is about 1.47 mL/g under aerobic conditions. The adsorption ratio of 99 Tc in bentonite is not affected by pH in the range of 5-12 and the CO 3 2- , Fe 3+ concentrations in the range of 10 -8 -10 -2 mol/L in the solution. The adsorption ratio of Tc in bentonite increases with the increase of the mass percent of Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 and the Fe 2+ concentration in the range of 10 -8 -10 -2 mol/L. Tc exists ainly in the form of Tc(VII) after the adsorption equilibriums. The adsorption ratio of Tc in bentonite increase with the increase of the mass percent of Fe and Tc exists mainly in the form of Tc(VII) after the adsorption equilibriums. The adsorption ratio of Tc in bentonite is about 84.84 mL/g under anoxic conditions. The adsorption ratios of 99 Tc in bentonite decreases with the increase of pH in the range of 5-12 and the CO 3 2- concentration in the range of 10 -8 -10 -2 mol/L in the solution. The adsorption ratio of Tc in bentonite increases with the increase of the Fe 3+ , Fe 2+ concentration in the range of 10 -8 -10 -2 mol/L and the mass percent of Fe, Fe 2 O 3 and Fe 3 O 4 . Tc exists mainly in the form of Tc(IV) after the adsorption equilibriums. The adsorption isotherms of TcO 4 - in bentonite are all in fairly agree with the Freundlich's equation under aerobic and anoxic conditions. (authors)

  20. Bentonite as a backfill material for shallow land repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalmali, V.S.; Deshingkar, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Two commercially available indigenous bentonite samples were evaluated for their cesium and strontium sorption properties in distilled water and surface water. By converting them into sodium form, the distribution coefficients for both cesium (I) and strontium (II) increased. Sodium bentonite was recommended because of high sorption capacity for Cs(I), Mg(II) and Sr(II) for use as backfill material in shallow land repositories where cement waste form containing Cs, Sr and Be wastes are disposed. (author)

  1. Saturation of bentonite dependent upon temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausmannova, Lucie; Vasicek, Radek

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The fundamental idea behind the long-term safe operation of a deep repository is the use of the Multi-barrier system principle. Barriers may well differ according to the type of host rock in which the repository is located. It is assumed that the buffer in the granitic host rock environment will consist of swelling clays which boast the ideal properties for such a function i.e. low permeability, high swelling pressure, self-healing ability etc. all of which are affected primarily by mineralogy and dry density. Water content plays a crucial role in the activation of swelling pressure as well as, subsequently, in the potential self healing of the various contact areas of the numerous buffer components made from bentonite. In the case of a deep repository, a change in water content is not only connected with the possible intake of water from the host rock, but also with its redistribution owing to changes in temperature after the insertion of the heat source (disposal waste package containing spent fuel) into the repository 'nest'. The principal reason for the experimental testing of this high dry density material is the uncertainty with regard to its saturation ability (final water content or the degree of saturation) at higher temperatures. The results of the Mock-Up-CZ experiment showed that when the barrier is constantly supplied with a saturation medium over a long time period the water content in the barrier as well as the degree of saturation settle independently of temperature. The Mock-Up-CZ experiment was performed at temperatures of 30 deg. - 90 deg. C in the barrier; therefore it was decided to experimentally verify this behaviour by means of targeted laboratory tests. A temperature of 110 deg. C was added to the set of experimental temperatures resulting in samples being tested at 25 deg. C, 95 deg. C and 110 deg. C. The degree of saturation is defined as the ratio of pore water volume to pore

  2. Biovailability of copper and zinc in pig and cattle slurries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakubus, M.; Dach, J.; Starmans, D.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Slurry is an important source of macronutrients, micro-nutrients and organic matter. Despite the considerable fertilizer value of slurry, it may be abundant in amounts of copper and zinc originating from dietary. The study presents quantitative changes in copper and zinc in individual slurries (pig

  3. Radio-frequency slurry-density measurement for dredging pipelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eeten, M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic dredgers make use of a density meter to measure the instantaneous density in the slurry transport pipeline, primarily for process control and production calculation. the current ‘golden’ standard for slurry density measurement is the radioactive density meter. It is based on a slurry

  4. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, J.P. [Adelphi Univ., Garden City, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  5. Sorption of strontium on bentonites from Slovak deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kufcakova, J.; Galambos, M.; Rajc, P.

    2005-01-01

    Sorption on bentonite from different Slovak deposits / Jelsovy potok, Kopernica and Lieskove has been investigated under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbate concentrations, presence of complementary cation. The sorption of strontium from aqueous solutions was investigated using a radiometric determination of distribution coefficient, Kd. The individual solutions were labelled with radiotracer. Radiation stability has been investigated, the higher sorption parameters were observed for the irradiated bentonites /tab.l/ , which can be explained by the increase of specific surface and change of solubility of the irradiated samples of bentonite. The presence of complementary cations, Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ and Ba 2+ depresses the sorption of Sr on bentonite. In the case of bentonite Kopernica the effectiveness in reducing the sorption of strontium by cations followed the order K + 4 + + 2+ 2+ 2+ . Results indicate that the sorption of Sr + on bentonite will be affected by the presence of high concentrations of various salts in the waste water effluents. (author)

  6. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew

    2007-09-01

    In Sweden and Finland, it is proposed that spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, for disposal in a geologic repository, either in vertical boreholes (KBS-3V) or in long horizontal boreholes (KBS-3H). The canisters will consist of a thick cast iron insert and a copper outer container, and each canister will be surrounded by a compacted bentonite clay buffer. It is important to investigate the possible consequences if a failure of these physical barriers was to occur. For instance, if mechanical failure of the copper outer container were to occur then groundwater could enter the annulus and reach the cast iron insert. This would result in anaerobically corroded iron from the cast iron insert interacting with the bentonite surrounding the canisters. The presence of anaerobically corroded iron in groundwater raises the question of how the bentonite will be affected by this process. In the case of the KBS-3H concept, mechanical failure of the copper outer container could lead to interaction between anaerobically corroded iron and bentonite, as above. However, direct contact between anaerobically corroding carbon steel and bentonite is also likely because of the presence of perforated carbon steel support structures in the long horizontal boreholes. As part of the NF-PRO project, an extensive experimental programme has been carried out over several years to study the interactions between anaerobically corroding carbon steel or cast iron and bentonite. The purpose of this report is to describe the modelling work that has been carried out, and the conclusions that have been reached. The experimental programme has carried out a series of long term experiments looking at anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel or cast iron in compacted MX80 bentonite at 30 deg C or 50 deg C. In the bentonite the concentration of iron decreased with increasing distance away from the iron-bentonite interface, with local iron concentrations as high as 20 wt % in

  7. Behaviour of bentonite accessory minerals during the thermal stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, David; Bruno, Jordi; Benbow, Steven; Takase, Hiro

    2000-03-01

    This report discusses in a quantitative manner the evolution of the accessory minerals in the bentonite as a result of the thermal event exerted by the spent fuel in the near field. Three different modelling approaches have been used and the results compared between them. The three different approaches have been calculated using two Differential Algebraic Equation (DAE) solver: DYLAN (Model-1) and the Nag DAE solver, d02ngf (Model-2) and the third approach (Model-3) using the last version of PHREEQC. The results from these calculations indicate the feasibility of the modelling approach to model the migration of bentonite accessory minerals and relevant aqueous species throughout the thermal gradient. These calculations indicate that the migration of quartz and quartz polymorphs is a lesser problem. The aqueous speciation of Ca in the bentonite pore water is fundamental in order to define the potential migration of anhydrite during the thermal stage. If CaSO 4 (aq) is the predominant aqueous species, then anhydrite dissolves at the initial groundwater migration times through bentonite. However, if Ca 2+ is considered to be the dominant Ca species at the bentonite pore water, then anhydrite migrates towards the clay/granite interface. This is the main difference in the chemical systems considered in the three model approaches used in this work. The main process affecting the trace mineral behaviour in bentonite is cation exchange. This process controls the concentration of calcium, which results in a direct control of the calcite precipitation-dissolution

  8. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew [Serco Assurance, Harwe ll (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    In Sweden and Finland, it is proposed that spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, for disposal in a geologic repository, either in vertical boreholes (KBS-3V) or in long horizontal boreholes (KBS-3H). The canisters will consist of a thick cast iron insert and a copper outer container, and each canister will be surrounded by a compacted bentonite clay buffer. It is important to investigate the possible consequences if a failure of these physical barriers was to occur. For instance, if mechanical failure of the copper outer container were to occur then groundwater could enter the annulus and reach the cast iron insert. This would result in anaerobically corroded iron from the cast iron insert interacting with the bentonite surrounding the canisters. The presence of anaerobically corroded iron in groundwater raises the question of how the bentonite will be affected by this process. In the case of the KBS-3H concept, mechanical failure of the copper outer container could lead to interaction between anaerobically corroded iron and bentonite, as above. However, direct contact between anaerobically corroding carbon steel and bentonite is also likely because of the presence of perforated carbon steel support structures in the long horizontal boreholes. As part of the NF-PRO project, an extensive experimental programme has been carried out over several years to study the interactions between anaerobically corroding carbon steel or cast iron and bentonite. The purpose of this report is to describe the modelling work that has been carried out, and the conclusions that have been reached. The experimental programme has carried out a series of long term experiments looking at anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel or cast iron in compacted MX80 bentonite at 30 deg C or 50 deg C. In the bentonite the concentration of iron decreased with increasing distance away from the iron-bentonite interface, with local iron concentrations as high as 20 wt % in

  9. Review of the interactions between bentonite and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    Properties of bentonite may be significantly affected by reaction with cement. This report reviews the literature to identify the reactions that may occur and considers their effects on the performance of bentonite in these applications. The dominant reactions expected under alkaline conditions prevalent in an underground repository where cement is used extensively are zeolitization, beidellitization, and ion exchange. Zeolitisation will occur at high temperatures (200 o C) or after long periods (500-1000 years) when the pH is high (pH>9). Beidellitization may occur at high pH (pH>9). The silica may reprecipitate in situ due to low hydraulic conductivity or in regions of low pH or temperature. This may result in reduced porosity/permeability and plasticity. Ion exchange reactions are virtually instantaneous. The rate of the reaction depends on the concentration and rate of access of ground water. Substitution of Ca 2+ ions from cement for Na + ions in sodium-bentonites will result in reduced swelling pressure and plasticity, and increased hydraulic conductivity of the bentonite. The effect of Na-bentonite on the properties of cement is the formation of an Al-substituted 11A tobermorite, which results in improved Cs + sorption. In cements reacted with Calcium-bentonite the main product was found to be a hydroxyapatite layer on the cement surface. (author)

  10. Diffusive transport of strontium-85 in sand-bentonite mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillham, R.W.; Robin, M.J.L.; Dytynyshyn, D.J.

    1983-06-01

    Diffusion experiments have been used to determine the transport of 85 Sr in sand-bentonite mixtures. The diffusion experiments were performed on one natural soil (Chalk River sand) and on seven mixtures of bentonite and silica sand, containing from 0 percent to 100 percent bentonite. Two non-reactive solutes ( 36 Cl and 3 H) and one reactive solute ( 85 Sr) were used in the study. The experiments with non-reactive solutes yielded estimates of tortuosity factors. Retardation factors were obtained from experimental porosities, experimental bulk densities, and from batch distribution coefficients (Ksub(d)). These Ksub(d) values are a simple way of describing the solute/medium reaction, and are based on the assumption that the cation-exchange reaction may be described by a linear adsorption isotherm passing through the origin. The results demonstrate that, for practical purposes and for our experimental conditions, the use of the distribution coefficient provides a convenient means of calculating the effective diffusion coefficient for 85 Sr. The porosity and bulk density were also found to have a considerable influence on the effective diffusion coefficient, through the retardation factor. Mixtures containing 5-10 percent bentonite were found to be more effective in retarding 85 Sr than either sand alone, or mixtures containing more bentonite. In the soils of higher bentonite content, the effect of increased cation-exchange capacity was balanced by a decreasing ratio of bulk density to porosity

  11. Chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposites: morphology and mechanical behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, C.R.C.; Melo, F.M.A. de; Vitorino, I.F.; Fook, M.V.L.; Silva, S.M.L.

    2010-01-01

    This study chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposite films were prepared by solution intercalation process, seeking to investigate the effect of the chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 e 10/1) on the morphology and mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposites. It was used as nanophase, Argel sodium bentonite (AN), was provided by Bentonit Uniao Nordeste-BUN (Campina Grande, Brazil) and as biopolymer matrix the chitosan of low molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of 86,7% was supplied by Polymar (Fortaleza, Brazil). The bionanocomposites was investigated by X-ray diffraction and tensile properties. According to the results, the morphology and the mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposite was affected by the ratio of chitosan/bentonite. The chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 and 10/1) indicated the formation of an intercalated nanostructure and of the predominantly exfoliated nanostructure, respectively. And the considerable increases in the resistance to the traction were observed mainly for the bionanocomposite with predominantly exfoliated morphology. (author)

  12. Anaerobic digestion of dairy farm slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, C

    1973-04-01

    Bell described the intermittent operation of a pilot-scale anaerobic digester receiving dilute dairy farm slurry. A 65 to 75 percent reduction of the ''permanganate (COD) value'' could be obtained at 35/sup 0/ and a 60 day detention time. Methane content of the gases ranged between 40 and 70 percent.

  13. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  14. Chemical influence on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of high-density bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellanos, E.; Romero, E.; Lioret, A. [Technical Univ. of Catalonia UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Musso, G. [Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    In radioactive waste disposal schemes, during the operational period of clay barriers, solute transport an d thermal gradients may alter the solute concentration of pore water. These induced changes have important consequences on hydro-mechanical properties and microstructural alterations (mineral composition and pore size distribution changes) of the clay barrier. Chemically induced changes originated by different imbibition fluids and soil mineral compositions have been a subject with a long research tradition. These researches have been mainly focused on the behaviour of reconstituted soils starting from slurry and saturated wit h saline solutions at elevated concentrations, where hydro-mechanical changes (soil compressibility and water permeability changes) are clearly detected. In contrast, available information concerning the response of high-density clays subjected to chemically induced actions with a wide range of pore solution concentrations is very limited in spite of its practical relevance to environmental geotechnics. This situation has been caused, at least in part, by the difficulties in detecting important hydro-mechanical changes when clays with low water storage capacity have been used. Nevertheless, this paper will demonstrate that even in the case of high-density fabrics, considerable changes can be observed when high-activity clays (bentonites) are imbibed with different pore fluid compositions. (authors)

  15. Bio-slurry as fertilizer : is bio-slurry from household digesters a better fertilizer than manure? : a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonten, L.T.C.; Zwart, K.B.; Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Postma, R.; Haas, de M.J.G.; Nysingh, S.L.

    2014-01-01

    In many developing countries manure is anaerobically digested to produce biogas. The residue of manure digestion, bio-slurry, can be used as fertilizer for crop production and aquaculture. This study compared bio-slurry and manure as fertilizers. Nutrients in bio-slurry, especially nitrogen, are

  16. Rheological Characterization of Unusual DWPF Slurry Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2005-01-01

    A study was undertaken to identify and clarify examples of unusual rheological behavior in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulant slurry samples. Identification was accomplished by reviewing sludge, Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product, and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product simulant rheological results from the prior year. Clarification of unusual rheological behavior was achieved by developing and implementing new measurement techniques. Development of these new methods is covered in a separate report, WSRC-TR-2004-00334. This report includes a review of recent literature on unusual rheological behavior, followed by a summary of the rheological measurement results obtained on a set of unusual simulant samples. Shifts in rheological behavior of slurries as the wt. % total solids changed have been observed in numerous systems. The main finding of the experimental work was that the various unusual DWPF simulant slurry samples exhibit some degree of time dependent behavior. When a given shear rate is applied to a sample, the apparent viscosity of the slurry changes with time rather than remaining constant. These unusual simulant samples are more rheologically complex than Newtonian liquids or more simple slurries, neither of which shows significant time dependence. The study concludes that the unusual rheological behavior that has been observed is being caused by time dependent rheological properties in the slurries being measured. Most of the changes are due to the effect of time under shear, but SB3 SME products were also changing properties while stored in sample bottles. The most likely source of this shear-related time dependence for sludge is in the simulant preparation. More than a single source of time dependence was inferred for the simulant SME product slurries based on the range of phenomena observed. Rheological property changes were observed on the time-scale of a single measurement (minutes) as well as on a time scale of hours

  17. Long-term stability of bentonite. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, H.; Karttunen, P.

    2010-07-01

    The long-term thermodynamic stability of the bentonite buffer in the evolving chemical, thermal and hydrological conditions at Olkiluoto has been evaluated by reviewing the relevant experimental data and natural occurrences of bentonite that could serve as analogues for the long-term bentonite stability in the expected repository conditions, especially focussing on mineral transformations due, among others, to thermal effects including cementation. Natural occurrences with stable smectite have been reviewed and compared with Olkiluoto groundwater compositions at present and during the expected hydrogeochemical evolution of the repository. Alteration of the bentonite buffer is expected to be insignificant for natural groundwater conditions at present and for the evolving groundwater conditions at the expected thermal boundary conditions caused by the heat induced from the fuel canisters ( + and SiO 2 and elevated pH due to degradation and dissolution processes. These may alter the conditions in the repository that may favour alteration and cementation processes. The amounts of foreign materials to be used in the repository will be updated along with the progress of the construction. Also the information on their impact on the barriers needs to be evaluated in more detail, including the degradation rate, mobility or dilution of the foreign materials in the repository environment. The exchangeable cation composition of the buffer bentonite is expected to equilibrate with the surrounding groundwater during and after saturation. This process is expected to lead towards Ca-dominant exchangeable cation composition within the montmorillonite interlayer spaces in the buffer. In general it seems that the transformation towards Ca-dominated composition would favour the long-term stability of the buffer as Ca-dominated smectite (compared to Na-dominated type) has larger water retention capacity and anion incorporation to the interlayer space of montmorillonite is more

  18. Customized bentonite pellets. Manufacturing, performance and gap filling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marjavaara, P.; Holt, E.; Sjoeblom, V. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-12-15

    The goal of this work was to provide knowledge about how to manufacture customized bentonite pellets and how customized bentonite pellets perform in practice during the nuclear repository construction process. The project was mainly focused on laboratory experimental tests to optimize the pellet filling by customizing the raw materials and pellet manufacturing. Bentonite pellets were made using both extrusion and roller compaction methods. The pellets were intended for use in gaps between compacted bentonite and the rock walls in both buffer deposition holes and tunnel backfilling. Performance of different types of custom-made pellets were evaluated with regard to their ease of manufacturing, density, crush strength, abrasion resistance, water holding capacity, free swelling and also their thermal conductivity. These evaluations were done in both Finland (by VTT) and Canada (by AECL). Over 50 different varieties of pellets were roller-compaction manufactured at AECL in Canada and 20 types of extrusion pellets at VTT in Finland. The parameters that were varied during manufacturing included: bentonite raw material type, water content, pellet sizes, bentonite compaction machine parameters, use of recycled pellets, and addition of two different types of filler (illite or granitic sand) at varying addition percentages. By examining the pellets produced with these methods and materials the performance and behaviour of the bentonite pellets were evaluated in laboratory with selected tests. The work done using extrusion pellets showed that it was possible to manufacture pellets with higher water contents, up to 21 % from MX-80. This water content value was higher than what was typically possible using roller-compaction method in this study. Higher water content values allow closer compatibility with the designed bentonite buffer water content. The extrusion tests also showed that the required production simulation runs could be made successfully with reference type of MX

  19. Evaluation of permeability and swelling pressure of compacted bentonite using a calcium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Takayoshi; Maeda, Munehiro; Mihara, Morihiro; Tanaka, Masuhiro

    1998-12-01

    Tests to determine the swelling pressure, permeability, compressive strength and elastic modulus of Ca-Na exchanged bentonite, Na-bentonite and Ca-bentonite at the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have mainly used distilled water. However, disposal facilities for TRU waste will use cementateous material for packaging, backfill as well as structural support. In this case, a large amount of calcium will dissolve in groundwater flowing through the cementateous material. Therefore, it is important to investigate the mechanical properties of bentonite in calcium-rich water as part of the disposal research program for TRU waste. In order to understand the effect of the chemical composition of water on the basic mechanical properties of bentonite - part of evaluating the disposal concepts for TRU waste disposal - we tested the permeability of compacted bentonite under saturated conditions using a calcium hydroxide solution. The aqueous solution represents water dominated by the calcium component. Na-bentonite, Ca-Na exchanged bentonite and Ca-bentonite were used for swelling pressure measurement tests and permeability testing. Measures of the maximum and equilibrium swelling pressure as well as permeability we obtained. The dry density of bentonite was varied between tests. Results show that swelling pressure and permeability are dependent on dry density. In separate tests using Ca-bentonite, the bentonite-mixing rate was varied as an independent parameter. Results show that there is little change in the swelling pressure and permeability between tests using calcium hydroxide solution and distilled water for all bentonite types. (author)

  20. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    There are concerns that the bentonite buffer surrounding the canisters with spent nuclear fuel may erode when non-saline groundwaters seep past the buffer. This is known to happen if the water content of ions is below the critical coagulation concentration CCC. Above the CCC the smectite forms a coherent gel, which does not release particles. One main effort in this study has been directed to assess under which conditions the pore water composition of the gel at the gel/water interface could be lower than the CCC. Another main effort has been directed to understanding the behaviour of expansive gel when the pore water is below the CCC. We have developed a Dynamic model for sodium gel expansion in fractures where the gel soaks up non-saline water as it expands. The model is based on a force balance between and on smectite particles, which move in the water. The Dynamic model of gel expansion showing the evolution in time and space of a gel was successfully tested against expansion experiments in test tubes. The expansion was measured with high resolution and in great detail over many months by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The model also predicted the gel expansion through filters with very narrow pores well. A gel viscosity model of dilute gels was derived, which accounts for ion concentration influence as well as the volume fraction of smectite in the gel. The model accounts for the presence of the DDL, which seemingly makes the particles larger so that they interact at lower particle densities. Simulations were performed for a case where the gel expands outward into the fracture that intersects the deposition hole. Fresh groundwater approaches and passes the gel/water interface. Smectite colloids move out into the water due to the repulsive forces between the particle and by Brownian motion (effect included in the Dynamic model). The dilute gel/sol is mobilised and flows downstream in a thin region where the viscosity is low enough to permit flow. Sodium diffuses

  1. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis

    2009-12-01

    There are concerns that the bentonite buffer surrounding the canisters with spent nuclear fuel may erode when non-saline groundwaters seep past the buffer. This is known to happen if the water content of ions is below the critical coagulation concentration CCC. Above the CCC the smectite forms a coherent gel, which does not release particles. One main effort in this study has been directed to assess under which conditions the pore water composition of the gel at the gel/water interface could be lower than the CCC. Another main effort has been directed to understanding the behaviour of expansive gel when the pore water is below the CCC. We have developed a Dynamic model for sodium gel expansion in fractures where the gel soaks up non-saline water as it expands. The model is based on a force balance between and on smectite particles, which move in the water. The Dynamic model of gel expansion showing the evolution in time and space of a gel was successfully tested against expansion experiments in test tubes. The expansion was measured with high resolution and in great detail over many months by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The model also predicted the gel expansion through filters with very narrow pores well. A gel viscosity model of dilute gels was derived, which accounts for ion concentration influence as well as the volume fraction of smectite in the gel. The model accounts for the presence of the DDL, which seemingly makes the particles larger so that they interact at lower particle densities. Simulations were performed for a case where the gel expands outward into the fracture that intersects the deposition hole. Fresh groundwater approaches and passes the gel/water interface. Smectite colloids move out into the water due to the repulsive forces between the particle and by Brownian motion (effect included in the Dynamic model). The dilute gel/sol is mobilised and flows downstream in a thin region where the viscosity is low enough to permit flow. Sodium diffuses

  2. Predicting transport requirements for radioactive-waste slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motyka, T.; Randall, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    A method for predicting the transport requirements of radioactive waste slurries was developed. This method involved preparing nonradioactive sludge slurries chemically similar to the actual high-level waste. The rheological and settling characteristics of these synthetic waste slurries were measured and found to compare favorably with data on actual defense waste slurries. Pressure drop versus flow rate data obtained fom a 2-in. slurry test loop confirmed the Bingham plastic behavior of the slurry observed during viscometry measurements. The pipeline tests, however, yielded friction factors 30 percent lower than those predicted from viscometry data. Differences between the sets of data were attributed to inherent problems in interpreting accurate yield-stress values of slurry suspensions with Couette-type viscometers. Equivalent lengths of fittings were also determined and found to be less than that of water at a specified flow rate

  3. Diffusion in crushed rock and in bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olin, M.

    1994-04-01

    Diffusion theories for porous media with sorption are reviewed to serve as a basis for considering diffusion in simple systems like sand of crushed rock. A Fickian diffusion and linear sorption model is solved both by analytical Laplance transform and Green's function methods and by numerical methods, and then applied to small-scale experiments for Finnish low- and medium-level operating waste repositories. The main properties of bentonite are reviewed. The hydraulic conductivity of compacted bentonite is so low that the major transport mechanism is diffusion. A Fickian diffusion and linear sorption model is applied to bentonite. The main component of bentonite, montmorillonite, has a high ion-exchange capacity and thus, transport in bentonite consists of interactive chemical and diffusion phenomena. A chemical equilibrium model, CHEQ, is developed for ion-exchange reactions in bentonite water systems. CHEQ is applied to some bentonite experiments with success, especially for monovalent ions. The fitted log-binding constants for sodium exchange with potassium, magnesium, and calcium were 0.27, 1.50, and 2.10, respectively. A coupled chemical and diffusion model, CHEQDIFF, is developed to take account of diffusion in pore water, surface diffusion and ion-exchange reactions. The model is applied to the same experiments as CHEQ, and validation is partly successful. In the diffusion case, the above-mentioned values for binding constants are used. The apparent diffusion (both anions and cations) and surface diffusion (only for cations) constants used are 3.0*10 -11 m 2 /s and 6.0*10 -12 m 2 /s, respectively, but these values are questionable, as experimental results good enough for fitting are not available. (orig.). (74 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.)

  4. Thermal properties of bentonite under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasicek, R. [Czech Technical Univ., Centre of Experimental Geotechnics, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2005-07-01

    Centre of Experimental Geotechnics (CEG) deals with the research of the behaviour of bentonite and clays. The measurement of thermal properties is not so frequent test in geotechnical laboratory but in relation to deep repository it is a part which should not be overlooked. The reason is the heat generated by canister with spent nuclear fuel and possible influence of the heat on the materials of the engineered barrier. In the initial stages following the burial of canister with the waste the barrier materials will be exposed to elevated temperature. According to existing information, these temperatures should not exceed 90 C. That heat can induce a creation of cracks and opening of joint between highly compacted blocks. It will predispose the bentonite barrier to penetration of water from surrounding towards to canister. Therefore easy removal of heat through the barrier is required. It is essential that the tests aimed at determining the real values of measured parameters are carried out in conditions identical with those anticipated in a future disposal system. These relatively complicated thermophysical tests are logical continuation of the simple ones, carried out under laboratory temperature and on not fully saturated samples without possibility to measure the swelling pressure. Thermophysical properties and swelling pressure are dominantly influenced by water content (which is influenced by temperature). Therefore is important to realize the tests under different moisture and thermal conditions. These tests are running at the APT-PO1 Analyser, designed to fulfill mentioned requirements - it allows measurement of thermal properties under temperature up to 200 C and swelling pressure up to 20 MPa. The device is capable to register the evolution of temperature, swelling and vapor pressure. The measurement of thermal conductivity and volume heat capacity is realized by the dynamic impulse method with point source of heat. Four types of tests are possible: at

  5. Lake restoration with aluminium, bentonite and Phoslock: the effect on sediment stability and light attenuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Flindt, Mogens

    treatments on aluminium mobility, sediment stability or light climate. A laboratory flume experiment including three shallow Danish lakes was conducted. We measured the effects of aluminium, Phoslock (a commercial product), bentonite, and a combination of bentonite/aluminium. Each treatment caused a varying...... consolidation of the sediment. The largest consolidation occurred using Phoslock- and bentonite-addition followed by bentonite/aluminium-addition, whereas aluminium alone had no effect. Sediment stability thresholds were measured before and after addition. Especially Phoslock, but also bentonite and bentonite....../aluminium increased sediment erosion threshold, with respectively 200%, 43% and 57%. Aluminium, bentonite/aluminium, and Phoslock improved the light conditions in the water phase, with respectively 60%, 57% and 50%, whereas bentonite created higher turbidity. Conclusively aluminium improved the light conditions...

  6. Effect of seawater and high-temperature history on swelling characteristics of bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Kunihiko

    2005-01-01

    In the case of construction of repository for nuclear waste near the coastal area, the effect of seawater on swelling characteristics of bentonite as an engineering as an engineering barrier should be considered. Effects of high-temperature history on swelling characteristics of bentonite should also be considered because nuclear waste generates heat. Thus, in this study, swelling characteristics of bentonite on the conditions of high temperature history and seawater are investigated. The results of this study imply that : (1) Swelling strain of sodium bentonite or transformed sodium bentonite decrease as the salinity of water increases, whereas those of calcium bentonite are not affected by salinity of the water. (2) Quantitative evaluation method for swelling strain and swelling pressure of several kinds of bentonites under brine is proposed. (3) Using distilled water, swelling strain and swelling pressure of sodium bentonite with high-temperature history is less than those without high-temperature history. (author)

  7. Thermic and thermodynamic properties of desorption process of essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukaniev, M.A.; Badalov, A.B.; Sharopov, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    It shown, that desorption process of essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays include by four parts (lines) and the nature between essential oil of Hyssopus seravshanicus from bentonite clays is physical and chemical sorption

  8. Observations of bentonite-hyper-alkaline fluid and bentonite-cement interactions by the X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabayashi, R.; Chino, D.; Kawaragi, C.; Sato, T.; Yoneda, T.; Kaneko, K.; Shibata, S.; Sakamoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite-hyper-alkaline fluid interaction has been a key research issue in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. It has therefore been investigated based on the dissolution rate of smectite (main constituent mineral of bentonite) under such hyper-alkaline condition. Generally, the dissolution rate has been obtained from batch and flow-through experiments under the conditions with high fluid/solid weight rations. These previous studies have provided a contribution to kinetic model of smectite dissolution. Some of them in particularly showed some equations explaining the effect of different factors such as pH of reactive fluid, temperature and deviation from equilibrium on smectite dissolution rate. However, the experimental conditions in such studies were completely different from the conditions in actual radioactive waste disposal system. For quantitative understanding, dissolution experiments for the compacted bentonite have also been conducted. These studies showed that the dissolution rate of compacted bentonite was different from that of batch and flow-through experiments. However, the difference has not been understood in details. On the other hand, the interface between bentonite and cement has also been investigated by experiments in laboratories and field sites, via reaction transport modelling. Despite the very few in numbers of experimental results as function of time, there are many long-term modelling works intended for bentonite-cement interaction. The models developed by many authors should be verified by comparing results of the model calculations with experimental observations. The experimental results with different conditions are therefore necessary for verifications and comparisons. Even in the experimental works done previously, the alteration process at the interface has mainly been observed by EPMA. EPMA is a destructive analysis with lower time resolution for 2D images

  9. Radioassay of vitamin B-12 employing bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, N.; Fries, J.E.; Richards, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Radioassay for vitamin B-12 using the unknown quantity of non-radioactive vitamin B-12 released from serum mixed with the radioactivity of a known quantity of radioactive vitamin B-12 tracer. A solution of intrinsic factor having a binding capacity less than the quantity of serum vitamin B-12 and radioactive vitamin B-12 is used to bind a portion of the vitamin B-12 mixture. The vitamin B-12 not bound to intrinsic factor is removed by addition of a bentonite-containing tablet. The quantity of radioactive vitamin B-12 bound to intrinsic factor is compared with standard values and the unknown serum vitamin B-12 obtained. In the steps of the procedure the acid assay medium is pre-combined with the radioactive tracer so that the radioactive vitamin B-12 tracer receives the same treatment as serum vitamin B-12. Certain of the other reagent solutions are pre-combined and the concentration of the components adjusted so that the volume used of each of these other reagent solutions is the same in different assay steps. Thus, fewer pipetting steps are necessary. 7 claims, 1 drawing figure

  10. Analysis of corrosion products of carbon steel in wet bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, K.; Nagano, T.; Kozai, N.; Nakashima, S.; Nakayama, S.; Muraoka, S.

    1991-01-01

    The following conclusions were obtained; (1) At 40degC, the average corrosion rate of SS41 carbon steel in wet bentonite was 0.025 mm/y. This is smaller than the value of 0.042 mm/y obtained in pure water at 40degC. However, at 95degC, the corrosion rate of SS41 carbon steel in wet bentonite was 0.27 mm/y, which is much larger than that in pure water at 95degC. (2) At 95degC, γ-FeO(OH) (lepidocrocite) was formed only in wet bentonite, and it was absent in pure water. Evaporation of moisture resulted in the formation of partial covering of bentonite, which promoted local corrosion. Consequently, γ-FeO(OH) was considered to be formed. (3) In wet bentonite at 95degC, α-Fe 2 O 3 (hematite) can be identified by means of colorimetry. The color of corrosion products is orangish, indicating the contribution of α-Fe 2 O 3 in iron hydroxides. (author)

  11. Tracer diffusion in compacted, water-saturated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Compacted Na-bentonite clay barriers, widely used in the isolation of solid-waste landfills and other contaminated sites, have been proposed for a similar use in the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Molecular diffusion through the pore space in these barriers plays a key role in their performance, thus motivating recent measurements of the apparent diffusion coefficient tensor of water tracers in compacted, water-saturated Na-bentonites. In the present study, we introduce a conceptual model in which the pore space of water-saturated bentonite is divided into 'macropore' and 'interlayer nanopore' compartments. With this model we determine quantitatively the relative contributions of pore-network geometry (expressed as a geometric factor) and of the diffusive behavior of water molecules near montmorillonite basal surfaces(expressed as a contrastivity factor) to the apparent diffusion coefficient tensor. Our model predicts, in agreement with experiment, that the mean principal value of the apparent diffusion coefficient tensor follows a single relationship when plotted against the partial montmorillonite dry density (mass of montmorillonite per combined volume of montmorillonite and pore space). Using a single fitted parameter, the mean principal geometric factor, our model successfully describes this relationship for a broad range of bentonite-water system, from dilute gel to highly-compacted bentonite with 80 percent of its pore water in interlayer nanopores

  12. Iodine sorption of bentonite - radiometric and polarographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konirova, R.; Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Ernestova, M.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments focused on kinetics of iodine retardation on bentonite, influence of aqueous phase pH, buffering properties of bentonite, etc. were carried out by batch method. Distribution coefficient KD was the criterion applied for evaluation of iodine interaction with solid phase. High sorption potential of bentonite to cationic forms of various radionuclides, resulting from relatively high cation exchange capacity, is generally known. On the other hand the inorganic anions are not adsorbed strongly to mineral surface of clays thus uptake of iodine (occurring mainly at iodide (I - ) or iodate (IO 3 - ) form under oxoic conditions) is limited. The distribution coefficients of iodine anions' sorption on bentonite R reach order of magnitude 10 -1 mL/g. In order to increase the sorption capacity of the solid phase, several additives were added to bentonite. Most of them didn't provide satisfactory results except of the addition of activated carbon, which has high surface area. Electromigration and polarographic methods were used for investigation of the redox state of iodine in aqueous phase and determination of KD values as well. Acquired results were compared with data obtained by radiometric measurements. (authors)

  13. Hydrothermal alkaline stability of bentonite barrier by concrete interstitial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey Jimenez, S.; Cuevas Rodriguez, J.; Ramirez Martin, S.; Vigil de la villa Mencia, R.; Martin Barca, M.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all the steps of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR) based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the waste is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barriers. Two of the engineering barriers in the Spanish design of DGR in granitic rock are compacted bentonite and concrete. The bentonite barrier is the backfilling and sealing material for the repository gallery, because of its mechanical and physico-chemical properties. The main qualities of concrete as a component of a multi barrier system are its low permeability, mechanical resistance and chemical properties. With regard to chemical composition of concrete, the alkaline nature of cement pore water lowers the solubility of many radioactive elements. However, structural transformation in smectite, dissolution or precipitation of minerals and, consequently, changes in the bentonite properties could occurs in the alkaline conditions generated by the cement degradation. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the effect of concrete in the stability of Spanish reference bentonite (La Serrata of Nijar, Almeria, Spain) in conditions similar to those estimated in a DGR in granitic rock. Because of the main role of bentonite barrier in the global performance of the repository, the present study is essential to guarantee its security. (Author)

  14. Diffusion, sorption, and retardation processes of anions in bentonite and organo-bentonites for multibarrier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schampera, Birgit; Dultz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The low permeability, high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and plasticity of bentonites favor their use in multibarrier systems of waste deposits [1]. Bentonites have a high CEC but their ability to sorb anions is very low. There is, however, need for retardation of anions and organic pollutants in many applications. Bentonites, modified with certain organic cations, have the capacity to sorb anions and non-polar organic compounds in addition to cations. Investigations on organically modified clays address a wide variety of applications including immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils, waste water treatment and in situ placement for the protection of ground water [2]. Many experiments on anion and cation sorption of organo-clays were conducted in the batch mode which does not reflect solid-liquid ratios and material densities in barrier systems. Diffusion experiments on compacted clays allow the evaluation of transport processes and sorption of pollutants at conditions relevant for repositories. For organo-clays only few diffusion studies are published e.g. [3] measured the diffusion of tritium and [4] the diffusion of H2O in bentonite and organo-bentonites. The organic cation hexadecylpyridinium (HDPy) was added to Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) in amounts corresponding to 2-400 % of the CEC. The uptake of organic cations was determined by the C-content, XRD and IR-spectroscopy. Wettability was analyzed by the contact angle. Physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of clays were characterized. Diffusion experiments were carried out in situ in a cell attached to the ATR-unit of a FTIR-spectrometer. For H2O-diffusion the compacted organo-clays are saturated first with D2O, afterwards H2O is supplied to the surface at the top of the clay platelet. Anion-diffusion was conducted with NO3--solution instead of H2O only having characteristic IR band positions at 1350 cm-1. Three different concentrations (0.25M, 0.5M and 1M) were used. Additional batch

  15. Evaluation for swelling characteristics of buffer and backfill materials for high-level nuclear waste disposal. Influence of sand-bentonite content and cation compositions in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Ogata, Nobuhide

    1999-01-01

    Compacted bentonite and sand-bentonite mixture are attracting greater attention as buffer and backfill materials for disposal pits and access tunnels in the underground facilities for repositories of high-level nuclear waste. Buffer and backfill materials must have the swelling characteristics and are expected to fill up the space between these materials and surrounding ground by swelling. This role is called as 'Self-sealing'. To design the specifications, such as dry density, bentonite content and size, of buffer and backfill materials for the disposal facilities of high-level nuclear wastes described above, we must evaluate the swelling characteristics of compacted bentonite and sand-bentonite mixtures. For this purpose, this study proposed the evaluation formula for swelling characteristics of buffer and backfill materials containing bentonite. This study derived new equations for evaluating the relationship between the swelling deformation of compacted bentonite and sand-bentonite mixtures, and the swelling behavior of montmorillonite minerals, which are swelling clay minerals. This study also proposed new equations for evaluating the ion compositions of bentonite, ion concentration of pore water and the specific surface of bentonite, which significantly influence the swelling characteristics of buffer and backfill materials. The evaluation formula proposed in this study is presented by combining the above-mentioned new equations with theoretical equations, of which are the Gouy-Chapman diffuse double layer theory and the van der Waals force, of repulsive and attractive forces of montmorillonite minerals. (author)

  16. Environmental Consequences of Pig Slurry Treatment Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ten Hoeve, Marieke

    occur during manure storage and after field application. The main emissions are ammonia, nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nitrate, phosphorus and odour. Slurry treatment technologies have been and are being developed in order to reduce the environmental impacts of manure. However, it is important...... and excluding biogenic carbon, marine and freshwater eutrophication potential, terrestrial acidification and eutrophication potential, and fossil resource depletion potential. The different types of treatment technologies showed varying environmental profiles, meaning that one type of technology was beneficial...... technology, or co-substrate for anaerobic digestion). With respect to odorous emissions, an LCIA method was developed, but due to a lack of data it proved difficult to include odour in LCA. Regulations appear to have an influence on the environmental impacts of slurry treatment. A decrease in N application...

  17. Pump transients in FGD slurry systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce-Campos, C.D., Thoy, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the start-up transient of a limestone slurry system used for a power plant scrubber is discussed. Particular characteristics of these kind of systems are pointed out and incorporated into an ad-hoc numerical model. Three possible start-up scenarios are discussed and compared with field experimental data. The results illustrate well the importance of air pocket purging prior to system start-up

  18. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  19. Engineering properties of nuclear waste slurries - 16378

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, Simon; Fairweather, Michael; Hunter, Timothy; Omokanye, Qanitalillahi; Peakall, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The type of particulate systems encountered in legacy nuclear waste slurries is highly complicated, with the aggregation and flow behaviour being at times very variable. However, deconstructing the complex overall slurry activity to singular particle-particle interactions can lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved with particle aggregation, and so to predictions of their settling and flow in nuclear systems. Of particular importance to legacy waste is the role of salts in controlling the attraction of particles (and so in dictating the rheological properties of the system) as sludge may contain a variety of specific ions and generally have high ionic conductivity [1]. In this paper, particle-particle interactions are characterised using a number of complimentary methods, and their influence on resulting flow and bed compression is measured. The methods used to characterise the particle-particle interactions under various salt and pH conditions were electro-acoustic analysis (zeta potential) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Following on from the analysis of particle-particle properties, bulk sediment behaviour was investigated using shear and compressive yield stress measurements, vital parameters in dictating flow and dewatering performance, respectively. Together, these techniques enable the characterisation of a range of particulate systems that may be encountered in legacy wastes, and results point to a number of important factors that can help explain the observed variability in industrial slurry behaviour. (authors)

  20. Slurry explosive containing an improved thickening agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakazono, Y.; Otsuka, Y.

    1970-08-18

    A slurry explosive having stable physical properties and a thickening agent which when blended with a slurry explosive, maintains it in a uniform and stable state as a good suspended dispersion condition over a long period of time, are described. The slurry explosive has a composition consisting essentially of ammonium nitrate, or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and an alkali metal nitrate, or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and an alkaline earth metal nitrate, or a mixture of ammonium nitrate and an alkali metal nitrate and an alkaline earth metal nitrate, at least one member selected from the group consisting of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, aluminum, smokeless powder and fuels, and water, 0.1 to 2.0% guar gum, not more than 0.3% of a borate or borates, and/or not more than 20% of hexamethylene tetramine, and 0.02 to 2.0% of an antimony compound or compounds, all percents being by weight. (6 claims)

  1. Evaluation of bentonite alteration due to interactions with iron. Sensitivity analyses to identify the important factors for the bentonite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Wilson, James; Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Performance assessment of geological disposal systems for high-level radioactive waste requires a consideration of long-term systems behaviour. It is possible that the alteration of swelling clay present in bentonite buffers might have an impact on buffer functions. In the present study, iron (as a candidate overpack material)-bentonite (I-B) interactions were evaluated as the main buffer alteration scenario. Existing knowledge on alteration of bentonite during I-B interactions was first reviewed, then the evaluation methodology was developed considering modeling techniques previously used overseas. A conceptual model for smectite alteration during I-B interactions was produced. The following reactions and processes were selected: 1) release of Fe 2+ due to overpack corrosion; 2) diffusion of Fe 2+ in compacted bentonite; 3) sorption of Fe 2+ on smectite edge and ion exchange in interlayers; 4) dissolution of primary phases and formation of alteration products. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the most important factors for the alteration of bentonite by I-B interactions. (author)

  2. Migration Behaviour of Strontium in Czech Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Baborova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with sorption and diffusion behaviour of strontium in Czech bentonite B75. The study is a part of a research on reactive transport of radioactive contaminants in barrier materials of a deep geological repository of radioactive waste in the Czech Republic. Series of sorption and diffusion experiments with Sr and non-activated Ca bentonite B75 produced in the Czech Republic were performed in two background solutions (CaCl2 and NaCl. On the basis of sorption batch experiments the kinetics of strontium sorption on bentonite was assessed and the sorption isotherms for various experimental conditions were obtained. As a result of performed diffusion experiments the parameters of diffusion (i.e. effective diffusion coefficient De and apparent diffusion coefficient Da were determined. The observed discrepancies between sorption characteristics obtained from the sorption and diffusion experiments are discussed.

  3. Decantation time of evaluation on bentonite clays fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, J.; Menezes, R.R.; Neves, G.A.; Lira, H.L; Santana, L.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite clays present a great number of industrial uses, from petroleum to pharmaceutics and cosmetic industry. The bentonite clay present particles with very fine particles that is responsible by the vast application of these materials. However, commercial clays present wide particle size distribution and a significant content of impurities, particularly quartz, in the form of silt and fine silt. So, the aim of this work is to analyze the effect of the stirring and decantation time in the deagglomeration, purification and size separation of the bentonite clay particles from Paraiba. The clays were characterized by X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. Based on the results it was observed the decantation time give the elimination of the agglomerates formed by submicrometric particles. The uses of decantation column give separation of the fraction below 200nm. (author)

  4. Effect of organic matter on 125I diffusion in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Wu; Qing Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Through-diffusion method was conducted to investigate the diffusion behavior of 125 I in bentonite in present of organic matter, such as polyaminopolycarboxylate EDTA, oxalic acid, hydrazine and humic acid HA. The effective diffusion coefficient D e value and rock capacity factor α were (2.32.6) × 10 -11 m 2 /s and 0.040-0.052, respectively. The small difference showed that iodine was preferentially associated with silicoaluminate mineral as an inorganic form. In present of HA, the D a value of 125 I was almost two orders of magnitude higher than that of HA and humic substances HS. The D e and α derived from the experiments were used to simulate its diffusion in the designed bentonite obstacle of high-level radioactive waste repository and the results showed that 125 I can be transported from 30 to 50 cm thickness of bentonite to the far-field of repository in several years. (author)

  5. Organophilization process of Brazilian bentonite for preparation of polymeric nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos I.R. de; Rocha, Marisa C.G.; Ferreira, Joao L.A.N.G.

    2015-01-01

    Bentonite clay from the municipality of Cubati, PB, was used for the preparation of an organophilic clay. First, the clay was treated with sodium chloride to obtain the homo-ionic sodium clay. The organoclay was, then, obtained from the reaction of homo-ionic clay with the quaternary ammonium salt, cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride. The natural clay and the modified clays were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The chemical analysis showed a decrease in the concentration of the majority of the metallic oxides when the bentonite was organophilizated. This result is characteristic of the metal cation exchange process by organic salt molecules. The X-ray diffraction confirmed the intercalation among the layers of the clay. The results obtained by FTIR showed the presence of the characteristic groups of the salt in the clay, thus confirming the obtaining of organophilic bentonite. (author)

  6. Database on gas migration tests through bentonite buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanai, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    Carbon steel is a candidate material for an overpack for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Japan. The corrosion of the carbon steel overpack in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions will cause the generation of hydrogen gas, which may affect hydrological and mechanical properties of the bentonite buffer. To evaluate such an effect of gas generation, it is necessary to develop a model of gas migration through bentonite buffer material taking account of data obtained from experiments. The gas migration experiments under both unsaturated and saturated conditions have been carried out to clarify the fundamental characteristics of bentonite for gas migration. This report compiles the experimental data obtained from gas migration tests for buffer material which has been conducted by JAEA until December, 2007. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  7. Microstructural modifications induced by hydraulic and mechanical actions on compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, E.; Suriol, J.; Lloret, A.; Castellanos, E.; Villar, M.V.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The hydration of bentonite generates microstructural changes that modify both its hydraulic and mechanical properties. As a consequence, the evolution of porosity and microstructure influence greatly the hydration transient state. Measurements and observations at this microstructural level are very important, since they help in further understanding higher structural levels and their consequences on material properties and behaviour under various hydro-mechanical stress state conditions. To accomplish the complex issue of microstructural studies, several techniques have to be applied. A very useful technique for the quantitative study at the microscale is mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), since the range of pore diameters that can be examined (from 6 nm to 400 μm) is very wide. The influence of various mechanical (loading) and hydraulic (wetting / drying) stress paths on the pore size distribution of compacted bentonite was analysed. Some of the conclusions reached are: - The pore size distribution is clearly bi-modal. The dominant values are 10 nm, which would correspond to the pores inside clay aggregates that are not affected by the magnitude of the compaction load, and a larger pore size, which depends on compaction degree and ranges from 20 μm (for ρd=1.68 g/cm 3 ) to 30 μm (for ρd = 1.4 g/cm 3 ). These larger voids would correspond to the inter-granular pores. The boundary between the two pore size families is around 150-200 nm. The same pattern is found irrespective of the clay water content. - There exists a significant pore volume into which the mercury cannot penetrate because it corresponds to pores smaller than 6 nm, and it is the same irrespective of the density of the specimens. - The inter-granular pores disappear when a clay slurry is compacted. - After wetting of compacted samples, the hindered and latent inter-aggregate pore size mode emerges (350 and 1100 nm). Simultaneously, and as a

  8. Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer results of PUSKURI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olin, M.; Rasilainen, K.; Itaelae, A.

    2011-08-01

    In the report main results form a KYT2010 programme's project Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer (PUSKURI) are presented. In THC modelling, Aku Itaelae made and published his Master of Science Thesis. Itaelae was able to successfully model the LOT-experiment. Additionally, he also listed problems and development proposals for THC-modelling of bentonite buffer. VTT and Numerola created in collaboration a model coupling saturation, diffusion and cation exchange; the model was implemented and tested in Numerrin, COMSOL and TOUGHREACT. Petri Jussila's PhD THM-model was implemented into COMSOL to facilitate further development. At GTK, the mineralogical characterisation of bentonite was planned. The previous THM model (Jussila's model) including only small deformations was successfully generalized to finite deformations in way at least formally preserving the original formalism. It appears that the theory allows also a possibility to include finite plastic deformations in the theory. In order to measure the relevant mechanical properties of compacted bentonite, two different experiments, namely hydrostatic compression experiment and one-dimensional compression experiment were designed. In the hydrostatic compression experiment, a cylindrical sample of compacted bentonite covered with liquid rubber coating is placed in the sample chamber equipped with a piston. The same device was also used in one-dimensional compression experiment. X-ray microtomographic techniques were used in order to study the basic mechanisms of water transport in bentonite. The preliminary results indicate that in the present experimental set-up, water transport is dominated by a dispersive mechanism such as diffusion of vapour in gas phase or diffusion of water in solid phase. (orig.)

  9. Low frequency aeration of pig slurry affects slurry characteristics and emissions of greenhouse gases and ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Salvador; Hunt, John; Misselbrook, Tom H

    2017-07-01

    Low frequency aeration of slurries may reduce ammonia (NH 3 ) and methane (CH 4 ) emissions without increasing nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions. The aim of this study was to quantify this potential reduction and to establish the underlying mechanisms. A batch experiment was designed with 6 tanks with 1 m 3 of pig slurry each. After an initial phase of 7 days when none of the tanks were aerated, a second phase of 4 weeks subjected three of the tanks to aeration (2 min every 6 h, airflow 10 m 3  h -1 ), whereas the other three tanks remained as a control. A final phase of 9 days was established with no aeration in any tank. Emissions of NH 3 , CH 4 , carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and N 2 O were measured. In the initial phase no differences in emissions were detected, but during the second phase aeration increased NH 3 emissions by 20% with respect to the controls (8.48 vs. 7.07 g m -3  [slurry] d -1 , P emissions were 40% lower in the aerated tanks (2.04 vs. 3.39 g m -3  [slurry] d -1 , P emissions remained after the aeration phase had finished. No effect was detected for CO 2 , and no relevant N 2 O emissions were detected during the experiment. Our results demonstrate that low frequency aeration of stored pig slurry increases slurry pH and increases NH 3 emissions.

  10. Availability of phosphorus in cow slurry using isotopic labelling technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongsakul, P.; Bertelsen, F.; Gissel-Nielsen, G.

    1988-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of cow slurry on P uptake by corn and to estimate the readily available P in the slurry by using an isotopic labelling techique. Water-soluble P in soil was increased and isotopic equilibrium of available P was attained after labelled slurry was mixed thoroughly throughout the soil. Labelled slurry applied at planting increased the P uptake by corn, whereas the same amount applied one week before harvest did not affect the P uptake. It was estimated that 46-54% of the total P uptake in plants is derived from the slurry. The readily available P (the L-value) in the slurry was at least 26 mg/kg which equals 3.7% of the total P. (author)

  11. Biogas slurry pricing method based on nutrient content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-ai; Guo, Honghai; Yang, Zhengtao; Xin, Shurong

    2017-11-01

    In order to promote biogas-slurry commercialization, A method was put forward to valuate biogas slurry based on its nutrient contents. Firstly, element contents of biogas slurry was measured; Secondly, each element was valuated based on its market price, and then traffic cost, using cost and market effect were taken into account, the pricing method of biogas slurry were obtained lastly. This method could be useful in practical production. Taking cattle manure raw meterial biogas slurry and con stalk raw material biogas slurry for example, their price were 38.50 yuan RMB per ton and 28.80 yuan RMB per ton. This paper will be useful for recognizing the value of biogas projects, ensuring biogas project running, and instructing the cyclic utilization of biomass resources in China.

  12. Characterization of bentonite clay from “Greda” deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadežda Stanković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mineralogical and technological investigations of the deposit “Greda” important characteristics of bentonite clay were determined. Representative samples of the deposit were characterized with X-ray diffraction, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that the main mineral is montmorillonite and in subordinate quantities kaolinite, quartz and pyrite. The chemical composition generally shows high silica and alumina contents in all samples and small quantities of Fe3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations. Based on technological and mineralogical research, bentonite from this deposit is a high-quality raw material for use in the ceramic industry.

  13. Evaluation of phenomena affecting diffusion of cations in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1995-04-01

    In a number of diffusion studies, contradictions between the apparent diffusivities of cations and their distribution coefficients in bentonite have been found. Two principal reasons have been offered as explanations for this discrepancy; diffusion of the sorbed cations, often called surface diffusion, and the decrease of sorption in compacted clay compared to a sorption value obtained from a batch experiment. In the study the information available from the literature on sorption-diffusion mechanisms of cations in bentonite has been compiled and re-interpreted in order to improve the understanding of the diffusion process. (103 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.)

  14. Thermal conductivity tests on buffermasses of bentonite/silt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutsson, S.

    1977-09-01

    The investigation concerns the thermal conductivity of the bentonite/quartz buffer mass suggested as embedding substance for radioactive canisters. The first part presents the theoretical relationships associated with the various heat transfer mechanisms in moist granular materials. Chapter 3 describes the author's experimental determination of the thermal conductivity of the buffer mass. The tested mass consisted of 10 percent (by weight) bentonite and 90 percent natural silt. Four tests were made with different water content values and degree of water saturation. A comparison between the measured and calculated thermal conductivities is given. It is shown that the conductivity can be calculated with an accuracy of +-20 percent. (author)

  15. Structure and forces in bentonite MX-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, Bo; Aakesson, Torbjoern; Joensson, Bengt; Meehdi, Segad; Janiak, John; Wallenberg, Reine

    2009-03-01

    Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) and its ion exchanged forms, Na and Ca montmorillonite, have been studied experimentally and theoretically. A variety of experimental techniques have been used in order to gain insight into the structural conditions in dry clay as well as clay in equilibrium with a bulk solution of given ionic composition. The main objective has been the swelling behaviour and osmotic pressure of montmorillonite clay when the bulk solution contains a mix of monovalent sodium and divalent calcium ions. For a clay system in equilibrium with pure water, Monte Carlo simulations predict a large swelling when the clay counterions are monovalent, while in presence of divalent counterions a limited swelling is predicted with an aqueous layer between the clay lamellaes of about 1 nm. This latter result is in excellent agreement with small angle x-ray scattering data, but in disagreement with dialysis experiments, which gives a significantly larger swelling for Ca montmorillonite in pure water. Obviously, there is one lamellar swelling and a second 'extra-lamellar' swelling, which could be the result of a phase separation in the clay. Montmorillonite in contact with a salt reservoir with both Na + and Ca 2+ counterions will only show a modest swelling unless the sodium concentration in the bulk is several orders of magnitude larger than the calcium concentration. The limited swelling of clay in presence of divalent counterions is a consequence of ion-ion correlations, which reduce the entropic repulsion as well as give rise to an attractive component in the total osmotic pressure. Ion-ion correlations also favour divalent counterions in a situation where we have a competition with monovalent ones. A more fundamental result of ion-ion correlations is that the osmotic pressure as a function of clay sheet separation becomes nonmonotonic, which indicates the possibility of a phase separation into a concentrated and a dilute clay phase. This phenomenon could explain the

  16. Heterogeneous ice slurry flow and concentration distribution in horizontal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jihong; Zhang, Tengfei; Wang, Shugang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A Mixture CFD model is applied to describe heterogeneous ice slurry flow. • The ice slurry rheological behavior is considered piecewise. • The coupled flow and concentration profiles in heterogeneous slurry flow is acquired. • The current numerical model achieves good balance between precision and universality. -- Abstract: Ice slurry is an energy-intensive solid–liquid mixture fluid which may play an important role in various cooling purposes. Knowing detailed flow information is important from the system design point of view. However, the heterogeneous ice slurry flow makes it difficult to be quantified due to the complex two phase flow characteristic. The present study applies a Mixture computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on different rheological behavior to characterize the heterogeneous ice slurry flow. The Mixture CFD model was firstly validated by three different experiments. Then the validated Mixture CFD model was applied to solve the ice slurry isothermal flow by considering the rheological behavior piecewise. Finally, the numerical solutions have displayed the coupled flow information, such as slurry velocity, ice particle concentration and pressure drop distribution. The results show that, the ice slurry flow distribution will appear varying degree of asymmetry under different operating conditions. The rheological behavior will be affected by the asymmetric flow distributions. When mean flow velocity is high, Thomas equation can be appropriate for describing ice slurry viscosity. While with the decreasing of mean flow velocity, the ice slurry behaves Bingham rheology. As compared with experimental pressure drop results, the relative errors of numerical computation are almost within ±15%. The Mixture CFD model is validated to be an effective model for describing heterogeneous ice slurry flow and could supply plentiful flow information

  17. Method of transporting radioactive slurry-like wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, K; Yusa, H; Sugimoto, Y

    1975-06-30

    The object is to prevent blockage of a transporting tube to positively and effectively transport radioactive slurry wastes. A method of transporting radioactive slurry-like wastes produced in an atomic power plant, wherein liquid wastes produced in the power plant are diluted to form into a driving liquid, by which said radioactive slurry-like wastes are transported within the pipe, and said driving liquid is recovered as the liquid waste.

  18. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  19. System and method for continuous solids slurry depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leininger, Thomas Frederick; Steele, Raymond Douglas; Cordes, Stephen Michael

    2017-07-11

    A system includes a first pump having a first outlet and a first inlet, and a controller. The first pump is configured to continuously receive a flow of a slurry into the first outlet at a first pressure and to continuously discharge the flow of the slurry from the first inlet at a second pressure less than the first pressure. The controller is configured to control a first speed of the first pump against the flow of the slurry based at least in part on the first pressure, wherein the first speed of the first pump is configured to resist a backflow of the slurry from the first outlet to the first inlet.

  20. State of the art on phase change material slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, Ziad; Delahaye, Anthony; Huang Li; Trinquet, François; Fournaison, Laurence; Pollerberg, Clemens; Doetsch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A bibliographic study on PCM slurries. ► Clathrate Hydrate slurry, Microencapsulated PCM Slurry, shape-stabilized PCM slurries and Phase Change Material Emulsions. ► Formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfers properties and applications of these four PCS systems. ► The use of thermal energy storage and distribution based on PCM slurries can improve the refrigerating machine performances. - Abstract: The interest in using phase change slurry (PCS) media as thermal storage and heat transfer fluids is increasing and thus leading to an enhancement in the number of articles on the subject. In air-conditioning and refrigeration applications, PCS systems represent a pure benefit resulting in the increase of thermal energy storage capacity, high heat transfer characteristics and positive phase change temperatures which can occur under low pressures. Hence, they allow the increase of energy efficiency and reduce the quantity of thermal fluids. This review describes the formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfer properties and applications of four PCS systems: Clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS), Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials Slurry (MPCMS), shape-stabilized PCM slurries (SPCMSs) and Phase Change Material Emulsions (PCMEs). It regroups a bibliographic summary of important information that can be very helpful when such systems are used. It also gives interesting and valuable insights on the choice of the most suitable PCS media for laboratory and industrial applications.

  1. Strength and Compaction Analysis of Sand-Bentonite-Coal Ash Mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobti, Jaskiran; Singh, Sanjay Kumar

    2017-08-01

    This paper deals with the strength and compaction characteristics of sand-bentonite-coal ash mixes prepared by varying percentages of sand, bentonite and coal ash to be used in cutoff walls and as a liner or cover material in landfills. The maximum dry density (MDD) and optimum moisture content (OMC) of sand-bentonite mixes and sand-bentonite-coal ash mixes were determined by conducting the standard proctor test. Also, the strength and stiffness characteristics of soil mixes were furnished using unconfined compressive strength test. The results of the study reveal influence of varying percentages of coal ash and bentonite on the compaction characteristics of the sand-bentonite-coal ash mixes. Also, validation of a statistical analysis of the correlations between maximum dry density (MDD), optimum moisture content (OMC) and Specific Gravity (G) was done using the experimental results. The experimental results obtained for sand-bentonite, sand-bentonite-ash and coal ash-bentonite mixes very well satisfied the statistical relations between MDD, OMC and G with a maximum error in the estimate of MDD being within ±1 kN/m3. The coefficient of determination (R2) ranged from 0.95 to 0.967 in case of sand-bentonite-ash mixes. However, for sand-bentonite mixes, the R2 values are low and varied from 0.48 to 0.56.

  2. Numerical simulation of alteration of sodium bentonite by diffusion of ionic groundwater components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-12-01

    Experiments measuring the movement of trace amounts of radionuclides through compacted bentonite have typically used unaltered bentonite. Models based on experiments such as these may not lead to accurate predictions of the migration through altered or partially altered bentonite of radionuclides that undergo ion exchange. To address this problem, we have modified an existing transport code to include ion exchange and aqueous complexation reactions. The code is thus able to simulate the diffusion of major ionic groundwater components through bentonite and reactions between the bentonite and groundwater. Numerical simulations have been made to investigate the conversion of sodium bentonite to calcium bentonite for a reference groundwater characteristic of deep granitic formations. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Luo Taian; Zhu Guoping; Chen Qingchun

    2007-12-01

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  4. Study on the properties of Gaomiaozi bentonite as the buffer/backfilling materials for HLW disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaodong, Liu [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China); [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Resources and Environment of Ministry of Education, Fuzhou (China); Taian, Luo; Guoping, Zhu; Qingchun, Chen [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China)

    2007-12-15

    Systematic studies including mineral composition and structure, physico- chemical properties and thermal properties have been conducted on Gaomiaozi bentonite, Xinghe County, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The compaction characteristics of bentonite and the influence of additive to bentonite have been discussed. The analysis of mineral composition and structure show that the bentonite ores are dominated by montmorillonite. Preliminary studies of the characteristics of ores indicated that No-type bentonite from the deposit has good absorption, excellent swelling and high cation exchangeability. The compressibility of bentonite will be improved by adding the additives such as quartz sand. The studies indicated that the characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite can satisfy the requirement of buffer/backfilling materials for HLW repository and the ores can be selected as the preferential candidate to provide buffer/backfill- ing materials for HLW repository in China. (authors)

  5. Pore water chemistry of Rokle Bentonite (Czech Republic)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervinka, R.; Vejsada, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. With inflowing the groundwater to Deep Geological Repository (DGR), the interaction of this water with engineering barrier materials will alter both, barrier materials and also the groundwater. One of the most important alterations represents the formation of bentonite pore water that will affect a number of important processes, e.g. corrosion of waste package materials, solubility of radionuclides, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides. The composition of bentonite pore water is influenced primarily by the composition of solid phase (bentonite), liquid phase (inflowing groundwater), the gaseous phase (partial pressure of CO 2 ), bentonite compaction and the rate of groundwater species diffusion through bentonite. Also following processes have to be taken into account: dissolution of admixtures present in the bentonite (particularly well soluble salts, e.g. KCl, NaCl, gypsum), ion exchange process and protonation and deprotonation of surface hydroxyl groups on clay minerals. Long-term stability of mineral phases and possible mineral transformation should not be neglected as well. In the Czech Republic, DGR concept takes local bentonite into account as material for both buffer and backfill. The candidate bentonite comes from the Rokle deposit (NW Bohemia) and represents complex mixture of (Ca,Mg)-Fe-rich montmorillonite, micas, kaolinite and other mineral admixtures (mainly Ca, Mg, Fe carbonates, feldspars and iron oxides). The mineralogical and chemical characteristics were published previously. This bentonite is different in composition and properties from worldwide studied Na-bentonite (e.g. MX-80, Volclay) or Na-Ca bentonite (e.g. Febex). This fact leads to the need of investigation of Rokle bentonite in greater detail to verify its suitability as a buffer and backfill in DGR. Presented task is focused on the study of pore water evolution. Our approach for this study consists in modeling the pore water using

  6. The application of bentonite in the atomic energy field and some research results of the sorption of uranium on Vietnam bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Than Van Lien; Do Qui Son; Le Thi Kim Dung

    2008-01-01

    The properties of bentonite can be summarised as follows: low gas permeability, low hydraulic conductivity, high radionuclide retardation capacity, high swelling potential, that is why bentonite has been widely used in the atomic energy fields in many countries all over the world. Vietnam has bentonite deposits that is exploited and used in some fields. In order to use bentonite - available and abandon resources in our country for atomic energy many research activities on the field of bentonite applications have been carried out in Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements and Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. In this content, this article introduces the application of bentonite in radioactive waste management and treatment fields (bentonite used as barrier in the deep repository for spent nuclear fuel, as barriers in landfills to prevent contamination of soil and groundwater by leachates containing radioactive, bentonite is also used as sorbent for nuclear reactor activation products (Co, Cr in the waste effluents). At the some time it is present some research results of the sorption of uranium on Vietnamese bentonite. (author)

  7. Glucose Oxidase Immobilization on TMAH-Modified Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Chrisnasari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bentonite modification by tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH on its capability to immobilize glucose oxidase (GOX was studied. Modification of bentonite was conducted by the adding of 0-5% (v/v TMAH. The observed results show that the different concentrations of TMAH affect the percentage of immobilized enzyme. The results of this study show that the best concentration of TMAH is 5% (v/v which can immobilize up to 84.71% of GOX. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier Transforms Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR studies have been carried out to observe the structural changes in bentonite due to TMAH modification. The obtained immobilized GOX show the optimum catalytic activity on reaction temperature of 40-50 °C and pH of 7. The immobilized GOX kinetics at the optimum conditions determined the Km and Vmax value to be 4.96x10-2 mM and 4.99x10-3 mM.min-1 respectively. In addition, the immobilized GOX on TMAH-modified bentonite is stable enough so it could be re-used six times before its activity decreased by 39.44%.

  8. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakre, Dilip; Rayalu, Sadhana; Kawade, Raju; Meshram, Siddharth; Subrt, J; Labhsetwar, Nitin

    2010-08-15

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mgg(-1) at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L(-1), which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed ( approximately 97%) using 1M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakre, Dilip; Rayalu, Sadhana; Kawade, Raju; Meshram, Siddharth; Subrt, J.; Labhsetwar, Nitin

    2010-01-01

    Low cost bentonite clay was chemically modified using magnesium chloride in order to enhance its fluoride removal capacity. The magnesium incorporated bentonite (MB) was characterized by using XRD and SEM techniques. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to study and optimize various operational parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH, effect of co-ions and initial fluoride concentration. It was observed that the MB works effectively over wide range of pH and showed a maximum fluoride removal capacity of 2.26 mg g -1 at an initial fluoride concentration of 5 mg L -1 , which is much better than the unmodified bentonite. The experimental data fitted well into Langmuir adsorption isotherm and follows pseudo-first-order kinetics. Thermodynamic study suggests that fluoride adsorption on MB is reasonably spontaneous and an endothermic process. MB showed significantly high fluoride removal in synthetic water as compared to field water. Desorption study of MB suggest that almost all the loaded fluoride was desorbed (∼97%) using 1 M NaOH solution however maximum fluoride removal decreases from 95.47 to 73 (%) after regeneration. From the experimental results, it may be inferred that chemical modification enhances the fluoride removal efficiency of bentonite and it works as an effective adsorbent for defluoridation of water.

  10. The biological costs of not reclaiming bentonite mine spoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Daniel W. Uresk; Richard M. Hansen

    1982-01-01

    Bentonite clay has been mined in the northern Great Plains for more than 80 years. Until the late 1960's, mine spoil materials were left in steep piles and no effort was made to restore biological productivity to these disturbed sites. As a result, unreclaimed spoils are barren and eroded. The biological costs of not reclaiming these spoils are examined in this...

  11. Mineralogical behaviour of bentonites in open and closed systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbert, H.J.; Kasbohm, J.

    2004-01-01

    Mineralogical and chemical changes of bentonites were investigated in a natural analogue study and in laboratory experiments. As a working hypothesis we assumed that in geological, i.e. open systems, bentonites may be penetrated over geological time scales by larger water volumes than high compacted bentonites used as technical barriers in repositories in salt formations. Under this assumption open geological systems are characterised by low solid/liquid ratios and closed repository systems by high solid/liquid ratios. Consequently in laboratory experiments the mineralogical changes were investigated under different solid/liquid ratios and compared with results of a natural analogue study. In the natural analogue study in deep boreholes in the East Slovakian Basin the expandability of montmorillonite and the degree of transformation in illite-smectite (IS) mixed layer structures was found to be dependent not only on depth and temperature but also on the salinity of the pore waters. In this open geological system with a comparatively low solid/liquid ratio the observed changes in the montmorillonite were significantly different than those observed in the laboratory study on compacted MX-80 bentonite. (authors)

  12. Behaviour of humic-bentonite aggregates in diluted suspensions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Formation and disaggregation of micron-size aggregates in a diluted suspension made up of HSs and bentonite (B) were studied by tracing distribution of aggregate sizes and their counts in freshly prepared and aged suspensions, and at high (10 000) and low (1.0) [HS]/[B] ratios. Diluted HSB suspensions are unstable ...

  13. Magnesium incorporated bentonite clay for defluoridation of drinking water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thakre, D.; Rayalu, S.; Kawade, R.; Meshram, S.; Šubrt, Jan; Labhsetwar, N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 180, 1-3 (2010), s. 122-130 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : adsorption * bentonite * fluoride removal Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.723, year: 2010

  14. Synthesis of MCM-41 nanomaterial from Algerian bentonite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesoporous materials of the MCM-41 type were synthesized from Algerian bentonite as an aluminosilicate source without the addition of pure silica and aluminum reagents. The samples were synthesized under hydrothermal condition using cetyltrimithylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The influence of initial ...

  15. Vitrification and neomineralisation of bentonitic and kaolinitic clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... metamorphic and/or igneous rocks. Resultant fired mineral phases depicted mineral compositions of ceramic bodies, and the study suggested that these clays could be gainfully utilized in the making of ceramic wares, subject to selected beneficiation processes. Keywords: kaolin, bentonite, vitrification, neomineralization, ...

  16. Diffusion of anions and cations in compacted sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.

    1994-02-01

    The thesis presents the results of studies on the diffusion mechanisms of anions and cations in compacted sodium bentonite, which is planned to be used as a buffer material in nuclear waste disposal in Finland. The diffusivities and sorption factors were determined by tracer experiments. The pore volume accessible to chloride, here defined as effective porosity, was determined as a function of bentonite density and electrolyte concentration in water, and the Stern-Gouy double-layer model was used to explain the observed anion exclusion. The sorption of Cs + and Sr 2+ was studied in loose and compacted bentonite samples as a function of the electrolyte concentration in solution. In order to obtain evidence of the diffusion of exchangeable cations, defined as surface diffusion, the diffusivities of Cs + and Sr 2+ in compacted bentonite were studied as a function of the sorption factor, which was varied by electrolyte concentration in solution. The measurements were performed both by a non-steady state method and by a through-diffusion method. (89 refs., 35 fig., 4 tab.)

  17. Effects of polyethyleneimine adsorption on rheology of bentonite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The influence of the cationic polymer, polyethyleneimine polymer (PEI) on the flow behaviour of bentonite suspensions (2%, w/w), was studied. XRD, zeta potential and adsorption studies were done together with rheological measurements. The addition of PEI at concentration ranges of 10-5–4.5 g/l and ...

  18. characterization of geotechnical properties of lateritic soil-bentonite

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... cilities should ensure minimum fluid flow through or into the repository ... were evaluated using the rigid wall permeameter un- der falling ... cell pressure [22]. 3. Results .... them to retain a portion of water (double layer water) that may ... water in the pore space. ... The effect of bentonite content on volumetric.

  19. Performance of Mn2+-modified Bentonite Clay for the Removal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    Clay minerals are promising materials for defluoridation of ... edge of the bentonite sheet. ... surface area analyzer (Autosorb-iQ & Quadrasorb SI, USA). .... used to describe chemisorption, as well as cation exchange reac- tions.14 t q. 1. K q. 1.

  20. Bentonite Modification with Manganese Oxides and Its Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dolinská, S.; Schütz, T.; Znamenáčková, I.; Lovás, M.; Vaculíková, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2015), s. 213-218 ISSN 1640-4920 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : bentonite * natrification * manganese oxide Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://www.potopk.com.pl/ Full _text/2015_full/IM%202-2015-a35.pdf

  1. The removal of chromium from wastewaters by activated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, A.; Chegrouche, S.; Ait Ghezala, H.; Douar, L.

    1994-12-01

    The adsorption of chromium onto activated bentonite has been investigated. Adsorption isotherms were analysed to obtain the Langmuir and freundlich constants. The operating parameters (i.e pH, contact time, solid/liquid ratio, temperatureand initial chromium concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption have been studied

  2. Thermal loading of bentonite. Impact on hydromechanics and permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zihms, Stephanie G.; Harrington, Jon [British Geological Survey, Nickerhill Keyworth (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    Due to its favorable properties, in particular, low permeability and swelling capacity, bentonite has been favored as an engineered barrier and backfill material for the geological storage of radioactive waste. To ensure safe long-term performance it is important to understand any changes in these properties when the material is subject to heat emitting waste. As such, this study will investigate the hydro-mechanical response of bentonite under multi-step thermal loading subject to a constant volume boundary condition. The experimental set up allows continuous measurements of hydraulic and mechanical response during each phase of the thermal cycle. The constant volume cell was placed inside an oven and connected to a hydraulic system with the water reservoir located externally. A pressure gradient of 4 MPa was placed across the sample for the duration of the test in order to map the evolution of permeability. After initial hydration of the bentonite, in this case signified by reaching the asymptote in total stress, the temperature was raised in 20 C increments from 20 to 80 C followed by a final 10 C step to reach 90 C. Each temperature was held constant for at least 7-10 days to allow the stresses and hydraulic transients to equilibrate. This data set will provide an insight into the hydromechanical behavior of the bentonite and the evolution of its permeability when exposed to elevated temperatures.

  3. DEPOSITS AND MINING POTENTIAL OF BENTONITE IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Klanfar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the materials that is planed to be used for buffering and backfilling in spent nuclear fuel repositories, within deep crystalline rock. There are several locations in Croatia that bentonite deposits and occurrences are found on. Some were exploited in past, and others were more or less explored. This paper presents overview of bentonite deposits, basic properties and potential resources, and mining practices in Croatia. Largest exploited deposits are found in area of Poljanska luka, Gornja Jelenska and Bednja. Surface and underground methods (drift and fill, sublevel caving were used during exploitation. In the area of Svilaja and Lika are found potentially valuable deposits that were never exploited. Montmorilonite content ranges form 20-50% to 57-89%. Most deposits contain bentonite beds with thickness 0,4-1,6 m, and have plunge 10°-30°. Few exceptions are nearly horizontal and thick more than 5 m and even 12 m. One is declined at 70° and up to 40m thick. Proven reserves are about 2,3 Mt with some level of uncertainty. Average production per mine during exploitation period can be assumed to be several thousands t/y.

  4. Structure and forces in bentonite MX-80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Bo; Aakesson, Torbjoern; Joensson, Bengt; Meehdi, Segad; Janiak, John; Wallenberg, Reine (Theoretical Chemistry, Chemical Center, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) and its ion exchanged forms, Na and Ca montmorillonite, have been studied experimentally and theoretically. A variety of experimental techniques have been used in order to gain insight into the structural conditions in dry clay as well as clay in equilibrium with a bulk solution of given ionic composition. The main objective has been the swelling behaviour and osmotic pressure of montmorillonite clay when the bulk solution contains a mix of monovalent sodium and divalent calcium ions. For a clay system in equilibrium with pure water, Monte Carlo simulations predict a large swelling when the clay counterions are monovalent, while in presence of divalent counterions a limited swelling is predicted with an aqueous layer between the clay lamellaes of about 1 nm. This latter result is in excellent agreement with small angle x-ray scattering data, but in disagreement with dialysis experiments, which gives a significantly larger swelling for Ca montmorillonite in pure water. Obviously, there is one lamellar swelling and a second 'extra-lamellar' swelling, which could be the result of a phase separation in the clay. Montmorillonite in contact with a salt reservoir with both Na+ and Ca2+ counterions will only show a modest swelling unless the sodium concentration in the bulk is several orders of magnitude larger than the calcium concentration. The limited swelling of clay in presence of divalent counterions is a consequence of ion-ion correlations, which reduce the entropic repulsion as well as give rise to an attractive component in the total osmotic pressure. Ion-ion correlations also favour divalent counterions in a situation where we have a competition with monovalent ones. A more fundamental result of ion-ion correlations is that the osmotic pressure as a function of clay sheet separation becomes nonmonotonic, which indicates the possibility of a phase separation into a concentrated and a dilute clay phase. This phenomenon could

  5. Gas migration mechanism of saturated dense bentonite and its modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko; Kudo, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In the current concept of repository for nuclear waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules inside of the engineered barrier, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the engineered barrier until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the following subjects: a) Effect of the accumulated gas pressure on surrounding objects such as concrete lining, rock mass. b) Effect of gas breakthrough on the barrier function of bentonite. c) Revealing and modeling gas migration mechanism for overcoming the scale effects in laboratory specimen test. Therefore in this study, gas migration tests for compacted and saturated bentonite to investigate and to model the mechanism of gas migration phenomenon. Firstly, the following conclusions were obtained through by the results of the gas migration tests which are conducted in this study: 1) Bubbles appear in the semitransparent drainage tube at first when the total gas is equal to the initial total axial stress or somewhat smaller. By increasing the gas pressure more, breakthrough of gas migration, which is defined as a sudden increase of amount of emission gas, occurred. When the total gas pressure exceeds the initial total axial stress, the total axial stress is always equal to the total gas pressure because specimens shrink in the axial direction with causing the clearance between the end of the specimen and porous metal. 2) Effective gas conductivity after breakthrough of gas migration is times larger than that

  6. Response surface optimisation for activation of bentonite with microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rožić Ljiljana S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the statistical design of the experimental method was applied on the acid activation process of bentonite with microwave irradiation. The influence of activation parameters (time, acid normality and microwave heating power on the selected process response of the activated bentonite samples was studied. The specific surface area was chosen for the process response, because the chemical, surface and structural properties of the activated clay determine and limit its potential applications. The relationship of various process parameters with the specific surface area of bentonite was examined. A mathematical model was developed using a second-order response surface model (RSM with a central composite design incorporating the above mentioned process parameters. The mathematical model developed helped in predicting the variation in specific surface area of activated bentonite with time (5-21 min, acid normality (2-7 N and microwave heating power (63-172 W. The calculated regression models were found to be statistically significant at the required range and presented little variability. Furthermore, high values of R2 (0.957 and R2 (adjusted (0.914 indicate a high dependence and correlation between the observed and the predicted values of the response. These high values also indicate that about 96% of the result of the total variation can be explained by this model. In addition, the model shows that increasing the time and acid normality improves the textural properties of bentonites, resulting in increased specific surface area. This model also can be useful for setting an optimum value of the activation parameters for achieving the maximum specific surface area. An optimum specific surface area of 142 m2g-1 was achieved with an acid normality of 5.2 N, activation time of 7.38 min and microwave power of 117 W. Acid activation of bentonite was found to occur faster with microwave irradiation than with conventional heating. Microwave

  7. Alteration of bentonite when contacted with supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinseok, K.; Jo, H. Y.; Yun, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Deep saline formations overlaid by impermeable caprocks with a high sealing capacity are attractive CO2 storage reservoirs. Shales, which consist of mainly clay minerals, are potential caprocks for the CO2 storage reservoirs. The properties of clay minerals in shales may affect the sealing capacity of shales. In this study, changes in clay minerals' properties when contacted with supercritical (SC) CO2 at various conditions were investigated. Bentonite, whichis composed of primarily montmorillonite, was used as the clay material in this study. Batch reactor tests on wet bentonite samples in the presence of SC CO2 with or without aqueous phases were conducted at high pressure (12 MPa) and moderate temperature (50 oC) conditions for a week. Results show that the bentonite samples obtained from the tests with SC CO2 had less change in porosity than those obtained from the tests without SC CO2 (vacuum-drying) at a given reaction time, indicating that the bentonite samples dried in the presence of SC CO2 maintained their structure. These results suggest that CO2 molecules can diffuse into interlayer of montmorillonite, which is a primary mineral of bentonite, and form a single CO2 molecule layer or double CO2 molecule layers. The CO2 molecules can displace water molecules in the interlayer, resulting in maintaining the interlayer spacing when dehydration occurs. Noticeable changes in reacted bentonite samples obtained from the tests with an aqueous phase (NaCl, CaCl2, or sea water) are decreases in the fraction of plagioclase and pyrite and formation of carbonate minerals (i.e., calcite and dolomite) and halite. In addition, no significant exchanges of Na or Ca on the exchangeable complex of the montmorillonite in the presence of SC CO2 occurred, resulting in no significant changes in the swelling capacity of bentonite samples after reacting with SC CO2 in the presence of aqueous phases. These results might be attributed by the CO2 molecule layer, which prevents

  8. Activation of a Ca-bentonite as buffer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hsing; Chen, Wen-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Swelling behavior is an important criterion in achieving the low-permeability sealing function of buffer material. A potential buffer material may be used for radioactive waste repository in Taiwan is a locally available clayey material known as Zhisin clay, which has been identified as a Ca-bentonite. Due to its Ca-based origin, Zhisin was found to exhibit swelling capacity much lower than that of Na-bentonite. To enhance the swelling potential of Zhisin clay, a cation exchange process by addition of Na2CO3 powder was introduced in this paper. The addition of Na2CO3 reagent to Zhisin clay, in a liquid phase, caused the precipitation of CaCO3 and thereby induced a replacement of Ca2+ ions by Na+ ions on the surface of bentonite. Characterization test conducted on Zhisin clay includes chemical analysis, cation exchange capacity, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry (TG). Free-swelling test apparatus was developed according to International Society of Rock Mechanics recommendations. A series of free-swelling tests were conducted on untreated and activated specimens to characterize the effect of activation on the swelling capacity of Zhisin clay. Efforts were made to determine an optimum dosage for the activation, and to evaluate the aging effect. Also, the activated material was evaluated for its stability in various hydrothermal conditions for potential applications as buffer material in a repository. Experimental results show that Na2CO3-activated Zhisin clay is superior in swelling potential to untreated Zhisin clay. Also, there exists an optimum amount of activator in terms of improvements in the swelling capacity. A distinct time-swell relationship was discovered for activated Zhisin clay. The corresponding mechanism refers to exchange of cations and breakdown of quasi-crystal, which results in ion exchange hysteresis of Ca-bentonite. Due to the ion exchange hysteresis, activated bentonite shows a post-rise time-swell relationship different than the sigmoid

  9. Cement/bentonite interaction. Results from 16 month laboratory tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    The work concerns possible bentonite clay mineral alteration in constructions with bentonite in close contact with cement, and the effect of such changes on bentonite buffer properties. The investigation comprises a 16 months laboratory test series with hydrothermal cell tests, percolation tests and diffusion tests. MX-80 Wyoming bentonite was used in all tests. Two types of artificial cement pore water solutions were used in the percolation and diffusion tests. The swelling pressure and the hydraulic conductivity were measured continuously in the percolation tests. After termination, the clay was analyzed with respect to changes in element distribution, mineralogy and shear strength. The water solutions were analyzed with respect to pH, cations and major anions. The results concerning chemical and mineralogical changes are in summary: Ion exchange in the montmorillonite until equilibrium with cement pore-water ions was reached; Increase in cation exchange capacity; Dissolution of original cristobalite; Increase in quartz content; Minor increase in illite content; Minor formation of chlorite; Formation of CSH(I); Wash away of CSH-gel into surrounding water. A large decrease in swelling pressure and a moderate increase in hydraulic conductivity were recorded in the samples percolated by SULFACEM pore-water solution. The mineralogical alterations only concerned a minor part of the total bentonite mass and the changes in physical properties were therefore most likely due to the replacement of the original charge balancing cation by cement pore-water cations. Comparisons between the current test result and results from 4 month tests indicate that the rates of illite and chlorite formation were reduced during the tests. The presence of zeolites in the clay could not be ensured. However, the discovery of CSH material is important since CSH is expected to precede the formation of zeolites 5 refs, 48 figs, 11 tabs

  10. Thermodynamic understanding on swelling pressure of bentonite buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    Smectite (montmorillonite) is a major clay mineral constituent of the bentonite buffer and backfilling materials to be used for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Swelling pressure of the bentonite buffer occurring in the permeation process of moisture was estimated based on thermodynamic theory and the thermodynamic data of interlayer water in smectite in this study. The relative partial molar Gibbs free energies (ΔG H2O ) of water on the smectite surface were measured as a function of water content (0-83%) in a dry density range of 0.6-0.9 Mg/m 3 . Purified Na-smectite of which interlayer cations were exchanged with Na + ions and soluble salts were completely removed, was used in this study. Obtained ΔG H2O decreased with an increase of water content in the range of water content lower than about 40%, and similar trends were obtained to data of Kunipia-F bentonite (Na-bentonite) of which smectite content was approximately 100 wt.%. From the specific surface area of smectite (ca. 800 m 2 /g) and the correlation between ΔG H2O and water content, water affected from the surface of smectite was estimated to be up to approximately 2 water layers. Swelling pressure versus smectite partial density (montmorillonite partial density) was estimated based on ΔG H2O from the chemical potential balance of water in equilibrium between the free water and moisturized smectite, and compared to data measured for various kinds of bentonites of which smectite contents were respectively different. The estimated swelling pressures were in good agreement with the measured data. (author)

  11. Study of cesium and strontium adsorption on slovak bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, M.

    2010-01-01

    Bentonite is a natural clay and one of the most promising candidates for use as a buffer material in the geological disposal systems for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. It is intended to isolate metal canisters with highly radioactive waste products from the surrounding rocks because of its ability to retard the movement of radionuclides by adsorption. Slovak Republic avails of many significant deposits of bentonite. Adsorption of Cs and Sr on five Slovak bentonite of deposits (Jelsovy potok, Kopernica, Lieskovec, Lastovce and Dolna Ves) and montmorillonite K10 (Sigma-Aldrich) has been studied with the using batch of radiometric techniques. Natural, irradiated and natrified samples, in three different kinds of grain size: 15, 45 and 250 μm have been used in the experiments. The adsorptions of Cs and Sr on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, pH after adsorption and effect of pH change, chemical modification, competitive ions and organic agents on the adsorption have been studied. The K d have been determined for adsorbent-Cs/Sr solution system as a function of contact time and adsorbate and adsorbent concentration. The data have been interpreted in terms of Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption of Cs and Sr has increased with increasing metal concentrations. Adsorption of Cs and Sr has been suppressed by presence of organic agents; and of bivalent cations more than univalent cations. By adsorption on natrified samples colloidal particles and pH value increase have been formed. Adsorption experiments carried out show that the most suitable materials intended for use as barriers surrounding a canister of spent nuclear fuel are bentonite of the Jelsovy potok and Kopernica deposits. (author)

  12. Technical Development of Slurry Three-Dimensional Printer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cho-Pei; Hsu, Huang-Jan; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the technical development of slurry three-dimensional printer (3DP) which based on photo-polymerization and constrained surface method. Basically, slurry consists of ceramic powder, resin and photo-initiator. The light engines for solidifying the photo-curable slurry can be classified as laser, liquid crystal panel (LCD), digital light processing (DLP). The slurry can be reacted and solidified by selective ray according to the reaction spectrum of photo-initiator. Ceramic powder used in this study is zirconia oxide. Experimental results show that ceramic particle size affects the viscosity of slurry severely resulting in low accuracy and the occurrence of micro crack in the layer casting procedure. Therefore, the effect of particle size on the curability and accuracy of built green part is discussed. A single dental crown is proposed to be fabricated by these three light engines as a benchmark for comparison. In addition, the cost and the limitation are compared in the aspect of dental crown fabrication. Consequently, the lowest cost is LCD-type slurry 3DP system. DLP-type slurry 3DP can produce green body with the fastest fabrication time. The volumetric error of sintered part that made by these three fabrication methods is similar because the composition of slurry is the same.

  13. Drag reduction of dense fine-grained slurries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Chára, Zdeněk; Štern, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2010), s. 261-270 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/1574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : kaolin slurry * drag reduction * experimental investigation * peptization * slurry rheology Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.553, year: 2010

  14. Cattle slurry on grassland - application methods and nitrogen use efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalor, S.T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cattle slurry represents a significant resource on grassland-based farming systems. The objective of this thesis was to investigate and devise cattle slurry application methods and strategies that can be implemented on grassland farms to improve the efficiency with which nitrogen (N) in

  15. The Settling and Compaction of Nuclear Waste Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACLEAN, G.T.

    1999-01-01

    The settling and compaction of simulated and real nuclear waste slurries were extensively studied. Experiments were carried out with simulated wastes at laboratory and large-scale sizes, and the results compared. A model of settling was derived and a method developed to correlate and scale-up settling data for different slurries and vessel sizes

  16. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination...

  17. Comparison of catalytic ethylene polymerization in slurry and gas phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daftaribesheli, Majid

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) with the annual consumption of 70 million tones in 2007 is mostly produced in slurry, gas-phase or combination of both processes. This work focuses on a comparison between the slurry and gas phase processes. Why does PE produced in theses two processes can show extremely different

  18. Bauxite slurry pipeline: start up operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othon, Otilio; Babosa, Eder; Edvan, Francisco; Brittes, Geraldo; Melo, Gerson; Janir, Joao; Favacho, Orlando; Leao, Marcos; Farias, Obadias [Vale, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, Nilton [Anglo Ferrous Brazil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The mine of Miltonia is located in Paragominas-PA, in the north of Brazil. Bauxite slurry pipeline starts at the Mine of Miltonia and finishes in the draining installation of Alunorte refinery at the port of Barcarena-PA, located approximately 244km away from the mine. The pipeline runs over seven cities and passes below four great rivers stream beds. The system was designed for an underground 24 inches OD steel pipe to carry 9.9 million dry metric tonnes per annum (dMTAs) of 50.5% solid concentration bauxite slurry, using only one pumping station. The system is composed by four storage tanks and six piston diaphragm pumps, supplying a flow of 1680 m3/h. There is a cathodic protection system along the pipeline extension to prevent external corrosion and five pressure monitoring stations to control hydraulic conditions, there is also a fiber optic cable interconnection between pump station and terminal station. Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI) was the designer and followed the commissioning program of the start up operations. This paper will describe the beginning of the pipeline operations, technical aspects of the project, the operational experiences acquired in these two years, the faced problems and also the future planning. (author)

  19. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  20. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinghao [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Cheng, Cheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, Chengjian, E-mail: xiaocj@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shao, Dadong, E-mail: shaodadong@126.com [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Zimu, E-mail: xzm@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH < 6.5 because of the strong complexation, and inhibits U(VI) adsorption at pH > 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  1. Sequential use of bentonites and solar photocatalysis to treat winery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Eva; Márquez, Gracia; Carpintero, Juan Carlos; Beltrán, Fernando J; Alvarez, Pedro

    2008-12-24

    The sequential use of low-cost adsorbent bentonites and solar photocatalysis to treat winery wastewater has been studied. Three commercial sodium-bentonites (MB-M, MB-G, and MB-P) and one calcium-bentonite (Bengel) were characterized and used in this study. These clay materials were useful to totally remove turbidity (90-100%) and, to a lesser extent, color, polyphenols (PPh), and soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODS) from winery wastewater. Both surface area and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bentonite had a positive impact on treatment efficiency. The effect of pH on turbidity removal by bentonites was studied in the 3.5-12 pH range. The bentonites were capable of greatly removing turbidity from winery wastewater at pH 3.5-5.5, but removal efficiency decreased with pH increase beyond this range. Settling characteristics (i.e., sludge volume index (SVI) and settling rate) of bentonites were also studied. Best settling properties were observed for bentonite doses around 0.5 g/L. The reuse of bentonite for winery wastewater treatment was found not to be advisable as the turbidity and PPh removal efficiencies decreased with successive uses. The resulting wastewater after bentonite treatment was exposed to solar radiation at oxic conditions in the presence of Fe(III) and Fe(III)/H2O2 catalysts. Significant reductions of COD, total organic carbon (TOC), and PPh were achieved by these solar photocatalytic processes.

  2. Alteration behavior of bentonite barrier of radioactive waste disposal by alkaline solutions. Part 2. Effect of type of alkaline solution on permeability of compacted bentonite-sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko

    2011-01-01

    Permeability tests were carried out using compacted bentonite-sand mixture with initial dry density of 1.55 Mg/m 3 and alkaline solutions at 50degC for about two years to estimate the alteration behavior and the change in the permeability. Bentonite-sand mixtures which contain bentonites of 15wt% were made using Na-bentonite or Ca-exchanged bentonite. 0.3M-NaOH solution with pH 13.3 and 5mM-Ca(OH) 2 solution with pH 12.0 were used to the permeability tests of Na-bentonite-sand mixture and of Ca-exchanged bentonite-sand mixture, respectively. In the case of the permeability test conducted using NaOH solution, montmorillonite and other associated minerals were dissolved, and consequently, the dry density and effective montmorillonite density of Na-bentonite-sand mixture were decreased. Furthermore, the mineralogical feature of montmorillonite was changed (i.e. beidellitization and an increase in the layer charge). The permeability of Na-bentonite-sand mixture was increased 5.6 times by the end of permeability test as a result of above alteration. In the case of the permeability test conducted using Ca(OH) 2 solution, montmorillonite and other associated minerals were dissolved, and calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) was precipitated. Consequently, the dry density of Ca-exchanged bentonite-sand mixture was increased, while the effective montmorillonite density was decreased. The mineralogical feature of montmorillonite was changed (i.e. beidellitization and an increase in the layer charge). The permeability of Ca-exchange bentonite-sand mixture was decreased by more than two orders of magnitude due to fill the pore of Ca-exchange bentonite-sand mixture by the precipitation of C-S-H. From above results, the type of alkaline solution affects the mineralogical alteration behavior of the compacted bentonite-sand mixture, and consequently, affects the changing trend of permeability. In conclusion, it is important not only to consider the dissolution of montmorillonite, but

  3. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. Power

  4. Application of HDTMA-intercalated bentonites in water waste treatment for U(VI) removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnak, Adrian; Viglasova, Eva; Galambos, Michal; Krivosudsky, Lukas; Universitat Wien, Vienna

    2017-01-01

    Bentonite deposits in Slovakia are systematically investigated as potential adsorbents for wastewater and radioactive waste treatment applications. Herein, adsorption properties (isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics) of raw and organo-modified bentonites towards uranium species in aqueous solutions were investigated. Organo-modified bentonites was prepared by practical and simple chemical modification method with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (denoted as HDTMA-bentonites). The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HDTMA-bentonites were spontaneous and endothermic, and well simulated by pseudo-second-order model. The maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) was calculated to be 31.45 mg/g at pH 8.5 and T = 298 K. Slovak bentonites Jelsovy potok and Kopernica, their natural and HDTMA-modified forms might be a promising sorbent for the treatment of U(VI) contaminants in aqueous solutions. (author)

  5. Progress of research on the influence of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on bentonite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Weimin; Zheng Zhenji; Chen Bao; Chen Yonggui

    2011-01-01

    Based on the previous laboratory studies and numerical simulation on bentonite in alkaline environments, the effects of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite are emphasized in this paper, temperature, pH values and concentration are discussed as main affecting factors. When bentonite is exposed to alkaline cation or alkaline solution, microstructure of bentonite will be changed due to the dissolution of montmorillonite and the formation of secondary minerals, which results in the decrease of swelling pressure. The amount of the reduction of swelling pressure depends on the concentration of alkaline solution. Temperature, polyvalent cation, salinity and concentration are the main factors affecting hydraulic properties of bentonite under alkaline conditions. Therefore, future research should focus on the mechanism of coupling effects of weak alkaline solutions on the mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite under different temperatures and different pH values. (authors)

  6. Optimization of acid-activated bentonites on bleaching of cotton oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacin, O.; Sayan, E.; Kirali, E.G.

    2013-01-01

    Bentonites are commonly used adsorbent on bleaching cotton oil to produce edible oil products. Bleaching capacities of neutralized cotton oil were investigated with acid-activated Arguvan and Kursunlu bentonites. Two models for acid activation of the bentonites were developed by using a full factorial experimental design and central composite design. The parameters used to develop these models were contact time, solid to liquid ratio, acid concentration and moisture of bentonite. By using a constrained optimization program, the maximum bleaching capacities of neutralized cotton oil were determined as 99.99% and 48.5% for Arguvan and Kursunlu, respectively. Optimum results showed that Turkish bentonites (especially Arguvan bentonite) have high bleaching ability and they can be used efficiently to bleach neutralized cotton oil by considering the favorable volume weight, capacity of oil adsorbed and filtration rate. (author)

  7. Microstructure of bentonite in relation to its physical properties within nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, E.

    1998-01-01

    High-level nuclear waste in Finland is planned to be placed in bedrock at a depth of several hundred metres. The spent fuel containers in boreholes drilled in the floors of deposition tunnels will be surrounded by bentonite blocks. The upper parts of the tunnels will be filled with mixture of bentonite and crushed rock. The behaviour of the bentonite around the containers during several years after deposition of nuclear waste should be predicted. In the present report, a short literature study of the microstructure of bentonite is presented. The report concentrates on bentonite MX-80. The use of stochastic imaging of microstructure was tested by using the Boolean simulation. Using stochastic imaging, the effect of changes of bentonite microstructure on its physical properties can be evaluated and predicted. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of permeability of compacted bentonite ground considering heterogeneity by geostatistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Nakamura, Kunihiko; Kudo, Kohji; Hironaga, Michihiko; Nakagami, Motonori; Niwase, Kazuhito; Komatsu, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    The permeability of the bentonite ground as an engineered barrier is possibly designed to the value which is lower than that determined in terms of required performance because of heterogeneous distribution of permeability in the ground, which might be considerable when the ground is created by the compaction method. The effect of heterogeneity in the ground on the permeability of the bentonite ground should be evaluated by overall permeability of the ground, whereas in practice, the effect is evaluated by the distribution of permeability in the ground. Thus, in this study, overall permeability of the bentonite ground is evaluated from the permeability of the bentonite ground is evaluated from the permeability distribution determined using the geostatistical method with the dry density data as well as permeability data of the undisturbed sample recovered from the bentonite ground. Consequently, it was proved through this study that possibility of overestimation of permeability of the bentonite ground can be reduced if the overall permeability is used. (author)

  9. Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

  10. Ice slurries; Les coulis de glace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The safety and environmental problems linked with the use of refrigerants (toxicity, flammability, ozone layer, greenhouse effect) are the object of numerous research works in order to reduce their harmful impact in the case of accidental situation. The use of 'coldness carriers' is particularly justified in the case of industrial refrigerating facilities involving long loops and important quantities of refrigerating fluids. The use of single-phase 'coldness carriers' is a very old technique which encounters a revival today with researches in progress about the use of two-phase (liquid-solid) compounds named ice-slurries. This book takes stock of the status of this research work in a practical and exhaustive way. (J.S.)

  11. Regulatory controls and slurry fracture injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusseault, M. B.; Bilak, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The technological and regulatory framework necessary for the safe operation of solid waste disposal using slurry fracture injection (SFI) in Saskatchewan and Alberta was studied. Seven current SFI sites were used as the source of experience. Regular audits of volumes, continuous pressure recording, careful deformation monitoring and analysis, and repeated evaluation of reservoir properties were considered to be the essential features. In the case of toxic wastes, microseismic monitoring and regular well interference or tracer tests might be additional measures used to increase confidence in the containment method. Given the recent introduction of SFI technology, guarding against over-regulation was recommended to allow SFI to operate under the most effective operating conditions, and to preserve its attractiveness as an environmentally attractive and safe waste disposal alternative. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  12. Drilling mud and cement slurry rheology manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    This book is not primarily concerned with theory. Its basic approach is practical. It has attempted to present a logical treatment which will be easy to apply in practice. As a result, certain computing methods were omitted, and precision sometimes has to be sacrificed to simplicity. However, no apology is made for the use of such approximations; in fact, any attempt at rigor would be doomed to failure, in view of the many inherent factors which do not lend themselves to quantitative treatment. Chapter 1: deals with fundamental concepts. Chapter 2: refers to the general principles involved in determining rheological parameters of drilling fluids and cement slurries. Chapter 3: relates to practical methods for using the results obtained in the first two Chapters, in units employed on the worksite. It is primarily intended for technicians called upon to make ''hydraulic'' computations during drilling. Chapter 4: contains several examples.

  13. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  14. PCB dechlorination in anaerobic soil slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, K.T.; Evans, B.S.

    1993-01-01

    Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy's, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges, including mixed wastes; however, a practical remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBS. The onset of dechlorination activity can be accelerated by addition of nutritional amendments and inducers. After 15 weeks of incubation with PCB-contaminated soil and nutrient solution, dechlorination has been observed under several working conditions. The best results show that the average chlorine content steadily dropped from 4.3 to 3.5 chlorines per biphenyl over a 15-week period

  15. Bentonite-like material sealing to high-level radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, J.; Linares Gonzalez, J.; Huertas Garcia, F.; Reyes Camacho.

    1993-01-01

    Among the most used materials for sealing of radioactive waste storage, bentonite shows a high number of advantages because of its plasticity, thermal and hydraulic conductivity, etc. The paper makes a review on different Spanish deposits of bentonite and their stability. Most of studies are focussed on the volcanic region at Cabo de Gata (Almeria). That area offers the most productive hydrothermal bentonite deposits in Spain

  16. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Stojiljković S.; Stamenković M.; Kostić D.; Miljković M.; Arsić B.; Savić I.; Savić I.

    2015-01-01

    The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. ...

  17. Migration behaviour of Pu released from Pu-doped glass in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashida, T.; Kohara, Y.; Yui, M.

    1994-01-01

    In order to investigate the coupled behavior of Pu release from the waste glass and transport in bentonite, a migration experiment with compacted sodium-type bentonite saturated with distilled water was carried out at room temperature, in which Pu-doped borosilicate glass was sandwiched. Under these conditions, leaching of Pu from the glass, diffusion and sorption of Pu in the compacted bentonite occur simultaneously. (orig.)

  18. The use of Syrian bentonite to remove organics and other ions from commercial Syrian phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorfan, S.; Abdulbaki, M.; Zein, A.

    2006-01-01

    Using of activated carbon to remove organic matter from phosphoric acid in uranium and P 2 O 5 extraction units has high cost. A new study was conducted to establish a new material instead of activated carbon. Experiments were carried out on removing organic matter by adsorption on Syrian bentonite. The experiments of the removal of humic acid by Syrian bentonite gave good results and showed that the chemical and thermal activation of bentonite increased the adsorption efficiency. (Authors)

  19. Investigation on the effect of seawater to hydraulic property and wetting process of bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Takuma

    2004-01-01

    On high-level waste disposal, bentonite is one of the most promising material for buffer and backfill material. The hydraulic properties and wetting process of bentonite are important not only for barrier performance assessment but also for prediction of waste disposal environment, such as resaturation time and thermal distribution. In Japan, we should consider the effect of seawater for bentonite, because radioactive waste will be disposed of in coastal area and in marine sediment where seawater remained. However, it is not enough to understand the effect of seawater. Therefore, experimental study was conducted to investigate the effect of seawater on the hydraulic conductivity and wetting process of bentonite. The effect of seawater on hydraulic conductivity is significant for Na-bentonite, the hydraulic conductivity of Na-bentonite in seawater is one order to magnitude higher than that in distilled water. On the other hand, the hydraulic conductivity of Ca-bentonite is not influenced by seawater. The hydraulic conductivity of bentonite decreases as effective montmorillonite density increases. The effective montmorillonite density is ratio between the weight of montmorillonite and volume of porosity and montmorillonite. The hydraulic conductivity of bentonite is close related to swelling property since the hydraulic conductivity decrease as the swelling pressure increase. Wetting process of compacted bentonite could be evaluated by diffusion phenomena since infiltration rate and change of saturation rate and represented by diffusion equation. The effect of seawater on water diffusivity is significant for Na-type bentonite with low effective montmorillonite density. Except for that condition, the water diffusivity of bentonite is almost constant and is not influenced by effective montmorillonite density and seawater. (author)

  20. The use of Syrian bentonite to remove organics and other ions from commercial Syrian phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorfan, S.; Abdulbaki, M.; Zein, A.

    2005-03-01

    Using of activated carbon to remove organic matter from phosphoric acid in uranium and P 2 O 5 extraction units has high cost. A new study was conducted to establish a new material instead of activated carbon. Experiments were carried out on removing organic matter by adsorption on Syrian bentonite. The experiments of the removal of humic acid by Syrian bentonite gave good results and showed that the chemical and thermal activation of bentonite increased the adsorption efficiency. (Authors)

  1. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  2. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  3. Rheological characterization of nanocomposites Nylon 6/bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.R.G.; Fernandes, P.C.; Oliveira, S.V.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are a class of materials that have been widely used in various applications. Among them, has been emphasizing the preparation of polymer films with barrier properties for applications in polymer membranes. In this work, nanocomposites of nylon 6/bentonite clay were obtained from a Homogenizer, in the ratios of 1, 3 and 5 wt% clay. The Brasgel PA bentonite clay was treated organically with Praepagen HY salt, to make it organophilic. By X-ray diffraction (XRD), it was showed that the efficiency of the incorporation of salt in the clay. The rheological curves showed that for the AST clay the torque did not change when compared with the pure nylon 6, while for the clay ACT, the torque increased gradually with the percentage of clay. (author)

  4. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  5. Retention of Cs on zeolite, bentonite and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atun, G.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of cesium on zeolite and bentonite minerals and their mixtures was studied by means of a batch method and a tracer technique. All experiments were carried out in the presence of CsCl spiked with 137 Cs and NaCl as a supporting electrolyte in varying concentrations. The distribution coefficients (K D ) did not show significant differences at low Cs + loadings while they decreased in the high loading region. Freundlich and D-R isotherms were applied to the adsorption data of zeolite and bentonite. Adsorption capacities and mean energies calculated from D-R isotherm parameters decreased by increasing ionic strength on both minerals. The identification of the specific uptake sites was attempted on the basis of the Freundlich isotherm. Experimentally observed distribution coefficients of Cs on two mineral mixtures were smaller than theoretically calculated values, except at the highest NaCl concentration. (author)

  6. Sedimentation Characteristics of Kaolin and Bentonite in Concentrated Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulah Obut

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The sedimentation characteristics of two clays, namely kaolinite and bentonite, were determinated at high clay (5 % wt/vol and electrolyte (1 N concentrations using various inorganic-organic compounds. It was observed that the settling behaviour of kaolinite (1:1 clay and montmorillonite (2:1 clay is quite different due to the structural differences between these minerals. Although, similar initial settling rates and final sediment volumes were obtained after 24 hours of settling time for kaolin suspensions, the corresponding rates and volumes for bentonite suspensions varied greatly with the used chemical compound. According to the experimental results, a further intensive theoretical and experimental investigation is needed to reveal the mechanism underlying the sedimentation characteristics of clay minerals at high clay and electrolyte concentrations.

  7. Removal of uranium from water media by bentonite and zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viglasova, E.; Krajnak, A.; Galambos, M.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2014-01-01

    The removal and recovery of uranium from contaminated surface, environment and ground water, as result of nuclear industries, has attracted more and more attentions. Several methods are available for removing of uranium, but adsorption among the others, is the most attractive. In case of management of radioactive waste, the adsorption of radionuclides plays significant role. Among the natural sorbents applied to the adsorption of uranium zeolites and bentonites offer a number of advantages. The main aims of this work are investigations of adsorption properties of Greek zeolite Metaxades and Greek bentonite Kimolos during adsorption of uranium from water solutions, comparison of their adsorption characteristics, fitting with isotherms (Freundlich, Langmuir and DR isotherm) and its behaviour during kinetics process influenced by temperature. (authors)

  8. Investigation of alteration behaviour of compacted bentonite contracted with carbon steel for 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Tadahiro; Ueno, Kenichi; Sasamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate long term behavior of corrosion for carbon steel in compacted bentonite, and to evaluate long term stability of bentonite, corrosion experiments were conducted using synthetic sea water and synthetic groundwater at 50 and 80degC for 10 years under anaerobic atmosphere. In the present study, the samples of compacted bentonite after experiments were investigated to understand the alteration behavior of bentonite by iron-bentonite interactions. Results were summarized below. Iron generated by corrosion of carbon steel was migrated into compacted bentonite further in the synthetic seawater case than in the synthetic groundwater case. Result of TEM observation for the sample of synthetic sea water case at 80degC showed that the original layer structure for clay minerals was maintained and the layer distance was about 12[A] which was similar to the layer distance of normal 2:1 smectite. Thus, it was suggested that there was no change in smectite before and after experiments. Iron generated by corrosion of carbon steel was migrated into compacted bentonite in anaerobic condition case but scarcely migrated in aerobic condition case. Results of EPMA analysis indicated that the maximum migration depth of iron in compacted bentonite was about 0.2 mm for sample in synthetic sea water at 80degC under anaerobic condition. Results of XRD analysis for the sample in which iron migration in compacted bentonite was observed showed that there was no corrosion product in compacted bentonite and the structure of clay mineral in bentonite was di-octahedral. Furthermore, the result of XRD analysis under relative humidity controlled condition suggested that the swelling property of sample after experiment was similar to that of initial Na-type smectite. Therefore, it was supposed that the initial Na-type smectite did not change during the experiment. Batch type experiments with different temperature, solutions and duration have been conducted to understand the alteration

  9. Investigations of the changes in the bentonite structure caused by the different treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljković S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bentonite was treated in different ways and the changes in structure were monitored. Acid activation with sulphuric acid of investigated bentonite caused the increase in specific volume of micropore-mesopore. It was shown that activation by acid obtained at a constant temperature and constant period of time provides the possibility to obtain samples of bentonite of searched porosity only by changing the concentration of sulphuric and hydrochloric acid. By thermal activation of bentonite clay in the temperature range 100-1100 0C, samples of desired porosity were acquired. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 174007i br. TR 34020

  10. Characteristics study of bentonite as candidate of buffer materials for radioactive waste disposal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryantoro; Arimuladi, S.P.; Sastrowardoyo, P.B.

    1998-01-01

    Literature studies on bentonite characteristic of, as candidate for radioactive waste disposal system, have been conducted. Several information have been obtained from references, which would be contributed on performance assessment of engineered barrier. The functions bentonite includes the buffering of chemical and physical behavior, i.e. swelling property, self sealing, hydraulic conductivities and gas permeability. This paper also presented long-term stability of bentonite in natural condition related to the illitisazation, which could change its buffering capacities. These information, showed that bentonite was satisfied to be used for candidate of buffer materials in radioactive waste disposal system. (author)

  11. Study of the Properties of Bentonites for their use in Clay Geo synthetic Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiro Lopez, A.; Mateo Sanz, B.; Garcia Cidoncha, H.; Blanco Fernandez, M.

    2014-01-01

    Bentonites used for the production of clay geo synthetic barriers need to meet some properties so that they can be a waterproofing system. among the bentonites used in industry, sodium bentonite has the lowest permeability due to its high water absorption capacity in the inter-laminar space, causing it to swell and form a barrier to water flow. this paper provides the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality. For this study, the main properties have been tested: water absorption, swelling index, fluid loss, cation exchange capacity and montmorillonite content. In order to optimize the procedure for the characterization of bentonites, correlations between different tests have been done, to identify the most suitable ones. Finally, a compatibility test has been carried out to study the performance of bentonites in water containing a high amount of sales, because in this case, an ion exchange between the interlayer sodium ions of bentonite and cations dissolved in the water can take, resulting in a decrease swell of the bentonite. (Author)

  12. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-07-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  13. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolo, María E.; Pettinari, Gisela R.; Musso, Telma B.; Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G.

    2014-11-01

    The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm-1 with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination.

  14. One-dimensional self-sealing ability of bentonites in artificial seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Hideo; Yasuhara, Kazuya; Murakami, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    A high-level radioactive waste disposal facility might be built in a coastal area in Japan from the viewpoint of feasible transportation of waste. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of seawater on a bentonite-based buffer. This study investigated the influence of seawater on self-sealing ability of three common sodium-types of bentonite by the laboratory experiment and chemical analysis. From the results of laboratory experiment, suitable specifications were defined for a bentonite-based buffer that can withstand the effects of seawater. Furthermore, mechanism on filtration of seawater components in highly compacted bentonite was discussed by the results of chemical analysis. (author)

  15. Possibilities of reducing radiocesium transfer to hen eggs. II. Using bentonite from Polish geological deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachubik, J.; Kowalski, B.

    2000-01-01

    The decontamination effectiveness of bentonite from Polish geological deposits in reducing the radiocesium transfer to hen eggs was examined. The egg white radiocesium concentration was higher than that in egg yolk. The highest decontamination efficacy in all egg components was noticed in animals treated with bentonite from the first day of radionuclide administration. Generally, the radioactivity concentration in hens treated simultaneously with 137CsCl and a cesium binder were lower by 50% than those in the controls. The decontamination efficiency lowered with the delayed bentonite treatment. In Poland bentonite seems to be an alternative to other decontamination agents. (author)

  16. Production of smectite organophylic clays from three commercial sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela Diaz, Francisco R.; Souza Santos, Persio de

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory cationic exchange procedures using Brazilian's commercial quaternary ammonium salt and three samples of commercial sodium bentonites (two Brazilian's and one from Wyoming (US) are described. Swelling values in some liquid organic media are shown for the organophilic clays and for a Brazilian's commercial organophilic clay. Organophilic clays with larger swelling values than the commercial organophilic clay in kerosene, Varsol, toluene and soya bean oil were obtained. (author)

  17. Removal of zinc from aqueous solutions by natural bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellah, A.; Chegrouche, S.

    1994-01-01

    The equilibrium isotherms of zinc adsorption onto natural bentonite show that the data correlate well with freundlich and Langmuir's models and that the adsorption is physical in nature. The operating parameters (agitation speed, solid/liquid ratio temperature, particle size and initial zinc concentration) influenced the rate of adsorption. The maximum monomolecular capacity (Q 0 ) according to the Langmuir model is 52.91 mg. g-1 for an initial zinc concentration of 300 mg. litre-1, At 20 0 C

  18. Leaching of rare earth elements from bentonite clay

    OpenAIRE

    van der Watt, J.G; Waanders, F.B

    2012-01-01

    Due to increasing concerns of global rare earth element shortfalls in the near future, possible alternative sources of rare earth elements have recently become of economic interest. One such alternative is decanting acid mine water originating primarily from abandoned old mines in the Witwatersrand region of the Republic of South Africa. In this study, a novel way of rare earth element removal from the acid mine drainage was employed, making use of bentonite clay, which has very good adsorben...

  19. Water uptake and motion in highly densified bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahr, G.; Mueller-Vonmoos, F.; Kraehenbuehl, F.; Stoeckli, H.F.

    1986-07-01

    Water uptake by the bentonites MX-80 and Montigel was investigated according to the classical method of determination of the heat immersion and the adsorption-desorption isotherms. In addition, the layer expansion of the montmorillonite was measured as a function of the water content. The evaluation of the adsorption isotherms according to Dubinin-Radushkevich and the stratification distances determined by x-ray confirmed gradual water uptake. Up to 10% water content, the water is adsorbed as a monolayer, up to 20%, as a bimolecular layer around the interlayer cations. The partial specific entropy could be determined from the approximative calculation of the partial specific enthalpy from the heats of immersion and the free enthalpy from the adsorption isotherms. From this it is evident that the interlayer water shows a high degree of order. In this condition, the mobility of the water molecules is considerably lower than in free water. From the adsorption isotherm and the layer expansion observed, it can be assumed that water can appear in the pore space only from approximately 25% water content. The spaces outwith the interlayer space and the surfaces of the montmorillonite particles are considered as pore space. If free swelling is prevented and with dry densities greater than 1.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ for the highly compacted bentonites, water uptake causes a drastic reduction of the original pore space so that practically all the water is in the interlayer space. Calculation of the swelling pressure from the adsorption isotherms gives a good approximation of the measured swelling pressures. A montmorillonite surface of ca. 750 m/sup 2//g for both bentonites can be derived from a Dubinin-Radushkevich analysis of the adsorption isotherm. Water uptake into the compacted unsaturated bentonites can be described as diffusion with a diffusion coefficient of the order of magnitude of 3.10/sup -10/ m/sup 2//s. (author)

  20. Preparation and performance of Ecobras/bentonite biodegrading films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Ana Nery M.; Melo, Nadja M.C.; Canedo, Eduardo L.; Carvalho, Laura H.; Araujo, Arthur R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Compounds based on the biodegradable polymer Ecobras and bentonite clay in its pristine, sonicated, and organically modified with a quaternary ammonium salt forms were prepared as flat films. Clays and compounds were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties of the films were determined according to pertinent ASTM standards. Reasonable properties, higher than those of the matrix, were obtained with compounds prepared with purified clays and organoclays, particularly for low clay loading. (author)

  1. Diffusion and sorption properties of radionuclides in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Ji-Wei; Neretnieks, I. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1997-07-01

    In this report, recent studies on sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in compacted bentonite have been reviewed. The sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient data obtained from experiments in the literature have been compiled. Based on these experimental data and the report SKB-TR--91-16 (Brandberg and Skagius, 1991), this report proposes a set of sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient values for modelling purpose for safety analysis of nuclear waste repositories. The variability and uncertainty of the diffusivity data span somewhat more than an order or magnitude up and down. Most of the nuclides have an effective diffusivity in around 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s. Ion exclusion effects are observed for C, Cl and for Tc in oxidizing waters. Effective diffusivities are nearly tow orders of magnitude lower for these elements and of the order of 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}/s. Surface diffusion effects are found for Cs, Ni, Pa, Pb, Ra, Sn, Sr and Zr. Effective diffusivities for these elements are of the order of 10{sup -8} m{sup 2}/s. The surface diffusion effect should decrease in saline waters which is seen for Cs and Sr where there are data available. It is also deemed that Ra will have this effect because of its similarity with Sr. The other nuclides should also show this decrease but no data is available. Sorption and diffusion mechanisms in compacted bentonite are discussed in the report. In highly compacted bentonite, sorption and hence its distribution coefficient is not well defined, and a pore diffusion coefficient or a surface diffusion coefficient is not well defined either. Therefore, an apparent diffusion coefficient and a total concentration gradient should be more relevant in describing the diffusion process in compacted bentonite. 99 refs.

  2. Advanced study of transport analysis in bentonite (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Katsuyuki

    2004-03-01

    Solute and radionuclide transport analysis in buffer material made of bentonite clay is essential in safety assessment of a geological disposal facility for high-level radioactive waste (HLW). It is keenly required to understand the true physical and chemical process of the transport phenomena and to improve reliability of the safety assessment, since any conventional methods based on experimental models involve difficulty to estimate the robustness for a very long-term behavior. In order to solve this difficulty we start with the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method for understanding the molecular-based fundamental properties such as an ionic state and diffusion characteristics of hydrated smectite clay minerals, and we extend the microscale properties to the macroscale behaviors by applying the multiscale homogenization method. In the study of this year we improved the MD atomic model for the hydrated clay minerals, and a new adsorption-diffusion analysis scheme by the homogenization analysis (HA). In the MD simulation first we improved the interatomic potential model for the smectitic clays. Then the behaviors of hydrated Na-beidellite and its substitution products by Cs and Ca were calculated. Not only the swelling behaviors of the beidellite minerals but also the diffusion characteristics of cations in the interlayer space are calculated. A microscopic image is important to specify micro/macro behavior of bentonite. Last year we observed microstructures of bentonite by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM). Based on the knowledge of the local material properties obtained by MD and the microscopic observation we simulated the micro-/macro-behavior of diffusion experiments of the bentonite which included the microscale adsorption characteristics at the edges of clay minerals. (author)

  3. Advanced study of transport analysis in bentonite (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Katsuyuki

    2005-02-01

    Solute and radionuclide transport analysis in buffer material made of bentonite clay is essential in safety assessment of a geological disposal facility for high-level radioactive waste (HLW). It is keenly required to understand the true physical and chemical process of the transport phenomena and to improve reliability of the safety assessment, since any conventional methods based on experimental models involve difficulty to estimate the robustness for a very long-term behavior. In order to solve this difficulty we start with the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method for understanding the molecular-based fundamental properties such as an ionic state and diffusion characteristics of hydrated smectite clay minerals, and we extend the microscale properties to the macroscale behaviors by applying the multiscale homogenization analysis (HA) method. In the study of this year we improved the MD atomic model for the hydrated clay minerals, and a new adsorption-diffusion analysis scheme by the homogenization analysis (HA). In the MD simulation we precisely simulated the molecular behaviors of cations and H 2 O in the neighborhood of a clay mineral. In FY2002 the swelling property and diffusivity of interlayer cations, Cs and Ca, were calculated. In FY2003 the interatomic potential model was improved, and the diffusivity of several interlayer cations were calculated. In FY2004 the interatomic potential model was further improved, and the swelling and diffusive properties became more realistic. Then the coordination number of cations were calculated. A microscopic image is important to specify micro/macro behavior of bentonite. In FY2002 we observed microstructures of bentonite by using a confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM). In FY2003 based on the knowledge of the local material properties obtained by MD and the microscopic observation we simulated the micro-/macro-behavior of diffusion experiments of the bentonite which included the microscale adsorption

  4. Development of Syringe/Bottle Hybrids for Sampling Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    A convenient and effective sample bottle system based on simple modifications of disposable plastic syringes and bottles has been devised and tested for slurry samples. Syringe/ bottle hybrids (hereafter referred to as syringe bottles) have the convenience of regular flat-bottom bottles with screw cap closures. In addition, the syringe imparts a sliding and adjustable bottom to the bottle that forces the entire contents from the bottle. The system was designed especially to collect samples for high temperature work-ups of DWPF slurry samples. The syringe bottles together with fixed-bottom sample vial inserts would provide the DWPF with convenient and reliable methods for dealing with slurry samples

  5. Evaluation of plant available nitrogen in concentrated pig slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, M.; Comas, J.; Pujola, M.

    2009-01-01

    In Northeast Spin the expansion of the pig industry has brought as a result the production of vast amounts of pig slurry that exceeds field crops fertilization needs and consequently has contributed to the environmental deterioration of the region particularly ground water with NO 3 pollution. Under such circumstances, it is needed to treat and/or export pig slurry. During the last year the implantation of cogeneration plants that take advantage of the surplus of energy to produce concentrate pig slurry by water evaporation that could easily transported. (Author)

  6. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2011-01-01

    soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 μm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam...... physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil...

  7. Use of radiation-induced polymers in cement slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.; Gogarty, W.B.

    1976-01-01

    Water loss from cement slurries is reduced by incorporating within a cement slurry a polymer obtained as a product of radiation-induced polymerization of acrylamide and/or methacrylamide and acrylic acid, methacrylic acid, and/or alkali metal salts thereof. The polymerization is preferably carried out in 10-60 percent aqueous monomer solution with gamma radiation. The aqueous monomer solution preferably contains 25-99 percent acrylamide and 75-1 percent sodium acrylate. The polymer can be present in concentration of about 0.001 to about 3.0 weight percent, based on the aqueous phase of the slurry

  8. Adsorption of strontium on different sodium-enriched bentonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinović Sanja R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonites from three different deposits (Wyoming, TX, USA and Bogovina, Serbia with similar cation exchange capacities were sodium enriched and tested as adsorbents for Sr2+ in aqueous solutions. X-Ray diffraction analysis confirmed successful Na-exchange. The textural properties of the bentonite samples were determined using low-temperature the nitrogen physisorption method. Significant differences in the textural properties between the different sodium enriched bentonites were found. Adsorption was investigated with respect to adsorbent dosage, pH, contact time and the initial concentration of Sr2+. The adsorption capacity increased with pH. In the pH range from 4.0–8.5, the amount of adsorbed Sr2+ was almost constant but 2–3 times smaller than at pH ≈11. Further experiments were performed at the unadjusted pH since extreme alkaline conditions are environmentally hostile and inapplicable in real systems. The adsorption capacity of all the investigated adsorbents toward Sr2+ was similar under the investigated conditions, regardless of significant differences in the specific surface areas. It was shown and confirmed by the Dubinin–Radushkevich model that the cation exchange mechanism was the dominant mechanism of Sr2+ adsorption. Their developed microporous structures contributed to the Sr2+ adsorption process. The adsorption kinetics obeyed the pseudo-second-order model. The isotherm data were best fitted with the Langmuir isotherm model. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III 45001

  9. Diffusion of radionuclides in concrete/bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albinsson, Y.; Boerjesson, S.; Andersson, K.; Allard, B.

    1993-02-01

    In a repository for nuclear waste, different construction materials will be used. Two important materials among these are concrete and bentonite clay. These will act as mechanical barriers, preventing convective water flow and also retard transport due to diffusion of dissolved radionuclides by a combination of mechanical constraints and chemical interactions with the solid. An important issue is the possible change of the initial sodium bentonite into the calcium form due to ion exchange with calcium from the cement. The initial leaching of the concrete has been studied using radioactive spiked concrete in contact with compacted bentonite. The diffusion of Cs, Am and Pu into 5 different types of concrete in contact with porewater have been measured. The measured diffusivity for Cs agrees reasonable well with data found in literature. For Am and Pu no movement could be measured (less than 0.2 mm) even though the contact times were extremely long (2.5 y and 5 y, respectively). This report gives also a summary of the previously published results about sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in cement performed in Prav/KBS/SKB projects 1980-1990. 25 refs

  10. Swelling pressure in compacted bentonite below 0°C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgersson, Martin; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite is a common component in many concepts for underground storage of high level radioactive waste. During its lifetime, an underground repository will be subject to various ambient temperatures. Backfilled tunnels, shafts and investigation bore holes closest to ground level will experience periods of temperature below 0 deg. C. From a safety assessment perspective, it is therefore essential to investigate and understand the behavior of bentonite below 0 deg. C. A large set of laboratory tests have been performed where fully water saturated samples of bentonites have been exposed to temperatures in the range -10 deg. C - +25 deg. C. The swelling pressure response has been recorded continuously. The samples have been varied with respect to bentonite type (e.g. calcium or sodium dominated), smectite content and density. The general observation is that the pressure of the bentonite lowers in a temperature range between 0 deg. C and a specific (negative) temperature T c , which is strongly correlated to the swelling pressure measured above 0 deg. C. Consequently, Tc decreases (i.e. becomes more negative) with increased density or smectite content. At T c , swelling pressure is completely lost. Furthermore, a very weak pressure dependence is observed at temperatures above 0 deg. C. This dependence is however strictly dependent on sample density. For any type of bentonite at high enough densities above 0 deg. C, the slope of the P-T curve is negative and becomes more negative with increasing density. For Na-dominated bentonites at lower densities, on the other hand, the slope is positive. An important observation is that no pressure increase was observed for any of the tested bentonite samples as the transition to temperatures below 0 deg. C was made. Since water expands as it freezes, this observation indicates that no ice is formed in compacted bentonite as the 0 deg. C level is passed. The observed swelling

  11. Compression characteristics and permeability of saturated Gaomiaozi ca-bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjing; Sun De'an; Fang Lei

    2012-01-01

    The compression characteristics and permeability of compacted Gaomiaozi Ca-bentonite saturated by the water uptake tests are studied by conducting a series of one-dimension compression tests. The permeability coefficient can be calculated by the Terzaghi's one-dimensional consolidation theory after the consolidation coefficient is obtained by the square root of time method. It is found that the compression curves of compacted specimens saturated by the water uptake tests tend to be consistent in the relatively high stress range. The compression indexes show a linear decrease with increasing dry density and the swelling index is a constant. The permeability coefficient decreases with increasing compression stress, and they show the linear relationship in double logarithmic coordinates. Meanwhile, the permeability coefficient shows a linear decrease with decreasing void ratio, which has no relationship with initial states, stress states and stress paths. The permeability coefficient k of GMZ Ca-bentonite at dry density Pd of 1.75 g/cm 3 can be calculated as 2.0 × 10 -11 cm/s by the linear relationship between Pd and log k. It is closed to the permeability coefficient of GMZ Ca-bentonite with the same dry density published in literature, which testifies that the method calculating the permeability coefficient is feasible from the consolidation coefficient obtained by the consolidation test. (authors)

  12. Bentonite as a colloid source in groundwaters at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuorinen, U.; Hirvonen, H.

    2005-02-01

    In this work bentonite was studied as a potential source of colloids in Olkiluoto groundwaters. Samples were collected at two groundwater stations, PVA1 at 37.5 m dept and PVA3 at 95.6 m depth, in the VLJ-tunnel. The deeper groundwater at PVA3 was more saline (2.6g/L of Cl-) than the shallow at PVA1 (0.8g/L of Cl-). A bentonite source had been assembled at each groundwater station so that two sample lines were available for water samples; one for collecting a sample before and the other for collecting a sample after interaction with bentonite. Before starting the actual colloid sampling groundwaters from both sample lines at both stations were analysed. Only minor alterations, mostly within the uncertainty limits of the analysis methods, were brought about in the water chemistries after interaction with the bentonite sources. The only clear changes were seen in the concentration of iron which decreased after interaction with bentonite in the groundwaters at both stations. After groundwater sampling the actual colloid sampling was performed. The water samples were collected and treated inside a movable nitrogen filled glove-box. The samples could be collected from each sampling line directly in the glove-box via two quick-couplings that had been assembled on the front face of the box. The sample lines had been assembled with 0.45 μm filters before entering the glove-box, because only colloids smaller than 0.45 μm were of interest, as they are not prone to sedimentation in slow groundwater flows and therefore could act as potential radionuclide carriers. Colloid samples were collected and treated similarly from both sampling lines at both groundwater stations. For estimating the colloid content the groundwater samples were filtered with centrifugal ultrafiltration tubes of different cut-off values (0.3 μm, 300kD and 10kD). The ultrafiltrations produced the colloid-containing concentrate fractions and the soluble substances-containing filtrate fractions. In

  13. Modelling Ni diffusion in bentonite using different sorption models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingsten, W.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An important component of the multi barrier disposal concept for a radioactive waste repository is the bentonite backfill surrounding the canisters containing vitrified high-level waste and spent fuel located in the tunnels deep within the chosen host rock. The effectiveness of the compacted bentonite barrier is such that calculations have indicated that many radionuclides have decayed to insignificant levels before having diffused through the thickness of bentonite. These calculations are performed using the simple Kd sorption concept in which the values are taken from batch type experiments performed on dispersed systems performed for a single metal at a time, usually at trace concentrations. However, in such complex systems many radionuclides, inactive metal contaminants/ground water components may be simultaneously present in the aqueous phase at a range of concentrations varying with time during the temporal evolution of the repository system. An important aspect influencing the sorption of any radioactive metal under a set of given geochemical conditions is its competition with other metals present, and how this may vary as a function of concentration. Competitive sorption effects are not currently included in safety assessments and are thus an issue which needs to be addressed. Here we provide some first estimates of the potential influence of competitive sorption effects on the migration of radioactive metals through compacted bentonite as a function of their concentration and the concentration of competing metals. Ni(II) and Fe(II) were chosen as possible competing cations since their concentration levels are expected to have values greater than trace levels and effects might be maximal and canister corrosion represents a permanent Fe source at the bentonite interface which could influence bivalent radionuclide diffusion. The modelling of the Ni(II) diffusion/sorption has been carried out using three

  14. Ageing effects on swelling behaviour of compacted GMZ01 bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, W.M., E-mail: ye_tju@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); United Research Center for Urban Environment and Sustainable Development, the Ministry of Education, China, Shanghai 200092 (China); Lai, X.L.; Liu, Y. [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen, Y.G. [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); United Research Center for Urban Environment and Sustainable Development, the Ministry of Education, China, Shanghai 200092 (China); Cui, Y.J. [Key Laboratory of Geotechnical and Underground Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ecole des Ponts Paris Tech, UR Navier/CERMES (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Ageing effects on compacted GMZ01 bentonite are investigated. • Swelling property decreases with ageing and influenced by initial conditions. • Ageing effects are mainly attributed to the bonding effects and the hydration of smectites. - Abstract: Ageing effects on the swelling properties of compacted GMZ01 bentonite are investigated in this paper. Samples were compacted to prescribed dry densities and water contents and kept for ageing under constant volume and K{sub 0} confined conditions for target days of 0, 1, 7, 15, 30 and 90. Then, swelling deformation and swelling pressure tests were performed on the aged samples. Results indicate that both the swelling deformation and swelling pressure decrease with ageing time, with a more significant decrease at the first few days of ageing. Ageing effects are more pronounced for samples with large dry density and high water content. At the same initial dry density and water content, samples aged under constant volume conditions show much smaller decrease of swelling pressure compared to that of samples aged under K{sub 0} confined conditions. The decrease of swelling potential of samples with ageing days is mainly attributed to the bonding effects and the internal redistribution of water within the bentonite, which was confirmed by the changes of microstructure of samples with ageing.

  15. Transient nuclide release through the bentonite barrier -SKB 91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, A.; Widen, H.

    1991-05-01

    A study of near-field radionuclide migration is presented. The study has been performed in the context of the SKB91 study which is a comprehensive performance assessment of disposal of spent fuel. The objective of the present study has been to enable the assessment of which nuclides can be screened out because they decay to insignificant levels already in the near-field of the repository. A numerical model has been used which describes the transient transport of radionuclides through a small hole in a HLW canister imbedded in bentonite clay into a fracture in the rock outside the bentonite. Calculations for more than twenty nuclides, nuclides with both high and low solubility have been made. The effect of sorption in the bentonite backfill is included. The size of the penetration hole was assumed to be constant up to time when the calculations were terminated, 500000 year after the deposition. The mass transport rate is controlled by diffusion. The model is three dimensional. The report describes the geometry of the modelled system, the assumptions concerning the transport resistances at the boundary conditions, the handling of the source term and obtained release curves. (au)

  16. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  17. Physical properties, fuel characteristics and P-fertilizer production related to animal slurry and products from separation of animal slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Ole; Johnsen, Tina; Triolo, Jin Mi

    The purpose of this study was twofold: firstly to examine the relationship between dry matter content (DM) and specific gravity (SG) and viscosity in slurry and the liquid fraction from slurry separation, and secondly to investigate the potential of energy production from combustion of manure fibre...... from slurry separation and phosphorus (P) fertilizer production from recycling of the ash. Manure fibre has a positive calorific value and may be used as a CO2-neutral fuel for combustion. The ashes from combustion are rich in P, an essential fertilizer compound. The study is based on samples of animal...

  18. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufhold, Stephan, E-mail: s.kaufhold@bgr.de [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Hassel, Achim Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sanders, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Dohrmann, Reiner [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); LBEG, Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion at the bentonite iron interface proceeds unaerobically with formation of an 1:1 Fe silicate mineral. A series of exposure tests with different types of bentonites showed that Na–bentonites are slightly less corrosive than Ca–bentonites and highly charges smectites are less corrosive compared to low charged ones. The formation of a patina was observed in some cases and has to be investigated further. - Highlights: • At the iron bentonite interface a 1:1 Fe layer silicate forms upon corrosion. • A series of iron–bentonite corrosion products showed slightly less corrosion for Na-rich and high-charged bentonites. • In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe–silicate, which has to be investigated further. - Abstract: Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na–bentonites compared to the Ca–bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe

  19. Properties of sodium lignosulfonate as dispersant of coal water slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dongjie; Qiu, Xueqing; Zhou, Mingsong; Lou, Hongming

    2007-01-01

    In order to use lignosulfonates (a by-product of pulp and paper processes) as an effective dispersant of coal water slurry five purified sodium lignosulfonate (SL) samples with different molecular weights were prepared by fractionation using ultrafiltration and dialysis. The effect of SL on the apparent viscosity of coal water slurry (CWS) was investigated. The adsorption behavior of the SL on the coal water interface has much greater effect on the viscosity of coal water slurry. The higher adsorption amount and compact adsorption film of SL on the coal surface help reduce the viscosity of CWS, and the zeta potential is also an important factor, which is influenced by the sulfonic and carboxyl group contents of the lignosulfonate molecule. Furthermore, the SL with its molecular weight ranging from 10,000 to 30,000 has both a higher adsorbed amount and zeta potential on the coal surface and the best effect on reducing the viscosity of the coal water slurry

  20. Effect of flotation on preparation of coal-water slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, K.; Laskowski, J.S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    In order to study the effect of flotation reagents on the properties of coal-water slurry, a sub-bituminous coal was cleaned via either forward flotation or reverse flotation. The froth product from the forward flotation, obtained with the use of diesel oil and MIBC, and the tailings of the reverse flotation, carried out with dextrin-tannic acid depressants and dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride collector, were used in the preparation of coal-water slurries. It was shown that while it was possible to obtain the coal-water slurry with a high-solids content from the coal rendered hydrophilic (tailings from the coal reverse flotation), in the case of the hydrophobic product (froth product from the forward flotation) a dispersing agent was required to obtain the coal-water slurry of the same high-solids content.

  1. Environmental Consequences of Future Biogas Technologies based on Separated Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    different slurry separation technologies have been assessed and compared to a business-as-usual reference slurry management scenario. The results show that the environmental benefits of such biogas production are highly dependent upon the efficiency of the separation technology used to concentrate......This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involving...... the volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises...

  2. Progress on radioactive waste slurry incineration with oxygen and steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, M.; Hayashi, M.; Oda, I.; Nonaka, N.; Kuwayama, K.; Shigeta, T.

    1988-01-01

    The radioactive waste (radwaste) slurry generated from the nuclear power plant operation, such as spent ion-exchange resins (powdered, bead), fire-retardant oils including phosphate ester and concentrated laundry (by the wet method) liquid waste, has been stored in an untreated condition on the plant site. Recently, since the Condensate Filter Demineralizer (CFD) has been applied in advanced BWR plants, the discharged volume of untreated spent powered resin slurry has been increasing steadily. TEE and NCE have been developing an effective new volume reduction system to treat this radwaste slurry based on an innovative incineration concept. The new system is called the IOS process, the feature of which is incineration with oxygen and steam admixture instead of conventional air. The IOS process, which consists mainly of high heat load incineration with slurry atomization, and combustion gas cooling and condensation by the wet method, has several advantages which are summarized in this paper

  3. Sorption and diffusion of FE(II) in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Tournassat, C.; Hadi, J.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2014-02-01

    The iron in the engineering barrier system of a nuclear waste repository interacts via the corrosion process with the swelling clay intended as the buffer material. This interaction may affect the sealing properties of the clay. In the case of iron-bentonite interaction, redox reactions, dissolution/precipitation, the diffusion and sorption are coupled together. In a combined study different processes are difficult to distinguish from each other, and more specific studies are needed for the separate processes. In particular, there is a need for well-controlled diffusion and sorption experiments where iron is kept as Fe(II). In this project, sorption and diffusion of Fe(II) in bentonite have been studied. The experiments were carried out under low-oxygen conditions in an anaerobic glove-box. The radioactive isotope ( 55 Fe) was used as a tracer in the experiments. The sorption experiments were carried out with two batches of purified MX-80 bentonite. One was purified at Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres, French Geological Survey (BRGM) and the other one at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). Experiments were also carried out with synthetic smectite, which did not include iron, which was prepared at LMPC (ENSC, F 68093 Mulhouse, France). The sorption experiments were carried out in 0.3 M and 0.05 M NaCl solutions as a function of pH, and in 0.3 M NaCl solution buffered at pH 5 as a function of added Fe(II) concentration. The separation of bentonite and solution at the end of the sorption experiment was carried out in the early phase by centrifuging only. In the later phase, ultrafiltering was added in order to improve the separation. The diffusion experiments were carried out in compacted samples prepared from MX-80 purified at VTT and saturated with 0.3 M NaCl at pH 8 and 5. A non-steady-state diffusion experiment method, where the tracer was introduced as an impulse source between two bentonite plugs was used in the measurements

  4. Sorption and diffusion of FE(II) in bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Tournassat, C.; Hadi, J. [BRGM, Orleans (France); Greneche, J.-M. [LPCE, Le Mans (France)

    2014-02-15

    The iron in the engineering barrier system of a nuclear waste repository interacts via the corrosion process with the swelling clay intended as the buffer material. This interaction may affect the sealing properties of the clay. In the case of iron-bentonite interaction, redox reactions, dissolution/precipitation, the diffusion and sorption are coupled together. In a combined study different processes are difficult to distinguish from each other, and more specific studies are needed for the separate processes. In particular, there is a need for well-controlled diffusion and sorption experiments where iron is kept as Fe(II). In this project, sorption and diffusion of Fe(II) in bentonite have been studied. The experiments were carried out under low-oxygen conditions in an anaerobic glove-box. The radioactive isotope ({sup 55}Fe) was used as a tracer in the experiments. The sorption experiments were carried out with two batches of purified MX-80 bentonite. One was purified at Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres, French Geological Survey (BRGM) and the other one at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT). Experiments were also carried out with synthetic smectite, which did not include iron, which was prepared at LMPC (ENSC, F 68093 Mulhouse, France). The sorption experiments were carried out in 0.3 M and 0.05 M NaCl solutions as a function of pH, and in 0.3 M NaCl solution buffered at pH 5 as a function of added Fe(II) concentration. The separation of bentonite and solution at the end of the sorption experiment was carried out in the early phase by centrifuging only. In the later phase, ultrafiltering was added in order to improve the separation. The diffusion experiments were carried out in compacted samples prepared from MX-80 purified at VTT and saturated with 0.3 M NaCl at pH 8 and 5. A non-steady-state diffusion experiment method, where the tracer was introduced as an impulse source between two bentonite plugs was used in the measurements

  5. A study on the treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gyeong Hwan; Chung, U. S.; Baik, S. T.; Park, S. K.; Moon, J.S.; Jung, K.J.

    1998-12-01

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries with anionic flocculants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake

  6. A study on the treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gyeong Hwan; Chung, U. S.; Baik, S. T.; Park, S. K.; Moon, J.S.; Jung, K.J

    1998-12-01

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries with anionic flocculants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake.

  7. Improved system for pumping slurry of gel explosives into boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T K; Clay, R B; Udy, L L

    1967-05-16

    A method is described for injecting an explosive slurry into a borehole containing water. The slurry is heavier than water and is pumped through the tubing to a depth close to the bottom of the well. Injection is continued until all water has been displaced above the lower end of the tubing. This type of immiscible displacement results in substantially no mixing between the water and the explosive. (15 claims)

  8. Comparison of catalytic ethylene polymerization in slurry and gas phase

    OpenAIRE

    Daftaribesheli, Majid

    2009-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) with the annual consumption of 70 million tones in 2007 is mostly produced in slurry, gas-phase or combination of both processes. This work focuses on a comparison between the slurry and gas phase processes. Why does PE produced in theses two processes can show extremely different properties and extremely different reaction behaviour even if the same Ziegler-Natta (ZN) catalyst is used? Generally, it is known that the reason can be found in the differences of local condition...

  9. Formula of Moulding Sand, Bentonite and Portland Cement toImprove The Quality of Al-Si Cast Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Andoko Andoko; Poppy Puspitasari; Avita Ayu Permanasari; Didin Zakaria Lubis

    2017-01-01

    A binder is any material used to strengthen the bonding of moulding sand grains. The primary function of the binder is to hold the moulding sand and other materialstogether to produce high-quality casts. In this study, there were four binder compositions being tested, i.e. 5% bentonite + 5% Portland cement, 4% bentonite + 6% Portland cement, 6% bentonite + 4% Portland cement, and 7% bentonite + 3% Portland cement. Each specimen was measured for its compressive strength, shear strength, tensil...

  10. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  11. Environmental consequences of future biogas technologies based on separated slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik; Petersen, Bjørn M

    2011-07-01

    This consequential life cycle assessment study highlights the key environmental aspects of producing biogas from separated pig and cow slurry, a relatively new but probable scenario for future biogas production, as it avoids the reliance on constrained carbon cosubstrates. Three scenarios involving different slurry separation technologies have been assessed and compared to a business-as-usual reference slurry management scenario. The results show that the environmental benefits of such biogas production are highly dependent upon the efficiency of the separation technology used to concentrate the volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises the whole slurry life cycle, including the flows bypassing the biogas plant. This study includes soil carbon balances and a method for quantifying the changes in yield resulting from increased nitrogen availability as well as for quantifying mineral fertilizers displacement. Soil carbon balances showed that between 13 and 50% less carbon ends up in the soil pool with the different biogas alternatives, as opposed to the reference slurry management.

  12. Effect of lapping slurry on critical cutting depth of spinel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhan-kui; Wang, Zhuan-kui; Zhu, Yong-wei; Su, Jian-xiu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Measured spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different slurries. • Evaluated the softened layer thickness in different slurries. • Discussed the effect of slurries on critical cutting depth of spinel. - Abstract: The critical cutting depth for lapping process is very important because it influences the mode of material removal. In this paper, a serial of microscopic indentation experiments were carried out for measuring spinel wafers’ hardness and crack length in different lapping slurries. Their critical cutting depth and fracture toughness were calculated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was also employed to study the surface chemical composition and softened layer thickness of wafers in different slurries. Experimental results indicate that the softened layers of spinel wafers are formed due to the corrosion of lapping slurries, which leads to a lower hardness and a larger fracture toughness of samples, and increases the critical cutting depth. Among them, the critical cutting depth in ethylene glycol solution is the largest and up to 21.8 nm. The increase of critical cutting depth is helpful to modify the surface quality of the work-piece being lapped via ductile removal mode instead of brittle fracture mode

  13. Experimental study on the rheological behaviour of coal ash slurries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assefa K.M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental investigations were carried out to evaluate the rheological behaviour of fly ash (FA slurry without and with the addition of bottom ash (BA and BA slurry without and with the addition of FA. The FA slurries exhibited Bingham behaviour at solid mass concentrations ranging from 60–65% and mixing proportions from 10– 40%. A substantial reduction in yield stress was observed except for mixing proportion of 40% on which the yield stress and viscosity were increased drastically for all solid concentrations. Hence, it can be concluded that the yield stress and viscosity of FA slurry were very much influenced by adding BA up to the mixing proportion of 30%. The rheological behaviour of BA slurries with and without the addition of FA in proportions of 10–50% was investigated and exhibited Newtonian behaviours for solid mass concentrations ranging from 30–50% without and with the addition of FA. The viscosity increases with increasing the solid concentrations and proportion of FA. Based on these experimental data, a correlation was developed to predict the relative viscosity of BA slurries as a function of solid volume fraction and FA mass proportion of 0–50% and the RMSE and R2 values showed good agreement between the experimental and the predicted data.

  14. BENTONITE-QUARTZ SAND AS THE BACKFILL MATERIALS ON THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raharjo Raharjo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the contribution of quartz sand in the bentonite mixture as the backfill materials on the shallow land burial of radioactive waste has been done. The experiment objective is to determine the effect of quartz sand in a bentonite mixture with bentonite particle sizes of -20+40, -40+60, and -60+80 mesh on the retardation factor and the uranium dispersion in the simulation of uranium migration in the backfill materials. The experiment was carried out by the fixed bed method in the column filled by the bentonite mixture with a bentonite-to-quartz sand weight percent ratio of 0/100, 25/75, 50/50, 75/25, and 100/0 on the water saturated condition flown by uranyl nitrate solution at concentration (Co of 500 ppm. The concentration of uranium in the effluents in interval 15 minutes represented as Ct was analyzed by spectrophotometer, then using Co and Ct, retardation factor (R and dispersivity ( were determined. The experiment data showed that the bentonite of -60+80 mesh and the quartz sand of -20+40 mesh on bentonite-to-quartz sand with weight percent ratio of 50/50 gave the highest retardation factor and dispersivity of 18.37 and 0.0363 cm, respectively.   Keywords: bentonite, quartz sand, backfill materials, radioactive waste

  15. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sanders, Daniel; Dohrmann, Reiner

    2015-03-21

    Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na-bentonites compared to the Ca-bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe-silicate. Up to now it is not clear why and how the patina formed. It, however, may be relevant as a corrosion inhibitor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Cr/Bentonite and HZSM-5 Zeolite as Catalysts for Ethanol Conversion to Biogasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ronal Widjaya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research it has been done characterization on Cr/Bentonit and Zeolit HZSM-5 catalysts for ethanol catalytic process to biogasoline (equal to gasoline. Cr/Bentonit has high acidity and resistant to a lot of moisture, so in addition to being able to processing feed which a lot of moisture (>15% from ethanol-water mixture, also it is not easy deactivated. Cr/Bentonit which is then used as the catalyst material on the process of ethanol conversion to be biogasoline and the result was compared with catalyst HZSM-5 zeolite. Several characterization methods: X-ray diffraction, Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET, thermogravimetry analysis (TGA, and catalyst activity tests using catalytic Muffler instrument and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS for product analysis were performed on both catalysts. From acidity measurement, it is known that acidity level of Cr/Bentonit is the highest and also from XRD result, it is known there is shift for 2theta in Cr/Bentonit, which indicates that Cr-pillar in the Bentonite can have interaction. It is also supported by BET data that shows the addition of specific surface are in Cr/Bentonite compared with natural Bentonite before pillarization. Futhermore catalyst activity test produced the results, analyzed by GC-MS, identified as butanol and also possibly formed hexanol, decane, dodecane, undecane, which are all included in gasoline range (C4 until C12.

  17. Study on the saturating and swelling behavior of an engineering bentonite barrier using a test model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Makoto; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Toida, Masaru; Fujisaki, Katsutoshi

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual design of a disposal facility with additional buffer depth for radioactive waste is mainly constituted from the multi-barrier system that is constructed around the waste form so that it prevents radionuclide transfer to the biosphere. The engineered bentonite barrier is one of the elements of the multi-barrier system and is constructed with homogeneous bentonite-containing material compacted to a high density so that there are no voids. Due to the swelling characteristics of the bentonite material, the self-sealing function which is an important function of the bentonite barrier can work, but at the same time it mechanically affects the neighboring structures. Therefore, an experimental study was implemented in order to evaluate the mechanical effect of the bentonite swelling behavior throughout the construction, emplacement operations and closure re-saturation phase. In this article, the results of swelling tests to obtain the mechanical properties of the bentonite and three types of test model experiments performed for the event observations in the different saturation processes are described. As a result, the effects of a seepage pattern of ground water and a variation in the density produced by construction on the swelling pressure distribution of the bentonite barrier could be reproduced and validated. It is thought that they will be important events when ground water permeates the bentonite layer of a multiple barrier system. (author)

  18. Literature study on the microstructure of bentonite and its effect on diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.; Pusch, R.

    1994-12-01

    In the study the available information from the literature on the microstructural properties of bentonite and its main component montmorillonite have been compiled, together with different phenomena which have been found to participate in the diffusion process in bentonite. (167 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.)

  19. Electrochemical and radiochemical material transport examinations in humate-containing montmorillonite a bentonite thin layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antal, K.; Joo, P.

    1999-01-01

    Various humate-containing H-bentonite layers were investigated using 137 Cs ion transport and radio absorption measuring method. These processes can model radioactive contamination migration in soils exposed to acid rains. Experiment using montmorillonite and bentonite layers are discussed, and the results obtained with electrochemical and radioisotope absorption techniques are presented. (R.P.)

  20. Removal of nitrate by zero-valent iron and pillared bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianfa; Li Yimin; Meng Qingling

    2010-01-01

    The pillared bentonite prepared by intercalating poly(hydroxo Al(III)) cations into bentonite interlayers was used together with Fe(0) for removing nitrate in column experiments. The obvious synergetic effect on nitrate removal was exhibited through uniformly mixing the pillared bentonite with Fe(0). In such a mixing manner, the nitrate was 100% removed, and the removal efficiency was much higher than the simple summation of adsorption by the pillared bentonite and reduction by Fe(0). The influencing factors such as bentonite type, amount of the pillared bentonite and initial pH of nitrate solutions were investigated. In this uniform mixture, the pillared bentonite could adsorb nitrate ions, and facilitated the mass transfer of nitrate onto Fe(0) surface, then accelerated the nitrate reduction. The pillared bentonite could also act as the proton-donor, and helped to keep the complete nitrate removal for at least 10 h even when the nitrate solution was fed at nearly neutral pH.

  1. Geochemical modelling of hydrogen gas migration in an unsaturated bentonite buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Thomas, H.R.; Al Masum, S.; Vardon, P.J.; Nicholson, D.; Chen, Q.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the transport and fate of hydrogen gas through compacted bentonite buffer. Various geochemical reactions that may occur in the multiphase and multicomponent system of the unsaturated bentonite buffer are considered. A reactive gas transport model, developed

  2. Effect of calcium bentonite on lipid parameters in Wistar albino rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo effect of Nigerian calcium bentonite clay on rat plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels of Wistar albino rats was investigated. The rats were fed for a period of four weeks with varying concentrations of the bentonite clay, and the cholesterol and triglyceride levels determined using spectrophotometric methods.

  3. Sorption of technetium and its analogue rhenium on bentonite material under aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudelkova, M.; Vinsova, H.; Konirova, R.; Ernestova, M.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.; Tereesha, M.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of technetium on bentonite materials has been studied from the point of view of characterization of long-term radioactive elements behavior in nuclear waste repository. Bentonite R (locality Rokle, Czech Republic) and two types of model groundwater (granitic and bentonite) were selected for the sorption experiments. The aim of our research has been to find out the conditions suitable for the technetium sorption on selected bentonite under oxidizing condition. The sorption experiments with Tc-99 on bentonite have been carried out by batch method. The influence of the addition of different materials (e.g. activated carbon, graphite, Fe 2+ ) with bentonite, the effect of solid: aqueous phase ratio and a pH value on the percentage of technetium uptake and on the K d values were tested. Perrhenate was selected as an analogue of pertechnetate in non-active experiments of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and isotachophoresis (ITP). The percentage of rhenium sorbed on bentonite material was determined from the decrease of perrhenate peak area (CE) and from the shortening of the ITP zone corresponding to perrhenate. Both electromigration methods provided comparable results. The results obtained in this study with non-active material were compared to those of technetium acquired by radiometry and polarography. The 8 days kinetics of the perrhenate and pertechnetate sorption on bentonite was described mathematically with a tendency to predict long-term behavior of studied systems. (authors)

  4. Theory and calculation of water distribution in bentonite in a thermal field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1988-09-01

    Highly compacted bentonite is under consideration for use as a buffer material in geological repositories for high-level radioactive wastes. To assess the suitability of bentonite for this use, it is necessary to be able to predict the rate and spatial extent of water uptake and water distribution in highly compacted bentonite in the presence of thermal gradients. The ''Buffer Mass Test'' (BMT) was conducted by workers in Sweden as part of the Stripa Project. The BMT measured uptake and spatial distributions of water infiltrating annuli of compacted MX-80 sodium bentonite heated from within and surrounded by granite rock; the measurements provided a body of data very valuable for comparison to results of theoretical calculations. Results of experiments on adsorption of water by highly compacted MX-80 bentonite have been reported by workers in Switzerland. The experiments included measurements of heats of immersion and adsorption-desorption isotherms. These measurements provide the basis for prediction of water vapor pressures in equilibrium with bentonite having specified adsorbed water contents at various temperatures. The present work offers a phenomenological description of the processes influencing movement of water in compacted bentonite in the presence of a variable thermal field. The theory is applied to the bentonite buffer-water system in an assumed steady state of heat and mass transport, using critical data derived from the experimental work done in Switzerland. Results of the theory are compared to distributions of absorbed water in buffers observed in the Swedish BMT experiments. 9 refs., 2 figs

  5. Natural analogue study for interaction between alkaline groundwater and bentonite at Mangatarem region in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Y.; Fujita, K.; Nakabayashi, R.; Sato, T.; Yoneda, T.; Yamakawa, M.; Fujii, N.; Namiki, K.; Kasama, T.; Alexander, R.; Arcilla, C.; Pascua, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Alteration of bentonite by alkaline leachate from cement/concrete in geological repositories for TRU radioactive waste is deleterious to bentonite performance as a buffer material. Although there have been many laboratory studies on high pH fluid-bentonite interaction for longer term understanding of the behavior of bentonites as buffer materials, different time scales between laboratory experiments and real disposal conditions impede its proper assessment. Thus, a natural analogue study can play an important role in (a) bridging the timescale gaps between laboratory experiments and real disposal conditions and (b) verifying the modeling studies of bentonite stability. Previous natural analogue studies on the cement-bentonite interaction are relatively few. Therefore, this study focuses on the process of serpentinization in ophiolitic rocks which resemble the process of leaching high pH ground waters from cement materials and report the results of study about alkaline water-bentonite interaction in Mangatarem, Philippines. In Mangatarem, in west central Luzon Island in the northern Philippines, there are bentonite quarries in the Aksitero Formation, which is part of the Zambales Ophiolite. Several alkaline hot springs derived from ongoing serpentinization of the ophiolite can be found in close proximity to the bentonite.Through a site characterization (including a foot survey, a series of boreholes and trench excavation in the Saile quarry in Mangatarem, the interface between the bentonite and the pillow lava of the upper ophiolite was confirmed, and chrysotile, a low temperature type of serpentine, was observed in the fault filling by XRD analysis. In the pillow lava, serpentine was also observed inside the fault that cut across both the bentonite and the pillow lava. From these facts, low temperature high pH fluids appears to have passed through the faults and came into contact with the bentonite. In order to

  6. Use of Bentonite in residual waters of tanneries for the removal of Cr(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echavarria Isaza, Adriana; Moreno Casaf, Monica; Ramirez Ochoa, Claudia; Tamayo Martinez, Claudia; Saldarriaga Molina, Carlos

    1998-01-01

    An efficient procedure is reported for Cr(III) removal from tannery waste waters by means of natural and chemically treated bentonites. The best result was obtained using 20 mL of effluent with 7.5 grams of Bentonite. With this quantity it was removed the total amount of chromium III present in the sample

  7. Coupled transport/reaction model of the properties of bentonite buffer in a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jinsong; Neretnieks, I.

    1996-11-01

    Two mechanisms that can affect the long-term properties of the bentonite buffer surrounding the canister in a final repository of spent nuclear fuel are studied. The two mechanisms are the oxidation of reducing minerals in the buffer by radiolytically generated oxidant, and the low-temperature alteration of Na-montmorillonite in the bentonite buffer to illite. A coupled mass transport with geochemical reaction model is used. Four cases have been considered, which differ in the assumptions of whether the radiolytically generated oxidant first oxidizes uraninite in the spent fuel, or it is directly transported to the bentonite to oxidize the pyrite. The cases also differ in the assumptions of varying initial concentrations of pyrite in the bentonite buffer. The modelling results show that, at low temperatures, the sodium montmorillonite in the bentonite buffer is chemically stable with respect to the chemical conditions of the near field. Alteration to illite and thus an increase in hydraulic conductivity and loss of swelling ability is not likely to occur. The radiolytically generated oxidant can possibly oxidize the reducing minerals in the bentonite buffer. A redox front can be generated. In all the cases considered in this study, the modelling results indicate that slightly less than 1% by weight of pyrite in the bentonite buffer will be able to ensure that the redox front does not penetrate through the bentonite buffer within 1 million years. 31 refs

  8. Effects of bentonite on plasma urea and creatinine of wistar albino rats.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The in vivo effect of Nigerian calcium bentonite clay on wistar albino rat plasma urea and creatinine levels were investigated. The rats were fed for a period of four weeks with varying concentrations of the bentonite clay, and the urea and creatinine levels determined using spectrophotometric methods. Test results showed ...

  9. Freezing of bentonite. Experimental studies and theoretical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    During its lifetime, a KBS-3 repository will be subject to various ambient temperatures. Backfilled tunnels, shafts and investigation bore holes closest to ground level will experience periods of temperature below 0 deg C. From a safety assessment perspective, it is therefore essential to understand the behavior of compacted bentonite below 0 deg C. A theoretical framework for predicting the pressure response in compacted water saturated bentonite due to temperature changes has been developed based on thermodynamics and a single pore-type. This model predicts an approximately linear temperature dependence of swelling pressure P{sub s}(w,DELTAT) = P{sub s}(w,0 deg C) + DELTAs(w)DELTAT/nu{sub clay}(w) where DELTAT denotes a temperature difference from 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) is the difference in partial molar entropy between clay water and bulk water, nu{sub clay} (w) is the partial molar volume of the clay water and w denotes the water/solid mass ratio of the clay. As bulk water changes phase at 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) has a different value dependent on whether DELTAT is negative or positive. Above 0 deg C DELTAs(w) is a small value for all relevant densities which means that the pressure response due to temperature changes is small. A further consequence of this fact is that DELTAs(w) is a large positive number below 0 deg C when the external water phase is transformed to ice. Consequently, the model predicts a large drop of swelling pressure with temperature below 0 deg C, in the order of 1.2 MPa/deg C. Specifically, the swelling pressure is zero at a certain (negative) temperature T{sub C}. T{sub C} also quantifies the freezing point of the bentonite sample under consideration, as ice formation in the bentonite does not occur until swelling pressure is lost. A large set of laboratory tests have been performed where fully water saturated samples of bentonites have been exposed to temperatures in the range -10 deg C to +25 deg C. The swelling pressure response has been

  10. Wyoming bentonites. Evidence from the geological record to evaluate the suitability of bentonite as a buffer material during the long-term underground containment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smellie, J.

    2001-12-01

    In the Swedish programme for the deep, geological disposal of radioactive wastes, bentonite is planned to be used as a barrier material to reduce groundwater flow and minimise radionuclide migration into the geosphere. One of the possible threats to long-term bentonite stability is the gradual incursion of saline water into the repository confines which may reduce the swelling capacity of the bentonite, even to the extent of eliminating the positive effects of mixing bentonite into backfill materials. Important information may be obtained from the study of analogous processes in nature (i.e. natural analogue or natural system studies) where bentonite, during its formation, has been in long-term contact with reducing waters of brackish to saline character. Type bentonites include those mined from the Clay Spur bed at the top of the Cretaceous Mowry Formation in NE Wyoming and demarcated for potential use as a barrier material (e.g. MX-80 sodium bentonite) in the Swedish radioactive waste programme. This bentonite forms part of the Mowry Shale which was deposited in a southern embayment of the late Albian Western Interior Cretaceous sea (Mowry Sea). The question is whether these bentonite deposits show evidence of post-deposition alteration caused by the sea water in which they were deposited, and/or, have they been altered subsequently by contact with waters of increasing salinity? Bentonites are the product of pyroclastic fall deposits thought to be generated by the type of explosive, subaerial volcanic activity characteristic of Plinian eruptive systems. In Wyoming the overall composition of the original ash varied from dacite to rhyolite, or latite to trachyte. The ash clouds were carried to high altitudes and eastwards by the prevailing westerly winds before falling over the shallow Mowry Sea and forming thin but widespread and continuous horizons on sea floor muds and sands. Whilst bentonites were principally wind-transported, there is evidence of some water

  11. Wyoming bentonites. Evidence from the geological record to evaluate the suitability of bentonite as a buffer material during the long-term underground containment of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, J [Conterra AB (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    In the Swedish programme for the deep, geological disposal of radioactive wastes, bentonite is planned to be used as a barrier material to reduce groundwater flow and minimise radionuclide migration into the geosphere. One of the possible threats to long-term bentonite stability is the gradual incursion of saline water into the repository confines which may reduce the swelling capacity of the bentonite, even to the extent of eliminating the positive effects of mixing bentonite into backfill materials. Important information may be obtained from the study of analogous processes in nature (i.e. natural analogue or natural system studies) where bentonite, during its formation, has been in long-term contact with reducing waters of brackish to saline character. Type bentonites include those mined from the Clay Spur bed at the top of the Cretaceous Mowry Formation in NE Wyoming and demarcated for potential use as a barrier material (e.g. MX-80 sodium bentonite) in the Swedish radioactive waste programme. This bentonite forms part of the Mowry Shale which was deposited in a southern embayment of the late Albian Western Interior Cretaceous sea (Mowry Sea). The question is whether these bentonite deposits show evidence of post-deposition alteration caused by the sea water in which they were deposited, and/or, have they been altered subsequently by contact with waters of increasing salinity? Bentonites are the product of pyroclastic fall deposits thought to be generated by the type of explosive, subaerial volcanic activity characteristic of Plinian eruptive systems. In Wyoming the overall composition of the original ash varied from dacite to rhyolite, or latite to trachyte. The ash clouds were carried to high altitudes and eastwards by the prevailing westerly winds before falling over the shallow Mowry Sea and forming thin but widespread and continuous horizons on sea floor muds and sands. Whilst bentonites were principally wind-transported, there is evidence of some water

  12. A simple biofilter for treatment of pig slurry in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S G; Mathanpaal, G; Dass, G T

    2005-03-01

    On commercial pig production farms in South East (SE) Asia, the liquid effluent is often discharged into rivers. The discharge is a hazard to the environment and to the health of people using water from the river either for consumption or for irrigation. Therefore, a simple percolation biofilter for treatment of the liquid effluent was developed. Pig slurry was treated in test-biofilters packed with different biomass for the purpose of selecting the most efficient material, thereafter the efficiency of the biofilter was examined at farm scale with demo biofilters using the most efficient material. The effect of using "Effective Microorganisms" (EM) added to slurry that was treated with biofilter material mixed with Glenor KR+ was examined. Slurry treatment in the test-biofilters indicated that rice straw was better than coconut husks, wood shavings, rattan strips and oil palm fronds in reducing BOD. Addition of EM and Glenor KR+ to slurry and biofilter material, respectively, had no effect on the temperature of the biofilter material or on the concentrations of organic and inorganic components of the treated slurry. The BOD of slurry treated in test biofilters is reduced to between 80 and 637 mg O2 I(-1) and in the demo biofilter to between 3094 and 3376 mg O2 l(-1). The concentration of BOD in the effluent is related to the BOD in the slurry being treated and the BOD concentration in slurry treated in test biofilters was lower than BOD of slurry treated in demo biofilters. The demo biofilter can reduce BOD to between 52 an 56% of the original value, and TSS, COD (chemical oxygen demand) and ammonium (NH4+) to 41-55% of the original slurry. The treated effluent could not meet the standards for discharge to rivers. The composted biofilter material has a high content of nitrogen and phosphorus; consequently, the fertilizer value of the compost is high. The investments costs were 123 US dollar per SPP which has to be reduced if this method should be a treatment option

  13. Preliminary Study on Benzoic Acid Adsorption from Crude Active Coals and Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbes Boucheta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the adsorption of pollutant benzoic acid by the modified bentonite of Maghnia (west of Algeria, and coal (Coal from the mines, southwest of Algeria, Bechar area under three forms, crude and activated. Kinetic data show that the balance of bentonite (as amended adsorbs organic acids better than activated and raw coal. Indeed, the intercalation of bentonite with benzoic acid causes an improvement in the texture of porous material, which allows its use in the adsorption of organic compounds. The adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich indicate that the adsorption of benzoic acid by the coal and bentonite yielded results favorably. The results obtained showed the practical value of using the activated coal and bentonite (as amended in the field of remediation of water contaminated with organic pollutants

  14. A study of the condition for the passivation of carbon steel in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Morimoto, Masataka; Honda, Akira

    1999-01-01

    It is important to study the corrosion behavior of materials to be used for overpack for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Carbon steel is one of the candidate materials. The type of corrosion on carbon steel depends on whether the carbon steel is passivated or not. In this study, the condition for the passivation of carbon steel was studied using bentonite as the buffer material. Anodic polarization in bentonite and the measurements of pH of porewater in bentonite was measured. The results of these experiments showed that the possibility of passivation is small in highly compacted bentonite in groundwater in Japan. Therefore, localized corrosion on carbon steel due to the breakdown of passive film is unlikely in bentonite. In other words, general corrosion seems to be the most probable type of corrosion under repository condition in Japan. (author)

  15. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jae-Won; Ha, Young-Kyoung; Choi, In-Kyu; Chun, Kwan-Sik

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium were studied. Corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was measured to be 20 μm/yr at 25 deg C using the AC impedance technique. This value is agreed with that obtained by weight loss at 40 deg C for 1 year. The effect of bicarbonate ion on the corrosion of carbon steel in wet bentonite was also evaluated. The carbon steels in wet bentonite having 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 M concentration of bicarbonate ion gave corrosion rates of 20, 8, and 0.2 μm/yr, respectively. Corrosion potentials of specimens were also measured and compared with the AC impedance results. Both results indicated that bicarbonate ion could effectively reduce the corrosion rate of carbon steels in bentonite due to the formation of protective layer on the carbon steel. (author)

  16. Cytotoxicity and mechanical behavior of chitin-bentonite clay based polyurethane bio-nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Barikani, Mehdi; Hussain, Rizwan; Jamil, Tahir; Anjum, Sohail

    2011-12-01

    Chitin based polyurethane bio-nanocomposites (PUBNC) were prepared using chitin, Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay enriched in montmorillonite (MMT), 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and polycaprolactone polyol CAPA 231 (3000 g/mol(-1)). The prepolymers having different concentration of Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay were extended with 2 moles of chitin. The structures of the resulted polymers were determined by FT-IR technique. The effect of nanoclay contents on mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility was investigated. The mechanical properties of the synthesized materials were improved with increase in the Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay contents. Optimum mechanical properties were obtained from the PU bio-nanocomposite samples having 4% Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay. The results revealed that the final PU bio-nanocomposite having 2% Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay contents is ideal contenders for surgical threads with on going investigations into their in vitro biocompatibility, non-toxicity, and mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mobility of U, Np, Pu, Am and Cm from spent nuclear fuel into bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramebaeck, H.; Skaalberg, M.; Eklund, U.B.; Kjellberg, L.; Werme, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mobility of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium from spent nuclear fuel (UO 2 ) into compacted bentonite was studied. Pieces of spent BWR UO 2 fuel was embedded in a compacted bentonite clay/low saline synthetic groundwater system. After a contact time of six years the bentonite was sliced into 0.1 mm thick slices and analysed for its content of actinides. Radiometric as well as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used for the analysis. The influence on the mobility by the addition of metallic iron, metallic copper and vivianite (Fe(II)-mineral) to the bentonite clay was investigated. The results show a low mobility of actinides in bentonite clay. Except for uranium the mobility of the other actinides could, after six years of diffusion time, only be detected less than 1 mm from the spent fuel. (orig.)

  18. Erosion of bentonite by flow and colloid diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Luis; Liu, Longcheng; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite intrusion into a fracture intersecting the canister deposition hole is modelled. The model describes the expansion of the bentonite within the fracture. It accounts for the repulsive electrostatic double-layer forces, the attractive van der Waals forces and friction forces between the particles and the water. The model also takes into account the diffusion of the colloid particles in the smectite sol. The buffer contains sodium in the pore water in much higher concentrations than the approaching seeping groundwater in the fracture has. Diffusion of sodium outward in the expanding gel is accounted for as this strongly influences the double layer force and the viscosity of the gel/sol. The gel/ sol is considered to be a fluid with a varying viscosity that is strongly dependent on the bentonite volume fraction in the gel and the sodium concentration in the water. Two different geometries were modelled; a rectangular and a cylindrical showing the flow in a fracture intersecting the deposition hole with the canister. The rectangular geometry was used to gain experience with the processes and mechanisms and how they interact since the cylindrical geometry was somewhat less stable numerically and more time consuming. In the rectangular geometry a fracture 1 metre long in the flow direction was modelled. In both geometries the fracture depth (extent from the deposition hole) was selected sufficiently large to ensure that the water velocity, near this border was nearly the same as the approaching water velocity and that the smectite concentration there was vanishingly small. It was found that the velocity of the fluid drops considerably where the bentonite volume fraction is larger than 1-2%. This is due to the strong increase in viscosity with increasing bentonite volume fraction. The loss of smectite as it is carried away by the slowly flowing fluid was found to be proportional to the square root of the seeping

  19. Review on cation exchange selectivity coefficients for MX-80 bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Sellin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bentonite is considered as engineered barrier in the near field of a nuclear waste repository due to its low permeability, what impedes groundwater flow to the nuclear waste, and its high retention capacity (sorption) of radionuclides in the eventuality of groundwater intrusion. One of the main retention processes occurring at the bentonite surface is ion exchange. This process may exert a strong control on the mobility of major pore water cations. Changes in major cation concentration, especially calcium, can affect the dissolution-precipitation of calcite, which in turn controls one of the key parameters in the system: pH. The cation exchange process is usually described according to the Gaines-Thomas convention: Ca 2+ + 2 NaX = CaX 2 + 2 Na + , K Ca = (N Ca x a 2 Na + )/(N 2 Na x a Ca 2+ ) where K Ca is the selectivity coefficient for the Ca by Na exchange, ai is the activity of cation 'i' in solution and NJ the equivalent fractional occupancy of cation 'J' in bentonite. Parameters such as solid to liquid (S:L) ratio and dry density of the solid have an important influence on the value of selectivity coefficients (K ex ). Although in most geochemical modelling works, K ex values are directly taken from experiments conducted at low S:L ratios and low dry densities, the expected conditions in a deep geological nuclear waste repository are higher S:L and higher bentonite density (1.6 g.cm -3 in the SKB design to obtain a fully water saturated density of around 2.0 g.cm -3 ). Experiments focused at obtaining selectivity coefficients under the conditions of interest face the difficulty of achieving a proper extraction and analyses of pore water without disturbing the system by the sampling method itself. In this work we have conducted a complete analyses of published data on MX-80 bentonite cationic exchange in order to assess the effect of the S:L ratio and dry density on the value of the selectivity coefficients determined so far

  20. Behavior of plutonium interacting with bentonite and sulfate-reducing anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, A.; Zheng, J.; Cayer, I.; Fujikawa, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ito, M.

    1997-01-01

    The interactions between sulfate reducing anaerobic bacteria and plutonium, with or without bentonite present, were investigated using distribution coefficients [Kd (ml/g)] as an index of the radionuclide behavior. Plutonium Kds for living bacteria varied within a large range, from 1,804 to 112,952, depending on the pH, while the Kds ranged from 1,180 to 5,931 for dead bacteria. In general, living bacteria had higher plutonium Kds than dead bacteria. Furthermore, the higher Kd values of 39,677 to 106,915 for living bacteria were obtained for a pH range between 6.83 and 8.25, while no visible pH effect was observed for dead bacteria. These Kd values were obtained using tracers for both 236 Pu and 239 Pu, which can check the experimental procedures and mass balance. Another comparison was conducted for plutonium Kd values of mixtures of living bacteria with bentonite and sterilized bacteria with bentonite. The range of Kd values for the non-sterilized bacteria with bentonite were 1,194 to 83,648 while Kd values for the sterilized bacteria with bentonite were from 624 to 17,236. Again, the Kd values for the living bacteria with bentonite were higher than those of sterilized bacteria with bentonite. In other words, the presence of living anaerobic bacteria with bentonite increased, by roughly 50 times, the Kd values of 239 Pu when compared to the mixture of dead bacteria with bentonite. The results indicate that the effects of anaerobic bacteria within the engineered barrier system (in this case bentonite) will play a significant role in the behavior of plutonium in geologic repositories

  1. The advantages of a salt/bentonite backfill for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, B.M.; Novak, C.F.; Jercinovic, M.

    1991-04-01

    A 70/30 wt% salt/bentonite mixture is shown to be preferable to pure crushed salt as backfill for disposal rooms in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report discusses several selection criteria used to arrive at this conclusion: the need for low permeability and porosity after closure, chemical stability with the surroundings, adequate strength to avoid shear erosion from human intrusion, ease of emplacement, and sorption potential for brine and radionuclides. Both salt and salt/bentonite are expected to consolidate to a final state of impermeability (i.e., ≤ 10 -18 m 2 ) adequate for satisfying federal nuclear regulations. Any advantage of the salt/bentonite mixture is dependent upon bentonite's potential for sorbing brine and radionuclides. Estimates suggest that bentonite's sorption potential for water in brine is much less than for pure water. While no credit is presently taken for brine sorption in salt/bentonite backfill, the possibility that some amount of inflowing brine would be chemically bound is considered likely. Bentonite may also sorb much of the plutonium, americium, and neptunium within the disposal room inventory. Sorption would be effective only if a major portion of the backfill is in contact with radioactive brine. Brine flow from the waste out through highly localized channels in the backfill would negate sorption effectiveness. Although the sorption potentials of bentonite for both brine and radionuclides are not ideal, they are distinctly beneficial. Furthermore, no detrimental aspects of adding bentonite to the salt as a backfill have been identified. These two observations are the major reasons for selecting salt/bentonite as a backfill within the WIPP. 39 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Sorption of technetium and its analogue rhenium on bentonite material under aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Konirova, R.; Vecernik, P.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of technetium on bentonite materials has been studied from the point of view of characterization of long-term radioactive elements behavior in nuclear waste repository. Bentonite R (locality Rokle, Czech Republic) and two types of model groundwater (granitic and bentonite) were selected for the sorption experiments. It is generally known that bentonite materials show an excellent cation-exchange capacity and, on the other hand, a poor uptake of anions. Technetium occurs under aerobic conditions in its most stable oxidation state (+VII) as pertechnetate, which makes a question of its sorption on bentonite more complex when compared with e.g. Cs + or Sr 2+ . To increase the K d values for technetium sorption on bentonite, it is necessary to carry out the experiments under anaerobic conditions in the presence of reducing agent, which is capable to lower the oxidation state of technetium which enables its successful immobilization. The aim of our research has been to find out the conditions suitable for the technetium sorption on selected bentonite under oxidizing conditions. The sorption experiments with Tc-99 on bentonite have been carried out by batch method. The influence of the addition of different materials (e.g. activated carbon, graphite, Fe 2+ , Fe) with bentonite, the effect of solid:aqueous phase ratio and a pH value on the percentage of technetium uptake and on the K d values were tested. Perrhenate was selected as an analogue of pertechnetate in non-active experiments of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and isotachophoresis (ITP). The percentage of rhenium sorbed on bentonite material was determined from the decrease of perrhenate peak area (CE) and from the shortening of the ITP zone corresponding to perrhenate. Both electromigration methods provided comparable results. The results obtained in this study with non-active material were compared to those of technetium acquired by radiometry and polarography. (authors)

  3. Electrical resistivity and rheological properties of sensing bentonite drilling muds modified with lightweight polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Mohammed

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the electrical resistivity and rheological properties of a water-based bentonite clay drilling mud modified with the lightweight polymer (guar gum under various temperature were investigated. Based on the experimental and analytical study, the electrical resistivity was identified as the sensing property of the bentonite drilling mud so that the changes in the properties can be monitored in real-time during the construction. The bentonite contents in the drilling muds were varied up to 8% by the weight of water and temperature was varied from 25 °C to 85 °C. The guar gum content (GG% was varied between 0% and 1% by the weight of the drilling mud to modify the rheological properties and enhance the sensing electrical resistivity of the drilling mud. The guar gum and bentonite clay were characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The total weight loss at 800 °C for the bentonite decreased from 12.96% to 0.7%, about 95% reduction, when the bentonite was mixed with 1% of guar gum. The results also showed that 1% guar gum decreased the electrical resistivity of the drilling mud from 50% to 90% based on the bentonite content and the temperature of the drilling mud. The guar gum modification increased the yield point (YP and plastic viscosity (PV by 58% to 230% and 44% to 77% respectively based on the bentonite content and temperature of the drilling mud. The rheological properties of the drilling muds have been correlated to the electrical resistivity of the drilling mud using nonlinear power and hyperbolic relationships. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental results. Hence the performance of the bentonite drilling muds with and without guar gum can be characterized based on the electrical resistivity which can be monitored real-time in the field. Keywords: Bentonite, Polymer (Guar gum, Electrical resistivity, Rheological properties, Temperature, Modeling

  4. Physicochemical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of domestic bentonite and bentonite-sand mixture as a buffer material in the high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kang, Chul Hyung; Chun, Kwan Sik

    1999-09-01

    The physicochemical properties such as specific weight, free swell rate, chemical composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area and distribution coefficient of Kyunggju bentonite were measured, and the mineralogical analysis was performed to investigate the mineralogical composition. For the compacted bentonite and the mixture of bentonite and sand, the liquid and plastic limit, the linear shrinkage, and compaction property, the compression property, the shear property, and the consolidation property were investigated and analyzed. The bentonite contains montmorillonite (70 percent), feldspar (29 percent), and small amounts of quartz(-1 percent). The compressive strengths of bentonites are increased from 0.53 MPa to 8.83 MPa rapidly with increasing dry density of 1.4 g/cm 3 to 1.8 g/cm 3 . The cohesion and internal friction angles of bentonites with the dry density of 1.4 g/cm 3 to 1.8 g/cm 3 are in the range of 500 to 1100 kPa and 27 to 50 degree, respectively. (Author). 21 refs., 20 tabs., 46 figs

  5. Physicochemical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of domestic bentonite and bentonite-sand mixture as a buffer material in the high-level waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kang, Chul Hyung; Chun, Kwan Sik

    1999-09-01

    The physicochemical properties such as specific weight, free swell rate, chemical composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area and distribution coefficient of Kyunggju bentonite were measured, and the mineralogical analysis was performed to investigate the mineralogical composition. For the compacted bentonite and the mixture of bentonite and sand, the liquid and plastic limit, the linear shrinkage, and compaction property, the compression property, the shear property, and the consolidation property were investigated and analyzed. The bentonite contains montmorillonite (70 percent), feldspar (29 percent), and small amounts of quartz(-1 percent). The compressive strengths of bentonites are increased from 0.53 MPa to 8.83 MPa rapidly with increasing dry density of 1.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}. The cohesion and internal friction angles of bentonites with the dry density of 1.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} are in the range of 500 to 1100 kPa and 27 to 50 degree, respectively. (Author). 21 refs., 20 tabs., 46 figs.

  6. Adsorption of La(III) onto GMZ bentonite. Effect of contact time, bentonite content, pH value and ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonggui Chen; Changsha University of Science and Technology, Changsha; Chunming Zhu; Weimin Ye; Yanhong Sun; Huiying Duan; Dongbei Wu

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite has been studied extensively because of its strong adsorption capacity. A local Na-bentonite named GMZ bentonite, collected from Gaomiaozi County (Inner Mongolia, China), was selected as the first choice of buffer/backfill material for the high-level radioactive waste repository in China. In this research, the adsorption of La (III) onto GMZ bentonite was performed as a function of contact time, pH, solid content and metal ion concentrations by using the batch experiments. The results indicate that the adsorption of La (III) on GMZ bentonite achieves equilibration quickly and the kinetic adsorption follows the pseudo-second-order model; the adsorption of La (III) on the adsorbent is strongly dependent on pH and solid content, the adsorption process follows Langmuir isotherm. The equilibrium batch experiment data demonstrate that GMZ bentonite is effective adsorbent for the removal of La (III) from aqueous solution with the maximum adsorption capacity of 26.8 mg g -1 under the given experimental conditions. (author)

  7. High Temperature Thermal Properties of Bentonite Foundry Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajewski P.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of measuring thermal conductivity and heat capacity of bentonite foundry sand in temperature range ambient - 900­­°C. During the experiments a technical purity Cu plate was cast into the green-sand moulds. Basing on measurements of the mould temperature field during the solidification of the casting, the temperature relationships of the measured properties were evaluated. It was confirmed that water vaporization strongly influences thermal conductivity of the moulding sand in the first period of the mould heating by the poured casting.

  8. Morphology study of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Rene A.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Medeiros, Vanessa Nobrega; Pessan, Luiz A.; Passador, Fabio R.

    2011-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have had much attention in recent years, especially those developed with layered silicates, due to the need for engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in the crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and it has been observed that it affects the behavior of crystalline and therefore the mechanical and physical properties. In this study, polyamide 6 nanocomposites were obtained by the melt intercalation technique, using regional bentonite clay modified with a quaternary ammonium salt in an amount of 3% by weight. XRD and TEM tests showed obtaining nanocomposites with exfoliated structures (author)

  9. Development of polymer nanocomposites with regional bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Edcleide M.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Paz, Rene A. da; Medeiros, Keila M. de; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Barbosa, Josiane D.V.; Barbosa, Renata

    2011-01-01

    nanocomposites with regional bentonite clay were prepared by melt intercalation technique. The clays were studied without modification and modified with four quaternary ammonium salts. It was evidenced by X-ray diffraction that salts were incorporated into the clay structure thus confirming its organophilization. The nanocomposites were evaluated by means of thermal mechanic and flammability tests where presented properties significantly improved their pure polymers. The process of biodegradation of obtained bio nanocomposites was accelerated by the presence of clay. The produced membranes from nanocomposites have potential in the oil-water separation. (author)

  10. Microbial communities in bentonite formations and their interactions with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Fernández, Margarita; Fernández-Sanfrancisco, Omar; Moreno-García, Alberto; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; Sánchez-Castro, Iván; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Microbial diversity of Spanish bentonites was studied. • High number of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbes were isolated from bentonites. • Natural bentonite microbes are able to tolerate high U concentrations. • U is immobilized by the cells of the strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa BII-R8 as U(VI) phosphates. - Abstract: A reliable performance assessment of deep geological disposal of nuclear waste depends on better knowledge of radionuclide interactions with natural microbes of geological formations (granitic rock, clay, salts) used to host these disposal systems. In Spain, clay deposits from Cabo de Gata region, Almeria, are investigated for this purpose. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of two bentonite samples (BI and BII) recovered from Spanish clay deposits. The evaluation of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbial populations shows the presence of a high number of cultivable bacteria (e.g. Stenotrophomonas, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Sphingomonas, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, etc.) affiliated to three phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In addition, a pigmented yeast strain BII-R8 related to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from these formations. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of uranium for the growth of these natural isolates were found to range from 4 to 10.0 mM. For instance, strain R. mucilaginosa BII-R8 was shown to tolerate up to 8 mM of U. Flow cytometry studies indicated that the high U tolerance of this yeast isolate is a biologically mediated process. Microscopically dense intracellular and cell wall-bound precipitates were observed by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-High-Angle Annular Dark-Field (STEM-HAADF). Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) element-distribution maps showed the presence of U and P within these accumulates, indicating the ability of cells to precipitate U as U(VI) phosphate minerals. Fundamental understanding of the

  11. Microbial communities in bentonite formations and their interactions with uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Fernández, Margarita; Fernández-Sanfrancisco, Omar; Moreno-García, Alberto; Martín-Sánchez, Inés; Sánchez-Castro, Iván; Merroun, Mohamed Larbi, E-mail: merroun@ugr.es

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Microbial diversity of Spanish bentonites was studied. • High number of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbes were isolated from bentonites. • Natural bentonite microbes are able to tolerate high U concentrations. • U is immobilized by the cells of the strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa BII-R8 as U(VI) phosphates. - Abstract: A reliable performance assessment of deep geological disposal of nuclear waste depends on better knowledge of radionuclide interactions with natural microbes of geological formations (granitic rock, clay, salts) used to host these disposal systems. In Spain, clay deposits from Cabo de Gata region, Almeria, are investigated for this purpose. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of two bentonite samples (BI and BII) recovered from Spanish clay deposits. The evaluation of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbial populations shows the presence of a high number of cultivable bacteria (e.g. Stenotrophomonas, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Sphingomonas, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, etc.) affiliated to three phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In addition, a pigmented yeast strain BII-R8 related to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from these formations. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of uranium for the growth of these natural isolates were found to range from 4 to 10.0 mM. For instance, strain R. mucilaginosa BII-R8 was shown to tolerate up to 8 mM of U. Flow cytometry studies indicated that the high U tolerance of this yeast isolate is a biologically mediated process. Microscopically dense intracellular and cell wall-bound precipitates were observed by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-High-Angle Annular Dark-Field (STEM-HAADF). Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) element-distribution maps showed the presence of U and P within these accumulates, indicating the ability of cells to precipitate U as U(VI) phosphate minerals. Fundamental understanding of the

  12. Predicting wear of hydrotransport pipelines in oil sand slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Been, J.; Lu, B.; Wolodko, J. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kiel, D. [Coanda Research and Development Corp., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    An overview of erosion and corrosion methods and techniques was presented. Wear to pipelines is influenced by slurry flow and chemistry; solids loading; and electrochemical interactions. While several experimental techniques have been developed to rank the performance of different pipeline materials, experiments do not currently provide accurate quantitative prediction of pipeline wear in the field. Rotating cylinder electrodes (RCE) and jet impingement methods are used to study the effect of flow velocity on corrosion rate. Slurry pot erosion-corrosion testers are used to rank materials for use in more dilute, less turbulent slurries. Coriolois slurry erosion testers are used to rank the erosion resistance of different pipeline materials. A pilot-scale flow loop is now being constructed by the Alberta Research Council (ARC) in order to replicate wet erosion phenomena in oil sands applications. The flow loop will be used to simulate the field conditions of oil sands pipelines and develop predictive wear data and models. Coulombic shear stress and characteristic wall velocities have been determined using a 2-layer model designed to represent flow as 2 distinct layers. To date, the flow loop pilot study has demonstrated that wear rates in smaller diameter flow loops are not significantly different than larger diameter field installations. Preliminary calculations have demonstrated that the flow loop can be used to accurately simulate the hydrodynamics and wear typically experienced in field slurry flows. 67 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  13. Methane Fermentation of Slurry with Chemical and Biological Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Smurzyńska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of proper slurry management is primarily present in intensive livestock production. Industrialized livestock farms generate enormous quantities of manure droppings in a livestock-litter-free system. The traditional management of slurry is made by using it as a fertilizer. Alternative techniques used for neutralizing the detrimental effect of slurry are based on the use of chemical and biological additives, as well as by introducing aerobic environment through aerobic or anaerobic digestion, leading to methane fermentation. In the experiment, cattle manure was used, which came from the Przybroda farm belonging to the University of Life Sciences in Poznan. The aim of the study was to determine the biogas yield of slurry using the chemical and biological additive available on the Polish market. Mesophilic and thermophilic fermentation was used for the indication of the effectiveness of the employed fermentation process. The slurry was supplemented by a biological and chemical additive, i.e. effective microorganisms and – PRP, respectively. The experiment allowed to achieve a higher biogas yield during the use of effective microorganisms.

  14. Gas migration through cement slurries analysis: A comparative laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arian Velayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cementing is an essential part of every drilling operation. Protection of the wellbore from formation fluid invasion is one of the primary tasks of a cement job. Failure in this task results in catastrophic events, such as blow outs. Hence, in order to save the well and avoid risky and operationally difficult remedial cementing, slurry must be optimized to be resistant against gas migration phenomenon. In this paper, performances of the conventional slurries facing gas invasion were reviewed and compared with modified slurry containing special gas migration additive by using fluid migration analyzer device. The results of this study reveal the importance of proper additive utilization in slurry formulations. The rate of gas flow through the slurry in neat cement is very high; by using different types of additives, we observe obvious changes in the performance of the cement system. The rate of gas flow in neat class H cement was reported as 36000 ml/hr while the optimized cement formulation with anti-gas migration and thixotropic agents showed a gas flow rate of 13.8 ml/hr.

  15. Numerical Investigation of Ice Slurry Flow in a Horizontal Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, K. S.; Pratihar, A. K.

    2018-02-01

    In the last decade, phase changing material slurry (PCMS) gained much attention as a cooling medium due to its high energy storage capacity and transportability. However the flow of PCM slurry is a complex phenomenon as it affected by various parameters, i.e. fluid properties, velocity, particle size and concentration etc.. In the present work ice is used as a PCM and numerical investigation of heterogeneous slurry flow has been carried out using Eulerian KTGF model in a horizontal pipe. Firstly the present model is validated with existing experiment results available in the literature, and then model is applied to the present problem. Results show that, flow is almost homogeneous for ethanol based ice slurry with particle diameter of 0.1 mm at the velocity of 1 m/s. It is also found that ice particle distribution is more uniform at higher velocity, concentration of ice and ethanol in slurry. Results also show that ice concentration increases on the top of the pipe, and the effect of particle wall collision is more significant at higher particle diameter.

  16. Protozoan predation in soil slurries compromises determination of contaminant mineralization potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, Nora; Johnsen, Anders R.; Brandt, Kristian K.; Sørensen, Jan; Aamand, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Soil suspensions (slurries) are commonly used to estimate the potential of soil microbial communities to mineralize organic contaminants. The preparation of soil slurries disrupts soil structure, however, potentially affecting both the bacterial populations and their protozoan predators. We studied the importance of this “slurry effect” on mineralization of the herbicide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA, 14 C-labelled), focussing on the effects of protozoan predation. Mineralization of MCPA was studied in “intact” soil and soil slurries differing in soil:water ratio, both in the presence and absence of the protozoan activity inhibitor cycloheximide. Protozoan predation inhibited mineralization in dense slurry of subsoil (soil:water ratio 1:3), but only in the most dilute slurry of topsoil (soil:water ratio 1:100). Our results demonstrate that protozoan predation in soil slurries may compromise quantification of contaminant mineralization potential, especially when the initial density of degrader bacteria is low and their growth is controlled by predation during the incubation period. - Highlights: ► We studied the protozoan impact on MCPA mineralization in soil slurries. ► Cycloheximide was used as protozoan inhibitor. ► Protozoa inhibited MCPA mineralization in dilute topsoil slurry and subsoil slurry. ► Mineralization potentials may be underestimated when using soil slurries. - Protozoan predation may strongly bias the quantification of mineralization potential when performed in soil slurries, especially when the initial density of degrader bacteria is low such as in subsoil or very dilute topsoil slurries.

  17. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Diego; Finsterle, Karin; Marziali, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The availa......This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales....... The available data underline a high efficiency for phosphorus binding. This efficiency can be limited by the presence of humic substances and competing oxyanions. Lanthanum concentrations detected during a LMB application are generally below acute toxicological threshold of different organisms, except in low...... alkalinity waters. To date there are no indications for long-term negative effects on LMB treated ecosystems, but issues related to La accumulation, increase of suspended solids and drastic resources depletion still need to be explored, in particular for sediment dwelling organisms. Application of LMB...

  18. Investigation of Erosion of Cement-Bentonite via Piping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cement-bentonite is one of the main materials used in the seepage barriers to protect earth dams and levees from water erosion. However, the current understanding of the erodibility of the cementitious materials and the interactions between cracked seepage barriers and the water flow is inadequate. Based on the laboratory pinhole erosion test, we first investigated the impacts of cement-bentonite treatments by using the ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS as replacement on the erosion characteristics, compared with the original mixtures; the inclusion of GGBS highlighted a potential advantage against water erosion. In addition, we proposed to calculate the erosion percentage and establish the mathematical relationships between the erosion percentage and different regimes, that is, different curing period, erosion time, and sizes of initial holes. Results showed that enough curing period was critical to avoid the increases of hydraulic conductivity in the macrofabric of the barrier; meanwhile, the materials were eroded quickly at the beginning and slowed down with the erosion time, where the enlargement of the initial creaks would be stabilised at some point in time. Moreover, the sizes of initial holes may affect the erosion situation varying from the sample curing periods.

  19. Adsorption behaviour of bivalent ions onto Febex bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Dpt. de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The sorption and transport properties of radionuclides in the near and far field barriers of a deep geological radioactive waste repository are amongst the principal aspects to be evaluated for the performance assessment (PA) of such a kind of disposal. The study of the clayey materials is crucial because the backfill material is constituted by compacted clay in most countries design; in addition, argillaceous formations are particularly suitable as host rock formations. It is widely recognised that, to acquire predictive modelling capability, a theoretical effort is needed for a mechanistic understanding of sorption processes, as they greatly influence the transport of radionuclides in clay porous structures. In this work, an exhaustive experimental study of the Co(II), Sr (II) and Ca(II) sorption behaviour on a Spanish bentonite was carried out. The clay used for these experiments is the FEBEX bentonite, which is basically formed by smectite (93 {+-} 2%) with small percentages of quartz (2 {+-} 1 %), plagioclase (3 {+-} 1 %), cristobalite (2 {+-} 1 %) and traces of minerals such as K-feldspar and calcite. (authors)

  20. Stress/strain/time properties of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1983-05-01

    In this paper, a recently developed creep theory based on statistical mechanics has been used to analyze a number of experimental creep curves, the conclusion being that the creep behavior of dense MX-80 bentonite is in agreement with the physical model, and that the average bond strength is within the hydrogen bond region. The latter conclusion thus indicates that interparticle displacements leading to macroscopic creep takes place in interparticle and intraparticle water lattices. These findings were taken as a justification to apply the creep theory to a prediction of the settlement over a one million year period. It gave an estimated settlement of 1 cm at maximum, which is of no practical significance. The thixotropic and viscous properties of highly compacted bentonite present certain difficulties in the determination and evaluation of the stress/strain/time parameters that are required for ordinary elastic and elasto-plastic analyses. Still, these parameters could be sufficiently well identified to allow for a preliminary estimation of the stresses induced in the metal canisters by slight rock displacements. The analysis, suggests that a 1 cm rapid shear perpendicular to the axes of the canisters can take place without harming them. (author)

  1. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubo, H.

    2002-02-01

    The chemical conditions of TRU waste repository were estimated as alkaline conditions effected by cementitious materials. And, some TRU wastes include soluble nitrate salt, we have to consider the repository conditions might be high ionic strength condition leaching of nitrate salt. In this study, experimental studies were carried out to evaluate hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. The followings results were obtained for bentonite. 1) In the immersion experiments of bentonite in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, the disappearance of montmorillonite of bentonite was observed and CSH formation was found after 30 days. In hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate, minerals at θ=37 nm by XRD was identified. 2) Significant effects of hyper alkaline on hydraulic conductivity of compacted bentonite were not observed. However, hydraulic conductivities of hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate and ion exchanged bentonite increased. In hyper alkaline with nitrate, more higher hydraulic conductivities of exchanged bentonite were measured. The followings results were obtained for rock. 1) In the immersion experiments of crushed tuff in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, CSH and CASH phases were observed. 2) The hydraulic conductivity of tuff in hyper alkaline fluids decreased gradually. Finally, hyper alkaline flow in tuff stopped after 2 months and hyper alkaline flow with nitrate stopped shorter than without nitrate. In the results of analysis of tuff after experiment, we could identified secondary minerals, but we couldn't find the clogging evidence of pores in tuff by secondary minerals. (author)

  2. Bentonite analogue research related to geological disposal of radioactive waste: current status and future outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reijonen, H.M. [Saanio and Rickkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Russel, A.W. [Bedrock Geosciences, Auenstein (Switzerland)

    2015-06-15

    The practice of utilising natural analogues in assessing the long-term behaviour of various components of geological repositories for radioactive waste is already well established in most disposal programmes. Numerous studies on bentonites, focussing on bentonite interaction with other components of the engineered barrier system and a range of host rock environments, are present in the literature. In this article, recent bentonite natural analogue studies are briefly reviewed, and gaps in the current literature identified, with the aim of (1) suggesting where relevant new information could be obtained by data mining published bentonite natural analogue studies with a new focus on current safety case requirements, (2) collecting relevant information by revisiting known bentonite analogue sites and conducting investigations with more appropriate analytical techniques, and (3) identifying novel study sites where, for example, bentonite longevity in very dilute to highly saline groundwater conditions can be studied. It must be noted that the use of natural analogues in safety case development is likely to be site and repository design-specific in nature and thus emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of relevant natural analogue data on bentonite longevity. (authors)

  3. Applicability of low alkaline cement for construction and alteration of bentonite in the cement. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriya, Keishiro; Fujii, Kensuke; Tajima, Takatoshi; Takeda, N.; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    This study consists of accelerating corrosion test of rebar in saline, automogeneous shrinkage test of HFSC, accelerating test for bentonite and rock, and summarizing rock and bentonite alteration. Corrosion of rebars in HFSC: Since sorption capacity of HFSC for Cl ion is slow due to low alkalinity, rate of corrosion of rebar in HFSC is very large. Cracking due to corrosion is generating in 4 years or 20 years, although service period is deferent in OPC amount. Automogenous shrinkage: Automogenous shrinkage of HFSC is larger than OPC in cement paste. It decreases corresponding to rise of fly ash content. The shrinkage in HFSC 226 is quite similar to OPC. The shrinkage in HFSC concrete is smaller than OPC concrete. 720 days alteration test of bentonite by solution of low alkaline cement: Ion exchange to Ca bentonite and calcite are observed in the solid phase. Thin plate of bentonite is disappeared and round shaped secondary mineral is generated. Dissolution of bentonite and generation of secondary minerals are limited in pH 11.0 or less, since pH of bentonite is about 10.0. 720 days alteration test of rock by solution of low alkaline cement: Calcite is generated in very test. Very small evidence is observed as generation of secondary minerals. Etched pits are observed in tuff A due to corrosion. (author)

  4. Bentonite analogue research related to geological disposal of radioactive waste: current status and future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reijonen, H.M.; Russel, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    The practice of utilising natural analogues in assessing the long-term behaviour of various components of geological repositories for radioactive waste is already well established in most disposal programmes. Numerous studies on bentonites, focussing on bentonite interaction with other components of the engineered barrier system and a range of host rock environments, are present in the literature. In this article, recent bentonite natural analogue studies are briefly reviewed, and gaps in the current literature identified, with the aim of (1) suggesting where relevant new information could be obtained by data mining published bentonite natural analogue studies with a new focus on current safety case requirements, (2) collecting relevant information by revisiting known bentonite analogue sites and conducting investigations with more appropriate analytical techniques, and (3) identifying novel study sites where, for example, bentonite longevity in very dilute to highly saline groundwater conditions can be studied. It must be noted that the use of natural analogues in safety case development is likely to be site and repository design-specific in nature and thus emphasis is placed on the appropriate use of relevant natural analogue data on bentonite longevity. (authors)

  5. Low-temperature pyrolysis of oily sludge: roles of Fe/Al-pillared bentonites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hanzhong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is potentially an effective treatment of oily sludge for oil recovery, and the addition of a catalyst is expected to affect its pyrolysis behavior. In the present study, Fe/Al-pillared bentonite with various Fe/Al ratios as pyrolysis catalyst is prepared and characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, and NH3-TPD. The integration of Al and Fe in the bentonite interlayers to form pillared clay is evidenced by increase in the basal spacing. As a result, a critical ratio of Fe/Al exists in the Fe/Al-pillared bentonite catalytic pyrolysis for oil recovery from the sludge. The oil yield increases with respect to increase in Fe/Al ratio of catalysts, then decreases with further increasing of Fe/Al ratio. The optimum oil yield using 2.0 wt% of Fe/Al 0.5-pillared bentonite as catalyst attains to 52.46% compared to 29.23% without catalyst addition in the present study. In addition, the addition of Fe/Al-pillared bentonite catalyst also improves the quality of pyrolysis-produced oil and promotes the formation of CH4. Fe/Al-pillared bentonite provides acid center in the inner surface, which is beneficial to the cracking reaction of oil molecules in pyrolysis process. The present work implies that Fe/Al-pillared bentonite as addictive holds great potential in industrial pyrolysis of oily sludge.

  6. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  7. Evolution of the bentonite barrier under glacial meltwater intrusion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, T.; Bouby, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE); Blechschmidt, I. [NAGRA National Cooperation Disposal Radioactive Waste, Wettingen (Switzerland); and others

    2015-07-01

    Recent safety assessments for repository concepts that combine a clay engineered barrier system (EBS) with a fractured rock have shown that melt water intrusion may have a direct impact on the EBS barrier function in two aspects: - Generation of colloids may degrade the engineered barrier - Colloid transport of radionuclides may reduce the efficiency of the natural barrier The studies presented here are performed in the framework of the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) KIT/GRS project KOLLORADO-e, the EU collaborative project CP BELBaR (www.skb.se/belbar) and especially within the Colloid Formation and Migration (CFM) project at the Grimsel Test Site, GTS (www.grimsel.com). Key research areas are (a) the erosion of the bentonite buffer, (b) clay colloid stability and (c) colloid-radionuclide- host rock surface interactions. Concerning bentonite buffer integrity parameters like the bentonite type, Na-/Ca-exchangeable cation ratio, compaction density, role of accessory minerals, the fracture aperture size and groundwater chemistry and flow velocity are investigated in order to identify controlling factors, understand the main mechanisms of erosion from the bentonite surface and to quantify the extent of the possible erosion under these different conditions. Clay colloid stability studies are performed under different geochemical conditions. The main objective is to answer the question if colloids formed at the near/far field interface would be stable only if favourable conditions exist and therefore their relevance for radionuclide transport will be strongly dependent on the local geochemical conditions (inorganic cations Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Al{sup 3+} and organic complexing agents). Finally, the interaction between colloids and radionuclides and the host rock is intensively investigated in order to answer the question, how colloid mobility may be affected by the composition of the host rock, surface roughness and the mechanism of

  8. Slurry burner for mixture of carbonaceous material and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodd, D.G.; Walker, R.J.

    1985-11-05

    The present invention is intended to overcome the limitations of the prior art by providing a fuel burner particularly adapted for the combustion of carbonaceous material-water slurries which includes a stationary high pressure tip-emulsion atomizer which directs a uniform fuel into a shearing air flow as the carbonaceous material-water slurry is directed into a combustion chamber, inhibits the collection of unburned fuel upon and within the atomizer, reduces the slurry to a collection of fine particles upon discharge into the combustion chamber, and regulates the operating temperature of the burner as well as primary air flow about the burner and into the combustion chamber for improved combustion efficiency, no atomizer plugging and enhanced flame stability.

  9. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Shah, R.R.; Davis, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer

  10. Radioactive waste slurry dehydrating and drum filling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihashi, Toshio; Abe, Kazuaki; Hasegawa, Akira

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for simultaneously filling and dehydrating radioactive waste in a waste can without the necessity of a special device for dehydration. Constitution: This device includes a radioactive waste storage tank, a pump for supplying the waste from the tank to a can, a drain tube having a filter at the lower end and installed displaceable in the axial direction of the can, and a drain pump. The slurry stored in the radioactive waste storage tank is supplied by the pump to the can, and the feedwater in the slurry is removed by another pump through a drain pipe having a filter which does not pass solid content from the can. Accordingly, as the slurry is filled in the can, the feedwater contained therein is removed. Consequently, it can simultaneously dehydrate and fill the dehydrated waste in the can. (Yoshihara, H.)

  11. Microalgal cultivation with biogas slurry for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liandong; Yan, Cheng; Li, Zhaohua

    2016-11-01

    Microalgal growth requires a substantial amount of chemical fertilizers. An alternative to the utilization of fertilizer is to apply biogas slurry produced through anaerobic digestion to cultivate microalgae for the production of biofuels. Plenty of studies have suggested that anaerobic digestate containing high nutrient contents is a potentially feasible nutrient source to culture microalgae. However, current literature indicates a lack of review available regarding microalgal cultivation with biogas slurry for the production of biofuels. To help fill this gap, this review highlights the integration of digestate nutrient management with microalgal production. It first unveils the current status of microalgal production, providing basic background to the topic. Subsequently, microalgal cultivation technologies using biogas slurry are discussed in detail. A scale-up scheme for simultaneous biogas upgrade and digestate application through microalgal cultivation is then proposed. Afterwards, several uncertainties that might affect this practice are explored. Finally, concluding remarks are put forward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Fast and Efficient Dehydration Process for Waste Drilling Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, slurry system was converted to colloid from fluid with the colloidization of high polymer coagulants with high viscosity. The solid-liquid separation of the waste slurry was realized by the process of chemical colloidal gel breaking, coagulation function, acidification gelout. In addition, the surface morphology of slurry cake was investigated by using Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM. The results indicate that mud separation effect is decides on the type of flocculants, gel breaker. The solid content of mud cake increases from 40.5% to 77.5% when A-PA and H20 are employed as the flocculants, gelout, with the dosage of zero point four grams and zero point five grams.

  13. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parolo, María E., E-mail: maria.parolo@fain.uncoma.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Pettinari, Gisela R. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Musso, Telma B. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modification of clay was evaluated by two methods for removing an organic substance. • Surfactant cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space. • The hydrophobic surface of adsorbents increased the retention of organic substances. • Clay grafted with vinyltrimethoxysilane showed the highest adsorption for aniline. - Abstract: The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm{sup −1} with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination.

  14. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parolo, María E.; Pettinari, Gisela R.; Musso, Telma B.; Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modification of clay was evaluated by two methods for removing an organic substance. • Surfactant cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space. • The hydrophobic surface of adsorbents increased the retention of organic substances. • Clay grafted with vinyltrimethoxysilane showed the highest adsorption for aniline. - Abstract: The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm −1 with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination

  15. Na-smectite s in the Cala de Tomate bentonite deposit (Spain): a natural analogue of the salinity effect on the bentonite barrier of a rad waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Fernandez, A.M.; Cozar, J.S. [CIEMAT - Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT/DIRE/CEAGP), Madrid (Spain); Delgado, A.; Reyes, E. [Ciencias de la Tierra y Quimica Ambiental Estacion Experimental del Zaidin Dpt., Granada (Spain); Fernandez-Soler, J.M. [Granada Univ., Dpt. de Mineralogia y Petrologia (Spain); Tsige, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Geologicas, Dpt. de Geodinamica, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Within the framework of the ENRESA programme for the assessment of the long-term behaviour of the bentonite-engineered barrier for a deep radwaste geological repository, analogue studies on several bentonite deposits are conducted at CIEMAT. Among these analogue studies, the thermal effect induced by volcanic intrusions on bentonite deposits is highlighted. In the Cabo de Gata volcanic region, there are several analogue scenarios where these studies have been performed, such as the Cala de Tomate bentonite deposit that was intruded by a pyroxene andesite volcanic dome. However, geological, mineralogical, physicochemical, geochemical and stable isotopic data obtained from the smectites do not allow to establish any analogy with the thermal effect expected on the bentonite-engineered barrier of a deep geological repository after burial. Thus, the bentonitisation processes took place after the intrusion of the dome, as a result of meteoric diagenesis intensively developed on faulting zone affecting the parent pyroclastic acid tuffs. This faulting process occurred after the dome intrusion. However, the physicochemical characteristics of these smectites, specially the exchangeable cations, allow to consider this bentonite deposit as a natural analogue of the saline effect on the clayey barrier. This analogy has been established because Na-smectites are present in this deposit and, up to our present knowledge, it is the first time that these smectites occur naturally in the Cabo de Gata-La Serrata de Nijar volcanic region. As a consequence, the main objectives of this work are: i) to characterise these smectites; ii) to establish their genesis and processes affecting them after their formation and iii) to identify the effects on the bentonite-engineered barrier should it were affected by a Na-rich saline waterfront. (authors)

  16. Startup of a Joule-heated glass melter with a graphite slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.L.; Routt, K.R.; Porter, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical equations and physical and electrical property data of various graphite slurries for starting up a glass melter. An application test is also included to demonstrate the graphite slurry startup technique

  17. REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION OF A NITROGEN HETEROCYCLIC HERBICIDE IN ANOXIC AQUIFER SLURRIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied the metabolic fate of bromacil in anaerobic aquifer slurries held under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, or methanogenic conditions. Liquid chromatograhy-mass spectrometry of the slurries confirmed that bromacil was debrominated under methanogenic conditions but was not...

  18. Method and apparatus for in-situ drying investigation and optimization of slurry drying methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Daniel, Claus; Howe, Jane Y.; Kiggans, Jr, James O.; Sabau, Adrian S.; Wood, III, David L.; Kalnaus, Sergiy

    2016-05-10

    A method of drying casted slurries that includes calculating drying conditions from an experimental model for a cast slurry and forming a cast film. An infrared heating probe is positioned on one side of the casted slurry and a thermal probe is positioned on an opposing side of the casted slurry. The infrared heating probe may control the temperature of the casted slurry during drying. The casted slurry may be observed with an optical microscope, while applying the drying conditions from the experimental model. Observing the casted slurry includes detecting the incidence of micro-structural changes in the casted slurry during drying to determine if the drying conditions from the experimental model are optimal.

  19. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Heidi Huus; Enemark, Heidi L.; Olsen, Annette

    2012-01-01

    to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for ground water contamination as compared to application of raw slurry.......The potential for transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a four week period......, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method although recovery rates were low (liquid slurry leached 73% and 90% more oocysts compared with columns with injected and surface applied raw slurry, respectively...

  20. Concrete/Febex Bentonite Interaction: Results On Short-Term Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Torres, E.; Martin, P.L. [CIEMAT, Environmental Department, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Interaction between the alkaline pore fluids from the concrete engineered barriers and the bentonite at the repository conditions may generate products that can diffuse through the porous structure of the bentonite affecting their properties. A comprehensive study based on series of short term experiments is being performed to provide experimental evidences on the physical, chemical and mineralogical changes during the concrete-compacted bentonite interaction. Samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM-EDS and FTIR. Measurements of swelling capacity, specific surface area and chemical analysis for cation exchange capacity and soluble salts analyses were also performed. (authors)

  1. Concrete/Febex Bentonite Interaction: Results On Short-Term Column Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escribano, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Torres, E.; Martin, P.L.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction between the alkaline pore fluids from the concrete engineered barriers and the bentonite at the repository conditions may generate products that can diffuse through the porous structure of the bentonite affecting their properties. A comprehensive study based on series of short term experiments is being performed to provide experimental evidences on the physical, chemical and mineralogical changes during the concrete-compacted bentonite interaction. Samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM-EDS and FTIR. Measurements of swelling capacity, specific surface area and chemical analysis for cation exchange capacity and soluble salts analyses were also performed. (authors)

  2. Brazilian bentonite study: use in Goiania; Estudo das bentonitas nacionais: utilizacao em Goiania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    1997-12-31

    The evaluation of the bentonite effect in the waste cementation process and in the final solidified product properties is presented. The research showed that bentonite amounts until 15% in the product improves the caesium retention without jeopardizing the other product properties. These results were very useful in the treatment of the wastes from the radiological accident occurred in Goiania in 1987, when a caesium sources was broken. Paste, mortar and grout with bentonite were used to solidify and immobilize these wastes. (author) 20 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.; e-mail: tellocc at urano.cdtn.br

  3. A new age model for the Late Ordovician bentonites in Oslo, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk Ballo, Eirik; Eivind Augland, Lars; Hammer, Øyvind; Svensen, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    During the Late Ordovician, explosive volcanic eruptions led to the deposition of worldwide bentonites. Some of the largest of these eruptions took place in the Sandbian and produced the Milbrig and Deicke K-bentonites of North America and the Kinnekulle K-bentonite of Scandinavia. We have studied the classic locality of Hagemann and Spjeldnæs (1955) - one of the most complete sections of Ordovician bentonites in Europe. The bentonites are present in the Arnestad Formation comprising dark shale with carbonate nodule beds grading into an increasingly more carbonate rich environment. Through a 50-meter interval we have identified 33 bentonites of which 10 have not previously been reported from this locality. The bentonites have an average thickness of 4.9 cm with a few exceptions such as the Kinnekulle K-bentonite (35 cm) and the Grimstorp B (13 cm). We have measured magnetic susceptibility of two 2-3 meter intervals with a sampling distance of 5 cm, using a handheld magnetic susceptibility meter in the field. These data show significant periodicity peaks that correlate well with Milankovitch cycles and are suggested to represent astronomically forced changes in sediment supply. This study further presents high-precision U-Pb zircon ages of five bentonites from the section, including the Kinnekulle K-bentonite and Grimstorp B. These two beds were previously dated by Svensen et al. (2015) from a locality south of Oslo. Our new data improves the precision of the ages of these two key beds, and constrain the duration of the entire interval and thus the onset and termination of the late Ordovician volcanic system that deposited these tephras. We conclude that the Oslo section provides a high-resolution age model to understand one of the most intense volcanic periods of the Paleozoic by combining radiometric and cyclostratigraphic data. BIBLIOGRAPHY Hagemann, F. and Spjeldnæs, N. (1955). "The Middle Ordovician of the Oslo region, Norway. 6. Notes on bentonites (K-bentonites

  4. Evidence of ammonium ion-exchange properties of natural bentonite and application to ammonium detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazoua, A; Kazane, I; Khedimallah, N; Dernane, C; Errachid, A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium exchange with hybrid PVC-bentonite (mineral montmorillonite clay) thin film was revealed using FTIR spectroscopy, EDX, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The effect of ammonium exchange on the charge transfer resistance of PVC-bentonite hybrid thin film was attributed to a modification of the intersheet distance and hydration of bentonite crystals. The obtained impedimetric ammonium sensor shows a linear range of detection from 10(-4)M to 1M and a detection limit around 10(-6)M. © 2013.

  5. Studies on mechanical behavior of bentonite for development of the constitutive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasakura, Tsuyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Mikio; Okamoto, Michitaka

    2002-02-01

    To integrate the system for evaluation of long-term hydraulic condition in near field of TRU waste disposal, series of laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effect of (1) cation exchange of Na-bentonite for Ca ion, and (2) the swelling behavior of bentonite, on its mechanical and hydraulic properties. For the purpose of this study, same lot of bentonite was used in a series of tests to obtain consistent data. A constitutive model of clayey materials, called Cam-clay model, was expanded conceptually to express the effects mentioned above. The research results of this year are summarized below; 1) Some basic properties such as cation exchange capacity, particle density, grain size distribution, compaction-characteristics and water content were obtained. To examine the effect of previous swelling history of bentonite on its swelling characteristics and hydraulic and mechanical properties, specimens, which generated swelling deformation to various volumetric strain levels, were specially prepared and used in the following tests. Swelling pressure tests, swelling deformation tests, permeability tests were conducted to observe one dimensional swelling characteristics and hydraulic properties of Na-bentonite and Ca-bentonite. High-pressured triaxial consolidated-undrained (CU) compression tests and high-pressured consolidation tests were also carried out to investigate the compression, swelling, and shearing behavior of each type of bentonite. 2) As indicated in previous studies, two important phenomena (1) bentonite possesses remarkable swelling capacity, (2) cation exchange of Na-bentonite for Ca-ion lead increasing of hydraulic conductivity, were confirmed in the test results. From the swelling deformation test results and published data, it was found that swelling capacity of bentonite has no dependency on previous swelling history and it could be easily expressed as a function of void ratio e. It was also confirmed that swelling pressure and water

  6. Technical report on treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Gyeong Hwan; Jo, Eun Sung; Park, Seung Kook; Jung, Ki Jung

    1999-06-01

    By literature survey, this report deals with the technology on typical pre-treatment and filtration of radioactive slurry liquid waste, produced during the operation of TRIGA Mark-II, III research reactor, and produced during the decommission/decontamination of TRIGA Mark-II, III research reactor. It is reviewed pre-treatment procedure, both physical and chemical that optimise the dewatering characteristics, and also surveyed types of dewatering devices based on centrifuges, vacuum and pressure filters with particular reference to various combined field approaches using two or more complementary driving forces to achieve better performance. Dewatering operations and devises on filtration of radioactive slurry liquid waste are also analysed. (author)

  7. Steam Explosions in Slurry-fed Ceramic Melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.T.

    2001-03-28

    This report assesses the potential and consequences of a steam explosion in Slurry Feed Ceramic Melters (SFCM). The principles that determine if an interaction is realistically probable within a SFCM are established. Also considered are the mitigating effects due to dissolved, non-condensable gas(es) and suspended solids within the slurry feed, radiation, high glass viscosity, and the existence of a cold cap. The report finds that, even if any explosion were to occur, however, it would not be large enough to compromise vessel integrity.

  8. Slurry Coating System Statement of Work and Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The Slurry Coating System will be used to coat crystals with a polymer to support Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) research and development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The crystals will be suspended in water in a kettle. A polymer solution is added, temperature of the kettle is raised and aggregates of the crystals and polymer form. The slurry is heated under vacuum to drive off the solvents and slowly cooled while mixing to room temperature. The resulting aggregates are then filtered and dried. The performance characteristics and fielding constraints define a unique set of requirements for a new system. This document presents the specifications and requirements for the system.

  9. Uncertainties in pore water chemistry of compacted bentonite from Rokle deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervinka, R.; Vejsadu, J.; Vokal, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The composition of compacted bentonite pore water influences a number of important processes occurring in a deep geological repository (DGR), e.g. corrosion of waste package materials, solubility of radionuclides, or diffusion and sorption of radionuclides. Its determination is not straightforward, because it is difficult to obtain (e.g. squeeze) the pore water from compacted bentonite without changing its properties. It is therefore necessary to combine experimentally obtained parameters and geochemical modelling to approach it compositions. This article describes the results achieved in investigation the composition of pore water of compacted Ca-Mg bentonite from Czech deposits, proposed in Czech DGR concept. Ca-Mg bentonite from the largest operating deposit Rokle (Tertiary neo-volcanic area, NW Bohemia) represents complex mixture of (Ca,Mg)-Fe-rich montmorillonite, micas, kaolinite and other mineral admixtures (mainly Ca, Mg, Fe carbonates, feldspars and iron oxides). For experimental investigations the homogenized and grind raw bentonite material obtained directly from the deposit and commercial product (partly Na-activated) from supplier were used. Geochemical characterization of Rokle bentonite included mineralogical composition analyzed by Xray diffraction, cation exchange capacity determined using Cu-trien method, surface complexation parameters determined by acid-base titrations and 'geochemical' porosity derived from diffusion experiments with tracers ( 3 H and 36 Cl). Soluble salts inventory was calculated on the base of results from aqueous extracts of bentonite in deionized water at different solid to liquid ratios (from 18.6 to 125 g/l) and high pressure squeezing of water saturated bentonite at different solid to liquid ratios (from 1:1 to 4:1 w/w). The geochemical model contained cation exchange in the interlayer space and protonization and de-protonization of surface hydroxyl groups on clay

  10. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David (Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  11. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David

    2010-12-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  12. Physical changes in MX-80 bentonite saturated under thermal gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Maria Victoria; Gomez-Espina, Roberto; Gutierrez-Nebot, Luis; Campos, Rocio; Barrios, Iciar

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. This study was developed in the framework of the Temperature Buffer Test (TBT project), which was a full-scale test for HLW disposal that aimed at improving the understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) behaviour of buffers with a temperature around and above 100 deg. C during the water saturation transient. The French organisation ANDRA run this test at the Aespoe HRL in cooperation with SKB (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB 2005). To simulate the conditions of the field test in the laboratory, 20-cm high columns of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm 3 with an initial water content of 16 percent were submitted in thermo-hydraulic cells to heating and hydration by opposite ends for different periods of time (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the columns was set at 140 deg. C and on top at 30 C, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. The tests were running for 337, 496 and 1510 days. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, specific surface area, porosity and basal spacings, among others, were determined in different positions along the bentonite columns. The strong gradients developed are remarkable. In the shorter tests the water content decreased below the initial value in the 7 cm closest to the heater, whereas in the longer test the decrease below the initial value took place only in the 5 cm closest to the heater. In the remaining part of the columns the water content increased with respect to the initial value, particularly so in the longest test. The dry density along the bentonite changed accordingly, decreasing in the hydrated areas below the initial value and increasing near the heater. The decrease in dry density is due to the swelling of the bentonite upon saturation, while the dry density increase results from the combination of two processes: the compression of the dry areas exerted by the hydrated bentonite, and the shrinkage due to the

  13. Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in iron ore slurry was studied as a function of the microstructure developed by austempering at 380 and 300°C for different exposure time in the slurry. The corrosion rates of the ADI balls immersed in the iron ore slurry was determined using weight loss method.

  14. Effects of acidifying pig diets on emissions of ammonia, methane and sulfur from slurry during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2014-01-01

    and feces were collected separately from twenty-four pigs fed one of four diets (Control, +BA, +CaCl2, +BA+CaCl2) in metabolic cages, and mixed as slurry. During 103 days of storage, all acidifying diets consistently reduced pH in the slurry by 0.4 - 0.6 units. There was a strong relationship between slurry...

  15. Effects of different treatments of cattle slurry manure on water-extractable phosphorus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapuis-Lardy, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Goede, de R.G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cattle slurry manure applied to land increases the risk of phosphorus (P) movement to surface waters, which may lead to eutrophication. The water-extractable fraction of P in slurry manure is correlated with P concentration in runoff from soils amended with slurry smanure, and thus is an effective

  16. Draught requirement of trailing foot and shallow injection equipment for applying slurry to grassland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsmans, J.F.M.; Hendriks, J.L.G.; Vermeulen, G.D.

    1998-01-01

    Surface spreading of slurry leads to the inevitable emission of ammonia into the environment. Injection of slurry on grassland reduces these emissions. However, injection of slurry by deep working injector tines with goose foot chisels (wings) requires high draught forces. This type of injection has

  17. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Denise Ester O.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  18. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Denise Ester O.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  19. Effects of bentonite kinds and dry density on the amount of settlement of overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kunihiko; Tanaka, Yukihisa

    2009-01-01

    The effects of bentonite kinds and dry density on the settlement behavior of overpack for high level radioactive waste disposal were investigated using both experimental (i.e. centrifuge) and analytical approaches. The nonlinear elastic analysis using a tangent modulus of elasticity obtained from the diffuse double layer theory was carried out to explain the settlement behavior from centrifuge experiments. The difference of properties between bentonites can be considered by this analysis. The results of nonlinear elastic analysis agreed with experimental results. The amount of settlement was decreased with an increase in the dry density and was exponentially decreased with an increase in the swelling pressure. Furthermore, no difference of the amount of settlement was observed if swelling pressure of each bentonite is same. When swelling pressure is more than 1 MPa, the amount of settlement of model overpack into bentonite with 400 mm thickness was less than 10 mm. (author)

  20. Textural properties of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) : acid-modified bentonite nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zunic, M.; Milutinovic-Nikolic, A.; Nastasovic, A.; Vukovic, Z.; Loncarevic, D.; Vukovic, I.; Loos, K.; ten Brinke, G.; Jovanovic, D.; Sharma, Bhaskar; Ubaghs, Luc; Keul, Helmut; Höcker, Hartwig; Loontjens, Ton; Benthem, Rolf van; Žunić, M.; Milutinović-Nikolić, A.; Nastasović, A.; Vuković, Z.; Lončarević, D.; Vuković, I.; Jovanović, D.

    The aim of this study was to obtain enhanced textural properties of macroporous crosslinked copolymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) by synthesizing nanocomposites with acid-modified bentonite. Nanocomposites were obtained by introducing various amounts of

  1. Effect of anionic polyelectrolytes on the flow of activated sodium bentonite drilling mud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalah Kaci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is often used in water-based drilling fluids. The xanthan gum is widely used as to increase the viscosity of the bentonite suspension. For the stabilization of the drilled layers, we use filtrate reducers: sodium carboxymethylcellulose low viscosity and cellulose polyanionic low viscosity. The objective of this work is to explain the effect of the polymers on the rheological behavior of the 5% bentonite suspensions. These results will provide practical recommendations for the rational use of different types of additives in water-based drilling muds. Our work is based on rheological trials on a viscometer. The results obtained on the bentonite 5%-xanthane suspension show a rheofluidifying behavior with yield stress conform to the Herschel-bulckly modal. While increasing the concentration of filtrate reducer decreases the yield stress and reduces the viscosity. The effect of CMC LV is more pronounced than PAC L.

  2. Temperature effects on geotechnical and hydraulic properties of bentonite hydrated with inorganic salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, H. M. A.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, T.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, International Journal of GEOMATE. This study investigated the combined effect of temperature and single-species salt solutions on geotechnical properties (swell index and liquid limit) and hydraulic conductivity of bentonite applying different cation types, concentrations, and temperatures...

  3. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, Denise Ester O. [Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Philippines (Philippines); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, Los Baños, College, Laguna 4031 Philippines (Philippines); Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T. [Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Philippines (Philippines)

    2016-05-18

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  4. Purification of bentonite clays from the district of Cubati, PB, for other uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.R.; Araujo, J.P.; Silva, I.A.; Cardoso, M.A.; Silva, C.D.; Neves, G.A.; Ferreira, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The state of Paraiba is responsible for the increased production of crude bentonite in the country, coming from one of the largest mines of Brazil, located in Boa Vista, PB. Recently, in the regions of Cubati and Pedra Lavrada, PB, found new deposits of bentonite that could expand the state reserves. The paper aims at the characterization and development of clay purified using the techniques of screening and hydrocycloning, from bentonite clay recently discovered in the city of Cubati, PB, for various uses. The sample characterization was performed through techniques: granulometric analysis by laser diffraction, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence and thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed that the samples are typical of bentonite clay, and that the purification process using only the hydrocycloning shows better results. (author)

  5. An optimum silica flour-bentonite mixture for an engineered barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.N.; Daffern, D.D.; Emer, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    To dispose of low-level and mixed wastes (MAR) by burial, it is necessary to design an impermeable closure, which limits water infiltration through the waste. Bentonite has very low permeability to water but can be subject to volume alterations. Over time, these alterations can lead to channeling and subsequent permeability increases. The fluid conductivity and bulk properties of silica flour and bentonite mixtures were tested to find a mixture that would retain the low conductivity of the bentonite while maintaining volumetric stability. Silica flour was chosen for its small grain size and spherical shape, and its similarity to silty soil. Test results indicate that a 90% silica flour and 10% bentonite mixture will provide the optimum properties for this application. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Swelling and hydraulic properties of Ca-bentonite for the buffer of a waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.O.; Cho, W.J.; Kang, C.H.; Chun, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    Swelling and hydraulic tests were carried out to provide the information for the selection of buffer material in a radioactive waste repository. Ca-bentonite and de-ionized water were used for the tests. The swelling pressures of compacted bentonite were in the wide range of 0.7 Kg/cm 2 to 190.2 Kg/cm 2 , and they largely increased with an increase in the dry density and bentonite content. However, the swelling pressures decreased with increasing the initial water content and beyond about 12 wt.% of the initial water content, leveled off to a nearly constant value. The hydraulic conductivities were lower than 10 -11 m/s for the compacted bentonite with the dry density higher than 1.4 Mg/m 3 . They increased with increasing temperature in the range of 20 deg. C to 150 deg. C. (author)

  7. EVALUATION OF THE BENTONITE CONTENT IN SPENT FOUNDRY SANDS AS A FUNCTION OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirlene Chegatti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the relationship of the bentonite content and hydraulic conductivity coefficient (k of waste foundry sands in tests of hydraulic conductivity in a flexible wall permeameter. The test samples had concentrations of activated sodium bentonite and natural sodium bentonite between 4% and 15%. It was also analyzed chemically the liquid leachate (aluminum, barium, chromium, cadmium, lead, phenols, iron, fluoride, and manganese, following de standard tests of Standard Methods 3111 B e D for the determination of this components in liquid samples. The experiments were supplemented with cation exchange capacity analysis. The results indicate that the values of are is related to the content of bentonite in waste foundry sand and the percolation from this waste disposal.

  8. Practical and theoretical basis for performing redox-measurements in compacted bentonite. A literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A.

    2008-12-01

    This report reviews the state-of-the-art with regard to redox measurements, especially in compacted water saturated bentonite, but also in natural systems like sediments and ground waters. Both theoretical and practical aspects of redox measurements are discussed, as well as some basic concepts like terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) and oxidative capacity (OXC). The problems associated with the interpretation of measured electrode potentials are treated. Despite many practical and theoretical difficulties, redox measurements continue to be carried out by researchers all over the world. The over-all conclusion from the literature survey is that fruitful redox-measurements can be performed in compacted bentonite. Irrespective of whether the measured redox potentials are absolute or not, the use of electrodes provide a valuable tool for studying, e.g., long-term changes in the pore water of compacted bentonite and/or the diffusion of oxygen into a bentonite. (orig.)

  9. On-Going Bentonite Pore Water Studies by NMR and SAXS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto; Root, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Compacted water-saturated MX-80 bentonite is presently being studied by SAXS and NMR in order to quantify the major pore water phases in the bentonite. The SAXS and NMR measurements gave very similar results indicating that the pore water is mainly distributed between two major phases (interlayer and non-interlayer water) and also indicate how these phases depend on the bentonite dry density. The results from the SAXS and NMR studies at VTT indicate the same thing: - The pore water in water-saturated compacted (?dry = 0.7-1.6 g/cm 3 ) bentonite is divided into two main phases: interlayer water and non-interlayer water. - The amounts of these pore water phases can be determined quantitatively with the above methods. (authors)

  10. Efficiency of ball milled South African bentonite clay for remediation of acid mine drainage

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using vibratory ball milled South African bentonite clay for neutralization and attenuation of inorganic contaminants from acidic and metalliferous mine effluents has been evaluated. Treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD...

  11. Evaluation of The Use of Bentonite, Kaolin and Feldspar For Immobilizing The Uranium Radionuclide Slugdewaste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayitno

    2006-01-01

    The experimental investigation on the mixture of bentonite, kaolin, feldspar, sludge waste and with the ratio of bentonite, kaolin, feldspar for evaluating its effectiveness has been done. Experimentally, this investigation is the preliminary study of the use of bentonite, kaolin, feldspar as a material for the immobilization of sludge waste containing material element especially uranium. This investigation was conducted by mixing waste (2,5; 5; 7.5; 10; 12.5 and 15 %) of total weight sludge waste and bentonite, kaolin, feldspar with of 800, 900 and 1000 o C temperature. The obtained the process condition in which the uranium fraction immobilized could be kept in the limit of safety standard for the sludge waste. Therefore, it could be concluded that the addition of hay ash as an additive in the formation of block monolith tend to minimize the leached sludge waste in the leaching media. (author)

  12. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O' Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  13. Agronomic valuing of slurry for management in common

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, M.; Estevez, M. D.; Faz, A.; Olivares, A. B.; Climent, V.

    2009-01-01

    Due to the intensification of livestock production and the concentration of holdings in specific areas, has disrupted the balance between production and utilization of swine waste in agriculture. given the volume of slurry generated in Murcia, and the total cultivable area and considering the legislation, RD 261/1996, which allows a maximum application of 170 kg N/ha year in areas designated as vulnerable, it is estimated that to implement the slurry generated in the region in a year, would require only half the arable land devoted to irrigation. In this way, this study has included detailed monitoring of the effect of the application of ping slurry at a concentration recommended on the properties and chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, water and plant to determine the influence of slurry on the reserve of organic matter in each of these crops, as well as contaminated soils, through the creation of a pilot system for managing livestock waste in accordance with preventive measures that allow for their optimal use, without risk of contamination for the system water-soil-plant. (Author 6 refs.

  14. Mineralenconcentraten uit dierlijke mest = Mineral concentrates from animal slurry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, P.; Buisonjé, de F.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 6 pilot production plants of mineral concentrates from animal manure were monitored, with the aim of gathering additional data on the chemical composition of the raw slurry and the end products. Beside that a literature review was executed to reveal the biological degradability of

  15. Radioactive slurry waste treatment (2) - surfactants dose effects on filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Jung, W. S.; Baek, S. T.; Jung, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake

  16. Developing Archetypal Machines for a Sequence of Food- Slurry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This current work is targeted at developing various archetypal machines for the improvement of the production of these food slurries. Three prototype machines have been developed and discussed in this paper, namely, the suction sieving machine, the vibration sieving machine and the continuous flow multi-stage milling ...

  17. Automated injection of slurry samples in flow-injection analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsman, M.H.F.M.; Hulsman, M.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of injectors are described for introducing solid samples as slurries in flow analysis systems. A time-based and a volume-based injector based on multitube solenoid pinch valves were built, both can be characterized as hydrodynamic injectors. Reproducibility of the injections of dispersed

  18. Rheokinetic Analysis of Hydroxy Terminated Polybutadiene Based Solid Propellant Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay K Mahanta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure kinetics of propellant slurry based on hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB and toluene diisocyanate (TDI polyurethane reaction has been studied by viscosity build up method. The viscosity (ɳ–time (t plots conform to the exponential function ɳ = aebt, where a & b are empirical constants. The rate constants (k for viscosity build up at various shear rate (rpm, evaluated from the slope of dɳ/dt versus ɳ plots at different temperatures, were found to vary from 0.0032 to 0.0052 min-1. It was observed that the increasing shear rate did not have significant effect on the reaction rate constants for viscosity build up of the propellant slurry. The activation energy (Eɳ, calculated from the Arrhenius plots, was found to be 13.17±1.78 kJ mole-1, whereas the activation enthalpy (∆Hɳ* and entropy (∆Sɳ* of the propellant slurry, calculated from Eyring relationship, were found to be 10.48±1.78 kJ mole-1 and –258.51± 5.38 J mole-1K-1, respectively. The reaction quenching temperature of the propellant slurry was found to be -9 ° C, based upon the experimental data. This opens up an avenue for a “freeze-and-store”, then “warm-up and cast”, mode of manufacturing of very large solid rocket propellant grains.

  19. The effect of slurry rheology on cold cap formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, D.D.; Hrma, P.

    1991-01-01

    Yield stress, viscosity, and flow distance were measured on three simulated nuclear waste feeds at different temperatures and oxide loadings. Hydroxide, formate, and frit feeds, to produce glass of identical composition, were tested. Application of the results to a slurry fed waste glass melter is discussed

  20. A layered model for inclined pipe flow of settling slurry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Václav; Krupička, Jan; Kesely, Mikoláš

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 333, June (2018), s. 317-326 ISSN 0032-5910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-14271S Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : inclined pipe * settling slurry * pressure drop * flow stratification * laboratory loop Impact factor: 2.942, year: 2016

  1. Debris flow rheology: Experimental analysis of fine-grained slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The rheology of slurries consisting of ≤2-mm sediment from a natural debris flow deposit was measured using a wide-gap concentric-cylinder viscometer. The influence of sediment concentration and size and distribution of grains on the bulk rheological behavior of the slurries was evaluated at concentrations ranging from 0.44 to 0.66. The slurries exhibit diverse rheological behavior. At shear rates above 5 s−1 the behavior approaches that of a Bingham material; below 5 s−1, sand exerts more influence and slurry behavior deviates from the Bingham idealization. Sand grain interactions dominate the mechanical behavior when sand concentration exceeds 0.2; transient fluctuations in measured torque, time-dependent decay of torque, and hysteresis effects are observed. Grain rubbing, interlocking, and collision cause changes in packing density, particle distribution, grain orientation, and formation and destruction of grain clusters, which may explain the observed behavior. Yield strength and plastic viscosity exhibit order-of-magnitude variation when sediment concentration changes as little as 2–4%. Owing to these complexities, it is unlikely that debris flows can be characterized by a single rheological model.

  2. Nanocomposites of PP and bentonite clay modified with different surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Andre W.B.; Agrawal, Pankaj; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Ueki, Marcelo M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of nano composites of polypropylene (PP) and national bentonite clay modified with different surfactants. The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the organophilization process was effective. The surfactants led to a significant increase in the basal spacing of Brasgel PA clay. XRD results of the mixture PP/Brasgel PA clay modified with Praepagem WB surfactant indicated that a nanocomposite with intercalated structure was formed. When the Brasgel PA clay was modified with Praepagem HY surfactant, DRX results indicated that a micro composite was formed. Screw speed, clay content and PP viscosity had no influence on the XRD pattern of the obtained materials. (author)

  3. Backfilling of deposition tunnels: Use of bentonite pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, David; Sanden, Torbjoern; Jonsson, Esther; Hansen, Johanna

    2011-02-01

    The state of knowledge related to use of bentonite pellets as part of backfill or other gap filling components in repository applications is reviewed. How the pellets interact with adjacent sealing materials and the surrounding rock mass is a critical aspect in determining backfill behaviour. The key features and processes that determine how the pellet component of the KBS-3V deposition tunnel backfill will behave are discussed and recommendations related to what additional information needs to be developed are provided. Experiences related to pellet material composition, size, shape, placement options and more importantly, the density to which they can be placed all indicate that there are significant limitations to the achievable as-placed density of bentonite pellet fill. Low as-placed density of the pellet fill component of the backfill is potentially problematic as the outermost regions of tunnel backfill will be the first region of the backfill to be contacted by water entering the tunnels. It is also through this region that initial water movement along the length of the deposition tunnels will occur. This will greatly influence the operations in a tunnel, especially with respect to situations where water is exiting the downstream face of still open deposition tunnels. Pellet-filled regions are also sensitive to groundwater salinity, susceptible to development of piping features and subsequent mechanical erosion by through flowing water, particularly in the period preceding deposition tunnel closure. A review of the experiences of various organisations considering use of bentonite-pellet materials as part of buffer or backfill barriers is provided in this document. From this information, potential options and limitations to use of pellets or pellet-granule mixtures in backfill are identified. Of particular importance is identification of the apparent upper-limits of dry density to which such materials can to be placed in the field. These bounds will

  4. Hydrothermal stability of bentonite-based buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, R.M.; Miller, H.G.

    1985-02-01

    The reactions expected in bentonite-based buffer materials under conditions typical of a nuclear fuel waste disposal include mineral transformations (e.g. smectite to illite; smectite to zeolite) and a range of low-temperature cementation reactions. The probable extent and significance of these reactions are reviewed, and other reactions involving proposed filler sands are also examined briefly. The effects of mineral transformations on buffer performance will be insignificant if disposal vault temperatures do not exceed 100-120 degrees C and pH remains in the range 4 to 8. At pH > 9, zeolitization and silica dissolution may occur and buffer stability cannot be assured. The effects of cementation reactions may be significant, but are difficult to predict and require further investigation

  5. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Rene A.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Medeirosa, Vanessa da N.; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Pessan, Luiz A.

    2010-01-01

    Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that they affect the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a regional bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt in an amount of 3% by weight. XRD results showed that incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and obtaining exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior in relation to pure polyamide, in other words, lost of toughness. (author)

  6. Evaluation on elution feature of bentonite buffer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Hirohisa; Kanno, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro

    1997-09-01

    In order to evaluate long term physical stability of artificial barrier in land disposal of high level radioactive wastes, it is necessary to know quantitatively elution behavior of buffering materials from disposal road (or cavity) to circumferential rock crack. When elution of the buffer material occurs on large scale, amount of bentonite in the disposal road (or cavity) reduces and reduction of various functions expected to the buffer materials is presumed. According to specification examples of road transverse arrangement and disposal vertical arrangement systems, evaluation on elution amount of the buffer materials at disposal environment was conducted. Opening width of rock crack in the disposal environment was supposed to be 0.5 mm. As a result, obtained mass elution ratios of the buffer materials due to extrusion phenomenon were 0.04 to 0.2% after 10,000 year and 2 to 12% after 1,000,000 years. (G.K.)

  7. Synthesis of mullite nanometers microwave from bentonite delaminated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, J.; Azevedo, N.A.; Vieira, D.A.; Neves, G.A.; Santana, L.N.L.; Menezes, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    The smectite clays present as lamellar structure is formed by two layers of silica tetrahedrons and one layer of aluminum octahedra, which can be individually delaminated, reaching a thickness of about 1mm. Mullite is the only thermodynamically stable crystalline phase of SiO 2 and Al2O 3 system and can be synthesized from minerals that exhibit these oxides in its composition. The microwave synthesis offers advantages over conventional methods, the heating is rapid and uniform, avoiding an undesirable grain growth. This study aims to obtain nanometric mullite from bentonites delamined subjected to microwave heating. The samples were initially treated, then rehydrated, frozen and deagglomeration in a ball mill for 4 and 8 hours. Subsequently subjected to centrifugation, drying and microwave heating. The results showed that nano-mullite was obtained for samples subjected to longer heating and dispersions. (author)

  8. Retention of redox sensitive waste elements in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torstenfelt, B.; Allard, B.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion of technetium, iodine, uranium and neptunium in compacted bentonite has been studied. The possible reduction of the transport rate of these elements (i.e. redoxsensitive elements) by mixing the clay with metallic iron (for technetium, uranium and neptunium) or by adding a chemisorbent (for iodine) to the clay is reported. Technetium has an apparent diffusivity about 5 times higher in the heptavalent state (TcO 4 - ) than in the tetravalent state (TcO(OH) 2 or TcO 2 ), uranium and neptunium in their higher oxidation state (VI and V) have apparent diffusivities about 6 and 50 times higher, respectively, than in the tetravalent state. Iodine, as I - (or IO 3 - ), has a transport rate more than one order of magnitude lower than TcO 4 - . 10 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  9. Characterization of LDPE/PBAT/PLA and organophilic bentonite nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueredo, Daniela Casimiro de; Viana, Hamilton; Rosa, Derval dos Santos; Poveda, Patricia Negrini Siqueira

    2011-01-01

    Due to the ascension of Green chemistry in the 90's, it has been a demand for the production of biodegradable materials which cause minimal impacts to environment. Some nanocomposites are in this material class. In this context, six formulations containing low density polyethylene (LDPE), a compatibilized commercial poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) blend under the trademark Ecovio and organophilic bentonite were processed by extrusion to make films which were characterized by X-ray diffraction, melt flow index (MFI) and mechanical tests. X- ray pattern revealed that the nano clay was composed predominantly of montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite and it could promote formation of intercalated or exfoliated composites. Nano clay also affected the fluidity of composites with variations in module up to 4%, as evidenced by melt flow index. Mechanical tests demonstrated that there was no uniformity in mechanical behavior of the nanocomposites. (author)

  10. Backfilling of deposition tunnels: Use of bentonite pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)); Sanden, Torbjoern (Clay Technology AB (Sweden)); Jonsson, Esther (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Mangaement Co. (Sweden)); Hansen, Johanna (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    The state of knowledge related to use of bentonite pellets as part of backfill or other gap filling components in repository applications is reviewed. How the pellets interact with adjacent sealing materials and the surrounding rock mass is a critical aspect in determining backfill behaviour. The key features and processes that determine how the pellet component of the KBS-3V deposition tunnel backfill will behave are discussed and recommendations related to what additional information needs to be developed are provided. Experiences related to pellet material composition, size, shape, placement options and more importantly, the density to which they can be placed all indicate that there are significant limitations to the achievable as-placed density of bentonite pellet fill. Low as-placed density of the pellet fill component of the backfill is potentially problematic as the outermost regions of tunnel backfill will be the first region of the backfill to be contacted by water entering the tunnels. It is also through this region that initial water movement along the length of the deposition tunnels will occur. This will greatly influence the operations in a tunnel, especially with respect to situations where water is exiting the downstream face of still open deposition tunnels. Pellet-filled regions are also sensitive to groundwater salinity, susceptible to development of piping features and subsequent mechanical erosion by through flowing water, particularly in the period preceding deposition tunnel closure. A review of the experiences of various organisations considering use of bentonite-pellet materials as part of buffer or backfill barriers is provided in this document. From this information, potential options and limitations to use of pellets or pellet-granule mixtures in backfill are identified. Of particular importance is identification of the apparent upper-limits of dry density to which such materials can to be placed in the field. These bounds will

  11. Sorption behaviour of caesium on a bentonite sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurel, C.; Marmier, N.; Fromage, F.; Seby, F.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Giffaut, E.

    2002-01-01

    Sorption of elements like Cs on clay is one of the principal processes delaying their release from deep repositories of nuclear wastes into the environment. The sorption processes taking place between non-purified natural clay material (bentonite) and synthetic groundwater (containing Ca, Mg, Na, K and carbonates) were therefore studied experimentally and modelled for Cs to determine whether thermodynamic computer codes capable of predicting the behaviour of this element in natural systems might be developed. The model used, based on the properties of a pure montmorillonite phase, incorporates the surface reactions for natural major ions and sorbing cations but does not have any adjustable parameters. The weight of each parameters used in the model is assessed. Surface reactions are classified as either major or minor, and a simplified model of Cs sorption that considers only the major processes is proposed. This simplified model might correspond to the less sophisticated thermodynamic model included in coupled geochemistry-transport models. (orig.)

  12. Preparation and characterization of bentonite clay for formation of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.J.M.; Silva, B.L.; Araujo, I.J.C.; Medeiros, A.M.; Melo, J.D.D.; Paskocimas, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    This study we used the linear medium density polyethylene (PELMD) as polymer matrix and introduced, as reinforcement to increase the mechanical and thermal properties, the green bentonite deposit of Boa Vista/PB, rich montmorillonite (MMT), previously characterized by XRD, that passed by three stages of purification. The first stage was to clean by washing and filtering for removal of coarse material (sand and organic matter), followed by an acid attack. In the second, we used the quaternary ammonium surfactant, in order to increase the distance between the layers of MMT, and the third was removed from the wastewater, using absolute ethanol, finishing the purification of process. Then, the clay was introduced into the polymer matrix by polymerization in solution by intercalation and characterized by XRD. The results showed a partial exfoliation, satisfying the increasing properties. (author)

  13. Life cycle assessment of biogas from separated slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamelin, L.; Wesnaes, M.; Wenzel, H. (Univ. of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)); Molt Petersen, B. (Aarhus Univ.. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    The environmental aspects of biogas production based on pre-treated slurry from fattening pigs and dairy cows have been investigated in a life cycle perspective. The pre-treatment consists of concentrating the slurry using a separation technology. Significant environmental benefits, compared to the status quo slurry management, can be obtained for both pig and cow slurry, especially regarding reductions of the contributions to global warming, but the results depend to a large extent on the efficiency of the separation technology. Adding separation after the biogas plant can contribute to a more efficient management of the phosphorus, and this has also been investigated. Based on the results of the study it can be concluded that: 1) The environmental benefits of biogas from separated slurry are very dependent upon the separation efficiency (for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous). This particularly applies for carbon, as the separation efficiency defines the extent to which the degradable carbon contained in the slurry is transferred to the biogas plant. Efficient separation can be obtained by using polymer, but also by using a suitable separation technology. It could be mentioned that the decanter centrifuge used has a rather high efficiency of transferring volatile solids (VS) to the fibre fraction also without the use of polymer. 2) Biogas production from separated slurry can lead to significant reductions in the contributions to global warming, provided that the 'best available technologies' described in the report are used. That includes, among others: - a covered and short time storage of the fibre fraction before entering the biogas plant, - a 2-step biogas production where the post-digestion tank is covered with air-tight cover, - a covered storage of the degassed fibre fraction The benefits are also highly dependent upon the source of energy substituted by the biogas. 3) Based on evidences from reviewed studies, the cationic polyacrylamide polymer

  14. The coupled process laboratory test of highly compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenyao; Li Guoding; Li Shushen; Wang Chengzu

    2004-01-01

    Highly compacted bentonite blocks have been heated and hydrated in the laboratory in order to simulate the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) coupled processes of buffer material in a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. The experiment facility, which is composed of experiment barrel, heated system, high pressure water input system, temperature measure system, water content measure system and swelling stress system, is introduced in this paper. The steps of the THM coupled experiment are also given out in detail. There are total 10 highly compacted bentonite blocks used in this test. Experimental number 1-4 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 5-8 are the tests with the heater and without the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time and final moisture distribution are measured. Experimental number 9-10 are the tests with the heater and the hydrated process, which temperature distribution vs. time, final moisture distribution and the swelling stress distribution at some typical points vs. time are measured. The maximum test time is nearly 20 days and the minimum test time is only 8 hours. The results show that the temperature field is little affected by hydration process and stress condition, but moisture transport and stress distribution are a little affected by the thermal gradient. The results also show that the water head difference is the mainly driving force of hydration process and the swelling stress is mainly from hydration process. It will great help to understand better about heat and mass transfer in porous media and the THM coupled process in actual HLW disposal. (author)

  15. Origins of chirality in Nature: a reassessment of the postulated role of bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youatt, J.B.; Brown, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    Bondy and Harrington have proposed that selective binding of L isomers of amino acids and D isomers of sugars to bentonite is the mechanism by which the chirality of molecules in living cells was originally established. Further experiments indicate that the observations of Bondy and Harrington are better explained in terms of the effects of the binding to bentonite of the products of radiochemical decomposition. 1 table

  16. Microwave-acid treated bentonite as adsorbent for removal of radiocobalt from liquid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egamediev, S.; Nurbaeva, D.; Saidova, Z.; Khujaev, S.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Development of new sorbents and study of its sorption properties is an important task for nuclear waste management. In this study it was examined the ability of modified bentonite clays to sorb 60Co radionuclide with aim to evaluate the possibility of using them as sorbents for treatment of radioactively contaminated solutions. The radioactive tracer technique was used for determination of distribution coefficients and to monitor the modification processes of bentonite

  17. Research program to study the gamma radiation effects in Spanish bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dies, J.; Tarrasa, F.; Cuevas de las, C.; Miralles, L.; Pueyo, J. J.

    2000-01-01

    The engineering barrier of a radioactive waste underground disposal facility, placed in a granitic host rock, will consist of a backfill of compacted bentonite blocks. At first, this material will be subjected to a gamma radiation field, from the waste canister, and heat from the spent fuel inside the canister. Moreover, any groundwater that reaches the repository will saturate the bentonite. For these reasons the performance of the engineered barrier must be carefully assessed in laboratory experiments. (Author)

  18. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope geochemistry of Cretaceous bentonites and shales from the Disturbed Belt, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslinger, E.V.; Yeh Hsuehwen

    1986-01-01

    The mineralogy, deltaO 18 , and deltaD of the 18 of the 18 of 18 , data for the 18 of bulk bentonite is 1 to 3 per mille more negative than the deltaO 18 of the 18 of several size fractions of clay-sized quartz separated from the bentonite varies from +11 per mille to +24 per mille. Results are presented and discussed. (author)

  19. Adsorption of and acidic dye from aqueous solution by surfactant modified bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouberka, Z.; Khenifi, A.; Belkaid, N.; Ait Mahamed, H.; Haddou, B.; Derriche, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the adsorption of an acidic dye S. Y. 4 GL (i.e: Supranol yellow 4GL) from aqueous solution on inorgano-organo clay. Bentonite is a kind of natural clay with good exchanging ability. By exchanging its inter lamellar cations with Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and hydroxy aluminic or chromium poly cations, the properties of natural bentonite can be greatly improved. (Author)

  20. Photophysical and adsorption properties of pyronin B in natural bentonite clay dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostami, Mohammad Reza [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Kaya, Mehmet [Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 53100 Rize (Turkey); Gür, Bahri; Onganer, Yavuz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey); Meral, Kadem, E-mail: kademm@atauni.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The molecular aggregation of PyB in bentonite aqueous dispersion is observed by using molecular absorption spectrum. - Highlights: • Molecular behavior of PyB adsorbed on bentonite was spectroscopically followed. • H-aggregates of PyB in bentonite aqueous dispersion were formed. • The adsorption characteristics of PyB on bentonite particles were determined. - Abstract: The present study focused on the adsorption and photophysical properties of pyronin B (PyB) in bentonite aqueous dispersion. The photophysical properties of PyB in the aqueous dispersion were studied by using UV–vis absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. In this concept, the interaction of the dye with bentonite particles in the aqueous dispersion was spectroscopically followed depending on certain parameters such as interaction time, pH and the dye concentration. Obtained spectral data revealed that the aggregate structures (H-type) of PyB in the aqueous dispersion were formed in the dye concentration range studied. The non-fluorescence nature of H-aggregates and the clay minerals governed the fluorescence property of PyB. The mentioned non-radiative processes caused the fluorescence lifetime of the dye to decrease compared to that in water. The adsorption process of PyB on bentonite was examined depending on contact time and initial adsorbate concentration. An adsorption isotherm was good-fitted by the Freundlich model with a linear regression correlation value of 0.999. The adsorption of PyB on bentonite particles was in agreement with pseudo second-order kinetics.

  1. Slurry erosion induced surface nanocrystallization of bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiulin; Wu, Jili; Pi, Jinghong; Cheng, Jiangbo; Shan, Yiping; Zhang, Yingtao

    2018-05-01

    Microstructure evolution and phase transformation of metallic glasses (MGs) could occur under heating condition or mechanical deformation. The cross-section of as-cast Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 MG rod was impacted by the solid particles when subjected to erosion in slurry flow. The surface microstructure was observed by XRD before and after slurry erosion. And the stress-driven de-vitrification increases with the increase of erosion time. A microstructure evolution layer with 1-2 μm thickness was formed on the topmost eroded surface. And a short range atomic ordering prevails in the microstructure evolution layer with crystalline size around 2-3 nm embedded in the amorphous matrix. The XPS analysis reveals that most of the metal elements in the MG surface, except for Cu, were oxidized. And a composite layer with ZrO2 and Al2O3 phases were formed in the topmost surface after slurry erosion. The cooling rate during solidification of MG has a strong influence on the slurry erosion induced nanocrystallization. And a lower cooling rate favors the surface nanocrystallization because of lower activation energy and thermo-stability. Finally, the slurry erosion induced surface nanocrystallization and microstructure evolution result in surface hardening and strengthening. Moreover, the microstructure evolution mechanisms were discussed and it is related to the cooling rate of solidification and the impact-induced temperature rise, as well as the combined effects of the impact-induced plastic flow, inter-diffusion and oxidation of the metal elements.

  2. Aerosols generated by spills of viscous solutions and slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Hodgson, W.H.

    1986-12-01

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop methods for estimating source terms from these accidents. Experiments were run by spilling viscous solutions and slurries to determine the mass and particle-size distribution of the material made airborne. In all cases, 1 L of solution was spilled from a height of 3 m. Aqueous solutions of sucrose (0 to 56%) gave a range of viscosities from 1.3 to 46 cp. The percent of spill mass made airborne from the spills of these solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0.0001. The mass of particles made airborne decreased as solution viscosity increased. Slurry loading ranged from 25 to 51% total solids. The maximum source airborne (0.0046 wt %) occurred with the slurry that had the lightest loading of soluble solids. The viscosity of the carrying solution also had an impact on the source term from spilling slurries. The effect of surface tension on the source term was examined in two experiments. Surface tension was halved in these spills by adding a surfactant. The maximum weight percent airborne from these spills was 0.0045, compared to 0.003 for spills with twice the surface tension. The aerodynamic mass medium diameters for the aerosols produced by spills of the viscous solutions, slurries, and low surface tension liquids ranged from 0.6 to 8.4 μm, and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.8 to 28.0

  3. Indian Creek-AML: Coal slurry reclamation (Kansas case history)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witthar, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Black and Veatch, assisted by Jack Nawrot, developed conceptual and final designs and provided construction assistance to create grasslands and wetlands in order to reclaim an abandoned coal mine for the state of Kansas. The mine included spoils, a coal refuse dump, and slurry pond in the Indian Creek drainage basin in east central Kansas. The Indian Creek flowed from an off-site abandoned mine and through the coal slurry pond where its waters became more polluted. The intent of the reclamation project was to improve water quality and create a wildlife refuge. The coal refuse was covered and seeded with a diversity of vegetation including several grasses and legume. The slurry pond was developed into a series of large wetland cells to improve water quality. Prior to reclamation, the water leaving the site had a typical pH of 3.3, ranging from 2.4 to 5.6, an iron content which typically over 22 mg/L and ranging over 100 mg/L, and contained large amounts of coal slurry. The acid sediment in the slurry killed fish and caused visible damage to a new large concrete box culvert several miles downstream of the site. Post-reclamation water quality leaving the Indian Creek site showed immediate improvement even before vegetation was reestablished. The existing wetland treatment systems have been successfully treating water for over seven years with the pH of the water leaving the wetlands above 7 and soluble iron content less than 1 mg/L. Fish in the constructed wetlands support waterfowl which now nest onsite

  4. Synthesis of H/Bentonite and Ni/Al2O3-bentonite and its application to produce biogasoline from nyamplung seed (Calophyllum inophillum Linn) oil by catalytic hydrocracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A. T.; Wijaya, K.; Sasongko, N. A.

    2018-03-01

    Hydrocracking process of Nyamplung (Calophyllum inophillum Linn) seed oil to produce biogasoline using H/bentonite and Ni/Al2O3-bentonite that pillared by Al2O3 as catalyst had been conducted. Bentonite was activated by acidification using HF 1% and H2SO4 0.5 M. Ni metal was impregnated into bentonite with two steps reaction; therewas intercalation with Al2O3kegging ion and Ni metal impregnation using NiCl2 metal salt. Catalysts were characterized by infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), BET, TEM and ammonia adsorption. Hydrocracking reaction was variated by Ni/Al2O3-bentonite and H/bentonite with ratio catalyst/oil 1:100. Biocrude was prepared by extraction by using ethanol 96%. Hydrocracking oil products were further analyzed by GC-MS. The results show that the acidity of bentonite by activation using HF 1% and H2SO4 0.5 M has been increased from 62.58 to 64.62 mmol/g. Impregnation process also increased the acidity of bentonite from 62.58 to 64.89 mmol/g. Activation using HF 1% and H2SO4 0.5 M, intercalation by Al2O3 and impregnation by Ni metal were increasing the crystallinity, surface area, total volume pore and average pore size of bentonite. These techniques were also causeddealumination of bentonite. The hydrocracking process successfully synthesized hydrocarbons with a number of carbon chain between C5-C20 which include bio-gasoline group compounds. Moreover, catalytic processes by H/bentonite and Ni/Al2O3-bentonite also successfully produced 39.83% and 60.37% of biogasoline yields, respectively.

  5. Salt content impact on the unsaturated property of bentonite-sand buffer backfilling materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ming [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Disaster and Environment in Western China, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Huyuan, E-mail: p1314lvp@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Disaster and Environment in Western China, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Jia Lingyan; Cui Suli [Key Laboratory of Mechanics on Disaster and Environment in Western China, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SWCC and infiltration process of bentonite-sand mixtures is researched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The k{sub u} of bentonite-sand mixtures was evaluated as the buffer backfilling materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt content impacting on the unsaturated property of bentonite-sand materials is small. - Abstract: Bentonite mixed with sand is often considered as possible engineered barrier in deep high-level radioactive waste disposal in China. In the present work, the vapor transfer technique and water infiltration apparatus were used to measure the soil water characteristic curve (SWCC) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (k{sub u}) of bentonite-sand mixtures (B/S) effected by salt content. Results show, the water-holding capacity and k{sub u} increase slightly with the concentration of Na{sup +} in pore liquid increasing from 0 g/L to 12 g/L, similar with the solution concentration of Beishan groundwater in China. Salt content in the laboratory produced only one order of magnitude increase in k{sub u}, which is the 'safe' value. The different pore liquid concentrations used in this study led to small differences in thickness of diffuse double layer of bentonite in mixtures, this might explain why some differences have been found in final values of k{sub u}.

  6. The influence of the addition of polymers on the physico-chemical properties of bentonite suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljkovic S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite clays have many applications in industries ranging from construction to cosmetics. Addition of polymers can profoundly influence the properties of bentonite suspensions and we now describe the influence of a range of different polymers. Whereas polyvinyl pyrolidone and soy isolate only slightly influenced the pH and the electrical conductivity of bentonite polymers in suspension, Carbopol solution caused decreases in both pH and electrical conductivity. As expected, strong electrolytes like sodium chloride caused big changes in the electrical conductivity of the suspensions. When the temperature of the bentonite suspensions was increased, the pH was almost unchanged, but the electrical conductivity increased. Bentonite treated with polymer suspensions can be used in purifying polluted water; for example, our results suggest that high pH caused by phosphorous salts can be addressed using bentonite modified with Carbopol. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije: Stanisa Stojiljkovic, Vojkan Miljkovic, Goran Nikolic, Ivana Savic and Ivan Savic, TR 34020, Danijela Kostic 172047 and Biljana Arsic 174007

  7. Monitoring of bentonite pore water with a probe based on solid-state microsensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco, Jahir; Baldi, Antoni; Martin, Pedro L.; Bratov, Andrei; Jimenez, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate the waste from the biosphere. This multi-barrier system typically comprises Natural geological barrier provided by the repository host rock and its surroundings and an engineered barrier system (EBS). Bentonite is being studied as an appropriated porous material for an EBS to prevent or delay the release and transport of radionuclides towards biosphere. The study of pore water chemistry within bentonite barriers will permit to understand the transport phenomena of radionuclides and obtain a database of the bentonite-water interaction processes. In this work, the measurement of some chemical parameters in bentonite pore water using solid-state microsensors is proposed. Those sensors are well suited for this application since in situ measurements are feasible and they are robust enough for the long periods of time that monitoring is needed in an EBS. A probe containing an ISFET (ion sensitive field effect transistor) for measuring pH, and platinum microelectrodes for measuring conductivity and redox potential was developed, together with the required instrumentation, to study the chemical changes in a test cell with compacted bentonite. Response features of the sensors' probe and instrumentation performance in synthetic samples with compositions similar to those present in bentonite barriers are reported. Measurements of sensors stability in a test cell are also presented

  8. Chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposites: morphology and mechanical behavior; Bionanocompositos quitosana/bentonita: morfologia e comportamento mecanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, C.R.C.; Melo, F.M.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Vitorino, I.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Fook, M.V.L.; Silva, S.M.L., E-mail: suedina@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This study chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposite films were prepared by solution intercalation process, seeking to investigate the effect of the chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 e 10/1) on the morphology and mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposites. It was used as nanophase, Argel sodium bentonite (AN), was provided by Bentonit Uniao Nordeste-BUN (Campina Grande, Brazil) and as biopolymer matrix the chitosan of low molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of 86,7% was supplied by Polymar (Fortaleza, Brazil). The bionanocomposites was investigated by X-ray diffraction and tensile properties. According to the results, the morphology and the mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposite was affected by the ratio of chitosan/bentonite. The chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 and 10/1) indicated the formation of an intercalated nanostructure and of the predominantly exfoliated nanostructure, respectively. And the considerable increases in the resistance to the traction were observed mainly for the bionanocomposite with predominantly exfoliated morphology. (author)

  9. Effect on physical properties of laterite soil with difference percentage of sodium bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Nur Aisyah; Azmi, Nor Azizah Che; Mukri, Mazidah; Noor, Siti Nur Aishah Mohd

    2017-08-01

    This research was carried out in an attempt to know the physical properties of laterite soil with the appearance of difference percentage of sodium bentonite. Lateritic soils usually develop in tropical and other regions with similar hot and humid climate, where heavy rainfall, warm temperature and well drainage lead to the formation of thick horizons of reddish lateritic soil profiles rich in iron and aluminium. When sodium predominates, a large amount of water can be absorbed in the interlayer, resulting in the remarkable swelling properties observed with hydrating sodium bentonite. There are some basic physical properties test conducted in this research which are Specific Gravity Test, pH Test, Sieve Analysis, Hydrometer Test, Shrinkage Limit and Atterberg Limit. The test will be conducted with 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% of sodium bentonite. Each test will be repeated three times for the accuracy of the result. From the physical properties test the soil properties characteristic react with the sodium bentonite can be determine. Therefore the best percentage of sodium bentonite admixture can be determined for laterite soil. The outcomes of this study give positive results due to the potential of sodium bentonite to improve the laterite soil particle.

  10. γ-radiation induced corrosion of copper in bentonite-water systems under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin Norrfors, K.; Björkbacka, Åsa; Kessler, Amanda; Wold, Susanna; Jonsson, Mats

    2018-03-01

    In this work we have experimentally studied the impact of bentonite clay on the process of radiation-induced copper corrosion in anoxic water. The motivation for this is to further develop our understanding of radiation-driven processes occurring in deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel where copper canisters containing the spent nuclear fuel will be embedded in compacted bentonite. Experiments on radiation-induced corrosion in the presence and absence of bentonite were performed along with experiments elucidating the impact irradiation on the Cu2+ adsorption capacity of bentonite. The experiments presented in this work show that the presence of bentonite clay has no or very little effect on the magnitude of radiation-induced corrosion of copper in anoxic aqueous systems. The absence of a protective effect similar to that observed for radiation-induced dissolution of UO2 is attributed to differences in the corrosion mechanism. This provides further support for the previously proposed mechanism where the hydroxyl radical is the key radiolytic oxidant responsible for the corrosion of copper. The radiation effect on the bentonite sorption capacity of Cu2+ (reduced capacity) is in line with what has previously been reported for other cations. The reduced cation sorption capacity is partly attributed to a loss of Al-OH sites upon irradiation.

  11. Development of spraying methods for high density bentonite barriers. Part 3. Field investigation of spraying methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Makoto; Kobayashi, Ichizo; Toida, Masaru; Fukuda, Katsumi; Sato, Tatsuro; Nonaka, Katsumi; Gozu, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    The authors have developed a new method of constructing high density bentonite barriers by means of a wet spraying method. Using this method, backfill material can be placed in narrow upper and side parts in a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Using a new supplying machine for bentonite, spraying tests were conducted to investigate the conditions during construction. On the basis of the test results, the various parameters for the spraying method were investigated. The test results are summarized as follows: 1. The new machine supplied about twice the weight of material supplied by a screw conveyor. A dry density of spraying bentonite 0.05 Mg/m 3 higher than that of a screw conveyor with the same water content could be achieved. 2. The dry density of sprayed bentonite at a boundary with concrete was the same as that at the center of the cross section. 3. The variation in densities of bentonite sprayed in the vertical downward and horizontal directions was small. Also, density reduction due to rebound during spraying was not seen. 4. Bentonite controlled by water content could be sprayed smoothly in the horizontal direction by a small machine. Also rebound could be collected by a machine conveying air. (author)

  12. Stabilization of heavy metals in soil using two organo-bentonites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Xiaohong; Liu, Cun; McCall, Wesley; Lu, Jinlong

    2017-10-01

    Stabilization of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg, Cr and As in soil using tetramethylammonium (TMA) and dodecyltrimethylammonium (DTMA) modified bentonites (T-Bents and D-Bents) as amendments was investigated. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was used to quantify the metal mobility after soil treatment. The structural parameters of modified bentonites, including the BET surface area, basal spacing and zeta potential were obtained as a function of the TMA and DTMA loading at 40, 80, 120, 160 and 200% of the bentonite's cation exchange capacity, respectively. The results indicated that the characteristics of the organo-bentonites fundamentally varied depending on the species and concentration of modifiers loaded on bentonite. T-Bents and D-Bents manifested distinct immobilization effectiveness towards various metals. In association with the organo-bentonite characteristics, the main interactive mechanisms for Cu, Zn and Cd proceeded via cation exchange, Hg proceeded via physical adsorption and partitioning, Cr and As proceeded via specific adsorption and electrostatic attraction, respectively. This study provided operational and mechanistic basis for optimizing the organic clay synthesis and selecting as the appropriate amendment for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P.

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs

  14. Modeling hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure of several kinds of bentonites affected by concentration of saline water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hasegawa, Takuma; Nakamura, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    In case of construction of repository for radioactive waste near the coastal area, the effect of brine on hydraulic conductivity of bentonite as an engineering barrier should be considered because it is known that the hydraulic conductivity of bentonite increases with increasing in salt concentration of water. Thus, the effect of salinity of water on hydraulic conductivity of bentonite has been conducted experimentally. However, it is necessary to elucidate and to model the mechanism of the phenomenon because various kinds of bentonites may possibly be placed in various salinity of salt water. In this study, a model for evaluating permeability of compacted bentonite is proposed considering a) increase in number of sheets of montomorillonite crystal because of cohesion, b) decrease in viscosity of water in interlayer between sheets of montmorillonite crystal. Quantitative evaluation method for permeability of several kinds of bentonite under brine is proposed based on the model mentioned above. (author)

  15. Study of Cadmium adsorption of Nickel and Zinc on a natural bentonite and homo ionic of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Giraldo, German Dario; Pinzon Bello, Jorge Alejo

    1999-01-01

    It was studied the adsorption of cadmium, nickel and zinc in aqueous solution at 25oC over a bentonite from the Cauca Valley, in its native state as well as in its sodium homo ionic form. The Langmuir isotherm adequately describes the adsorption of these metal ions over both bentonites, and the thermodynamic distribution coefficient, Kdm, which allow quantifying the degree of adsorption, can be calculated. Baeyens-bradbury model correlates well the adsorption of the metal ions over both bentonites but Kdm cannot be calculated from it. The adsorption data do not adjust to freundlich isotherm or B.E.T. As well as they do to the previously mentioned models. The sodium homo ionic bentonite adsorbs nickel and zinc better than the native bentonite, whereas there are not significant differences in cadmium adsorption. The order of adsorption over both bentonites, Cadmium > Zinc > Nickel, follow the HSAB principle

  16. Effect of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid on the sorption and desorption of cobalt to bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Sh.M.; Ren, A.P.; Chen, Ch.L.; Chen, Y.X.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Humic substances and bentonite have attracted great interest in radioactive waste management. Here the sorption of cobalt on bentonite in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) under ambient conditions was studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength, FA and solution concentrations on cobalt sorption to bentonite were also investigated using batch techniques. The results indicate that the sorption of cobalt is strongly dependent on pH and is independent of ionic strength under our experimental conditions. Surface complexation is considered the main mechanism of cobalt sorption to bentonite. In the presence of FA, little effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found at pH 8. The addition sequences of FA/Co 2+ to the bentonite suspension on the sorption of cobalt to FA-coated bentonite were also studied. The results indicated that the sorption is not influenced by the addition sequences. Some possible mechanisms are discussed

  17. Sorption of 17b-Estradiol to Pig Slurry Separates and Soil in the Soil-Slurry Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Petersen, Søren O; Lægdsmand, Mette

    2012-01-01

    to agricultural soils, to different size fractions of pig slurry separates, and to soils amended with each size fraction to simulate conditions in the soil–slurry environment. A crude fiber fraction (SS1) was prepared by sieving (solids removed by an on-farm separation process. Three other size...... fractions (SS2 > SS3 > SS4) were prepared from the liquid fraction of the separated slurry by sedimentation and centrifugation. Sorption experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol L−1 CaCl2 and in natural pig urine matrix. Sorption in 0.01 mol L−1 CaCl2 was higher than that in pig urine for all solids used....... Sorption of E2 to soil increased with its organic carbon content for both liquid phases. The solid–liquid partition coefficients of slurry separates were 10 to 30 times higher than those of soils, but the organoic carbon normalized partition coefficient values, reflecting sorption per unit organic carbon...

  18. Swelling pressure and water absorption property of compacted granular bentonite during water absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, T.; Komine, H.; Murakami, S.; Sekiguchi, T.; Sekine, I.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite is currently planned to be used as buffer materials in engineered barrier of radioactive waste disposal. Granular bentonites are expected as the materials used in constructions as buffer materials by in-situ compaction methods. After applying these buffer materials, it is expected that the condition of the buffer area changes in long-term by the seepage of groundwater into buffer area. Therefore, it is important to understand water movement and swelling behavior of the buffer materials for evaluating the performance of engineered barrier. In this study, we investigated water absorption property and swelling pressure of compacted granular bentonite. Specifically, the process of swelling pressure and amount of water absorption of granular bentonite-GX (Kunigel-GX, produced at the Tsukinuno mine in Japan) were observed by laboratory tests. To discuss the influence of maximum grain size of bentonite particle on swelling pressure and water absorption property, two types of samples were used. One is granular sample which is Bentonite-GX controlled under 2 mm the maximum grain size, the other is milled sample which is Bentonite-GX with the maximum grain size under 0.18 mm by milling with the agate mortar. In addition, the mechanism on the swelling pressure of compacted granular bentonite was considered and discussed. In the cases of granular sample, swelling pressure increases rapidly, then gradually continues to increase up to maximum value. In the cases of milled sample, swelling pressure also increases rapidly at first. However, then its value decreases before progressing of gradual increase continues. Especially, this trend was clearly observed at a relatively low dry density. At the peaks of these curves, the swelling pressure of granular samples is lower than that of milled samples. In addition, the increasing of swelling pressure by the time the peak observed during the process of swelling pressure from

  19. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic potential of respirable bentonite particles with different quartz contents and chemical modifications in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geh, Stefan; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Dopp, Elke [University Hospital, Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Essen (Germany); Yuecel, Raif [University Hospital, Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), Essen (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Edinburgh, ELEGI COLT Lab, Scotland (United Kingdom); Albrecht, Catrin; Borm, Paul J.A. [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); Armbruster, Lorenz [Verein fuer Technische Sicherheit und Umweltschutz e.V., Gotha (Germany); Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bruening, Thomas [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, Eik [University of Rostock, Institute of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biosystems Technology, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Considering the biological reactivity of pure quartz in lung cells, there is a strong interest to clarify the cellular effects of respirable siliceous dusts, like bentonites. In the present study, we investigated the cellular uptake and the cytotoxic potential of bentonite particles (Oe< 10 {mu}m) with an {alpha}-quartz content of up to 6% and different chemical modifications (activation: alkaline, acidic, organic) in human lung fibroblasts (IMR90). Additionally, the ability of the particles to induce apoptosis in IMR90-cells and the hemolytic activity was tested. All bentonite samples were tested for endotoxins with the in vitro-Pyrogen test and were found to be negative. Cellular uptake of particles by IMR90-cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was analyzed in IMR90-cells by determination of viable cells using flow cytometry and by measuring of the cell respiratory activity. Induced apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/Propidiumiodide-staining and gel electrophoresis. Our results demonstrate that activated bentonite particles are better taken up by IMR90-cells than untreated (native) bentonite particles. Also, activated bentonite particles with a quartz content of 5-6% were more cytotoxic than untreated bentonites or bentonites with a quartz content lower than 4%. The bentonite samples induced necrotic as well as apoptotic cell death. In general, bentonites showed a high membrane-damaging potential shown as hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. We conclude that cellular effects of bentonite particles in human lung cells are enhanced after chemical treatment of the particles. The cytotoxic potential of the different bentonites is primarily characterized by a strong lysis of the cell membrane. (orig.)

  20. Numerical simulation of cesium and strontium migration through sodium bentonite altered by cation exchange with groundwater components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, J.S.; Carnahan, C.L.

    1988-10-01

    Numerical simulations have been used to investigate how spatial and temporal changes in the ion exchange properties of bentonite affect the migration of cationic fission products from high-level waste. Simulations in which fission products compete for exchange sites with ions present in groundwater diffusing into the bentonite are compared to simulations in which the exchange properties of bentonite are constant. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Leaf absorption of atmospheric ammonia emitted from pig slurry applied beneath the canopy of winter wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjedde Sommer, S.; Jensen, E.S.; Kofoed Schjoerring, J.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption of volatilized ammonia after application of slurry onto the soil surface (sand) between rows of a wheat crop was studied in two experiments. The slurry was labelled with 15 N-NH 4 . During seven days the accumulated gaseous N loss from the slurry varied from 6.9 to 11.1 g N m -2 . In April ammonia losses from slurry applied beneath a 5 cm high wheat crop were equal to losses from slurry applied to a fallow, but 2.2% of the lost atmospheric ammonia was taken up by the leaves. In May ammonia loss from slurry applied between the rows of a 43 cm high crop was reduced by 6% compared to the loss from fallow, because of a reduced transfer of ammonia from the slurry to the air. Of the emitted ammonia 3.3% was absorbed by the canopy. (au)

  2. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry.

  3. The adsorption characteristics and porous structure of bentonite adsorbents as determined from the adsorption isotherms of benzene vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEPA STOJANOVSKA

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of benzene vapor on natural and acid activated bentonites was treated by the theory of volume filling of micropores. The micropore volume and characteristic values of the free energy of adsorption were determined from the adsorption isotherms. The Dubinin–Radushkevish–Stoeckli and Dubinin–Astakhov equations were used for this purpose. The results showed that natural bentonite has a more homogeneous micropore structure than the acid activated ones. The characteristic values of the free energy of adsorption for the natural bentonite were higher than those of the acid activated bentonite. This is due to differences in its structure and the pore size.

  4. Evaluation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Biochemical Traits of Lettuce under Drought Stress and Super Absorbent or Bentonite Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Valizadeh Ghale Beig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two superabsorbents (natural-bentonite and (synthetic-A 200 on the chlorophyll fluorescence index, proline accumulation, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and total carbohydrate in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. was evaluated. For this purpose, a factorial experiment using completely randomized design with superabsorbents at 3 levels (0, 0.15, 0.30 w/w%, drought stress at 2 levels (60 and 100% of field capacity and 4 replicates was conducted. Results showed that photosystem photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm II under drought stress (60% FC as well as lower levels of bentonite superabsorbent polymer reduced. The minimum and maximum proline content were obtained in 0.3% bentonite, 100% FC and 0 benetonite, 60% FC, respectively. The lowest and highest phenolic compounds was corresponded to the highest levels in both super absorbents and control respectively, so that the super absorbent and bentonite, reduced phenolic compounds by 62.65 and 66.21% compared to control. 0 and 0.15 wt % bentonite in high drought stress (60% FC showed the highest and 0.3 wt % bentonite and 100% FC attained the lowest level of antioxidant activity. Control bentonite treatment beds at 60% FC and beds containing 0.3 wt. % bentonite in 100% FC, showed the lowest and the highest total carbohydrate content respectively. Results of this study indicate that bentonite can reduce the negative effects of drought stress similar to artificial super absorbent.

  5. Alteration behavior of bentonite barrier of radioactive waste disposal by alkaline solutions. Part 1. Permeability change of compacted bentonite immersed in alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Kunihiko

    2010-01-01

    Permeability tests using the compacted bentonites and alkaline solutions were carried out to estimate of alteration behavior and the change of permeability during the alteration reaction. The permeability tests of the compacted bentonites were carried out at 23degC for one week after they were immersed in alkaline solution at 60degC for four weeks (immersing test). After permeability tests, the compacted bentonites were repeatedly tested as the same procedure (i.e. repetition of permeability test and immersing test) at 11 cycles. The compacted bentonites with initial dry density of 1.6 Mg/m 3 were reacted with the different type of the alkaline solutions (deionized water, NaOH (pH=12 and 14), KOH (pH=12 and 14) and Ca(OH) 2 (pH=12)) in each experiments. In the case of deionized water and alkaline solutions of pH12, the mineral compositions of altered bentonite were similar to original bentonite while the exchangeable cations of altered bentonites were changed. No changes of the mineralogical features of montmorillonite in altered bentonites (i.e. illitization, baideritization and increasing of layer charge) were observed in the case of deionized water, pH12-NaOH and pH12-Ca(OH) 2 . The montmorillonite was changed to the illite/smectite interstratified mineral containing about 40% illite like component during the reaction with pH12-KOH. In the case of alkaline solutions with pH14, the component minerals of bentonite (e.g. montmorillonite, quartz and clinoptilolite) were dissolved, consequently secondly minerals (e.g. analcime and phillipsite) were crystallized during experiments. Furthermore, the mineralogical features of montmorillonite were changed as illitization (pH14-KOH), beidellitization (pH14-NaOH and pH14-KOH) and increasing of layer charge (pH14-NaOH and pH14-KOH). No increasing of permeability were observed during the experiment using pH12-NaOH and pH12-Ca(OH) 2 as well as the case of deionized water. In the case of pH12-KOH, the permeability continually

  6. Development and validation of mechanical model for saturated/unsaturated bentonite buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S.; Komine, H.; Kato, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Development and validation of mechanical models for bentonite buffer and backfill materials are one of important subjects to appropriately evaluate long term behaviour or condition of the EBS in radioactive waste disposal. The Barcelona Basic Model (BBM), which is one of extensions of the modified Cam-Clay model for unsaturated and expansive soil, has been developed and widely applied to several problems by using the coupled THM code, Code B right. Advantage of the model is that mechanical characteristics of buffer and backfill materials under not only saturated condition but also unsaturated one are taken account as well as swelling characteristics due to wetting. In this study the BBM is compared with already existing experimental data and already developed another model in terms of swelling characteristics of Japanese bentonite Kunigel-V1, and is validated in terms of consolidation characteristics based on newly performed controlled-suction oedometer tests for the Kunigel-V1 bentonite. Komine et al. (2003) have proposed a model (set of equations) for predicting swelling characteristics based on the diffuse double layer concept and the van der Waals force concept etc. They performed a lot of swelling deformation tests of bentonite and sand-bentonite mixture to confirm the applicability of the model. The BBM well agrees with the model proposed by Komine et al. and the experimental data in terms of swelling characteristics. Compression index and swelling index depending on suction are introduced in the BBM. Controlled-suction consolidation tests (oedometer tests) were performed to confirm the applicability of the suction dependent indexes to unsaturated bentonite. Compacted bentonite with initial dry density of 1.0 Mg/m 3 was tested. Constant suction, 80 kPa, 280 kPa and 480 kPa was applied and kept during the consolidation tests. Applicability of the BBM to consolidation and swelling behaviour of saturated and

  7. Advanced computational model for three-phase slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2001-10-01

    In the second year of the project, the Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is further developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the bubbles and particle motions. An experimental set for studying a two-dimensional bubble column is also developed. The operation of the bubble column is being tested and diagnostic methodology for quantitative measurements is being developed. An Eulerian computational model for the flow condition in the two-dimensional bubble column is also being developed. The liquid and bubble motions are being analyzed and the results are being compared with the experimental setup. Solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions were compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures is also being studied. Further progress was also made in developing a thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction in a state of turbulent motion. The balance laws are obtained and the constitutive laws are being developed. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The technique of Phase-Doppler anemometry was used in these studies. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also establish the

  8. Nutrient losses from cattle co-digestate slurry during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Perazzolo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Among environmental issues related to intensive livestock activity, emissions to air from manure management are of increasing concern. Thus the knowledge of the effect of treatment application on subsequent emissions from manure is required to assess the environment impact of management solutions. This work addresses the effect of anaerobic digestion and phase separation on emissions during storage by studying nitrogen losses from lab-scale stores and field pilot-scale stores of a co-digestate cattle slurry and its respective separated fractions. Lab-scale experiment was carried in temperature-controlled room where each fraction (untreated, separated liquid and separated solid was stored in duplicate for a period of 32 days in 30 L vessel. Pilot-scale experiment was carried out both during the cold season and during warm season for 90 days of storage. In both experimentations samples of the manure were analysed periodically for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN, total ammonia nitrogen, dry matter and volatile solids and pH. These analyses allow estimating nitrogen losses in different storage conditions. Effects of mechanical separation and season were assessed by ANOVA (Wilcoxon test, P<0.05. In temperature controlled conditions nitrogen losses measured account for 13% and 26% of TKN for unseparated and separated slurries respectively. In field conditions during cold season nutrient losses were limited. On average unseparated and separated slurries lost respectively 6.8% and 12.6% of their initial TKN content. Much higher were the TKN losses from the slurries examined in warm season where losses raised up to 40% of the initial TKN content. Generally mechanical separation increases nutrient losses, but the differences were not significant in field conditions. The results highlighted that nutrient losses, in particular the nitrogen ones, can be considerable especially during summer storage. The latter, in case of separated slurries, are mainly related

  9. Advanced computational model for three-phase slurry reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2000-11-01

    In the first year of the project, solid-fluid mixture flows in ducts and passages at different angle of orientations were analyzed. The model predictions are compared with the experimental data and good agreement was found. Progress was also made in analyzing the gravity chute flows of solid-liquid mixtures. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for analyzing three-phase slurry flows in a bubble column is being developed. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas liquid flows in the bubble column, and makes use of the Lagrangian particle tracking procedure to analyze the particle motions. Progress was also made in developing a rate dependent thermodynamically consistent model for multiphase slurry flows in a state of turbulent motion. The new model includes the effect of phasic interactions and leads to anisotropic effective phasic stress tensors. Progress was also made in measuring concentration and velocity of particles of different sizes near a wall in a duct flow. The formulation of a thermodynamically consistent model for chemically active multiphase solid-fluid flows in a turbulent state of motion was also initiated. The general objective of this project is to provide the needed fundamental understanding of three-phase slurry reactors in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) liquid fuel synthesis. The other main goal is to develop a computational capability for predicting the transport and processing of three-phase coal slurries. The specific objectives are: (1) To develop a thermodynamically consistent rate-dependent anisotropic model for multiphase slurry flows with and without chemical reaction for application to coal liquefaction. Also to establish the material parameters of the model. (2) To provide experimental data for phasic fluctuation and mean velocities, as well as the solid volume fraction in the shear flow devices. (3) To develop an accurate computational capability incorporating the new rate-dependent and anisotropic model for analyzing reacting and

  10. Experimental investigations of piping phenomena in bentonite based buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Asano, H.; Kobayashi, I.; Sellin, P.; Svemar, C.; Holmqvist, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Formation of channels in a clay based buffer material is often referred to as 'piping'. Piping is likely to occur in bentonite based buffer materials in a fractured host rock during the early evolution of the repository when strong hydraulic gradients are present. After water saturation of the repository and reestablishment of the hydraulic gradients piping will not be an issue. However, piping in the early phase may still have implications for long-term performance: 1. if the pipes fail to close there may be remaining conductive pathways in the engineered barrier, and 2. piping may lead to erosion or redistribution of material which needs to be taken into account in the long-term performance assessment. This means that the piping process may affect requirements on rock characterization, water inflow and water management during the installation phase, buffer material properties and buffer installation methodology. As a part of the 'Bentonite re-saturation' program, RWMC has initiated and performed studies of the piping process. The main objectives of the studies are to answer: 1. Under what conditions can pipes form? 2. How do pipes evolve with time? 3. When and how do pipes close/reseal? 4. How does piping affect the buffer properties? 5. How much mass can be lost by erosion? The answers will be used in the development of the requirements stated above as well as input to long term performance assessments. overview of the experiment Test apparatuses were manufactured for investigation of the piping phenomena, see Figure 1. The apparatuses have drainage gutter to prevent clogging to take place with eroded material, and to keep an advection field around specimens. There is also a storage chamber for eroded material on the apparatuses. In the investigation, specimens of bentonite block and pellets were used. The block specimen consisted of a mixture of Japanese Na type bentonite, termed Kunigel V1, and 30 wt% silica

  11. Sorption-desorption of samarium in Febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Guinart, O.; Rigol, A.; Vidal, M.; Fernandez-Poyatos, P.; Alba, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The chemical and physical nature of the clay is a key issue in the design of engineered barriers. The FEBEX bentonite is one of the clays candidates to be used in engineered barriers in deep geology repositories (DGR). Here, its performance was tested with respect to the sorption-desorption of samarium, which is a lanthanide that, besides being considered as a natural analogue of actinides, may also be present in high level radioactive waste in the form of the radioactive isotope 151 Sm. FEBEX bentonite was used in this study. This is a di-octahedral smectite, with isomorphic substitutions in tetrahedral and octahedral sheets. Its theoretical cation exchange capacity value is 1500 meq kg -1 . Sorption isotherms were obtained for Sm in the range of initial concentrations of 0.01 and 9 meq l -1 . Tests were carried out in deionized water and in a medium simulating the composition of interstitial water. Sorption tests were performed equilibrating 30 ml of the Sm solution with 0.2 g of clay. After a contact time of 24 hours, supernatants were decanted off after centrifugation. The quantification of the concentration of Sm in the initial and final solutions allowed us to quantify the Sm equilibrium concentration (C eq ), the fraction sorbed in the FEBEX bentonite (C sorb ) and to derive the sorption K d data. Desorption tests were applied to determine the desorption K d and the percentage of Sm reversibly sorbed. Desorption tests were performed with the bentonite residue from the sorption step, under the same experimental conditions, but without Sm. Powder X-ray diffractograms were obtained from 3 to 70 deg. 2θ with a step of 0.05 deg. and a counting time of 3 s. The crystalline phases were identified using the computer program X'Pert HighScore. The morphology of the samples was analyzed by SEM at 20 kV. An EDX system was fitted to the SEM equipment to perform chemical analyses of the samples using a Si/Li detector

  12. Physical and chemical properties for sandstone and bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Haruo

    2004-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties such as porosity, pore-size distribution, dry density, solid density, mineralogy and chemical composition, which are important parameters for the understanding and analysis of the diffusion phenomena of radionuclides and ions in bentonite and in the geosphere, were measured. The measurements were performed for sandstone, of which fundamental data and information are limited. For bentonite, 3 kinds of bentonites with different smectite contents (Kunigel-V1, Kunipia-F, MX80) were used. In the measurements of the physical and chemical properties of rock, the measurements of solid density by pychnometer, the measurements of porosity, dry density and solid density by water saturation method, the measurements of porosity, dry density, solid density, pore-size distribution and specific surface area of pores by Hg porosimetry, the identifications of constituent minerals by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), the measurement of chemical composition by whole rock analysis, the observations of micropore structure by Laser Confocal Microscope (LCM), the measurements of water vaporization curves and the measurements of the homogeneity of the rock by penetration of KMnO 4 were performed. While, in the measurements of the physical and chemical properties for bentonite, water basis water content, water content, porosity, dry density, solid density and their distributions in samples were measured, and the degree of inhomogeneity was quantitatively evaluated by comparing with data and information reported up to date. The porosities of sandstone are 15.6±0.21% for water saturation method and 15.5±0.2% for Hg porosimetry, and similar values were obtained in both methods. The solid densities ranged 2.65-2.69 Mg/m 3 for 3 methods, and the average value was 2.668±0.012 Mg/m 3 . The average pore size was 88.8±0.5nm, and pore sizes ≤10μm shared 80% of total pore volume and pore sizes ≤1μm shared 40%. The specific surface area of the pores is 4.09±0.017 m

  13. Modified swelling pressure apparatus using vapor pressure technique for compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tomoyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. bentonite. The compacted bentonite is found in unsaturated conditions before applying of swelling due to absorption. The behaviour of compacted bentonite is not consistent with the principle and concepts of classical, saturated soil mechanics. An unsaturated soil theoretical framework using soil water characteristic curve has been fairly established over the past several decades. The soil-water characteristic curve is a relationship between soil moisture and soil suction obtained by the axis translation technique, vapor pressure technique or osmotic suction control which is a key feature in unsaturated soil mechanics. The soil-water characteristic curve can be used for prediction of the shear strength, volume change and hydraulic conductivity. Cui et al. 2002 indicated soil-water characteristic curve of expansive clay soil in high soil suction ranges using osmotic suction technique. Tripathy et al. 2010 described the soil-water characteristic curve both using the axis translation technique and vapor pressure technique in the entire soil suction ranges. Nishimura and Koseki 2011 measured suction of bentonite applied high soil suction due vapor pressure using a chilled mirror dew point potentiometer (WP4-T of DECAGON Device). The bentonite with gravimetric water content of 18 % indicated soil suction of 2.8 MPa at least. It is predicted that suction efforts to swelling pressure and shear strength of unsaturated compacted bentonite. This study focuses on the influence of suction on both swelling pressure and shear strength of compacted bentonite. The soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC) tests were conducted for compacted bentonite using both axis-translation technique and vapor pressure technique. The SWCC had a range from 0 kPa to 296 MPa in suction. The compacted bentonite having two different soil suctions were prepared for swelling pressure tests. Newly swelling pressure testing apparatus was developed in order

  14. RHEOLOGICAL AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSES OF SIMULANT SB5 SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR-MELTER FEED TANK SLURRIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.

    2010-02-08

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will complete Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in fiscal year 2010. DWPF has experienced multiple feed stoppages for the SB5 Melter Feed Tank (MFT) due to clogs. Melter throughput is decreased not only due to the feed stoppage, but also because dilution of the feed by addition of prime water (about 60 gallons), which is required to restart the MFT pump. SB5 conditions are different from previous batches in one respect: pH of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product (9 for SB5 vs. 7 for SB4). Since a higher pH could cause gel formation, due in part to greater leaching from the glass frit into the supernate, SRNL studies were undertaken to check this hypothesis. The clogging issue is addressed by this simulant work, requested via a technical task request from DWPF. The experiments were conducted at Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) wherein a non-radioactive simulant consisting of SB5 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product simulant and frit was subjected to a 30 hour SME cycle at two different pH levels, 7.5 and 10; the boiling was completed over a period of six days. Rheology and supernate elemental composition measurements were conducted. The caustic run exhibited foaming once, after 30 minutes of boiling. It was expected that caustic boiling would exhibit a greater leaching rate, which could cause formation of sodium aluminosilicate and would allow gel formation to increase the thickness of the simulant. Xray Diffraction (XRD) measurements of the simulant did not detect crystalline sodium aluminosilicate, a possible gel formation species. Instead, it was observed that caustic conditions, but not necessarily boiling time, induced greater thickness, but lowered the leach rate. Leaching consists of the formation of metal hydroxides from the oxides, formation of boric acid from the boron oxide, and dissolution of SiO{sub 2}, the major frit component. It is likely that the observed precipitation of Mg

  15. Sorption of Uranium(VI and Thorium(IV by Jordanian Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz I. Khalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification of raw bentonite was done to remove quartz. This includes mixing the raw bentonite with water and then centrifuge it at 750 rpm; this process is repeated until white purified bentonite is obtained. XRD, XRF, FTIR, and SEM techniques will be used for the characterization of purified bentonite. The sorption behavior of purified Jordanian bentonite towards and Th4+ metal ions in aqueous solutions was studied by batch experiment as a function of pH, contact time, temperature, and column techniques at 25.0∘C and . The highest rate of metal ions uptake was observed after 18 h of shaking, and the uptake has increased with increasing pH and reached a maximum at . Bentonite has shown high metal ion uptake capacity toward uranium(VI than thorium(IV. Sorption data were evaluated according to the pseudo- second-order reaction kinetic. Sorption isotherms were studied at temperatures 25.0∘C, 35.0∘C, and 45.0∘C. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R sorption models equations were applied and the proper constants were derived. It was found that the sorption process is enthalpy driven for uranium(VI and thorium(IV. Recovery of uranium(VI and thorium(IV ions after sorption was carried out by treatment of the loaded bentonite with different concentrations of HNO3 1.0 M, 0.5 M, 0.1 M, and 0.01 M. The best percent recovery for uranium(VI and thorium(IV was obtained when 1.0 M HNO3 was used.

  16. Modelling bentonite pore waters for the Swiss high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curti, E.

    1993-11-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to contribute to definition of representative compositions of bentonite pore waters in the near-field of the Swiss repository for high-level radioactive waste. Such compositions are necessary for determining the solubility limits of radionuclides for the safety analysis KRISTALLIN I. The model developed here is based on the premise, supported by experimental data, that the composition of bentonite pore waters is largely controlled by the dissolution or precipitation of reactive trace solids in bentonite. Selectivity constants for the exchange equilibria among Na-K, Na-Ca, and Ca-Mg were derived from water-bentonite interaction experiments performed for NAGRA by the British Geological Survey (BGS). An important parameter for the prediction of radionuclide solubilities is the oxidation potential of the bentonite water. Since the BGS experiments yielded no information on this, the oxidation potential had to be estimated from model assumptions. Bentonite pore waters were defined by computer simulation with the geochemical code MINEQL. They have been modelled in a closed system, i.e. assuming the bentonite, once it has reacted with a fixed volume of groundwater, does not exchange further chemical species with an external reservoir. No attempt was made to model the evolution of the pore water by simulating diffusive exchange processes. It can be anticipated that uncertainties in the concentrations of some major elements (e.g. Al, Si) will not significantly affect the calculated radionuclide solubilities. The latter will depend primarily on the concentrations of a few major ligands (OH - , Cl - and CO 3 -2 ) and, for multivalent elements, also on the oxidation potential of the solution. (author) 10 figs., 22 tabs., 40 refs

  17. Adsorption properties and porous structure of sulfuric acid treated bentonites determined - SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SNEZANA BREZOVSKA

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper adsorption isotherms of benzene vapor on natural bentonite from Ginovci, Macedonia, and forms acid activated with 10 % and 15 % solutions of hydrochloric were interpreted by means of the Dubinin–Radushkevich–Stoeckli and Dubinin–Astakhov equations; the investigation has been continued with bentonites acid activated with 10 % and 15 % solutions of sulfuric acid where X-ray analysis indicates smaller structural changes. Using the above equations, the heterogeneity of the micropores and the energetic heterogeneity of the bentonites were determined from the differential distribution of the micropore volume with respect to the structural parameter of the equations characterizing the microporous structure and to the molar free energy of adsorption. Activated bentonites obtain bigger pores but also a certain quantity of new small pores appear during acid activation with the higher concentration of acid. The micropore volumes, determined from the adsorption of benzene vapor, of bentonites activated with 10 % and 15 % solution of hydrochloric acid (144.60 cm3 kg-1 and 110.06 cm3 kg-1, respectively, decrease in comparison with that of natural bentonite (162.55 cm3 kgv.1 In contrast, the values of the micropore volume for bentonities treated with 10 % and 15 % solutions of sulfuric acids increase (169.19 cm3 kg-1 and 227.74 cm3 kg-1. That is due to the difference in the structural changes occurring during activation with hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. The values of the free energy of adsorption of benzene vapor for natural bentonite are higher than those of the acid acitivated bentonities, what is in accordance with the structural and porosity changes.

  18. Strontium migration in a crystalline medium: effects of the presence of bentonite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarran, Nairoby; Missana, Tiziana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula; Mingarro, Manuel

    2011-03-25

    The effects of bentonite colloids on strontium migration in fractured crystalline medium were investigated. We analyzed first the transport behaviour of bentonite colloids alone at different flow rates; then we compared the transport behaviour of strontium as solute and of strontium previously adsorbed onto stable bentonite colloids at a water velocity of approximately 7.1·10(-6)m/s-224m/yr. Experiments with bentonite colloids alone showed that - at the lowest water flow rate used in our experiments (7.1·10(-6)m/s) - approximately 70% of the initially injected colloids were retained in the fracture. Nevertheless, the mobile colloidal fraction, moved through the fracture without retardation, at any flow rate. Bentonite colloids deposited over the fracture surface were identified during post-mortem analyses. The breakthrough curve of strontium as a solute, presented a retardation factor, R(f)~6, in agreement with its sorption onto the granite fracture surface. The breakthrough curve of strontium in the presence of bentonite colloids was much more complex, suggesting additional contributions of colloids to strontium transport. A very small fraction of strontium adsorbed on mobile colloids moved un-retarded (R(f)=1) and this fraction was much lower than the expected, considering the quantity of strontium initially adsorbed onto colloids (90%). This behaviour suggests the hypothesis of strontium sorption reversibility from colloids. On the other hand, bentonite colloids retained within the granite fracture played a major role, contributing to a slower strontium transport in comparison with strontium as a solute. This was shown by a clear peak in the breakthrough curve corresponding to a retardation factor of approximately 20. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization in vineyard acid soils amended with a bentonitic winery waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Carbon mineralization and nitrogen ammonification processes were determined in different vineyard soils. The measurements were performed in samples non-amended and amended with different bentonitic winery waste concentrations. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO2 released by the soil under laboratory conditions, whereas NH4+ was determined after its extraction with KCl 2M. The time evolution of both, carbon mineralization and nitrogen ammonification, was followed during 42 days. The released CO2 was low in the analyzed vineyard soils, and hence the metabolic activity in these soils was low. The addition of the bentonitic winery waste to the studied soils increased highly the carbon mineralization (2-5 fold), showing that the organic matter added together the bentonitic waste to the soil have low stability. In both cases, amended and non-amended samples, the maximum carbon mineralization was measured during the first days (2-4 days), decreasing as the incubation time increased. The NH4+ results showed an important effect of bentonitic winery waste on the ammonification behavior in the studied soils. In the non-amended samples the ammonification was no detected in none of the soils, whereas in the amended soils important NH4+ concentrations were detected. In these cases, the ammonification was fast, reaching the maximum values of NH4 between 7 and 14 days after the bentonitic waste additions. Also, the percentages of ammonification respect to the total nitrogen in the soil were high, showing that the nitrogen provided by the bentonitic waste to the soil is non-stable. The fast carbon mineralization found in the soils amended with bentonitic winery wastes shows low possibilities of the use of this waste for the increasing the organic carbon pools in the soil.On the other hand, the use of this waste as N-fertilizer can be possible. However, due its fast ammonification, the waste should be added to the soils during active plant growth periods.

  20. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.A. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, S.A. [Government F.C. College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.