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Sample records for bentonite slurry

  1. Field test of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting into rock fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline rocks have fractures which may cause unexpected routes of groundwater seepage. Cement grouting is one of the most effective methods to minimize seepage; however, cement materials may not be suitable for the purpose of extra-long durability, because cement is neutralized or degraded by chemical and physical influence of chemical reaction. Natural clay like bentonite is one of the most promising materials for seepage barrier; however, water/bentonite grout is so viscous that enough amount of bentonite can not be grouted into rock fractures. To increase bentonite content in grout with low viscosity, the utilization of ethanol as a mixing liquid was studied. Ethanol suppresses bentonite swelling, and more bentonite can be injected more than that of water/bentonite slurry. In this paper, grouting into in-situ rock mass fracture from the ground surface was tested to investigate the barrier performance and workability of ethanol/bentonite slurry as a grouting material. (author)

  2. The study on bentonite slurry grout with ethanol for fractured rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to propose the grouting material and method for fractured rock masses. So experimental study is executed in order to grasp that the properties of grouting material is stable and impermeable. In this study, experiments of hydraulic test and grouting injection test are performed on bentonite slurry mixes in the laboratory. From the results of the tests, a mixer of ethanol and bentonite is found to be very suitable for a grouting material. Also, dynamic grouting method is able to inject the concentrated bentonite slurry in the fractured aperture. (author)

  3. Evaluation on application of bentonite slurry grout for excavation disturbed zone in order to recover low permeable rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to improve the technologies of the grouting for excavation disturbed zone in order to recover low permeable rock masses for research and development on geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In this study, experiments of grouting injection test are performed on bentonite slurry mixes with saline and ethanol in the laboratory. From the results of the tests, low viscous and high density bentonite slurry is found to be able to inject the concentrated bentonite slurry and to recover low permeable in the fine fractured aperture. In conclusion this bentonite slurry is able to be expected the grouting effects for excavation disturbed zone in order to recover low permeable rock masses. (author)

  4. Experimental study on the mechanism of ethanol/bentonite slurry grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To ensure safety and efficiency of construction and operation of repositories, rock fractures need to be grouted where they intersect the facility. Cement-based grouting materials that have been used extensively in the past may, however, react with the groundwater and produce hyperalkaline leachate. A possible solution for this issue is use of alternative material. Ethanol/Bentonite Slurry Grouting is another approach to minimize the long-term permeability of rock fractures. The slurry has high fluidity for the case of the ethanol concentration in the liquid phase being 60%. The viscosity of the slurry with bentonite content of 0.4 Mg/m'3 was measured for conditions of the shear rate ranging from 0.1 to 1000 1/s. The viscosity of the slurry changed dramatically between the ethanol concentrations of 60 to 40%, behaving as a non-Newtonian fluid. In order to investigate when the ethanol content of the slurry becomes low enough to achieve sufficient viscosity in rock fractures, an Ethanol Diffusion Test with experimental openings was carried out in the laboratory. Extrapolation of the measured minimum time for the filled slurry to reach the desirable low concentration of ethanol lead to the estimated minimum time ranging from 0.1 hours to 0.7 hours for a 0.2 mm aperture. These facts suggest that the injected slurry flows through the openings of fractures during the early period of injection and, later, as its ethanol content decreases, slurrys viscosity increases sufficiently so that the openings can be blocked. (author)

  5. One-dimensional contaminant transport model for the design of soil-bentonite slurry walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A user oriented computer model (TRANS1D) was developed for application to the analysis and design of vertical soil-bentonite barriers. TRANS1D is a collection of analytical and numerical solutions to the one dimensional advective-dispersive-reactive (ADR) equation. The primary objective in developing TRANS1D was to enable the designer of a barrier system to evaluate the potential system performance with respect to contaminant transport, without performing difficult and time consuming field or laboratory experiments. Several issues related to model application are discussed, including identification of governing transport processes, specification of boundary conditions, and parameter estimation. Model predictions are compared with the results of laboratory column experiments conducted with soil bentonite barrier material under diffusion-dominated conditions. Good agreement between model calibrations and experimental results was noted, with calibrated diffusion coefficients for organic contaminants consistent with literature values

  6. Experimental study on workability of soil-bentonite backfills for vertical slurry cutoff walls%土膨润土系竖向隔离墙材料施工和易性试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅丹兵; 杜延军; 刘松玉; 范日东; 杨玉玲

    2016-01-01

    为研究满足各类场地条件下土膨润土系竖向隔离墙材料施工和易性要求的主要施工参数,对钙基膨润土浆液和钠基膨润土浆液进行马氏漏斗黏度试验、API滤失试验和密度测定,并针对砂膨润土、黏性土膨润土、砂黏性土膨润土3类土膨润土系竖向隔离墙材料进行坍落度试验.试验结果表明,钙基膨润土浆液和钠基膨润土浆液的合理膨润土掺量分别为10%和3%.3类土膨润土系竖向隔离墙材料的坍落度与含水率均呈良好的线性正相关性.采用标准坍落筒和迷你锥坍落筒所测定的坍落度结果之间存在统一的经验关系.采用迷你锥坍落筒代替标准坍落筒进行土膨润土系竖向隔离墙材料施工和易性试验时,满足坍落度要求的含水率范围为其液限的1.0~1.6倍,所对应坍落度范围为22~48 mm.%In order to investigate the main construction parameters that meet the workability of soil-bentonite backfills for vertical slurry cutoff walls under various types of site conditions, the marsh fun-nel test, API(American Petroleum Institute) filtrate loss test and density measurement for sodium ben-tonite-water slurries and calcium bentonite-water slurries were carried out.The slump tests of three soil-bentonite backfills, including sandy soil-bentonite, clayey soil-bentonite sandy and soil-clayey soil-bentonite backfills, were measured.The experimental results show that the suitable contents of bentonite for calcium bentonite-water slurries and sodium bentonite-water slurries are 10% and 3%, respectively.The slumps of three soil-bentonite backfills and the water content exhibit a good linear positive correlation.And there exists a uniform correlation between the results based on the standard slump cone and those based on the miniature slump cones.When the standard slump cone is replaced by the miniature slump cone, the water content meeting the requirements of the slump is

  7. BENTONITE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Kutlić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite has vide variety of uses. Special use of bentonite, where its absorbing properties are employed to provide water-tight sealing is for an underground repository in granites In this paper, bentonite processing and beneficiation are described.

  8. Misturas de um solo laterítico com cimento e bentonita para uso em cortinas verticais Mixtures of a lateritic soil with cement and bentonite for slurry wall purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Batista

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available É crescente mundo afora o uso de cortinas verticais para contenção da contaminação em água subterrânea. Os solos lateríticos, pela sua ampla distribuição no Brasil, possuem grande potencial de aplicação nessas obras. Entretanto algumas questões ainda carecem de maior investigação, como a interação e compatibilidade desses solos com a bentonita e o cimento, principais aditivos usados para melhorar as propriedades das cortinas. O presente artigo avalia propriedades de um solo laterítico e suas misturas com bentonita e cimento, incluindo a investigação de parâmetros geotécnicos mecânicos e hidráulicos. A campanha laboratorial consistiu de ensaios de caracterização física, físico-química e mineralógica, de condutividade hidráulica, de compressão simples e de cisalhamento direto. Os resultados demonstram que a adição de 3% de bentonita em amostras compactadas não trouxe a diminuição esperada da condutividade hidráulica do solo laterítico, ainda que tenha proporcionado um considerável incremento na resistência ao cisalhamento da mistura.There is an increasing worldwide demand for slurry walls to contain contaminated groundwater. Lateritic soils, due to their wide distribution in the Brazilian territory, have great potential to be used in these cases. However, some issues remain uncertain and need investigation, including the interaction and compatibility of these soils with bentonite or cement, the most used additives to improve their geotechnical properties. This work evaluates some mechanical and hydraulic properties of a lateritic soil sample and its mixtures with bentonite and cement. The laboratorial procedures consisted of physical, physico-chemical and mineralogical characterization, hydraulic conductivity, uniaxial compression and direct shearing testing. The results demonstrate that the addition of 3% of bentonite in compacted samples did not decrease the hydraulic conductivity of the lateric soil as

  9. Metals attenuation in minerally-enhanced slurry walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.C.; Prince, M.J. [Bucknell Univ., Lewisburg, PA (United States); Adams, T.L. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Blue Bell, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In current practice, a soil-bentonite slurry trench cutoff wall is a mixture of water, soil, and bentonite that is designed to serve as a passive barrier to ground water and contaminant transport. This study evaluated the transformation of a passive slurry trench cutoff wall barrier to an active barrier system. Conventional soil-bentonite vertical barriers presently serve as passive barriers to contaminated ground water. An active barrier will not only fulfill the functions of the present passive barrier system, but also retard contaminant transport by adsorptive processes. Attapulgite, Na-chabazite, and Ca-chabazite were added to {open_quotes}activate{close_quotes} the conventional soil-bentonite backfill. Batch extraction tests were performed to determine the partitioning coefficients of cadmium and zinc between the liquid and solid phase when in contact with the backfill mixes. Batch extraction and mathematical modeling results demonstrate the ability of an active barrier to retard the transport of cadmium and zinc. The reactivity of the soil-bentonite vertical barrier depends heavily on the inorganic being adsorbed. The reactivity of the barrier also depends on the adsorptive capabilities of the clay minerals added to the conventional soil-bentonite vertical barrier. The results of laboratory studies suggest that passive barrier systems can be transformed to active systems. Further, the data suggests that although conventional soil-bentonite vertical barriers are presently designed as passive barriers, they already have adsorptive capacity associated with active barriers.

  10. Porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In this study, the porewater chemistry in compacted bentonite, considered as an engineered barrier in the repository of spent fuel, has been studied in interaction experiments. Many parameters, like the composition and density of bentonite, composition of the solution, bentonite-to-water ratio (B/W), surrounding conditions and experimental time have been varied in the experiments. At the end of the interaction the equilibrating solution, the porewaters squeezed out of the bentonite samples, and bentonites themselves were analyzed to give information for the interpretation and modelling of the interaction. Equilibrium modelling was performed with the HYDRAQL/CE computer code 33 refs.

  11. Gas Transport in Bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Gutierre-Rodrigo, V.; Martin, P. I.; Romero, F. J.; Barcala, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The gas permeability of the Spanish FEBEX bentonite compacted at dry densities of between 1.4 and 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} with high water contents was measured for different confining, injection and back pressures. The results were compared with results obtained in previous investigations for lower degrees of saturation. It was checked that gas permeability was greatly affected by dry density, decreasing about three orders of magnitude when it increased from 1.5 to 1.8 g/cm{sup 3} for similar water content. The increase of water content caused also a decrease in gas permeability. It was found that both gas permeability and the relative gas permeability were mainly related to the accessible porosity. These relationships could be fitted to potential expressions with exponents between 3 and 4, as well as the relationship between intrinsic permeability and void ratio. For gas pressures below 1.2 MPa no effect of the injection or confining pressures on the value of permeability was detected. For a given confining pressure the permeability value decreased as the effective pressure increased, especially if the increase in effective pressure was due to a decrease in gas back pressure. It was checked that the Klinkenberg effect was not significant for this material in the range of pressures applied in the tests. The gas breakthrough pressure values in FEBEX saturated bentonite were determined for different dry densities. They increased clearly with dry density and were always higher than the swelling pressure of the bentonite. In high density samples gas flow tended to stop abruptly after breakthrough, whereas in lower density samples gas flow decreased gradually until a given pressure gradient was reached. The permeabilities computed after breakthrough (which usually did not stabilise) were inversely related to dry density. This would indicate that, even if the flow took place predominantly through preferential pathways that sometimes closed quickly after breakthrough and others

  12. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  13. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  14. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain mostly

  15. Bentonite erosion. Laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Mats (Div. of Nuclear Chemistry, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden), School of Chemical Science and Engineering)

    2009-11-15

    This report covers the laboratory studies that have been performed at Nuclear Chemistry, KTH in the project 'Bentonite Erosion'. Many of the experiments in this report were performed to support the work of the modelling group and were often relatively simple. One of the experiment series was performed to see the impact of gravity and concentration of mono- and di-valent cations. A clay suspension was prepared in a test tube. A net was placed in contact with the suspension, the test tube was filled with solutions of different concentrations and the system was left overnight to settle. The tube was then turned upside down and the behaviour was visually observed. Either the clay suspension fell through the net or stayed on top. By using this method surprisingly sharp determinations of the Critical Coagulation (Flocculation) Concentration (CCC/CFC) could be made. The CCC/CFC of Ca2+ was for sodium montmorillonite determined to be between 1 and 2 mM. An artificial fracture was manufactured in order to simulate the real case scenario. The set-up was two Plexiglas slabs separated by 1 mm thick spacers with a bentonite container at one side of the fracture. Water was pumped with a very low flow rate perpendicular to bentonite container and the water exiting the fracture was sampled and analyzed for colloid content. The bentonite used was treated in different ways. In the first experiment a relatively montmorillonite rich clay was used while in the second bentonite where only the readily soluble minerals had been removed was used. Since Plexiglas was used it was possible to visually observe the bentonite dispersing into the fracture. After the compacted bentonite (1,000 kg/m3) had been water saturated the clay had expanded some 12 mm out into the fracture. As the experiment progressed the clay expanded more out into the fracture and seemed to fractionate in two different phases with less material in the outmost phase. A dark rim which was later analyzed to contain

  16. Pertechnetate diffusion in GMZ bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    99Tc is an important radionuclides related to repository safety assessment. The mobility pertechnetate (TcO4-) can be reduced to immobility technetium(IV) hydrous oxides (TcO2 · nH2O) by Fe(II)-bearing minerals. In China, Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite is regarded as the favorable candidate backfilling material for the HLW repository, which is contained some FeO. The diffusion behavior of 99Tc was investigated in GMZ bentonite by through- and out-diffusion methods. The effective diffusion coefficient (De), the accessible porosity (εacc), apparent diffusion coefficient (Da) and distribution coefficient (Kd) were decreased with the increasing of dry density. The De values were (2.8 ± 0.2) x 10-11 m2/s and (3.5 ± 0.2) x 10-12 m2/s at dry density of 1,600 and 1,800 kg/m3, respectively. It was indicated that the dominating species was TcO4- during the diffusion processing. While, out-diffusion results showed that part of TcO4- may be reduced by Fe(II). The relationship of De and εacc could be described by Archie's law with exponent n = 2.4 for 99Tc diffusion in GMZ bentonite. Furthermore, the relationship between Da and dry density (ρ) was exponential. (author)

  17. Bentonite erosion by dilute waters in initially saturated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. One scenario of interest for the long-term safety assessment of a spent nuclear fuel repository involves the loss of bentonite buffer material through contact with dilute groundwater at a transmissive fracture interface (SKB 2011, Posiva 2012a). The scenario is based on the stable colloids at low ionic strength: - the cohesive forces of bentonite decrease in low-salinity conditions, and colloids start to dominate and are able to leave the gel-like bentonite on the groundwater bentonite boundary; - after colloid formation, groundwater may carry away the only just released clay colloids; - low-salinity events are most probable during post-glacial conditions, when also pressure gradients are high, causing elevated flow velocity, which may enhance colloidal transport. Therefore, it is very important from the point of view of repository safety assessment to be able to estimate how much bentonite may be lost during a post-glacial event, when the groundwater salinity and velocity, as well as the duration of the event are fixed. It is possible that more than one event will hit the same canister and buffer, and that several canisters and buffers may be jeopardized. The results in the issue so far may be divided into modelling attempts and experimental work. The modelling has been based on two main guidelines: external (Birgersson et al., 2009) and internal friction models (Neretnieks et al., 2009). However, these models have not been validated for erosion, probably due to lack of suitable laboratory data. The latter approach is more ambitious due to lack of fitting parameters, though the internal friction model itself may be varied. The internal friction model has proven to be time-consuming to solve numerically. This work indicates that experiments carried out by Schatz et al. (2012) differ significantly from the predictions obtained from Neretnieks' model. We present our numerical modelling results based on a set of

  18. Properties of Bentonite Enhanced Loess and Laterite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳生; 白庆中; 聂永丰

    2004-01-01

    Loess and laterite distributed widely in the northern and southern China cannot be directly used as the natural barrier to isolate the solid waste because of their high hydraulic conductivity. In this paper, they are enhanced by bentonite to improve their hydraulic performance. The impact of bentonite content and water content on compressive strength of the compacted soil was investigated. The effects of bentonite content, water content, dry density and hydraulic gradient on the hydraulic conductivity were studied in detail. For the laterite and the laterite with 8% of bentonite, the experimental results of hydraulic conductivity can be applied in the engineering design. However, for the loess and the bentonite enhanced loess, those of hydraulic conductivity can not be directly applied in the engineering design because their hydraulic performance does not comply with the Darcy's law. These experimental results have to be carefully modified before application.

  19. Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.G.

    1994-12-30

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

  20. Assessment Criteria of Bentonite Binding Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Żymankowska-Kumon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The criteria, with which one should be guided at the assessment of the binding properties of bentonites used for moulding sands, areproposed in the paper. Apart from the standard parameter which is the active bentonite content, the unrestrained growth indicator should be taken into account since it seems to be more adequate in the estimation of the sand compression strength. The investigations performed for three kinds of bentonites, applied in the Polish foundry plants, subjected to a high temperature influences indicate, that the pathway of changes of the unrestrained growth indicator is very similar to the pathway of changes of the sand compression strength. Instead, the character of changes of the montmorillonite content in the sand in dependence of the temperature is quite different. The sand exhibits the significant active bentonite content, and the sand compression strength decreases rapidly. The montmorillonite content in bentonite samples was determined by the modern copper complex method of triethylenetetraamine (Cu(II-TET. Tests were performed for bentonites and for sands with those bentonites subjected to high temperatures influences in a range: 100-700ºC.

  1. Effectiveness of fracture sealing with bentonite grouting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite is known to have an extremely low permeability and a self-healing ability. It has therefore been selected as a major sealing component in several repository concepts. Bentonite grouts have the following advantages, (1) small particle size, can be injected into small fractures or voids, (2) suitable water absorption properties, can produce gels at low concentrations, and (3) stable physical and chemical properties, may have considerable longevity. Bentonite fracture grouting tests are performed on a model made of circular acrylic plates with outer diameter of 30 cm and central injection hole of 2.5 cm diameter. Suspension with bentonite concentration of 15% to 31% have been injected into fractures with apertures of 9 to 90 microns under injection pressures less than 0.6 MPa. Grouting reduces the hydraulic conductivities of the fractures from the 10-1 to the 10-5 cm/s level. When the suspension is thin enough and the fracture is very small, channeling develops in the grouted fractures. Preliminary results indicate that the permeability of a grouted fracture does not increase with time in more than 125 days. The flow properties of bentonite suspensions, viscosity, shear stress, yield stress and gelation, are investigated. Water flow through ungrouted fractures and movement of water in bentonite grout are studies. The physical stability or bleeding capacity of bentonite suspensions is determined. 122 refs., 56 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Quality assurance of the bentonite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a quality assurance chain for the bentonite material acquisition for a nuclear waste disposal repository. Chemical, mineralogical and geotechnical methods, which may be applied in quality control of bentonite are shortly reviewed. As a case study, many of the presented control studies were performed for six different bentonite samples. Chemical analysis is a very reliable research method to control material homogeneity, because the accuracy and repeatability of the study method is extremely good. Accurate mineralogical study of bentonite is a complicated task. X-ray diffractometry is the best method to identify smectite minerals, but quantitative analysis of smectite content remains uncertain. To obtain a better quantitative analysis, development of techniques based on automatic image analysis of SEM images is proposed. General characteristics of bentonite can be obtained by rapid indicator tests, which can be done on the place of reception. These tests are methylene blue test giving information on the cation exchange capacity, swelling index and determination of water absorption. Different methods were used in the determination of cation exchange capacity (CEC) of bentonite. The results indicated differences both between methodologies and between replicate determinations for the same material and method. Additional work should be done to improve the reliability and reproducibility of the methodology. Bentonite contains water in different modes. Thus, different determination methods are used in bentonite studies and they give somewhat dissimilar results. Clay research use frequently the so-called consistency tests (liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index). This study method does, however, not seem to be very practical in quality control of bentonite. Therefore, only the determination of liquid limit with fall-cone method is recommended for quality control. (orig.)

  3. Activation of wine bentonite with gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The action of gamma rays on wine bentonite as well as influence of its adsorption and technologic qualities on the composition and stability of wines against protein darkening and precipitation has been studied. The experiments were carried out with wine bentonite produced in the firm Bentonite and irradiated with doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 MR. White and red wines have been treated with irradiated bentonite under laboratory conditions at 1.0 g/dm3. All samples are treated at the same conditions. The flocculation rate of the sediment was determined visually. Samples have been taken 24 h later from the cleared wine layers. The following parameters have been determined: clarification, filtration rate, phenolic compounds, calcium, colour intensity, total extracted substances, etc. The volume of the sediment has been determined also. The control samples have been taken from the same unirradiated wines. The results showed better and faster clarification in on the third, the 20th and the 24th hours with using of gamma-irradiated at doses 0.8 and 1.0 MR. The sediment was the most compact and its volume - the smallest compared to the samples treated with bentonite irradiated with doses of 0.6 and 0.4 MR. This ensures a faster clarification and better filtration of treated wines. The bentonite activated with doses of 0.8 and 1.0 MR adsorbs the phenolic compounds and the complex protein-phenolic molecules better. In the same time it adsorbs less extracted substances compared to untreated bentonite and so preserves all organoleptic properties of wine. The irradiated bentonite adsorbs less the monomers of anthocyan compounds which ensures brighter natural colour of wine. The gamma-rays activation consolidates calcium in the crystal lattice of bentonite particles and in this way eliminates the formation of crystal precipitates

  4. Slurry pipeline design approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betinol, Roy; Navarro R, Luis [Brass Chile S.A., Santiago (Chile)

    2009-12-19

    Compared to other engineering technologies, the design of a commercial long distance Slurry Pipeline design is a relatively new engineering concept which gained more recognition in the mid 1960 's. Slurry pipeline was first introduced to reduce cost in transporting coal to power generating units. Since then this technology has caught-up worldwide to transport other minerals such as limestone, copper, zinc and iron. In South America, the use of pipeline is commonly practiced in the transport of Copper (Chile, Peru and Argentina), Iron (Chile and Brazil), Zinc (Peru) and Bauxite (Brazil). As more mining operations expand and new mine facilities are opened, the design of the long distance slurry pipeline will continuously present a commercially viable option. The intent of this paper is to present the design process and discuss any new techniques and approach used today to ensure a better, safer and economical slurry pipeline. (author)

  5. Rotary cup slurry atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, H. T.; Marnicio, R. J.

    1983-06-01

    The theory of a two-phase flow in a rotating cup atomizer is described. The analysis considers the separation of the solid and liquid media thus realistically modeling the flow of two layers along the inner cup wall: a slurry of increasing solids concentration and a supernatent liquid layer. The analysis is based on the earlier work of Hinze and Milborn (1950) which addressed the flow within a rotary cup for a homogeneous liquid. The superimposition of a settling velocity under conditions of high centrifugal acceleration permits the extended analysis of the separation of the two phases. Appropriate boundary conditions have been applied to the film's free surface and the cup wall and to match the flow characteristics at the liquid-slurry interface. The changing slurry viscosity, increasing nonlinearly with growing solid loading, was also considered. A parameter study illustrates the potential for a cup design to provide optimal slurry and liquid film thicknesses for effective atomization.

  6. Modelling Iron-Bentonite Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Wilson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of both iron canisters and bentonitic clay in some engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes creates the potential for chemical interactions which may impact upon the long-term performance of the clay as a barrier to radionuclide migration. Flooding of potential radionuclide sorption sites on the clay by ferrous ions and conversion of clay to non-swelling sheet silicates (e.g. berthierine) are two possible outcomes deleterious to long-term performance. Laboratory experimental studies of the corrosion of iron in clay show that corrosion product layers are generally thin ( 250 °C) are dominated by chlorite, whereas lower temperatures produce berthierine, odinite, cronstedtite, or Fe-rich smectite. Unfortunately, the inevitable short-term nature of laboratory experimental studies introduces issues of metastability and kinetics. The sequential formation in time of minerals in natural systems often produces the formation of phases not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics. Evidence from analogous natural systems suggests that the sequence of alteration of clay by Fe-rich fluids will proceed via an Ostwald step sequence. The computer code, QPAC, has been modified to incorporate processes of nucleation, growth, precursor cannibalisation, and Ostwald ripening to address the issues of the slow growth of bentonite alteration products. This, together with inclusion of processes of iron corrosion and diffusion, has enabled investigation of a representative model of the alteration of bentonite in a typical EBS environment. Simulations with fixed mineral surface areas show that berthierine dominates the solid product assemblage, with siderite replacing it at simulation times greater than 10 000 years. Simulations with time-dependent mineral surface areas show a sequence of solid alteration products, described by: magnetite -> cronstedtite -> berthierine -> chlorite. Using plausible estimates of mineral

  7. Results of bentonite grouting experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bentonite grouting, which will not solidify, is mainly expected to reduce the hydraulic conductivity of underground water in the expected damage zone by filling the fractures or cracks, so the evaluation of the degree of hydraulic conductivity, stability and the improvement area becomes important. The study and basic experiments for sealing of the adits have been promoted, up to now, from the aspects of the characteristics and long term stability of candidate materials, and design and construction (Pusch et al., 1987; Tanai and Masuda, 1991). However, in Japan, the application examples of clay type materials for grouting are extremely few and is limited to the construction experience of the national oil underground storage at Kuji (Miyanaga and Ebara, 1993), with the exception of some test cases (Boergesson et al., 1991) from overseas. This report summarize basic characteristics of the clay type material relevant to the hydraulic conductivity, from the result of the clay grouting experiment conducted at the rock site. (author)

  8. Gas migration through bentonite clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen gas produced by irradiation of pore water in the highly compacted bentonite that surrounds the copper canisters according to the KBS 2 and 3 concepts, may escape from the clay/copper interface if the gas pressure is higher than the groundwater pressure. A reasonable physical model predicts that gas may penetrate wider capillary passages that actually exist in the very dense clay, although these passages are still of microscopic size. In the large majority of the clay voids, the capillary action is sufficient, however, to resist gas penetration, and this suggests that a possible mechanism of gas migration is that of a finger-like pattern of tortuous gas passages extending from the canisters if radiolysis takes place at all. Two series of experiments have been run at gas pressures up to about 10 MPa. Nitrogen as well as hydrogen were used in these tests which seem to confirm, in principle, the validity of the physical model. (authors)

  9. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  10. Design and construction of a soil bentonite cut-off wall for Suncor's South Tailings Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, B. [Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Bowron, M. [Suncor Energy Inc., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Commissioned in July 2006, Suncor's South Tailings Pond (STP) is an external oil sands tailings storage facility with a footprint of 2300 hectares including infrastructure. The Southwest cut-off wall was completed in 2008, forming one of four principal seepage management systems for the STP. The cut-off wall consists of soil bentonite backfill from native materials from the wall excavation. Construction of the wall utilized both a long-stick back-hoe and crane mounted clamshell to excavate the wall under bentonite slurry. This paper discussed the construction of the cut-off wall as well as the the field and laboratory testing programs that determined the soil-bentonite mix. It also described the quality assurance and quality control programs conducted during construction. Last, the paper provided a brief discussion of the design and construction issues specific to seepage cut-off walls in the oil sands region. It was concluded that while construction of a soil-bentonite wall is a simple process, a professional experienced in the construction of deep walls is essential to achieve a quality product. Technical site support is also needed by the construction team in order to confirm geology, material properties and design assumptions. 1 tab., 5 figs.

  11. Pore water chemistry of the febex bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of pore water chemistry in the clay barrier is essential for performance assessment purposes in a nuclear waste repository, since the pore water composition controls the processes involved in the release and transport of the radionuclides. The methodology followed to define the representative composition of the FEBEX bentonite pore water is presented in this paper. A series of bentonite-water interaction tests have been performed with the aim of providing a database on the main chemical parameters of the bentonite. These tests were carried out both with high solid to liquid (s:l) ratios (squeezing tests) and low s:l ratios (aqueous extracts tests). The exchangeable cations have also been analyzed to determine the selectivity coefficient of the exchange reactions. To complete the data set, a physical and mineralogical characterization of the bentonite was made. The most significant bentonite-water interaction processes controlling the chemistry of the system was identified. The ion concentrations basically depend on the s:l ratio of the system, and the pore water composition is controlled by the dissolution of chlorides, dissolution/precipitation of carbonates and sulphates and the cation exchange reactions in the smectite. The bentonite/water system was modelled with the PHREEQC2 program to obtain the best possible estimation of the pore water composition for initial conditions of water content (=14%), after checking the conceptual model with the experimental results. The model predictions fitted satisfactorily with the experimental data at low s:l ratios. At high s:l ratios, the modelled results agree adequately, except for the sulphate content, which could be affected by the effective porosity, anion exclusion or stagnant zones not taken into account in the model. According to the model, the FEBEX bentonite pore water at 14% moisture is a sodium-chloride type, with an ionic strength of 0.25 M and pH of 7.78. Copyright (2001) Material Research

  12. Microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, M.; Itavaara, M.

    2012-07-01

    The proposed disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes involves storing the wastes underground in copper-iron containers embedded in buffer material of compacted bentonite. Hydrogen sulphide production by sulphate-reducing prokaryotes is a potential mechanism that could cause corrosion of waste containers in repository conditions. The prevailing conditions in compacted bentonite buffer will be harsh. The swelling pressure is 7-8 MPa, the amount of free water is low and the average pore and pore throat diameters are small. This literature study aims to assess the potential of microbial activity in bentonite buffers. Literature on the environmental limits of microbial life in extreme conditions and the occurrence of sulphatereducing prokaryotes in extreme environments is reviewed briefly and the results of published studies characterizing microbes and microbial processes in repository conditions or in relevant subsurface environments are presented. The presence of bacteria, including SRBs, has been confirmed in deep groundwater and bentonite-based materials. Sulphate reducers have been detected in various high-pressure environments, and sulphate-reduction based on hydrogen as an energy source is considered a major microbial process in deep subsurface environments. In bentonite, microbial activity is strongly suppressed, mainly due to the low amount of free water and small pores, which limit the transport of microbes and nutrients. Spore-forming bacteria have been shown to survive in compacted bentonite as dormant spores, and they are able to resume a metabolically active state after decompaction. Thus, microbial sulphide production may increase in repository conditions if the dry density of the bentonite buffer is locally reduced. (orig.)

  13. Migration behavior of iodine in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the wastes that include I-129 dispose, compacted bentonite would be used as buffer material as well as for HLW disposal. Therefore in this study diffusion experiments were carried out to investigate the migration behavior of iodine in compacted bentonite. Bentonite used in this study consists of more than 95 % of sodium montmorillonite. Bentonite powder was compacted into a cylinder with a diameter of 10 mm and a height of 10 mm with a varied dry density. After saturated with water including 0.01 M of NaCl for one month, approximately 10 micro liters of tracer solution I- or IO3- were spiked on a surface of compacted bentonite respectively. The constant boundary concentrations and the diffusion coefficients of I- and IO3- were determined by the penetration method. Iodine profiles showed typical shape of error function complement. The constant boundary concentration of I- is several times larger than that of IO3-. This could be cause by geometrical limitation and/or anion exclusion of montmorillonite because IO3- is larger than I- and montmorillonite has negative surface charge. Apparent diffusion coefficients of I- and IO3- were obtained in the range of 27.0 to 192.9 μm2/s and 9.8 to 117.4 μm2/s, respectively. (author)

  14. Enhancement of the bentonite sorption properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mockovciakova, Annamaria, E-mail: mocka@saske.sk [Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences Watsonova 45, 04354 Kosice (Slovakia); Orolinova, Zuzana [Institute of Geotechnics, Slovak Academy of Sciences Watsonova 45, 04354 Kosice (Slovakia); Skvarla, Jiri [Institute of Montaneous Sciences and Environmental Protection, Technical University in Kosice, Park Komenskeho 19, 04200 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2010-08-15

    The almost monomineral fraction of bentonite rock-montmorillonite was modified by magnetic particles to enhance its sorption properties. The method of clay modification consists in the precipitation of magnetic nanoparticles, often used in preparing of ferrofluids, on the surface of clay. The influence of the synthesis temperature (20 and 85 deg. C) and the weight ratio of bentonite/iron oxides (1:1 and 5:1) on the composite materials properties were investigated. The obtained materials were characterized by the X-ray diffraction method and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Changes in the surface and pore properties of the magnetic composites were studied by the low nitrogen adsorption method and the electrokinetic measurements. The natural bentonite and magnetic composites were used in sorption experiments. The sorption of toxic metals (zinc, cadmium and nickel) from the model solutions was well described by the linearized Langmuir and Freundlich sorption model. The results show that the magnetic bentonite is better sorbent than the unmodified bentonite if the initial concentration of studied metals is very low.

  15. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Thinning of kaolin slurry

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasák, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    After mixing kaolin with water attractive and repulsive forces between kaolin particles initiate process of coagulation and peptisation, respectively. The coagulation process in the kaolin slurry gives rise to voluminous aggregates of kaolin particles, where a great deal of water is fixed.

  17. Sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock borehole plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, S.; Daemen, J.J.K. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mining and Geological Engineering

    1992-07-01

    This study includes a systematic investigation of the sealing performance of bentonite and bentonite/crushed rock plugs. American Colloid C/S granular bentonite and crushed Apache Leap tuff have been mixed to prepare samples for laboratory flow testing. Bentonite weight percent and crushed tuff gradation are the major variables studied. The sealing performance assessments include high injection pressure flow tests, polyaxial flow tests, high temperature flow tests, and piping tests. The results indicate that a composition to yield a permeability lower than 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s would have at least 25% bentonite by weight mixed with well-graded crushed rock. Hydraulic properties of the mixture plugs may be highly anisotropic if significant particle segregation occurs during sample installation and compaction. Temperature has no significant effect on the sealing performance within the test range from room temperature to 600{degree}C. Piping damage to the sealing performance is small if the maximum hydraulic gradient does not exceed 120 and 280 for samples with a bentonite content of 25 and 35%, respectively. The hydraulic gradients above which flow of bentonite may take place are deemed critical. Analytical work includes the introduction of bentonite occupancy percentage and water content at saturation as two major parameters for plug design. A permeability model is developed for the prediction of permeability in clays, especially in view of the difficulties in obtaining this property experimentally. A piping model is derived based on plastic flow theory. This piping model permits the estimation of critical hydraulic gradients at which flow of bentonite takes place. The model can also be used to define the maximum allowable pore diameter of a protective filter layer.

  18. Synthesis and Characteristics of Organic Bentonite Gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The bentonite was modified using Ca-bentonite as a matrix and octadecyl/ hexadecyl ammoniumsized by dispersing it into the dimethyl benzene-methyl alcohol system fully.The optimum process conditions for organic modification were that the coating agent dosage is 22g/L, reaction time is 90 minutes and the pH value of pulp is 10.X-ray diffraction ( XRD ) analysis indicates that the d (001) value of the modified bentonite is 20.532A.The influence of gel temperature on its viscosity characteristic was studied.By analyzing the transmssion electron microscopy (TEM) images and observing the dispersed gel, the nanometer effect of the organic gel was discussed.

  19. MANU. Purchase of Bentonite. Process Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to describe the entire bentonite purchasing process accurately. This will enable efficient and focused use of information related to the purchasing phase and to each individual bentonite batch. This work continues from the work started in the report by Ahonen et al. (2008), Quality Assurance of the Bentonite Material, Posiva Working Report 2008-33. The current work includes a short enquiry for all relevant and at the time known producers or re-sellers of bentonite. Questions about relevant products suitable for civil engineering use, more specifically nuclear waste disposal site use, were asked together with test methods, typical test results and test standards. The following aspects and opinions have been processed from the results that were obtained during the project. Each seller/producer has a quality management system, QMS (typically ISO 9001), and ability to perform the basic tests, but there is not an established common set of properties to be tested. Some producers are willing to test according to customers' specifications. Posiva could arrange a network of capable laboratories to carry out tests according to its selected standards. This activity should then be accredited with a reasonable testing volume. Before starting the purchase of bentonite at a large scale, Posiva should go through negotiations and audits with each seller in order to make sure that both parties are testing with the same methods and both understand the range where the values of key parameters may lie. A database is needed for gathering statistically relevant information from the bentonite material parameters over the long run. This is needed for determining the limits within which the material parameters should remain in order to be acceptable. Posiva is encouraged to create a process to optimize the test types and the amount of tests should be identified for immediate and long term use. This process ensures the required quality and costs involved. (orig.)

  20. Ion diffusion in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehikoinen, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    In the study, a two-dimensional molecular-level diffusion model, based on a modified form of the Gouy-Chapman (GC) theory of the electrical double layers, for hydrated ionic species in compacted bentonite was developed. The modifications to the GC theory, which forms the very kernel of the diffusion model, stem from various non-conventional features: ionic hydration, dielectric saturation, finite ion-sizes and specific adsorption. The principal objectives of the study were met. With the aid of the consistent diffusion model, it is a relatively simple matter to explain the experimentally observed macroscopic exclusion for anions as well as the postulated, but greatly controversial, surface diffusion for cations. From purely theoretical grounds, it was possible to show that the apparent diffusivities of cations, anions and neutral molecules (i) do not exhibit order-or-magnitude differences, and (ii) are practically independent of the solution ionic strength used and, consequently, of the distribution coefficient, K{sub d}, unless they experience specific binding onto the substrate surface. It was also of interest to investigate the equilibrium anionic concentration distribution in the pore geometry of the GMM model as a function of the solution ionic strength, and to briefly speculate its consequences to diffusion. An explicit account of the filter-plate effect was taken by developing a computerised macroscopic diffusion model, which is based upon the very robust and efficient Laplace Transform Finite-Difference technique. Finally, the inherent limitations as well as the potential fields of applications of the models were addressed. (orig.) 45 refs.

  1. Effects of silica sol on bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite will be used in Sweden as an engineered barrier in the disposal of nuclear waste, mainly due to bentonites sorption and swelling capacity, where the latter property is warranted in order to seal possible future intersecting fractures. However during the actual construction and deposition period other grouting agents must be used in order to seal already existing fractures. In Sweden Silica sol is currently being investigated in situ at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory as a fine fracture (< 100 μm) grouting agent by injection. During this period, there is a plausible risk of Silica sol coming into contact with bentonite. The effect of Silica sol, either in colloidal form or as a gel, on the chemical and physical properties of bentonite has not been properly addressed and has to be further investigated. The Silica sol (Meyco MP320, EKA Chemicals) consists of amorphous SiO2 particles, average size approximately 20 nm. Due to the small particle size Silica sol can penetrate and seal finer fractures than more coarse grouting agents commonly used. Upon injection NaCl (approx 0.3 M) is used as a gel accelerator, leading to a hydrological barrier in the form of a ductile gel after < 1 hour, which then hardens with time (months) increasing its strength significantly, depending on water content, ionic strength and temperature. Upon aggregation, either due to high ionic strength or drying, the silica colloids aggregate seemingly irreversible forming siloxane bonds by condensation of the silanol surface groups. These silanol groups can react at the montmorillonite edges in a similar way. In a worst case scenario the Silica sol would act as an inorganic glue, creating a pillared montmorillonite or modify the edges of the clay particles. Such effects would irreversibly reduce the overall swelling capacity of the affected bentonite. An experimental program has been developed to characterize the Silica sol

  2. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites

  3. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.

  4. Ion-migration through bentonite/zeolite and bentonite/quartz sand mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the geological disposal system of the high level radioactive wastes radionuclides begin leaching from the waste form when the canister is degraded by corrosion. The buffer materials, as one of the engineered barriers can retard the migration of the radionuclides to the biosphere. In this study, the diffusivity of radionuclides has been obtained in the compacted clay materials, such as mixtures of bentonite-zeolite, and bentonite-quartz sand for buffer materials. For the bentonite and zeolite mixture, Kd-value for cesium has been increasing with zeolite contents. The increase in the Kd-value has also been obtained for strontium, though the inclination is found to be smaller than that for cesium. In the case of bentonite and quartz sand mixture, the Kd-value has increased with quartz content (up to 70%), though the increasing rate is smaller than that in the zeolite mixture. The purpose of the quartz sand mixing is to improve the thermal conductivity of the buffer materials. It is to be noted that the sorption capability of bentonite and quartz sand mixture is found to be a little bit larger than that of bentonite. As for cesium, the Kd-values obtained in diffusion experiment agree well with those from batch experiments within a factor of 2, while for strontium good agreement has not been obtained

  5. Modelling of slurry droplet drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadja, M.; Bergeles, G. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-05-01

    Heat, mass and momentum transfer between a slurry droplet and a gas flow are investigated numerically. The developed model can be applied to assess drying and combustion properties of slurries inside spray dryers or combustors and to estimate the time needed to reach ignition of the solid component in slurry fuels. The model was applied to coal water droplet slurries the properties of which are available in the literature but can also be used for study of drying of any other slurry such as that encountered in flue gas desulfurization systems. The parametric study revealed that the most important factor in slurry drying is the ambient temperature and that the injection velocity, the ambient pressure of the flowing medium or the particle initial temperature affect very little the drying rate.

  6. Fe-bentonite. Experiments and modelling of the interactions of bentonites with iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of this study were to enhance the understanding of the interactions of bentonites with steel containers in the near field of a repository in salt formations and to determine missing experimental thermo-hydraulical-chemical and mineralogical data needed for the THC modelling of the interactions of bentonites with iron. At the beginning of this project a literature review helped to clarify the state of the art regarding the above mentioned objectives prior to the start of the experimental work. In the following experimental programme the hydraulic changes in the pore space of compacted MX80 bentonites containing metallic iron powder and in contact with three solutions of different ionic strength containing different concentrations of Fe2+ have been investigated. The alterations of MX80 and several other bentonites have been assessed in contact with the low ionic strength Opalinus Clay Pore Water (OCPW) and the saturated salt solutions NaCl solution and IP21 solution. Under repository relevant boundary conditions we determined on compacted MX80 samples with the raw density of 1.6 g/cm3 simultaneously interdependent properties like swelling pressures, hydraulic parameters (permeabilities and porosities), mineralogical data (changes of the smectite composition and iron corrosion products), transport parameters (diffusion coefficients) and thermal data (temperature dependent reaction progresses). The information and data resulting from the experiments have been used in geochemical modelling calculations and the existing possibilities and limitations to simulate these very complex near field processes were demonstrated. The main conclusion of this study is that the alteration of bentonites in contact with iron is accentuated and accelerated. Alterations in contact with solutions of different ionic strength identified by the authors in previous studies were found be much more intensive in contact with metallic iron and at elevated temperatures. The

  7. International symposium on slurry flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on two-phase slurry flow. Topics considered at the conference included flow models, drag, flow rate, stresses in a fluid-solid mixture, kinetic models, the shear viscosity of dense-phase slurries at varying shear rates, the modeling of particulates based on the Markov process, fluid-particle flows in geothermal drilling applications, two-phase nozzle flow, laminar flow, centrifugal slurry pumps, slurry pipeline flow, and the beneficiation of coal by agglomeration during hydraulic transport

  8. Performance of a Centrifugal Slurry Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Hawas Yahya Bajawi; Basharat Salim; Ziyadh Suhibani

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of speed, concentration and size of slurry on the performance of a centrifugal pump. For this purpose a facility was built where the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump was examined using aggregate slurry. Three sizes of slurry with three concentrations and at three impeller speeds were used for the performance investigations of a centrifugal slurry pump. As a reference performance the performance of centrifugal slurry pu...

  9. Iron content and reducing capacity of granites and bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iron contents in various granites and in bentonite have been determined. For granites, the content is usually in the range 1-9% (weight) and 2.5-3% for bentonite. Most of the iron is divalent in the granites (70-90%); in bentonite the divalent fraction is 25-50%. A large part of the divalent iron in the granites appears to be accessible for the reduction of dissolved oxygen in an aqueous system. (author)

  10. FTIR analysis of bentonite in moulding sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, C.; Holtzer, M.; Bobrowski, A.

    2008-05-01

    Bentonite is used in a wide range of applications. One of them is the foundry industry. The aim of this study was to investigate modification of moulding sands by dust which is generated during foundry process. Recycling of this dust is very important from ecological point of view. The samples of moulding sands were examined by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Analysis of the bands due to the Si-O stretching vibrations allows to reveal the changes of active bentonite and silica sand, i.e. the main components of the moulding sands. FTIR results are compared with technological properties of the materials studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods have been used as the complementary measurement.

  11. Synthesis of PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite through sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitompul, Johnner; Setyawan, Daru; Kim, Daniel Young Joon; Lee, Hyung Woo

    2016-04-01

    This paper concerns the synthesis of poly(D,L-lactic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) bentonite nanocomposites. Poly (D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) was synthesized using lactic acid through the ZnO-catalyzed direct polycondensation method at vacuum pressure and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was synthesized with L-lactide by ring-opening polymerization method. The PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were synthesized using the solvent casting method. The nanoclay, bentonite, was prepared using the solution-intercalation method by dissolving the nanoparticles into chloroform before sonication. In this study, PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films were produced using variable amounts of nanoclay and sonication times during the mixing of PDLLA/PLLA and bentonite. The properties of the PDLLA/PLLA nanocomposites were then characterized using the X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Universal Testing Machine (UTM), Water Vapor Permeability (WVP) tests, and the enzymatic biodegradability test. The XRD test was used to measure the intercalation of nanoclay layers in the PDLLA/PLLA matrix and the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite intercalated nanocomposite films. It was found through these various tests that adding bentonite to the PDLLA/PLLA increases tensile strength to 56.76 MP. Furthermore, the biodegradability increases as well as the barrier properties of the polymers The different sonication time used during the mixing of the polymer solution with bentonite also affected the properties of the PDLLA/PLLA-bentonite nanocomposite films.

  12. Swelling characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite and its prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De’an Sun; Wenjing Sun; Lei Fang

    2014-01-01

    Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite has been chosen as a possible matrix material of buffers/backfills in the deep geological disposal to isolate the high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in China. In the Gaomiaozi deposit area, calcium bentonite in the near surface zone and sodium bentonite in the deeper zone are observed. The swelling characteristics of GMZ sodium and calcium bentonites and their mixtures with sand wetted with distilled water were studied in the present work. The test results show that the relationship be-tween the void ratio and swelling pressure of compacted GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures at full saturation is independent of the initial conditions such as the initial dry density and water content, but dependent on the ratio of bentonite to sand. An empirical method was accordingly proposed allowing the prediction of the swelling deformation and swelling pressure with different initial densities and bentonite-sand ratios when in saturated conditions. Finally, the swelling capacities of GMZ Na-and Ca-bentonites and Kunigel Na-bentonite are compared.

  13. Swelling characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite and its prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De'an Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gaomiaozi (GMZ bentonite has been chosen as a possible matrix material of buffers/backfills in the deep geological disposal to isolate the high-level radioactive waste (HLRW in China. In the Gaomiaozi deposit area, calcium bentonite in the near surface zone and sodium bentonite in the deeper zone are observed. The swelling characteristics of GMZ sodium and calcium bentonites and their mixtures with sand wetted with distilled water were studied in the present work. The test results show that the relationship between the void ratio and swelling pressure of compacted GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures at full saturation is independent of the initial conditions such as the initial dry density and water content, but dependent on the ratio of bentonite to sand. An empirical method was accordingly proposed allowing the prediction of the swelling deformation and swelling pressure with different initial densities and bentonite-sand ratios when in saturated conditions. Finally, the swelling capacities of GMZ Na- and Ca-bentonites and Kunigel Na-bentonite are compared.

  14. Removal of Phosphate from Aqueous Solution with Modified Bentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐艳葵; 童张法; 魏光涛; 李仲民; 梁达文

    2006-01-01

    Bentonite combined with sawdust and other metallic compounds was used to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions in this study. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate on the modified bentonite were investigated, including the effects of temperature, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration of phosphate and pH on removal of phosphate by conducting a series of batch adsorption experiments. The results showed that 98% of phosphate removal rate was obtained since sawdust and bentonite used in this investigation were abundantly and locally available. It is concluded that modified bentonite is a relatively efficient, low cost and easily available adsorbent for the removal of phosphate from aqueous solutions.

  15. KAJIAN ADSORPSI LINEAR ALKYL BENZENE SULPHONATE (LAS DENGAN BENTONIT-KITOSAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miftah Rifai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Deterjen pada umumnya tersusun atas surfaktan anionik seperti LAS (Linear alkyl Benzene sulphonate. pada percobaan ini LAS dapat menyerap sinar pada daerahuv dengan panjang gelombang maksimumnya adalah 223,5 nm. LAS dalam perairan dapat menimbulkan potensi masalah pencemaran.Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah sebagai salah satu alternatif penanganan masalah pencemaran limbah domestik dengan cara menguji kinerja bentonit alam dan bentonit termodifikasi kitosan dalam mengadsorpsi LAS. Untuk mengetahui bahwa kitosan telah bereaksi dengan bentonit maka diuji dengan FTIR dan XRD pada bentonit alam dan bentonit-kitosan. Kemudian ditentukan waktu kontak optimum antara LAS dengan bentonit alam dan bentonit-kitosan. Serta penentuan isoterm adsorpsi LAS dengan bentonit alam dan bentonit-kitosan dengan cara membuat variasi konsentrasi larutan LAS. Uji kinerja bentonit alam dan bentonit-kitosan dalam mengadsorpsi LAS dilakukan dengan menggunakan sistem batch. Didapat waktu kontak optimum antara LAS berinteraksi dengan bentonit alam adalah 15 menit dengan kapasitas adsorpsi sebesar 3,265 mg/g. Sedangkan Waktu kontak optimum interaksi LAS dengan bentonit-kitosan terjadi pada waktu 15 menit dengan kapasitas adsorpsi sebesar 1,7mg/g. Dari hasil yang didapat maka dapat terlihat bahwa bentonit alam memiliki kapasitas adsorpsi yang lebih besar dibandingkan bentonit hasil modifikasi dengan kitosan. Interaksi antara bentonit alam dan bentonit–kitosan dengan LAS terjadi secara fisik dengan energi adsorpsi bentonit alam dengan LAS adalah 19,31 KJ/mol dan energi adsorpsi bentonit-kitosan dengan LAS adalah 19,60 KJ/mol.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Plastic Concrete Containing Bentonite

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Zhang; Qiaoyan Guan; Qingfu Li

    2013-01-01

    Plastic concrete consists of aggregates, cement, water and bentonite, mixed at a high water cement ratio, to produce a ductile material. It is used for creating an impermeable barrier (cut-off wall) for containment of contaminated sites or seepage control in highly permeable dam foundations. The effects of water to binder ratio and clay dosage on mechanical properties of plastic concrete were investigated. The results indicate that the water to binder ratio and clay dosage have great influenc...

  17. Stability of bentonite gels in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present, extended study comprises a derivation of a simple rock model as a basis for calculation of the penetration rate of bentonite and of the groundwater flow rate, which is a determinant of the erodibility of the protruding clay film. This model, which is representative of a gross permeability of about 10-8 - 10-9 m/s, implies a spectrum of slot-shaped joints with apertures ranging between 0.1 and 0.5 mm. It is concluded that less than 2percent of the highly compacted bentonite will be lost into traversing joints in 106 years. A closer analysis, in which also Poiseuille retardation and short-term experiments were taken into account, even suggests that the penetration into the considered joints will be less than that. The penetration rate is expected to be 1 decimeter in a few hundred years. The risk of erosion by flowing groundwater was estimated by comparing clay particle bond strength, evaluated from viscometer tests, and theoretically derived drag forces, the conclusion being that the maximum expected water flow rate in the widest joints of the rock model (4 times 10-4 m/s) is not sufficient to disrupt the gel front or the large individual clay flocs that may exist at this front. The experiments support the conclusion that erosion will not be a source of bentonite loss. A worst case scenario with a shear zone being developed across deposition holes is finally considered and in addition to this, the conditions in the fracture-rich tunnel floor at the upper end of the deposition holes are also analysed. This study shows that even if the rock is much more fractured than normal conditions would imply, the bentonite loss is expected to be very moderate and without substantial effect on the barrier functions of the remaining clay cores in the deposition holes. (author)

  18. Plutonium sorption and desorption behavior on bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, James D; Zavarin, Mavrik; Tumey, Scott J; Kersting, Annie B

    2015-03-01

    Understanding plutonium (Pu) sorption to, and desorption from, mineral phases is key to understanding its subsurface transport. In this work we study Pu(IV) sorption to industrial grade FEBEX bentonite over the concentration range 10(-7)-10(-16) M to determine if sorption at typical environmental concentrations (≤10(-12) M) is the same as sorption at Pu concentrations used in most laboratory experiments (10(-7)-10(-11) M). Pu(IV) sorption was broadly linear over the 10(-7)-10(-16) M concentration range during the 120 d experimental period; however, it took up to 100 d to reach sorption equilibrium. At concentrations ≥10(-8) M, sorption was likely affected by additional Pu(IV) precipitation/polymerization reactions. The extent of sorption was similar to that previously reported for Pu(IV) sorption to SWy-1 Na-montmorillonite over a narrower range of Pu concentrations (10(-11)-10(-7) M). Sorption experiments with FEBEX bentonite and Pu(V) were also performed across a concentration range of 10(-11)-10(-7) M and over a 10 month period which allowed us to estimate the slow apparent rates of Pu(V) reduction on a smectite-rich clay. Finally, a flow cell experiment with Pu(IV) loaded on FEBEX bentonite demonstrated continued desorption of Pu over a 12 day flow period. Comparison with a desorption experiment performed with SWy-1 montmorillonite showed a strong similarity and suggested the importance of montorillonite phases in controlling Pu sorption/desorption reactions on FEBEX bentonite.

  19. Hydrothermal alterations of Bentonites in Almeria (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of bentonite as backfilling and sealing material in the high level radioactive waste disposals has been treated in previous studies accomplished by different authors. However, the use of this clayey barrier needs the resolution of different problems so that its efficiency will be enhanced. between those could be cited the study of the actual capacity of sealing the space around the canister and the accommodation to the pressure of the rocky environment; the possible variations in plasticity; the diffusion and reaction processes that can be produced through the barrier by groundwater, the capacity of radionuclides adsorption, etc. These studies, show that the bentonites with high content in smectite fulfill satisfactorily with the physical and chemical conditions to be used as sealing material, but it is known that the smectite can be unstable in diagenetic conditions similar to those are given in a deep repository of radioactive wastes, being transformed into illite. A conclusion of immediate interest is deduced from this last study. The bentonites used as sealing material in radioactive waste repositories must no contain Na as interlayer cation since it is very easily exchangeable by K. It is better to select those smectites with Ca and Mg that detain the entry of K in the interlayer and as a consequence the transformation process of smectite into illite is made more difficult. (Author)

  20. Modelling interaction of deep groundwaters with bentonite and radionuclide speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic description of radionuclide release from the near-field, an investigation has been initiated to quantitatively specify the chemistry of the near-field. In the Swiss case, the main components of the near-field are the glass waste-matrix, a thick steel canister horizontally emplaced in a drift, and a backfill of highly compacted sodium bentonite. This report describes a thermodynamic model which is used to estimate the chemical composition of the pore water in compacted sodium bentonite. Solubility limits and speciation of important actinides and the fission product technetium in the bentonite pore water are then calculated. The model is based on available experimental data on the interaction of sodium bentonite and groundwater and represents means of extrapolation from laboratory data to repository conditions. The modelled composition of the pore water of compacted sodium bentonite, as well as the various compositions resulting from the long-term extrapolation, are used to estimate radionuclide solubilities in the near-field of a deep repository. From the chemical point of view, calcium bentonite seems to be more stable than sodium bentonite in the presence of Swiss Reference Groundwater. Since the effect of calcium bentonite on the groundwater chemical composition will be considerably less marked than that of sodium bentonite, especially with respect to key parameters for the nuclide speciation like carbonate concentration and pH, the use of calcium bentonite instead of sodium bentonite will improve the reliability in the prediction of source terms for radionuclide transport in the geosphere. (author)

  1. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, M.S. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Van Essen, D.C. [Advanced Integrated Management Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes must be retrieved, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed for disposal. Before removal from the storage tanks, the sludge and liquid wastes will typically be combined to create a mixture of suspended solids, generally referred to as a slurry; the slurry is then pumped from the tank to the treatment facilities by pipelines. Since the wastes are radioactive, it is critically important that the slurries are transported safely and successfully. The consequences of pipeline plugging are unacceptable from the perspectives of schedule, cost, and safety. The baseline method of ensuring that the transport properties of the slurries are correct is to sample the slurry in the tank and analyze the sample in the laboratory. This method has some problems. First, there is a delay between the time that the sample is taken and the time that the analytical results are reported. For some types of analysis, this delay could be from 24 to 48 hours. Second, although the tank is being mixed to keep tile solids in suspension during this period, there is no way to determine whether the contents of the tank are homogenous unless multiple samples are collected at various depths and locations. Therefore, an on-line system that monitors slurry transport properties in real time is needed to evaluate the slurry prior to and during transfer.

  2. Slurry flow principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shook, C A; Brenner, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Slurry Flow: Principles and Practice describes the basic concepts and methods for understanding and designing slurry flow systems, in-plan installations, and long-distance transportation systems. The goal of this book is to enable the design or plant engineer to derive the maximum benefit from a limited amount of test data and to generalize operating experience to new situations. Design procedures are described in detail and are accompanied by illustrative examples needed by engineers with little or no previous experience in slurry transport.The technical literature in this field is extensive:

  3. Slurry pipeline technology: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Jay P. [Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Rafael; Pinto, Daniel; Vidal, Alisson [Ausenco do Brasil Engenharia Ltda., Nova Lima, MG (Brazil). PSI Div.

    2009-12-19

    Slurry pipelines represent an economical and environmentally friendly transportation means for many solid materials. This paper provides an over-view of the technology, its evolution and current Brazilian activity. Mineral resources are increasingly moving farther away from ports, processing plants and end use points, and slurry pipelines are an important mode of solids transport. Application guidelines are discussed. State-of-the-Art technical solutions such as pipeline system simulation, pipe materials, pumps, valves, automation, telecommunications, and construction techniques that have made the technology successful are presented. A discussion of where long distant slurry pipelines fit in a picture that also includes thickened and paste materials pipe lining is included. (author)

  4. Mineralogy and geochemistry of bauxite and bentonite deposits from Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dos Muchangos, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Results of mineralogical and geochemical studies of bauxites, kaolinitic clays and bentoniteS from Mozambique are presented in this thesis. The bauxite and kaolinitic clay deposits in Penhalonga area (in the central western part of Mozambique) are associated with Precambrian magmatic rocks and the b

  5. Remediation of distilleries wastewater using chitosan immobilized Bentonite and Bentonite based organoclays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dib, F I; Tawfik, F M; Eshaq, Gh; Hefni, H H H; ElMetwally, A E

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic nanocomposite, namely chitosan immobilized Bentonite (CIB) with chitosan content of 5% was synthesized in an acetic acid solution (2%). Organically modified CIB and Bentonite (mbent.) were prepared by intercalating cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic surfactant at doses equivalent to 1.5 and 3 times the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of clay. The prepared samples were characterized using FTIR, XRD and SEM to explore the interlayer structure and morphology of the resultant nanocomposites. The remediation of distilleries (vinasse) wastewater process was carried out using different adsorbents including CIB, modified CIB (mCIB), Bentonite (bent.), modified Bentonite (mbent.) and chitosan at different contact time. The results showed that the packing density of surfactant used in the synthesis of organoclays strongly affects the sorption capacity of the clay mineral and also showed that (mCIB)3 was found to be the most effective sorbent in the purification of distilleries wastewater with 83% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction and 78% color removal. PMID:26840179

  6. Synthesis and Photocatalytic Activity of Ti-pillared Bentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jianwen; WU Pingxiao; ZHENG Shaoyan; LIU Yun; WANG Feifei; XIE Xianfa

    2006-01-01

    Ti-pillared bentonite has been successfully prepared using a modified method that can induce the transformation of TiO2 pillar from amorphous to anatase phase at a low temperature (150℃). The value of d001 =1.94 nm obtained by Ti-pillared bentonite is larger than that of corresponding raw clay (1.56 nm). Due to large numbers of Ti-pillars formed, the Ti-pillared bentonite shows an excellent ability in adsorbing Rhodamine B (RB). The photocatalytic activity and kinetic equation are investigated by decomposing RB solution under the UV irradiation. It is found that the Tipillared bentonite shows super photocatalytic activity for the degradation of RB solution compared with the untreated bentonite and pure TiO2, and the kinetic equation of the degradation of RB solution is a 1.5-oder equation.

  7. Adsorption behavior of 239Pu by Gaomiaozi bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption behavior of 239Pu by Gaomiaozi bentonite as a function of the factors of aqueous phase pH value, 239Pu initial concentration and ionic species is studied by static adsorption experiments in this paper. The following results are obtained. Adsorption equilibrium time of 239Pu by Gaomiaozi bentonite samples is about 24 h, and the adsorption distribution ratio Kd value of 239Pu increases with the pH value, but decreases with increasing initial concentration of 239Pu. And adsorption of 239Pu by bentonite samples with different ionic species show that anions affect the most on adsorption of bentonite is CO32-, followed by HCO3- and SO42-, whereas Cl- and NO3- hardly have any influence on the adsorption of bentonite. (authors)

  8. Enhanced shear strength of sodium bentonite using frictional additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, K.E. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Bowders, J.J.; Gilbert, R.B. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important obstacles to using geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) in landfill cover systems is the low shear strength provided by the bentonitic portion of the GCL. In this study, the authors propose that granular, frictional materials might be added to the bentonite to form an admixture that would have greater shear strength than the bentonite alone while still raining low hydraulic conductivity. Bentonite was mixed with two separate granular additives, expanded shale and recycled to form mixtures consisting of 20-70% bentonite by weight. In direct shear tests at normal stresses of 34.5-103.5 kPa, effective friction angles were measured as 45{degrees} for the expanded 36{degrees} for the recycled glass, and 7{degrees} for the hydrated granular bentonite. The strength of the expanded shale mixtures increased nearly linearly as the percentage shale in the mixture increased, to 44{degrees} for a bentonite mixture with 80% shale. The addition of recycled glass showed little effect on the shear strength of the mixtures of glass and bentonite. Hydraulic conductivity measurements for both types of mixtures indicated a linear increase with log(k) as the amount of granular additive increased. For applications involving geosynthetic clay liners for cover systems, a mixture of 40% expanded shale and 60% bentonite is recommended, although further testing must be done. The 40/60 mixture satisfies the hydraulic equivalency requirement, with k = 5.1X10{sup -9} cm/sec, while increasing the shear strength parameters of the bentonitic mixture to {phi}{prime} = 17{degrees} and c{prime} = 0.

  9. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, M.S. [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Van Essen, D.C. [Advanced Integrated Management Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses.

  10. Comparative testing of slurry monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of radioactive liquid and sludge wastes that must be retrieved from underground storage tanks, transferred to treatment facilities, and processed to a final waste form. The wastes will be removed from the current storage tanks by mobilizing the sludge wastes and mixing them with the liquid wastes to create slurries. Each slurry would then be transferred by pipeline to the desired destination. To reduce the risk of plugging a pipeline, the transport properties (e.g., density, suspended solids concentration, viscosity, particle size range) of the slurry should be determined to be within acceptable limits prior to transfer. These properties should also be monitored and controlled within specified limits while the slurry transfer is in progress. The DOE issued a call for proposals for developing on-line instrumentation to measure the transport properties of slurries. In response to the call for proposals, several researchers submitted proposals and were funded to develop slurry monitoring instruments. These newly developed DOE instruments are currently in the prototype stage. Before the instruments were installed in a radioactive application, the DOE wanted to evaluate them under nonradioactive conditions to determine if they were accurate, reliable, and dependable. The goal of this project was to test the performance of the newly developed DOE instruments along with several commercially available instruments. The baseline method for comparison utilized the results from grab-sample analyses

  11. Medical ice slurry production device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Kenneth E.; Oras, John; Son, HyunJin

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  12. Adsorption of aniline, phenol, and chlorophenols on pure and modified bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, A.; Gür, A.; Ceylan, H.

    2006-11-01

    In the present study, pure bentonite and bentonite modified by HNO3, EDTA, and HDTMA are adsorbents. The changes on the surfaces of bentonite samples are studied by IR spectroscopy. The adsorption of aniline, phenol, and phenol derivatives on these adsorbents is examined by means of gas chromatography. As the result of these examinations, it is seen that the adsorption capacities of clay-organic complexes (bentonite-EDTA and bentonite-HDTMA) are higher than those of bentonite-HNO3 and pure bentonite.

  13. Sorption of Uranium(VI) and Thorium(IV) by Jordanian Bentonite

    OpenAIRE

    Fawwaz I. Khalili; Salameh, Najla'a H.; Mona M. Shaybe

    2013-01-01

    Purification of raw bentonite was done to remove quartz. This includes mixing the raw bentonite with water and then centrifuge it at 750 rpm; this process is repeated until white purified bentonite is obtained. XRD, XRF, FTIR, and SEM techniques will be used for the characterization of purified bentonite. The sorption behavior of purified Jordanian bentonite towards and Th4+ metal ions in aqueous solutions was studied by batch experiment as a function of pH, contact time, temperature,...

  14. Engineering Properties of Bentonite Stabilized with Lime and Phosphogypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sujeet

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering properties such as compaction, unconfined compressive strength, consistency limits, percentage swell, free swell index, the California bearing ratio and the consolidation of bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum are presented in this paper. The content of the lime and phosphogypsum varied from 0 to 10 %. The results reveal that the dry unit weight and optimum moisture content of bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The percentage of swell increased and the free swell index decreased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum to the bentonite + 8 % lime mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum as well as an increase in the curing period up to 14 days. The liquid limit and plastic limit of the bentonite + 8 % lime increased, whereas the plasticity index remained constant with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum. The California bearing ratio, modulus of subgrade reaction, and secant modulus increased for the bentonite stabilized with lime and phosphogypsum. The coefficient of the consolidation of the bentonite increased with the addition of 8 % lime and no change with the addition of 8 % phosphogypsum.

  15. Colloid chemical aspects of the ''confined bentonite concept''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the amount of particles released from a bentonite gel by light scattering and visual inspection show that while particles are released in distilled water, the gel will be coagulated if in contact with ground water and consequently the release of particles is negligibly small. Studies of sedimentation volumes by ultracentrifugation also clearly indicate that the bentonite in contact with ground water under the repository pressure will form a completely stable coagulated gel. The swelling of confined bentonite was studied in an ''artificial crack'' of width 0.5 mm. The bentonite flowed readily into this crack and into the much narrower crack formed when the cell was broken. The swelling properties of the bentonite at the repository depth are discussed. It is argued that the gel, if sufficient volume is available, will swell spontaneously to a volume that is approximately 30 % larger than the initial one and then form a stable, coagulated gel containing 30-35 % water in equilibrium with the ground water. Investigations of the diffusion of colloidal matter (sodium lignosulphonate molecules of mean diameter 6 nm) and calcium ions into a dilute bentonite gel show that colloidal matter very probably will have a negligible rate of diffusion while the calcium ions diffuse rapidly. This implies that the initial bentonite gel which is partially in its sodium form will be completely exchanged to its calcium form when brought into contact with ground water which ensures that it will remain coagulated even in its swollen state

  16. Effects of polyethyleneimine adsorption on rheology of bentonite suspensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Alemdar; N Öztekin; F B Erim; Ö I Ece; N Güngör

    2005-06-01

    The influence of the cationic polymer, polyethyleneimine polymer (PEI) on the flow behaviour of bentonite suspensions (2%, w/w), was studied. XRD, zeta potential and adsorption studies were done together with rheological measurements. The addition of PEI at concentration ranges of 10-5–4.5 g/l and their rheological properties and stability of bentonite suspensions were studied. The adsorption rates for the bentonite suspensions are very fast. The XRD results showed that the PEG molecules did not intercalate into the layers of the clay.

  17. Gas transport through saturated bentonite and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The aim of this investigation was the determination of the gas transport properties of saturated compacted bentonite and its interfaces. The bentonite used was the Spanish FEBEX bentonite, which is mainly composed of montmorillonite (more than 90%). For a dry density of 1.6 g/cm3 the saturated permeability of the bentonite is about 5.10-14 m/s, with deionised water used as percolating fluid. The saturated swelling pressure for the same dry density has a value of about 6 MPa. To perform the gas breakthrough tests a series of stainless steel cells were designed and manufactured. The cells consisted of a body, in which the cylindrical sample was inserted, pistons with o-rings at both ends of the samples and threaded caps. The samples, of 3.8 and 5.0 cm in diameter and 2.5 or 5.0 in height, were obtained by uniaxial compaction of the bentonite with its hygroscopic water content directly inside the cell body. Saturation with deionised water was accomplished by applying injection pressures of between 2 and 10 bar. The water content of the bentonite after saturation was higher than 27% for all the dry densities. Once the samples saturated, the filters on top and bottom of the samples were replaced by dry ones, the cells were again closed, and they were connected to a setup specially designed to measure breakthrough pressure. It consisted of two stainless steel deposits connected to the ends of the cell. One of the deposits was pressurised with nitrogen at 2 bar, whereas vacuum was applied to the other one. The pressures were measured by means of pressure transmitters. If no changes in pressure were recorded during 24 h, the injection pressure in the upstream deposit was increased by 2 bar and kept constant for 24 h. The process was repeated until gas started to flow through the sample. The time required for the completion of a particular experiment was determined by the conditions of the sample being studied. Although

  18. Water uptake and stress development in bentonites and bentonite-sand buffer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of swelling pressure and the transfer of pore water pressures through dense bentonite and bentonite-sand materials are examined in this report. This report focuses on the swelling pressure and total pressure developed in initially unsaturated specimens allowed access to free water on one end. The bentonite in this wetted region rapidly develops its full swelling pressure and this pressure is transferred upwards through the specimen. Hence, the bentonite plug will exert a pressure approximately equivalent to the swelling pressure even though only a small region of the plug is actually saturated. A number of specimens were tested with total pressure sensors mounted normal and parallel to the axis of compaction. Lateral pressures developed long before the wetting front reached sensor locations, suggesting stress transfer through the unsaturated portions of these specimens. On achieving saturation, specimens were found to have similar swelling pressures both normal to and parallel to the axis of compaction. This indicates that there is little or no specimen anisotropy induced by the compaction process. Tests were conducted on specimens allowed only to take on a limited quantity of water and it was found that density anisotropy was induced as the result of the swelling pressures generated by the buffer. The wetted skin of buffer developed a considerable pressure and compressed a region of buffer immediately above the wetted region. The results suggest that the buffer material placed in a disposal vault will rapidly develop and transfer swelling pressures as a result of the saturation of a limited region or 'skin' within the emplacement site. The total pressure ultimately present on the container surface should be the sum of the swelling and hydraulic components. (author). 14 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs

  19. Temperature influence on structural changes of foundry bentonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzer, Mariusz; Bobrowski, Artur; Żymankowska-Kumon, Sylwia

    2011-10-01

    The results of investigations of three calcium bentonites, activated by sodium carbonate, applied in the foundry industry as binding material for moulding sands, subjected to the influence of high temperatures - are presented in the paper. Investigations were performed by the thermal analysis (TG) method, the infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method and the modern Cu(II)-TET complex method (used for the determination of the montmorillonite content in bentonite samples). The occurrence of the dehydration process and two-stage dehydroxylation process was confirmed only for bentonite no. 2. This probably indicates that cis- and trans-isomers are present in the octahedric bentonite structure. Tests were performed at temperatures: 500, 550, 700, 900, 1000, 1100, 1200 °C.

  20. A study on the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonites

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Anh-Minh; Le, Trung Tinh; 10.1016/j.clay.2007.11.001

    2008-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite is one of the most important properties in the design of high-level radioactive waste repositories where this material is proposed for use as a buffer. In the work described here, a thermal probe based on the hot wire method was used to measure the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite specimens. The experimental results were analyzed to observe the effects of various factors (i.e. dry density, water content, hysteresis, degree of saturation and volumetric fraction of soil constituents) on the thermal conductivity. A linear correlation was proposed to predict the thermal conductivity of compacted bentonite based on experimentally observed relationship between the volumetric fraction of air and the thermal conductivity. The relevance of this correlation was finally analyzed together with others existing methods using experimental data on several compacted bentonites.

  1. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić; Dubravko Domitrović; Želimir Veinović

    2007-01-01

    Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs) composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the lo...

  2. Unified theory for swelling deformation and swelling pressure of bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The correlation of the water volume to vertical overburden pressure (p) is obtained as Vw/ Vm=KÞDs-3 for bentonite with fractal-textured surface. The maximum swelling strain is predicted according to the correlation of the water volume to vertical overburden pressure. The predictions of the maximum swelling strain and swelling pressure are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data of Tsukinuno and Wyoming bentonite. (authors)

  3. The Effect of Bentonite on External Corrosion of Well Casings

    OpenAIRE

    Orayith, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe overall goal of this research is concerned with understanding the effects of bentonite on the external corrosion of bare mild steel well casing. Na-bentonite is mainly used in enormous amounts in drilling processes, so it used as the main electrochemical environment surrounding the casing at different condition. The major part of the current study was divided into 3 stages; the first stage is constant current cathodic protection (CP) with a range of 0.0 (Open Circuit Potential) to...

  4. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew [Serco Assurance, Harwe ll (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    In Sweden and Finland, it is proposed that spent nuclear fuel will be encapsulated in sealed cylindrical canisters, for disposal in a geologic repository, either in vertical boreholes (KBS-3V) or in long horizontal boreholes (KBS-3H). The canisters will consist of a thick cast iron insert and a copper outer container, and each canister will be surrounded by a compacted bentonite clay buffer. It is important to investigate the possible consequences if a failure of these physical barriers was to occur. For instance, if mechanical failure of the copper outer container were to occur then groundwater could enter the annulus and reach the cast iron insert. This would result in anaerobically corroded iron from the cast iron insert interacting with the bentonite surrounding the canisters. The presence of anaerobically corroded iron in groundwater raises the question of how the bentonite will be affected by this process. In the case of the KBS-3H concept, mechanical failure of the copper outer container could lead to interaction between anaerobically corroded iron and bentonite, as above. However, direct contact between anaerobically corroding carbon steel and bentonite is also likely because of the presence of perforated carbon steel support structures in the long horizontal boreholes. As part of the NF-PRO project, an extensive experimental programme has been carried out over several years to study the interactions between anaerobically corroding carbon steel or cast iron and bentonite. The purpose of this report is to describe the modelling work that has been carried out, and the conclusions that have been reached. The experimental programme has carried out a series of long term experiments looking at anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel or cast iron in compacted MX80 bentonite at 30 deg C or 50 deg C. In the bentonite the concentration of iron decreased with increasing distance away from the iron-bentonite interface, with local iron concentrations as high as 20 wt % in

  5. Effect of activation on swelling property in Ca-bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compacted bentonite is attracting greater attention as buffer material for deep geological repository of high-level radioactive waste under current design concept. Swelling behavior is a significant property in achieving the low-permeability sealing function. The potential buffer material used is a locally available clayey material known as Zhisin clay in Taiwan. Zhisin clay is a Ca-type bentonite. Experimental data indicated that the swelling potential of Zhisin clay is much lower than that of Na-bentonite due to its exchangeable cation type and capacity. To enhance the swelling potential of Zhisin clay, a cation exchange process by addition of Na2CO3 powder is introduced in this research. Addition of Na2CO3 reagent to Zhisin clay caused precipitation of CaCO3 to occur and induced a replacement of Ca2+ ions by Na+ ions on the surface of bentonite in liquid phase. Experimental results show that Na2CO3-activated Zhisin clay is superior in swelling potential to untreated Zhisin clay. Due to the ion exchange hysteresis, activated bentonite shows different type of time-swell curve from traditional sigmoid-shaped curve. The optimal amount of Na2CO3 addition is found to be 1%, and the maximum swelling strain was found to be 3 times as much as that of untreated Zhisin clay. The Na2CO3 -activated Zhisin clay exhibited improved resistance to thermal environments and behaved similar to the Na-type bentonites under different hydrothermal temperatures. (authors)

  6. Study on Preparation and Properties of Grease Based on Ultraifne Bentonite Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Guo Xiaochuan; Jiang Mingjun; He Yan

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility for preparation of ultraifne bentonite powder by different milling methods was studied. And the comparison of comprehensive performance between ultraifne bentonite grease and traditional bentonite grease was also investigated. The results indicated that the statistic Z-average size of ultraifne bentonite prepared by sand milling was 250 nm with a narrow size distribution and the lattice structure of ultraifne bentonite maintained good character despite a slight distortion occasioned. The mechanical stability, colloid stability, antiwear ability and friction-reducing property of ultraifne bentonite grease were superior to the traditional one.

  7. Long-term stability of bentonite. A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term thermodynamic stability of the bentonite buffer in the evolving chemical, thermal and hydrological conditions at Olkiluoto has been evaluated by reviewing the relevant experimental data and natural occurrences of bentonite that could serve as analogues for the long-term bentonite stability in the expected repository conditions, especially focussing on mineral transformations due, among others, to thermal effects including cementation. Natural occurrences with stable smectite have been reviewed and compared with Olkiluoto groundwater compositions at present and during the expected hydrogeochemical evolution of the repository. Alteration of the bentonite buffer is expected to be insignificant for natural groundwater conditions at present and for the evolving groundwater conditions at the expected thermal boundary conditions caused by the heat induced from the fuel canisters (+ and SiO2 and elevated pH due to degradation and dissolution processes. These may alter the conditions in the repository that may favour alteration and cementation processes. The amounts of foreign materials to be used in the repository will be updated along with the progress of the construction. Also the information on their impact on the barriers needs to be evaluated in more detail, including the degradation rate, mobility or dilution of the foreign materials in the repository environment. The exchangeable cation composition of the buffer bentonite is expected to equilibrate with the surrounding groundwater during and after saturation. This process is expected to lead towards Ca-dominant exchangeable cation composition within the montmorillonite interlayer spaces in the buffer. In general it seems that the transformation towards Ca-dominated composition would favour the long-term stability of the buffer as Ca-dominated smectite (compared to Na-dominated type) has larger water retention capacity and anion incorporation to the interlayer space of montmorillonite is more extensive

  8. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    There are concerns that the bentonite buffer surrounding the canisters with spent nuclear fuel may erode when non-saline groundwaters seep past the buffer. This is known to happen if the water content of ions is below the critical coagulation concentration CCC. Above the CCC the smectite forms a coherent gel, which does not release particles. One main effort in this study has been directed to assess under which conditions the pore water composition of the gel at the gel/water interface could be lower than the CCC. Another main effort has been directed to understanding the behaviour of expansive gel when the pore water is below the CCC. We have developed a Dynamic model for sodium gel expansion in fractures where the gel soaks up non-saline water as it expands. The model is based on a force balance between and on smectite particles, which move in the water. The Dynamic model of gel expansion showing the evolution in time and space of a gel was successfully tested against expansion experiments in test tubes. The expansion was measured with high resolution and in great detail over many months by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The model also predicted the gel expansion through filters with very narrow pores well. A gel viscosity model of dilute gels was derived, which accounts for ion concentration influence as well as the volume fraction of smectite in the gel. The model accounts for the presence of the DDL, which seemingly makes the particles larger so that they interact at lower particle densities. Simulations were performed for a case where the gel expands outward into the fracture that intersects the deposition hole. Fresh groundwater approaches and passes the gel/water interface. Smectite colloids move out into the water due to the repulsive forces between the particle and by Brownian motion (effect included in the Dynamic model). The dilute gel/sol is mobilised and flows downstream in a thin region where the viscosity is low enough to permit flow. Sodium diffuses

  9. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu; Moreno, Luis (Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    There are concerns that the bentonite buffer surrounding the canisters with spent nuclear fuel may erode when non-saline groundwaters seep past the buffer. This is known to happen if the water content of ions is below the critical coagulation concentration CCC. Above the CCC the smectite forms a coherent gel, which does not release particles. One main effort in this study has been directed to assess under which conditions the pore water composition of the gel at the gel/water interface could be lower than the CCC. Another main effort has been directed to understanding the behaviour of expansive gel when the pore water is below the CCC. We have developed a Dynamic model for sodium gel expansion in fractures where the gel soaks up non-saline water as it expands. The model is based on a force balance between and on smectite particles, which move in the water. The Dynamic model of gel expansion showing the evolution in time and space of a gel was successfully tested against expansion experiments in test tubes. The expansion was measured with high resolution and in great detail over many months by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The model also predicted the gel expansion through filters with very narrow pores well. A gel viscosity model of dilute gels was derived, which accounts for ion concentration influence as well as the volume fraction of smectite in the gel. The model accounts for the presence of the DDL, which seemingly makes the particles larger so that they interact at lower particle densities. Simulations were performed for a case where the gel expands outward into the fracture that intersects the deposition hole. Fresh groundwater approaches and passes the gel/water interface. Smectite colloids move out into the water due to the repulsive forces between the particle and by Brownian motion (effect included in the Dynamic model). The dilute gel/sol is mobilised and flows downstream in a thin region where the viscosity is low enough to permit flow. Sodium diffuses

  10. Mechanisms and models for bentonite erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are concerns that the bentonite buffer surrounding the canisters with spent nuclear fuel may erode when non-saline groundwaters seep past the buffer. This is known to happen if the water content of ions is below the critical coagulation concentration CCC. Above the CCC the smectite forms a coherent gel, which does not release particles. One main effort in this study has been directed to assess under which conditions the pore water composition of the gel at the gel/water interface could be lower than the CCC. Another main effort has been directed to understanding the behaviour of expansive gel when the pore water is below the CCC. We have developed a Dynamic model for sodium gel expansion in fractures where the gel soaks up non-saline water as it expands. The model is based on a force balance between and on smectite particles, which move in the water. The Dynamic model of gel expansion showing the evolution in time and space of a gel was successfully tested against expansion experiments in test tubes. The expansion was measured with high resolution and in great detail over many months by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The model also predicted the gel expansion through filters with very narrow pores well. A gel viscosity model of dilute gels was derived, which accounts for ion concentration influence as well as the volume fraction of smectite in the gel. The model accounts for the presence of the DDL, which seemingly makes the particles larger so that they interact at lower particle densities. Simulations were performed for a case where the gel expands outward into the fracture that intersects the deposition hole. Fresh groundwater approaches and passes the gel/water interface. Smectite colloids move out into the water due to the repulsive forces between the particle and by Brownian motion (effect included in the Dynamic model). The dilute gel/sol is mobilised and flows downstream in a thin region where the viscosity is low enough to permit flow. Sodium diffuses

  11. Lake restoration with aluminium, bentonite and Phoslock: the effect on sediment stability and light attenuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Flindt, Mogens

    treatments on aluminium mobility, sediment stability or light climate. A laboratory flume experiment including three shallow Danish lakes was conducted. We measured the effects of aluminium, Phoslock (a commercial product), bentonite, and a combination of bentonite/aluminium. Each treatment caused a varying...... consolidation of the sediment. The largest consolidation occurred using Phoslock- and bentonite-addition followed by bentonite/aluminium-addition, whereas aluminium alone had no effect. Sediment stability thresholds were measured before and after addition. Especially Phoslock, but also bentonite and bentonite....../aluminium increased sediment erosion threshold, with respectively 200%, 43% and 57%. Aluminium, bentonite/aluminium, and Phoslock improved the light conditions in the water phase, with respectively 60%, 57% and 50%, whereas bentonite created higher turbidity. Conclusively aluminium improved the light conditions...

  12. Performance characteristics of EZhou bentonite of Hubei province and its modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Wei; Fan Zitian; Hu Xueting

    2009-01-01

    Both the chemical compositions and performance characteristics of the bentonite raw ores in Ezhou area of Hubei province and Honghuoshan area of Liaoning province were compared and analyzed. The properties of these two kinds of bentonites were tested before and after Na+- and Li+-modification. The results show that the Ezhou bentonite ore possesses higher montmorillonite content than the Honghuoshan bentonite ore, but the Ezhou Na-bentonite has weaker castability (e.g. Wet compression strength and hot wet tensile strength) than the Honghuoshan Na-bentonite, while the performance of Ezhou Li-bentonite, such as colloid index, swelling value, swelling volume and mould coating performance, is equivalent to that of the Honghuoshan Na-bentonite.

  13. Geochemical discrimination of the Upper Ordovician Kinnekulle Bentonite in the Billegrav-2 drill core section, Bornholm, Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo Kiipli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The content of the trace elements Ti, Nb, Zr and Th has been analysed in 34 Upper Ordovician bentonites from the Billegrav-2 drill core, Bornholm, Denmark. The section contains two 80–90 cm thick bentonites, which potentially may represent the Kinnekulle Bentonite, as well as several rather thick but composite bentonite layers with thin terrigenous shale interbeds. Comparison of the four immobile trace elements with data from the Kinnekulle Bentonite reported from other locations in Baltoscandia indicate that the 80 cm thick bentonite between 88.30 and 89.10 m in the Billegrav-2 core represents this marker bed. The other thick (90 cm bentonite in the Billegrav-2 core, exceeding the thickness of the Kinnekulle Bentonite, belongs to the Sinsen or uppermost Grefsen Series bentonites. Bentonites in the Grefsen Series frequently contain much higher concentrations of trace elements than the Kinnekulle Bentonite.

  14. CHARACTERISTICS OF BENTONITE AND ITS SYNERGISTIC RETENTION EFFECT WITH CPAM ON WHEAT STRAW PULP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Liu; Wenxia Liu

    2004-01-01

    The various properties of bentonite samples with different sources and their synergistic retention effect with CPAM on wheat straw pulps were investigated.The investigated properties of bentonite included adsorptive capacity based on methylene blue,cation-exchange capacity, swelling volume, colloidal volume, particle size and charge properties. The results show that particle size is the most important properties of bentonite for its synergistic retention effect with CPAM. Using Wyoming type sodium bentonite without drying after modification can obtain the excellent furnishes retention.

  15. Measurement of pH of the Compacted Bentonite under the Reducing Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Nessa, Syeda Afsarun; Idemitsu, Kazuya; Yamasaki, Yosuke; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Arima, Tatsumi

    2007-01-01

    Compacted bentonite and carbon steel have been considered as the good buffer and over-pack materials in the repositories of high-level radioactive waste disposal. Sodium bentonite, Kunipia-F contains approximately 95wt% of montmorillonite. It has a high cation-exchange capacity and a high specific surface area, and its properties determine the behavior of bentonite. The pH of the pore water in compacted bentonite is an extremely important parameter because of its influence on radionuclide sol...

  16. Mechanical Properties of Plastic Concrete Containing Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Plastic concrete consists of aggregates, cement, water and bentonite, mixed at a high water cement ratio, to produce a ductile material. It is used for creating an impermeable barrier (cut-off wall for containment of contaminated sites or seepage control in highly permeable dam foundations. The effects of water to binder ratio and clay dosage on mechanical properties of plastic concrete were investigated. The results indicate that the water to binder ratio and clay dosage have great influence on the mechanical properties of plastic concrete. There is a tendency of decrease in the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, shear strength and elastic modulus of plastic concrete with the increase of water to binder ratio and clay dosage, while, the internal friction angle of the shear specimens is increasing gradually. To improve the resistance to deformation of cut-off walls constructed with plastic concrete, the higher water to binder ratio and clay dosage can be selected to decrease the elastic modulus of plastic concrete in the practical design and applications of plastic concrete on condition that the plastic concrete has enough compressive strength, tensile strength and shear strength.

  17. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha;

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in...... generally high. It was concluded that the contribution from floors to NH3 emissions was effect on N2O emissions was observed. The effect...

  18. Hydrothermal alkaline stability of bentonite barrier by concrete interstitial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all the steps of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR) based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the waste is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barriers. Two of the engineering barriers in the Spanish design of DGR in granitic rock are compacted bentonite and concrete. The bentonite barrier is the backfilling and sealing material for the repository gallery, because of its mechanical and physico-chemical properties. The main qualities of concrete as a component of a multi barrier system are its low permeability, mechanical resistance and chemical properties. With regard to chemical composition of concrete, the alkaline nature of cement pore water lowers the solubility of many radioactive elements. However, structural transformation in smectite, dissolution or precipitation of minerals and, consequently, changes in the bentonite properties could occurs in the alkaline conditions generated by the cement degradation. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate the effect of concrete in the stability of Spanish reference bentonite (La Serrata of Nijar, Almeria, Spain) in conditions similar to those estimated in a DGR in granitic rock. Because of the main role of bentonite barrier in the global performance of the repository, the present study is essential to guarantee its security. (Author)

  19. Diffusion, sorption, and retardation processes of anions in bentonite and organo-bentonites for multibarrier systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schampera, Birgit; Dultz, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The low permeability, high cation exchange capacity (CEC) and plasticity of bentonites favor their use in multibarrier systems of waste deposits [1]. Bentonites have a high CEC but their ability to sorb anions is very low. There is, however, need for retardation of anions and organic pollutants in many applications. Bentonites, modified with certain organic cations, have the capacity to sorb anions and non-polar organic compounds in addition to cations. Investigations on organically modified clays address a wide variety of applications including immobilization of pollutants in contaminated soils, waste water treatment and in situ placement for the protection of ground water [2]. Many experiments on anion and cation sorption of organo-clays were conducted in the batch mode which does not reflect solid-liquid ratios and material densities in barrier systems. Diffusion experiments on compacted clays allow the evaluation of transport processes and sorption of pollutants at conditions relevant for repositories. For organo-clays only few diffusion studies are published e.g. [3] measured the diffusion of tritium and [4] the diffusion of H2O in bentonite and organo-bentonites. The organic cation hexadecylpyridinium (HDPy) was added to Wyoming bentonite (MX-80) in amounts corresponding to 2-400 % of the CEC. The uptake of organic cations was determined by the C-content, XRD and IR-spectroscopy. Wettability was analyzed by the contact angle. Physical, chemical and mineralogical properties of clays were characterized. Diffusion experiments were carried out in situ in a cell attached to the ATR-unit of a FTIR-spectrometer. For H2O-diffusion the compacted organo-clays are saturated first with D2O, afterwards H2O is supplied to the surface at the top of the clay platelet. Anion-diffusion was conducted with NO3--solution instead of H2O only having characteristic IR band positions at 1350 cm-1. Three different concentrations (0.25M, 0.5M and 1M) were used. Additional batch

  20. Chemical influence on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of high-density bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radioactive waste disposal schemes, during the operational period of clay barriers, solute transport an d thermal gradients may alter the solute concentration of pore water. These induced changes have important consequences on hydro-mechanical properties and microstructural alterations (mineral composition and pore size distribution changes) of the clay barrier. Chemically induced changes originated by different imbibition fluids and soil mineral compositions have been a subject with a long research tradition. These researches have been mainly focused on the behaviour of reconstituted soils starting from slurry and saturated wit h saline solutions at elevated concentrations, where hydro-mechanical changes (soil compressibility and water permeability changes) are clearly detected. In contrast, available information concerning the response of high-density clays subjected to chemically induced actions with a wide range of pore solution concentrations is very limited in spite of its practical relevance to environmental geotechnics. This situation has been caused, at least in part, by the difficulties in detecting important hydro-mechanical changes when clays with low water storage capacity have been used. Nevertheless, this paper will demonstrate that even in the case of high-density fabrics, considerable changes can be observed when high-activity clays (bentonites) are imbibed with different pore fluid compositions. (authors)

  1. Adsorption of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole from aqueous solution by organo-bentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Jing; Meifang Hou; Ping Zhao; Xiaoyan Tang; Hongfu Wan

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole onto organo-bentonite was investigated.Natural bentonite from Gaozhou in Guangdong Province,China was collected.Organo-bentonite was prepared by intercalation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide into the natural bentonite.The physicochemical properties of the prepared organo-bentonite were characterized by X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.The results showed that montmorillonite is the main component of the natural bentonite.The basal spacing of the natural bentonite is 1.47 nm,which increased to 1.98 nm on intercalation with cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide.Moreover,both the surface area and pore volume increased with intercalation.Clear CH2 stretching (3000-2800 cm-1) and scissoring (1480-1450 cm-1) modes of the intercalated surfactants were observed for organobentonite.Compared with the pseudo first-order kinetic model,the pseudo second-order kinetic model is more suitable to describe the adsorption kinetics of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole onto organo-bentonite.The adsorption capacity of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole onto organo-bentonite increased with increasing initial concentration of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole,but decreased with increasing adsorbent dosage.The adsorption isotherm of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole onto organo-bentonite fits well with the Langmuir model.The maximum adsorption capacity of organo-bentonite for 2-mercaptobenzothiazole was 33.61 mg/g,indicating that organo-bentonite is a promising adsorbent for 2-mercaptobenzothiazole.

  2. Dewatering fine coal slurries by gel extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, S.H.; Lyu, L.H.; Barnthouse, K. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1998-07-01

    Gel extraction is evaluated as a novel technique for dewatering fine coal slurries. This technique uses temperature-responsive gels to absorb water from slurries at low temperatures; after separation of the swollen gel from the dewatered slurry, the gel is heated slightly above ambient temperature, which causes it to release the water it absorbed. The gel can then be recycled. The equilibrium and kinetic properties of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) gel were evaluated for utility in this process. The gels effectively dewatered slurries to around 70 wt% solids; performance was not a strong function of particle size, though coarser slurries ({minus}16 mesh) could be dewatered to greater extents than the finer slurries (325 x 400 mesh). The gels showed no sign of deterioration over a period of 2 months and 20 cycles.

  3. Eutrophication management in surface waters using lanthanum modified bentonite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Copetti, Diego; Finsterle, Karin; Marziali, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales. The availa......This paper reviews the scientific knowledge on the use of a lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB) to manage eutrophication in surface water. The LMB has been applied in around 200 environments worldwide and it has undergone extensive testing at laboratory, mesocosm, and whole lake scales...

  4. Characterization of bentonite clay from “Greda” deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadežda Stanković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mineralogical and technological investigations of the deposit “Greda” important characteristics of bentonite clay were determined. Representative samples of the deposit were characterized with X-ray diffraction, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that the main mineral is montmorillonite and in subordinate quantities kaolinite, quartz and pyrite. The chemical composition generally shows high silica and alumina contents in all samples and small quantities of Fe3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations. Based on technological and mineralogical research, bentonite from this deposit is a high-quality raw material for use in the ceramic industry.

  5. SLURRY FLOW MODELLING BY CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.C. Ghanta

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made in the present study to develop a generalized slurry flow model using CFD and utilize the model to predict concentration profile. The purpose of the CFD model is to gain better insight into the solid liquid slur¬ry flow in pipelines. Initially a three-dimensional model problem was developed to understand the influence of the particle drag coefficient on the solid concen¬tration profile. The preliminary simulations highlighted the need for correct mo¬delling of the inter phase drag force. The various drag correlations available in the literature were incorporated into a two-fluid model (Euler-Euler along with the standard k- turbulence model with mixture properties to simulate the tur¬bulent solid-liquid flow in a pipeline. The computational model was mapped on to a commercial CFD solver FLUENT6.2 (of Fluent Inc., USA. To push the en¬velope of applicability of the simulation, recent data from Kaushal (2005 (with solid concentration up to 50% was selected to validate the three dimensional simulations. The experimental data consisted of water-glass bead slurry at 125 and 440-micron particle with different flow velocity (from 1 to 5 m/s and overall concentration up to 10 to 50% by volume. The predicted pressure drop and concentration profile were validated by experimental data and showed excel-lent agreement. Interesting findings came out from the parametric study of ve-locity and concentration profiles. The computational model and results discus¬sed in this work would be useful for extending the applications of CFD models for simulating large slurry pipelines.

  6. Numerical simulation of alteration of sodium bentonite by diffusion of ionic groundwater components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments measuring the movement of trace amounts of radionuclides through compacted bentonite have typically used unaltered bentonite. Models based on experiments such as these may not lead to accurate predictions of the migration through altered or partially altered bentonite of radionuclides that undergo ion exchange. To address this problem, we have modified an existing transport code to include ion exchange and aqueous complexation reactions. The code is thus able to simulate the diffusion of major ionic groundwater components through bentonite and reactions between the bentonite and groundwater. Numerical simulations have been made to investigate the conversion of sodium bentonite to calcium bentonite for a reference groundwater characteristic of deep granitic formations. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Study on long-term performance of bentonite layer in radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to appropriately evaluate the long-term performance of the bentonite layer in a radioactive waste repository because it can considerably affect the repository function for containment and delay of nuclides. Thus far, limited knowledge has been available on alkali alteration phenomena of highly compacted bentonite and their effect on its physical properties. In this study, we developed an apparatus for testing alkali alteration phenomena of highly compacted bentonite and its physical properties. Through studies conducted using the apparatus, we concluded that the alkali dissolution rate of montmorillonite in highly compacted bentonite is less than 9.7 x 10-13 mol/m2/sec and that the hydraulic conductivity of the bentonite layer is affected by the pore structure, which can be refined by the effect of dissolution and precipitation of minerals in bentonite, as well as by the density of the bentonite layer and the electrolyte concentration of pore solution. (author)

  8. Retreatment of silicon slurry by membrane processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, F. [Universite Paul Cezanne Aix Marseille, Laboratoire de Mecanique, Modelisation et Procedes Propres (M2P2 - UMR-CNRS 6181), Europole de l' Arbois, BP. 80, Batiment Laennec, Hall C, 13545 Aix en Provence Cedex 04 (France); KEMESYS, 125 ZA Verdalai, 13790 Peynier (France); Coetsier, C.; Carretier, E. [Universite Paul Cezanne Aix Marseille, Laboratoire de Mecanique, Modelisation et Procedes Propres (M2P2 - UMR-CNRS 6181), Europole de l' Arbois, BP. 80, Batiment Laennec, Hall C, 13545 Aix en Provence Cedex 04 (France); Ennahali, M.; Laborie, B. [KEMESYS, 125 ZA Verdalai, 13790 Peynier (France); Serafino, C.; Bulgarelli, F. [Rockwood Wafer reclaim France, ZI des Pradeaux, 13850 Greasque (France); Moulin, P., E-mail: philippe.moulin@univ-cezanne.fr [Universite Paul Cezanne Aix Marseille, Laboratoire de Mecanique, Modelisation et Procedes Propres (M2P2 - UMR-CNRS 6181), Europole de l' Arbois, BP. 80, Batiment Laennec, Hall C, 13545 Aix en Provence Cedex 04 (France)

    2011-08-30

    Highlights: {yields} Membrane processes were used to regenerate Silicon CMP slurry effluent {yields} A two-step ultrafiltration process was performed at laboratory and industrial scales {yields} A new hybrid process (membrane ultrafiltration and chemical addition) is developed {yields} A ratio of 0.65 of dissolved chemicals allows RR and TTV to be within specifications {yields} At industrial scale, the hybrid process enables the reuse of electronic effluents. - Abstract: The purpose of the present study is to develop a process to regenerate the polish liquid used in Chemical and Mechanical Polishing (CMP), called 'slurry', and more specifically Silicon CMP slurry. Physico-chemical analyses show a considerable dilution of slurry through washing waters used in polishing. Thus, this effluent has been characterised for a better identification of the deviations from the slurry of reference (Point Of Use). Hence, the principle is to regenerate this effluent by membrane processes. The ultrafiltration results obtained at laboratory scale have led to the development of an industrial prototype. An optimal utilisation of this treatment allows completing a two-step process: the reconcentration by ultrafiltration and a chemical adjustment by addition of concentrated slurry. A stable behaviour of the slurry at the different steps of the process has been observed. Polishing results are similar with retreated and POU slurries. Furthermore, the functioning at industrial scale permits to maintain the performances obtained on the laboratory pilot.

  9. Diffusion of anions and cations in compacted sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis presents the results of studies on the diffusion mechanisms of anions and cations in compacted sodium bentonite, which is planned to be used as a buffer material in nuclear waste disposal in Finland. The diffusivities and sorption factors were determined by tracer experiments. The pore volume accessible to chloride, here defined as effective porosity, was determined as a function of bentonite density and electrolyte concentration in water, and the Stern-Gouy double-layer model was used to explain the observed anion exclusion. The sorption of Cs+ and Sr2+ was studied in loose and compacted bentonite samples as a function of the electrolyte concentration in solution. In order to obtain evidence of the diffusion of exchangeable cations, defined as surface diffusion, the diffusivities of Cs+ and Sr2+ in compacted bentonite were studied as a function of the sorption factor, which was varied by electrolyte concentration in solution. The measurements were performed both by a non-steady state method and by a through-diffusion method. (89 refs., 35 fig., 4 tab.)

  10. DEPOSITS AND MINING POTENTIAL OF BENTONITE IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Klanfar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is one of the materials that is planed to be used for buffering and backfilling in spent nuclear fuel repositories, within deep crystalline rock. There are several locations in Croatia that bentonite deposits and occurrences are found on. Some were exploited in past, and others were more or less explored. This paper presents overview of bentonite deposits, basic properties and potential resources, and mining practices in Croatia. Largest exploited deposits are found in area of Poljanska luka, Gornja Jelenska and Bednja. Surface and underground methods (drift and fill, sublevel caving were used during exploitation. In the area of Svilaja and Lika are found potentially valuable deposits that were never exploited. Montmorilonite content ranges form 20-50% to 57-89%. Most deposits contain bentonite beds with thickness 0,4-1,6 m, and have plunge 10°-30°. Few exceptions are nearly horizontal and thick more than 5 m and even 12 m. One is declined at 70° and up to 40m thick. Proven reserves are about 2,3 Mt with some level of uncertainty. Average production per mine during exploitation period can be assumed to be several thousands t/y.

  11. Polypropylene–clay composite prepared from Indian bentonite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuchhanda Sarkar; Kausik Dana; Sankar Ghatak; Amarnath Banerjee

    2008-02-01

    In the present work, a set of experimental polypropylene (PP) clay composites containing pristine bentonite clay of Indian origin has been prepared and then characterized. The polymer clay composites are processed by solution mixing of polypropylene with bentonite clay using a solvent xylene and high speed electric stirrer at a temperature around 130°C and then by compression molding at 170°C. The mechanical properties of PP–clay composites like tensile strength, hardness and impact resistance have been investigated. Microstructural studies were carried out using scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope and the thermal properties were studied using differential scanning calorimeter. Mechanical properties of the prepared composites showed highest reinforcing and toughening effects of the clay filler at a loading of only 5 mass % in PP matrix. Tensile strength was observed to be highest in case of 5 mass % of clay loading and it was more than 14% of that of the neat PP, while toughness increased by more than 80%. Bentonite clay–PP composite (5 mass %) also showed 60% increase in impact energy value. However, no significant change was observed in case of hardness and tensile modulus. Higher percentages of bentonite clay did not further improve the properties with respect to pristine polypropylene. The study of the microstructure of the prepared polymer layered silicate clay composites showed a mixed morphology with multiple stacks of clay layers and tactoids of different thicknesses.

  12. Response surface optimisation for activation of bentonite with microwave irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rožić Ljiljana S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the statistical design of the experimental method was applied on the acid activation process of bentonite with microwave irradiation. The influence of activation parameters (time, acid normality and microwave heating power on the selected process response of the activated bentonite samples was studied. The specific surface area was chosen for the process response, because the chemical, surface and structural properties of the activated clay determine and limit its potential applications. The relationship of various process parameters with the specific surface area of bentonite was examined. A mathematical model was developed using a second-order response surface model (RSM with a central composite design incorporating the above mentioned process parameters. The mathematical model developed helped in predicting the variation in specific surface area of activated bentonite with time (5-21 min, acid normality (2-7 N and microwave heating power (63-172 W. The calculated regression models were found to be statistically significant at the required range and presented little variability. Furthermore, high values of R2 (0.957 and R2 (adjusted (0.914 indicate a high dependence and correlation between the observed and the predicted values of the response. These high values also indicate that about 96% of the result of the total variation can be explained by this model. In addition, the model shows that increasing the time and acid normality improves the textural properties of bentonites, resulting in increased specific surface area. This model also can be useful for setting an optimum value of the activation parameters for achieving the maximum specific surface area. An optimum specific surface area of 142 m2g-1 was achieved with an acid normality of 5.2 N, activation time of 7.38 min and microwave power of 117 W. Acid activation of bentonite was found to occur faster with microwave irradiation than with conventional heating. Microwave

  13. Activation of a Ca-bentonite as buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Swelling behavior is an important criterion in achieving the low-permeability sealing function of buffer material. A potential buffer material may be used for radioactive waste repository in Taiwan is a locally available clayey material known as Zhisin clay, which has been identified as a Ca-bentonite. Due to its Ca-based origin, Zhisin was found to exhibit swelling capacity much lower than that of Na-bentonite. To enhance the swelling potential of Zhisin clay, a cation exchange process by addition of Na2CO3 powder was introduced in this paper. The addition of Na2CO3 reagent to Zhisin clay, in a liquid phase, caused the precipitation of CaCO3 and thereby induced a replacement of Ca2+ ions by Na+ ions on the surface of bentonite. Characterization test conducted on Zhisin clay includes chemical analysis, cation exchange capacity, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry (TG). Free-swelling test apparatus was developed according to International Society of Rock Mechanics recommendations. A series of free-swelling tests were conducted on untreated and activated specimens to characterize the effect of activation on the swelling capacity of Zhisin clay. Efforts were made to determine an optimum dosage for the activation, and to evaluate the aging effect. Also, the activated material was evaluated for its stability in various hydrothermal conditions for potential applications as buffer material in a repository. Experimental results show that Na2CO3-activated Zhisin clay is superior in swelling potential to untreated Zhisin clay. Also, there exists an optimum amount of activator in terms of improvements in the swelling capacity. A distinct time-swell relationship was discovered for activated Zhisin clay. The corresponding mechanism refers to exchange of cations and breakdown of quasi-crystal, which results in ion exchange hysteresis of Ca-bentonite. Due to the ion exchange hysteresis, activated bentonite shows a post

  14. Activation of a Ca-bentonite as buffer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hsing; Chen, Wen-Chuan

    2016-04-01

    Swelling behavior is an important criterion in achieving the low-permeability sealing function of buffer material. A potential buffer material may be used for radioactive waste repository in Taiwan is a locally available clayey material known as Zhisin clay, which has been identified as a Ca-bentonite. Due to its Ca-based origin, Zhisin was found to exhibit swelling capacity much lower than that of Na-bentonite. To enhance the swelling potential of Zhisin clay, a cation exchange process by addition of Na2CO3 powder was introduced in this paper. The addition of Na2CO3 reagent to Zhisin clay, in a liquid phase, caused the precipitation of CaCO3 and thereby induced a replacement of Ca2+ ions by Na+ ions on the surface of bentonite. Characterization test conducted on Zhisin clay includes chemical analysis, cation exchange capacity, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry (TG). Free-swelling test apparatus was developed according to International Society of Rock Mechanics recommendations. A series of free-swelling tests were conducted on untreated and activated specimens to characterize the effect of activation on the swelling capacity of Zhisin clay. Efforts were made to determine an optimum dosage for the activation, and to evaluate the aging effect. Also, the activated material was evaluated for its stability in various hydrothermal conditions for potential applications as buffer material in a repository. Experimental results show that Na2CO3-activated Zhisin clay is superior in swelling potential to untreated Zhisin clay. Also, there exists an optimum amount of activator in terms of improvements in the swelling capacity. A distinct time-swell relationship was discovered for activated Zhisin clay. The corresponding mechanism refers to exchange of cations and breakdown of quasi-crystal, which results in ion exchange hysteresis of Ca-bentonite. Due to the ion exchange hysteresis, activated bentonite shows a post-rise time-swell relationship different than the sigmoid

  15. Experimental Investigation of Near-Borehole Crack Plugging with Bentonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, R. A.; Islam, M. N.; Bunger, A.

    2015-12-01

    The success of the disposal of nuclear waste in a deep borehole (DBH) is determined by the integrity of the components of the borehole plug. Bentonite clay has been proposed as a key plugging material, and its effectiveness depends upon its penetration into near-borehole cracks associated with the drilling process. Here we present research aimed at understanding and maximizing the ability of clay materials to plug near-borehole cracks. A device was constructed such that the borehole is represented by a cylindrical chamber, and a near-borehole crack is represented by a slot adjacent to the center chamber. The experiments consist of placing bentonite clay pellets into the center chamber and filling the entire cavity with distilled water so that the pellets hydrate and swell, intruding into the slot because the cell prohibits swelling in the vertical direction along the borehole. Results indicate that the bentonite clay pellets do not fully plug the slot. We propose a model where the penetration is limited by (1) the free swelling potential intrinsic to the system comprised of the bentonite pellets and the hydrating fluid and (2) resisting shear force along the walls of the slot. Narrow slots have a smaller volume for the clay to fill than wider slots, but wider slots present less resistive force to clay intrusion. These two limiting factors work against each other, leading to a non-monotonic relationship between slot width and intrusion length. Further experimental results indicate that the free swelling potential of bentonite clay pellets depends on pellet diameter, "container" geometry, and solution salinity. Smaller diameter pellets possess more relative volumetric expansion than larger diameter pellets. The relative expansion of the clay also appears to decrease with the container size, which we understand to be due to the increased resistive force provided by the container walls. Increasing the salinity of the solution leads to a dramatic decrease in the clay

  16. Study of cesium and strontium adsorption on slovak bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite is a natural clay and one of the most promising candidates for use as a buffer material in the geological disposal systems for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. It is intended to isolate metal canisters with highly radioactive waste products from the surrounding rocks because of its ability to retard the movement of radionuclides by adsorption. Slovak Republic avails of many significant deposits of bentonite. Adsorption of Cs and Sr on five Slovak bentonite of deposits (Jelsovy potok, Kopernica, Lieskovec, Lastovce and Dolna Ves) and montmorillonite K10 (Sigma-Aldrich) has been studied with the using batch of radiometric techniques. Natural, irradiated and natrified samples, in three different kinds of grain size: 15, 45 and 250 μm have been used in the experiments. The adsorptions of Cs and Sr on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, pH after adsorption and effect of pH change, chemical modification, competitive ions and organic agents on the adsorption have been studied. The Kd have been determined for adsorbent-Cs/Sr solution system as a function of contact time and adsorbate and adsorbent concentration. The data have been interpreted in terms of Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption of Cs and Sr has increased with increasing metal concentrations. Adsorption of Cs and Sr has been suppressed by presence of organic agents; and of bivalent cations more than univalent cations. By adsorption on natrified samples colloidal particles and pH value increase have been formed. Adsorption experiments carried out show that the most suitable materials intended for use as barriers surrounding a canister of spent nuclear fuel are bentonite of the Jelsovy potok and Kopernica deposits. (author)

  17. Surfactant-modified bentonite clays: preparation, characterization, and atrazine removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirban; Singh, Neera

    2015-03-01

    Bentonite clay was modified using quaternary ammonium cations, viz. phenyltrimethylammonium (PTMA), hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA), trioctylmethylammonium (TOMA) [100 % of cation exchange capacity of clay], and stearylkonium (SK) [100 % (SK-I) and 250 % (SK-II) of cation exchange capacity of clay]. The organoclays were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Atrazine adsorption on modified clays was studied using a batch method. Bentonite clay was a poor adsorbent of atrazine as 9.4 % adsorption was observed at 1 μg mL(-1) atrazine concentration. Modification of clay by PTMA cation did not improve atrazine adsorption capacity. However, atrazine adsorption in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-bentonites varied between 49 and 72.4 % and data fitted well to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm (R > 0.96). Adsorption of atrazine in organoclays was nonlinear and slope (1/n) values were adsorption constants, K f(1/n) in HDTMA-, TOMA-, and SK-I-bentonites was 239.2, 302.4, and 256.6, respectively, while increasing the SK cation loading in the clay (SK-II) decreased atrazine adsorption [K f(1/n) - 196.4]. Desorption of atrazine from organoclays showed hysteresis and TOMA- and SK-I-bentonites were the best organoclays to retain the adsorbed atrazine. Organoclays showed better atrazine removal from wastewater than an aqueous solution. The synthesized organoclays may find application in soil and water decontamination and as a carrier for atrazine-controlled released formulations. PMID:25273519

  18. Coupled thermo-hydro-chemical models of swelling bentonites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, Javier; Mon, Alba; Zheng, Liange; Montenegro, Luis; Naves, Acacia; Pisani, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of radioactive waste in deep geological repositories is based on the multibarrier concept of retention of the waste by a combination of engineered and geological barriers. The engineered barrier system (EBS) includes the solid conditioned waste-form, the waste container, the buffer made of materials such as clay, grout or crushed rock that separate the waste package from the host rock and the tunnel linings and supports. The geological barrier supports the engineered system and provides stability over the long term during which time radioactive decay reduces the levels of radioactivity. The strong interplays among thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration, thermal and solute transport stages of the engineered barrier system (EBS) of a radioactive waste repository call for coupled THMC models for the metallic overpack, the unsaturated compacted bentonite and the concrete liner. Conceptual and numerical coupled THMC models of the EBS have been developed, which have been implemented in INVERSE-FADES-CORE. Chemical reactions are coupled to the hydrodynamic processes through chemical osmosis (C-H coupling) while bentonite swelling affects solute transport via changes in bentonite porosity changes (M-H coupling). Here we present THMC models of heating and hydration laboratory experiments performed by CIEMAT (Madrid, Spain) on compacted FEBEX bentonite and numerical models for the long-term evolution of the EBS for 1 Ma. The changes in porosity caused by swelling are more important than those produced by the chemical reactions during the early evolution of the EBS (t < 100 years). For longer times, however, the changes in porosity induced by the dissolution/precipitation reactions are more relevant due to: 1) The effect of iron mineral phases (corrosion products) released by the corrosion of the carbon steel canister; and 2) The hyper alkaline plume produced by the concrete liner. Numerical results show that

  19. Performance of a Centrifugal Slurry Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawas Yahya Bajawi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of speed, concentration and size of slurry on the performance of a centrifugal pump. For this purpose a facility was built where the performance of a centrifugal slurry pump was examined using aggregate slurry. Three sizes of slurry with three concentrations and at three impeller speeds were used for the performance investigations of a centrifugal slurry pump. As a reference performance the performance of centrifugal slurry pump was also tested with clean water. The performance of pump has been reported as variations of head, power and efficiency at various flow rates along with the system characteristics of the pump. The results reveal that the pump performance is grossly affected by the type of slurry, its concentration and size. Besides this the variation in speed also affects the performance as is observed in pumps with water. The maximum decrease in the head, with respect to clear water, at the operating point was found to be 47% for aggregate for size 20 mm, 15% concentration and 2600 rpm. The maximum decrement in efficiency at operating point for aggregate was found to be 47% for 4 mm size, 15% concentration and at 2200 rpm. The power increment requirement for aggregate was 9% for 4 mm size, 15% concentration and 2600 rpm.

  20. Acidification of animal slurry--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangueiro, David; Hjorth, Maibritt; Gioelli, Fabrizio

    2015-02-01

    Ammonia emissions are a major problem associated with animal slurry management, and solutions to overcome this problem are required worldwide by farmers and stakeholders. An obvious way to minimize ammonia emissions from slurry is to decrease slurry pH by addition of acids or other substances. This solution has been used commonly since 2010 in countries such as Denmark, and its efficiency with regard to the minimization of NH3 emissions has been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the impact of such treatment on other gaseous emissions during storage is not clear, since the studies performed so far have provided different scenarios. Similarly, the impact of the soil application of acidified slurry on plant production and diffuse pollution has been considered in several studies. Also, the impact of acidification upon combination with other slurry treatment technologies (e.g. mechanical separation, anaerobic digestion …) is important to consider. Here, a compilation and critical review of all these studies has been performed in order to fully understand the global impact of slurry acidification and assess the applicability of this treatment for slurry management. PMID:25463570

  1. Final report of the rock sealing project - Sealing of the near-field rock around deposition holes by use of bentonite grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Test 1 of the rock sealing project comprised determ ination of the hydraulic properties of the rock around large-diameter holes like canister deposition holes or TBM tunnels and attempts were made to seal the fractures intersecting such holes with bentonite slurry. The heater holes from the buffer mass test which are 76 cm in diameter, were used and injection made from inside the holes with a specially designed device using dynamic injection technique. The hydraulic properties of the surrounding rock were tested by use of the same device before and after the injections, as well as after a 3 months heat pulse. The results were interpreted by applying a special derived grout flow model and by analyzing the rock response through different calculation techniques, as well as by localizing the injected grout by rock excavation. The experiments showed that grouting of fractured rock by using the applied technique can give very significant sealing. (au)

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of Slurry Management Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik; Petersen, Bjørn Molt

    This report contains the results of Life Cycle Assessments of two slurry management technologies - acidification and decentred incineration. The LCA foundation can be used by the contributing companies for evaluating the environmental sustainability of a specific technology from a holistic Life...... Cycle perspective. Through this the companies can evaluate the environmental benefits and disadvantages of introducing a specific technology for slurry management. From a societal perspective the results can contribute to a clarification of which slurry management technologies (or combination...... of technologies) having the largest potential for reducing the overall environmental impacts....

  3. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of alkaline ion-exchanged ZnO/bentonite nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamideh Pouraboulghasem; Mohammad Ghorbanpour; Razieh Shayegh; Samaneh Lotfiman

    2016-01-01

    Nanocomposites of zinc/bentonite clay were synthesized for use as an antibacterial material by a quick and simple alkaline ion exchange method. The synthesis of zinc doped bentonite nanocomposite was accomplished by placing bentonite in a melting bath of ZnSO4 for 10, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min. The complexes were characterized by XRD, SEM and DRS. XRD analyses and SEM observations confirmed the diffusion of zinc to the clay surfaces. Antibacterial activity tests againstEscherichia coli showed that bentonite did not present any antibacterial properties, but after alkaline ion exchange treatment, inhibition was noted. The highest antibacterial activity was observed with ZnO/bentonite composite alkaline ion exchange for 60 and 90 min. Interestingly, the leaching test indicated that ZnO/bentonite did not present any risk for drinking water treatment.

  4. Sorption of wastewater containing reactive red X-3B on inorgano-organo pillared bentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Bentonite is a kind of natural clay with good exchanging ability. By exchanging its interlamellar cations with various soluble cations, such as quaternary ammonium cations and inorganic metal ions, the properties of natural bentonite can be greatly improved. In this study, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA), CaCl2, MgCl2, FeCl3, AlCl3 were used as organic and inorganic pillared materials respectively to produce several kinds of Ca-, Mg-, Fe-, Al-organo pillared bentonites. Sorption of reactive red X-3B on them was studied to determine their potential application as sorbents in wastewater treatment. The results showed that these pillared bentonites had much improved sorption properties, and that the dye solutions' pH value had some effect on the performance of these inorgano-organo pillared bentonites. Isotherms of reactive X-3B on these pillared bentonites suggested a Langmuir-type sorption mechanism.

  5. Progress of research on the influence of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on bentonite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the previous laboratory studies and numerical simulation on bentonite in alkaline environments, the effects of alkaline cation and alkaline solution on mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite are emphasized in this paper, temperature, pH values and concentration are discussed as main affecting factors. When bentonite is exposed to alkaline cation or alkaline solution, microstructure of bentonite will be changed due to the dissolution of montmorillonite and the formation of secondary minerals, which results in the decrease of swelling pressure. The amount of the reduction of swelling pressure depends on the concentration of alkaline solution. Temperature, polyvalent cation, salinity and concentration are the main factors affecting hydraulic properties of bentonite under alkaline conditions. Therefore, future research should focus on the mechanism of coupling effects of weak alkaline solutions on the mineral composition, microstructure, swelling capacity and hydraulic properties of bentonite under different temperatures and different pH values. (authors)

  6. Characteristics of thermally-enhanced bentonite grouts for geothermal heat exchanger in South Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chulho; LEE; Kangja; LEE; Hangseok; CHOI; Hyo-Pum; CHOI

    2010-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and viscosity of bentonite grouts have been evaluated and compared each other to determine the suitability of these materials for backfilling vertical boreholes of ground heat exchangers.Seven bentonite grouts from different product sources were considered in this paper.Two additives,silica sand and graphite were added in bentonite grouts to enhance thermal performance.The bentonite grouts indicate that both the thermal conductivity and the viscosity increase with the content of silica sand and graphite.Therefore,it is recommended to select cautiously the amount of silica sand and graphite considering not only thermal conductivity but also viscosity for the optimum condition of backfilling.Finally,the effect of salinity in the pore water on the change of swelling potential of the bentonite-based grouts has been quantitatively evaluated to show the feasibility of bentonite grouts in the coastal area.

  7. Bentonite-like material sealing to high-level radioactive wastes storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the most used materials for sealing of radioactive waste storage, bentonite shows a high number of advantages because of its plasticity, thermal and hydraulic conductivity, etc. The paper makes a review on different Spanish deposits of bentonite and their stability. Most of studies are focussed on the volcanic region at Cabo de Gata (Almeria). That area offers the most productive hydrothermal bentonite deposits in Spain

  8. Diffusion coefficient test of {sup 237}Np in bentonite backfill materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Anxi; Fan Zhiwen; Zhang Jinsheng; Gu Cunli [China Inst. for Radiation Protection, Shanxi (China); Mukai, M.; Maeda, T.; Matsumoto, J.; Tanaka, T.; Ogawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    This paper describes the work on diffusion coefficient test of Np in bentonite backfill materials. Due to its very low permeability, diffusion is the dominant migration mechanics in bentonite. The bentonite comes from Inner Mongolia of China. {sup 237}Np was used as tracer. The special apparatus for diffusion test was setup, the diffusion coefficient of Np in pure bentonite and sand-bentonite mixture were tested. The tracer was introduced between two bentonite columns. After a specific contacting period, the bentonite columns were taken out and cut to very thin slices. The radioactivity in bentonite slices was analyzed to give the nuclide concentration versus distance curves. The diffusion coefficient could be estimated. The diffusion coefficient of pure bentonite at different density was tested. When the density of pure bentonite samples varied from 1.1, 1.3, 1.5 to 1.7 g/ml, their diffusion coefficient were 1.36 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}/s 1.16 x 10{sup -13}m{sup 2}/s, 1.07 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}/s and 8.26 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s respectively. The diffusion coefficient of Np in sand-bentonite mixture sample was 4.13 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}/s. To estimate the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) value of Np in mixture sample by diffusion method, the diffusion coefficient of Br was measured./ The concluded K{sub d} value was 77ml/g for the sand-bentonite mixture. The K{sub d} value obtained by batch test methods was 30ml/g. The reason is related with the error of Br diffusion coefficient and solid-liquid ratio. (author)

  9. LABORATORY TESTING OF BENTONITE CLAYS FOR LANDFILL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Top and bottom liners are one of the key construction elements in every landfill. They are usually made as compacted clay liners (CCLs composed of several layers of compacted clay with strictly defined properties or by the use of alternative materials such as: GCL – geosynthetic clay liner, BES – bentonite enhanced soils or bentonite/polymer mixtures. Following the state of the art experiences in the world, GCLs are used in Croatian landfills for several years, as well. Depending upon the location and the obeying function, GCLs have to fulfill certain conditions. A legislated compatibility criterion has to be proven by various laboratory tests. In the paper are presented the results of direct shear and chemical compatibility tests of GCLs as well as the results of permeability measurement of kaolin clay (the paper is published in Croatian .

  10. Sorption of Lithium on Bentonite, Kaolin and Zeolite

    OpenAIRE

    Mandy Hoyer; Nicolai-Alexeji Kummer; Broder Merkel

    2015-01-01

    Li sorption was studied on natural bentonite, kaolin and zeolite in batch experiments at variable Li and Na concentrations (0, 1.5, 15, 150, 750 mM LiCl and 0.01, 0.1, 1, 3, 5 M NaCl). The solid-to-solution ratio was 1:4 and pH ranged from 2 to 10. Maximum Li sorption was determined at 0.01 M NaCl and 750 mM LiCl concentration in solution. It was 3800 ± 380 ppm, 1300 ± 130 ppm and 3900 ± 390 ppm on bentonite, kaolin and zeolite, respectively, which is in the average to upper range typical fo...

  11. Comparative study of bentonite properties with respect to the application as geotechnical barrier in HLRW repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In concepts for the storage of high level radioactive waste (HLRW) the application of bentonite as sealing material is envisaged. Relevant properties of bentonites are cation exchange capacity (retention of pollutants), swelling (sealing of cracks), and low hydraulic conductivity. These properties significantly vary with the type of counter ion which is dominant in the smectite (commonly montmorillonite) interlayers. However, the variability of bentonites - not depending on the type of counter ion - is frequently underestimated. Bentonites vary in the mineralogical and chemical composition, and the arrangement of all components (intergrowth and micro fabric). Additionally, the main component (smectite) varies with respect to the degree of structural order, particle size, crystallite size, chemical composition, morphology, and amount and location of negative charges. This variation, of course, strongly affects bentonite properties in almost all fields of industrial application. Measurable parameters only occasionally explain the different properties. The common approach, therefore, is to perform application tests. In this study an attempt is made to identify the variation of bentonite properties with respect to the application in HLRW repositories. The study is based on the comparative investigation of 30 different bentonites from important bentonite mining areas worldwide. The bentonites were characterized intensively by mineralogical, optical, and chemical methods: XRD, IR, SEM, CEC, XRF, granulometry, layer charge density. (authors)

  12. Diffusion and sorption properties of radionuclides in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, recent studies on sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in compacted bentonite have been reviewed. The sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient data obtained from experiments in the literature have been compiled. Based on these experimental data and the report SKB-TR--91-16 (Brandberg and Skagius, 1991), this report proposes a set of sorption distribution coefficient and diffusion coefficient values for modelling purpose for safety analysis of nuclear waste repositories. The variability and uncertainty of the diffusivity data span somewhat more than an order or magnitude up and down. Most of the nuclides have an effective diffusivity in around 10-10 m2/s. Ion exclusion effects are observed for C, Cl and for Tc in oxidizing waters. Effective diffusivities are nearly tow orders of magnitude lower for these elements and of the order of 10-12 m2/s. Surface diffusion effects are found for Cs, Ni, Pa, Pb, Ra, Sn, Sr and Zr. Effective diffusivities for these elements are of the order of 10-8 m2/s. The surface diffusion effect should decrease in saline waters which is seen for Cs and Sr where there are data available. It is also deemed that Ra will have this effect because of its similarity with Sr. The other nuclides should also show this decrease but no data is available. Sorption and diffusion mechanisms in compacted bentonite are discussed in the report. In highly compacted bentonite, sorption and hence its distribution coefficient is not well defined, and a pore diffusion coefficient or a surface diffusion coefficient is not well defined either. Therefore, an apparent diffusion coefficient and a total concentration gradient should be more relevant in describing the diffusion process in compacted bentonite

  13. Soil-Bentonite Cutoff Walls: Hydraulic Conductivity and Contaminant Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Britton, Jeremy Paul

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil-bentonite cutoff walls are commonly used to contain contaminants in the subsurface. A key property in determining the effectiveness of a cutoff wall is its hydraulic conductivity. There are important difficulties and uncertainties regarding the accuracy of commonly used methods of measuring the hydraulic conductivity of cutoff walls. When predicting contaminant transport through cutoff walls, common practice is to use the average hydraulic conductivity of the wall. ...

  14. Sorption of Lithium on Bentonite, Kaolin and Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Hoyer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Li sorption was studied on natural bentonite, kaolin and zeolite in batch experiments at variable Li and Na concentrations (0, 1.5, 15, 150, 750 mM LiCl and 0.01, 0.1, 1, 3, 5 M NaCl. The solid-to-solution ratio was 1:4 and pH ranged from 2 to 10. Maximum Li sorption was determined at 0.01 M NaCl and 750 mM LiCl concentration in solution. It was 3800 ± 380 ppm, 1300 ± 130 ppm and 3900 ± 390 ppm on bentonite, kaolin and zeolite, respectively, which is in the average to upper range typical for clay minerals. Under these conditions, kaolin was saturated with Li, whereas Li in bentonite and zeolite occupied only about 55%–79% and 9%–26% of the typical cation exchange capacity (CEC of smectites and zeolites, respectively. This is explained by differences in the way Li is bound in the materials studied. Li sorption on bentonite was independent of pH due to strong pH buffering. Above pH 5, kaolin was transformed to gibbsite, which completely changed its Li sorption capabilities. Extremely low as well as extremely high pH destabilized the crystal lattice of zeolite. All in all it was shown that, under the studied conditions, Li sorption on the studied materials occurs in detectable quantities. So, clay minerals and zeolites can act as a sink for Li if Li concentrations in solution are sufficiently high.

  15. Post examination of copper ER sensors exposed to bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Copper sensors were used for monitoring corrosion in bentonite during 4.2-y exposure. • Corrosion rates were estimated by applying three different methods. • Average corrosion rates for copper in bentonite are several µm/year. - Abstract: Copper corrosion in saline solutions under oxic conditions is one of concerns for the early periods of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories. The main aim of the study was to investigate the corrosion behaviour of copper during this oxic period. The corrosion rate of pure copper was measured by means of thin electrical resistance (ER) sensors that were placed in a test package containing an oxic bentonite/saline groundwater environment at room temperature for a period of four years. Additionally, the corrosion rate was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements that were performed on the same ER sensors. By the end of the exposure period the corrosion rate, as estimated by both methods, had dropped to approximately 1.0 μm/year. The corrosion rate was also estimated by the examination of metallographic cross sections. The post examination tests which were used to determine the type and extent of corrosion products included different spectroscopic techniques (XRD and Raman analysis). It was confirmed that the corrosion rate obtained by means of physical (ER) and electrochemical techniques (EIS) was consistent with that estimated from the metallographic cross section analysis. The corrosion products consisted of cuprous oxide and paratacamite, which was very abundant. From the types of attack it can be concluded that the investigated samples of copper in bentonite underwent uneven general corrosion

  16. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    OpenAIRE

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec; Davorin Matanović; Gracijan Krklec

    1994-01-01

    During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures) and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production...

  17. Diffusion of radionuclides in concrete/bentonite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a repository for nuclear waste, different construction materials will be used. Two important materials among these are concrete and bentonite clay. These will act as mechanical barriers, preventing convective water flow and also retard transport due to diffusion of dissolved radionuclides by a combination of mechanical constraints and chemical interactions with the solid. An important issue is the possible change of the initial sodium bentonite into the calcium form due to ion exchange with calcium from the cement. The initial leaching of the concrete has been studied using radioactive spiked concrete in contact with compacted bentonite. The diffusion of Cs, Am and Pu into 5 different types of concrete in contact with porewater have been measured. The measured diffusivity for Cs agrees reasonable well with data found in literature. For Am and Pu no movement could be measured (less than 0.2 mm) even though the contact times were extremely long (2.5 y and 5 y, respectively). This report gives also a summary of the previously published results about sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in cement performed in Prav/KBS/SKB projects 1980-1990. 25 refs

  18. Phenol determination on HDTMA-bentonite-based electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojovic, Z., E-mail: zoricam@nanosys.ihtm.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoseva 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Jovic-Jovicic, N.; Milutinovic-Nikolic, A.; Bankovic, P.; Rabi-Stankovic, A. Abu; Jovanovic, D. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoseva 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} HDTMA-modified bentonites were tested as electrode materials in the electro-oxidation of phenol. {yields} The influences of the surfactant loading and pH of the supporting electrolyte were investigated. {yields} Rapid deactivation of electrodes occurred in an acidic environment. {yields} Good stability of the investigated electrodes was obtained in alkaline medium. {yields} The sensitivity toward phenol and stability of the electrodes was markedly improved with increasing HDTMA loading. - Abstract: The partial and complete substitution of cations in the interlayer region of clay with different amounts of hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide (HDTMABr) was performed. The aim was to synthesize organo-bentonites to be used as constituents of porous electrodes for the electrooxidation of phenol. Domestic clay from Bogovina was subjected to a common procedure of the production of organo-bentonites. It included the following steps: grinding, sieving, Na-exchange, cation exchange and drying. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, while the textural properties were evaluated by nitrogen physisorption. The multisweep cyclic voltammetry was applied to analyze the behavior of the clay modified glassy carbon electrode. The influences of the surfactant loading and pH of the support electrolyte were investigated. Rapid deactivation of electrodes occurred in an acidic environment, while good stability of the investigated electrodes was obtained in alkaline medium.

  19. Purification of Sardinella sp., Oil: Centrifugation and Bentonite Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Suseno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugation and purification using adsorbents is one example of a fish oil refining techniques applied to reduce impurities of fish oil. The study aimed to determine the sardine oil quality before treatment, to determine yield of fish oil after centrifugation treatment and to determine the influence of centrifugation speed and bentonite concentration on sardine oil quality. Factorial design with two factors was used in this study. Level of free fatty acid and peroxide value before purification was 35.53% and 170 mEq/kg. Yield of fish oil after centrifugation treatment has been ranged from 17.42±3.56 to 76.33±0.21%. The best treatment which could reduce the peroxide value and total oxidation was a treatment with centrifugation speed at 6500 rpm and bentonite concentration at 3%. Peroxide value and total oxidation of its treatment was 25.00±0.00 and 51.43±0.01 mEq/kg. The lowest value of p-anisidine was 1.29±0.05 mEq/kg and its value could be found in a treatment with centrifugation speed at 4500 rpm and bentonite concentration at 5%. The level of free fatty acid after purification process was ranged from 27.35 to 34.69%. Oil clarity tended to increase with the increase of centrifugation speed and adsorbent concentration.

  20. Preparation and thermal properties of chitosan/bentonite composite beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofilović Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their biodegradable and nontoxic nature, biopolymer composites are often used as remarkable adsorbents in treatment of wastewater. In this study chitosan/bentonite composite beads were obtained by addition of clay into the polymer using solution process. Before the composite preparation, bentonite was modified with surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB. The morphology of beads was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Thermal properties of the composite beads were studied by simultaneous thermogravimetry coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (SDT and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. TG results showed that the complex decomposition mechanism of the composites depends on the preparation procedure. It was observed that the concentration of NaOH used for composites precipitation affects the final structure of beads. The influence of preparation procedure on the glass transition temperature Tg of chitosan/bentonite samples was not found (Tg values for all samples were about 144 °C. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45022 and ON172014 and Provincial Secretariat of Vojvodina for Science and Technological Development 114-451-2396/2011-01.

  1. Biofilm Formation of Pasteurella Multocida on Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandranpillai Rajagopal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Biofilms are structural communities of bacterial cells enshrined in a self produced polymeric matrix. The studies on biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida have become imperative since it is a respiratory pathogen and its biofilm mode could possibly be one of its virulence factors for survival inside a host. The present study describes a biofilm assay for P. multocida on inert hydrophilic material called bentonite clay.Materials and methods: The potential of the organism to form in vitro biofilm was assessed by growing the organism under nutrient restriction along with the inert substrate bentonite clay, which will provide a surface for attachment. For quantification of biofilm, plate count by the spread plate method was employed. Capsule production of the attached bacteria was demonstrated by light microscopic examination following Maneval staining and capsular polysaccharide estimation was done using standard procedures.Results and Conclusion: The biofilm formation peaked on the third day of incubation (1.54 ×106 cfu/g of bentonite clay while the planktonic cells were found to be at a maximum on day one post inoculation (8.10 ×108 cfu/ml of the broth. Maneval staining of late logarithmic phase biofilm cultures revealed large aggregates of bacterial cells, bacteria appearing as chains or as a meshwork. The capsular polysaccharide estimation of biofilm cells revealed a 3.25 times increase over the planktonic bacteria. The biofilm cells cultured on solid media also produced some exclusive colony morphotypes

  2. Thermophilic digestion of pig manure slurries at 48 deg. C; Termofil udraadning af svinegylle ved 48 grader C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, J.; Joergensen, P.; Hannibal, E.

    1995-06-01

    Thermophilic digestion of pig manure slurries can give problems because of its high nitrogen content that, together with high concentrations of ammonia content, can encumber the growth activities of the bacteria so that the production of methane will be stopped. A series of experiments were carried out on a biomass conversion plant located on a farm in order to address this problem. These are described and the resulting data are given. It was concluded that it is possible to solve the problem by operating at a temperature of 48 deg. C, a low thermophilic temperature. The production of methane was also increased under these conditions, to 0.53 cubic meters per kilogram organic dry matter. Methane production is also highly dependent on residence time in the reactor, which is recommended as being 16 days and nights. Bentonite can have a stabilizing effect on the ammonia-binding process. (AB)

  3. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufhold, Stephan, E-mail: s.kaufhold@bgr.de [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); Hassel, Achim Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz (Austria); Sanders, Daniel [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Dohrmann, Reiner [BGR, Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany); LBEG, Landesamt für Bergbau, Energie und Geologie, Stilleweg 2, D-30655 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-03-21

    Graphical abstract: Corrosion at the bentonite iron interface proceeds unaerobically with formation of an 1:1 Fe silicate mineral. A series of exposure tests with different types of bentonites showed that Na–bentonites are slightly less corrosive than Ca–bentonites and highly charges smectites are less corrosive compared to low charged ones. The formation of a patina was observed in some cases and has to be investigated further. - Highlights: • At the iron bentonite interface a 1:1 Fe layer silicate forms upon corrosion. • A series of iron–bentonite corrosion products showed slightly less corrosion for Na-rich and high-charged bentonites. • In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe–silicate, which has to be investigated further. - Abstract: Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na–bentonites compared to the Ca–bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe

  4. Studies of coal slurries property; Slurry no seijo ni kansuru kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabata, M.; Aihara, Y.; Imada, K. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nogami, Y.; Inokuchi, K. [Mitsui SRC Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Sakaki, T.; Shibata, M.; Hirosue, H. [Kyushu National Industrial Research Institute, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It was previously found that the increase of slurry temperature provides a significant effect of slurry viscosity reduction for the coal slurry with high concentration of 50 wt%. To investigate the detailed influence of slurry temperature for the coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt%, influence of temperature on the successive change of apparent viscosity was observed at the constant shear rate. When the concentration of coal was increased from 45 wt% to 50 wt%, viscosity of the slurry was rapidly increased. When heated above 70{degree}C, the apparent viscosity decreased during heating to the given temperature, but it increased successively after reaching to the given temperature. The apparent viscosity showed higher value than that of the initial viscosity. The coal slurry with concentration of 50 wt% showed the fluidity of Newtonian fluid at the lower shear rate region, but showed the fluidity of pseudo-plastic fluid at the higher shear rate region. The slurry having high apparent viscosity by the successive change showed higher apparent viscosity with increasing the higher even by changing the shear rate. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  5. Optical measurement of slurry concentration profile in a concurrent-flow gas-slurry column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical technique is described which allows the measurement of steady-state slurry concentration profile in a slender concurrent-flow gas-slurry bubble column. The optically measured profile is compared with that predicted by a previously reported semiempirical dispersion model. Qualitative agreement is observed between them, and the reliability of the technique is supported by additional experimental data

  6. Silurian bentonites in Lithuania: correlations based on sanidine phenocryst composition and graptolite biozonation – interpretation of volcanic source regions

    OpenAIRE

    Tarmo Kiipli; Sigitas Radzevičius; Toivo Kallaste

    2014-01-01

    Integrated correlation of bentonites (altered volcanic ashes) and graptolite biozonation is presented. Detailed study of two Lithuanian drill core sections extended previous knowledge of the occurrence and composition of bentonites to the south. Identification of graptolite species allowed bentonites to be assigned their proper stratigraphical position. Silurian bentonites in Lithuania are mostly characterized by wide and very wide XRD 201 reflections of the main component of sanidine phenocr...

  7. Thermal treatment of bentonite reduces aflatoxin b1 adsorption and affects stem cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nones, Janaína; Nones, Jader; Riella, Humberto Gracher; Poli, Anicleto; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves; Kuhnen, Nivaldo Cabral

    2015-10-01

    Bentonites are clays that highly adsorb aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and, therefore, protect human and animal cells from damage. We have recently demonstrated that bentonite protects the neural crest (NC) stem cells from the toxicity of AFB1. Its protective effects are due to the physico-chemical properties and chemical composition altered by heat treatment. The aim of this study is to prepare and characterize the natural and thermal treatments (125 to 1000 °C) of bentonite from Criciúma, Santa Catarina, Brazil and to investigate their effects in the AFB1 adsorption and in NC cell viability after challenging with AFB1. The displacement of water and mineralogical phases transformations were observed after the thermal treatments. Kaolinite disappeared at 500 °C and muscovite and montmorillonite at 1000 °C. Slight changes in morphology, chemical composition, and density of bentonite were observed. The adsorptive capacity of the bentonite particles progressively reduced with the increase in temperature. The observed alterations in the structure of bentonite suggest that the heat treatments influence its interlayer distance and also its adsorptive capacity. Therefore, bentonite, even after the thermal treatment (125 to 1000 °C), is able to increase the viability of NC stem cells previously treated with AFB1. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of bentonite in preventing the toxic effects of AFB1.

  8. Facile synthesis of carbon nanotube/natural bentonite composites as a stable catalyst for styrene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Ali; Zhang, Jian; Mizera, Jan; Girgsdies, Frank; Wang, Ning; Hamid, Sharifah Bee Abd; Schlögl, Robert; Su, Dang Sheng

    2008-12-28

    Natural bentonite mineral, without any wet chemical treatment, was used directly to catalyze the growth of multi-wall CNTs and the produced CNTs/bentonite as an integrated composite stably catalyzed the oxidative dehydrogenation reaction over a long period of time; this concept provides a highly economical way for large-scale synthesis of nanocarbons and manufacture of styrene synthesis catalysts. PMID:19057768

  9. Literature study on the microstructure of bentonite and its effect on diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the study the available information from the literature on the microstructural properties of bentonite and its main component montmorillonite have been compiled, together with different phenomena which have been found to participate in the diffusion process in bentonite. (167 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.)

  10. Geochemical modelling of hydrogen gas migration in an unsaturated bentonite buffer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Thomas, H.R.; Al Masum, S.; Vardon, P.J.; Nicholson, D.; Chen, Q.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the transport and fate of hydrogen gas through compacted bentonite buffer. Various geochemical reactions that may occur in the multiphase and multicomponent system of the unsaturated bentonite buffer are considered. A reactive gas transport model, developed wi

  11. Physico-chemical characterization of bentonite and its application for Mn2+ removal from water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranđelović Marjan S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite is mainly composed of clay minerals from smectite group, therefore it has a well developed and chemically active surface area and high cation exchange capacity. Moreover, an interlayer space of smectite has unusual hydration properties, which manifest as swelling of bentonite in water. These properties make bentonite as a commonly used raw material in chemistry and industry, and it is very important in environmental protection and water treatment as an effective sorbent of heavy metals. The results of X-ray diffraction, a cationic exchange capacity, specific surface area, acid-base properties of the surface and the swelling index showed that the bentonite sample contains mostly montmorillonite. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of bentonite in the removal of Mn2+ from aqueous systems. The experimental results of Mn2+ adsorption on the bentonite were interpreted by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherms. The adsorption isotherm studies indicate that the adsorption of Mn2+ follows Langmuir isotherm very well. Theoretical monolayer saturation capacity according to Langmuir model was 12.41 mg/g. The removal of Mn2+ is achieved by ion exchange mechanism with naturally occurring cations in bentonite, as well as by forming the inner- and outer-sphere complexes with bentonite surface.

  12. Freezing of bentonite. Experimental studies and theoretical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    During its lifetime, a KBS-3 repository will be subject to various ambient temperatures. Backfilled tunnels, shafts and investigation bore holes closest to ground level will experience periods of temperature below 0 deg C. From a safety assessment perspective, it is therefore essential to understand the behavior of compacted bentonite below 0 deg C. A theoretical framework for predicting the pressure response in compacted water saturated bentonite due to temperature changes has been developed based on thermodynamics and a single pore-type. This model predicts an approximately linear temperature dependence of swelling pressure P{sub s}(w,DELTAT) = P{sub s}(w,0 deg C) + DELTAs(w)DELTAT/nu{sub clay}(w) where DELTAT denotes a temperature difference from 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) is the difference in partial molar entropy between clay water and bulk water, nu{sub clay} (w) is the partial molar volume of the clay water and w denotes the water/solid mass ratio of the clay. As bulk water changes phase at 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) has a different value dependent on whether DELTAT is negative or positive. Above 0 deg C DELTAs(w) is a small value for all relevant densities which means that the pressure response due to temperature changes is small. A further consequence of this fact is that DELTAs(w) is a large positive number below 0 deg C when the external water phase is transformed to ice. Consequently, the model predicts a large drop of swelling pressure with temperature below 0 deg C, in the order of 1.2 MPa/deg C. Specifically, the swelling pressure is zero at a certain (negative) temperature T{sub C}. T{sub C} also quantifies the freezing point of the bentonite sample under consideration, as ice formation in the bentonite does not occur until swelling pressure is lost. A large set of laboratory tests have been performed where fully water saturated samples of bentonites have been exposed to temperatures in the range -10 deg C to +25 deg C. The swelling pressure response has been

  13. Wyoming bentonites. Evidence from the geological record to evaluate the suitability of bentonite as a buffer material during the long-term underground containment of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smellie, J. [Conterra AB (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    In the Swedish programme for the deep, geological disposal of radioactive wastes, bentonite is planned to be used as a barrier material to reduce groundwater flow and minimise radionuclide migration into the geosphere. One of the possible threats to long-term bentonite stability is the gradual incursion of saline water into the repository confines which may reduce the swelling capacity of the bentonite, even to the extent of eliminating the positive effects of mixing bentonite into backfill materials. Important information may be obtained from the study of analogous processes in nature (i.e. natural analogue or natural system studies) where bentonite, during its formation, has been in long-term contact with reducing waters of brackish to saline character. Type bentonites include those mined from the Clay Spur bed at the top of the Cretaceous Mowry Formation in NE Wyoming and demarcated for potential use as a barrier material (e.g. MX-80 sodium bentonite) in the Swedish radioactive waste programme. This bentonite forms part of the Mowry Shale which was deposited in a southern embayment of the late Albian Western Interior Cretaceous sea (Mowry Sea). The question is whether these bentonite deposits show evidence of post-deposition alteration caused by the sea water in which they were deposited, and/or, have they been altered subsequently by contact with waters of increasing salinity? Bentonites are the product of pyroclastic fall deposits thought to be generated by the type of explosive, subaerial volcanic activity characteristic of Plinian eruptive systems. In Wyoming the overall composition of the original ash varied from dacite to rhyolite, or latite to trachyte. The ash clouds were carried to high altitudes and eastwards by the prevailing westerly winds before falling over the shallow Mowry Sea and forming thin but widespread and continuous horizons on sea floor muds and sands. Whilst bentonites were principally wind-transported, there is evidence of some water

  14. KAJIAN ADSORPSI HORMON PENGATUR TUMBUH ASAM GIBERELIN DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN BENTONIT ALAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ula Nurul Fadlilah

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Telah dilakukan adsorpsi asam giberelin dengan menggunakan bentonit alam hasil purifikasi. Proses purifikasi dilakukan dengan menggunakan larutan H2O2. Bentonit alam hasil purifikasi dikarakterisasi dengan Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR dan X-Ray difraction (XRD. Jumlah asam giberelin yang teradsorpsi diukur dengan menggunakan spektrofotometer UV-vis. Proses adsorpsi dilakukan dengan sistem batch dan variasi pH larutan asam giberelin, variasi waktu adsorpsi, variasi kadar bentonit alam serta variasi konsentrasi asam giberelindilakukan untuk mengetahui kapasitas adsorpsi GA3. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa bentonit alam dapat mengadsorpsi asam giberelin pada pH larutan asam giberelin optimum pada pH 3, waktu optimum adsorpsi pada 2 jam, kadar bentonit alam pada 1,5 gram dan konsentrasi optimum asam giberelin pada 70 ppm. Model isoterm adsorpsi GA3 mengikuti model isoterm Freundlich.

  15. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrosion behaviors of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium were studied. Corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was measured to be 20 μm/yr at 25 deg C using the AC impedance technique. This value is agreed with that obtained by weight loss at 40 deg C for 1 year. The effect of bicarbonate ion on the corrosion of carbon steel in wet bentonite was also evaluated. The carbon steels in wet bentonite having 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 M concentration of bicarbonate ion gave corrosion rates of 20, 8, and 0.2 μm/yr, respectively. Corrosion potentials of specimens were also measured and compared with the AC impedance results. Both results indicated that bicarbonate ion could effectively reduce the corrosion rate of carbon steels in bentonite due to the formation of protective layer on the carbon steel. (author)

  16. Cytotoxicity and mechanical behavior of chitin-bentonite clay based polyurethane bio-nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Khalid Mahmood; Zuber, Mohammad; Barikani, Mehdi; Hussain, Rizwan; Jamil, Tahir; Anjum, Sohail

    2011-12-01

    Chitin based polyurethane bio-nanocomposites (PUBNC) were prepared using chitin, Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay enriched in montmorillonite (MMT), 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and polycaprolactone polyol CAPA 231 (3000 g/mol(-1)). The prepolymers having different concentration of Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay were extended with 2 moles of chitin. The structures of the resulted polymers were determined by FT-IR technique. The effect of nanoclay contents on mechanical properties and in vitro biocompatibility was investigated. The mechanical properties of the synthesized materials were improved with increase in the Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay contents. Optimum mechanical properties were obtained from the PU bio-nanocomposite samples having 4% Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay. The results revealed that the final PU bio-nanocomposite having 2% Delite HPS bentonite nanoclay contents is ideal contenders for surgical threads with on going investigations into their in vitro biocompatibility, non-toxicity, and mechanical properties. PMID:21945787

  17. Erosion of bentonite by flow and colloid diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Bentonite intrusion into a fracture intersecting the canister deposition hole is modelled. The model describes the expansion of the bentonite within the fracture. It accounts for the repulsive electrostatic double-layer forces, the attractive van der Waals forces and friction forces between the particles and the water. The model also takes into account the diffusion of the colloid particles in the smectite sol. The buffer contains sodium in the pore water in much higher concentrations than the approaching seeping groundwater in the fracture has. Diffusion of sodium outward in the expanding gel is accounted for as this strongly influences the double layer force and the viscosity of the gel/sol. The gel/ sol is considered to be a fluid with a varying viscosity that is strongly dependent on the bentonite volume fraction in the gel and the sodium concentration in the water. Two different geometries were modelled; a rectangular and a cylindrical showing the flow in a fracture intersecting the deposition hole with the canister. The rectangular geometry was used to gain experience with the processes and mechanisms and how they interact since the cylindrical geometry was somewhat less stable numerically and more time consuming. In the rectangular geometry a fracture 1 metre long in the flow direction was modelled. In both geometries the fracture depth (extent from the deposition hole) was selected sufficiently large to ensure that the water velocity, near this border was nearly the same as the approaching water velocity and that the smectite concentration there was vanishingly small. It was found that the velocity of the fluid drops considerably where the bentonite volume fraction is larger than 1-2%. This is due to the strong increase in viscosity with increasing bentonite volume fraction. The loss of smectite as it is carried away by the slowly flowing fluid was found to be proportional to the square root of the seeping

  18. Coupled THMC models for bentonite in clay repository for nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Li, Y.; Anguiano, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Illitization, the transformation of smectite to illite, could compromise some beneficiary features of an engineered barrier system (EBS) that is composed primarily of bentonite and clay host rock. It is a major determining factor to establish the maximum design temperature of the repositories because it is believed that illitization could be greatly enhanced at temperatures higher than 100 oC and thus significantly lower the sorption and swelling capacity of bentonite and clay rock. However, existing experimental and modeling studies on the occurrence of illitization and related performance impacts are not conclusive, in part because the relevant couplings between the thermal, hydrological, chemical, and mechanical (THMC) processes have not been fully represented in the models. Here we present fully coupled THMC simulations of a generic nuclear waste repository in a clay formation with bentonite-backfilled EBS. Two scenarios were simulated for comparison: a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister can reach about 200 oC and a case in which the temperature in the bentonite near the waste canister peaks at about 100 oC. The model simulations demonstrate that illitization is in general more significant at higher temperatures. We also compared the chemical changes and the resulting swelling stress change for two types of bentonite: Kunigel-VI and FEBEX bentonite. Higher temperatures also lead to much higher stress in the near field, caused by thermal pressurization and vapor pressure buildup in the EBS bentonite and clay host rock. Chemical changes lead to a reduction in swelling stress, which is more pronounced for Kunigel-VI bentonite than for FEBEX bentonite.

  19. Influence of dry density on HTO diffusion in GMZ bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the low permeability and high swelling property, Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite is regarded as the favorable candidate backfilling material for a potential repository. The diffusion behaviors of HTO in GMZ bentonite were studied to obtain effective diffusion coefficient (De) and accessible porosity (ε) by through- and out-diffusion experiments. A computer code named Fitting for diffusion coefficient (FDP) was used for the experimental data processing and theoretical modeling. The De and ε values were (5.2-11.2) x 10-11 m2/s and 0.35-0.50 at dry density from 1,800 to 2,000 kg/m3, respectively. The De values at 1,800 kg/m3 was a little higher than that of at 2,000 kg/m3, whereas the D e value at 1,600 kg/m3 was significantly higher (approximately twice) than that of at 1,800 and 2,000 kg/m3. It may be explained that the diffusion of HTO mainly occurred in the interlayer space for the highly compacted clay (dry density exceeding 1,300 kg/m3). 1,800 and 2,000 kg/m3 probably had similar interlayer space, whereas 1,600 kg/m3 had more. Both De and ε values decreased with increasing dry density. For compacted bentonite, the relationship of De and ε could be described by Archie's law with exponent n = 4.5 ± 1.0. (author)

  20. Interactions between copper corrosion products and MX-80 bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents results from a study of the possible interaction between copper corrosion products and MX-80 bentonite under conditions that might occur in a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Finland. The first part of the report describes the results from a literature survey, the objective of which was to identify some relevant corrosion products that might form when copper corrodes in wet MX-80 bentonite. On the basis of the literature survey, atacamite and a green copper corrosion product produced in-house were used for experimental studies. Experiments were performed with both soft and compacted MX-80. The soft samples consisted of water-saturated MX-80 mixed with CuCl2 solutions of various concentrations. The samples were kept under anaerobic conditions at ambient room temperature or at 75 deg C for 330 days. Porewater samples were then squeezed from the samples and analysed. Compacted MX-80 samples were stored under anaerobic conditions and kept in contact with an NaCl solution. The samples were kept at room temperature and 75 deg C for 2.9 years and then analysed. The presence of either atacamite or the green copper corrosion product on the plates did not have any notable effects on the porewater chemistry. However, the Cu concentration profiles indicated that the corrosion products did dissolve, and then diffused into the surrounding bentonite. Concentration profiles were found to be roughly the same, irrespective of whether the samples had been stored at room temperature or at 75 deg C. (orig.)

  1. Rocketdyne's advanced coal slurry pumping program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. E.; Wong, G. S.; Gilman, H. H.

    1977-01-01

    The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation is conducting a program for the engineering, fabrication, and testing of an experimental/prototype high-capacity, high-pressure centrifugal slurry feed pump for coal liquefaction purposes. The abrasion problems in a centrifugal slurry pump are primarily due to the manner in which the hard, solid particles contained in the slurry are transported through the hydraulic flow passages within the pump. The abrasive particles can create scraping, grinding, cutting, and sandblasting effects on the various exposed parts of the pump. These critical areas involving abrasion and impact erosion wear problems in a centrifugal pump are being addressed by Rocketdyne. The mechanisms of abrasion and erosion are being studied through hydrodynamic analysis, materials evaluation, and advanced design concepts.

  2. ADSORPTION STUDY OF RHODAMIN B DYE ON IRAQI BENTONITE AND MODIFIED BENTONITE BY NANOCOMPOUNDS TIO2, ZNO, AL2O3 AND SODIUM DODECYL SULFATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Salman AL-Jobouri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of Rhodamin B on Iraqi bentonite at the concentration range from 50 to 250 μg mL-1 was studied, Nano compounds; ZnO, TiO2, Al2O3 m and SDS in different amounts 0.01-0.1 g 10-1 g of Bentonite were used to modified the adsorption capacity of bentonite to remove the Rhodamin B from aqueous solutions. The study indicated that using 0.05 g and 0.1 of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS lead to increase the percentage removal (%R from 79.3% for pure bentonite to 99.3%. While using 0.05 g TiO2 lead to increase the %R to 98.9%, 0.05 of ZnO to 98.6%. The other amount additives and Al2O3 using was not success to increase the %R for the Rhodamin B on bentonite surface. SEM measurement was achieved to discover the Nanoparticl exists in the bentonite surfaces.

  3. Sunflower oil bleaching by adsorption onto acid-activated bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Foletto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Two bentonite clays with different mineralogical compositions from Mendoza, Argentine, were activated with H2SO4 solutions of 4 and 8 N at 90ºC for 3.5 hours. This treatment affected clay structural properties, as was shown by thermogravimetry, infrared spectrometry and chemical analysis. Bleaching efficiency for sunflower oil was strongly dependent on the acid concentration used for clay activation. The samples have bleaching capacity comparable to that observed with a commercial adsorbent standard. The mineralogical composition of natural clays influenced the properties of the activated clays.

  4. Swelling characteristics of immersed sand-bentonite mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丰土根; 崔红斌; 孙德安; 杜冰

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory one-dimensional consolidation apparatus was employed to research the swelling stress and volume of the sand-bentonite mixture under immersed conditions. The stress-strain characteristics of mixtures under varied mixing ratios and loading statuses were analyzed. Based on the results of tests, the mechanism of mixture swelling and collapsing was further discussed. The results show that mixtures with low sand ratios are suitable as hydraulic barrier or containment barriers of general landfills, geological repository and other hydraulic infrastructure works.

  5. Microbial communities in bentonite formations and their interactions with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Microbial diversity of Spanish bentonites was studied. • High number of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbes were isolated from bentonites. • Natural bentonite microbes are able to tolerate high U concentrations. • U is immobilized by the cells of the strain Rhodotorula mucilaginosa BII-R8 as U(VI) phosphates. - Abstract: A reliable performance assessment of deep geological disposal of nuclear waste depends on better knowledge of radionuclide interactions with natural microbes of geological formations (granitic rock, clay, salts) used to host these disposal systems. In Spain, clay deposits from Cabo de Gata region, Almeria, are investigated for this purpose. The present work characterizes the culture-dependent microbial diversity of two bentonite samples (BI and BII) recovered from Spanish clay deposits. The evaluation of aerobe and facultative anaerobe microbial populations shows the presence of a high number of cultivable bacteria (e.g. Stenotrophomonas, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Sphingomonas, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, etc.) affiliated to three phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. In addition, a pigmented yeast strain BII-R8 related to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa was also recovered from these formations. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of uranium for the growth of these natural isolates were found to range from 4 to 10.0 mM. For instance, strain R. mucilaginosa BII-R8 was shown to tolerate up to 8 mM of U. Flow cytometry studies indicated that the high U tolerance of this yeast isolate is a biologically mediated process. Microscopically dense intracellular and cell wall-bound precipitates were observed by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy-High-Angle Annular Dark-Field (STEM-HAADF). Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) element-distribution maps showed the presence of U and P within these accumulates, indicating the ability of cells to precipitate U as U(VI) phosphate minerals. Fundamental understanding of the

  6. Observations on microbial activity in acidified pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard; Nielsen, Daniel Aagren;

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of pig slurry to pH 5.5 is used as a measure to reduce ammonia emission from pits and storages. The slurry is acidified with sulphuric acid in a process tank and pumped back to the slurry pits or to a storage tank. We investigated the effect of acidification on microbial activity...

  7. Emissions of ammonia, nitrous oxide and methane from cattle slurry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, O.; Velthof, G.L.; Bussink, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements were made of N2O and CH4 production during a 6 month storage (15 degrees C) period from either unamended cattle slurry or slurry unamended with HNO3 to pH 4.5 or pH 6. After storage the slurry was surface applied to grassland soil, under

  8. Biovailability of copper and zinc in pig and cattle slurries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakubus, M.; Dach, J.; Starmans, D.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Slurry is an important source of macronutrients, micro-nutrients and organic matter. Despite the considerable fertilizer value of slurry, it may be abundant in amounts of copper and zinc originating from dietary. The study presents quantitative changes in copper and zinc in individual slurries (pig

  9. SEPARATING LIQUID MODERATOR FROM A SLURRY TYPE REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, H.C.

    1961-07-01

    A system for evaporating moderator such as D/sub 2/O from an irradiated slurry or sloution characterized by two successive evaproators is described. In the first of these the most troublesome radioactivity dissipates before the slurry becomes too thick to be pumped out; in the second the slurry, now easier to handle, can be safely reduced to a sludge.

  10. Development of a phenomenological model for coal slurry atomization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooher, J.P. [Adelphi Univ., Garden City, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Highly concentrated suspensions of coal particles in water or alternate fluids appear to have a wide range of applications for energy production. For enhanced implementation of coal slurry fuel technology, an understanding of coal slurry atomization as a function coal and slurry properties for specific mechanical configurations of nozzle atomizers should be developed.

  11. Adsorption behaviour of bivalent ions onto Febex bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Dpt. de Impacto Ambiental de la Energia Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    The sorption and transport properties of radionuclides in the near and far field barriers of a deep geological radioactive waste repository are amongst the principal aspects to be evaluated for the performance assessment (PA) of such a kind of disposal. The study of the clayey materials is crucial because the backfill material is constituted by compacted clay in most countries design; in addition, argillaceous formations are particularly suitable as host rock formations. It is widely recognised that, to acquire predictive modelling capability, a theoretical effort is needed for a mechanistic understanding of sorption processes, as they greatly influence the transport of radionuclides in clay porous structures. In this work, an exhaustive experimental study of the Co(II), Sr (II) and Ca(II) sorption behaviour on a Spanish bentonite was carried out. The clay used for these experiments is the FEBEX bentonite, which is basically formed by smectite (93 {+-} 2%) with small percentages of quartz (2 {+-} 1 %), plagioclase (3 {+-} 1 %), cristobalite (2 {+-} 1 %) and traces of minerals such as K-feldspar and calcite. (authors)

  12. Electrophysical characteristics of polyurethane/organo-bentonite nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification of the Egyptian Bentonite (EB) was carried out using organo-modifier namely; octadecylamine ODA. Before the modification, the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the EB was measured, also it was purified from different impurities using HCl and distilled water. The Organo-bentonite OB was characterized using IR, XRD, and TEM. PU/ODA-B nano composites were prepared by in situ polymerization then characterized by XRD and TEM. An amount of ODA-B ranging from 0.25% up to 5% by weight was added to the polyol component of the resin before mixing with toluene diisocynate TDI. TEM showed that the nano composites achieved good dispersion in the polyurethane matrix. The mechanical, swelling and electrical properties of the nano composites were measured. The results indicate that the tensile strength of all the nano composites enhanced with the addition of OB compared with the pure PU. The crosslink density of the nano composites increases with increasing the content of OB. The Pool-Frenckel conduction mechanism predominates for all the nano composite samples and the blank one

  13. Potassium sorbate as an inhibitor in copper chemical mechanical planarization slurry. Part I. Elucidating slurry chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Magi; Starosvetsky, David [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Vaes, Jan [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Ein-Eli, Yair, E-mail: eineli@tx.technion.ac.i [Department of Materials Engineering, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-04-01

    The integration of an advanced inhibitor, potassium sorbate (K[CH{sub 3}(CH){sub 4}CO{sub 2}]), in a copper CMP slurry based on hydrogen peroxide and glycine is reported. The first part of the study discusses the slurry chemistry by qualitatively describing the processes involved and proposes a mechanism for a hydrogen peroxide-glycine based slurry having sorbate anion as an inhibitor. For this purpose, the specific role of each chemical constituent in the slurry was elucidated at a fundamental level by electrochemical studies, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements, all linked to the CMP performance on blanket wafers. Once the polishing mechanism was resolved the influence of the inhibitor was evaluated by CMP processing of patterned wafers.

  14. Mechanisms of advanced oxidation processing on bentonite consumption reduction in foundry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Komarneni, Sridhar; Voigt, Robert C; Furness, J C

    2005-10-01

    Prior full-scale foundry data have shown that when an advanced oxidation (AO) process is employed in a green sand system, the foundry needs 20-35% less makeup bentonite clay than when AO is not employed. We herein sought to explore the mechanism of this enhancement and found that AO water displaced the carbon coating of pyrolyzed carbonaceous condensates that otherwise accumulated on the bentonite surface. This was discerned by surface elemental analysis. This AO treatment restored the clay's capacity to adsorb methylene blue (as a measure of its surface charge) and water vapor (as a reflection of its hydrophilic character). In full-scale foundries, these parameters have been tied to improved green compressive strength and mold performance. When baghouse dust from a full-scale foundry received ultrasonic treatment in the lab, 25-30% of the dust classified into the clay-size fraction, whereas only 7% classified this way without ultrasonics. Also, the ultrasonication caused a size reduction of the bentonite due to the delamination of bentonite particles. The average bentonite particle diameter decreased from 4.6 to 3 microm, while the light-scattering surface area increased over 50% after 20 min ultrasonication. This would greatly improve the bonding efficiency of the bentonite according to the classical clay bonding mechanism. As a combined result of these mechanisms, the reduced bentonite consumption in full-scale foundries could be accounted for. PMID:16245849

  15. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical conditions of TRU waste repository were estimated as alkaline conditions effected by cementitious materials. And, some TRU wastes include soluble nitrate salt, we have to consider the repository conditions might be high ionic strength condition leaching of nitrate salt. In this study, experimental studies were carried out to evaluate hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. The followings results were obtained for bentonite. 1) In the immersion experiments of bentonite in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, the disappearance of montmorillonite of bentonite was observed and CSH formation was found after 30 days. In hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate, minerals at θ=37 nm by XRD was identified. 2) Significant effects of hyper alkaline on hydraulic conductivity of compacted bentonite were not observed. However, hydraulic conductivities of hyper alkaline fluid with nitrate and ion exchanged bentonite increased. In hyper alkaline with nitrate, more higher hydraulic conductivities of exchanged bentonite were measured. The followings results were obtained for rock. 1) In the immersion experiments of crushed tuff in hyper alkaline fluids with and without nitrate, CSH and CASH phases were observed. 2) The hydraulic conductivity of tuff in hyper alkaline fluids decreased gradually. Finally, hyper alkaline flow in tuff stopped after 2 months and hyper alkaline flow with nitrate stopped shorter than without nitrate. In the results of analysis of tuff after experiment, we could identified secondary minerals, but we couldn't find the clogging evidence of pores in tuff by secondary minerals. (author)

  16. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  17. Settlement of tailings slurries by creep compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.D.; Chalaturnyk, R.J.; Jeeravipoolvarn, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Large volumes of sand, silt, clay and small amounts of bitumen are produced from the oil sand mining operations in northern Alberta. A model is being developed to predict the consolidation behaviour of highly thixotrophic tailings slurries. The model incorporates effective stress-void ratio and void ratio-hydraulic conductivity relationships for the material. The thixotrophic strength-time relationship and the void ratio-creep rate relationship is also considered along with the mineralogy, bitumen content and water chemistry. Most analytical predictions of the rate and magnitude tailings settling overestimate how fast pore pressures will dissipate. Field deposits of non-segregating tailings to mature fine tailings demonstrate continued high pore pressures near the surface which deter surface reclamation. A finite strain theory is used in geotechnical analyses which predict the consolidation behavior of soft soils. However, this theory does not predict the full range of sedimentation, consolidation and pore pressure dissipation which occurs in thixotrophic tailings slurries. This new strain consolidation model assumes that the creep rate of the slurry exceeds the pore pressure dissipation rate. The model is useful for rapidly deposited, low permeability thixotrophic slurries where the upwards drainage path increases by several metres a year such as in oil sand tailings ponds and consolidated tailings (CT) deposits. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  18. Project Caesium - An ion exchange model for the prediction of distribution coefficients of caesium in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A surface chemical model is established to thermodynamically describe caesium sorption on bentonite. Caesium sorption is studied on Wyoming bentonite MX-80 in solutions of NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2 of concentrations varying between 0.025M and 1M, as well as in the weakly saline Allard groundwater and the strongly saline Aespoe groundwater. Based on these experiments it is shown that the sorption behaviour of caesium on bentonite can be described, within the experimental and model uncertainties, in terms of a one-site ion exchange model. The ion exchange constant for the replacement of Na+ on montmorillonite by Cs+ is logKex degrees = 1.6. The model predictions compare well with sorption data published in the open literature on both Wyoming bentonite MX-80 and other types of bentonite. For the analysis of diffusion experiments in compacted bentonite, the apparent diffusivity of tritiated water, HTO, is used as an analogue to estimate the pore diffusivity of Cs+. Since insufficient information is available at present to estimate the porosity actually available for diffusion in compacted bentonite, it is assumed that the diffusion porosity can be approximated by using the value of the bulk porosity. Under these circumstances, the cation ex change capacity (CEC) found to be available for the diffusing species in compacted bentonite corresponds to about 12% of the total CEC of bentonite. It is recognised that the errors made in the estimation of the pore diffusivity and of the diffusion porosity are contained in the reduction factor of the CEC. A discussion of the factors affecting the diffusivities of radionuclides and the problem of establishing consistent sets of diffusivity data is given in the Appendix. 33 refs, 7 figs, 12 tabs

  19. Characterization of organo-modified bentonite sorbents: The effect of modification conditions on adsorption performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parolo, María E., E-mail: maria.parolo@fain.uncoma.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Pettinari, Gisela R. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); Musso, Telma B. [Instituto de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ingeniería de Procesos, Biotecnología y Energías Alternativas (PROBIEN), Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina); CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sánchez-Izquierdo, María P.; Fernández, Laura G. [Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Neuquén 8300 (Argentina)

    2014-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Modification of clay was evaluated by two methods for removing an organic substance. • Surfactant cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space. • The hydrophobic surface of adsorbents increased the retention of organic substances. • Clay grafted with vinyltrimethoxysilane showed the highest adsorption for aniline. - Abstract: The organic modification of a natural bentonite was evaluated using two methods: exchanging the interlayer cations by hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) and grafting with vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS) and γ-methacryloyloxy propyl trimethoxysilane (TMSPMA) on montmorillonite surface. The physicochemical characterization of all materials was made by X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area techniques. HDTMA cations and organosilanes were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonite, as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing. IR spectroscopy, TGA and BET area give evidence of successful organic modification. The studies show a decrease in the IR absorption band intensity at 3465 cm{sup −1} with surfactant modification, and also a decrease of mass loss due to adsorbed water observed in two samples: the organoclay and functionalized bentonites, which are evidences of a lower interlayer hydrophilicity. The efficiency of aniline removal onto natural bentonite, organobentonite and functionalized bentonites from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Aniline sorption on natural bentonite was studied using batch experiments, XRD and IR spectroscopy. The hydrophobic surface of organobentonite and functionalized bentonites increased the retention capacity for nonionic organic substances such as aniline on bentonites. The sorption properties of modified bentonite, through different modification methods, enhanced the potential industrial applications of bentonites in water decontamination.

  20. [Effect of SDS on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto amphoteric modified bentonites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Tao; Meng, Zhao-Fu; Yang, Ya-Ti; Yang, Shu-Ying; Li, Bin; Xu, Shao-e

    2014-07-01

    Under different modified ratios, temperatures, pH and ionic strengths, the effect of sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) on the adsorption of Cd2+ onto bentonites which modified with amphoteric modifier dodecyl dimethyl betaine (BS-12) was studied by batch experiments, and the adsorption mechanism was also discussed. Results showed that the adsorption of Cd2+ on amphoteric bentonites can be enhanced significantly by SDS combined modification, Cd2+ adsorption decreases in the order: BS + 150SDS (BS-12 + 150% SDS) > BS + 100SDS (BS-12 + 100% SDS) > BS +50SDS(BS-12 + 50% SDS) > BS + 25SDS (BS-12 + 25% SDS) > BS (BS-12) > CK (unmodified soil). The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Langmuir equation. The change of temperature effect from positive on CK and amphoteric bentonites to negative on BS + 150SDS bentonites is observed with an increase of SDS modified ratio. The pH has little influence on Cd2+ adsorption on bentonites. The adsorption of Cd2+ on bentonites decreases with ionic strength rise, but the effect of ionic strength can be reduced with an increase of SDS modified ratio also. The adsorption thermodynamic parameters demonstrated that the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites was spontaneously controlled by entropy increment. When the SDS modified ratio is lower than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites is a process with characteristics of both enthalpy increment and entropy increment, while the SDS modified ratio is equal to or higher than 100% CEC, the adsorption of Cd2+ on modified bentonites becomes a process of enthalpy decrement and entropy increment. PMID:25244843

  1. Na-smectite s in the Cala de Tomate bentonite deposit (Spain): a natural analogue of the salinity effect on the bentonite barrier of a rad waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Fernandez, A.M.; Cozar, J.S. [CIEMAT - Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT/DIRE/CEAGP), Madrid (Spain); Delgado, A.; Reyes, E. [Ciencias de la Tierra y Quimica Ambiental Estacion Experimental del Zaidin Dpt., Granada (Spain); Fernandez-Soler, J.M. [Granada Univ., Dpt. de Mineralogia y Petrologia (Spain); Tsige, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Geologicas, Dpt. de Geodinamica, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Within the framework of the ENRESA programme for the assessment of the long-term behaviour of the bentonite-engineered barrier for a deep radwaste geological repository, analogue studies on several bentonite deposits are conducted at CIEMAT. Among these analogue studies, the thermal effect induced by volcanic intrusions on bentonite deposits is highlighted. In the Cabo de Gata volcanic region, there are several analogue scenarios where these studies have been performed, such as the Cala de Tomate bentonite deposit that was intruded by a pyroxene andesite volcanic dome. However, geological, mineralogical, physicochemical, geochemical and stable isotopic data obtained from the smectites do not allow to establish any analogy with the thermal effect expected on the bentonite-engineered barrier of a deep geological repository after burial. Thus, the bentonitisation processes took place after the intrusion of the dome, as a result of meteoric diagenesis intensively developed on faulting zone affecting the parent pyroclastic acid tuffs. This faulting process occurred after the dome intrusion. However, the physicochemical characteristics of these smectites, specially the exchangeable cations, allow to consider this bentonite deposit as a natural analogue of the saline effect on the clayey barrier. This analogy has been established because Na-smectites are present in this deposit and, up to our present knowledge, it is the first time that these smectites occur naturally in the Cabo de Gata-La Serrata de Nijar volcanic region. As a consequence, the main objectives of this work are: i) to characterise these smectites; ii) to establish their genesis and processes affecting them after their formation and iii) to identify the effects on the bentonite-engineered barrier should it were affected by a Na-rich saline waterfront. (authors)

  2. Bentonite-stabilized CDA/CTA membranes for seawater desalination. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bentonite-stabilized seawater desalination membranes developed at GKSS were characterized by two transport coefficients. Both the hydrodynamic permeability as well as the electro-mechanical coefficient were significantly changed after 2000 hours RO rest runs. Their alterations were interpreted - applying the fively-porous membrane model - as an increase of the diffusion potential and a decrease of the streaming potential. The salt diffusion coefficient was analysed to be diminished by about 10%. The lowest performance changes of the membranes with 1000 ppm bentonite dope, support the experimental findings of flux-stabilization of bentonite-containing CDA/CTA membranes, published previously. (orig.)

  3. NBR/ORGANOMODIFIED BENTONITE INTERCALATED HYBRIDS AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE TOUGHNESS OF PVC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-jiang You; De-min Jia; Zeng-yong Zhen; Kui Ding; Song Xi; Hai-lin Mo; Yong-hua Zhang

    2003-01-01

    Hybrids of intercalative nitrile-butadiene rubber/organomodified bentonite (NBR/OMB) were prepared by the latex intercalation technique. Investigation of their mechanical properties and the microstructure of NBR/OMB showed that the organomodified bentonite is an effective toughener for NBR. Transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) tests showed that the NBR macromolecule could be intercalated into the galleries of bentonite.Incorporation of NBR/OMB hybrids as tougheners into poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) results in a substantial increase in the impact strength of PVC, but little decrease in its tensile strength and flexural strength, compared to the unmodified PVC.

  4. Concrete/Febex Bentonite Interaction: Results On Short-Term Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escribano, A.; Turrero, M.J.; Torres, E.; Martin, P.L. [CIEMAT, Environmental Department, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Interaction between the alkaline pore fluids from the concrete engineered barriers and the bentonite at the repository conditions may generate products that can diffuse through the porous structure of the bentonite affecting their properties. A comprehensive study based on series of short term experiments is being performed to provide experimental evidences on the physical, chemical and mineralogical changes during the concrete-compacted bentonite interaction. Samples were analyzed by XRD, SEM-EDS and FTIR. Measurements of swelling capacity, specific surface area and chemical analysis for cation exchange capacity and soluble salts analyses were also performed. (authors)

  5. Removal of natural uranium from water produced in the oil industry using Algerian bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch sorption experiments have been carried out to remove natural uranium (NORM) from water obtained together with crude oil and natural gas, using Algerian bentonites. The effect of some important factors such as S/L ratio, pH, initial concentration, particle size was evaluated and a kinetic study performed. The value of the distribution coefficient (Kd) at equilibrium for natural uranium varied from 30 to 600 cm3 x g-1 and 50 to 1100 cm3 x g-1 (∼ 10% margin error) using natural bentonite and drilling bentonite, respectively. The isotherms showed that the data are consistent with both Freundlich and Langmuir models. (author)

  6. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David (Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  7. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and waste management company (SKB) is conducting a series of long term buffer material (LOT) tests at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) to test the behaviour of the bentonite buffer under conditions similar to those expected in a KBS-3 deep geological repository for high level nuclear waste (HLNW). In the present work a numerical model is developed to simulate (i) the thermo-hydraulic, (ii) transport and (iii) geochemical processes that have been observed in the LOT A2 test parcel. The LOT A2 test lasted approximately 6 years, and consists of a 4 m long vertical borehole drilled in diorite rock, from the ground of the Aespoe HRL tunnel. The borehole is composed of a central heater, maintained at 130 deg C in the lower 2 m of the borehole, a copper tube surrounding the heater and a 100 mm thick ring of pre-compacted Wyoming MX-80 bentonite around the copper tube /Karnland et al. 2009/. The numerical model developed here is a 1D axis-symmetric model that simulates the water saturation of the bentonite under a constant thermal gradient; the transport of solutes; and, the geochemical reactions observed in the bentonite blocks. Two cases have been modelled, one considering the highest temperature reached by the bentonite (at 3 m depth in the borehole, where temperatures of 130 and 85 deg C have been recorded near the copper tube and near the granitic host rock, respectively) and the other case assuming a constant temperature of 25 deg C, representing the upper part of borehole, where the bentonite has not been heated. In the LOT A2 test, the initial partially saturated bentonite becomes progressively water saturated, due to the injection of Aespoe granitic groundwater at granite - bentonite interface. The transport of solutes during the bentonite water saturation stage is believed to be controlled by water uptake from the surrounding groundwater to the wetting front and, additionally, in the case of heated bentonite, by a cyclic evaporation

  8. EVALUATION OF THE BENTONITE CONTENT IN SPENT FOUNDRY SANDS AS A FUNCTION OF HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY COEFFICIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirlene Chegatti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the relationship of the bentonite content and hydraulic conductivity coefficient (k of waste foundry sands in tests of hydraulic conductivity in a flexible wall permeameter. The test samples had concentrations of activated sodium bentonite and natural sodium bentonite between 4% and 15%. It was also analyzed chemically the liquid leachate (aluminum, barium, chromium, cadmium, lead, phenols, iron, fluoride, and manganese, following de standard tests of Standard Methods 3111 B e D for the determination of this components in liquid samples. The experiments were supplemented with cation exchange capacity analysis. The results indicate that the values of are is related to the content of bentonite in waste foundry sand and the percolation from this waste disposal.

  9. Temperature effects on geotechnical and hydraulic properties of bentonite hydrated with inorganic salt solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, H. M. A.; Kawamoto, K.; Saito, T.;

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, International Journal of GEOMATE. This study investigated the combined effect of temperature and single-species salt solutions on geotechnical properties (swell index and liquid limit) and hydraulic conductivity of bentonite applying different cation types, concentrations, and temperatures...... increased whereas the liquid limit decreased with increasing temperature for all cation types and concentrations. Significant and high correlations were found between swell index and liquid limit of bentonite at all three temperatures. Hydraulic conductivity of bentonite was found to increase...... with increasing temperature. No significant change in hydraulic conductivity with time was observed for all concentrations and cation types, and, overall, concentration and valance of cations had little effect on the hydraulic conductivity of bentonite....

  10. Practical and theoretical basis for performing redox-measurements in compacted bentonite. A literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the state-of-the-art with regard to redox measurements, especially in compacted water saturated bentonite, but also in natural systems like sediments and ground waters. Both theoretical and practical aspects of redox measurements are discussed, as well as some basic concepts like terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) and oxidative capacity (OXC). The problems associated with the interpretation of measured electrode potentials are treated. Despite many practical and theoretical difficulties, redox measurements continue to be carried out by researchers all over the world. The over-all conclusion from the literature survey is that fruitful redox-measurements can be performed in compacted bentonite. Irrespective of whether the measured redox potentials are absolute or not, the use of electrodes provide a valuable tool for studying, e.g., long-term changes in the pore water of compacted bentonite and/or the diffusion of oxygen into a bentonite. (orig.)

  11. Effect of bentonite modification on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Denise Ester O.; Pajarito, Bryan B.; Mangaccat, Winna Faye F.; Tigue, Maelyn Rose M.; Tipton, Monica T.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of sodium activation, ion-exchange with tertiary amine salt, surface treatment with non-ionic surfactant, and wet grinding of bentonite on hardness and mechanical properties of natural rubber nanocomposites (NRN) was studied using full factorial design of experiment. Results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) show increase in basal spacing d of bentonite due to modification, while attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirm the organic modification of bentonite. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) shows that the main effect of surface treatment increases the hardness and decreases the tensile modulus of the NRN. The surface treatment and wet grinding of bentonite decrease the tensile stresses at 100, 200 and 300% strain of NRN. Sodium activation and ion-exchange negatively affect the compressive properties, while surface treatment significantly improves the compressive properties of NRN.

  12. Backfilling of deposition tunnels: Use of bentonite pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, David (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)); Sanden, Torbjoern (Clay Technology AB (Sweden)); Jonsson, Esther (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Mangaement Co. (Sweden)); Hansen, Johanna (Posiva Oy (Finland))

    2011-02-15

    The state of knowledge related to use of bentonite pellets as part of backfill or other gap filling components in repository applications is reviewed. How the pellets interact with adjacent sealing materials and the surrounding rock mass is a critical aspect in determining backfill behaviour. The key features and processes that determine how the pellet component of the KBS-3V deposition tunnel backfill will behave are discussed and recommendations related to what additional information needs to be developed are provided. Experiences related to pellet material composition, size, shape, placement options and more importantly, the density to which they can be placed all indicate that there are significant limitations to the achievable as-placed density of bentonite pellet fill. Low as-placed density of the pellet fill component of the backfill is potentially problematic as the outermost regions of tunnel backfill will be the first region of the backfill to be contacted by water entering the tunnels. It is also through this region that initial water movement along the length of the deposition tunnels will occur. This will greatly influence the operations in a tunnel, especially with respect to situations where water is exiting the downstream face of still open deposition tunnels. Pellet-filled regions are also sensitive to groundwater salinity, susceptible to development of piping features and subsequent mechanical erosion by through flowing water, particularly in the period preceding deposition tunnel closure. A review of the experiences of various organisations considering use of bentonite-pellet materials as part of buffer or backfill barriers is provided in this document. From this information, potential options and limitations to use of pellets or pellet-granule mixtures in backfill are identified. Of particular importance is identification of the apparent upper-limits of dry density to which such materials can to be placed in the field. These bounds will

  13. Behaviour of bentonite/montmorillonite gel at low ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Swedish KBS-3 concept for a geological deep storage of spent nuclear fuel, bentonite of high montmorillonite content is proposed to serve as a buffer surrounding copper canisters containing the spent fuel. Montmorillonite has an exceptional affinity for water which results in the build-up of a swelling pressure when bentonite is placed in a confined volume. There may be fractures intersecting the deposition hole and at those fractures the bentonite is not restricted but can continue to swell until a steady state is reached. Under present day Swedish groundwater conditions the swelling into fractures will be limited because the montmorillonite at the swelling front will coagulate. However, at the end of a glaciation one cannot exclude that glacial meltwater of low ionic strength will permeate the bedrock. This could cause erosion of the bentonite, due to colloidal sol formation at the swelling front. A homo-ionic Ca-montmorillonite would not pose any problem because it has limited swelling due to attraction forces caused by ion correlations. In homo-ionic Na-montmorillonite, on the other hand, the correlation interactions are weak and cannot prevent the sol formation in case the montmorillonite is contacted with water of low ionic strength. Under repository conditions the montmorillonite is not homo-ionic, but contains a variety of counterions, both mono- and divalent. It was demonstrated earlier that for mixed Ca/Na-montmorillonite the sol-formation ability is much more sensitive to the ionic strength of the electrolyte than homo-ionic Na-montmorillonite. In deionized water sol formation occurs unless the equivalent charge fraction of Ca2+ is 90% or higher. However in electrolyte solution it was found that the sol is unstable if the ionic strength is above 4 mM. The investigated cases indicate that this condition holds even if the charge fraction of Ca2+ in the interlayer is as low as 20%. In this work it is

  14. Properties of zeolite a synthesized by natural bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic zeolite was prepared by using of natural bentonite from Kampo area and the application of detergent builder was investigated. The optimum synthetic condition was SiO2/Al2O3 = 2, Na2O/Al2O3 = 1, H2O/Al2O3 30 at 90 deg C for 3 hr and it was found by XRD analysis that the zeolite synthesized under this condition was type A. When the zeolite A synthesized under the optimum condition was contacted with 40 deg Dh CaCl2 solution at 30 deg C for 15 min, the cation exchange capacity was 264.9 mg CaO/g-zeolite. And the whiteness of the sample was 89% and the mean particle size was 9.95μm. (author)

  15. Preparation and characterization of bentonite clay for formation of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study we used the linear medium density polyethylene (PELMD) as polymer matrix and introduced, as reinforcement to increase the mechanical and thermal properties, the green bentonite deposit of Boa Vista/PB, rich montmorillonite (MMT), previously characterized by XRD, that passed by three stages of purification. The first stage was to clean by washing and filtering for removal of coarse material (sand and organic matter), followed by an acid attack. In the second, we used the quaternary ammonium surfactant, in order to increase the distance between the layers of MMT, and the third was removed from the wastewater, using absolute ethanol, finishing the purification of process. Then, the clay was introduced into the polymer matrix by polymerization in solution by intercalation and characterized by XRD. The results showed a partial exfoliation, satisfying the increasing properties. (author)

  16. Hydraulic permeability of bentonite-polymer composites for application in landfill technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, Hanna; Haase, Hanna; Schanz, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Bentonites are often used as barrier materials in landfill technology to prevent infiltration of leachates to the natural environment. Since decades, geoenvironmental engineering aims at improving the hydro-mechanical performance of landfill liners. Various studies on the permeability performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) show effects of non-standard liquids on behaviour of Na+-bentonite regarding its sealing capacity. With increasing concentration of chemical aggressive solutions the sealing capacity decreases (Shackelford et al. 2000). An opportunity to improve the hydraulic permeability of the bentonites is the addition of polymers. The changes in hydraulic permeability performance of polymer treated and untreated bentonites while adding chemical aggressive solutions were studied by several authors. Results obtained by Scalia et al. (2014) illustrate that an increase in permeability can be prevented by adding polymer to Na+-bentonite. On the other hand, Ashmawy et al. (2002) presented results on the incapability of several commercial bentonite-polymer-products. The objective of this study is to characterize the influence of polymer addition on hydraulic performance of Na+-bentonite systematically. Therefore, the influence of 1% polymer addition of cationic and anionic polyacrylamide on the swelling pressure and hydraulic permeability of MX 80 bentonite was investigated. Preparation of bentonite-polymer composites was conducted (1) in dry conditions and (2) using solution-intercalation method. Experiments on hydraulic permeability were carried out using distilled water as well as CaCl2-solution. References Ashmawy, A. K., El-Hajji, D., Sotelo, N. & Muhammad, N. (2002), `Hydraulic Performance of Untreated and Polymer-treated Bentonite in Inorganic Landfill Leachates', Clays and Clay Minerals 50(5), 546-552. Scalia, J., Benson, C., Bohnhoff, G., Edil, T. & Shackelford, C. (2014), 'Long-Term Hydraulic Conductivity of a Bentonite-Polymer Composite Permeated

  17. Adsorption of and acidic dye from aqueous solution by surfactant modified bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to study the adsorption of an acidic dye S. Y. 4 GL (i.e: Supranol yellow 4GL) from aqueous solution on inorgano-organo clay. Bentonite is a kind of natural clay with good exchanging ability. By exchanging its inter lamellar cations with Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and hydroxy aluminic or chromium poly cations, the properties of natural bentonite can be greatly improved. (Author)

  18. Research program to study the gamma radiation effects in Spanish bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The engineering barrier of a radioactive waste underground disposal facility, placed in a granitic host rock, will consist of a backfill of compacted bentonite blocks. At first, this material will be subjected to a gamma radiation field, from the waste canister, and heat from the spent fuel inside the canister. Moreover, any groundwater that reaches the repository will saturate the bentonite. For these reasons the performance of the engineered barrier must be carefully assessed in laboratory experiments. (Author)

  19. Removal of formaldehyde from aqueous solution by adsorption on kaolin and bentonite: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Salman, Muhammad; Athar, Makshoof; SHAFIQUE, Umer; Rehman, Rabia

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of formaldehyde on bentonite and kaolin was studied in batch mode. Parameters like adsorbent dose, pH, contact time and agitation speed were investigated. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms were employed for describing adsorption equilibrium. The maximum amounts of formaldehyde adsorbed (qmax), as evaluated by Langmuir isotherm, were 3.41 and 5.03 milligrams per gram of ground kaolin and bentonite, respectively. The study results led to the conclusion that kaol...

  20. An investigation on physical properties of polyethylene composite with bentonite, kaolin and calcium carbonate additives

    OpenAIRE

    Karabeyoğlu, Sencer S.; , Nurşen Öntürk

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite, Kaolin, Calcium carbonate easily obtained in nature as mineral products are widely used in plastics industry for additive materials. In this study, Bentonite, Kaolin, and Calcium carbonate minerals were compounded with polyethylene matrix used in specific rates. Prepared compounds melted in sheet metal molds and cooled down under appropriate conditions. Thus, production of composite material was achieved. Hardness, water absorption, and physical properties of manufactured composite...

  1. The effect of pore structural factors on diffusion in compacted sodium bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four kinds of diffusion experiments; (1) through-diffusion (T-D) experiments for diffusion direction dependency to compacted direction, (2) in-diffusion (I-D) experiments for composition dependency of silica sand in bentonite, (3) I-D experiments for initial bentonite grain size dependency, and (4) I-D experiments for the effect of a single fracture developed in bentonite, were carried out using tritiated water (HTO) to evaluate the effect of pore structural factors on diffusion. For (1), effective diffusivities (De) in Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1 and Kunipia-F, were measured for densities of 1.0 and 1.5 Mg.m-3 in the axial and perpendicular directions to compacted one. Although De values in Kunigel-V1 for both directions were similar over the density, De values for perpendicular direction to compacted one in Kunipia-F were higher than those for the same direction as compacted one. For (2), apparent diffusivities (Da) in Kunigel-V1 with silica sand were measured for densities of 0.8 to 1.8 Mg.m-3. No significant effect of the mixture of silica sand was found. For (3), Da values for densities of 0.8 to 1.8 Mg.m-3 were measured for a granulated Na-bentonite, OT-9607. However, no effect of initial bentonite grain size was found. For (4), Da values in Kunigel-V1, in which a single fracture was artificially reproduced and immersed in distilled water, were measured. No effect of the fracture on Da was found. Based on this, it may be said that the composition of smectite in bentonite affects the orientation property of clay particle and also affects diffusion. Furthermore, a penetrated fracture formed in bentonite is restored for a short while and does not affect diffusion. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  2. Environmental Consequences of Pig Slurry Treatment Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ten Hoeve, Marieke

    occur during manure storage and after field application. The main emissions are ammonia, nitrous oxide, methane, carbon dioxide, nitrate, phosphorus and odour. Slurry treatment technologies have been and are being developed in order to reduce the environmental impacts of manure. However, it is important...... and excluding biogenic carbon, marine and freshwater eutrophication potential, terrestrial acidification and eutrophication potential, and fossil resource depletion potential. The different types of treatment technologies showed varying environmental profiles, meaning that one type of technology was beneficial...... technology, or co-substrate for anaerobic digestion). With respect to odorous emissions, an LCIA method was developed, but due to a lack of data it proved difficult to include odour in LCA. Regulations appear to have an influence on the environmental impacts of slurry treatment. A decrease in N application...

  3. Emplacement-related layering in magma slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petford, N.

    2009-04-01

    Textures and structures such as layering, grading and foliations preserved in igneous rocks offer a glimpse into the magma emplacement process. However, despite recent advances, a full and proper understanding of the fluid dynamics of congested fluid-particle mixtures during shear remains elusive. This is a shame as without recourse to such fundamental understanding, the interpretation of structural field data in the context of magma flow remains problematic. One way to gain insight into the process is to treat flowing magma as a dynamic material with a rheology similar to sheared, congested slurries. The idea that dense magma equates to a high temperature slurry is an attractive one, and opens up a way to examine the emplacement process that does not rely on equilibrium thermodynamics as a final explanation for commonly observed igneous structures. Using the Basement Sill, Antarctica, as a world class example of a magmatic slurry, shearing at high Peclet (Pe) number where particle diffusion is negligible has the potential to impart a rich diversity of structures including layering, grading and flow segregation. Work to model numerically the flow of the Basement Sill slurry using a range of theoretical and experimentally-derived non-Newtonian magma rheologies will be presented and assessed. A key impilcation is that in addition to more classical explanations such as compaction and gravitational settling, igneous layering can also arise spontaneously during shear associated with the ascent and emplacement of congested magma. A final aspect of the emplacement model considers the irregular geometry of the Basement Sill boundaries. Movement of magma along these boundaries results in the formation of local eddies and fluid swirl/back-flow that add additional complexity to macroscopic flow field.

  4. Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactor modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Harke, F.W. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports experimental and theoretical results on hydrodynamic studies. The experiments were conducted in a hot-pressurized Slurry-Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR). It includes experimental results of Drakeol-10 oil/nitrogen/glass beads hydrodynamic study and the development of an ultrasonic technique for measuring solids concentration. A model to describe the flow behavior in reactors was developed. The hydrodynamic properties in a 10.16 cm diameter bubble column with a perforated-plate gas distributor were studied at pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1.36 MPa, and at temperatures from 20 to 200{degrees}C, using a dual hot-wire probe with nitrogen, glass beads, and Drakeol-10 oil as the gas, solid, and liquid phase, respectively. It was found that the addition of 20 oil wt% glass beads in the system has a slight effect on the average gas holdup and bubble size. A well-posed three-dimensional model for bed dynamics was developed from an ill-posed model. The new model has computed solid holdup distributions consistent with experimental observations with no artificial {open_quotes}fountain{close_quotes} as predicted by the earlier model. The model can be applied to a variety of multiphase flows of practical interest. An ultrasonic technique is being developed to measure solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 180 {degrees}C and 0.1 MPa. The data show that both the sound speed and attenuation are well-defined functions of both the solid and gas concentrations in the slurries. The results suggest possibilities to directly measure solids concentration during the operation of an autoclave reactor containing molten wax.

  5. Kapasitas Adsorpsi Bentonit terhadap Sulfur dan Merkuri secara Simultan pada Pembakaran Batubara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhamidi Yusran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pemanfaatan batubara sebagai sumber energi melalui pembakaran langsung akan menghasilkan emisi gas, partikulat trace metal (logam berat dan abu (terutama abu terbang yang akan mencemari udara. Penanganan terhadap pencemaran tersebut merupakan hal yang sangat mendesak. Dalam studi ini ditawarkan penyelesaian secara simultan terhadap emisi SOx dan partikulat logam berat merkuri pada pembakaran batubara peringkat rendah yang ada di Aceh melalui penyerapan menggunakan bentonit alam yang juga terdapat di Aceh (juga di daerah lain di Indonesia. Penggunaan bentonit dapat mengurangi emisi gas SO2 dan partikulat trace metal Hg dalam gas buang dan abu terbang. Bentonit dapat meningkatkan afinitas atau gaya tarik menarik antara Hg dan mineral-mineral dalam bentonit dan sekaligus menurunkan afinitas Hg terhadap S atau SO2. Konsentrasi bentonit dalam kajian ini, tanpa kalsinasi dan langsung dicampur dalam batubara, adalah 0 – 16% dan temperatur pembakaran adalah 700 – 900oC. Hasil yang didapat menunjukkan bahwa kondisi maksimum penyerapan sulfur dan/atau SO2 serta merkuri terjadi pada kandungan bentonit 6% dan temperatur 700oC.

  6. Investigation of Co(II) sorption on GMZ bentonite from aqueous solutions by batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a local bentonite from Gaomiaozi county (Inner Mongolia, China) was converted to Na-bentonite and was characterized by FTIR and XRD to determine its chemical constituents and micro-structure. The removal of cobalt from aqueous solutions by Na-bentonite was investigated as a function of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and temperature by batch technique under ambient conditions. The results indicated that the sorption of Co(II) was strongly dependent on pH. At low pH, the sorption of Co(II) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models were used to simulate the sorption isotherms of Co(II) at the temperatures of 293.15, 313.15 and 333.15 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔS0, ΔH0) of Co(II) sorption on GMZ bentonite calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms indicated that the sorption of Co(II) on GMZ bentonite was an exothermic and spontaneous process. The Na-bentonite is a suitable material for the preconcentration and solidification of Co(II) from aqueous solutions. (author)

  7. The influence of the addition of polymers on the physico-chemical properties of bentonite suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojiljkovic S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite clays have many applications in industries ranging from construction to cosmetics. Addition of polymers can profoundly influence the properties of bentonite suspensions and we now describe the influence of a range of different polymers. Whereas polyvinyl pyrolidone and soy isolate only slightly influenced the pH and the electrical conductivity of bentonite polymers in suspension, Carbopol solution caused decreases in both pH and electrical conductivity. As expected, strong electrolytes like sodium chloride caused big changes in the electrical conductivity of the suspensions. When the temperature of the bentonite suspensions was increased, the pH was almost unchanged, but the electrical conductivity increased. Bentonite treated with polymer suspensions can be used in purifying polluted water; for example, our results suggest that high pH caused by phosphorous salts can be addressed using bentonite modified with Carbopol. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije: Stanisa Stojiljkovic, Vojkan Miljkovic, Goran Nikolic, Ivana Savic and Ivan Savic, TR 34020, Danijela Kostic 172047 and Biljana Arsic 174007

  8. [Study on performance of double mineral base liner using modified bentonite as active material].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhi-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Tie-Jun; Ren, He-Jun; Zhou, Rui; Hua, Fei; Wang, Bing; Hou, Yin-Ting; Dai, Yun

    2009-06-15

    The absorbing capacity of clay,roasting bentonites by 450 degrees C and dual-cation organobentonites of the pollutions in landfill leachate was compared through static experiment, and investigations were conducted into availability of controlling the permeating of landfill leachate and feasibility of removing the main pollutants in leachate on the double mineral base liners of clay/roasting bentonites by 450 degrees C and clay/dual-cation organobentonites by using nice landfill leachate as the filter fluid. Experiment indicated that the adsorption equilibrium time of landfill leachate in clay, roasting bentonites by 450 degrees C and dual-cation organobentonites was 24 h; the absorbing capacity of roasting bentonites by 450 degrees C and dual-cation organobentonites was larger than that of clay. Simultaneous the penetration coefficients of the two liners were respective 1.31 x 10(-8) cm x s(-1) and 2.80 x 10(-8) cm x s(-1); Double mineral base liners of clay/roasting bentonites by 450 degrees C owned larger absorbing capacity of NH4+, however, double mineral base liners of clay/dual-cation organobentonites had strong absorbing capacity of organic pollutants and the attenuation rate of COD was 33.82% higher than the other. Conclusion was drawn that different types of modified bentonite should be chosen as "the active layer" according to different styles of landfill pollutants. PMID:19662882

  9. Study of combined effect of proteins and bentonite fining on the wine aroma loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Simone; Panighel, Annarita; Gazzola, Diana; Flamini, Riccardo; Curioni, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The wine aroma loss as a consequence of treatments with bentonite is due to the occurrence of multiple interaction mechanisms. In addition to a direct effect of bentonite, the removal of aroma compounds bound to protein components adsorbed by the clay has been hypothesized but never demonstrated. We studied the effect of bentonite addition on total wine aroma compounds (extracted from Moscato wine) in a model solution in the absence and presence of total and purified (thaumatin-like proteins and chitinase) wine proteins. The results showed that in general bentonite alone has a low effect on the loss of terpenes but removed ethyl esters and fatty acids. The presence of wine proteins in the solution treated with bentonite tended to increase the loss of esters with the longest carbon chains (from ethyl octanoate to ethyl decanoate), and this was significant when the purified proteins were used. The results here reported suggest that hydrophobicity can be one of the driving forces involved in the interaction of aromas with both bentonite and proteins. PMID:25665100

  10. Chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposites: morphology and mechanical behavior; Bionanocompositos quitosana/bentonita: morfologia e comportamento mecanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, C.R.C.; Melo, F.M.A. de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Vitorino, I.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Fook, M.V.L.; Silva, S.M.L., E-mail: suedina@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais

    2010-07-01

    This study chitosan/bentonite bionanocomposite films were prepared by solution intercalation process, seeking to investigate the effect of the chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 e 10/1) on the morphology and mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposites. It was used as nanophase, Argel sodium bentonite (AN), was provided by Bentonit Uniao Nordeste-BUN (Campina Grande, Brazil) and as biopolymer matrix the chitosan of low molecular weight and degree of deacetylation of 86,7% was supplied by Polymar (Fortaleza, Brazil). The bionanocomposites was investigated by X-ray diffraction and tensile properties. According to the results, the morphology and the mechanical behavior of the bionanocomposite was affected by the ratio of chitosan/bentonite. The chitosan/bentonite ratio (5/1 and 10/1) indicated the formation of an intercalated nanostructure and of the predominantly exfoliated nanostructure, respectively. And the considerable increases in the resistance to the traction were observed mainly for the bionanocomposite with predominantly exfoliated morphology. (author)

  11. Fundamental study on anisotropy of diffusion and migration pathway in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEM observations for micropore structure in compacted bentonite and through-diffusion experiments for non-sorptive tritiated water (HTO) were conducted to evaluate the anisotropy of diffusive pathway in compacted bentonite used as a buffer material in the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The SEM observations and thorough-diffusion experiments were conducted for axial and perpendicular directions to the compacted direction of bentonite as a function of bentonite's dry density. Two types of Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1 and Kunipia-F with different smectite contents were used in both experiments. No orientation of clay particles was found for low-smectite content Kunigel-V1, while layers of clay particles orientated in the perpendicular direction to compacted direction were observed for Kunipia-F with approximately 100 wt% smectite content. This tendency is in good agreement with that for HTO's effective diffusivities obtained from diffusion experiments, indicating that smectite content in bentonite affects the orientation properties of clay particles and diffusive pathway. (author)

  12. Study of Japanese and Serbia bentonite on the fraction of 137Cs from cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite clay mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching tests in cement-ion exchange resins-bentonite matrix, were carried out in accordance with a method recommended by IAEA. The cement specimens were prepared from construction cement which is basically a standard Portland cement. The cement was mixed with saturated wet cation exchange resins, (100 g. of dry resins +100 g. of water containing 137Cs) and two bentonite clay, from Serbia, and another from Japan. After each leaching period the radioactivity in the leachant was measured. All results exhibit practically the same general characteristics. An enhanced initial period of leaching occurs during the first 25-30 days or so, followed by a distinct reduction in the leach rate which is broadly maintained up to the long period of leaching. The leach behaviour of cement-mortar materials can be explained as a combination of two processes: surface wash-off, which is not diffusion controlled, followed by a static diffusion stage. Enhanced initial period of leaching can be explained in terms of a rapid equilibrium being established between spaces present in the surface pores of the Portland cement and ions in solution in the leachant; hence the term wash-off. It is the second stage which is controlled by diffusion that dominates the long-term leaching behaviour of the material. We also prove that increasing amount of bentonite causes a significant reduction in the leaching rate, because of bentonite good sorption characteristics and ion selectivity. We showed that the bentonite from Serbia can successfully be used for the immobilisation of radioactive waste with same quality as Japanese bentonite

  13. Microencapsulated paraffin in phase-change-slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwander, S.; Schossig, P.; Henning, H.M. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme, Freiburg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Phase-Change-Slurries (PCS) are mixtures of a Phase-Change-Material (PCM) and a carrier-.uid. Such PCS of microencapsulated paraf.n as PCM and water as carrier-.uid are investigated at Fraunhofer ISE. The shell of the microcapsule prevents an interaction between the paraf.n and the water. At ISE a test-facility was built to study the stability of the capsules while pumped with conventional pumps through common used heating components like pipes, heat exchangers, volume-.ow measurement instruments, pressure relief valves etc. To analyze the stability of the capsules SEM-pictures are taken after pumping them several weeks to control the optical state of the capsules. The speci.c heat of fusion is checked by DSC-Measurements. Thermal measurements are carried out to investigate the thermal behavior of the Slurry while pumped through heat exchangers. The results show that the PC-Material can be melted and frozen while.owing through the heat exchangers. The presented results illustrate that microencapsulated PC-Slurries can enhance the heatcapacity of a heat-carrier-.uid and they are also stable enough to be used with common heating or cooling devices. (orig.)

  14. Cellular uptake and cytotoxic potential of respirable bentonite particles with different quartz contents and chemical modifications in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geh, Stefan; Rettenmeier, Albert W.; Dopp, Elke [University Hospital, Institute of Hygiene and Occupational Medicine, Essen (Germany); Yuecel, Raif [University Hospital, Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research), Essen (Germany); Duffin, Rodger [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Edinburgh, ELEGI COLT Lab, Scotland (United Kingdom); Albrecht, Catrin; Borm, Paul J.A. [Institute of Environmental Health Research (IUF), Duesseldorf (Germany); Armbruster, Lorenz [Verein fuer Technische Sicherheit und Umweltschutz e.V., Gotha (Germany); Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Bruening, Thomas [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine of the Institutions for Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Hoffmann, Eik [University of Rostock, Institute of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biosystems Technology, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    Considering the biological reactivity of pure quartz in lung cells, there is a strong interest to clarify the cellular effects of respirable siliceous dusts, like bentonites. In the present study, we investigated the cellular uptake and the cytotoxic potential of bentonite particles (Oe< 10 {mu}m) with an {alpha}-quartz content of up to 6% and different chemical modifications (activation: alkaline, acidic, organic) in human lung fibroblasts (IMR90). Additionally, the ability of the particles to induce apoptosis in IMR90-cells and the hemolytic activity was tested. All bentonite samples were tested for endotoxins with the in vitro-Pyrogen test and were found to be negative. Cellular uptake of particles by IMR90-cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity was analyzed in IMR90-cells by determination of viable cells using flow cytometry and by measuring of the cell respiratory activity. Induced apoptotic cells were detected by AnnexinV/Propidiumiodide-staining and gel electrophoresis. Our results demonstrate that activated bentonite particles are better taken up by IMR90-cells than untreated (native) bentonite particles. Also, activated bentonite particles with a quartz content of 5-6% were more cytotoxic than untreated bentonites or bentonites with a quartz content lower than 4%. The bentonite samples induced necrotic as well as apoptotic cell death. In general, bentonites showed a high membrane-damaging potential shown as hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes. We conclude that cellular effects of bentonite particles in human lung cells are enhanced after chemical treatment of the particles. The cytotoxic potential of the different bentonites is primarily characterized by a strong lysis of the cell membrane. (orig.)

  15. Study on QTi3.5-10graphite slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 杜云慧; 刘汉武; 曾大本; 崔建忠; 巴立民

    2004-01-01

    QTi3.5-10graphite (mass fraction, %) slurry was prepared using electromagnetic-mechanical stirring technology. The distribution of graphite particles in QTi3. 5-10graphite slurry was studied using cold quenching method. The results show that solid fraction of QTi3.5-10graphite slurry increases with the decreasing stirring temperature. There is a linear relationship between solid fraction and stirring temperature. With increasing solid fraction, the rising of graphite particles in slurry is restricted gradually. When the solid fraction is larger than 42.5 %,the rising of graphite particles in slurry can be controlled, and QTi3.5-10graphite slurry with uniform distribution of graphite particles can be prepared.

  16. Injection of Aqueous Slurry for Making Zirconia Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shun'ai; LI Maoqiang

    2009-01-01

    Zirconia aqueous slurry was prepared with fine zirconia powder.Injection process for making zirconia fiber was demonstrated,including preparation of aqueous slurry,injection of slurry,fiber setting in acetone,and fiber firing.The principle of the process was discussed.The effects of solid loading in the zirconia slurry,addition of dispersant in the slurry,and ball milling time on the rheological properties of the slurry,especially yield stress,were illustrated.The role of acetone as curing agent was discussed.Zirconia poly-crystalline fber with at 1 530 ℃ for 5 h.Microstructure of the sintered zirconia fiber was investigated.

  17. Microstructure Formation and Degradation Mechanism of Cementitious Plugging Agent Slurries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Peiyu; ZHOU Yongxiang; YANG Zhenjie; QIN Jian

    2007-01-01

    The hydration products and microstructure of class G oil well cement and a newly developed plugging agent (YLD) slurries cured in the simulated temperature and pressure environment, which was of similar temperature and pressure with those at the bottom of oil well in a normal depth, were investigated using XRD, TG and SEM. Severe leakage is confirmed at the interface between hardened slurries and steel tube during the dynamically curing process, which induces the quick loss of cementing property of slurries. This should be the dominating cause of degradation of class G oil well cement slurry. A secondary hydration process can take place at the eroded interface of hardened YLD plugging agent slurry. Newly formed C-S-H gel has a self-healing effect to repair the damaged interface, which unceasingly maintains the cementing property of the YLD plugging agent slurry. Therefore, the effective using period of YLD plugging agent can be prolonged.

  18. Silurian bentonites in Lithuania: correlations based on sanidine phenocryst composition and graptolite biozonation – interpretation of volcanic source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo Kiipli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Integrated correlation of bentonites (altered volcanic ashes and graptolite biozonation is presented. Detailed study of two Lithuanian drill core sections extended previous knowledge of the occurrence and composition of bentonites to the south. Identification of graptolite species allowed bentonites to be assigned their proper stratigraphical position. Silurian bentonites in Lithuania are mostly characterized by wide and very wide XRD 201 reflections of the main component of sanidine phenocrysts. Only fourteen of the 69 samples studied contained sanidine with a sharp reflection, which gave the best correlation potential. In the Lithuanian sections one bentonite was found in the Rhuddanian, five bentonites were recognized in the Aeronian, 17 bentonites in the Telychian, 26 in the Sheinwoodian, 10 in the Homerian and six in the Ludlow. All bentonites found in Lithuania are characterized by the main component of sanidine. A large number of Lithuanian bentonites are not known in Latvia and Estonia, indicating that volcanic ashes reached the East Baltic area from two source regions – the Central European and Norwegian Caledonides.

  19. Studies on dynamic compaction and hydraulic properties of Bentonite-based materials for geological disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the safe disposal method of high-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants, there is the 'geological disposal' that buries the waste in the stable soil. For cushioning materials to be used for geological disposal, performances such as low permeability. self-sealing ability, and nuclide sorption ability are required, and bentonite has been picked up as a candidate for its main base material. This paper takes up granular bentonite and bentonite - silica sand mixed material as the bentonite-based materials used as cushioning materials for site application, and explains their dynamic compaction test and easy-to-use evaluation method. As for the granular bentonite, it was found that its compaction properties can be predicted from the plastic limit of pulverized sample of the original ore as a raw material for granular bentonite. As for bentonite - silica sand mixed material, the relationship between maximum dry density, optimum moisture content, and plastic limit showed a very good match between the measured results and calculated results. The permeability coefficient of granular bentonite can be predicted from the wet volume strain of montmorillonite, or the partial density of montmorillonite. As for the bentonite - silica sand mixed material, the permeability of Fe(III) type montmorillonite became significantly larger. (A.O.)

  20. Evaluation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Biochemical Traits of Lettuce under Drought Stress and Super Absorbent or Bentonite Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Valizadeh Ghale Beig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of two superabsorbents (natural-bentonite and (synthetic-A 200 on the chlorophyll fluorescence index, proline accumulation, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and total carbohydrate in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. was evaluated. For this purpose, a factorial experiment using completely randomized design with superabsorbents at 3 levels (0, 0.15, 0.30 w/w%, drought stress at 2 levels (60 and 100% of field capacity and 4 replicates was conducted. Results showed that photosystem photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm II under drought stress (60% FC as well as lower levels of bentonite superabsorbent polymer reduced. The minimum and maximum proline content were obtained in 0.3% bentonite, 100% FC and 0 benetonite, 60% FC, respectively. The lowest and highest phenolic compounds was corresponded to the highest levels in both super absorbents and control respectively, so that the super absorbent and bentonite, reduced phenolic compounds by 62.65 and 66.21% compared to control. 0 and 0.15 wt % bentonite in high drought stress (60% FC showed the highest and 0.3 wt % bentonite and 100% FC attained the lowest level of antioxidant activity. Control bentonite treatment beds at 60% FC and beds containing 0.3 wt. % bentonite in 100% FC, showed the lowest and the highest total carbohydrate content respectively. Results of this study indicate that bentonite can reduce the negative effects of drought stress similar to artificial super absorbent.

  1. Evaluation of long-term interaction between cement and bentonite for geological disposal (2) XAFS analysis of calcium silicate hydrate precipitates at cementitious and bentonite material interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Numerical analyses of the long-term alteration of the engineered barriers used for the disposal of TRU waste predicted precipitation of C-S-H minerals at the interface between the cementitious materials and the bentonite-based buffer. When the C-S-H precipitates at this interface, the diffusion coefficient in the engineered barriers will decrease, resulting in reduced mass transport, which feeds back to reduce the rate of subsequent alteration. The C-S-H predicted to form at the cement-bentonite interface could not be identified directly using conventional analytical tools, including XRD, due to its low crystallinity. The authors propose that XAFS analysis, which provides spectra sensitive to the valency and coordination of the element of interest regardless of its crystallinity, would be capable of characterizing the C-S-H. The presence of the C-S-H precipitated as a secondary mineral has already been confirmed by applying chemical and XAFS analyses to bentonite specimens collected from the compacted bentonite-cement interface. However, because of the limitations on the width of specimens that can be collected by cutting from block samples, i.e. approximately 1 mm, detailed concentration profiles could not be obtained for this secondary C-S-H. In this study, XAFS spectra of thin specimens were measured using an X-ray detector in order to obtain detailed concentration profiles for the C-S-H formed at the interface between the cementitious material and the bentonite-based buffer. The X-ray detector used in the XAFS analysis consists of 1024 photodiodes arranged in line with a 0.025 mm pitch (photodiode array; PDA). Ca-K-edge XAFS measurements were conducted at the Photon Factory of the KEK. The synchrotron was operated in top-up mode with 450 mA during the measurements. Specimens were taken from a contact sample of compacted bentonite (Kunigel V1; dry density of 1.6 g/cm3) and hardened OPC (w/c = 0.6) immersed in

  2. Ultrasonic measurements in ice slurry generation by direct contact evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    Vuarnoz, Didier; Ata-Caesar, Derrick; Sari, Osmann; Egolf, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Important reductions of refrigerant amounts can be achieved by using secondary refrigeration fluids. Ice slurry is a two-phase fluid and thus, compared to single phase secondary refrigeration fluids, offers the advantage of the latent heat of fusion when the ice phase melts during heat exchange. Therefore, the challenges that the introduction of ice slurry as a common thermal fluid is facing are, in the first place, how to generate ice slurry in an efficient and ecological way. Optimal design...

  3. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Wenyan Chen; Qiang Cai; Yuan Zhao; Guojuan Zheng; Yuting Liang

    2014-01-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested...

  4. Survey of state water laws affecting coal slurry pipeline development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogozen, M.B.

    1980-11-01

    This report summarizes state water laws likely to affect the development of coal slurry pipelines. It was prepared as part of a project to analyze environmental issues related to energy transportation systems. Coal slurry pipelines have been proposed as a means to expand the existing transportation system to handle the increasing coal shipments that will be required in the future. The availability of water for use in coal slurry systems in the coal-producing states is an issue of major concern.

  5. Heterogeneous ice slurry flow and concentration distribution in horizontal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A Mixture CFD model is applied to describe heterogeneous ice slurry flow. • The ice slurry rheological behavior is considered piecewise. • The coupled flow and concentration profiles in heterogeneous slurry flow is acquired. • The current numerical model achieves good balance between precision and universality. -- Abstract: Ice slurry is an energy-intensive solid–liquid mixture fluid which may play an important role in various cooling purposes. Knowing detailed flow information is important from the system design point of view. However, the heterogeneous ice slurry flow makes it difficult to be quantified due to the complex two phase flow characteristic. The present study applies a Mixture computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on different rheological behavior to characterize the heterogeneous ice slurry flow. The Mixture CFD model was firstly validated by three different experiments. Then the validated Mixture CFD model was applied to solve the ice slurry isothermal flow by considering the rheological behavior piecewise. Finally, the numerical solutions have displayed the coupled flow information, such as slurry velocity, ice particle concentration and pressure drop distribution. The results show that, the ice slurry flow distribution will appear varying degree of asymmetry under different operating conditions. The rheological behavior will be affected by the asymmetric flow distributions. When mean flow velocity is high, Thomas equation can be appropriate for describing ice slurry viscosity. While with the decreasing of mean flow velocity, the ice slurry behaves Bingham rheology. As compared with experimental pressure drop results, the relative errors of numerical computation are almost within ±15%. The Mixture CFD model is validated to be an effective model for describing heterogeneous ice slurry flow and could supply plentiful flow information

  6. Denitrification in nitric-acid-treated cattle slurry during storage.

    OpenAIRE

    Oenema, O.; G. L. Velthof

    1993-01-01

    Lowering the pH of cattle slurry with HNO3 was used to reduce NH3 volatilization during storage and after application. Incubation studies were carried out to examine possible NO3 losses and N2O emission from HNO3 treated slurry during storage. Batches of cattle slurry were treated with various amounts of HNO3 to obtain a pH range of 6.0 to 3.0. The slurries were stirred once or twice a week and stored for 6 months at 15 degrees C. Changes in pH, Eh, NO3- and NH4 concn, and emissions of N2O, C...

  7. Modified swelling pressure apparatus using vapor pressure technique for compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. bentonite. The compacted bentonite is found in unsaturated conditions before applying of swelling due to absorption. The behaviour of compacted bentonite is not consistent with the principle and concepts of classical, saturated soil mechanics. An unsaturated soil theoretical framework using soil water characteristic curve has been fairly established over the past several decades. The soil-water characteristic curve is a relationship between soil moisture and soil suction obtained by the axis translation technique, vapor pressure technique or osmotic suction control which is a key feature in unsaturated soil mechanics. The soil-water characteristic curve can be used for prediction of the shear strength, volume change and hydraulic conductivity. Cui et al. 2002 indicated soil-water characteristic curve of expansive clay soil in high soil suction ranges using osmotic suction technique. Tripathy et al. 2010 described the soil-water characteristic curve both using the axis translation technique and vapor pressure technique in the entire soil suction ranges. Nishimura and Koseki 2011 measured suction of bentonite applied high soil suction due vapor pressure using a chilled mirror dew point potentiometer (WP4-T of DECAGON Device). The bentonite with gravimetric water content of 18 % indicated soil suction of 2.8 MPa at least. It is predicted that suction efforts to swelling pressure and shear strength of unsaturated compacted bentonite. This study focuses on the influence of suction on both swelling pressure and shear strength of compacted bentonite. The soil-water characteristic curve (SWCC) tests were conducted for compacted bentonite using both axis-translation technique and vapor pressure technique. The SWCC had a range from 0 kPa to 296 MPa in suction. The compacted bentonite having two different soil suctions were prepared for swelling pressure tests. Newly swelling pressure testing apparatus was developed in order

  8. Nitrogen fertiliser value of digested dairy cow slurry, its liquid and solid fractions, and of dairy cow slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Cavalli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of crop availability of livestock slurry nitrogen (N is necessary to maximise crop N use efficiency and to minimise environmental losses. Results from field and laboratory incubation experiments suggest that first-year crop availability of slurry N comes mainly from its ammonium fraction because net mineralisation of organic N is often negligible in the short term. A two-year field experiment during 2011 and 2012 in northern Italy was undertaken with several aims: to estimate the N fertiliser value of raw dairy cow slurry, digested dairy cow slurry, and the liquid and solid fractions of the digested slurry, and to verify if applied ammonium recovery was similar both among slurries and between slurries and inorganic N fertiliser (ammonium sulphate. Different fertilisers were applied before silage maize cultivation followed by an unfertilised Italian ryegrass crop. The results showed that ammonium recovery was significantly higher in mineral-fertilised (75% versus slurry-fertilised (30% treatments, except in digested slurry (65%. This indicates that ammonium applied with organic materials is less efficient than when applied with mineral fertiliser. For the digested slurry and its liquid fraction, most of the applied ammonium was available to the maize during its application year (55% due to a low carbon (C/organic N ratio. The apparent N recovery of the raw slurry and digested slurry solid fraction increased substantially between the first (-1.4% and second (20% years, as these materials had high C/organic N ratios; they likely immobilised N for several months post application, producing residual effects during the Italian ryegrass and next maize crops.

  9. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.A. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, S.A. [Government F.C. College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Sorption of Uranium(VI and Thorium(IV by Jordanian Bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawwaz I. Khalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification of raw bentonite was done to remove quartz. This includes mixing the raw bentonite with water and then centrifuge it at 750 rpm; this process is repeated until white purified bentonite is obtained. XRD, XRF, FTIR, and SEM techniques will be used for the characterization of purified bentonite. The sorption behavior of purified Jordanian bentonite towards and Th4+ metal ions in aqueous solutions was studied by batch experiment as a function of pH, contact time, temperature, and column techniques at 25.0∘C and . The highest rate of metal ions uptake was observed after 18 h of shaking, and the uptake has increased with increasing pH and reached a maximum at . Bentonite has shown high metal ion uptake capacity toward uranium(VI than thorium(IV. Sorption data were evaluated according to the pseudo- second-order reaction kinetic. Sorption isotherms were studied at temperatures 25.0∘C, 35.0∘C, and 45.0∘C. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R sorption models equations were applied and the proper constants were derived. It was found that the sorption process is enthalpy driven for uranium(VI and thorium(IV. Recovery of uranium(VI and thorium(IV ions after sorption was carried out by treatment of the loaded bentonite with different concentrations of HNO3 1.0 M, 0.5 M, 0.1 M, and 0.01 M. The best percent recovery for uranium(VI and thorium(IV was obtained when 1.0 M HNO3 was used.

  11. Carbon and nitrogen mineralization in vineyard acid soils amended with a bentonitic winery waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Carbon mineralization and nitrogen ammonification processes were determined in different vineyard soils. The measurements were performed in samples non-amended and amended with different bentonitic winery waste concentrations. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO2 released by the soil under laboratory conditions, whereas NH4+ was determined after its extraction with KCl 2M. The time evolution of both, carbon mineralization and nitrogen ammonification, was followed during 42 days. The released CO2 was low in the analyzed vineyard soils, and hence the metabolic activity in these soils was low. The addition of the bentonitic winery waste to the studied soils increased highly the carbon mineralization (2-5 fold), showing that the organic matter added together the bentonitic waste to the soil have low stability. In both cases, amended and non-amended samples, the maximum carbon mineralization was measured during the first days (2-4 days), decreasing as the incubation time increased. The NH4+ results showed an important effect of bentonitic winery waste on the ammonification behavior in the studied soils. In the non-amended samples the ammonification was no detected in none of the soils, whereas in the amended soils important NH4+ concentrations were detected. In these cases, the ammonification was fast, reaching the maximum values of NH4 between 7 and 14 days after the bentonitic waste additions. Also, the percentages of ammonification respect to the total nitrogen in the soil were high, showing that the nitrogen provided by the bentonitic waste to the soil is non-stable. The fast carbon mineralization found in the soils amended with bentonitic winery wastes shows low possibilities of the use of this waste for the increasing the organic carbon pools in the soil.On the other hand, the use of this waste as N-fertilizer can be possible. However, due its fast ammonification, the waste should be added to the soils during active plant growth periods.

  12. Internal stratification of two thick Ordovician bentonites of Estonia: deciphering primary magmatic, sedimentary, environmental and diagenetic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Siir

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-six samples from two major altered volcanic ash beds, Kinnekulle and BII Bentonite of the Kuressaare core section (K-3, Saaremaa Island, were explored to record the geochemical and mineralogical heterogeneity of beds. Signs of ash transport fractionation, redeposition of volcanic ash and diagenetic redistribution of material are described and interpreted. In authigenic mineralogy of the Kinnekulle Bentonite illite–smectite dominates with addition of K-feldspar at the margins. The BII Bentonite is composed of chlorite–smectite and illite–smectite. The stability of phenocryst compositions, including that of sanidine and biotite, indicates that both bentonites originate from a single eruption. The observed rather stable pyroclastic sanidine compositions in the cross section of bentonites confirm the reliability of sanidine-based fingerprinting of altered volcanic ash beds. Trace element distribution in bentonites and host rocks indicates that Zr, Ga, Rb, Nb, Ti and Th stayed largely immobile during volcanic ash alteration and reflect primary ash composition. However, some redistribution of Nb and Ti as well as Y has probably occurred near the contacts of bentonite with the host rock. More scattered grain size distribution and immobile element patterns of the Kinnekulle Bentonite support the idea that the primary ash bed had a heterogeneous composition and it was one of the biggest bentonites of the Phanerozoic and most likely records an extended volcanic event. Significant geochemical variations, including a high S content, near the upper and lower contacts of the Kinnekulle Bentonite and elevated Ca and P in host rocks of both bentonites suggest that the studied large ash-falls caused notable perturbations in shallow marine and early post-sedimentary environment.

  13. Acidification of pig slurry before separation to improve slurry management on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Iria; Coutinho, João; Balsari, Paolo; Popovic, Olga; Fangueiro, David

    2016-08-01

    Pig slurry, rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), is generally applied to soil as organic fertilizer. However, costs related to slurry transport may limit its utilization to fields close to the farm, leading to significant N losses, namely ammonia (NH3) emissions. Slurry acidification, to minimize NH3 emissions, is a potential solution to this problem, while solid-liquid separation leads to a solid fraction (SF) - rich in organic matter (OM) and phosphorus - and a liquid fraction (LF) rich in soluble nutrients. We hypothesized that a combination of acidification and separation could affect the quality of the resulting fractions depending on the separation technique used. After acidification, the two most common techniques for separation, centrifugation (CF) and screw-press (SP), were applied. The main characteristics of the slurry fractions in terms of nutrient concentrations and speciation as well as the potential N mineralization (PNM) were analysed. Our results show SFs with improved properties, mostly N and PNM when acidification is performed before separation with both techniques. The PNM was significantly increased in LFs from both techniques after acidification. The [Formula: see text] concentration increased in LFs from SP with acidification; therefore, slurry acidification is recommended to avoid any N losses during the separation process with SP, while CF may not require such pretreatment. Acidification could allow the use of a cheaper technique such as SP relative to CF since it prevents NH3 emissions during the separation process and leads to more equilibrated fractions in terms of nutrient composition. PMID:26695081

  14. Adsorption Properties of Bentonite with In Situ Immobilized Polyaniline Towards Anionic Forms of Cr(VI), Mo(VI), W(VI), V(V)

    OpenAIRE

    Kateryna RYABCHENKO; Elina YANOVSKA; Mariya MELNYK; Dariusz STERNIK; Olga KYCHKIRUK; Valentun TERTYKH

    2016-01-01

    A new composite material bentonite-PANI was synthesized by in situ immobilization of polyaniline (PANI) on the surface of natural mineral bentonite. It was established as a result of the modification of bentonite a surface area and an interlayer distance of mineral decrease and particles of bentonite transformed of irregular shape with different porosity on irregularly shaped particles of smaller size. It has been found that the total Cr(VI) ions extraction took place under the acid condition...

  15. Thermal detoxification and bloating of chromium(VI) with bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Y.-L., E-mail: yulin@thu.edu.t [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, H.-F.; Peng, Y.-S.; Yang, J.-C. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China); Paul Wang, H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environmental Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, C.-Y.; Shih, W.-L.; Hsu, C.-C. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung 40704, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    This study stabilizes and bloats Cr(VI)-sorbed bentonite by heating at high temperature. Cr leaching decreases with increasing temperatures. Heating the sample at 1100 {sup o}C results in a non-detectable Cr concentration in the leachate, equivalent to a Cr leaching percent less than 0.001% (i.e., Cr TCLP concentration <0.018 mg of Cr L{sup -1} of leachate). Morphology observed with a scanning electron microscopy indicates the occurrence of sintering of the sample heated at 1100 {sup o}C. The heated samples also show the occurrence of a vesicant process at 1100 {sup o}C. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that heating at 500 {sup o}C for 4 h can convert approximately 87% Cr(VI) into Cr(III) that is negligibly toxic; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detected to be the most abundant Cr species. After heating at higher temperatures, namely 900-1100 {sup o}C, almost all doped Cr(VI) is reduced to Cr(III) as inferred from the height of the pre-edge peak of XANES spectra and/or from XANES simulation.

  16. Evaluation of impact strength of polyamide 6/bentonite clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, Rene Anisio; Araujo, Edcleide Maria; Tomas Jeferson Alves; Amanda Damiao; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega [Federal University of Campina Grande (CCT/UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia; Pessan, Luiz Antonio [Federal University of Sao Carlos (DEMa/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Materials Engineering Department

    2012-07-15

    Nanocomposites of polymer/clay have had much attention in recent years, particularly those developed with layered silicates due to the need of engineering materials more efficient than pure polymers for certain applications. The level of exfoliation of layered silicates in crystalline structure of polymer matrices has been studied and has been observed that it affects the crystalline behavior and the physical and mechanical properties. In this study, nanocomposites of polyamide 6 were obtained by the melt intercalation method, using a Brazilian bentonite modified with a quaternary ammonium salt. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the incorporation of salt among the layers of clay, making it organophilic and that the nanocomposites presented exfoliated and/or partially exfoliated structures and confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By thermogravimetry (TG), the results indicated that the presence of clay increased the thermal stability of polyamide 6. The impact properties of the nanocomposites showed inferior values in relation to the pure polyamide, in other words, decrease the toughness. (author)

  17. Experimental Study on Volume Change Indices of Bentonite Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results regarding statically compacted clay specimens to study the volume change behavior of bentonites. The volume change indices such as the coefficients of compressibility, volume compressibility, and consolidation ( i. e.av , mv and cv respectively) and the saturated coefficient of permeability k at different surcharge pressures were determined with the commonly adopted procedures. The swell potentials, swelling pressures, different phases of the swollen specimens were analyzed for the volume change behavior during compression. Experimental results revealed that the swell potential is dependent on the initial dry density, the initial water content and the vertical pressure at which the clay specimens were allowed to swell. The swelling pressure was found to be similar for the specimens with varying water content, showing strong dependency on the initial void ratio. The compression indices ( viz. mv and av) of saturated specimens decreased with an increase in the vertical pressure. About 80% to 90% of the volume change occurred in the primary compression phase under any given vertical pressure. The coefficient of consolidation cv and the saturated coefficient of permeability k decreased with an increase in the vertical pressure.

  18. FACTORS AFFECTING THE HYDRAULIC BARRIER PERFORMANCE OF SOIL-BENTONITE MIXTURE CUT-OFF WALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Atsushi; Inui, Toru; Katsumi, Takeshi; Kamon, Masashi; Araki, Susumu

    Containment technique using cut-off walls is a valid method against contaminants in subsurface soil and/or groundwater. This paper states laboratory testing results on hydraulic barrier performance of Soil-Bentonite (SB), which is made by mixing bentonite with in-situ soil. Since the bentonite swelling is sensitive to chemicals, chemical compatibility is important for the hydraulic barrier performance of SB. Hydraulic conductivity tests using flexible-wall permeameter were conducted on SB specimens with various types and concentrations of chemicals in the pore water and/or in the permeant and with various bentonite powder contents. As a result, hydraulic barrier performance of SB was influenced by the chemical concentration in the pore water of original soil and bentonite powder content. In the case that SB specimens have damage parallel to the permeating direction, no significant leakage in the SB occurs by the self-sealing property of SB. In addition, the hydraulic conductivity values of SB have excellent correlation with their plastic indexes and swelling pr essures, thus these properties of SB have some possibility to be indicators for estimation of the hydraulic barrier performance of SB.

  19. The Lower Silurian Osmundsberg K-bentonite. Part I: Stratigraphic position, distribution, and palaeogeographic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Stig M.; Huff, W.D.; Kolata, Dennis R.

    1998-01-01

    A large number of Lower Silurian (Llandovery) K-bentonite beds have been recorded from northwestern Europe, particularly in Baltoscandia and the British Isles, but previous attempts to trace single beds regionally have yielded inconclusive results. The present study suggests that based on its unusual thickness, stratigraphic position and trace element geochemistry, one Telychian ash bed, the Osmundsberg K-bentonite, can be recognized at many localities in Estonia, Sweden and Norway and probably also in Scotland and Northern Ireland. This bed, which is up to 115 cm thick, is in the lower-middle turriculatus Zone. The stratigraphic position, thickness variation and geographic distribution of the Osmundsberg K-bentonite are illustrated by means of 12 selected Llandovery successions in Sweden, Estonia, Norway, Denmark, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In Baltoscandia, the Osmundsberg K-bentonite shows a trend of general thickness increase in a western direction suggesting that its source area was located in the northern Iapetus region between Baltica and Laurentia. Because large-magnitude ash falls like the one that produced the Osmundsberg K-bentonite last at most a few weeks, such an ash bed may be used as a unique time-plane for a variety of regional geological and palaeontological studies.

  20. THE IMPACT OF LABORATORY AIR TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY ON BENTONITE WATER ABSORPTION CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Strgar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite, which is a mineral component of geosynthetic clay liners, has important physical and chemical properties that ensure very small hydraulic permeability. The main component of bentonite is a clay mineral called sodium montmorillonite whose very low permeability is due to its ability to swell. The deposits of bentonite are spread all over the world, however, only a very small number of those deposits satisfies all the quality and durability demands that must be met if the bentonite is to be used in the sealing barriers. Depending on the location of installation and their purpose, geosynthetic clay liners must meet certain requirements. Their compatibility with the prescribed criterion is confirmed through various laboratory procedures. Amongst them are tests examining the index indicators (free swell index, fluid loss index, and water absorption capacity. This paper presents results regarding the impact of laboratory air temperature and relative humidity of the testing area on the water absorption capacity. This is one of the criteria that bentonite must satisfy during the quality and durability control of the mineral component of geosynthetic clay liner (the paper is published in Croatian.

  1. Polypropylene Fiber Amendments to Alleviate Initiation and Evolution of Desiccation Cracks in Bentonite Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, M.; Gebrenegus, T. B.

    2009-12-01

    Sodium saturated bentonite is a major constituent of compacted and geosynthetic liners and covers for hydraulic isolation of hazardous waste, playing a crucial role in protecting groundwater and other environmental resources from harmful landfill leachates. Due to favorable hydraulic properties (i.e., low permeability), large surface area and associated adsorption capacity for particular contaminants, and relative abundance and low cost, bentonite is the material of choice in many modern waste containment systems. However, long-term interactions between bentonite and waste leachate and exposure of bentonite to desiccative conditions may significantly deteriorate liner or cover performance and ultimately lead to failure of containment systems. In the presented study, the potential usefulness of polypropylene fiber amendments for preventing initiation and evolution of desiccation cracks, while maintaining acceptably low permeability under saturated conditions was investigated. Well-controlled desiccation experiments were conducted using initially saturated bentonite-sand mixtures that contained varying amounts of polypropylene fibers. Initiation and evolution of surface cracks were observed by means of X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT). Advanced image analysis techniques were employed to characterize and quantify 2-D and 3-D features of the evolving crack networks. Potential negative effects of employed additives on saturated hydraulic conductivity were determined with fully-automated Flexible Wall Permeametry (FWP).

  2. Adsorption behavior of a textile dye of Reactive Blue 19 from aqueous solutions onto modified bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to evaluate adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic parameters of Reactive Blue 19 (RB19) onto modified bentonite from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature were investigated in the experimentally. Natural bentonite was modified by using 1,6-diamino hexane (DAH) as a modifying agent. The characterization of modified bentonite (DAH-bentonite) was accomplished by using FTIR, TGA, BET and elemental analysis techniques. The optimum pH value for the adsorption experiments was found to be 1.5 and all the experiments were carried out at this pH value. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model agrees very well with the experimental results. Equilibrium data were also fitted well to the Langmuir isotherm model in the studied concentration range of RB19 at 20 deg. C. The results indicate that DAH-modified bentonite is a suitable adsorbent for the adsorption of textile dyes.

  3. Adsorption of mixed cationic-nonionic surfactant and its effect on bentonite structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaxin Zhang; Yan Zhao; Yong Zhu; Huayong Wu; Hongtao Wang; Wenjing Lu

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of cationic-nordonic mixed surfactant onto bentonite and its effect on bentonite structure were investigated.The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behavior on clay mineral for its possible use in remediation technologies of soil and groundwater contaminated by toxic organic compounds.The cationic surfactant used was hexadecylpyridinium bromide(HDPB),and the nonionic suffactant was Triton X-100(TX100).Adsorption of TX100 was enhanced significantly by the addition of HDPB,but this enhancement decreased with an increase in the fraction of the cationic surfactant.Part of HDPB was replaced by TX100 which decreased the adsorption of HDPB.However,the total adsorbed amount of the mixed surfactant was still increased substantially,indicating the synergistic effect between the cationic and nonionic surfactants.The surfactant-modified bentonite was characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area measurement,Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,and thermogravimetric-derivative thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyses.Surfactant intercalation was found to decrease the bentonite specific surface area,pore volume,and surface roughness and irregularities,as calculated by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms.The co-adsorption of the cationic and nonionic surfactants increased the ordering conformation of the adsorbed surfactants on bentonite,but decreased the thermal stability of the organobentonite system.

  4. FRACTAL ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL ADSORPTION ON SURFACES OF ACID ACTIVATED BENTONITES FROM SERBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Rožić

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Solid surfaces are neither ideally regular, that is, morphological and energeticcally homogeneous, nor are they fully irregular or fractal. Instead, real solid surfaces exhibit a limited degree of organization quantified by the fractal dimension, D. Fractal analysis was applied to investigate the effect of concentrations of HCl solutions on the structural and textural properties of chemically activated bentonite from southern Serbia. Acid treatment of bentonites is applied in order to remove impurities and various exchangeable cations from bentonite clay. Important physical changes in acid-activated smectite are the increase of the specific surface area and of the average pore volume, depending on acid strength, time and temperature of a treatment. On the basis of the sorption-structure analysis, the fractal dimension of the bentonite surfaces was determined by Mahnke and Mögel method. The fractal dimension evaluated by this method was 2.11 for the AB3 and 1.94 for the AB4.5 sample. The estimation of the values of the fractal dimension of activated bentonites was performed in the region of small pores, 0.5 nm < rp < 2 nm.

  5. Microbial incidence on copper and titanium embedded in compacted bentonite clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Joergen; Lydmark, Sara; Edlund, Johanna; Paeaejaervi, Anna; Pedersen, Karsten (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-10-15

    The incidence of bacteria on metal surfaces was examined in an experimental setting simulating conditions of the proposed Swedish concept for disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Titanium and copper rods were embedded in compacted bentonite clay saturated with groundwater collected at a depth of 450 m. Bentonite blocks were exposed to an external flux of groundwater with or without added lactate or H{sub 2} for up to 203 days. Bacterial accumulation on metal rods and in the surrounding bentonite was analyzed using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), with genetic markers for overall bacterial presence (16S rDNA) as well as specific for sulfate-reducing bacteria (apsA). Clay species composition was analyzed by cloning and sequencing 16S rDNA extracted from the clay. Results suggest limited bacterial accumulation on metal surfaces, amounting to a maximum of approximately 106 apsA copies cm-2, corresponding to a 3.7% coverage of metal surfaces. Bacterial species composition appeared to be a mix of species originating from the bentonite clay and from the added groundwater, including an apparently high proportion of sulfate-reducing bacteria. While titanium surfaces exhibited higher bacterial presence than did copper surfaces, neither the degree of bentonite compaction nor the addition of lactate or H{sub 2} appeared to have any effect on the bacterial incidence on metal surfaces

  6. Photodegradation of Methylene Blue by TiO2-Fe3O4-Bentonite Magnetic Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe3O4-bentonite nanoparticles have been prepared by a coprecipitation technique under a nitrogen atmosphere. An aqueous suspension of bentonite was first modified with FeCl2 and FeCl3. TiO2 was then loaded onto the surface of the Fe3O4-bentonite by a sol-gel method. After sufficient drying, the colloidal solution was placed in a muffle furnace at 773 K to obtain the TiO2-Fe3O4-bentonite composite. The material has been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM. Morphological observation showed that Fe3O4 and TiO2 nanoparticles had been adsorbed on the surface of bentonite nanoneedles. The material was then applied for the photodegradation of the azo dye methylene blue (MB. It was found that the removal efficiency of MB exceeded 90% under UV illumination, and that only a 20% mass loss was incurred after six cycles. The composite material thus showed good photocatalytic performance and recycling properties.

  7. Modeling cation diffusion in compacted water-saturated Na-bentonite at low ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium bentonites are used as barrier materials for the isolation of landfills and are under consideration for a similar use in the subsurface storage of high-level radioactive waste. The performance of these barriers is determined in large part by molecular diffusion in the bentonite pore space. We tested two current models of cation diffusion in bentonite against experimental data on the relative apparent diffusion coefficients of two representative cations, sodium and strontium. On the 'macropore/nanopore' model, solute molecules are divided into two categories, with unequal pore-scale diffusion coefficients, based on location: in macropores or in interlayer nanopores. On the 'surface diffusion' model, solute molecules are divided into categories based on chemical speciation: dissolved or adsorbed. The macropore/nanopore model agrees with all experimental data at partial montmorillonite dry densities ranging from 0.2 (a dilute bentonite gel) to 1.7 kg dm-3 (a highly compacted bentonite with most of its pore space located in interlayer nanopores), whereas the surface diffusion model fails at partial montmorillonite dry densities greater than about 1.2 kg dm-3

  8. [Thermodynamics adsorption and its influencing factors of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on the bentonite and humus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Chi; Zai, De-Xin; Zhao, Rong

    2010-11-01

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus was investigated by using the equilibrium oscillometry. The adsorption capacity of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus was great higher than bentonite at the same concentration. Equilibrium data of Langmuir, Freundlich isotherms showed significant relationship to the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on humus (chlorpyrifos: R2 0.996 4, 0.996 3; triazophos: R2 0.998 9, 0.992 4). Langmuir isotherm was the best for chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite (chlorpyrifos: R2 = 0.995 7, triazophos: R2 = 0.998 9). The pH value, adsorption equilibrium time and temperature were the main factors affecting adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos on bentonite and humus. The adsorption equilibrium time on mixed adsorbent was 12h for chlorpyrifos and 6h for triazophos respectively. The mass ratio of humus and bentonite was 12% and 14% respectively, the adsorption of chlorpyrifos and triazophos was the stronglest and tended to saturation. At different temperatures by calculating the thermodynamic parameters deltaG, deltaH and deltaS, confirmed that the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous exothermic process theoretically. The adsorption was the best when the pH value was 6.0 and the temperature was 15 degrees C.

  9. Multi-stage slurry system used for grinding and polishing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hed, P. Paul (San Ramon, CA); Fuchs, Baruch A. (Aventura, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A slurry system draws slurry from a slurry tank via one of several intake pipes, where each pipe has an intake opening at a different depth in the slurry. The slurry is returned to the slurry tank via a bypass pipe in order to continue the agitation of the slurry. The slurry is then diverted to a delivery pipe, which supplies slurry to a polisher. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is stopped in order for the slurry in the slurry tank to begin to settle. As the polishing continues, slurry is removed from shallower depths in order to pull finer grit from the slurry. When the polishing is complete, the flow in the delivery pipe is ceased. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is resumed to start agitating the slurry. In another embodiment, the multiple intake pipes are replaced by a single adjustable pipe. As the slurry is settling, the pipe is moved upward to remove the finer grit near the top of the slurry tank as the polishing process continues.

  10. Mass transfer in gas-liquid slurry reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beenackers, A.A.C.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1993-01-01

    A critical review is presented on the mass transfer characteristics of gas¿liquid slurry reactors. The recent findings on the influence of the presence of solid particles on the following mass transfer parameters in slurry reactors are discussed: volumetric gas¿liquid mass transfer coefficients (kLa

  11. MASS-TRANSFER IN GAS-LIQUID SLURRY REACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEENACKERS, AACM; VANSWAAIJ, WPM

    1993-01-01

    A critical review is presented on the mass transfer characteristics of gas-liquid slurry reactors. The recent findings on the influence of the presence of solid particles on the following mass transfer parameters in slurry reactors are discussed: volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficients (k(L

  12. Fluidized bed ice slurry generator for enhanced secondary cooling systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meewisse, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Ice slurries are liquid solutions of a freezing point depressant in water, in which small ice crystals are present. Ice slurries are efficient secondary cooling fluids because they utilize the latent heat effect involved with the ice/water phase change. A high heat capacity is available at relativel

  13. The resource utilization of algae - preparing coal slurry with algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidong Li; Weifeng Li; Haifeng Li [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification of Education Ministry of China

    2010-05-15

    Nowadays, the occurrence of harmful algal blooms is increasing rapidly all over the world. However, the methods of resource utilization of algae are very few. In this study, we propose a new way to dispose algae, which is gasification of coal-algae slurry. Coal slurries prepared with algae were investigated, and gasification reactivity of coal-algae slurry was compared with that of coal-water slurry (CWS). The results showed that, anaerobic fermentation, chemical treatment, high-speed shearing and heating are effective pre-treatment methods on reducing the viscosity of algae, which could obviously increase the maximum solids concentration of coal-algae slurry. When the de-ionized water/algae ratio is 1:1, the maximum solids concentration could get to 62.5 wt.%, which is almost the same as that of CWS. All the coal-algae slurries exhibit pseudo-plastic behavior, and this type of fluid is shear-thinning. Compared with CWS, the stability of coal-algae slurry is much better, which could be no solids deposition after 70 h. The coal-algae slurry displays better gasification reactivity than CWS. 30 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Bauxite slurry pipeline: start up operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othon, Otilio; Babosa, Eder; Edvan, Francisco; Brittes, Geraldo; Melo, Gerson; Janir, Joao; Favacho, Orlando; Leao, Marcos; Farias, Obadias [Vale, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, Nilton [Anglo Ferrous Brazil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The mine of Miltonia is located in Paragominas-PA, in the north of Brazil. Bauxite slurry pipeline starts at the Mine of Miltonia and finishes in the draining installation of Alunorte refinery at the port of Barcarena-PA, located approximately 244km away from the mine. The pipeline runs over seven cities and passes below four great rivers stream beds. The system was designed for an underground 24 inches OD steel pipe to carry 9.9 million dry metric tonnes per annum (dMTAs) of 50.5% solid concentration bauxite slurry, using only one pumping station. The system is composed by four storage tanks and six piston diaphragm pumps, supplying a flow of 1680 m3/h. There is a cathodic protection system along the pipeline extension to prevent external corrosion and five pressure monitoring stations to control hydraulic conditions, there is also a fiber optic cable interconnection between pump station and terminal station. Pipeline Systems Incorporated (PSI) was the designer and followed the commissioning program of the start up operations. This paper will describe the beginning of the pipeline operations, technical aspects of the project, the operational experiences acquired in these two years, the faced problems and also the future planning. (author)

  15. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  16. Effective Compressibility of a Bubbly Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, S. I.; Gauglitz, P. A.; Rossen, W. R.

    2001-09-01

    The goal of this study is to fit model parameters to changes in waste level in response to barometric pressure changes in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. This waste compressibility is a measure of the quantity of gas, typically hydrogen and other flammable gases, that can pose a safety hazard, retained in the waste. A one-dimensional biconical-pore-network model for compressibility of a bubbly slurry is presented in a companion paper. Fitting these results to actual waste level changes in the tanks implies that bubbles in the slurry layer are long and the ratio of pore-body radius to pore-throat radius is close to 1; unfortunately, compressibility can not be quantified unambiguously from the data without additional information on pore geometry. Therefore, determining the quantity of gas in the tanks requires more than just waste-level data. The non-uniqueness of the fit is also found with two other simple models: a capillary-tube model with contact angle hysteresis and a spherical-pore model. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11502128

  17. Improving feed slurry rheology by colloidal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, W.O.; Ternes, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PSN) has investigated three colloidal techniques in the laboratory to improve the sedimentation and flowability of Hanford simulated (nonradioactive) current acid waste (CAW) melter feed slurry: polymer-induced bridging flocculation; manipulating glass former (raw SiO/sub 2/ or frit) particle size; and alteration of nitric acid content. All three methods proved successful in improving the rheology of the simulated CAW feed. This initially had exhibited nearly worst-case flow and clogging properties, but was transformed into a flowable, resuspendable (nonclogging) feed. While each has advantages and disadvantages, the following three specific alternatives proved successful: addition of a polyelectrolyte in 2000 ppM concentration to feed slurry; substitution of a 49 wt % SiO/sub 2/ colloidal suspension (approx. 10-micron particle size) for the -325 mesh (less than or equal to 44-micron particle size) raw-chemical SiO/sub 2/; and increase of nitric acid content from the reference 1.06 M to optimum 1.35 M. The first method, polymer-induced bridging flocculation, results in a high sediment volume, nonclogging CAW feed. The second method, involving the use of colloidal silica particles results in a nonsedimenting feed that when left unagitated forms a gel. The third method, increase in feed acidity, results in a highly resuspendable (nonclogging) melter feed. Further research is therefore required to determine which of the three alternatives is the preferred method of achieving rheological control of CAW melter feeds.

  18. Time evolution of the general characteristics and Cu retention capacity in an acid soil amended with a bentonite winery waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula;

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bentonite waste added to a "poor" soil on its general characteristic and copper adsorption capacity was assessed. The soil was amended with different bentonite waste concentrations (0, 10, 20, 40 and 80Mgha-1) in laboratory pots, and different times of incubation of samples were...

  19. Report on Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Laboratory Tests Performed by CIEMAT on Febex Bentonite 2004-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the laboratory studies performed by CIEMAT with the FEBEX bentonite in the context of WP3.2 of the NF-PRO Project and of the Agreement ENRESA-CIEMAT Anexo V are presented and analysed in this report. They refer to the effect of the hydraulic gradient on the permeability of bentonite, the effect of the thermal gradient on the hydration kinetics of bentonite, and the repercussion of temperature on the hydro-mechanical properties of bentonite (swelling, permeability and water retention capacity). In all the cases the bentonite has been used compacted to densities expected in the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The existence of threshold and critical hydraulic gradients has been observed, both of them dependent on bentonite density and water pressures. After more than seven years of hydration, the 40-cm high bentonite columns are far from full saturation, the thermal gradient additionally delaying the process, which is very slow. Temperatures below 100 degree centigrade slightly decrease the swelling and the water retention capacity of the bentonite and increase its permeability. The information obtained improves the knowledge on the behaviour of expansive clay and will help the development of constitutive models and the interpretation of the results obtained in the mock-up and the in situ tests. (Author) 35 refs

  20. Report on Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Laboratory Tests Performed by CIEMAT on Febex Bentonite 2004-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Gomez-Espina, R.

    2009-11-25

    The results of the laboratory studies performed by CIEMAT with the FEBEX bentonite in the context of WP3.2 of the NF-PRO Project and of the Agreement ENRESA-CIEMAT Anexo V are presented and analysed in this report. They refer to the effect of the hydraulic gradient on the permeability of bentonite, the effect of the thermal gradient on the hydration kinetics of bentonite, and the repercussion of temperature on the hydro-mechanical properties of bentonite (swelling, permeability and water retention capacity). In all the cases the bentonite has been used compacted to densities expected in the engineered barrier of a high-level radioactive waste repository. The existence of threshold and critical hydraulic gradients has been observed, both of them dependent on bentonite density and water pressures. After more than seven years of hydration, the 40-cm high bentonite columns are far from full saturation, the thermal gradient additionally delaying the process, which is very slow. Temperatures below 100 degree centigrade slightly decrease the swelling and the water retention capacity of the bentonite and increase its permeability. The information obtained improves the knowledge on the behaviour of expansive clay and will help the development of constitutive models and the interpretation of the results obtained in the mock-up and the in situ tests. (Author) 35 refs.

  1. A coupled THC model of the FEBEX in situ test with bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2011-04-01

    The performance assessment of a geological repository for radioactive waste requires quantifying the geochemical evolution of the bentonite engineered barrier. This barrier will be exposed to coupled thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes. This paper presents a coupled THC model of the FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test which accounts for bentonite swelling and chemical and thermal osmosis. Model results attest the relevance of thermal osmosis and bentonite swelling for the geochemical evolution of the bentonite barrier while chemical osmosis is found to be almost irrelevant. The model has been tested with data collected after the dismantling of heater 1 of the in situ test. The model reproduces reasonably well the measured temperature, relative humidity, water content and inferred geochemical data. However, it fails to mimic the solute concentrations at the heater-bentonite and bentonite-granite interfaces because the model does not account for the volume change of bentonite, the CO{sub 2}(g) degassing and the transport of vapor from the bentonite into the granite. The inferred HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and pH data cannot be explained solely by solute transport, calcite dissolution and protonation/deprotonation by surface complexation, suggesting that such data may be affected also by other reactions.

  2. Transport of heavy metals and chemical compatibility of hydraulic conductivity of a compacted sand-bentonite mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthanit Charoenthaisong

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soils are usually used as barrier material in landfill liners because of its low hydraulic conductivity and high sorption capacity. Bentonite, which consists mainly of montmorillonite, has a high cation exchange capacity resulting in a high retention capacity of heavy metals. Sand is a permeable material but its hydraulic conductivity decreases significantly when mixed with bentonite. However, using a sand-bentonite mixture as landfill liners is questionable, because the hydraulic conductivity of the sand-bentonite mixture may increase when permeated with heavy metal solutions, which are normally found in landfill leachates. In this paper, transport of heavy metals through a compacted sand-bentonite mixture and its chemical compatibility were studied through the batch adsorption test, the column test, and the hydraulic conductivity test.Experimental results indicate that the sorption capacity of the bentonite, ranked in descending order, was Cr3+, Pb2+, Cd2+, Zn2+, and Ni2+, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of the sand-bentonite mixture were in the order of 10-5 cm2/s and the retardation factors were 130, 115, 111, and 90 for Pb2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of thesand-bentonite mixture was only compatible with a chromium solution having a concentration not greater than 0.001 M.

  3. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard;

    2012-01-01

    with acidification, on sulfur transformations in slurry and emissions of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) during storage of fresh and aged cattle slurry. When pH was lowered to 5.5 it resulted in an almost complete inhibition of sulfate reduction. There was a huge emission of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with addition...... of sulfate and methionine (P H2S production in the sulfate-amended slurries resulted in little accumulation of MT and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) under neutral...... of the compounds in fresh or aged slurry. Generally, addition of a sulfate increased the contribution from H2S dramatically, whereas acidification lowered the H2S contribution but increased that of MT. Thus, acidification of slurry with sulfuric acid may potentially produce more odor from S compounds than...

  4. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    retention of particulate P and dissolved organic P, caused by placing slurry away from active flow paths in the fine-textured soil columns, as well as to chemical retention of dissolved inorganic P, caused by better contact between slurry P and soil adsorption sites. Dissolved organic P was less retained......Managing phosphorus (P) losses in soil leachate following land application of manure is key to curbing eutrophication in many regions. We compared P leaching from columns of variably textured, intact soils (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) subjected to surface application or injection of dairy cattle (Bos...... in soil after slurry application than other P forms. On these soils with low to intermediate P status, slurry injection lowered P leaching losses from clay-rich soil, but not from the sandy soils, highlighting the importance of soil texture in managing P losses following slurry application....

  5. Effect of fermentation temperature on hydrogen production from cow waste slurry by using anaerobic microflora within the slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Waki, Miyoko; Moriya, Naoko; Yasuda, Tomoko; Tanaka, Yasuo; Haga, Kiyonori

    2007-02-01

    We examined hydrogen production from a dairy cow waste slurry (13.4 g of volatile solids per liter) by batch cultures in a temperature range from 37 to 85 degrees C, using microflora naturally present within the slurry. Without the addition of seed bacteria, hydrogen was produced by simply incubating the slurry, using the microflora within the slurry. Interestingly, two peaks of fermentation temperatures for hydrogen production from the slurry were observed at 60 and 75 degrees C (392 and 248 ml H2 per liter of slurry, respectively). After the termination of the hydrogen evolution, the microflora cultured at 60 degrees C displayed hydrogen-consuming activity, but hydrogen-consuming activity of the microflora cultured at 75 degrees C was not detected, at least for 24 days. At both 60 and 75 degrees C, the main by-product was acetate, and the optimum pH of the slurry for hydrogen production was around neutral. Bacteria related to hydrogen-producing moderate and extreme thermophiles, Clostridium thermocellum and Caldanaerobacter subterraneus, were detected in the slurries cultured at 60 and 75 degrees C, respectively, by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses, using the V3 region of 16S rDNA.

  6. Preparation of Bentonite Supported Nano Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysts by Electrostatic Self-assembly Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Cheng; SHI Huisheng; LI Yan

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic self-assembly method (ESAM) was used to prepare bentonite supported-nano titanium dioxide photocatalysts.The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Methyl orange was used to estimate the photocatalytic activity of the materials.The effects of the calcination temperature and silane dosage on the photocatalytic activity of the samples were investigated.The experimental results show that the bentonite facilitates the formation of anatase and restrains the transformation of anatase to rutile.Part of nano-size TiO2 particles insert into the galleries of bentonite.The photocatalysts exhibit a synergistic effect of adsorption and photocatalysis on methyl orange.Photocatalysts prepared by ESAM method exhibit higher photocatalytic activity and better recycle ability than those of the traditional method.

  7. Leachability of bentonite/cement for medium-level waste immobilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlat, M.S.; Rabia, N. [Centre de Radioprotection et de Surete, Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    1998-12-31

    The release of radionuclides from Algerian bentonite/cement matrix has been measured experimentally using static and dynamic testing procedures. The waste forms were cement/sand and bentonite/cement matrices contaminated with Cs-137. To characterise radionuclide/waste form combination, two parameters, diffusion (D) and distribution coefficients ({alpha}) were used. (D) is an effective diffusion coefficient that describes the kinetic behaviour and is most easily determined using Soxhlet test, whereas, ({alpha}) describes the distribution of radionuclide between aqueous and solid phases at equilibrium and is best measured in static test. Leach rates obtained being very low. Distribution coefficient values have showed that the bentonite has relatively a high degree of fixation. It was concluded that the matrix under study seems play a role for the immobilisation. (orig.)

  8. Rebounding process of moulding sands-thermal degradation of bentonite binding qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dańko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems related to a gradual degradation of binding qualities of montmorillonite, the main component of foundry bentonites, are presented in the paper. This degradation is caused by high temperatures originated from liquid metal influencing moulding sands. Laboratory measurements of an active binding agent content in classic moulding sands prepared with two types of bentonite and subjected to a controlled heating to high temperatures – were performed. These laboratory examinations were compared to industrial tests, in which a temperature distribution was being determined in several places in the thickness of the casting ingot mould for 24 hours from the moment of pouring liquid metal. On the basis of the performed examinations, the method allowing to determine optimal additions in the rebounding process of the tested bentonites was developed.

  9. Removal of radioactive cesium, strontium, and iodine from natural waters using bentonite, zeolite, and activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cs-134, Sr-85, and I-131 were produced by neutron irradiation of CsCl, SrCl2, and K2TeO3, respectively, using the Kyoto University Reactor. These radioactive nuclides were added to river water and seawater to prepare artificially contaminated samples, and the removal of these nuclides using bentonite, zeolite, and activated carbon was then investigated. In the river water samples, Cs-134 and Sr-85 were successfully removed using bentonite and zeolite, and I-131 was removed using activated carbon. In the seawater samples, Cs-134 was removed using bentonite and zeolite, whereas Sr-85 and I-131 were hardly removed at all by these adsorbents. (author)

  10. Influence of ionic strength on the viscosities and water loss of bentonite suspensions containing polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Viana Amorim

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was made of the influence of ionic strength (S on the apparent (AV and plastic (PV viscosities and water loss (WL of sodium bentonite suspension with polymers. Na-bentonite was dispersed in water (4.86% w/w of different ionic strengths (S = 0.0, 0.015, 0.030 and 0.045 M followed by the addition of polymer. Three polymer samples were studied, i.e., low viscosity carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC BV, polyanionic cellulose (PAC, and partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM. The results indicated that the presence of salts and increased salinity greatly influence the apparent and plastic viscosities and water loss of bentonite suspensions with polymer.

  11. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Bentonite Clay - Laboratory and in situ Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the diffusion of ions in compacted bentonite clay. Laboratory experiments were performed to examine in detail different processes that affect the diffusion. To demonstrate that the results obtained from the laboratory investigations are valid under in situ conditions, two different kinds of in situ experiments were performed. Laboratory experiments were performed to better understand the impact of ionic strength on the diffusion of S2+ and Cs+ ions, which sorb to mineral surfaces primarily by ion exchange. Furthermore, surface related diffusion was examined and demonstrated to take place for Sr2+ and Cs+ but not for Co2+, which sorbs on mineral surfaces by complexation. The diffusion of anions in bentonite clay compacted to different dry densities was also investigated. The results indicate that anion diffusion in bentonite clay consists of two processes, one fast and another slower. We ascribe the fast diffusive process to intralayer diffusion and the slow process to diffusion in interparticle water, where anions are to some extent sorbed to edge sites of the montmorillonite. Two different types of in situ experiments were performed, CHEMLAB and LOT. CHEMLAB is a borehole laboratory, where cation (Cs+, Sr2+ and Co2+) and anion (I- and TcO4-) diffusion experiments were performed using groundwater from a fracture in the borehole. In the LOT experiments cylindrical bentonite blocks surrounding a central copper rod were placed in a 4 m deep vertical borehole. The borehole was then sealed and the blocks are left for 1, 5 or >> 5 years. When the bentonite was water saturated the central copper rod is heated to simulate the temperature increase due to radioactive decay of the spent fuel. Bentonite doped with radioactive Cs and Co was placed in one of the lower blocks. Interestingly, the redox-sensitive pertechnetate ion (TcO4-) which thermodynamically should be reduced and precipitate as TcO2 n H2O, travelled unreduced through the bentonite

  12. Physico-chemical characteristics of nano-organo bentonite prepared using different organo-modifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Motawie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different types of nano-organo bentonite (NOB were prepared from the Egyptian Bentonite (EB. EB was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray EDX. It was purified from different impurities using a conventional method via the treatment with HCl and distilled water. The modification of the clay was carried out using different types of organo-modifiers namely; hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HTAB, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (Silane, octadecylamine (ODA, and dodecylamine (DDA. The cation exchange capacity (CEC was measured for pristine bentonite after and before modification. The NB was characterized by FTIR, XRD, TEM, and TGA techniques. The obtained results indicated that variation of the interlayer space gallery was effected by the type of the penetrator used.

  13. Effect of sodium dodecyl sulfate on flow and electrokinetic properties of Na-activated bentonite dispersions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Günıster; S İşçı; A Alemdar; N Güngör

    2004-06-01

    The present study reports the effect of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, C12H25 OSO3Na) upon the electrokinetic (electrophoretic mobility, zeta potential) and rheological (viscosity, yield value) properties of the Ca-bentonitic clay found in Turkey and its Na-activated form. The SDS dispersant was added in different concentrations in the range of 1 × 10-5-5 × 10-2 mol/l. The results show that the viscosity and zeta potential values of bentonite dispersion are affected by the addition of anionic surfactant. The obtained data are analysed by considering the kind of exchangeable cations. Thixotropic property effect was observed in bentonite dispersions.

  14. Water retention behaviour of compacted bentonites: experimental observations and constitutive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonne Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite-based materials are studied as potential barriers for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. In this context, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the engineered barrier is first characterized by free swelling conditions followed by constant volume conditions. This paper presents an experimental study conducted in order to characterize the water retention behaviour of a compacted MX-80 bentonite/sand mixture. Then, based on observations of the material double structure and the water retention mechanisms in compacted bentonites, a new water retention model is proposed. The model considers adsorbed water in the microstructure and capillary water in the aggregate-porosity. The model is calibrated and validated against the experimental data. It is used for better understanding competing effects between volume change and water uptake observed during hydration under free swelling conditions.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF BENTONITE FOR ENGINEERED BARRIER SYSTEMS IN RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL SITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravko Domitrović

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Engineered barrier systems are used in radioactive waste disposal sites in order to provide better protection of humans and the environment from the potential hazards associated with the radioactive waste disposal. The engineered barrier systems usually contain cement or clay (bentonite because of their isolation properties and long term performance. Quality control tests of clays are the same for all engineering barrier systems. Differences may arise in the required criteria to be met due for different application. Prescribed clay properties depend also on the type of host rocks. This article presents radioactive waste management based on best international practice. Standard quality control procedures for bentonite used as a sealing barrier in radioactive waste disposal sites are described as some personal experiences and results of the index tests (free swelling index, water adsorption capacity, plasticity limits and hydraulic permeability of bentonite (the paper is published in Croatian.

  16. Sorption of 17b-Estradiol to Pig Slurry Separates and Soil in the Soil-Slurry Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Mostofa; Petersen, Søren O; Lægdsmand, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of freshwater by estrogens from manure applied to agricultural land is of grave concern because of the potentially harmful effects on aquatic life and human health. Recent developments in liquid manure (slurry) management include partial removal of particulate slurry dry matter (PSDM...... to agricultural soils, to different size fractions of pig slurry separates, and to soils amended with each size fraction to simulate conditions in the soil–slurry environment. A crude fiber fraction (SS1) was prepared by sieving (... fractions (SS2 > SS3 > SS4) were prepared from the liquid fraction of the separated slurry by sedimentation and centrifugation. Sorption experiments were conducted in 0.01 mol L−1 CaCl2 and in natural pig urine matrix. Sorption in 0.01 mol L−1 CaCl2 was higher than that in pig urine for all solids used...

  17. Approval condition in application of bentonite grouting to the radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to understand the flow properties and the permeability of bentonite grout added NaCl by the laboratory tests, and to clarify the approval condition of bentonite as materials. The viscosity of the bentonite suspension was measured under the weight ratio of water and bentonite (W/B) is 6 to 20. The suspension of which W/B is smaller than 10 is difficult to inject into the rock joints, because the viscosity is higher than the thickest cement milk on dam grouting. When the necessary permeability of the clay grout is assumed to be 10-7 (cm/sec), the W/B becomes 10 or less. Then, when we add NaCl to the suspension of which W/B is 6, the viscosity decreases as the amount of NaCl increases. The injectable viscosity is achieved by adding NaCl as the proportion of water to NaCl is 1 to 40. Next, the permeability of the bentonite suspension that added NaCl was examined by the falling head permeability test. It was found that the initial permeability 10-6 (cm/sec) decreased to 10-8∼10-9 (cm/sec) by the test of the sample of 'B:W:NaCl=20:20:1' for 10 days. From these results, the suspension to inject into the rock joints can be made by adding NaCl. And it was clarified that the groundwater permeation to the suspension causes the decrease of the permeability. In addition, the bentonite is swelling according to the infiltration of underground water, the persistence in the suppression effect of diffusion and stability to erosion can be expected. (author)

  18. Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer results of PUSKURI project; Bentoniittipuskurin kytketty kaeyttaeytyminen PUSKURI-hankkeen tuloksia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olin, M.; Rasilainen, K.; Itaelae, A. [and others

    2011-08-15

    In the report main results form a KYT2010 programme's project Coupled behaviour of bentonite buffer (PUSKURI) are presented. In THC modelling, Aku Itaelae made and published his Master of Science Thesis. Itaelae was able to successfully model the LOT-experiment. Additionally, he also listed problems and development proposals for THC-modelling of bentonite buffer. VTT and Numerola created in collaboration a model coupling saturation, diffusion and cation exchange; the model was implemented and tested in Numerrin, COMSOL and TOUGHREACT. Petri Jussila's PhD THM-model was implemented into COMSOL to facilitate further development. At GTK, the mineralogical characterisation of bentonite was planned. The previous THM model (Jussila's model) including only small deformations was successfully generalized to finite deformations in way at least formally preserving the original formalism. It appears that the theory allows also a possibility to include finite plastic deformations in the theory. In order to measure the relevant mechanical properties of compacted bentonite, two different experiments, namely hydrostatic compression experiment and one-dimensional compression experiment were designed. In the hydrostatic compression experiment, a cylindrical sample of compacted bentonite covered with liquid rubber coating is placed in the sample chamber equipped with a piston. The same device was also used in one-dimensional compression experiment. X-ray microtomographic techniques were used in order to study the basic mechanisms of water transport in bentonite. The preliminary results indicate that in the present experimental set-up, water transport is dominated by a dispersive mechanism such as diffusion of vapour in gas phase or diffusion of water in solid phase. (orig.)

  19. Radionuclide transport coupled with bentonite extrusion in a saturated fracture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Robert Angelo

    The study in this dissertation focuses on the characterization of radionuclide migration in a water saturated fracture. The near field of a high level radioactive waste repository contains the engineered barrier system, which provides manufactured components designed to limit radionuclide releases to the environment. A major component in this system involves the utilization of bentonite as a buffer to protect the degraded waste package and limit release of radionuclides into intersecting fractures that pose possible pathways for transport to the environment. A model is derived for radionuclide migration through this fracture. The model incorporates the features of bentonite: extrusion into the fracture, sorption, and the effect of bentonite swelling on groundwater flow. The resulting derivation of this model is a coupled system of differential equations. The differential equation describing the mass conservation of radionuclides is coupled to the equation system for bentonite extrusion. The models are coupled through the parameters in the radionuclide transport model, which are dependent on the spatial distribution of solid material in the domain. Numerical evaluations of the solution to this radionuclide transport model were conducted for neptunium, a weakly sorbing radionuclide and americium, a strongly sorbing radionuclide. Results were presented in terms normalized spatial distribution of radionuclide concentration in the fluid phase and normalized radionuclide release rate in the fluid phase. Major findings of the study conducted for this dissertation are provided. (1) Bentonite extrusion affects fluid phase advection resulting in groundwater flow countercurrent to the direction of extrusion to the direction of radionuclide migration. (2) The sorption distribution coefficient is the most important parameter affecting radionuclide behavior in this system for this model. (3) Simulations of the model for americium, a highly sorbing radionuclide, indicate that

  20. Multi-stage slurry system used for grinding and polishing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hed, P. Paul; Fuchs, Baruch A.

    2000-03-01

    A slurry system draws slurry from a slurry tank via one of several intake pipes, where each pipe has an intake opening at a different depth in the slurry. The slurry is returned to the slurry tank via a bypass pipe in order to continue the agitation of the slurry. The slurry is then diverted to a delivery pipe, which supplies slurry to a polisher. The flow of shiny in the bypass pipe is stopped in order for the slurry in the slurry tank to begin to settle. As the polishing continues, slurry is removed from shallower depths in order to pull finer grit from the slurry. When the polishing is complete, the flow in the delivery pipe is ceased. The flow of slurry in the bypass pipe is resumed to start agitating the slurry. In another embodiment, the multiple intake pipes are replaced by a single adjustable pipe. As the slurry is settling, the pipe is moved upward to remove the finer grit near the top of the slurry tank as the polishing process continues.

  1. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. Power

  2. Erosion from compacted and confined bentonite at different water flow velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite barrier in deep geological repositories for high-level radioactive waste is expected to contribute to the repository safety due to its plasticity, low hydraulic permeability, swelling ability and sorption capability to retain radionuclides, amongst other properties. In a repository scenario, the water coming from the geological formation hydrates the bentonite and promotes its swelling, contributing to seal rock fissures. However, due to its expansion, bentonite suffers a density loss, strongest at the gel front. Under appropriate conditions, the gel can be transformed to a sol and different erosion processes may favour the release of bentonite particles and colloids (size3 with NaCl and a mixed Ca-Na electrolyte at 10-3 M. Consecutive flow changes were applied during selected time periods. Water velocities varied from 1.5.10-8 m/s to 3. 10-6 m/s and experiments lasted more than two years. Results confirmed that initial erosion rates were fairly constant with time, but at longer time the erosion was slowed down, and in the case of electrolytes with Ca content even tended to equilibrium, as can be appreciated in Figure 1, which shows the cumulative bentonite colloid masses eroded from FEBEX bentonite compacted at 1.65 g/cm3, with mixed Ca-Na electrolyte at 10-3 M, under different flow conditions. These effects were not so evident with NaCl electrolyte, which just showed gentle variations on colloid erosion rhythm under the experiment time span. Significant changes in colloid erosion rates were not observed, in any case, under successive flow changes and under the experimental conditions analyzed. The system chemistry seems to be much more relevant on colloid erosion rates than flow velocity. Results showed that the erosion rates measured at longer times are much lower than those observed in the initial linear stage. Moreover, it was observed that the continuous calcium supply inhibited colloid

  3. Efficiency of additives of the polysaccharide type on physical properties of bentonite mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Beňo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The addition of polysaccharide additives generally aims at improving some important physical properties of bentonite mixt ures, above allthe stability of moulds against the water loss and prevention of surface defects of castings. Polysaccharide products of inland and foreign production were checked in mixtures of two bentonites of the Czech provenance with the same montmorillonite content. The attention was paid in particular to the abrasion resistance of mixtures during storing them under constant climatic conditions.Conclusions have shownthe substantial influence of: the amount of the added additive, the kind and structural composition of the additive (pH of the water extract, electric conductance.

  4. A Study on the Effect of Clay Particle Orientation on Diffusion in Compacted Bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.

    2002-02-26

    In this study, the effect of the orientation of clay particles on diffusion in compacted bentonite, which is regarded to be quite important as a candidate buffer material in safety assessment for a geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was experimentally discussed by investigating effective diffusion coefficients (De) for tritiated water (HTO), which is non-sorptive onto bentonite. The diffusion experiments were carried out for 2 kinds of smectite contents of Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1{reg_sign} (content of Na-smectite, 46-49wt%) and Kunipia-F{reg_sign} (content of Na-smectite, > 99wt%) at dry densities of 1.0 and 1.5 Mg/m3 by a through-diffusion method. The through-diffusion experiments were carried out for the same direction as compacted direction of bentonite and perpendicular direction to compacted direction. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations for the cross section of bentonite in the axial and perpendicular directions to compacted direction of bentonite were also carried out at dry densities of 1.0, 1.6, and 2.0 Mg/m3. Although De values for Kunigel-V1{reg_sign} were approximately the same for both diffusion directions to compacted direction over the densities, and no anisotropy in De was found, De values in the perpendicular direction to compacted direction for Kunipia-F{reg_sign} were clearly higher than those in the same direction as compacted direction. In the SEM observations, no significant orientation of clay particles was found for Kunigel-V1{reg_sign} over the densities, while the orientation of clay particles was clearly found for Kunipia-F{reg_sign}, and the degree of the orientation of clay particles became significant with an increase in dry density of bentonite. This tendency is in good agreement with that for De values obtained, indicating that smectite content in bentonite affects the orientation property of clay particles, and that the orientated clay particles affect diffusion pathway.

  5. Photodegradation of dye pollutants on TiO2 pillared bentonites under UV light irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静谊; 朱怀勇; 丁哲; 陈春城; 赵进才

    2002-01-01

    TiO2 pillared bentonite samples dried under different conditions are used to degrade 2,4-dichlorophenol and orange II under UV light irradiation. The supercritical dried sample exhibits a high activity for the photodegradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and orange II due to its structural features. TOC and COD are measured during the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol under UV light irradiation using P25 and TiO2 pillared bentonite samples dried under different conditions. The clay-based catalysts can be readily separated by filtration or sedimentation.

  6. Influence of salt solutions on the swelling pressure and hydraulic conductivity of compacted GMZ01 bentonite

    OpenAIRE

    ZHU, Chunming; Ye, Wei-Min; Chen, Yong-Gui; Chen, Bao; Cui, Yu Jun

    2013-01-01

    During the long-term operation of a deep geological repository, infiltration of groundwater with different chemical compositions can affect the buffer/backfill properties of compacted bentonite. Using a newly developed apparatus, swelling pressure and permeability tests were carried out on densely compacted GMZ01 bentonite samples, which has an initial dry density of 1.70 Mg/m3, with de-ionized water as well as NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at different concentrations. Salinity effects of infiltra...

  7. Thermal effect on water retention curve of bentonite: experiment and thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal effects on water retention curve of GMZ bentonite were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Water retention tests were conducted on GMZ bentonite at five temperatures ranging from 20℃ to 100℃. Test results showed that the water retention capacity and the hysteresis of the water retention curve decreased with increasing temperature, and that the water retention curves at different temperatures were almost parallel to each other. Based on the thermodynamics of sorption, a model was established to describe the temperature influence on the water retention curve. The model was validated by comparing the model predictions and the test results. (authors)

  8. A Study on the Effect of Clay Particle Orientation on Diffusion in Compacted Bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the effect of the orientation of clay particles on diffusion in compacted bentonite, which is regarded to be quite important as a candidate buffer material in safety assessment for a geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, was experimentally discussed by investigating effective diffusion coefficients (De) for tritiated water (HTO), which is non-sorptive onto bentonite. The diffusion experiments were carried out for 2 kinds of smectite contents of Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1(regsign) (content of Na-smectite, 46-49wt%) and Kunipia-F(regsign) (content of Na-smectite, > 99wt%) at dry densities of 1.0 and 1.5 Mg/m3 by a through-diffusion method. The through-diffusion experiments were carried out for the same direction as compacted direction of bentonite and perpendicular direction to compacted direction. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observations for the cross section of bentonite in the axial and perpendicular directions to compacted direction of bentonite were also carried out at dry densities of 1.0, 1.6, and 2.0 Mg/m3. Although De values for Kunigel-V1(regsign) were approximately the same for both diffusion directions to compacted direction over the densities, and no anisotropy in De was found, De values in the perpendicular direction to compacted direction for Kunipia-F(regsign) were clearly higher than those in the same direction as compacted direction. In the SEM observations, no significant orientation of clay particles was found for Kunigel-V1(regsign) over the densities, while the orientation of clay particles was clearly found for Kunipia-F(regsign), and the degree of the orientation of clay particles became significant with an increase in dry density of bentonite. This tendency is in good agreement with that for De values obtained, indicating that smectite content in bentonite affects the orientation property of clay particles, and that the orientated clay particles affect diffusion pathway

  9. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay; Preparacao de caracterizacao de argilas bentonitas organofilicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Lab. de Engenharia Ambiental; Silva, M.G.C., E-mail: meuris@feq.unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  10. Possible effects of external electrical fields on the corrosion of copper in bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taxen, Claes (Swerea KIMAB (Sweden))

    2011-12-15

    External potentials that develop across a repository may interact with the copper canister. A study was undertaken to investigate the potential corrosion effects of voltage differences in a repository. A set of experiments was performed to study the tendency of copper in bentonite to corrode under influence of an externally applied electrical field. A model study was made to estimate possible corrosion effects of an external electrical field on a full-scale canister in the KBS-3 concept. The interaction between the repository represented by a copper canister in bentonite, and an external electrical field is illustrated with an example

  11. Erosion of sodium bentonite by flow and colloid diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smectite gel formed at the outer part of a bentonite buffer in granitic rock could expand into rock fractures with seeping water. Such a gel can release colloids into low ionic strength waters. In addition the gel/sol can itself slowly flow downstream when it has reached a low particle concentration sufficient to decrease the viscosity to allow flow. The erosion due to the combined effects of particle diffusion and gel/sol flow is modelled for a thin fracture into which the gel expands influenced by various forces between and on particles. Some of the forces such as the electrical double layer force and viscous force are strongly influenced by the ionic strength of the pore water. Changes in the ionic strength due to diffusion and dilution of ions in the expanding clay are modelled simultaneously with the gel expansion, flow of gel and colloid release to the seeping water. The model includes description of flow of the seeping fluid, which gradually turns from pure water to sol to more dense gel as the smectite source is approached. The model also describes expansion of the gel/sol and colloid release and flow and diffusion of ions in the system. The coupled models are solved using a numerical code. The results show that the gel will flow with a non-negligible flowrate when its volume fraction is below 1%, but that the erosion and loss of smectite is not much influenced by the concentration of sodium in the clay or in the approaching seeping water, if they are kept below the Critical Coagulation Concentration, CCC. (authors)

  12. Current status of mechanical erosion studies of bentonite buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of the bentonite buffer in KBS-3-type nuclear waste repository concept relies to a great extent on the buffer surrounding the canister having sufficient dry density. Loss of buffer material caused by erosion remains as the most significant process reducing the density of the buffer. The mechanical erosion, or pre-saturation erosion, is the process where flowing groundwater transports buffer material away from the deposition hole towards the deposition tunnel. This process reduces the overall buffer density and potentially creates localized regions of low density. In the worst case the process is assumed to last as long as the free volume between the pellets in the pellets filled regions is filled with groundwater. With fixed environmental and material parameters a set of experiments was performed, testing the erosive properties of different buffer and backfill materials (MX-80 and Friedland Clay) in different groundwater conditions. The method used was a pinhole erosion test using two sizescales; 100 mm and 400 mm of cell length. The purpose of the pinhole tests was to test the scenario where piping channel is formed in the buffer and water flows through a single channel. The erosion data was produced with two methods, firstly the time-related erosion rates measured in-situ during the measurement and secondly the overall mass loss in the sample cell measured after dismantling of the test. It was observed that erosion in piping channels decreases rapidly (∼24 h) and irreversibly to a level that is an order of magnitude lower than the peak values. (orig.)

  13. Removal of basic dye by modified Unye bentonite, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption behavior of crystal violet (CV+) from aqueous solution onto raw (RB) and manganese oxide-modified (MMB) bentonite samples was investigated as a function of parameters such as initial CV+ concentration, contact time and temperature. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption models were applied to describe the equilibrium isotherms. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacities of RB and MMB were estimated as 0.32 and 1.12 mmol/g, respectively. The mean adsorption energy derived from D-R isotherm for MMB showed that the type of adsorption of dye molecules on this material may be defined as chemical adsorption. The adsorption rate was fast and more than half of the adsorbed-CV+ was removed in the first 55 min for RB and 5 min for MMB at the room temperature. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic and the intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and rate constants were evaluated. The thermodynamic parameters such as ΔH, ΔS and ΔG were found 117.41 kJ/mol, 41.50 J/(mol K), -5.07 kJ/mol (RB) and 21.19 kJ/mol 98.34 J/(mol K), -7.84 kJ/mol (MMB) at 295.15 K, respectively. The quite high adsorption capacity and high adsorption rate of MMB will provide an important advantage for using of this material in basic dye solution

  14. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of bentonite pellet mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, C.; Alonso, E. E.; Romero, E.

    Granular mixtures made of high-density pellets of bentonite are being evaluated as an alternative buffer material for waste isolation. Ease of handling is an often-mentioned advantage. The paper described the experimental program performed to characterize the hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted pellet’s mixtures used in the engineered barrier (EB) experiment. The material tested in the laboratory was based in the pellet’s mixtures actually used for the emplacement of the EB in situ experiment. Grain size distribution was adjusted to a maximum pellet size compatible with the specimen’s dimensions. Dry densities of statically compacted specimens varied in most of the cases in the range: 1.3-1.5 Mg/m 3. Pellets had a very high dry density, close to 2 Mg/m 3. The outstanding characteristic of these mixtures is its discontinuous porosity. Pore sizes of the compacted pellets vary around 10 nm. However the inter-pellet size of the pores is four to five orders of magnitude higher. This double porosity and the highly expansive nature of the pellets controlled all the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the mixture. Tests performed include infiltration tests using different water injection rates and mechanisms of water transfer (in liquid and vapour phases), suction controlled oedometer tests and swelling pressure tests. The interpretation of some of the tests performed required backanalysis procedures using a hydro-mechanical (HM) computer code. Material response was studied within the framework of the elastoplastic constitutive model proposed by Alonso et al. [Alonso, E.E., Gens, A., Josa, A., 1990. A constitutive model for partially saturated soils. Géotechnique 40 (3), 405-430] (Barcelona Basic Model, BBM). Parameters for the model were identified and also a set of hydraulic laws necessary to perform coupled HM analysis.

  15. Use of immobile trace elements for the correlation of Telychian bentonites on Saaremaa Island, Estonia, and mapping of volcanic ash clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiipli, Tarmo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Thirty suspected altered volcanic ash (bentonite samples from the Nässumaa-825 and Orissaare-859 sections were analysed by the X-ray fluorescence method. Twenty of these samples revealed chemical signs of pure volcanogenic material, one was of mixed terrigenous–volcanogenic origin, and nine were classified as terrigenous claystones. Twenty of the bentonites were correlated, with variable confidence, with bentonites from earlier studied sections; one sample represents a formerly unknown eruption. New and earlier published bentonite correlations were used for tracing the diachronous nature of the Rumba–Velise formations boundary and for composing new isopach schemes of six Telychian bentonites.

  16. Testing of In-Line Slurry Monitors and Pulsair Mixers with Radioactive Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylton, T.D.; Bayne, C.K.

    1999-08-01

    Three in-line slurry monitoring instruments were demonstrated, tested, and evaluated for their capability to determine the transport properties of radioactive slurries. The instruments included the Endress + Hauser Promass 63M Coriolis meter for measuring density, the Lasentec M600P for measuring particle size distribution, and a prototype ultrasonic monitor that was developed by Argonne National Laboratory for measuring suspended solids concentration. In addition, the power consumption of the recirculation pump was monitored to determine whether this parameter could be used as a tool for in-line slurry monitoring. The Promass 63M and the M600P were also evaluated as potential indicators of suspended solids concentration. In order to use the Promass 63M as a suspended solids monitor, the densities of the fluid phase and the dry solid particle phase must be known. In addition, the fluid phase density and the dry solids density must remain constant, as any change will affect the correlation between the slurry density and the suspended solids concentration. For the M600P, the particle size distribution would need to remain relatively constant. These instruments were demonstrated and tested at the Gunite and Associated Tanks Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The testing of the instruments was conducted in parallel with the testing of a Pulsair mixing system, which was used to mix the contents of the selected tank. A total of six tests were performed. A submersible pump was positioned at two depths, while the Pulsair system was operated at three mixing rates.

  17. Ice slurry cooling development and field testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hietala, J. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States); Wendland, R.D. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Collins, F. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-07-01

    A new advanced cooling technology collaborative program is underway involving Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northern States Power (NSP) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The program will conduct field tests of an ice slurry distributed load network cooling concept at a Northern States Power utility service center to further develop and prove the technology and to facilitate technology transfer to the private sector. The program will further develop at Argonne National Laboratory through laboratory research key components of hardware needed in the field testing and develop an engineering data base needed to support the implementation of the technology. This program will sharply focus and culminate research and development funded by both the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute on advanced cooling and load management technology over the last several years.

  18. Desulfurization from Bauxite Water Slurry (BWS) Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuzhong; Ge, Lan; Wang, Zhi; Zhuang, Siyuan; Wang, Yuhua; Ren, Lihui; Wang, Mingyong

    2016-02-01

    Feasibility of high-sulfur bauxite electrolysis desulfurization was examined using the electrochemical characterization, XRD, DTA, and FTIR. The cyclic voltammetry curves indicated that bauxite water slurry (BWS) electrolysis in NaOH system was controlled by diffusion. Additionally, the desulfurization effect of NaCl as the electrolyte was significantly better than that of NaOH as an electrolyte. As the stirring rate increased, the desulfurization ratio in NaCl system was not increased obviously, while the desulfurization ratio in NaOH system increased significantly, indicating further that electrolysis desulfurization in NaOH solution was controlled by diffusion. According to XRD, DTA, and FTIR analysis, the characteristic peaks of sulfur-containing phase in bauxite after electrolysis weakened or disappeared, indicating that the pyrite in bauxite was removed from electrolysis. Finally, the electrolytic desulfurization technology of bauxite was proposed based on the characteristics of BWS electrolysis.

  19. Load directly from railcar to slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, J.M. [General Chemical Corp., Claymont, DE (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Many process plants must unload soluble, granular chemicals from railcars and trucks and then dissolve or slurry them before use. Material handling problems such as agglomeration, plugging, spillage, dusting and noise can make these efforts inefficient and drive up capital, maintenance and labor costs. Pneumatic and gravity flow technologies are beset with these problems. To solve them, General Chemical Corp. has developed a device called the GCH Hydrator that unloads directly into water. The apparatus and associated process is adaptable to many chemicals. The Hydrator has been successfully used in paper making, chemical processing, petroleum refining, metals recovery and water treatment. Specific sites include: white liquor makeup in paper making; sulfur dioxide scrubbing in chemical processing and refining; acid neutralization in metals recovery, paper making, and sulfuric acid manufacture; and pH and alkalinity control in water treatment facilities.

  20. Hydrodynamic models for slurry bubble column reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidaspow, D. [IIT Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to convert a {open_quotes}learning gas-solid-liquid{close_quotes} fluidization model into a predictive design model. This model is capable of predicting local gas, liquid and solids hold-ups and the basic flow regimes: the uniform bubbling, the industrially practical churn-turbulent (bubble coalescence) and the slugging regimes. Current reactor models incorrectly assume that the gas and the particle hold-ups (volume fractions) are uniform in the reactor. They must be given in terms of empirical correlations determined under conditions that radically differ from reactor operation. In the proposed hydrodynamic approach these hold-ups are computed from separate phase momentum balances. Furthermore, the kinetic theory approach computes the high slurry viscosities from collisions of the catalyst particles. Thus particle rheology is not an input into the model.

  1. ORGANIC NITROGEN IN A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco André Grohskopf

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The application of pig slurry may have a different effect on nitrogen dynamics in soil compared to mineral fertilization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the different forms of organic N in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico (Typic Hapludox and their relationship to N uptake by crops in response to 10 years of annual application of pig slurry and mineral fertilizer. The treatments were application rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 m3 ha-1 of pig slurry, in addition to mineral fertilizer, organized in a randomized block design with four replications. The N contents were determined in the plant tissue and in the forms of total N and acid hydrolyzed fractions: ammonium-N, hexosamine-N, α-amino-N, amide-N, and unidentified-N. Annual application of pig slurry or mineral fertilizer increased the total-N content in the 0-10 cm depth layer. The main fractions of organic N in the soil were α-amino-N when pig slurry was applied and unidentified-N in the case of mineral fertilizers. Pig slurry increased the N fractions considered as labile: α-amino-N, ammonium-N, and amide-N. The increase in these labile organic N fractions in the soil through pig slurry application allows greater N uptake by the maize and oat crops in a no-tillage system.

  2. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  3. Toxicity evaluation of pig slurry using luminescent bacteria and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenyan; Cai, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan; Zheng, Guojuan; Liang, Yuting

    2014-07-01

    Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v) and 1.95% (v/v) respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v). Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR), while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v) and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent. PMID:24995598

  4. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  5. Microbial Community Dynamics During Biogas Slurry and Cow Manure Compost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong-yan; LI Jie; LIU Jing-jing; L Yu-cai; WANG Xiao-fen; CUI Zong-jun

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the microbial community dynamics and maturation time of two compost systems: biogas slurry compost and cow manure compost, with the aim of evaluating the potential utility of a biogas slurry compost system. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), gene clone library, temperature, C/N ratio, and the germination index were employed for the investigation, cow manure compost was used as the control. Results showed that the basic strip and dominant strips of the DGGE bands for biogas slurry compost were similar to those of cow manure compost, but the brightness of the respective strips for each system were different. Shannon-Weaver indices of the two compost systems differed, possessing only 22%similarity in the primary and maturity stages of the compost process. Using bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, 88 bacterial clones were detected. Further, 18 and 13 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were present in biogas slurry and cow manure compost, respectively. The 18 OTUs of the biogas slurry compost belonged to nine bacterial genera, of which the dominant strains were Bacillus sp. and Carnobacterium sp.;the 13 OTUs of the cow manure compost belonged to eight bacterial genera, of which the dominant strains were Psychrobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Clostridium sp. Results demonstrated that the duration of the thermophilic phase (more than 50°C) for biogas slurry compost was 8 d less than the according duration for cow manure compost, and the maturation times for biogas slurry and cow manure compost were 45 and 60 d, respectively. It is an effective biogas slurry assimilate technology by application of biogas slurry as nitrogen additives in the manufacture of organic fertilizer.

  6. Selection of design parameters for a slurry injection tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Nyord, Tavs

    2013-01-01

    determined through minimizing the tool draft force with constraints which ensured that the desired amount of slurry can be injected into the soil without slurry being exposed on the soil surface. Four sweeps with different working widths (50, 110, 180, and 250 mm) and a constant rake angle of 15° were......Injection has been recognized as an effective method for land application of liquid slurry. Optimization design is essential for developing higher-performance injection tools and identifying potential improvement of existing tools. In this study, design parameters of an injection tool were...

  7. ORGANIC NITROGEN IN A TYPIC HAPLUDOX FERTILIZED WITH PIG SLURRY

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The application of pig slurry may have a different effect on nitrogen dynamics in soil compared to mineral fertilization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the different forms of organic N in a Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico (Typic Hapludox) and their relationship to N uptake by crops in response to 10 years of annual application of pig slurry and mineral fertilizer. The treatments were application rates of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 m3 ha-1 of pig slurry, in addition to mineral fer...

  8. Flow behavior of coarse-grained slurries in pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Vlasák, P.; Chára, Z.; Kysela, B. (Bohuš); Sobota , J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the experimental investigation of model coarse-grained slurry on a recirculation pipe loop with smooth stainless steel pipes. Graded pebble gravel and glass balls were used as a model for poly-metallic nodules, and very fine glass beads as a model for fine-grained sand. The investigation was focused on evaluating the effect of slurry velocity and particle concentration on pressure drops and the slurry flow behavior in the turbulent regime. Also the effect of fine-grained p...

  9. Development of Syringe/Bottle Hybrids for Sampling Slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A convenient and effective sample bottle system based on simple modifications of disposable plastic syringes and bottles has been devised and tested for slurry samples. Syringe/ bottle hybrids (hereafter referred to as syringe bottles) have the convenience of regular flat-bottom bottles with screw cap closures. In addition, the syringe imparts a sliding and adjustable bottom to the bottle that forces the entire contents from the bottle. The system was designed especially to collect samples for high temperature work-ups of DWPF slurry samples. The syringe bottles together with fixed-bottom sample vial inserts would provide the DWPF with convenient and reliable methods for dealing with slurry samples

  10. Microstructure of silicon carbide nano powder-polycarbosilane-solvent mixed slurries and observed shear rate dependence in slurry viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SiC powder, polycarbosilane and xylene mixed slurries were prepared for microstructure observation and viscosity measurement. Slurries with averaged primary SiC size of 270 or 50 nm revealed existence of isolated secondary particles smaller than 1 μm in optical microscope observation. These secondary particles showed a Brownian motion in a xylene-PCS medium. On the other hand, slurry with an averaged primary SiC size of 20 nm revealed existence of large secondary particles in the size of 2-5 μm. The apparent area occupied with these secondary particles was far larger than that occupied by secondary particles of 270 or 50 nm in spite of a low SiC content. It was suggested that the secondary particles observed in the 20 nm slurry possessed small spaces among the primary SiC particles. Viscosity measurement presented that apparent viscosity of the slurry was high in general when the primary SiC particle size was small. In particular, the 20 nm SiC slurries showed quite high viscosity even at a SiC content of 5-6 mass%, which almost corresponded to that of 40 mass% for a SiC 270 nm slurry. Shear thinning effect was also remarkable when the primary SiC particle size was small

  11. Thermal - Hydraulic Behavior of Unsaturated Bentonite and Sand-Bentonite Material as Seal for Nuclear Waste Repository: Numerical Simulation of Column Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, E.; Graupner, B.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    For deep geological repositories of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW), bentonite and sand bentonite mixtures are investigated as buffer materials to form a a sealing layer. This sealing layer surrounds the canisters and experiences an initial drying due to the heat produced by HLRW and a successive re-saturation with fluid from the host rock. These complex thermal, hydraulic and mechanical processes interact and were investigated in laboratory column experiments using MX-80 clay pellets as well as a mixture of 35% sand and 65% bentonite. The aim of this study is to both understand the individual processes taking place in the buffer materials and to identify the key physical parameters that determine the material behavior under heating and hydrating conditions. For this end, detailed and process-oriented numerical modelling was applied to the experiments, simulating heat transport, multiphase flow and mechanical effects from swelling. For both columns, the same set of parameters was assigned to the experimental set-up (i.e. insulation, heater and hydration system), while the parameters of the buffer material were adapted during model calibration. A good fit between model results and data was achieved for temperature, relative humidity, water intake and swelling pressure, thus explaining the material behavior. The key variables identified by the model are the permeability and relative permeability, the water retention curve and the thermal conductivity of the buffer material. The different hydraulic and thermal behavior of the two buffer materials observed in the laboratory observations was well reproduced by the numerical model.

  12. Analysis of colloids erosion from the bentonite barrier of a high level radioactive waste repository and implications in safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the dominant mechanisms of colloid formation from compacted and confined bentonite innovative experiments were conducted. Chemical or physical processes that can affect the erosion of the bentonite surface were analyzed (ionic strength of the water, Ca in the water and in the exchange complex of the clay, dry density of the clay and presence of a water flow rate at the bentonite surface).Hydration, swelling and extrusion of clay into pores or fractures are primary steps for the formation of free colloidal particles in the aqueous phase, and the chemistry of the clay/water system is the most important parameter controlling the generation and stability of colloids. Ca-bentonite formed colloids quantities below the detection limit of our techniques, even in deionised water, but a percentage of Na approximately 20-30% in the clay exchange complex, as that present in the FEBEX bentonite, is enough to allow the formation of colloidal particles in quantities very similar to those produced by the Na-bentonite. The results for bentonite colloid generation obtained at a laboratory scale allowed the estimation of a range of colloid generation rates under different chemical conditions. Results were compared with in situ experimental investigations carried out at the FEBEX gallery emplaced in a granite massif at the Grimsel Test Site (Switzerland). The quantitative analysis of laboratory and in situ data can be used as input for models and performance assessment (PA) of high level radioactive waste (HLRW) repositories. (authors)

  13. Preparation and characterization Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang for esterification fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulloh, Abdulloh; Aminah, Nanik Siti; Triyono, Mudasir, Trisunaryanti, Wega

    2016-03-01

    Catalyst preparation and characterization of Al3+-bentonite for esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid has been done. Al3+-bentonite catalyst was prepared from natural bentonite of Turen Malang through cation exchange reaction using AlCl3 solution. The catalysts obtained were characterized by XRD, XRF, pyridine-FTIR and surface area analyser using the BET method. Catalyst activity test of Al3+-bentonite for esterification reaction was done at 65°C using molar ratio of metanol-fatty acid of 30:1 and 0.25 g of Al3+-bentonite catalyst for the period of ½, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 hours. Based on the characterization results, the Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst has a d-spacing of 15.63 Ǻ, acid sites of Brönsted and Lewis respectively of 230.79 µmol/g and 99.39 µmol/g, surface area of 507.3 m2/g and the average of radius pore of 20.09 Å. GC-MS analysis results of the oil phase after esterification reaction showed the formation of biodiesel (FAME: Fatty acid methyl ester), namely methyl palmitate, methyl oleate and methyl linoleate. The number of conversions resulted in esterification reaction using Al3+-bentonite Turen Malang catalyst was 74.61%, 37.75%, and 20, 93% for the esterification of palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively.

  14. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  15. Biochar, Bentonite and Zeolite Supplemented Feeding of Layer Chickens Alters Intestinal Microbiota and Reduces Campylobacter Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Tanka P.; Walsh, Kerry B.; Bhattarai, Surya P.; Midmore, David J.; Van, Thi T. H.; Moore, Robert J.; Stanley, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    A range of feed supplements, including antibiotics, have been commonly used in poultry production to improve health and productivity. Alternative methods are needed to suppress pathogen loads and maintain productivity. As an alternative to antibiotics use, we investigated the ability of biochar, bentonite and zeolite as separate 4% feed additives, to selectively remove pathogens without reducing microbial richness and diversity in the gut. Neither biochar, bentonite nor zeolite made any significant alterations to the overall richness and diversity of intestinal bacterial community. However, reduction of some bacterial species, including some potential pathogens was detected. The microbiota of bentonite fed animals were lacking all members of the order Campylobacterales. Specifically, the following operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were absent: an OTU 100% identical to Campylobacter jejuni; an OTU 99% identical to Helicobacter pullorum; multiple Gallibacterium anatis (>97%) related OTUs; Bacteroides dorei (99%) and Clostridium aldenense (95%) related OTUs. Biochar and zeolite treatments had similar but milder effects compared to bentonite. Zeolite amended feed was also associated with significant reduction in the phylum Proteobacteria. All three additives showed potential for the control of major poultry zoonotic pathogens. PMID:27116607

  16. The Increasing of Bentonite Quality as a Composite of B-3 Waste CeramicSolidification Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ceramic composite from local material of bentonite Nanggulan wascarried out. The material were grinded, sieved to get through 100 mesh,rinsed with aquadest, dried at the temperature of 60 oC and putted in theexecutor, then were calcinate (physical activated) at 300 oC and chemicalactivated with NaCl 1.0 to 5.0 M. The activated bentonite were contacted withlead concentration of 150 to 500 ppm and then were dried at 60 oC.Bentonite-Pb which obtained was made to pellet by adding weak cullet withcomposition variation of bentonite-Pb to cullet = 20:80, 25:75, 30:70, 35:65,and 40:60%, and ignited on furnace at the the temperature of 850 oC, 900oC, and 1000 oC for composite ceramic production. The chemical compositionand mineral test for original local material and ceramic composite ofoptimization result were done by using AAS and X-ray diffraction, whereas theleaching test, pressure and porosity test were done only for ceramiccomposite. The experiment results were reported in this paper. (author)

  17. Methylene blue adsorption of GMZ bentonite and the effect of hyper-alkaline solution erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of combining the halo method with the spectrometer method, was used to study on the Methylene blue (MB) adsorption of Gaomiaozi (GMZ) bentonite, which had been eroded by hyper-alkaline solution, to investigate the mechanism of the effect of hyper-alkaline pore water on the buffer/backfill properties of GMZ bentonite. Results present, method employed in this article is brief and feasible, and high accuracy; The total specific surface area calculated by the test of MB adsorption is more accurate than the method of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGIVIE). The MB adsorption of samples, which had been eroded by hyper-alkaline solution, decreases with the increase of the concentration of hyper-alkaline solution, and the change law agrees with the variation of the mass percentage of montmorillonite in bentonite tested by X- Ray diffraction (XRD). Therefore, the erosion of hyper-alkaline pore water might dissolve montmorillonite, which is the effective composition of bentonite, and destroy the tetrahedron- octahedron-tetrahedron (T-O-T) structure of montmorillonite, then lead to the decrease of cation exchange capability and the specific surface area of montmorillonite, and the the macroscopic expressions are the decrease of MB adsorption, the swelling potential and the increase of permeability. (authors)

  18. Gas migration mechanism of saturated highly-compacted bentonite and its modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current concept of repository for radioactive waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules inside of the engineered barrier, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the engineered barrier until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Therefore the gas migration tests are conducted in this study to investigate the mechanism of gas migration. On the basis of the experimental facts obtained through the gas migration tests, possible gas migration mechanism is proposed. A simplified method for calculating gas pressure at large breakthrough, which is defined as a sudden and sharp increase in gas flow rate out of the specimen is also proposed. (author)

  19. Adsorption of p-chlorophenol from aqueous solutions on bentonite and perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumanova, Bogdana; Peeva-Antova, P

    2002-03-29

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (p-CP) from aqueous solutions on bentonite and perlite was studied. These materials are available in large quantities in Bulgaria. Model solutions of various concentrations (1-50 mgdm(-3)) were shaken with certain amounts of adsorbent to determine the adsorption capacity of p-CP on bentonite and perlite as well. The influence of several individual variables (initial adsorbate concentration, adsorbent mass) on the rate of uptake of the studied compound on the adsorbent was determined by carrying out experiments at different contact times using the batch adsorber vessel designed according to the standard tank configuration. Rapid adsorption was observed 20-30 min after the beginning for every experiment. After that, the concentration of p-CP in the liquid phase remained constant. The adsorption equilibrium of p-CP on bentonite and perlite was described by the Langmuir and the Freundlich models. A higher adsorption capacity was observed for bentonite (10.63 mgg(-1)) compared to that for perlite (5.84 mgg(-1)).

  20. Study on GMZ bentonite-sand mixture by undrained triaxial tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wen-jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is particularly necessary to study the deformation, strength and the changes of pore water pressure of bentonite-based buffer/backfill materials under the undrained condition. A series of isotropic compression tests and triaxial shear tests under undrained conditions were conducted on the compacted saturated/unsaturated GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures with dry mass ratio of bentonite/sand of 30:70. During the tests, the images of the sample were collected by photographic equipment and subsequently were cropped, binarized and centroids marked by image processing technique. Based on identification of the variation of the position of marked centroids, the deformation of the sample can be determined automatically in real-time. Finally, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of saturated and unsaturated bentonite-sand mixtures under the undrained condition can be obtained. From results of triaxial shear tests on unsaturated samples under constant water content, inflated volumetric deformation transforms to contractive volumetric deformation due to the increase of the confining pressure and lateral expansion deformation are observed due to the increase in the shearing stress. Moreover, the net mean stress affects the initial stiffness, undrained shear strength and deformation of the sample during the undrained shear tests.

  1. Treatment of oil–water emulsions by adsorption onto activated carbon, bentonite and deposited carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Okiel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Emulsified oil in waste water constitutes is a severe problem in the different treatment stages before disposed off in a manner that does not violate environmental criteria. One commonly used technique for remediation of petroleum contaminated water is adsorption. The main objective of this study is to examine the removal of oil from oil–water emulsions by adsorption on bentonite, powdered activated carbon (PAC and deposited carbon (DC. The results gave evidence of the ability of the adsorbents to adsorb oil and that the adsorptive property of the three adsorbents (bentonite, PAC, and DC has been influenced by different factors. The effects of contact time, the weight of adsorbents and the concentration of adsorbate on the oil adsorption have been studied. Oil removal percentages increase with increasing contact time and the weight of adsorbents, and decrease with increasing the concentration of adsorbate. Equilibrium studies show that the Freunlich isotherm was the best fit isotherm for oil removal by bentonite, PAC, and DC. The data show higher adsorptive capacities by DC and bentonite compared to the PAC.

  2. Adsorptive Removal of Reactive Black 5 from Wastewater Using Bentonite Clay: Isotherms, Kinetics and Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tahir Amin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The studies of the kinetics and isotherms adsorption of the Reactive Black 5 (RB5 onto bentonite clay were explored in a batch study in a laboratory. The maximum RB5 adsorption conditions of bentonite clay were optimized such as shaking speed (100 rpm, temperature (323 K, pH (10, contact time (40 min, initial dye concentration (170 mg·L−1, and particle size (177 µm. The adsorbent surface was characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy spectroscopy. The mechanisms and characteristic parameters of the adsorption process were analyzed using two parameter isotherm models which revealed the following order (based on the coefficient of determination: Harkin-Jura (0.9989 > Freundlich (0.9986 and Halsey (0.9986 > Langmuir (0.9915 > Temkin (0.9818 > Dubinin–Radushkevich (0.9678. This result suggests the heterogeneous nature of bentonite clay. Moreover, the adsorption process was chemisorption in nature because it follows the pseudo-second order reaction model with R2 value of 0.9998, 0.9933 and 0.9891 at 25, 75 and 100 mg·L−1 RB5 dye in the solution, respectively. Moreover, based on the values of standard enthalpy, Gibbs free energy change, and entropy, bentonite clay showed dual nature of exothermic and endothermic, spontaneous and non-spontaneous as well as increased and decreased randomness at solid–liquid interface at 303–313 K and 313–323 K temperature, respectively.

  3. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from inorganic clay mineral: Bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Gizem; Baskaya, Hüseyin S; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2016-01-01

    There has been limited study of the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from inorganic clay minerals. Determining the amount of PAH removal is important in predicting their environmental fate. This study was carried out to the degradation and evaporation of PAHs from bentonite, which is an inorganic clay mineral. UV apparatus was designed specifically for the experiments. The impacts of temperature, UV, titanium dioxide (TiO2), and diethylamine (DEA) on PAH removal were determined. After 24 h, 75 and 44 % of ∑12 PAH in the bentonite were removed with and without UV rays, respectively. DEA was more effective as a photocatalyst than TiO2 during UV application. The ∑12 PAH removal ratio reached 88 % with the addition of DEA to the bentonite. It was concluded that PAHs were photodegraded at high ratios when the bentonite samples were exposed to UV radiation in the presence of a photocatalyst. At the end of all the PAH removal applications, higher evaporation ratios were obtained for 3-ring compounds than for heavier ones. More than 60 % of the amount of ∑12 PAH evaporated consisted of 3-ring compounds.

  4. Modelling gas migration in compacted bentonite: GAMBIT Club Phase 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the second phase of a programme of work to develop a computational model of gas migration through highly compacted bentonite. Experimental data that have appeared since the earlier report are reviewed for the additional information they might provide on the mechanism of gas migration in bentonite. Experiments carried out by Horseman and Harrigton (British Geological Survey) continued to provide the main data sets used in model evaluation. The earlier work (POSIVA Report 98-08) had resulted in a preliminary model of gas migration whose main features are gas invasion by microcrack propagation, and dilation of the pathways formed with increasing gas pressure. New work was carried out to further explore the capabilities of this model. In addition, a feature was added to the model to simulate gas pathway creation by water displacement rather than crack propagation. The development of a new alternative gas migration model is described. This is based on a volume-averaged representation of gas migration rather than on a description of flow in discrete pathways. Evaluation of this alternative model showed that it can produce similar agreement with experimental results to the other models examined. The implications of flow geometry, confining conditions and flow boundary conditions on gas migration behaviour in bentonite are reviewed. Proposals are made for the development of the new model into a tool for simulating gas migration through a bentonite buffer around a waste canister, and for possible enhancements to the model that might remove some of its currently perceived deficiencies. (orig.)

  5. Hydraulic properties of dune sand–bentonite mixtures of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Gueddouda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the valorization of local materials such as desert dune sand obtained from Laghouat region in the South Algeria and mine bentonite intended for the realization of liner base layers in the conception of insulation barriers for hazardous waste facilities. In practice, an economical mixture satisfying the hydraulic requirements is generally concerned. First, in order to get an adequate dune sand–bentonite mixture compacted to the optimum Proctor condition, an investigation on saturated hydraulic behavior is carried out in this study for different mixtures. Using oedometer test (indirect measurement, the adequate mixture of 85% dune sand and 15% bentonite satisfies the conditions of saturated hydraulic conductivity (k  3 MPa. This technique is conducted based on the exploitation of the water retention curve in order to establish the relationships between hydraulic conductivity, degree of saturation, and suction. It shows that the hydraulic conductivity increases with the degree of saturation and decreases with the suction. However, the hydraulic conductivity has a constant value for suctions larger than 20 MPa. The selected dune sand–bentonite mixture satisfies the regulation requirements and hence constitutes a good local and economical material for the conception of barrier base liners.

  6. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to assess quantitatively permeability of bentonite altered by hyper alkaline and nitrate. Modeling is progressed based on experimental results. The following results are obtained. 1) Consolidation test was carried out in 3 types of bentonite and 30 % sand mixture in which cation exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  7. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Several experimental studies have been carried out in this study in order to assess quantitatively water conductivity of bentonite which is altered by hyper alkaline and nitrate. Modeling for previous results is carried out and several requirements to be defined are proposed. The conclusion of this study is summarized as below. Secondary minerals of bentonite alteration due to hyper alkaline with nitrate: 1) CSH and CAH were observed corresponding to solving montmorillonite in AWN solution. 2) Na2O Al2O3 1.68SiO2 generated from 90 days in batch experiment and it was observed in 360 days. Assessment of swelling and water conductivity changing by hyper alkaline with nitrate: 1) Little changing of water conductivity of bentonite was observed by saturated Ca(OH)2 solution and hyper alkaline solution. The conductivity significantly increased by penetrating sodium nitrate solution. 2) Water conductivity of ion exchanged bentonite by hyper alkaline solution significantly increased. It increased more by penetrating AWN solution. Modeling of tuff alteration by hyper alkaline solution: 1) Flow through test is proposed since soluble velocity to hyper alkaline solution should be defined. (author)

  8. Textural properties of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) : acid-modified bentonite nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zunic, M.; Milutinovic-Nikolic, A.; Nastasovic, A.; Vukovic, Z.; Loncarevic, D.; Vukovic, I.; Loos, K.; ten Brinke, G.; Jovanovic, D.; Sharma, Bhaskar; Ubaghs, Luc; Keul, Helmut; Höcker, Hartwig; Loontjens, Ton; Benthem, Rolf van; Žunić, M.; Milutinović-Nikolić, A.; Nastasović, A.; Vuković, Z.; Lončarević, D.; Vuković, I.; Jovanović, D.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain enhanced textural properties of macroporous crosslinked copolymer poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) by synthesizing nanocomposites with acid-modified bentonite. Nanocomposites were obtained by introducing various amounts of acid-modifie

  9. 40 CFR 436.220 - Applicability; description of the bentonite subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of the bentonite subcategory. 436.220 Section 436.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS MINERAL MINING AND PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY...

  10. Effects of lipids on thermophilic anaerobic digestion and reduction of lipid inhibition upon addition of bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelidaki, I; Petersen, S P; Ahring, B K

    1990-07-01

    The effect of bentonite-bound oil on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure was investigated. In digestor experiments, addition of oil was found to be inhibitory during start-up and the inhibitory effect was less pronounced when the oil was added in the form of bentonite-bound oil compared to when the oil was added alone. After adaptation of the digestors, very rapid degradation of oil was observed and more than 80% of the oil was degraded within a few hours after daily feeding. In batch experiments, glyceride trioleate was found to be inhibitory to thermophilic anaerobic digestion when the concentrations were higher than 2.0 g/l. However, addition of bentonite (a clay mineral) at concentrations of 0.15% and 0.45% was found to partly overcome this inhibition. Addition of calcium chloride in concentration of 3 mM (0.033% w/v) showed a similar positive effect on the utilization of oil, but the effect was lower than with bentonite. PMID:1366749

  11. Gas transport in the bentonite barrier of AGP and their interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of gas transport processes through the barriers is of great relevance in the assessment of the behaviour of the repository. The main objective of this study is to determine the properties of gas transport in saturated bentonite samples and the interfaces between them. (Author)

  12. Determination of trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis in Anatolian bentonitic clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, N.; Tulun, T.; Alemdar, A.

    1998-08-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was carried out for the determination of trace elements in non-swelling type bentonitic clays. Samples were irradiated in Triga Mark II type of reactor at the Nuclear Institute of Technical University of Istanbul. Irradiation was performed in two steps for "short and long lived" isotopes. The γ spectra of short lived isotopes were interpreted with respect to Al, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Ti, Mn, V qualitatively and that of long lived isotopes with respect to Sc, Cr, Br, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Sm, Yb, Hf quantitatively. The relative richness of the trace elements (Al, Ti, Ca, Mg, Na, K) observed in the Sampo 90 program was obtained using Atomic Absorption technique by normalizing its value to that of sodium. The silicon content of samples was determined by gravimetry. The results indicated that Sample I contained relatively higher amount of REE, Sb, Ca and Na than Sample II. The amount of Sc, Cr and Br were about similar in both samples. Concentrations of La, Ce, Sm and Yb are higher than REE abundances found in all natural waters. These results suggest that Ca-bentonite samples are representative of primary deposition environment. In addition, the Sc content of both the samples indicates that Ca-bentonite deposits originated from continental crust. The relatively high amount of REE might bring about porosity problems in the use of Ca-bentonite in cement and concrete production.

  13. Simulation of Water Percolation in a FEBEX Bentonite Block using TOUGH2 Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use Tough2 program to simulate the water percolation in a Febex bentonite Block. From obtained results, we conclude that mean field approximation does not describe this process because the heterogeneity of the medium it is not include in mathematical formalism. (Author) 17 refs

  14. Removal of Chromium from Waste Water of Tanning Industry Using Bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanning industry is considered as one of the oldest industries in the world, which produces solid and liquid wastes, where the Chromium-containing liquid wastes are considered to be as the main liquid pollutant to the environment. In this research, a new method is applied to remove the chromium from the industrial water wastes, which are produced by tanning industry using the Aleppo Bentonite.The experiments on laboratory- prepared samples and collected samples from some tanning factories in Damascus have proved that chromium removal from tanning waste water is very effective for solution of 85-98 %. Moreover, the optimal conditions for the treatment process of tanning waste water by Aleppo Bentonite have determined and found to be (pH=4, Bentonite concentration = 20 g l-1 when chromium concentration is 0.8 g l-1 , solution temperature = 30 degree centigrade, and Bentonite particle size < 90 μm). However, the proposed method can be considered to be an environmental solution for the treatment of tanning industrial wastes in Syria. (author)

  15. Bentonite engineered barrier building method for radioactive waste on sub-surface disposal test project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The engineering barriers such as clay and concrete materials are planned to use for covering radioactive waste in cavern-type disposal facility. The requirement to clay barrier is very low permeability, which could be satisfied by high density Bentonite, and such a compaction method will be needed. Two methods, compaction and air shot, were tested in engineering scale for constructing a high-density clay barrier. Two types of compaction equipments, 'Teasel plate' and 'Plate compacter', were developed and engineering scale experiments were performed for compacting Bentonite only and Bentonite-sand-aggregate mixture. As a result, the Teasel plate can reach higher density Bentonite in relatively short time in comparison to other equipments. While, regarding air shot method, an air-shot machine in a tunnel construction site was tested by different water adding methods (wet, dry, and half wet). It is concluded that the dry and half wet constructing methods will achieve reasonable workability. As a result, the best construction option can be chosen according to the locations of radioactive waste facility. (author)

  16. Effect of Impeller Agitation on Preparation of Tetra-n-Butyl Ammonium Bromide Semiclathrate Hydrate Slurries

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiro Inoue; Kazunari Ohgaki; Shunsuke Hashimoto; Hiroyuki Ito

    2012-01-01

    The slurries-containing tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) solution and its semiclathrate hydrate have attracted a lot of interest as latent heat transport media. These hydrate slurries contain some microparticles of crystal, and the size and shape of these hydrate particles could affect the mobility of slurries. Hence, it is essential to investigate the efficient hydrate-slurry preparation methods and the effect of hydrate particles on the fluid property of slurries for the application to...

  17. Experimental characterization of cement-bentonite interaction using core infiltration techniques and 4D computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, F.; Mäder, U.; Jenni, A.; Schwendener, N.

    Deep geological storage of radioactive waste foresees cementitious materials as reinforcement of tunnels and as backfill. Bentonite is proposed to enclose spent fuel drums, and as drift seals. The emplacement of cementitious material next to clay material generates an enormous chemical gradient in pore water composition that drives diffusive solute transport. Laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling predict significant mineral alteration at and near interfaces, mainly resulting in a decrease of porosity in bentonite. The goal of this project is to characterize and quantify the cement/bentonite skin effects spatially and temporally in laboratory experiments. A newly developed mobile X-ray transparent core infiltration device was used, which allows performing X-ray computed tomography (CT) periodically without interrupting a running experiment. A pre-saturated cylindrical MX-80 bentonite sample (1920 kg/m3 average wet density) is subjected to a confining pressure as a constant total pressure boundary condition. The infiltration of a hyperalkaline (pH 13.4), artificial OPC (ordinary Portland cement) pore water into the bentonite plug alters the mineral assemblage over time as an advancing reaction front. The related changes in X-ray attenuation values are related to changes in phase densities, porosity and local bulk density and are tracked over time periodically by non-destructive CT scans. Mineral precipitation is observed in the inflow filter. Mineral alteration in the first millimeters of the bentonite sample is clearly detected and the reaction front is presently progressing with an average linear velocity that is 8 times slower than that for anions. The reaction zone is characterized by a higher X-ray attenuation compared to the signal of the pre-existing mineralogy. Chemical analysis of the outflow fluid showed initially elevated anion and cation concentrations compared to the infiltration fluid due to anion exclusion effects related to compaction of

  18. Study on the Surface-Physicochemical-Property Changing of Bentonite by Adapting a New Soil Stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Xiang, Wei; Lang, Linzhi; Cui, Deshan

    2015-04-01

    Surface-physicochemical-property of clays has been proved to have direct influence on its mechanic behavior. Specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important factors for surface-physicochemical-property assessment. The smaller SSA tends higher strength (shear strength, unconfined compressive strength and tensile strength) under different water contents of soil. In this paper, a new soil stabilizer (Tung oil-based sulfonated) is developed and applied to improve the properties of Ca-bentonite. The differences of specific surface area, fractal dimension and micro geometric morphology between raw Ca-bentonite samples and modified ones are investigated based on the data acquired from water vapor, nitrogen adsorption experiments and SEM experiments. Results show that the SSA including external SSA and total SSA of treated samples decrease largely and apparently when compared to that of the raw samples. Furthermore, the higher volume ratio between soil stabilizer and water, the more decrease in SSA. Compared to the ones of raw Ca-bentonite, the external SSA and total SSA of the modified Ca-bentonite samples decrease by 48.5% and 25.2%, respectively, when the volume ratio was 1:50. This result implies that the connection of montmorillonite particles becomes more tightly after the treatment by the soil stabilizer. In addition, an obvious decreasing trend is found in fractal dimension by analysis of water vapor adsorption isotherms. This finding indicates that the pore surface tends to be smoother by the chemical action among particles bonds, more condensable in aggregates and shorter space between the interlayer of montmorillonite. SEM results display that the new soil stabilizer developed a quantity of lamellar aggregates but did not change the structure of montmorillonite. Based on all mentioned above, the results of fractal dimension analysis are verified. Consequently, this study shows that the new soil stabilizer (Tung oil-based sulfonated) has obvious effects

  19. New-Generation Sealing Slurries For Borehole Injection Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryczek, Stanisław; Gonet, Andrzej; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Złotkowski, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The development of techniques and technologies thanks to which parameters of the ground medium can be modified makes specialists look for new recipes of geopolymers - binders for the reinforcing and sealing of unstable and permeable grounds. The sealing slurries are expected to meet a number of strict requirements, therefore it is important to find new admixtures and additives which could modify the fresh and hardened slurry. Special attention has been recently paid to the fluid ash - a by-product of the combustion of hard coals. However, the use of this additive is associated with the application of appropriate superplastifier. Laboratory analyses of rheological parameters of fresh sealing slurries and the ways of improving their liquidity by a properly selected third-generation superplastifier are presented in the paper. The slurries were based on Portland cement CEM I, milled granulated large-furnace slag and fly ash from fluidized-bed combustion of hard coal.

  20. Continuous in-house acidification affecting animal slurry composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Maibritt; Cocolo, Giorgia; Jonassen, Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    dissolution in acidified slurry. Acceleration of carbohydrate hydrolysis was indicated, while deceleration of microbial acidogenesis, acetogenesis, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction was indicated. The particles were larger following acidification treatment causing a lower viscosity, likely due...

  1. A novel kind of TSV slurry with guanidine hydrochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a novel alkaline TSV (through-silicon-via) slurry with guanidine hydrochloride (GH) on CMP (chemical mechanical polishing) was investigated. The novel alkaline TSV slurry was free of any inhibitors. During the polishing process, the guanidine hydrochloride serves as an effective surface-complexing agent for TSV CMP applications, the removal rate of barrier (Ti) can be chemically controlled through tuned selectivity with respect to the removal rate of copper and dielectric, which is helpful to modifying the dishing and gaining an excellent topography performance in TSV manufacturing. In this paper, we mainly studied the working mechanism of the components of slurry and the skillful application guanidine hydrochloride in the TSV slurry. (paper)

  2. Ice slurry based thermal storage in multifunctional buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M. J.; Kusumoto, N.

    Ice slurry based thermal storage plays an important role in reshaping patterns of electricity use for space cooling and heating. It offers inherent advantages in energy efficiency, operating savings, load follow-up and flexible installation over conventional thermal storage technologies. This paper provides discussions on the generation mechanism and performance of ice slurry, as well as the operation principle of the ice slurry based thermal storage system. Details of the system design, control strategy and operation performance are given through a case study on a recent installation in Herbis Osaka, the largest simple building complex in Japan. An evaluation of different installations with ice slurry thermal storage reveals that it is a rewarding technology that provides significant operating savings for the building air-conditioning and improves energy utilization efficiency in modern society.

  3. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton;

    2011-01-01

    -textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting...... soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 μm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam...... physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil...

  4. Analysis of the porewater chemical composition of a Spanish compacted bentonite used in an engineered barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, A. M. a.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.; Rivas, P.

    Compacted bentonites are being considered in many countries as a backfill material in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. A knowledge of the porewater chemistry in the clay barrier is essential since the porewater composition influences the release and transport of the radionuclides. However, quantification of the water chemistry in compacted bentonite under repository conditions is difficult. The methodology followed to obtain the porewater composition of the FEBEX bentonite is described in this paper. It is based on the characterisation of the solid phase, determination of the physico-chemical properties of the montmorillonite component and geochemical modelling. The FEBEX bentonite has a high cation exchange capacity (∼1 eq/kg), high surface area (∼725 m 2/g total surface area and 62 m 2/g external surface area) and accessory minerals such as carbonates, sulphates, pyrite, etc.; and organic matter. The chloride inventory in the FEBEX bentonite is ∼22 mmol/kg. The montmorillonite, together with the other mineral phases present, will determine the composition of the porewater. However, in order to calculate a unique aqueous chemistry, two further quantities are required, the chloride concentration and the pH. Water vapour adsoption/desorption isotherms, together with c-lattice spacing determinations, were used to identify the different states and location of water. Most of the water in the as received bentonite resides in the interlayer space. However, the measurements indicate that about 0.053 l/kg may be regarded as free water, implying a chloride concentration of 0.42 M. The pH of the system is fixed by equilibrium with the atmosphere ( PCO 2=10 -3.5 bar) and saturation with the carbonate phases present. The porewater calculated to be in equilibrium with the as received FEBEX bentonite powder is a Na-Ca-Mg chloride type with a high ionic strength, 0.66 M, and a pH of ∼7.4. Likewise, in order to calculate the porewater composition of

  5. Experimental studies on the interactions between anaerobically corroding iron and bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Liisa (Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)); Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden)); Rance, Andy; Smart, Nick (Serco Assurance, Hook (United Kingdom))

    2008-06-15

    Anaerobic corrosion experiments using compacted bentonite, carbon steel and cast iron coupons, and carbon steel wires, were performed at temperatures of 30 deg C and 50 deg C. Dry Wyoming bentonite MX-80 powder was mixed with pieces of wire, and then compacted in stainless steel holders. The samples were evacuated and placed in test cells under nitrogen. For the coupon tests, the coupons were placed in the upper and lower part of cells filled with compacted bentonite. The compacted bentonite samples were immersed in deaerated artificial ground water containing sodium chloride and sodium carbonate at pH 10.4. The experiments with coupons ran for 356 days at 50 deg C and for 900 days at 30 deg C and the experiments with wires ran for 829 days at 30 deg C and for 911 days at 50 deg C. Corrosion products on the surface of wires and coupons were examined using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. A mixture of magnetite, hematite and goethite was found on the surface of coupons. Only magnetite was observed on the surface of wires. The bentonite was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA), Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer transmission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction. In addition, cation exchange capacity and exchangeable cations as well as total chemical composition were determined. Hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure were also measured. In the coupon tests, increased iron contents could be observed in a thin contact zone. Sodium from the synthetic ground water had substituted for a fraction of the calcium in the interlayer positions of montmorillonite, which could be seen also in the total contents of these elements. A small increase in hydraulic conductivity was observed. In the wire tests a high

  6. Experimental studies on the interactions between anaerobically corroding iron and bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic corrosion experiments using compacted bentonite, carbon steel and cast iron coupons, and carbon steel wires, were performed at temperatures of 30 deg C and 50 deg C. Dry Wyoming bentonite MX-80 powder was mixed with pieces of wire, and then compacted in stainless steel holders. The samples were evacuated and placed in test cells under nitrogen. For the coupon tests, the coupons were placed in the upper and lower part of cells filled with compacted bentonite. The compacted bentonite samples were immersed in deaerated artificial ground water containing sodium chloride and sodium carbonate at pH 10.4. The experiments with coupons ran for 356 days at 50 deg C and for 900 days at 30 deg C and the experiments with wires ran for 829 days at 30 deg C and for 911 days at 50 deg C. Corrosion products on the surface of wires and coupons were examined using Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. A mixture of magnetite, hematite and goethite was found on the surface of coupons. Only magnetite was observed on the surface of wires. The bentonite was examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA), Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer transmission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction. In addition, cation exchange capacity and exchangeable cations as well as total chemical composition were determined. Hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure were also measured. In the coupon tests, increased iron contents could be observed in a thin contact zone. Sodium from the synthetic ground water had substituted for a fraction of the calcium in the interlayer positions of montmorillonite, which could be seen also in the total contents of these elements. A small increase in hydraulic conductivity was observed. In the wire tests a high

  7. Physical and chemical clay binder characteristics from various locality and their influence on some technological properties of bentonite mouling mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explore the complex physical – chemical characteristics of bentonite of slovak provenance and to compare with non-slovak, which is considered as European highest quality standard in foundry and to compare from the point of foundry application. These characteristics of raw material have direct relationship with technological properties of bentonite sand mixtures and mainly with the quality of castings poured into these mixtures. To compare technological properties of bentonite forming mixtures with use of various clay types point of view application in foundry industry.

  8. A study on the treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries with anionic flocculants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake

  9. The aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Massana Guitart, Jordi; Guerrero Bustos, Ana; Antón Fuentes, Rebeca; Garcimartin Molina, Miguel Angel; Sanchez Espinosa, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to measure the behaviour of various mortars employed in livestock media in central Spain and to analyse the aggressiveness of pig slurry to cement blended with fly ash mortars. To achieve this, mortar specimens were immersed in ponds storing pig slurry. Mortar specimens, of 40 ? 40 ? 160 mm, were made from four types of cement commonly used and recommended for rural areas. The types were a sulphate-resistant Portland cement and three cements blended in different proportions with ...

  10. Effective use of fly ash slurry as fill material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, S; Kawaguchi, M; Yasuhara, K

    2000-09-15

    A lot of effort has been put into increasing coal ash utilization; however, 50% of total amount is disposed of on land and in the sea. Several attempts have been reported recently concerning slurried coal fly ash use for civil engineering materials, such as for structural fill and backfill. The authors have studied this issue for more than 15 years and reported its potential for (1) underwater fills, (2) light weight backfills, and (3) light weight structural fills, through both laboratory tests and construction works. This paper is an overview of the results obtained for slurry, focusing on the following. (1) Coal fly ash reclaimed by slurry placement shows lower compressibility, higher ground density, and higher strength than by the other methods. This higher strength increases stability against liquefaction during earthquake. (2) Higher stability of the fly ash ground formed by slurry placement is caused by higher density and its self-hardening property. (3) Stability of fly ash reclaimed ground can be increased by increasing density and also by strength enhancement by cement addition. (4) Technical data obtained through a man-made island construction project shows the advantages of fly ash slurry in terms of mechanical properties such as higher stability against sliding failure, sufficient ground strength, and also in terms of cost saving. (5) Concentration in leachates from the placed slurry is lower than the Japanese environmental law. (6) In order to enlarge the fly ash slurry application toward a lightweight fill, mixtures of air foam, cement and fly ash were examined. Test results shows sufficient durability of this material against creep failure. This material was then used as lightweight structural fill around a high-rise building, and showed sufficient quality. From the above data, it can be concluded that coal fly ash slurry can be effectively utilized in civil engineering projects.

  11. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    The geotechnical barrier is an important component of a geological repository and consists of compacted bentonite surrounding radioactive waste containers. Its most important functions are, to retard the radionuclide migration into the biosphere and to prevent groundwater contact with containers. lt is therefore of central importance to investigate the bentonite material on its capacity to sorb radionuclides under near-natural chemical and physical conditions. The purpose of this work was to study the adsorption of uranium(VI) on bentonit and on montmorillonite-standards at high uranium concentrations. Thereby, a special account was given to the calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation, which leads to the formation of very stable and mobile uncharged Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex. Results of batch experiments showed that the dicalcium-uranyl-tricarbonate complexation lowers the uranium(VI) sorption on natural clay (bentonite) by a factor of up to 3. After 21 days of contact time, about 40 % and 20 % of the initial uranium(VI)concentration were sorbed on Na-bentonite and ea-bentonite, respectively, from a solution with Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} dominating the uranium(VI) speciation. On the contrary, about 55 % of the initial uranium(VI)-concentration were sorbed on thes clays from the solution, in which (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} complex dominated the uranium(VI) speciation. Thus uranium(VI) sorption is more strongly influenced by the solution composition than by bentonite type. Na-bentonite should be used instead of ea-bentonite as a geotechnical barrier, since calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation may be a realistic scenario. Further SEM-EDX and HREM-EDX studies showed that uranium(VI) sorption occurred predominantly on montmorillonite, which is the main component of bentonite. Uranium(VI) sorption on bentonite's accessory Minerals (pyrite, calcite, mica, and feldspar) was not observed. Investigation of uranium

  12. Investigations on uranium sorption on bentonite and montmorillonite, respectively, and uranium in environmental samples; Untersuchungen zur Uransorption an Bentonit bzw. Montmorillonit sowie von Uran in Umweltproben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azeroual, Mohamed

    2010-09-22

    The geotechnical barrier is an important component of a geological repository and consists of compacted bentonite surrounding radioactive waste containers. Its most important functions are, to retard the radionuclide migration into the biosphere and to prevent groundwater contact with containers. lt is therefore of central importance to investigate the bentonite material on its capacity to sorb radionuclides under near-natural chemical and physical conditions. The purpose of this work was to study the adsorption of uranium(VI) on bentonit and on montmorillonite-standards at high uranium concentrations. Thereby, a special account was given to the calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation, which leads to the formation of very stable and mobile uncharged Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} complex. Results of batch experiments showed that the dicalcium-uranyl-tricarbonate complexation lowers the uranium(VI) sorption on natural clay (bentonite) by a factor of up to 3. After 21 days of contact time, about 40 % and 20 % of the initial uranium(VI)concentration were sorbed on Na-bentonite and ea-bentonite, respectively, from a solution with Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} dominating the uranium(VI) speciation. On the contrary, about 55 % of the initial uranium(VI)-concentration were sorbed on thes clays from the solution, in which (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(OH){sub 3}{sup -} complex dominated the uranium(VI) speciation. Thus uranium(VI) sorption is more strongly influenced by the solution composition than by bentonite type. Na-bentonite should be used instead of ea-bentonite as a geotechnical barrier, since calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexation may be a realistic scenario. Further SEM-EDX and HREM-EDX studies showed that uranium(VI) sorption occurred predominantly on montmorillonite, which is the main component of bentonite. Uranium(VI) sorption on bentonite's accessory Minerals (pyrite, calcite, mica, and feldspar) was not observed. Investigation of uranium

  13. Pemanfaatan Bentonit Dan Karbon Sebagai Support Katalis NiO-MgO Pada Hidrogenasi Gliserol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferlyna Sari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Semakin meningkatnya produksi biodiesel maka gliserol kasar yang merupakan produk samping dari reaksi transesterifikasi dari minyak nabati juga semakin besar. Salah satu cara yang dikembangkan untuk memanfaatkan gliserol adalah dengan mengubahnya menjadi propilen glikol (1,2-propanadiol melalui proses hidrogenasi menggunakan katalis heterogen (padat. Dalam penelitian ini digunakan katalis padat NiO-MgO dengan support bentonit dan karbn aktif dalam hidrogenasi gliserol untuk mengetahui pengaruh jumlah katalis, berat promote terhadap bentonit atau karbon, suhu, serta waktu reaksi terhadap besarnya konversi gliserol dan yield propilen glikol yang dihasilkan. Penelitian ini terdiri dari dua tahapan, yaitu preparasi katalis dan pembuatan propilen glikol. Preparasi katalis dilakukan melalui proses impregnasi dan kalsinasi. Kemudian dilakukan proses pembuatan propilen glikol di dalam reaktor batch berpengaduk dengan berat katalis, berat promoter terhadap bentonit dan karbon aktif, suhu, serta waktu reaksi sesuai variabel. Produk hasil proses hidrogenasi dipisahkan dari katalis, lalu menganalisa kadar gliserol sisa dengan menggunakan metode titrimetri dan propilen glikol terbentuk menggunakan analisa gas chromatography (GC. Konversi gliserol terbaik pada proses hidrogenasi gliserol menjadi propylene glycol dengan katalis NiO-MgO/Bentonit dan NiO-MgO/Karbon masing-masing sebesar 50,419% dan 52,882% pada kondisi suhu 200°C, tekanan 200 psi dengan 20% berat promote terhadap katalis dan 7%berat katalis selama 2 jam. Yield propylene glycol terbaik dengan menggunakan katalis NiO-MgO/Bentonit sebesar 8,1848% pada kondisi suhu 220°C dengan 10% berat promote terhadap katalis dan 7%berat katalis selama 3 jam, sedangkan pada katalis NiO-MgO/Karbon diperoleh yield terbaik sebesar 7,2607% pada kondisi suhu 200°C dengan 5% berat promote terhadap katalis dan 7%berat katalis selama 3 jam.

  14. Microstructure and anisotropic swelling behaviour of compacted bentonite/sand mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simona Saba; Jean-Dominique Barnichon; Yu-Jun Cui; Anh Minh Tang; Pierre Delage

    2014-01-01

    Pre-compacted elements (disks, torus) of bentonite/sand mixture are candidate materials for sealing plugs of radioactive waste disposal. Choice of this material is mainly based on its swelling capacity allowing all gaps in the system to be sealed, and on its low permeability. When emplaced in the gallery, these elements will start to absorb water from the host rock and swell. Thereby, a swelling pressure will develop in the radial direction against the host rock and in the axial direction against the support structure. In this work, the swelling pressure of a small scale compacted disk of bentonite and sand was experimentally studied in both radial and axial directions. Different swelling kinetics were identified for different dry densities and along different directions. As a rule, the swelling pressure starts increasing quickly, reaches a peak value, decreases a little and finally stabilises. For some dry densities, higher peaks were observed in the radial direction than in the axial direction. The presence of peaks is related to the microstructure change and to the collapse of macro-pores. In parallel to the mechanical tests, microstructure investigation at the sample scale was conducted using microfocus X-ray computed tomography (mCT). Image observation showed a denser structure in the centre and a looser one in the border, which was also confirmed by image analysis. This structure hetero-geneity in the radial direction and the occurrence of macro-pores close to the radial boundary of the sample can explain the large peaks observed in the radial swelling pressure evolution. Another interesting result is the higher anisotropy found at lower bentonite dry densities, which was also analysed by means of mCT observation of a sample at low bentonite dry density after the end of test. It was found that the macro-pores, especially those between sand grains, were not filled by swelled bentonite, which preserved the anisotropic microstructure caused by uniaxial

  15. Ordovician K-bentonites in the Argentine Precordillera: relations to Gondwana margin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, W.D.; Bergstrom, Stig M.; Kolata, Dennis R.; Cingolani, C.A.; Astini, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is included in the Special Publication entitled 'The proto- Andean margin of Gondwana', edited by R.J. Pankhurst and C.W. Rapela. Ordovician K-bentonites have now been recorded from >20 localities in the vicinity of the Argentine Precordillera. Most occur in the eastern thrust belts, in the San Juan Limestone and the overlying the Gualcamayo Formation, but a few ash beds are known also from the central thrust belts. The oldest occur in the middle Arenig I, victoriae lunatus graptolite (Oe. evae conodont) Zone, and the youngest in the middle Llanvirn P. elegans (P. suecicus) Zone. Mineralogical characteristics, typical of other Ordovician K-bentonites, include a matrix of illite/smectite mixed-layer clay and a typical felsic volcanic phenocryst assemblage: biotite, beta-form quartz, alkali and plagioclase feldspar, apatite, and zircon, with lesser amounts of hornblende, clinopyroxene, titanite and Fe-Ti oxides. The proportions of the mineral phases and variations in their crystal chemistry are commonly unique to individual (or small groups of) K-bentonite beds. Glass melt inclusions preserved in quartz are rhyolitic in composition. The sequence is unique in its abundance of K-bentonite beds, but a close association between the Precordillera and other Ordovician sedimentary basins cannot be established. The ash distribution is most consistent with palaeogeographical reconstructions in which early Ordovician drifting of the Precordillera occurred in proximity to one or more volcanic arcs, and with eventual collision along the Andean margin of Gondwana during the mid-Ordovician Ocloyic event of the Famatinian orogeny. The Puna-Famatina terrane northeast of the Precordillera might have served as the source of the K-bentonite ashes, possibly in concert with active arc magmatism on the Gondwana plate itself.

  16. Geochemical and Mineralogical Changes in Compacted MX-80 Bentonite Submitted to Heat and Water Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Espina, R.; Villar, M. V.

    2010-05-01

    A 20-cm high column of MX80 bentonite compacted at dry density 1.70 g/cm{sup 3} with an initial water content of 16 percent was submitted to heating and hydration by opposite ends for 496 days (TH test). The temperature at the bottom of the column was set at 140 degree centigrade and on top at 30 degree centigrade, and deionised water was injected on top at a pressure of 0.01 MPa. Upon dismantling water content, dry density, mineralogy, specific surface area, cation exchange capacity, content of exchangeable cations, and concentration of soluble salts and pH of aqueous extracts were determined in different positions along the bentonite column. The pore water composition was modelled with a geochemical software. The test tried to simulate the conditions of an engineered barrier in a deep geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The water intake and distribution of water content and dry density along the bentonite were conditioned by the thermal gradient. Liquid water did not penetrate into the column beyond the area in which the temperature was higher than 100 degree centigrade. A convection cell was formed above this area, and liquid water loaded with ions evaporated towards cooler bentonite as it reached the area where the temperature was too high. In this area precipitation of mineral phases took place, Advection, interlayer exchange and dissolution/precipitation processes conditioned the composition of the pore water along the column. In most of the column the pore water was Na-SO{sub 4} {sup 2}- type, and changed to Na-Cl near the heater. TH treatment did not cause significant changes in the smectite content or the other mineral phases of the bentonite. (Author) 41 refs.

  17. Mineralogy and sealing properties of various bentonites and smectite-rich clay materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work includes a coherent study of Wyoming bentonite with respect to the most relevant properties for use in a repository, and a parallel study of other potential buffer and tunnel backfilling materials. The reason for this is twofold; to quantify the effect of mineralogical variations on the various important sealing properties of bentonite, and to verify that there are alternative potential sources of bentonite. The latter is motivated by the fact that Sweden alone plans to deposit at least 6,000 copper canisters which include approximately 130,000 metric tones bentonite buffer material and several times more as tunnel backfill material. Different types of sealing clay materials may also be relevant to use, since the demands on the clay will be different at the various locations in a repository. Alternative sources of bentonite would consequently be valuable in order to secure quality, supply, and price. Important aspects on buffer and tunnel backfilling materials may be summarized as: Original sealing properties. Hazardous substances in any respect. Short-term effects of ground-water chemistry. Long-term stability, i.e. effects of temperature and ground-water chemistry. Availability. Costs. The focus in this study is on the first three items. The long-term stability is indirectly considered in that mineralogical composition is determined. The availability is only considered in such a way that most of the analyzed materials represent huge clay formations, which contain much more material than needed for a repository. The cost aspects have not been included, mainly because the present day price is not relevant due to the time frame of the construction of a repository

  18. Mineralogy and sealing properties of various bentonites and smectite-rich clay materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, Ola; Olsson, Siv; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB (SE))

    2006-12-15

    The present work includes a coherent study of Wyoming bentonite with respect to the most relevant properties for use in a repository, and a parallel study of other potential buffer and tunnel backfilling materials. The reason for this is twofold; to quantify the effect of mineralogical variations on the various important sealing properties of bentonite, and to verify that there are alternative potential sources of bentonite. The latter is motivated by the fact that Sweden alone plans to deposit at least 6,000 copper canisters which include approximately 130,000 metric tones bentonite buffer material and several times more as tunnel backfill material. Different types of sealing clay materials may also be relevant to use, since the demands on the clay will be different at the various locations in a repository. Alternative sources of bentonite would consequently be valuable in order to secure quality, supply, and price. Important aspects on buffer and tunnel backfilling materials may be summarized as: Original sealing properties. Hazardous substances in any respect. Short-term effects of ground-water chemistry. Long-term stability, i.e. effects of temperature and ground-water chemistry. Availability. Costs. The focus in this study is on the first three items. The long-term stability is indirectly considered in that mineralogical composition is determined. The availability is only considered in such a way that most of the analyzed materials represent huge clay formations, which contain much more material than needed for a repository. The cost aspects have not been included, mainly because the present day price is not relevant due to the time frame of the construction of a repository

  19. Cost effects of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal costs of an HLW repository in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the cost effect results of Cu powder and bentonite on the disposal cost for an HLW repository in Korea. In the cost analysis for both of these cost drivers, the price of Cu powder and the bentonite can affect the canister cost and the bentonite cost of the disposal holes as well as backfilling cost of the tunnels, respectively. Finally, we found that the unit cost of Cu and bentonite was the dominant cost drivers for the surface and underground facilities of an HLW repository. Therefore, an optimization of a canister and the layout of a disposal hole and disposal tunnels are essential to decrease the direct disposal cost of spent fuels. The disposal costs can be largely divided into two parts such as a surface facilities' cost and an underground facilities' cost. According to the KRS' cost analysis, the encapsulation material as well as the buffering and backfilling cost were the significant costs. Especially, a canister's cost was approximately estimated to be more than one fourth of the overall disposal costs. So it can be estimated that the unit cost of Cu powder is an important cost diver. Because the outer shell of the canister was made of Cu powder by a cold spray coating method. In addition, the unit cost of bentonite can also affect the buffering and the backfilling costs of the disposal holes and the disposal tunnels. But, these material costs will be highly expensive and unstable due to the modernization of the developing countries. So the studies for a material cost should be continued to identify the actual cost of an HLW repository

  20. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  1. Physical and chemical stability of the bentonite buffer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A literature study was made on previous work on clay erosion and on the fundamental processes that govern the stability of clay gels. Mechanical erosion has been studied earlier and models devised to estimate the tendency to erode. We have used a different approach that we deem is fundamentally more correct. Chemical erosion processes have not been found to be studied previously and we have approached the problem by applying simple but fundamental mass balances and transport processes to the problem. The physical and chemical processes that govern the repulsive and cohesive forces in clay are well understood in principle but cannot yet be applied quantitatively to predict the gel/sol behaviour of the bentonite clay. It was necessary to rely directly on laboratory measurements for information on swelling and gel/sol properties. The backfill bentonite clay acts as a Bingham fluid over a wide range of clay density. To mobilise the clay a shear stress larger than the Bingham yield stress must be applied to the gel. The Bingham yield stress has been measured to be larger than 1 Pa (N/m2) although it cannot be ruled out that lower values can be found under different experimental conditions than those reported. Shear stresses exerted by the water flowing in the fractures that intersect the deposition holes with the clay backfill have been estimated for a wide range of fracture transmissivities, apertures and hydraulic gradients that could exist under repository conditions. This includes the extremely high gradients that could exist during some periods during an ice age. For fracture transmissivities ranging from 10-9 to 10-6 m2/s, fracture apertures from 0.1 to 2 mm and the hydraulic gradients from 0.01 to 1 mH2O/m, the largest local shear stress found in this range was about 0.1 Pa. To investigate a 'what if' situation where the shear stress exceeds the yield stress simple models were devised. They were used to assess the rate of erosion by the groundwater. In one model

  2. Experimental study on the rheological behaviour of coal ash slurries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assefa K.M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental investigations were carried out to evaluate the rheological behaviour of fly ash (FA slurry without and with the addition of bottom ash (BA and BA slurry without and with the addition of FA. The FA slurries exhibited Bingham behaviour at solid mass concentrations ranging from 60–65% and mixing proportions from 10– 40%. A substantial reduction in yield stress was observed except for mixing proportion of 40% on which the yield stress and viscosity were increased drastically for all solid concentrations. Hence, it can be concluded that the yield stress and viscosity of FA slurry were very much influenced by adding BA up to the mixing proportion of 30%. The rheological behaviour of BA slurries with and without the addition of FA in proportions of 10–50% was investigated and exhibited Newtonian behaviours for solid mass concentrations ranging from 30–50% without and with the addition of FA. The viscosity increases with increasing the solid concentrations and proportion of FA. Based on these experimental data, a correlation was developed to predict the relative viscosity of BA slurries as a function of solid volume fraction and FA mass proportion of 0–50% and the RMSE and R2 values showed good agreement between the experimental and the predicted data.

  3. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  4. Contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youzhi Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the cementation of deep wells, contamination at the contact surface between cement slurry and drilling fluid will present a technical challenge, which may threaten operation safety. To deal with the problem, lab tests and analysis were performed specifically on the compatibility of fluids during cementation in Sichuan and Chongqing gas fields. Impacts of commonly used additives for drilling fluids were determined on fluidity and thickening time of conventional cement slurry. Through the infrared spectrum analysis, SEM and XRD, infrared spectrum data of kalium polyacrylamide (KPAM and bio-viscosifier were obtained, together with infrared spectrum, SEM and XRD data of cement slurry with additives. Contamination mechanisms of the cement slurry by conventional additives for drilling fluid were reviewed. Test results show that both KPAM and bio-viscosifier are such high-molecular materials that the long chains in these materials may easily absorb cement particles in the slurry to form mixed network structures; as a result, cement particles were prone to agglomeration and eventually lost their pumpability. Finally, assessment of and testing methods for the contamination effects of drilling fluid additives on cement slurry were further improved to form standards and codes that may help solve the said problems. This study will provide technological supports for the preparation of drilling fluids with desirable properties prior to cementation, the selection of optimal drilling fluids additives, and the development of innovative drilling fluids additives.

  5. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena (BandTech Oy (Finland)); Carlsson, Torbjoern; Muurinen, Arto (VTT (Finland)); Svensson, Daniel (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden)); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu (JAEA (Japan)); Wersin, Paul; Rosch, Dominic (Gruner Ltd (Switzerland))

    2010-05-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two iron-bentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5-1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B+Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia

  6. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two iron-bentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5-1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B+Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N2 and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO3, or 0.05 M Na2SO4. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H2, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO2, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia, reducing conditions, a pH of around eight

  7. Granular bentonite production as buffer material for a full-scale emplacement ('FE') experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Swiss repository concept for the disposal of spent fuel (SF) and high-level vitrified waste (HLW), the canisters are emplaced in galleries surrounded by a bentonite buffer. These engineered barriers with favourable and well-known properties and predictable performance provide the secondary containment of the waste. The bentonite buffer has the following functions: a) to keep the canisters in place and protect them by homogenising the stress field; b) to mechanically stabilise the space between the canisters and the geological barrier; c) to act as a transport barrier for radionuclides and as a barrier for colloids; d) to ensure low corrosion rates of both the canister and the waste form and e) to limit microbial activity. In order to provide these functions, it is necessary for at least a significant part of the thickness of bentonite not to be altered in an unacceptable way by temperature or chemical interaction with the formation water or corrosion products of the canister. The FE experiment ('Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment') at Mont Terri URL, which develops and demonstrates on a 1:1 scale of the Swiss repository concept for disposal of SF and HLW in Opalinus Clay, is supported by the LUCOEX project, co-funded by the European Commission as part of the seventh Euratom research and training Framework Programme on nuclear energy. In this poster, a strategy based on previous experiences and the production concept based on current technology for producing a granular bentonite is presented. The main objectives of manufacturing granular bentonite for the LUCOEX/FE project are as follows: - Production of a suitable grain size distribution of the granules in order to achieve a target emplacement density and homogeneous emplacement; - Optimization of different parameters during the production process; - Evaluation of rational production processes for the production of suitable granular material; - Development

  8. Correlation of upper Llandovery–lower Wenlock bentonites in the När (Gotland, Sweden and Ventspils (Latvia drill cores: role of volcanic ash clouds and shelf sea currents in determining areal distribution of bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarmo Kiipli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Study of volcanic ash beds using biostratigraphy, sanidine composition and immobile elements within bentonites has manifested several well-established and some provisional correlations between Gotland and East Baltic sections. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence microanalysis of phenocrysts has revealed bentonites containing Mg-rich or Fe-rich biotite. Sanidine phenocrysts contain, in addition to a major Na and K component, often a few per cent of Ca and Ba. On the basis of new correlations the mapping of the distribution areas of bentonites has been extended from the East Baltic to Gotland. The bentonite distribution can be separated into two parts in North Latvia–South Estonia, indicating the existence of shelf sea currents in the Baltic Silurian Basin.

  9. Slurry and processing technique of CLBO crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng-li; LIU Yu-ling; NIU Xin-huan; TAN Bai-mei

    2006-01-01

    CsLiB6O10(CLBO) is a new-type nonlinear optical crystal material. CLBO has many good performances,especially the frequency multiplication performance in deep ultraviolet band. CLBO has important application prospect on solid-state UV laser,broad band tunable laser and laser nucleus flame igniter. Though,CLBO will be air slaking and cracking when the ambient humidity is more than 40%,which brings more difficult on CLBO surface finishing. According to the performance and structure characteristic of CLBO crystal,a new water-free slurry applying for CLBO crystal chemical mechanical polishing(CMP) was investigated. The abrasive is SiO2. The influence of polishing processing parameter on polishing process for CLBO crystal was discussed,and the parameter optimal value of polishing plate speed,pressure,pH value and abrasive concentration were determined. Through such parameters,high efficiency and precision plane polishing was gotten. The CLBO CMP process was studied,the results show that low pressure and high speed can improve the CLBO crystal surface removal rate and flatness.

  10. Trace element determination in different milk slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E M; Lorenzo, M L; Cabrera, C; López, M C; Sánchez, J

    1999-11-01

    We have studied the contents of trace elements of nutritional or toxicological interest in 90 samples of whole, low-fat, skim, condensed, evaporated and powdered milks. Slurries of the samples were prepared with Triton X-100 and analysed using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The temperature-time programme of the graphite oven was optimized for each element, and the accuracy, precision, selectivity and sensitivity of the method were verified. Concentrations of the trace elements we investigated were: Pb 0-0.211 microgram/g, Cd 0-28.985 ng/g, Al 0.528-4.025 micrograms/g, Cu 0.041-0.370 microgram/g, Cr 0-0.177 microgram/g, Mn 0.024-0.145 microgram/g, Se 0-23.333 ng/g, Zn 0.297-0.827 microgram/g and Ni 0.058-1.750 micrograms/g. (A value of zero indicates that the element was undetectable by our methods.) Concentrations of the pairs of elements Cu-Cd, Mn-Cd, Mn-Cu, Zn-Mn, Ni-Cu, Ni-Mn and Ni-Zn were significantly correlated (P milk analyzed.

  11. The use of bentonite and zeolite as caesium-binders in feed to reindeer - experiences from Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Åhman

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Feeding is used in Sweden to lower radiocaesium levels in reindeer before slaughter. In feeds used for this purpose, bentonite is added as a caesium-binder to prevent absorption of radiocaesium, since the animals usually have som access to contaminated pasture in their corrals. Bentonite is efficient as a caesium-binder but increases water consumption and excretion of urine. Zeolite has been used as a caesium-binder to reindeer in a few experiments. The effect, however, has been inferior to that of bentonite. It seems that zeolite, mixed in feeds, loose some of its effect as the feed is stored. The need of a caesium-binder is demonstrated by results from practical feeding of reindeer where radiocaesium levels have not decreased as expected when feed without bentonite has been used.

  12. Adsorptioin performance of modified nkalagu bentonite in dye removal: kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics and structureal properties of the modified samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption performance of modified Nkalagu bentonite in removing Congo red (CR) from solution was investigated. The raw bentonite was modified by three different physicochemical methods: thermal activation (TA), acid activation (AA), and combined acid and thermal activation (ATA). The Congo red adsorption increased with increase in contact time, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dosage, temperature, and pH change. The results of the kinetics analysis of the adsorption data revealed that adsorption follows pseudo second-order kinetics. Analysis of the equilibrium data showed that Langmuir isotherm provided a better fit to the data. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters revealed that adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The results from this study suggest that a combination of thermal and acid activation is an effective modification method to improve adsorption capacity of bentonite and makes the bentonite as low-cost adsorbent for removal of water pollutants. (author)

  13. Lifetime of Bentonites study: hydrothermal stability of saponites; Estudio de longevidad en bentonitas: estabilidad hidrotermal de saponitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguey, S.; Cuevas, J.; Garralon, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Geologia y Geoquimica, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The report studies the lifetime of bentonite and the hydrothermal stability of saponites. The testing comprised determination of physical and chemical properties of clays, the stability of the mineral porosity, lifetime and the wall of clay.

  14. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the 63 μm. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K2O) of the Na>Mg>>K. The 2O) which indicates that also this smectite may be interstratified with a few percent illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite but in this case Fe predominates over Mg in the octahedral sheet. The structural formula suggests that this smectite has the lowest total layer charge of the smectites examined. Kutch BF 04 contains essentially no particles >63 μm. The bentonite has a high content of titanium and iron-rich accessory minerals, such as anatase, magnetite, hematite and goethite. Other accessory minerals of significance are feldspars and quartz, whereas the content of sulphur

  15. Analysis of the effect of vibrations on the bentonite buffer in the canister hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Martin (AaF- Berg och Maetteknik, Stockholm (Sweden)); Hakami, Hossein; Ekneligoda, Thushan (Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden))

    2009-09-15

    During the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in crystalline rock, blasting activities in certain deposition tunnels will occur at the same time as the deposition of canisters containing the waste is going on in another adjacent access tunnel. In fact, the deposition consists of several stages after the drilling of the deposition hole. The most vulnerable stage from a vibration point of view is when the bentonite buffer is placed in the deposition hole but the canister has not been placed yet. During this stage, a hollow column of bentonite blocks remains free to vibrate inside the deposition hole. The goal of this study was to investigate the displacement of the bentonite blocks when exposed to the highest vibration level that can be expected during the drill and blast operations. In order to investigate this, a three dimensional model in 3DEC, capable of capturing the dynamic behaviour of the bentonite buffer was set up. To define the vibration levels, which serve as input data for the 3DEC model, an extensive analysis of the recorded vibrations from the TASQ - tunnel was carried out. For this purpose, an upper expected vibration limit was defined. This was done outgoing from the fact that the planned charging for the construction of the geological repository will lie in the interval 2 to 4 kg. Furthermore, at the first stage for this study, it was decided that the vibration should be conservatively evaluated for 30 m distance. Using these data, it was concluded that the maximum vibration level that can be expected will be approximately 60 mm/s. After simplifying the vibration signal, a sinusoidal wave with the amplitude 60 mm/s was applied at the bottom of the column and it was assumed that the vibrations only affect the bentonite buffer in one direction (horizontal direction). From this simulation, it was concluded that hardly any displacements occurred. However, when applying the same sinusoidal wave both in the horizontal and the

  16. Isostatic compaction of beaker shaped bentonite blocks on the scale 1:4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Lars-Erik [Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden); Nord, Sven [Ifoe Ceramics AB, Bromoella (Sweden ); Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Sjoeblom, Rolf [AaF-Energikonsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of the present work is to test, on a scale of 1:4, the feasibility of manufacturing bentonite blocks by isostatic compaction for application as a buffer material in a repository for spent nuclear fuel. In order for the tests to be sensitive to any weaknesses of the method, the blocks were shaped as beakers. The scope included the following: 1. Preparation of powder: a. mixing of the bentonite and addition of water in predetermined amounts, b. sieving to remove any lumps generated; 2. Isostatic compaction: a. establishment of a separate laboratory for the handling of bentonite powder (weighing, mixing, filling, sampling and machining), b. development and design of equipment and procedures for compaction of bentonite to beaker-shaped specimens, c. compaction process operation, d. visual inspection; 3. Sampling and characterisation: a. extraction of samples from the blocks made, b. determination of water content, c. determination of density, d. determination of strain at maximum stress by means of bending tests, e. determination of tensile strength by means of bending tests, f. determination of geometries of the blocks prepared; 4. Post-treatment by means of machining: a. machining of blocks made, b. visual inspection; 5. Evaluation. The work went very smoothly. No significant obstacles or unexpected events were encountered. The conclusions are as follows: The conclusions drawn in this report from work on the (linear)scale of one to four are very relevant to the full scale. Mixing of bentonite powder as well as moistening can be carried out on a pilot scale with a good homogeneity and with maintained good quality of the press powder. The compaction of bentonite can be carried out in a similar manner to the present operation at Ifoe Ceramics AB. This implies a very efficient handling as well as a very efficient use of the time in the press which may account for a large proportion of the total cost. The blocks could readily be produced to reproducible

  17. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumpulainen, S.; Kiviranta, L. [B and Tech Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Carlsson, T.; Muurinen, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Svensson, D. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (SKB), Stockholm (Sweden); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Yui, Mikatzu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Wersin, P.; Rosch, D. [Gruner Ltd, Basel (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two ironbentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5- 1.6 g/cm{sup 3}) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B and Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N{sub 2} and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3}, or 0.05 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H{sub 2}, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO{sub 2}, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited

  18. Long-term alteration of bentonite in the presence of metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the KBS-3H concept, each copper canister containing spent nuclear fuel will be surrounded by a bentonite buffer and a perforated steel cylinder. Since steel is unstable in wet bentonite, it will corrode and the corrosion products will interact with the surrounding bentonite in ways that are not fully understood. Such interaction may seriously impair the bentonite's functioning as a buffer material, e.g. by lowering its CEC or decreasing its swelling capacity. This report presents results from two ironbentonite experiments carried out under quite different conditions at VTT (Finland) and JAEA (Japan). Both studies focused on long-term iron-bentonite interactions under anaerobic conditions. The study at VTT comprised eight years long experiments focused on diffusive based interactions between solid cast-iron and compacted MX-80 bentonite (dry density 1.5- 1.6 g/cm3) in contact with an aqueous 0.5 M NaCl solution. The study at JAEA comprised ten years long batch experiments, each involving a mixture of metallic iron powder (25 g), an industrially refined Na bentonite, Kunipia F, which contains more than 99% montmorillonite (25 g), and an aqueous solution (250 mL). Samples were sent to B and Tech in airtight steel vessels filled with N2 and subsequently analyzed at various laboratories in Finland and Sweden. The JAEA samples differed with regard to the initial solution chemistry, which was either distilled water, 0.3 M NaCl, 0.6 M NaCl, 0.1 M NaHCO3, or 0.05 M Na2SO4. The analyses of the MX-80 bentonite samples were carried out on samples containing a cast iron cylinder and also on corresponding background samples with no cast iron. In addition, the external solution and gas phase in contact with the bentonite were analyzed. Briefly, the gas contained H2, most possibly caused by corrosion of the cast iron, and CO2, mainly as a result of carbonate dissolution. The eight years old external solution exhibited, inter alia, reducing conditions, a pH of around

  19. Stability for a novel low-pH alkaline slurry during the copper chemical mechanical planarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of a novel low-pH alkaline slurry (marked as slurry A, pH = 8.5) for copper chemical mechanical planarization was investigated in this paper. First of all, the stability mechanism of the alkaline slurry was studied. Then many parameters have been tested for researching the stability of the slurry through comparing with a traditional alkaline slurry (marked as slurry B, pH = 9.5), such as the pH value, particle size and zeta potential. Apart from this, the stability of the copper removal rate, dishing, erosion and surface roughness were also studied. All the results show that the stability of the novel low-pH alkaline slurry is better than the traditional alkaline slurry. The working-life of the novel low-pH alkaline slurry reaches 48 h. (semiconductor technology)

  20. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  1. Physical and chemical stability of the bentonite buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu; Neretnieks, Ivars [Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal I nstitute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-12-15

    A literature study was made on previous work on clay erosion and on the fundamental processes that govern the stability of clay gels. Mechanical erosion has been studied earlier and models devised to estimate the tendency to erode. We have used a different approach that we deem is fundamentally more correct. Chemical erosion processes have not been found to be studied previously and we have approached the problem by applying simple but fundamental mass balances and transport processes to the problem. The physical and chemical processes that govern the repulsive and cohesive forces in clay are well understood in principle but cannot yet be applied quantitatively to predict the gel/sol behaviour of the bentonite clay. It was necessary to rely directly on laboratory measurements for information on swelling and gel/sol properties. The backfill bentonite clay acts as a Bingham fluid over a wide range of clay density. To mobilise the clay a shear stress larger than the Bingham yield stress must be applied to the gel. The Bingham yield stress has been measured to be larger than 1 Pa (N/m{sup 2}) although it cannot be ruled out that lower values can be found under different experimental conditions than those reported. Shear stresses exerted by the water flowing in the fractures that intersect the deposition holes with the clay backfill have been estimated for a wide range of fracture transmissivities, apertures and hydraulic gradients that could exist under repository conditions. This includes the extremely high gradients that could exist during some periods during an ice age. For fracture transmissivities ranging from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s, fracture apertures from 0.1 to 2 mm and the hydraulic gradients from 0.01 to 1 mH{sub 2}O/m, the largest local shear stress found in this range was about 0.1 Pa. To investigate a 'what if' situation where the shear stress exceeds the yield stress simple models were devised. They were used to assess the rate of

  2. Attenuation of elastic waves in bentonite and monitoring of radioactive waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, A.; Tisato, N.; Grasselli, G.

    2016-04-01

    Deep geological repositories, isolated from the geosphere by an engineered bentonite barrier, are currently considered the safest solution for high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) disposal. As the physical conditions and properties of the bentonite barrier are anticipated to change with time, seismic tomography was suggested as a viable technique to monitor the physical state and integrity of the barrier and to timely detect any unforeseen failure. To do so, the seismic monitoring system needs to be optimized, and this can be achieved by conducting numerical simulations of wave propagation in the repository geometry. Previous studies treated bentonite as an elastic medium, whereas recent experimental investigations indicate its pronounced viscoelastic behaviour. The aims of this contribution are (i) to numerically estimate the effective attenuation of bentonite as a function of temperature T and water content Wc, so that synthetic data can accurately reproduce experimental traces and (ii) assess the feasibility and limitation of the HLRW repository monitoring by simulating the propagation of sonic waves in a realistic repository geometry. A finite difference method was utilized to simulate the wave propagation in experimental and repository setups. First, the input of the viscoelastic model was varied to achieve a match between experimental and numerical traces. The routine was repeated for several values of Wc and T, so that quality factors Qp(Wc, T) and Qs(Wc, T) were obtained. Then, the full-scale monitoring procedure was simulated for six scenarios, representing the evolution of bentonite's physical state. The estimated Qp and Qs exhibited a minimum at Wc = 20 per cent and higher sensitivity to Wc, rather than T, suggesting that pronounced inelasticity of the clay has to be taken into account in geophysical modelling and analysis. The repository-model traces confirm that active seismic monitoring is, in principle, capable of depicting physical changes in the

  3. Control of Montmorillonite Surface Coatings on Quartz Grains in Bentonite by Precursor Volcanic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendlandt, R. F.; Harrison, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    The pathogenic tendencies of respirable-sized quartz grains may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the quartz as well as external factors. Surface coatings on quartz are of particular interest as they modify both physical and chemical properties of quartz grain surfaces and sequester the grain from contact with reactive lung fluids. Wendlandt et al. (Appl. Geochem. 22, 2007) investigated the surface properties of respirable-sized quartz grains in bentonites and recognized pervasive montmorillonite surface coatings on the quartz that resisted removal by repeated vigorous washings and reaction with HCl. To understand the persistence of montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains of igneous origin, volcanic ash deposits of varying age and degree of alteration to montmorillonite were sampled in Utah, including the distal Lava Creek (c. 0.64 Ma) and Bishop Tuffs (c. 0.74 Ma), and SW Colorado (Conejos Fm, San Juan Volcanic Field) for comparison with commercial grade Cretaceous-age "western" and "southern" bentonites. Quartz grains, hand-picked from these samples, were analyzed using FE-SEM and HRTEM. Continuous coatings of volcanic glass occur on quartz grains from the distal volcanic ash samples. As glass alteration to montmorillonite becomes more extensive, quartz grain surfaces start to display patches of montmorillonite. These patches become continuous in extent on quartz grains from the bentonites. Late precipitation of opal- CT lepispheres is consistent with the alteration reaction for volcanic glass: Volcanic glass + H2O = montmorillonite + SiO2(am) + ions(aq). HRTEM of quartz grains reveals an amorphous surface layer, consistent with a volcanic glass coating. Our results indicate that persistent montmorillonite coatings on quartz grains in bentonites are related to precursor volcanic glass coatings on these grains. The absence of glass coatings on other mineral grains in bentonite (feldspar, biotite) may be a consequence of the presence of strong cleavage

  4. The corrosion rate of copper in a bentonite test package measured with electric resistance sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosborg, Bo [Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden); Kosec, Tadeja; Kranjc, Andrej; Kuhar, Viljem; Legat, Andraz [Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    LOT1 test parcel A2 was exposed for six years in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, which offers a realistic environment for the conditions that will prevail in a deep repository for high-level radioactive waste disposal in Sweden. The test parcel contained copper electrodes for real-time corrosion monitoring in bentonite ring 36, where the temperature was 24 deg C, and copper coupons in bentonite rings 22 and 30, where the temperature was higher. After retrieval of the test parcel in January 2006, a bentonite test package consisting of bentonite rings 35 - 37 was placed in a container and sealed with a thick layer of paraffin. Later the same year new copper electrodes were installed in the test package. In January 2007 electric resistance (ER) sensors of pure copper with a thickness of 35 {mu}m were also installed in the test package mainly to facilitate the interpretation of the results from the real-time corrosion monitoring with electrochemical techniques. The ER measurements have shown that the corrosion rate of pure copper exposed in an oxic bentonite/ saline groundwater environment at room temperate decreases slowly with time to low but measurable values. The corrosion rates estimated from the regularly performed EIS measurements replicate the ER data. Thus, for this oxic environment in which copper acquires corrosion potentials of the order of 200 mV (SHE) or higher, electrochemical measurements provide believable data. Comparing the recorded ER data with an estimate of the average corrosion rate based on comparing cross-sections from exposed and protected sensor elements, it is obvious that the former overestimates the actual corrosion rate, which is understandable. It seems as if electrochemical measurements can provide a better estimate of the corrosion rate; however, this is quite dependent on the use of proper measuring frequencies and evaluation methods. In this respect ER measurements are more reliable. It has been shown that real-time corrosion

  5. Bentonite deposits as a natural analogue to long-term barriers in a final repository of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geology of bentonite occurrences in Almeria (Spain) and Wyoming (USA) were studied in order to find suitable natural analogue to the longterm mechanical behaviour of the bentonite barrier in the final nuclear waste disposal. The study is based on literature review over both occurrence areas and on fieldwork observations from Almeria, Spain. The deposit areas differ from each other by age, deposition environment, exchangeable cation chemistry, alteration condition, occurrence and deformational features. One of the most important deformational feature in Almeria bentonites was the existence of Tertiary (Middle and Upper Miocene, 6-15.5 Ma old) bentonite intrusion inside/over younger Quaternary (Pleistocene Superior, 0.01-0.72 Ma old) sediments. This was a result of the confining pressure of overlying volcanic rocks and sediments and the high plasticity behaviour of bentonites. According to this observation, the pressure effect in final nuclear waste repositories requires further investigations. The bentonites in Wyoming have survived weathering and shearing without losing their expandability or other properties typical of smectite-rich materials. (orig.)

  6. Summary of a GAMBIT Club Workshop on Gas Migration in Bentonite. A Report produced for the GAMBIT Club

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to review the status of understanding of gas migration in bentonite, and particularly the experimental data that provides the basis for such understanding as exists, the GAMBIT Club organised a workshop of invited participants that was held in Madrid during 29-30 October 2003. (The GAMBIT Club is a consortium of radioactive waste management agencies: SKB, ANDRA, Enresa, JNC, Nagra, and Posiva.) The motivation for the workshop was the difficulty found in developing models of gas migration in bentonite because of lack of detailed characterisation of its mechanism and controlling parameters. This report provides a summary of the presentations made at the workshop and of the discussions that took place. Copies of the slides presented are provided in the appendix. The titles of the presentations are: Overview of Current Status of Experimental Knowledge and Understanding of Gas migration in Bentonite (William Rodwell); Summary of GAMBIT Club Modelling of Gas Migration in Compacted Bentonite (William Rodwell); A Capillarity/advection Model for Gas Break-through Pressures (Marolo Alfaro, Jim Graham); Recent Experiments by JNC on Gas Migration in Bentonite (Kenji Tanai, Mikihiko Yamamoto); Gas Flow in Clays: Experimental Data Leading to Two-phase and Preferential-path Modelling (Eduardo Alonso); Gas Movement in MX80 Bentonite under Constant Volume Conditions (Jon Harrington, Steve Horseman); Some Practical Observations on Gas Flow in Clays and Clay-rich Rocks (Steve Horseman, Jon Harrington); Early Large-scale Experiments on Gas Break-through Pressures in Clay based Materials (Harald Hoekmark)

  7. Study on the adsorption of Cr(Ⅵ) onto landfill liners containing granular activated carbon or bentonite activated by acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hai-jun; LUAN Mao-tian; ZHANG Jin-li; YU Yong-xian

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption capacity of landfill liners containing granular activated carbon (GAC), or bentonite activated by acid, for Cr(VI) was investigated by batch testing. The results show that both GAC and activated bentonite could be used as sorptive amendments for trapping Cr(VI) in landfill liners. The Cr(VI) sorption to GAC and activated bentonite is much greater than Cr(VI) sorption to natural clay. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto all the soils increases with increasing temperature; adsorption ca-pacity is also significantly influenced by soil-solid concentration. As the soil-solid concentration increases the adsorption capacity first decreases logarithmically, but then stabilizes when the soil-solid concentration exceeds a critical value (e.g. 400 g/L). Perme-ability tests were conducted in the laboratory. The results indicate that the hydraulic conductivity of landfill liners containing GAC or activated bentonite can meet the engineering requirement of 1 nm/s. One-dimensional transport simulations for Cr(VI) were performed to evaluate the effect of GAC and activated bentonite on landfill liners. The results of the simulations indicate that land-fill liners containing GAC, or activated bentonite, significantly retard the transport of Cr(VI) relative to a conventional clay liner.

  8. Summary of a GAMBIT Club Workshop on Gas Migration in Bentonite. A Report produced for the GAMBIT Club

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodwell, W.R. [Serco Assurance, Risley (GB)] (ed.)

    2005-11-15

    In order to review the status of understanding of gas migration in bentonite, and particularly the experimental data that provides the basis for such understanding as exists, the GAMBIT Club organised a workshop of invited participants that was held in Madrid during 29-30 October 2003. (The GAMBIT Club is a consortium of radioactive waste management agencies: SKB, ANDRA, Enresa, JNC, Nagra, and Posiva.) The motivation for the workshop was the difficulty found in developing models of gas migration in bentonite because of lack of detailed characterisation of its mechanism and controlling parameters. This report provides a summary of the presentations made at the workshop and of the discussions that took place. Copies of the slides presented are provided in the appendix. The titles of the presentations are: Overview of Current Status of Experimental Knowledge and Understanding of Gas migration in Bentonite (William Rodwell); Summary of GAMBIT Club Modelling of Gas Migration in Compacted Bentonite (William Rodwell); A Capillarity/advection Model for Gas Break-through Pressures (Marolo Alfaro, Jim Graham); Recent Experiments by JNC on Gas Migration in Bentonite (Kenji Tanai, Mikihiko Yamamoto); Gas Flow in Clays: Experimental Data Leading to Two-phase and Preferential-path Modelling (Eduardo Alonso); Gas Movement in MX80 Bentonite under Constant Volume Conditions (Jon Harrington, Steve Horseman); Some Practical Observations on Gas Flow in Clays and Clay-rich Rocks (Steve Horseman, Jon Harrington); Early Large-scale Experiments on Gas Break-through Pressures in Clay based Materials (Harald Hoekmark)

  9. Novel techniques for slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudukovic, M.P.

    1999-05-14

    The objective of this cooperative research effort between Washington University, Ohio State University and Exxon Research Engineering Company was to improve the knowledge base for scale-up and operation of slurry bubble column reactors for syngas conversion and other coal conversion processes by increased reliance on experimentally verified hydrodynamic models. During the first year (July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996) of this three year program novel experimental tools (computer aided radioactive particle tracking (CARPT), particle image velocimetry (PIV), heat probe, optical fiber probe and gamma ray tomography) were developed and tuned for measurement of pertinent hydrodynamic quantities, such as velocity field, holdup distribution, heat transfer and bubble size. The accomplishments were delineated in the First Technical Annual Report. The second year (July, 1996--June 30, 1997) was spent on further development and tuning of the novel experimental tools (e.g., development of Monte Carlo calibration for CARPT, optical probe development), building up the hydrodynamic data base using these tools and comparison of the two techniques (PIV and CARPT) for determination of liquid velocities. A phenomenological model for gas and liquid backmixing was also developed. All accomplishments were summarized in the Second Annual Technical Report. During the third and final year of the program (July 1, 1997--June 30, 1998) and during the nine months no cost extension, the high pressure facility was completed and a set of data was taken at high pressure conditions. Both PIV, CT and CARPT were used. More fundamental hydrodynamic modeling was also undertaken and model predictions were compared to data. The accomplishments for this period are summarized in this report.

  10. Improvements of marine clay slurries using chemicalephysical combined method (CPCM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongqing Wu; Wenyu Xu; Romy Tjuar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the effectiveness, applicability and validity of chemicalephysical combined methods (CPCMs) for treatment of marine clay (MC) slurries were evaluated. The method CPCM1 combines chemical stabilization and vacuum preloading (VP), while CPCM2 is similar to CPCM1 but includes both the application of surcharge and use of geo-bags to provide confinement during surcharge preloading. The key advantage of CPCM2 using geo-bags is that the surcharge can be immediately applied on the chemically stabilized slurries. Two types of geo-bags were investigated under simulated land filling and dyke conditions, respectively. The test results show that the shear strength (cu) of treated slurry by CPCM2 is generally much higher than that by CPCM1. Besides, the use of CPCM2 can significantly reduce the treatment time due to the short drainage paths created by geo-bags. Overall, CPCM2 allows faster consolidation and higher preloading that help to achieve higher mechanical properties of the stabilized slurry. There are consistent relationships between cU and water content of slurries treated by CPCM2. Several important observations were also made based on comparisons of experimental data.

  11. Predicting wear of hydrotransport pipelines in oil sand slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Been, J.; Lu, B.; Wolodko, J. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kiel, D. [Coanda Research and Development Corp., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    An overview of erosion and corrosion methods and techniques was presented. Wear to pipelines is influenced by slurry flow and chemistry; solids loading; and electrochemical interactions. While several experimental techniques have been developed to rank the performance of different pipeline materials, experiments do not currently provide accurate quantitative prediction of pipeline wear in the field. Rotating cylinder electrodes (RCE) and jet impingement methods are used to study the effect of flow velocity on corrosion rate. Slurry pot erosion-corrosion testers are used to rank materials for use in more dilute, less turbulent slurries. Coriolois slurry erosion testers are used to rank the erosion resistance of different pipeline materials. A pilot-scale flow loop is now being constructed by the Alberta Research Council (ARC) in order to replicate wet erosion phenomena in oil sands applications. The flow loop will be used to simulate the field conditions of oil sands pipelines and develop predictive wear data and models. Coulombic shear stress and characteristic wall velocities have been determined using a 2-layer model designed to represent flow as 2 distinct layers. To date, the flow loop pilot study has demonstrated that wear rates in smaller diameter flow loops are not significantly different than larger diameter field installations. Preliminary calculations have demonstrated that the flow loop can be used to accurately simulate the hydrodynamics and wear typically experienced in field slurry flows. 67 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  12. Use of immobile trace elements for the correlation of Telychian bentonites on Saaremaa Island, Estonia, and mapping of volcanic ash clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Kiipli, Tarmo; Orlova, Kiira; Kiipli, Enli; Kallaste, Toivo

    2008-01-01

    Thirty suspected altered volcanic ash (bentonite) samples from the Nässumaa-825 and Orissaare-859 sections were analysed by the X-ray fluorescence method. Twenty of these samples revealed chemical signs of pure volcanogenic material, one was of mixed terrigenous–volcanogenic origin, and nine were classified as terrigenous claystones. Twenty of the bentonites were correlated, with variable confidence, with bentonites from earlier studied sections; one sample represents a formerly unknown erupt...

  13. Alkali-activated fly ash-based geopolymers with zeolite or bentonite as additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyu Hu; Xiaomin Zhu; Fumei Long [Nanchang University, Nanchang (China). College of Civil Engineering

    2009-11-15

    Geopolymers were synthesized by using fly ash as the main starting material, zeolite or bentonite as supplementary materials, and NaOH and CaO together as activator. An orthogonal array testing protocol was used to analyze the influence of the mix proportion on the properties of the geopolymers. The results indicate that the concentration of NaOH solution and the CaO content play an important role on the strength of the materials. Especially, with zeolite as additive, the fly ash-based geopolymer shows the highest strength and the best sulfate resistance. Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray, and SEM-EDX demonstrate that supplementary zeolite may involve the process of geopolymerization to form a stable zeolitic structure and improve the properties of the geopolymer. Bentonite simply acts as a filler to make the geopolymer more compact, but shows no improvement on the compositions and the microstructures of the geopolymer.

  14. Modelling of erosion of bentonite gel by gel/sol flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite intrusion into a fracture intersecting the canister deposition hole is modelled. The model describes the expansion of the bentonite within the fracture. It accounts for the repulsive electrostatic double-layer forces, the attractive van der Waals forces and friction forces between the particles and the water. The model also takes into account the diffusion of the colloid particles in the smectite sol. Diffusion of a counterion, sodium, is accounted for as this strongly influences the double layer force and the viscosity of the gel/sol. The gel/sol is considered to be a fluid with a varying viscosity that is strongly dependent on the bentonite volume fraction in the gel and the sodium concentration in the water. Two different geometries were modelled; a rectangular and a cylindrical. The rectangular geometry was used to gain experience with the processes and mechanisms and how they interact since the cylindrical geometry was somewhat less stable numerically and more time consuming. In the rectangular geometry a fracture 1 metre long in the flow direction was modelled. In both geometries the fracture size was selected sufficiently large to ensure that the water velocity, near the distant border was nearly the same as the approaching water velocity and that the smectite concentration there was vanishingly small. It was found that the velocity of the fluid drops considerably where the bentonite volume fraction is larger than 1-2%. This is due to the strong increase in viscosity with increasing bentonite volume fraction. The loss of smectite by the slowly flowing fluid was found to be proportional to the square root of the seeping water velocity for the rectangular geometry. For the cylindrical geometry, the dependence is somewhat lower (exponent about 0.4) since the length of the gel/water interface decreases with increasing water flow rate. The penetration depth of the gel/water interface decreases with increasing water flow rate. For water velocity of the

  15. The effects of apple pomace, bentonite and calcium superphosphate on swine manure aerobic composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishao; Huang, Yimei; Liu, Xueling; Huang, Hua

    2014-09-01

    The effects of additives such as apple pomace, bentonite and calcium superphosphate on swine manure composting were investigated in a self-built aerated static box (90 L) by assessing their influences on the transformation of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous and compost maturity. The results showed that additives all prolonged the thermophilic stage in composting compared to control. Nitrogen losses amounted to 34-58% of the initial nitrogen, in which ammonia volatilization accounted for 0.3-4.6%. Calcium superphosphate was helpful in facilitating composting process as it significantly reduced the ammonia volatilization during thermophilic stage and increased the contents of total nitrogen and phosphorous in compost, but bentonite increased the ammonia volatilization and reduced the total nitrogen concentration. It suggested that calcium superphosphate is an effective additive for keeping nitrogen during swine manure composting. PMID:24928053

  16. Study on the mechanical properties of a HMS-PP nanocomposite with a Brazilian bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work concerns to the study of the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite HMSPP - Polypropylene High Melt Strength (obtained at a dose of 12.5 kGy) and a bentonite clay Brazilian Paraiba (PB), known as 'Chocolate' in concentrations of 5 and 10% by weight, comparison of to one American Clay, cloisite 20A nanocomposite was done. Agent compatibilizer polypropylene-graft, known as maleic anhydride (PP-g-AM) was addict 3% concentration thought technique melt intercalation using a twin-screw extruder and the specimens were prepared by injection process. The mechanical behavior was evaluated by strength, flexural strength and impact tests. The morphology of the nanocomposites was studied by the technique of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while the organophilic bentonite and nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (FTIR). (author)

  17. Modelling of erosion of bentonite gel by gel/sol flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars; Longcheng Liu (Chemical Engineering and Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    Bentonite intrusion into a fracture intersecting the canister deposition hole is modelled. The model describes the expansion of the bentonite within the fracture. It accounts for the repulsive electrostatic double-layer forces, the attractive van der Waals forces and friction forces between the particles and the water. The model also takes into account the diffusion of the colloid particles in the smectite sol. Diffusion of a counterion, sodium, is accounted for as this strongly influences the double layer force and the viscosity of the gel/sol. The gel/sol is considered to be a fluid with a varying viscosity that is strongly dependent on the bentonite volume fraction in the gel and the sodium concentration in the water. Two different geometries were modelled; a rectangular and a cylindrical. The rectangular geometry was used to gain experience with the processes and mechanisms and how they interact since the cylindrical geometry was somewhat less stable numerically and more time consuming. In the rectangular geometry a fracture 1 metre long in the flow direction was modelled. In both geometries the fracture size was selected sufficiently large to ensure that the water velocity, near the distant border was nearly the same as the approaching water velocity and that the smectite concentration there was vanishingly small. It was found that the velocity of the fluid drops considerably where the bentonite volume fraction is larger than 1-2%. This is due to the strong increase in viscosity with increasing bentonite volume fraction. The loss of smectite by the slowly flowing fluid was found to be proportional to the square root of the seeping water velocity for the rectangular geometry. For the cylindrical geometry, the dependence is somewhat lower (exponent about 0.4) since the length of the gel/water interface decreases with increasing water flow rate. The penetration depth of the gel/water interface decreases with increasing water flow rate. For water velocity of the

  18. Diffusion of hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and large molecular weight anions in bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusivities of HS- and H2 have been determined from profile analysis and steady state transport experiments. The diffusivity of HS- was found to be 9x10-12 and 4x10xsec1 in MX-80 and Erbsloeh bentonite respectively. The results are in fair agreement with the results earlier obtained for Cl- and I-. The H2 diffusivity calculated from steady state transport was found to be surprisingly low (3.6x10-12m2xsec-1). Various heavy anions with molecular weights 290-30x103 were found to migrate through MX-80 bentonite with diffusivities in the range (2,1-0,75)x10-15m2xsec-1. (Author)

  19. Studies on incorporation of exfoliated bentonitic clays in polyurethane foams for increasing flame retardancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this contribution we report the results of studying the incorporation of exfoliated bentonitic clays into polyurethane foams. A suspension in water of a sodium bentonite from Argentine Patagonia was interchanged with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) for 4 h at 80°C, rendering an exfoliated clay, which is nanometric in only one dimension. This nanoclay, when dispersed in the polyurethane, resulted in the same fire retardancy rating (UL-94) than when polyurethane was treated with a commercial nanoclay. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low augmentations of polyurethane samples treated with the synthethized nanoclay (2,5% w/w) showed no differences respect to untreated polyurethane, except for the irregularity of void edges.

  20. Comparative Study of Laterite and Bentonite Based Organoclays: Implications of Hydrophobic Compounds Remediation from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nafees

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well.

  1. Characterization of Brazilian Bentonite Organoclays as sorbents of petroleum-derived fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bertagnolli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on preparing and characterizing Brazilian bentonite clay through the use of quaternary ammonium salt so as to apply it as a sorbent for petroleum-derived fuels. Bentonite clay was organophilizated by the intercalation of quaternary ammonium salts such as cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The resulting materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, N2 physisorption and infrared spectroscopy techniques. The clay similarity with petroleum-derived fuels, gasoline and diesel oil were defined by sorption and swelling tests. The increase in basal spacing and the appearance of absorption bands related to the CH2 and CH3 groups confirm the efficiency of Brazilian organoclays. Removal percentages between 50 and 60 for benzene, toluene and xylene indicate the potential of organoclay in the remediation of areas contaminated by petroleum-derived fuels.

  2. Evaluation of hydraulic conductivities of bentonite and rock under hyper alkaline and nitrate conditions (3) (Summary)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the summary of JNC-TJ--8400-2005-002. 1) Circumstance of TRU waste repository shows alkaline condition due to leaching of cementitious materials. The waste containing significant soluble nitrate may changes ground water chemistry to high ion strength. Consolidation test and permeability test are carried out in order to as. exchanged with nitrate. It is noted that permeability of bentonite increased at from 40 to 200 times by cation exchange. 2) Permeability of hyper alkaline solution is almost same to water. Permeability of hyper alkaline solution with nitrates increased corresponding to rising ion strength. 3) The results of batch of column test were simulated. The model can explain clearly the results in short period. This can estimate leaching ratio and secondary minerals. The model can simulate the experimental results by two types of velocity theory on altering bentonite. (author)

  3. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Saw V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity. The phase equilibrium of methane hydrate under different experimental conditions was investigated. The effects of the particle size of silica sand as well as a mixture of bentonite clay and silica sand on methane hydrate formation and its dissociation were studied. The kinetics of hydrate formation was studied under different subcooling conditions to observe its effects on the induction time of hydrate formation. The amount of methane gas encapsulated in hydrate was computed using a real gas equation. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is used to estimate the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation with measured phase equilibrium data.

  4. Bentonite electrical conductivity: a model based on series–parallel transport

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2010-01-30

    Bentonite has significant applications nowadays, among them as landfill liners, in concrete industry as a repairing material, and as drilling mud in oil well construction. The application of an electric field to such perimeters is under wide discussion, and subject of many studies. However, to understand the behaviour of such an expansive and plastic material under the influence of an electric field, the perception of its electrical properties is essential. This work serves to compare existing data of such electrical behaviour with new laboratorial results. Electrical conductivity is a pertinent parameter since it indicates how much a material is prone to conduct electricity. In the current study, total conductivity of a compacted porous medium was established to be dependent upon density of the bentonite plug. Therefore, surface conductivity was addressed and a series-parallel transport model used to quantify/predict the total conductivity of the system. © The Author(s) 2010.

  5. A new type of bentonite-based non-woven composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosić Branko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich-like composites based on clays and textiles are extensively applied in various fields, including civil engineering and environmental protection. In this paper, the synthesis of a new type of composite with embedded bentonite particles within a non-woven polyester matrix is presented. The synthesized composite has improved mechanical properties compared to the corresponding non-woven matrix. Although more than two-times thinner, the synthesized composite showed mechanical properties similar to those of a commercial composite chosen for comparison. Sorption test results confirmed that the contribution of the textile component to the sorption of aqueous Cu(II ions by the composite was negligible. The sorption of aqueous Cu(II ions on the synthesized composite was best-fitted using the Langmuir model. The presented study confirmed that the loss of bentonite particles from the composite can be eliminated using the suggested synthesis method.

  6. Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Bentonite Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Su, Guojun; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Wen

    2016-08-01

    A series of bentonite nanocomposites have been synthesized by modifying bentonite with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB) and the common complexing agents, complexone (ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid, EDTA) or mercaptocomplexant (2-Mercaptobenzothiazole, MBT). These adsorbents are used to remove heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+),Co(2+)). The Bent-CTMAB-MBT adsorbed metal ions are higher than Bent-CTMAB-EDTA under the same ion concentration in AAS. Compared with the single ion system, the adsorption of the mixed ion system of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Co(2+) had decreased differently. In the mixed system, the adsorption of Mn(2+) is significantly lower, but the adsorption of Cu(2+) was highest. The adsorption sequence of these four metal ions was Cu(2+) > Zn(2+) > Co(2+) > Mn(2+), and the selective adsorption was closely related to the hydration energy of heavy metal ions. We could remove more metal ions in different stages with the adsorption sequence. PMID:27456144

  7. Effects of the structural nature of the anionic additives on the rheological behavior of bentonite suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different experimental measurements (Theology, granulometry, XRD) were carried out in order to study the main properties of bentonite suspensions in presence of anionic additives at different concentrations. These additives are: Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) as surfactant, a flexible polymer (Sodium Carboxy Methyl Cellulose, CMC) and a semi-rigid polymer (Xanthan gum). It has been shown that the structural nature of anionic additive influences directly the mixtures viscoelastic and flow behavior. The steric effect of the surfactant modifies the Face-Edge interactions and yields changes of the mixtures rheological behavior at low deformation rates. Polymers act by coating each clay particle and prevent their agglomeration. Therefore, bentonite has no direct effect on the rheological behavior of the mixtures: the additives are responsible for the mechanisms of de-structuration and structure reorganization as well as the mixtures viscous and viscoelastic behavior. (author)

  8. Study of the Properties of Bentonites for their use in Clay Geo synthetic Barriers; Estudio de la propiedades de las bentonitas para su utilizacion en barreras geosinteticas arcillosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiro Lopez, A.; Mateo Sanz, B.; Garcia Cidoncha, H.; Blanco Fernandez, M.

    2014-02-01

    Bentonites used for the production of clay geo synthetic barriers need to meet some properties so that they can be a waterproofing system. among the bentonites used in industry, sodium bentonite has the lowest permeability due to its high water absorption capacity in the inter-laminar space, causing it to swell and form a barrier to water flow. this paper provides the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality the study of the properties of four bentonite to evaluate their quality. For this study, the main properties have been tested: water absorption, swelling index, fluid loss, cation exchange capacity and montmorillonite content. In order to optimize the procedure for the characterization of bentonites, correlations between different tests have been done, to identify the most suitable ones. Finally, a compatibility test has been carried out to study the performance of bentonites in water containing a high amount of sales, because in this case, an ion exchange between the interlayer sodium ions of bentonite and cations dissolved in the water can take, resulting in a decrease swell of the bentonite. (Author)

  9. Corrosion monitoring of carbon steel in the bentonite in deep underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous study, a corrosion sensor has been developed and its applicability to monitoring of the corrosion behavior of carbon steel overpack has been confirmed. In this study, a simulated overpack was placed with buffer material composed mainly of bentonite in test tunnel of 350 m deep underground constructed at Horonobe underground research laboratory. The corrosion monitoring was performed by AC impedance method using the corrosion sensors embeded in the buffer material. (author)

  10. Adsorption potential of bentonite and attapulgite clays applied for the desalination of sea water

    OpenAIRE

    Nel, Monica; Waanders, Frans B.; Fosso-Kankeu, Elvis

    2014-01-01

    A possible new process for the partial desalination of seawater is to use bentonite clay or attapulgite as an adsorbent. The ion exchange property of these clays, which is a result of the characteristic t-o-t layer structure, enables the use of these materials as adsorbents. This technique has the opportunity to be used as a pre-treatment as current commercial seawater desalination processes are very expensive. The clay was characterized using XRD, XRF and SEM analyses. ...

  11. The Lower Silurian Osmundsberg K-bentonite. Part II: Mineralogy, geochemistry, chemostratigraphy and tectonomagmatic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, W.D.; Bergstrom, Stig M.; Kolata, Dennis R.; Sun, H.

    1998-01-01

    The Lower Silurian Osmundsberg K-bentonite is a widespread ash bed that occurs throughout Baltoscandia and parts of northern Europe. This paper describes its characteristics at its type locality in the Province of Dalarna, Sweden. It contains mineralogical and chemical characteristics that permit its regional correlation in sections elsewhere in Sweden as well as Norway, Estonia, Denmark and Great Britain. The Baltica as part of the subduction complex associated with the closure of Iapetus.

  12. Study of mechanical properties of films of nanocomposites LLDPE/bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical properties of LLDPE/bentonite clay were determined as a function of clay content (1 and 2% w/w), purification and organophilization. Raw materials were characterized by FTIR and XRD. Nanocomposites were obtained as flat films and characterized by XRD and mechanical properties. Results indicate that best overall mechanical properties were displayed by systems containing purified clay and that they tended to decrease with increasing clay content. Organofilization was effective and only intercalated nanocomposites were obtained. (author)

  13. Development of mechanistic sorption model and treatment of uncertainties for Ni sorption on montmorillonite/bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in buffer materials (bentonite) are the key processes in the safe geological disposal of radioactive waste, because migration of radionuclides in this barrier is expected to be diffusion-controlled and retarded by sorption processes. It is therefore necessary to understand the detailed/coupled processes of sorption and diffusion in compacted bentonite and develop mechanistic /predictive models, so that reliable parameters can be set under a variety of geochemical conditions relevant to performance assessment (PA). For this purpose, JAEA has developed the integrated sorption and diffusion (ISD) model/database in montmorillonite/bentonite systems. The main goal of the mechanistic model/database development is to provide a tool for a consistent explanation, prediction, and uncertainty assessment of Kd as well as diffusion parameters needed for the quantification of radionuclide transport. The present report focuses on developing the thermodynamic sorption model (TSM) and on the quantification and handling of model uncertainties in applications, based on illustrating by example of Ni sorption on montmorillonite/bentonite. This includes 1) a summary of the present state of the art of thermodynamic sorption modeling, 2) a discussion of the selection of surface species and model design appropriate for the present purpose, 3) possible sources and representations of TSM uncertainties, and 4) details of modeling, testing and uncertainty evaluation for Ni sorption. Two fundamentally different approaches are presented and compared for representing TSM uncertainties: 1) TSM parameter uncertainties calculated by FITEQL optimization routines and some statistical procedure, 2) overall error estimated by direct comparison of modeled and experimental Kd values. The overall error in Kd is viewed as the best representation of model uncertainty in ISD model/database development. (author)

  14. A bentonite-gold nanohybrid as a heterogeneous green catalyst for selective oxidation of silanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, R J; John, Jubi; Varma, R Luxmi

    2016-08-23

    A highly efficient, environmentally benign and reusable heterogeneous bentonite-gold nanohybrid catalyst was designed and synthesized. This heterogeneous catalyst could efficaciously catalyse the oxidation of organosilanes to silanols. The reaction is 98.7% atom economical and the products were obtained in excellent yield without the formation of disiloxanes as byproducts. The catalyst was also well applicable for the gram scale preparation of silanols.

  15. The effect of zeolite,bentonite and sepiolite minerals onheavy metal uptake by sunflower

    OpenAIRE

    N . Esmaeilpour Fard; J. Givi; S. Houshmand

    2015-01-01

    Mining, industrial and agricultural activities can result in considerable soil pollution by heavy metals (HMs). One of the methods to control this pollution is application of adsorbent minerals. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of adsorbent minerals (bentonite, zeolite and sepiolite) on transfer of some heavy metals (i.e., Pb, Zn and Cd) from soil to tissues of sunflower (Heliantus annuus L.). Treatments included: Non-polluted soil, HM-polluted soil, polluted soil + benton...

  16. ALTERNATIVE BINDERS TO BENTONITE FOR IRON ORE PELLETIZING : PART II : EFFECTS ON METALLURGICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Sivrikaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was started to find alternative binders to bentonite and to recover the low preheated and fired pellet mechanical strengths of organic binders-bonded pellets. Bentonite is considered as a chemical impurity for pellet chemistry due to acid constituents (SiO2 and Al2O3. Especially addition of silica-alumina bearing binders is detrimental for iron ore concentrate with high acidic content. Organic binders are the most studied binders since they are free in silica. Although they yield pellets with good wet strength; they have found limited application in industry since they fail to give sufficient physical and mechanical strength to preheated and fired pellets. It is investigated that how insufficient preheated and fired pellet strengths can be improved when organic binders are used as binder. The addition of a slag bonding/strength increasing constituent (free in acidic contents into pellet feed to provide pellet strength with the use of organic binders was proposed. Addition of boron compounds such as colemanite, tincal, borax pentahydrate, boric acid together with organic binders such as CMC, starch, dextrin and some organic based binders, into magnetite and hematite pellet mixture was tested. After determining the addition of boron compounds is beneficial to recover the low pellet physical and mechanical qualities in the first part of this study, in this second part, metallurgical and chemical properties (reducibility - swelling index – microstructure – mineralogy - chemical content of pellets produced with combined binders (an organic binder plus a boron compound were presented. The metallurgical and chemical tests results showed that good quality product pellets can be produced with combined binders when compared with the bentonite-bonded pellets. Hence, the suggested combined binders can be used as binder in place of bentonite in iron ore pelletizing without compromising the pellet chemistry.

  17. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Shah, R.R.; Davis, R.L.

    1994-09-01

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer.

  18. Microalgal cultivation with biogas slurry for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liandong; Yan, Cheng; Li, Zhaohua

    2016-11-01

    Microalgal growth requires a substantial amount of chemical fertilizers. An alternative to the utilization of fertilizer is to apply biogas slurry produced through anaerobic digestion to cultivate microalgae for the production of biofuels. Plenty of studies have suggested that anaerobic digestate containing high nutrient contents is a potentially feasible nutrient source to culture microalgae. However, current literature indicates a lack of review available regarding microalgal cultivation with biogas slurry for the production of biofuels. To help fill this gap, this review highlights the integration of digestate nutrient management with microalgal production. It first unveils the current status of microalgal production, providing basic background to the topic. Subsequently, microalgal cultivation technologies using biogas slurry are discussed in detail. A scale-up scheme for simultaneous biogas upgrade and digestate application through microalgal cultivation is then proposed. Afterwards, several uncertainties that might affect this practice are explored. Finally, concluding remarks are put forward.

  19. Gas distribution effects on waste properties: Viscosities of bubbly slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The retention and episodic release of flammable gases are critical safety concerns for double-shell tanks that contain waste slurries. The rheological behavior of the waste, particularly of the settled sludge, is critical to characterizing the tendency of the waste to retain gas bubbles. The presence of gas bubbles is expected to affect the rheology of the sludge, but essentially no literature data are available to assess the effect of bubbles. Accordingly, the objectives of this study are to develop models for the effect of gas bubbles on the viscosity of a particulate slurry, develop an experimental method (capillary rheometer), collect data on the viscosity of a bubbly slurry, and develop a theoretical basis for interpreting the experimental data from the capillary rheometer

  20. Study on combustion characteristics of petroleum coke residual oil slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shou Weiyi; Xu Xiaoming; Cao Xinyu [and others

    1997-07-01

    Petroleum coke residual oil slurry (POS) is one of prospect substitute of oil burned in many industrial boilers and utilities in China. It is a mixture of pulverized petroleum coke, residual oil and slurry oil. We carried out a series of experiments to study its ignition and combustion mechanism. Experimental results show that the ignition temperature of petroleum coke is higher than normal anthracite and meager coal, and it is difficult to be burned in oil-fired furnace directly. The petroleum coke`s combustion property is improved greatly after mixing with residual oil and slurry oil. The combustion process of POS can be divided into three phases: preheating, kindling and homogenous combustion, burning of the petroleum coke residue. The combustion condition of POS is close to bituminous and coal-oil-mixture (COM).

  1. Semisolid Slurry Preparation of Die Steel with High Chromium Content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei-min; ZHAO Ai-min; ZHANG Li-juan; ZHONG Xue-you

    2004-01-01

    The semisolid slurry preparation of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV with high chromium content was studied. The results show that the semisolid slurry of both steels with solid of 40 %-60 % can be made by electromagnetic stirring method and is easy to be discharged from the bottom little hole of the stirring chamber. The sizes of the spherical primary austenite in the slurry of die steels Cr12 and Cr12MoV are 50-100 μm and 80-150 μm, respectively. The homogeneous temperature field and solute field for both steel melts are obtained. The strong temperature fluctuation in the melt with many fine primary austenite grains occurs and the remelting of the secondary arm roots at the same time is accelerated because of the electromagnetic stirring. These are the most important reasons for deposition of spherical primary austenite grains.

  2. Concentrated biogas slurry enhanced soil fertility and tomato quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang-Bo Yu; Xi-Ping Luo; Fang-Bo Yu; Xi-Ping Luo; Cheng-Fang Song; Miao-Xian Zhang; Sheng-Dao Shan (Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Inst. of Environmental Technology, Zhejiang Forestry University, Linan (China))

    2010-05-15

    Biogas slurry is a cheap source of plant nutrients and can offer extra benefits to soil fertility and fruit quality. However, its current utilization mode and low content of active ingredients limit its further development. In this paper, a one-growing-season field study was conducted to assess the effects of concentrated biogas slurry on soil property, tomato fruit quality, and composition of microflora in both nonrhizosphere and rhizosphere soils. The results showed that application of concentrated slurry could bring significant changes to tomato cultivation, including increases in organic matter, available N, P, and K, total N and P, electrical conductivity, and fruit contents of amino acids, protein, soluble sugar, beta-carotene, tannins, and vitamin C, together with the R/S ratios and the culturable counts of bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi in soils. It was concluded that the application is a practicable means in tomato production and will better service the area of sustainable agriculture

  3. Mixing conditions in application of bentonite grouting to radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to understand the flow properties and permeability of bentonite grout with NaCl added, using laboratory tests, and to clarify the mixing conditions of bentonite as a material. Given that the required permeability of clay grout is 10-9 (m/s), the combination of grout (W/B) becomes 6 or less. The viscosity of the grout was measured, and because the viscosity was higher than the thickest cement milk on dam grouting, it was found that grout with a W/B of less than 10 was difficult to inject into rock joints. We then added NaCl to grout with a W/B is 6, and its viscosity decreased as the amount of NaCl increased. A grout of viscosity able to be injected into rock joints was achieved by adding NaCl in a density higher than 'W:NaCl=40:1'. Next, the permeability of a bentonite suspension with NaCl was examined using the falling head permeability test. Testing the sample 'B:W:NaCl=20:20:1' for 10 days revealed that the initial permeability 10-8 (m/s) decreased to 10-10 - 10-11 (m/s). These results showed that a suspension to inject into rock joints could be made by adding NaCl, and clarified that permeation of groundwater into the suspension causes a decline in permeability. (author)

  4. Hydrothermal alterations of Bentonites in Almeria (Spain); Alteracion hidrotermal de las bentonitas de Almeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares Gonzalez, J.; Barahona Fernandez, E.; Huertas Garcia, F.; Caballero Mesa, E.; Cuadros Ojeda, J.

    1996-12-01

    The use of bentonite as backfilling and sealing material in the high level radioactive waste disposals has been treated in previous studies accomplished by different authors. However, the use of this clayey barrier needs the resolution of different problems so that its efficiency will be enhanced. between those could be cited the study of the actual capacity of sealing the space around the canister and the accommodation to the pressure of the rocky environment; the possible variations in plasticity; the diffusion and reaction processes that can be produced through the barrier by groundwater, the capacity of radionuclides adsorption, etc. These studies, show that the bentonites with high content in smectite fulfill satisfactorily with the physical and chemical conditions to be used as sealing material, but it is known that the smectite can be unstable in diagenetic conditions similar to those are given in a deep repository of radioactive wastes, being transformed into illite. A conclusion of immediate interest is deduced from this last study. The bentonites used as sealing material in radioactive waste repositories must no contain Na as interlayer cation since it is very easily exchangeable by K. It is better to select those smectites with Ca and Mg that detain the entry of K in the interlayer and as a consequence the transformation process of smectite into illite is made more difficult. (Author)

  5. The removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by adsorption using surfactant-modified bentonite and kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkaram, Uday F.; Mukhlis, Abduljabar A. [Department of Chemistry, College of Education, Ibn Al-Haitham, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq); Al-Dujaili, Ammar H., E-mail: ahdujaili@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, College of Education, Ibn Al-Haitham, University of Baghdad, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2009-09-30

    The natural bentonite (BC) and kaolinite (KC) were modified with two surfactant of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA) and phenyltrimethylammonium bromide (PTMA) to form four kinds of organic-modified clays, i.e., HDTMA-bentonite (BHM), HDTMA-kaolinite (KHM), PTMA-bentonite (KPM) and PTMA-kaolinite (KPM). The modified minerals were characterized by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FT-IR spectroscopy. The surface areas were determined using methylene blue adsorption method. Cation-exchange capacity (CEC) was estimated using an ethylenediamine complex of copper method and the modifier loading was calculated from the total carbon analysis. The ability of raw and organo-modified clays to remove phenol from aqueous solutions has been carried out as a function of contact time, pH and temperatures using a batch technique. The removal of phenol from aqueous solutions by modified clays seems to be more effective than unmodified samples. The adsorption capacity was found to increase with increasing temperature indication that the adsorptions were endothermic. The adsorption of phenol onto these clays was found to be increased by increasing of pH value and the adsorption patterns data are correlated well by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and that the adsorption is physical in nature. The experimental data fitted very well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic study of adsorption process showed that the adsorption of phenol with these six adsorbents was carried out spontaneously, and the process was endothermic in nature.

  6. Effect of gas pressure on the sealing efficiency of compacted bentonite-sand plugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. F.; Davy, C. A.; Talandier, J.; Skoczylas, F.

    2014-12-01

    This research relates to the assessment of the sealing ability of bentonite/sand plugs when swollen in presence of both water and gas pressures, in the context of deep underground radioactive waste storage. Compacted bentonite/sand plugs are placed inside a constant volume cell, and subjected to swelling in presence of both water and gas: swelling kinetics and effective swelling pressure Pswell are identified. Secondly, the gas breakthrough (GB) characteristics of swollen plugs are assessed to determine their ability for gas migration, which has to be minimal for sealing radioactive waste repositories. We show that gas pressure Pg does not affect significantly Pswell until a threshold Pg > 2 MPa. When swelling occurs inside a tube with a smooth (turned) inner surface, continuous GB occurs when Pg is equivalent to the effective Pswell (obtained without gas pressure, at 7.32 MPa ± 0.11). When the plug swells inside a grooved tube, continuous GB does not occur up to Pg ≥ 10.5 MPa: smooth interfaces are a preferential gas migration pathway rather than grooved interfaces, and rather than water-saturated bentonite-sand plugs. With smooth tubes, in presence of Pg ≥ 2 MPa, although Pswell is not affected, gas passes through the sample at significantly lower values than Pswell, due to partial sample saturation. It is concluded that GB pressure is a more accurate indicator of partial sample saturation than swelling pressure Pswell alone.

  7. Organo-modified bentonites as new flame retardant fillers in epoxy resin nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Tiziana; D'Angelo, Emanuele; Mazzocchetti, Laura; Saraga, Federico; Sambri, Letizia; Franchini, Mauro Comes; Giorgini, Loris

    2016-05-01

    The present work deals with two organophilic bentonites, based on nitrogen-containing compounds: these organoclays were synthesized via an ion exchange process starting from pristine bentonite with 6-(4-butylphenyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (BFTDA) and 11-amino-N-(pyridine-2yl)undecanamide (APUA) and then used for the production of epoxy-based flame retardant nanocomposites. The amount of organic modifier in the organoclays Bento-BFTDA and Bento-APUA was determined with a TGA analysis and is around 0.4mmol/g for both samples. The effect of the organoclays on a commercial epoxy resin nanocomposite's thermo-mechanical and flammability properties was investigated. Composites containing 3wt% and 5wt% of the nanofillers were prepared by solventless addition of each organoclay to the epoxy resin, followed by further addition of the hardener component. For the sake of comparison a similar nanocomposite with the plain unmodified bentonite was produced in similar condition. The nanocomposites's thermo-mechanical properties of all the produced samples were measured and they resulted slightly improved or practically unaffected. On the contrary, when the flame behaviour was assessed in the cone-calorimeter, an encouraging decrease of 17% in the peak heat released rate (pHRR) was obtained at 3wt% loading level with Bento-APUA. This is a promising result, assessing that the APUA modified organoclay might act as flame retardant.

  8. Heterogeneous photo-assisted Fenton catalytic removal of tetracycline using Fe-Ce pillared bentonite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚平; 贾成光; 彭然; 马丰; 欧光南

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, a novel heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalyst was prepared by iron and cerium pillared bentonite. The catalyst Fe-Ce/bentonite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. It is found that Fe and Ce intercalate into the silicate layers of bentonite successfully. Tetracycline was removed by heterogeneous photo-Fenton reaction using the catalyst in this work. The effects of different reaction systems, hydrogen peroxide concentration, initial pH, catalyst dosage, UV power and introduction of different anions on degradation were investigated in details. The stability of catalyst was investigated through recycling experiment. The results show that removal rate of tetracycline is 98.13%under the conditions of 15 mmol/L H2O2, 0.50 g/L catalyst dosage, initial pH 3.0, 11 W UV lamp power and 60 min reaction time. However, the removal rate decreases after adding some anions. The hydroxyl radical plays an important role in heterogeneous photo-assisted Fenton degradation of tetracycline. The catalyst is very stable and can be recycled many times.

  9. Synthesis of polycationic bentonite-ionene complexes and their benzene adsorption capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria Campos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to structurally modify clays in order to incorporate water-insoluble molecules, such as petroleum hydrocarbons. The potential for ion exchange of quaternary ammonium salts was studied, which revealed their ability to interact with anions on the cationic surface, for environmental applications of the material. Ionenes, also known as polycations, have many potential uses in environmental applications. In this work, cationic aliphatic ammonium polyionenes, specifically 3,6-ionene and 3,6-dodecylionene, were prepared for incorporation into clay to form bentonite-ionene complexes. The intercalation of bentonite with ionene polymers resulted in an increase in the basal spacing of 3,6-dodecylionene from 1.5-3.5 nm. The higher d001 spacing of 3,6-dodecylionene samples than that of 3,6-ionene samples may be attributed to their longer tail length. The behavior of the TG/DTG curves and the activation energy values suggest that 3,6-dodecylionene (E = 174.85 kJ mol–1 is thermally more stable than 3,6 ionene (E = 115.52 kJ mol–1 complexes. The adsorption of benzene by 3,6-ionene and 3,6-dodecylionene was also investigated. The increase in benzene concentrations resulted in increased benzene adsorption by the sorbents tested in this work. The sorption capacity of benzene on ionene-modified bentonite was in the order of 3,6-dodecylionene > 3,6-ionene.

  10. Effect of Heating/Hydratation on Compacted Bentonite: Tests in 60-cm Long Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Fernandez, A. M.; Martin, P. L.; Barcala, J. M.; Gomez-Espina, R.; Rivas, P.

    2008-07-01

    The conditions of the bentonite in an engineered barrier for high-level radioactive waste disposal have been simulated in a series of tests. Cylindrical cells with an inner length of 60 cm and a diameter of 7 cm were constructed. Inside the cells, blocks of compacted FEBEX bentonite were put one on top of the other. the bottom surface of the material was heated at 100 degree centigree and the top surface was injected with granitic water. the duration of the tests was 0.5, 1,2 and 7,6 years. The temperatures and water intake were measured during the tests and, at the end, the cells were dismounted and the dry density, water content, mineralogy, geochemistry and some hydro-mechanical properties of the clay (permeability, swelling) were measured at different positions. the values obtained are compared among them and to those of the untreated FEBEX bentonite. The study has run over for 10 years in the context of the projects FEBEX I and II and NF-PRO. (Author) 50 refs.

  11. Verification of substitution of bentonites by montmorillonitic clays summary report on Czech montmorillonitic clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech bentonites and smectite-rich clays were characterised in order to study if they could be used as buffer and backfill materials instead of non-Czech commercial bentonites. The characterisation work was orgnized by RAWRA (the Czech Radioactive Waste Repository Authority) and the main part of the work was performed in the Czech Republic at Charles University and at Czech Technical University. Parallel and complementary characterisation was conducted in Finland in Sweden. This report was compiled with the aim to summarise the results, and to compare the methods and results gained in different testing laboratories. The characterisation included mineralogical, chemical and geotechnical investigations and experiments on thermal stability and sorption. There were some variations between the results gained in different laboratories. This was mainly due to differences between the testing methods used but also due to heterogeneity of the samples. The Czech bentonite-clays from Rokle and Strance clay deposits contained relatively high amount of swelling minerals and thus can be considered as potential buffer and backfill materials. (orig.)

  12. Effect of sodium nitrate on the diffusion of Cl- and I- in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For safety assessment of TRU waste disposal, the effective diffusion coefficients (De) for Cl- and I- in compacted bentonite (Kunigel V1) were determined as a function of NaNO3 concentration, ranging from 0.01 to 5 mol/dm3. The De values for Cl- and I- increased from approximately 10-12 to 10-11 m2/s with increasing NaNO3 concentration. The capacity factor α, indicative of the effective porosity, also increased with increasing NaNO3 concentration. The maximum α values of 0.21 for Cl- and 0.24 for I- at 5 mol/dm3 NaNO3 concentration were lower than the total porosity of compacted bentonite (0.40), suggesting an anion exclusion effect. Therefore, the increases in the De values were interpreted in terms of the decrease in anion exclusion. The De values for Cl- and I-, normalized by their diffusivities in bulk water, were found to increase in proportion to the α values in a log-log plot, while the De values in porous media generally increase in proportion to the total porosity. This relationship between the log De and the log α is considered to be derived from the lower effective porosities for Cl- and I- than the total porosity in compacted bentonite due to anion exclusion. (author)

  13. Effect of humic acid on the diffusion of ReO4- in GMZ bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic acid is ubiquitous in soils and water. It affects the migration of radionuclides by complexation or redox reactions. The effect of humic acid on the diffusion of ReO4- in GMZ bentonite was investigated at dry density from 1,300 to 1,800 kg/m3. The effective diffusion coefficient De and rock capacity factor α were measured by through-diffusion method. The De decreased from 5.5 to 0.59 × 10-11 m2/s and α decreased from 0.2 to 0.12 with the dry density increasing from 1,300 to 1,800 kg/m3. The retardation factor R in GMZ bentonite at three dry densities was obtained, which were less than one. Archie's law was used to describe the relationship between accessible porosity εacc and De. An empirical parameter n (n = 2.2 ± 0.2) was obtained for Re diffusion in GMZ bentonite in the presence of humic acid. (author)

  14. Adsorption and solid phase extraction of 8-hydroxyquinoline from aqueous solutions by using natural bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogen-heterocyclic compound 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ) is one of the components of coal tar and has a wide variety of uses in industry. Because of its toxicity for aquatic organisms and harmful effects for human health, the removal of 8HQ from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto natural bentonite was investigated in the present work. The experimental results show that the optimum pH value of 2.5 is favourable for the 8HQ adsorption. The experimental data were fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic and Langmuir adsorption isotherm models at all studied temperatures. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir isotherm model at 20 deg. C was 120.6 mg g-1. The calculated thermodynamic results such as ΔGo (-24.3 kJ mol-1) and ΔHo (-9.56 kJ mol-1) indicate that the adsorption process is spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Solid phase extraction of 8HQ was also performed. The X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses were carried out in order to confirm the 8HQ adsorption onto bentonite. According to the obtained results, natural bentonite can be a reusable and effective adsorbent for the removal of 8HQ.

  15. Geochemical processes and compacted bentonite FEBEX with a thermohydraulic gradient with a thermohydraulic gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all sep of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR), based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the wastes is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barrier. In the context of an investigation of the near field for a repository of HLW, the FEBEX Project, a set of laboratory test has been designed to give a better understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical and geochemical behaviour of the compacted bentonite as a confinement barrier. The object of these work is to analyse the properties of the bentonite and its behaviour under conditions that will be found in a repository. The precipitation of mineral phases, due to local changes in the chemical equilibrium and the hydration itself, can produce changes in the salinity of the interstitial water and in the microstructural organisation of the clay particles. the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the bentonite can be modified by the special conditions of the barrier. (Author)

  16. Bacterial Diversity in Bentonites, Engineered Barrier for Deep Geological Disposal of Radioactive Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Fernandez, Margarita; Cherkouk, Andrea; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar; Boon, Nico; Sanchez-Castro, Ivan; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-11-01

    The long-term disposal of radioactive wastes in a deep geological repository is the accepted international solution for the treatment and management of these special residues. The microbial community of the selected host rocks and engineered barriers for the deep geological repository may affect the performance and the safety of the radioactive waste disposal. In this work, the bacterial population of bentonite formations of Almeria (Spain), selected as a reference material for bentonite-engineered barriers in the disposal of radioactive wastes, was studied. 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene-based approaches were used to study the bacterial community of the bentonite samples by traditional clone libraries and Illumina sequencing. Using both techniques, the bacterial diversity analysis revealed similar results, with phylotypes belonging to 14 different bacterial phyla: Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Armatimonadetes, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus, Firmicutes, Gemmatimonadetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, Nitrospirae, Verrucomicrobia and an unknown phylum. The dominant groups of the community were represented by Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high diversity was found in three of the studied samples. However, two samples were less diverse and dominated by Betaproteobacteria.

  17. Numerical simulation of slurry jets using mixture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-xin HUAI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Slurry jets in a static uniform environment were simulated with a two-phase mixture model in which flow-particle interactions were considered. A standard k-ε turbulence model was chosen to close the governing equations. The computational results were in agreement with previous laboratory measurements. The characteristics of the two-phase flow field and the influences of hydraulic and geometric parameters on the distribution of the slurry jets were analyzed on the basis of the computational results. The calculated results reveal that if the initial velocity of the slurry jet is high, the jet spreads less in the radial direction. When the slurry jet is less influenced by the ambient fluid (when the Stokes number St is relatively large, the turbulent kinetic energy k and turbulent dissipation rate ε, which are relatively concentrated around the jet axis, decrease more rapidly after the slurry jet passes through the nozzle. For different values of St, the radial distributions of streamwise velocity and particle volume fraction are both self-similar and fit a Gaussian profile after the slurry jet fully develops. The decay rate of the particle velocity is lower than that of water velocity along the jet axis, and the axial distributions of the centerline particle streamwise velocity are self-similar along the jet axis. The pattern of particle dispersion depends on the Stokes number St. When St = 0.39, the particle dispersion along the radial direction is considerable, and the relative velocity is very low due to the low dynamic response time. When St = 3.08, the dispersion of particles along the radial direction is very little, and most of the particles have high relative velocities along the streamwise direction.

  18. Experimental investigation of ice slurry heat transfer in horizontal tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per; Palm, Bjoern; Melinder, Aake [Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-09-15

    Heat transfer of ice slurry flow based on ethanol-water mixture in a circular horizontal tube has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethanol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The heat transfer tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 22% depending on test performed. Measured heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry are found to be higher than those for single phase fluid, especially for laminar flow conditions and high ice mass fractions where the heat transfer is increased with a factor 2 in comparison to the single phase flow. In addition, experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients of ice slurry flow were compared to the analytical results, based on the correlation by Sieder and Tate for laminar single phase regime, by Dittus-Boelter for turbulent single phase regime and empirical correlation by Christensen and Kauffeld derived for laminar/turbulent ice slurry flow in circular horizontal tubes. It was found that the classical correlation proposed by Sieder and Tate for laminar forced convection in smooth straight circular ducts cannot be used for heat transfer prediction of ice slurry flow since it strongly underestimates measured values, while, for the turbulent flow regime the simple Dittus-Boelter relation predicts the heat transfer coefficient of ice slurry flow with high accuracy but only up to an ice mass fraction of 10% and Re{sub cf} > 2300 regardless of imposed heat flux. For higher ice mass fractions and regardless of the flow regime, the correlation proposed by Christensen and Kauffeld gives good agreement with experimental results. (author)

  19. Compacted bentonite provides long-term solution for roadway stopping at Sondershausen mine. Langzeitfunktionstuechtiger Streckenverschluss aus kompaktiertem Bentonit im Bergwerk Sondershausen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aland, H.J. (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Proterra, Jena (Germany)); Handke, N. (Thyssen Schachtbau GmbH, Muelheim an der Ruhr (Germany)); Leuschner, J.; Bodenstein, J. (Ercosplan Ingenieurgesellschaft Geotechnik und Bergbau mbH, Erfurt (Germany)); Sitz, P.; Gruner, M. (Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bergbau); Springer, H. (GSES mbH, Sondershausen (Germany)); Maelzer, K. (GVV mbH, Sondershausen (Germany))

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the project was to reinforce the geological barrier between two salt mines by installing a long-term geotechnical barrier in a mineral-salt roadway of circular cross-section. This geotechnical barrier was composed of a preliminary short-term stopping, comprising a concrete pier in the shape of a truncated cone with a pre-fitted membrane, and a permanent stopping for the long term. To create a durable seal and to produce a stopping which would remain stable for many years, highly-compacted, dry-placed cast bentonite blocks were used for the first time. The material quality and geometry of the blocks was controlled through the admixture of specially graded sand. The effectiveness of the seal was determined using three criteria (technical soundness, air circulation around the excavation zone and ability to transfer axial loads) which were based on material characterstics for cast blocks of natural compacted calcium bentonite, namely hydraulic conductivity, swelling pressure, strength and susceptibility to fracturing, which were established in a saliniferous environment. The entire operation, which included the excavation work, the side-wall treatment, the concreting phase and the installation of the individual sealing elements, was monitored and inspected according to a specified quality maintenance programme. (orig.)

  20. Method and apparatus for in-situ drying investigation and optimization of slurry drying methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Daniel, Claus; Howe, Jane Y.; Kiggans, Jr, James O.; Sabau, Adrian S.; Wood, III, David L.; Kalnaus, Sergiy

    2016-05-10

    A method of drying casted slurries that includes calculating drying conditions from an experimental model for a cast slurry and forming a cast film. An infrared heating probe is positioned on one side of the casted slurry and a thermal probe is positioned on an opposing side of the casted slurry. The infrared heating probe may control the temperature of the casted slurry during drying. The casted slurry may be observed with an optical microscope, while applying the drying conditions from the experimental model. Observing the casted slurry includes detecting the incidence of micro-structural changes in the casted slurry during drying to determine if the drying conditions from the experimental model are optimal.

  1. An advanced alkaline slurry for barrier chemical mechanical planarization on patterned wafers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chenwei; Liu Yuling; Niu Xinhuan; Tian Jianying; Gao Baohong; Zhang Xiaoqiang

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an alkaline barrier slurry (named FA/O slurry) for barrier removal and evaluated its chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) performance through comparison with a commercially developed barrier slurry.The FA/O slurry consists of colloidal silica,which is a complexing and an oxidizing agent,and does not have any inhibitors.It was found that the surface roughness of copper blanket wafers polished by the FA/O slurry was lower than the commercial barrier slurry,demonstrating that it leads to a better surface quality.In addition,the dishing and electrical tests also showed that the patterned wafers have a lower dishing value and sheet resistance as compared to the commercial barrier slurry.By comparison,the FA/O slurry demonstrates good planarization performance and can be used for barrier CMP.

  2. Combined pig slurry and mineral fertilization for corn cultivation

    OpenAIRE

    Maritane Prior; Silvio César Sampaio; Lúcia Helena Pereira Nóbrega; Miguel Angel Uribe Opazo; Jonhatan Dieter; Thaisa Pegoraro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the environmental effects of the use of pig slurry to irrigate the corn crop grown in a typical Red Distroferric Latosol and in leachate composition. Twenty four lysimeters, filled with soil, in a protected environment, received five doses of pig slurry (0; 112.5; 225; 337.5 and 450 m³ ha-1 per growing cycle) combined with two mineral fertilization doses (50 and 75% of the recommended dose - 80 kg ha-1of nitrogen). Corn height and yield were evaluate...

  3. Environmental Consequences of Future Biogas Technologies based on Separated Slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamelin, Lorie; Wesnæs, Marianne; Wenzel, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    the volatile solids in the solid fraction. The biogas scenario involving the most efficient separation technology resulted in a dry matter separation efficiency of 87% and allowed a net reduction of the global warming potential of 40%, compared to the reference slurry management. This figure comprises...... the whole slurry life cycle, including the flows bypassing the biogas plant. This study includes soil carbon balances and a method for quantifying the changes in yield resulting from increased nitrogen availability as well as for quantifying mineral fertilizers displacement. Soil carbon balances showed...

  4. Separation of phosphorus from pig slurry using chemical additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estevez Rodriguez, M.D.; Gomez del Puerto, A.M.; Montealegre Meléndez, M.L.;

    2005-01-01

    Increasing livestock production and regulation of the amount of phosphorus (P) that may be applied to arable land may force livestock farmers to transport animal manure over long distances if plant nutrients in the manure are to be used in a sustainable way. Animal slurry contains large amounts of...... retention of P in a solid fraction. The laboratory studies showed that 98% of the P in slurry was retained in the solid fraction retained on the filter net (12% to 28% retained W:W) after the addition of coagulants and flocculants. Linear cationic polyacrylamide polymers proved to be more efficient at lower...

  5. Technical report on treatment of radioactive slurry liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gyeong Hwan; Jo, Eun Sung; Park, Seung Kook; Jung, Ki Jung

    1999-06-01

    By literature survey, this report deals with the technology on typical pre-treatment and filtration of radioactive slurry liquid waste, produced during the operation of TRIGA Mark-II, III research reactor, and produced during the decommission/decontamination of TRIGA Mark-II, III research reactor. It is reviewed pre-treatment procedure, both physical and chemical that optimise the dewatering characteristics, and also surveyed types of dewatering devices based on centrifuges, vacuum and pressure filters with particular reference to various combined field approaches using two or more complementary driving forces to achieve better performance. Dewatering operations and devises on filtration of radioactive slurry liquid waste are also analysed. (author)

  6. Steam Explosions in Slurry-fed Ceramic Melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J.T.

    2001-03-28

    This report assesses the potential and consequences of a steam explosion in Slurry Feed Ceramic Melters (SFCM). The principles that determine if an interaction is realistically probable within a SFCM are established. Also considered are the mitigating effects due to dissolved, non-condensable gas(es) and suspended solids within the slurry feed, radiation, high glass viscosity, and the existence of a cold cap. The report finds that, even if any explosion were to occur, however, it would not be large enough to compromise vessel integrity.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of an Ice-slurry Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪若瑜; 董梁; 尚德义; 徐建生; Kawaji M

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility equipped with refrigerant and brine circulation systems, and a rotating-scraper ice-slurry generator was constructed to analyze the ice-slurry flow and heat transfer accompanied by phase change in an industrial generator. The axial and transverse brine temperature and ice fraction concentration profiles in the ice generator were measured. The heat transfer efficiency lower than the average was identified in the upper half of the ice generator and its cause was determined by conducting three-dimensional numerical simulation using a commercial CFD code, FLUENT. Approaches of improving the brine-side heat transfer rates were investigated by incorporating extra mixing blades from numerical simulation.

  8. Electrochemical behaviors of silicon wafers in silica slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolan Song; Haiping Yang; Xunda Shi; Xi He; Guanzhou Qiu

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of n-type silicon wafers in silica-based slurry were investigated, and the influences of the pH value and solid content of the slurry on the corrosion of silicon wafers were studied by using electrochemical DC polarization and AC impedance techniques. The results revealed that these factors affected the corrosion behaviors of silicon wafers to different degrees and had their suitable parameters that made the maximum corrosion rate of the wafers. The corrosion potential of (100) surface was lower than that of (111), whereas the current density of (100) was much higher than that of (111).

  9. Organophilic treatments of bentonite increase the adsorption of aflatoxin B1 and protect stem cells against cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nones, Janaína; Nones, Jader; Poli, Anicleto; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves; Riella, Humberto Gracher; Kuhnen, Nivaldo Cabral

    2016-09-01

    Bentonite clays exhibit high adsorptive capacity for contaminants, including aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin responsible for causing severe toxicity in several species including pigs, poultry and man. Organophilic treatments is known to increase the adsorption capacity of bentonites, and the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of Brazilian bentonite and two organic salts - benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) to adsorb AFB1. For this end, 2(2) factorial designs were used in order to analyze if BAC or CTAB was able to increase AFB1 adsorption when submitted in different temperature and concentration. Both BAC and CTAB treatment (at 30°C and 2% of salt concentration) were found to increase the adsorption of AFB1 significantly compared with untreated bentonite. After organophilic bentonite treatments with BAC or CTAB, a vibration of CH stretch (2850 and 2920cm(-1)) were detected. A frequency of the SiO stretch (1020 and 1090cm(-1)) was changed by intercalation of organic cation. Furthermore, the interlayer spacing of bentonite increases to 1.23nm (d001 reflection at 2θ=7.16) and 1.22 (d001 reflection at 2θ=7.22) after the addition of BAC and CTAB, respectively. Another aim of the study was to observe the effects of these two bentonite salts in neural crest stem cell cultures. The two materials that were created by organophilic treatments were not found to be toxic to stem cells. Furthermore the results indicate that the two materials tested may protect the neural crest stem cells against damage caused by AFB1. PMID:27281241

  10. Sorption of metal cations on suspended bentonite. Effects of pH, ionic strength and complexing anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Parveen Kumar; Pathak, Priyanath; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.

    2014-07-01

    Batch sorption experiments have been carried out to understand the interaction of different metal cations such as Am(III), Eu(III), Sr(II), and Cs(I) with bentonite clay at varying pH (1-9). The effects of other experimental parameters such as ionic strength (0.01-1 M (NaClO{sub 4})), clay to metal ion concentration ratio, and the presence of complexing anions such as oxalic acid (ox), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and humic acid (HA) on Eu(III) sorption have also been investigated. The sorption of Eu(III) has been found to be invariant with the change in ionic strength suggesting inner-sphere complexation on the bentonite surface. Near quantitative sorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) has been observed in the entire pH range and there is marginal influence of the presence of 1 x 10{sup -4} M of ox and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} on the sorption profile. However, the presence of 1 x 10{sup -4} M EDTA suppresses the sorption of Eu(III) ion onto bentonite. Desorption studies of Eu(III) loaded onto bentonite using varying concentrations of HClO{sub 4} (0.01-1.0 M) solutions reveal that higher acidity favors the process. The sorption of Eu(III) on bentonite followed the Langmuir isotherm suggesting monolayer sorption process. The data fitting to D-R isotherm suggested that the Eu(III) sorption on bentonite follows ion exchange mechanism. The sorption capacity of bentonite clay was determined to be 3.8(±0.1) x 10{sup -4} moles/g using Langmuir and D-R isotherms. (orig.)

  11. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, J.F.; Horseman, S.T. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  12. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  13. Microstructure and anisotropic swelling behaviour of compacted bentonite/sand mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Saba

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-compacted elements (disks, torus of bentonite/sand mixture are candidate materials for sealing plugs of radioactive waste disposal. Choice of this material is mainly based on its swelling capacity allowing all gaps in the system to be sealed, and on its low permeability. When emplaced in the gallery, these elements will start to absorb water from the host rock and swell. Thereby, a swelling pressure will develop in the radial direction against the host rock and in the axial direction against the support structure. In this work, the swelling pressure of a small scale compacted disk of bentonite and sand was experimentally studied in both radial and axial directions. Different swelling kinetics were identified for different dry densities and along different directions. As a rule, the swelling pressure starts increasing quickly, reaches a peak value, decreases a little and finally stabilises. For some dry densities, higher peaks were observed in the radial direction than in the axial direction. The presence of peaks is related to the microstructure change and to the collapse of macro-pores. In parallel to the mechanical tests, microstructure investigation at the sample scale was conducted using microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT. Image observation showed a denser structure in the centre and a looser one in the border, which was also confirmed by image analysis. This structure heterogeneity in the radial direction and the occurrence of macro-pores close to the radial boundary of the sample can explain the large peaks observed in the radial swelling pressure evolution. Another interesting result is the higher anisotropy found at lower bentonite dry densities, which was also analysed by means of μCT observation of a sample at low bentonite dry density after the end of test. It was found that the macro-pores, especially those between sand grains, were not filled by swelled bentonite, which preserved the anisotropic microstructure caused by

  14. 30 CFR 77.216 - Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and impounding structures; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water, sediment, or slurry impoundments and... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Surface Installations § 77.216 Water, sediment, or slurry... structures which impound water, sediment, or slurry shall be required if such an existing or...

  15. Measurement of ion speciation in animal slurries using the Donnan Membrane Technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelt, van der B.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2005-01-01

    The availability of nutrients in animal slurry for plant uptake depends on the total content as well as on the forms in which these nutrients are present in slurry manure. A DMT-manure cell was developed which can help to determine the speciation of nutrients in animal slurries. The cell consists of

  16. THE RESEARCH OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF STOWING SLURRY WITH HIGH-WATER MATERIAL SOLIDIFYING TAILINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨本生; 刘文永

    1996-01-01

    High-water material, tailings from goldmine and water are mixed into a new slurry.Testing of rheological properties of stowing slurries A and B is made to determine type and rheo-logical parameters of the slurry. The main factors influencing rheological properties of the slurryare analyzed and the rational concentration and empirical resistance calculating formula of pipeline transportation are presented.

  17. Hydrate plugging or slurry flow : effect of key variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellecase, E.; Geraci, G.; Barrios, L.; Estanga, D.; Domingues, R.; Volk, M. [Tulsa Univ., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Although oil and gas companies have proven design criteria and proper operating procedures to prevent hydrate plugs from forming, hydrates remain the primary issue in flow assurance. The costs associated with hydrate prevention affect project economics, particularly in deepwater pipelines. As such, there is an interest in developing a technology that allows hydrates to be transported as a slurry, while avoiding plugs. The feasibility of managing such hydrate flow was investigated. This study used a hydrate flow loop to investigate the effects of flow conditions on the transportability of a slurry in both steady-state and restart conditions. For most cases, uninhibited steady-state slurry flow conditions above 25 per cent water-cut were marginal, and most likely not feasible at 50 per cent water-cut or above. Liquid loading and velocity appeared to have a marginal effect on plugging tendency. However, minimum velocity may be needed to guarantee slurry transportation. Some of the important parameters and key variables that determine if a plug will form, particularly in restart conditions, include oil-water dispersion properties; oil-water phase segregation on the plugging tendency of model fluids; the location and state of the water; and the flow pattern. It was concluded that the plugging behaviour of oil systems changes with these variables, and with the oil-water chemistry. As such, specific strategies must be developed for each field. 4 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  18. Bench Scale Test of Absorption Slurry-ice Maker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasao, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Takashi

    Slurry ice system is desirable as cold heat source for air conditioning, because it requires less conveyance power or less pipe size. On the other hand, recently absorption refrigerator is reevaluated because it can utilize various types of waste heat and it does not use fluorocarbon refrigerant. But it had been regarded to be difficult to make ice by absorption refrigerator because the refrigerant is water. However making slurry ice is possible, of cource, if the slurry ice generated by partial freezing of water is continuously taken away from the evaporator. This method was certified experimentally with a bench scale model. For ice making continuously, ice had not to be frozen stiff at water surface or inside wall of the evaporator. Then refrigerant water in the evaporator was raised swirl flow. And inside wall of the evaporator was finished by water repellent coating, and heated from outside wall. This slurry ice was adaptable to hydraulic transportation, because ice was needle crystal with about 5 mm length and ice temperature was 0°C.

  19. NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O' Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

    2001-01-07

    This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

  20. Rheokinetic Analysis of Hydroxy Terminated Polybutadiene Based Solid Propellant Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay K Mahanta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure kinetics of propellant slurry based on hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB and toluene diisocyanate (TDI polyurethane reaction has been studied by viscosity build up method. The viscosity (ɳ–time (t plots conform to the exponential function ɳ = aebt, where a & b are empirical constants. The rate constants (k for viscosity build up at various shear rate (rpm, evaluated from the slope of dɳ/dt versus ɳ plots at different temperatures, were found to vary from 0.0032 to 0.0052 min-1. It was observed that the increasing shear rate did not have significant effect on the reaction rate constants for viscosity build up of the propellant slurry. The activation energy (Eɳ, calculated from the Arrhenius plots, was found to be 13.17±1.78 kJ mole-1, whereas the activation enthalpy (∆Hɳ* and entropy (∆Sɳ* of the propellant slurry, calculated from Eyring relationship, were found to be 10.48±1.78 kJ mole-1 and –258.51± 5.38 J mole-1K-1, respectively. The reaction quenching temperature of the propellant slurry was found to be -9 ° C, based upon the experimental data. This opens up an avenue for a “freeze-and-store”, then “warm-up and cast”, mode of manufacturing of very large solid rocket propellant grains.

  1. Field Efficiency of Slurry Applications Involving In-field Transports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn; Green, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    event model for the simulation of CTF operations executed by cooperating machines has been introduced. The use of this model makes it possible to estimate the extent of reduction of the field efficiency. In this paper, a field experiment involving slurry application under the conventional unconstrained...

  2. Overview of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis in Slurry Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁百全; 李涛; A.A.C.M.Beenackers; G.P.vanderLaan

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis specially in slurry reactors is presented, covering reaction kinetics, activity and selectivity of catalysts, product distribution, effects of process parameters, mass transfer and solubility of gas. Some important aspects of further research axe proposed for improving both theories and production.

  3. Overview of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis in Slurry Reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis specially in slurry reactors ispresented, covering reaction kinetics, activity and selectivity of catalysts, productdistribution, effects of process parameters, mass transfer and solubility of gas. Someimportant aspects of further research are proposed for improving both theories andproduction.

  4. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution by hydroxy-aluminum, hydroxy-iron and hydroxy-iron-aluminum pillared bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus removal is important for the control of eutrophication, and adsorption is an efficient treatment process. In this study, three modified inorganic-bentonites: hydroxy-aluminum pillared bentonite (Al-Bent), hydroxy-iron pillared bentonite (Fe-Bent), and mixed hydroxy-iron-aluminum pillared bentonite (Fe-Al-Bent), were prepared and characterized, and their phosphate adsorption capabilities were evaluated in batch experiments. The results showed a significant increase of interlayer spacing, BET surface area and total pore volume which were all beneficial to phosphate adsorption. Phosphate adsorption capacity followed the order: Al-Bent > Fe-Bent > Fe-Al-Bent. The adsorption rate of phosphate on the adsorbents fits pseudo-second-order kinetic models (R2 = 1.00, 0.99, 1.00, respectively). The Freundlich and Langmuir models both described the adsorption isotherm data well. Thermodynamic studies illustrated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Finally, phosphate adsorption on the inorganic pillared bentonites significantly raised the pH, indicating an anion/OH- exchange reaction.

  5. Adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution by hydroxy-aluminum, hydroxy-iron and hydroxy-iron-aluminum pillared bentonites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Liangguo, E-mail: yanyu-33@163.com [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Xu Yuanyuan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yu Haiqin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Xin Xiaodong [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Wei Qin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Du Bin, E-mail: sdjndb@263.com [College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2010-07-15

    Phosphorus removal is important for the control of eutrophication, and adsorption is an efficient treatment process. In this study, three modified inorganic-bentonites: hydroxy-aluminum pillared bentonite (Al-Bent), hydroxy-iron pillared bentonite (Fe-Bent), and mixed hydroxy-iron-aluminum pillared bentonite (Fe-Al-Bent), were prepared and characterized, and their phosphate adsorption capabilities were evaluated in batch experiments. The results showed a significant increase of interlayer spacing, BET surface area and total pore volume which were all beneficial to phosphate adsorption. Phosphate adsorption capacity followed the order: Al-Bent > Fe-Bent > Fe-Al-Bent. The adsorption rate of phosphate on the adsorbents fits pseudo-second-order kinetic models (R{sup 2} = 1.00, 0.99, 1.00, respectively). The Freundlich and Langmuir models both described the adsorption isotherm data well. Thermodynamic studies illustrated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. Finally, phosphate adsorption on the inorganic pillared bentonites significantly raised the pH, indicating an anion/OH{sup -} exchange reaction.

  6. Conceptual modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical processes in bentonite buffer for high-level nuclear waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoung Young; Park, Jin Young [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji Hun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    In this study, thermal-hydrological-chemical modeling for the alteration of a bentonite buffer is carried out using a simulation code TOUGHREACT. The modeling results show that the water saturation of bentonite steadily increases and finally the bentonite is fully saturated after 10 years. In addition, the temperature rapidly increases and stabilizes after 0.5 year, exhibiting a constant thermal gradient as a function of distance from the copper tube. The change of thermal-hydrological conditions mainly results in the alteration of anhydrite and calcite. Anhydrite and calcite are dissolved along with the inflow of groundwater. They then tend to precipitate in the vicinity of the copper tube due to its high temperature. This behavior induces a slight decrease in porosity and permeability of bentonite near the copper tube. Furthermore, this study finds that the diffusion coefficient can significantly affect the alteration of anhydrite and calcite, which causes changes in the hydrological properties of bentonite such as porosity and permeability. This study may facilitate the safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste repositories.

  7. Effect of pH, foreign ions and temperature on radionickel sorption onto bentonite from Inner Mongolia, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear power releases large amounts of radionuclides into the natural environment. Herein, the sorption of radionuclide 63Ni on bentonite from Gaomiaozi county (Inner Mongolia, China) at different experimental conditions such as pH, contact time, ionic strength, foreign cations and anions, and temperatures were investigated by using batch technique. The results indicated that the sorption of 63Ni on the bentonite was quickly at first contact time and then increased slowly with increasing contact time. The sorption of 63Ni was strongly dependent on ionic strength at low pH values and independent of ionic strength at high pH values. The sorption of 63Ni on bentonite was mainly dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange at low pH values, whereas inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH values. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models were applied to simulate the sorption isotherms of 63Ni at three different temperatures, and the thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔH deg, ΔS deg and ΔG deg) calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms indicated that the sorption of 63Ni on bentonite was an endothermic and spontaneous process. Experimental results indicate that the bentonite is a suitable material for the preconcentration and solidification of 63Ni from large volume of solutions in radionickel pollution cleanup. (author)

  8. Mineralogical investigations of the interaction between iron corrosion products and bentonite from the NF-PRO Experiments (Phase 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the findings of a second programme of work (Phase 2) undertaken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB, to characterise the mineralogical alteration of samples of compacted bentonite from experiments that SKB have co-funded in a study by Serco Assurance (Culham Laboratory, UK) to investigate the interaction of iron and bentonite, within the EU Framework 6 NF-PRO Project. Reacted bentonite residues from four NF-PRO Experiments - NFC1, NFC4, NFC7 and NFC13 were examined by BGS using; X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD); petrographical analysis with backscattered scanning electron microscopy (BSEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) techniques, cation exchange capacity (CEC) and exchangeable cation analysis; and sequential chemical extraction. In addition, background chemical analysis of altered and background bentonite were also obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS). Bentonite immediately adjacent to corroding steel wires was found to have interacted with Fe released from the corroding metal. This resulted in the formation of narrow haloes of altered bentonite around the corroding steel wires, in which the clay matrix was significantly enriched in Fe. Similar observations were observed in bentonite around corroded iron coupons (observed in experiments NFC4 and NFC7 only), although the alteration zones were not as well developed in comparison to those around corroded steel wires. Detailed petrographical observation found no evidence for the formation discrete iron oxide or iron oxyhydroxide phases within the clay matrix but appeared to show that the clay particles themselves had become enriched in Fe. However, data from sequential chemical extraction suggests that a significant proportion (26 to 68%) of the iron in the altered bentonite is present as amorphous iron oxide or crystalline iron oxides (15 to 33% of the total iron). Some of the crystalline iron is present as primary magnetite and ilmenite

  9. Life cycle assessment of biogas from separated slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamelin, L.; Wesnaes, M.; Wenzel, H. (Univ. of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)); Molt Petersen, B. (Aarhus Univ.. Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2010-07-01

    The environmental aspects of biogas production based on pre-treated slurry from fattening pigs and dairy cows have been investigated in a life cycle perspective. The pre-treatment consists of concentrating the slurry using a separation technology. Significant environmental benefits, compared to the status quo slurry management, can be obtained for both pig and cow slurry, especially regarding reductions of the contributions to global warming, but the results depend to a large extent on the efficiency of the separation technology. Adding separation after the biogas plant can contribute to a more efficient management of the phosphorus, and this has also been investigated. Based on the results of the study it can be concluded that: 1) The environmental benefits of biogas from separated slurry are very dependent upon the separation efficiency (for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous). This particularly applies for carbon, as the separation efficiency defines the extent to which the degradable carbon contained in the slurry is transferred to the biogas plant. Efficient separation can be obtained by using polymer, but also by using a suitable separation technology. It could be mentioned that the decanter centrifuge used has a rather high efficiency of transferring volatile solids (VS) to the fibre fraction also without the use of polymer. 2) Biogas production from separated slurry can lead to significant reductions in the contributions to global warming, provided that the 'best available technologies' described in the report are used. That includes, among others: - a covered and short time storage of the fibre fraction before entering the biogas plant, - a 2-step biogas production where the post-digestion tank is covered with air-tight cover, - a covered storage of the degassed fibre fraction The benefits are also highly dependent upon the source of energy substituted by the biogas. 3) Based on evidences from reviewed studies, the cationic polyacrylamide polymer

  10. Effect of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and humic substances on Th(IV) sorption to GMZ bentonite studied by batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite has been studied extensively because of its strong sorption and complexation ability. Herein, GMZ bentonite from Gaomiaozi county (Inner Mongolia, China) was investigated as the candidate of backfill material for the removal of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that the sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength at pH 5. Outer-sphere surface complexation or ion-exchange are the main mechanism of Th(IV) sorption on GMZ bentonite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH > 5 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere surface complexation or surface precipitation. Soil fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA) have a positive influence on the sorption of Th(IV) on bentonite at pH < 5. The different addition sequences of HA and Th(IV) to GMZ bentonite suspensions have no obvious effect on Th(IV) sorption to HA-bentonite hybrids. The high sorption capacity of Th(IV) on GMZ bentonite suggests that the GMZ bentonite can remove Th(IV) ions from large volumes of aqueous solutions in real work. (author)

  11. Geochemical evolution of the Fe/Febex bentonite interface under simultaneous hydration and heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Carbon steel canister and compacted bentonite have been proposed as overpack and sealing materials for the engineered barrier system (EBS). This work reports the results of an experimental work designed to investigate the geochemical processes occurring in the canister/FEBEX bentonite interface during pre-saturation phase of a deep geological disposal. Corrosion behaviour of the canister depends strongly on the evolution of environmental conditions. In this way, moisture conditions at the canister surface will dictate the mechanism and extension of the corrosion process, as well as during the gradual saturation of the near-field, deliquescence of salts and other impurities could favour the initialization of localized corrosion. Therefore, saline fronts are expected to be formed during the saturation of the clay barrier and chloride and sulphate could move by advective transport towards the metallic container due to the hydraulic and thermal gradients that will be established along the bentonite barrier, compromising canister performance. In the tests bentonite was subjected simultaneously to constant hydration and heating, in opposite directions, in order to simulate the conditions of the clay barrier in the repository and better understand the coupled THMC (Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical) processes that can affect the performance of the bentonite barrier or the metallic container. The tests were performed in cylindrical cells with an internal diameter of 70 mm and an inner length of 100 mm in which compacted FEBEX bentonite (1.65 g/cm3) and Fe powder were placed. They were made out of Teflon to prevent as much as possible lateral heat conduction. Externally, stainless steel 316 L rings avoid the deformation caused by the swelling of bentonite. The upper closing of the cells was made by means of a stainless steel plug. Inside this plug there was a deposit in which water circulated at room temperature. The bottom

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs

  14. Physical properties, fuel characteristics and P-fertilizer production related to animal slurry and products from separation of animal slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Ole; Johnsen, Tina; Triolo, Jin Mi;

    to high water content, suggesting a drying of the manure fibre would be favourable. The mean P concentration in the ashes was 112, 123, 157, and 51 g kg-1 for AD, pigs, mink and cattle respectively. Manure fibre ashes derived from cattle slurry and AD plants, which used feed with a high percentage...

  15. Design and construction of a seepage cut off wall using the slurry trench technique in cold temperatures at the Horizon Dam project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, L.A.; Sobkowicz, J.C. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described the design and construction of a soil-cement-bentonite seepage cut off water that was constructed in 2007 as part of the Horizon Dam project at Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. Horizon oil sands site. The Horizon Dam is an earth retention structure which diverts the Tar River around the mine and plant site, and creates a man-made lake providing replacement fish habitat. It was necessary to build the cut off wall to control seepage through the native coarse grained alluvial deposits encountered under the dam and to minimize the risk of piping due to large hydraulic gradients created by the lake. This paper discussed the design of the dam and the field investigation using different geotechnical drilling methods, geophysics and in-situ testing to support design of the cut off wall. Specifically, the paper discussed a literature review and laboratory testing program that were carried out to assess the appropriate backfill mix to be used. The construction of the cut off wall took place at the end of winter using the slurry trench technique. As such, some unique constructability issues were encountered because of cold weather, the use of cement in the backfill, and the native soil conditions. It was concluded that although strict quality control/assurance measures were implemented, one defect in the cut off wall occurred, which required mitigation to provide a product that met the design intentions. 5 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs.

  16. Post-treatment of hydrocarbon-burdened effluents by means of adsorption to bentonites; Nachbehandlung kohlenwasserstoffhaltiger Abwaesser durch Adsorption an Bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuker, F. [Fachhochschule Muenster, Burgsteinfurt (Germany). Fachbereich Chemieingenieurwesen; Nussbaumer, A. [Edelhoff Entsorgung West GmbH und Co., Hagen (Germany)

    1996-06-01

    During chemical/physical treatment of liquid toxic waste, e.g. emulsions or oil/water mixtures, a separate process stage of hydrocarbon adsorption may be necessary after hydroxide precipitation of the metal salts as soon as the metal freight is reduced by the application of anaerobic biological processes. This is possible, in principle, with the aid of bentonites. Instead of the discontinuous process investigated here, a continuous process would be better suited in practice. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei der chemisch-physikalischen Behandlung fluessiger Sonderabfaelle wie Emulsionen oder Oel-Wasser-Gemischen kann nach einer Hydroxidfaellung der Metallsalze ein separates Verfahren zur Adsorption von Kohlenwasserstoffen erforderlich sein, sobald die Metallfracht durch den Einsatz einer anaeroben Biologie reduziert wird. Dies ist durch den Einsatz von Bentoniten grundsaetzlich moeglich. Anstelle der hier untersuchten diskontinuierlichen Verfahrensweise waere fuer die betriebliche Praxis ein kontinuierliches Verfahren guenstiger. (orig.)

  17. Adsorption of trace elements on a bentonite sample: experimental study and modelling; Retention d'elements trace sur une bentonite: etude experimentale et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurel, Ch

    2002-12-15

    Radioactive waste storage in deep underground is studied in France. The alteration of the radioactive waste can mobilize the elements that can migrate to the geosphere. Clays (bentonite) are investigated as major materials constituting the barriers because of their low permeability and high retention capacity. A thermodynamic surface complexation model, based on the component additivity principle was investigated, in order to predict the adsorption behaviour of pollutants in contact with clay. This principle allows an independent determination of each parameter of the model, limiting the fitting procedure of correlated data, and it allows the use of an adsorption thermodynamic database for a solid. The predictions obtained were in good accordance with experimental data. The model could then be applied successfully in performance assessment. (author)

  18. 膨润土增强的黄土和红土的性质%Properties of Bentonite Enhanced Loess and Laterite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳生; 白庆中; 聂永丰

    2004-01-01

    Loess and laterite distributed widely in the northern and southern China cannot be directly used as the natural barrier to isolate the solid waste because of their high hydraulic conductivity. In this paper, they are enhanced by bentonite to improve their hydraulic performance. The impact of bentonite content and water content on compressive strength of the compacted soil was investigated. The effects of bentonite content, water content,dry density and hydraulic graiient on the hydraulic conductivity were studied in detail. For the laterite and the laterite with 8% of bentonite, the experimental results of hydraulic conductivity can be applied in the engineering design. However, for the loess and the bentonite enhanced loess, those of hydraulic conductivity can not be directly applied in the engineering design because their hydraulic performance does not comply with the Darcy's law. These experimental results have to be carefully modified before application.

  19. Effects of Cattle Slurry Acidification on Ammonia and Methane Evolution during Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Andersen, Astrid; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    experiments, the pH of acidified cattle slurry increased gradually to between 6.5 and 7. Acidification of slurry reduced the evolution of CH4 by 67 to 87%. The greatest reduction was observed with aged cattle slurry, which had a much higher potential for CH4 production than fresh slurry. Sulfate...... and methionine amendment to cattle slurry without pH adjustment also significantly inhibited methanogenesis, probably as a result of sulfide production. The study suggests that complex microbial interactions involving sulfur transformations and pH determine the potential for CH4 emission during storage of cattle...... slurry, and that slurry acidification may be a cost-effective greenhouse gas mitigation option....

  20. Slurry atomizer for a coal-feeder and dryer used to provide coal at gasifier pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, John L.; Smith, William C.; Friggens, Gary R.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a coal-water slurry atomizer for use a high-pressure dryer employed in a pumping system utilized to feed coal into a pressurized coal gasifier. The slurry atomizer is provided with a venturi, constant area slurry injection conduit, and a plurality of tangentially disposed steam injection ports. Superheated steam is injected into the atomizer through these ports to provide a vortical flow of the steam, which, in turn, shears slurry emerging from the slurry injection conduit. The droplets of slurry are rapidly dispersed in the dryer through the venturi where the water is vaporized from the slurry by the steam prior to deleterious heating of the coal.

  1. Decantation time of evaluation on bentonite clays fractionation; Avaliacao do tempo de decantacao no fracionamento de argilas bentonitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, J.; Menezes, R.R.; Neves, G.A.; Lira, H.L; Santana, L.N.L., E-mail: lisiane@dema.ufcg.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    Bentonite clays present a great number of industrial uses, from petroleum to pharmaceutics and cosmetic industry. The bentonite clay present particles with very fine particles that is responsible by the vast application of these materials. However, commercial clays present wide particle size distribution and a significant content of impurities, particularly quartz, in the form of silt and fine silt. So, the aim of this work is to analyze the effect of the stirring and decantation time in the deagglomeration, purification and size separation of the bentonite clay particles from Paraiba. The clays were characterized by X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. Based on the results it was observed the decantation time give the elimination of the agglomerates formed by submicrometric particles. The uses of decantation column give separation of the fraction below 200nm. (author)

  2. Effect Of Coir Fibres On The Compaction And Unconfined Compressive Strength Of Bentonite-Lime-Gypsum Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilak B. Vidya

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effect of coir fibres on the compaction and unconfined compressive strength of a bentonite-lime-gypsum mixture. The coir fiber content varied from 0.5 to 2 %. The results indicated that the dry unit weight and the optimum moisture content of a bentonite – lime mix increased with the addition of gypsum. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the increase in the lime content up to 8 %. Beyond 8 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The dry unit weight of the reference mix decreased, and the optimum moisture content increased with the addition of coir fibre. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite + 8 % lime mix increased up to 4 % with the gypsum. Beyond 4 %, the unconfined compressive strength decreased. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix increased with the addition of coir fibre up to a fibre content of 1.5 %. The unconfined compressive strength of the reference mix-coir fibre composite was less in comparison to the reference mix. The unconfined compressive strength of the bentonite increased with the addition of lime and gypsum and with the increase in the curing period. The improvement in the post-peak region was better for the reference mix with reinforced coir fibres as compared to the unreinforced reference mix. The improved post-peak behaviour of the bentonite-lime-gypsum-coir fibre mixture could boost the construction of temporary roads on such problematic soils. Further, its use will also provide an environmental motivation for providing a means of consuming large quantities of coir fibres.

  3. A comparative study of the removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions by bentonite and expanded perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakir, Achraf; Bessiere, Jacques; Kacemi, Kacem E L; Marouf, Bouchaïb

    2002-11-11

    Local bentonite and expanded perlite (Morocco) have been characterised and used for the removal of trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The kinetic study had showed that the uptake of Cr(III) by bentonite is very rapid compared to expanded perlite. To calculate the sorption capacities of the two sorbents, at different pH, the experimental data points have been fitted to the Freundlich and Langmuir models, respectively, for bentonite and expanded perlite. For both sorbents the sorption capacity increases with increasing the pH of the suspensions. The removal efficiency has been calculated for both sorbents resulting that bentonite (96% of Cr(III) was removed) is more effective in removing trivalent chromium from aqueous solution than expanded perlite (40% of Cr(III) was removed). In the absence of Cr(III) ions, both bentonite and expanded perlite samples yield negative zeta potential in the pH range of 2-11. The changes of expanded perlite charge, from negative to positive, observed after contact with trivalent chromium(III) solutions was related to Cr(III) sorption on the surface of the solid. Thus, it was concluded that surface complexation plays an important role in the sorption of Cr(III) species on expanded perlite. In the case of bentonite, cation-exchange is the predominate mechanism for sorption of trivalent chromium ions, wherefore no net changes of zeta potential was observed after Cr(III) sorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, at different pH values, were also made to corroborate the zeta potential results.

  4. Report on hydro-mechanical and chemical-mineralogical analyses of the bentonite buffer in Canister Retrieval Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Ann; Johannesson, Lars-Erik; Kristensson, Ola; Olsson, Siv [Clay Technology AB (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    The effect of five years of exposure to repository-like conditions on compacted Wyoming bentonite was determined by comparing the hydraulic, mechanical, and mineralogical properties of samples from the bentonite buffer of the Canister Retrieval Test (CRT) with those of reference material. The CRT, located at the Swedish Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), was a full-scale field experiment simulating conditions relevant for the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in crystalline host rock. The compacted bentonite, surrounding a copper canister equipped with heaters, had been subjected to heating at temperatures up to 95 deg C and hydration by natural Na-Ca-Cl type groundwater for almost five years at the time of retrieval. Under the thermal and hydration gradients that prevailed during the test, sulfate in the bentonite was redistributed and accumulated as anhydrite close to the canister. The major change in the exchangeable cation pool was a loss in Mg in the outer parts of the blocks, suggesting replacement of Mg mainly by Ca along with the hydration with groundwater. Close to the copper canister, small amounts of Cu were incorporated in the bentonite. A reduction of strain at failure was observed in the innermost part of the bentonite buffer, but no influence was seen on the shear strength. No change of the swelling pressure was observed, while a modest decrease in hydraulic conductivity was found for the samples with the highest densities. No coupling was found between these changes in the hydro-mechanical properties and the montmorillonite . the X-ray diffraction characteristics, the cation exchange properties, and the average crystal chemistry of the Na-converted < 1 {mu}m fractions provided no evidence of any chemical/structural changes in the montmorillonite after the 5-year hydrothermal test.

  5. Long term chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of compacted soil bentonite polymer complex submitted to synthetic leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razakamanantsoa, Andry Rico; Djeran-Maigre, Irini

    2016-07-01

    An experimental program is carried out to investigate the long term hydro-mechanical behavior correlated with chemical one of compacted soils with low concentration of Ca-bentonite and Ca-bentonite polymer mixture. The effect of prehydration on the hydraulic performance is compared to the polymer adding effect. All specimens are submitted to synthetic leachate (LS) under different permeation conditions. Several issues are studied: mechanical stability, hydraulic performance, chemical exchange of cations validated with microstructure observations. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observations demonstrate two distinct behaviors: dispersive for Bentonite (B) and B with Polymer P1 (BP1) and flocculated for B with Polymer P2 (BP2). Direct shear tests show that bentonite adding increases the Soil (S) cohesion and decreases the friction angle. Polymer adding behaves similarly by maintaining the soil cohesion and increasing the friction angle. Hydraulic conductivity of prehydrated soil bentonite (SB) and direct permeation of polymer added soil bentonite are studied (SBP1 and SBP2). Hydraulic test duration are in range of 45days to 556days long. Prehydration allows to delay the aggressive effect of the LS in short term but seems to increase its negative effect on the hydraulic conductivity value in long term exposure. SB and SBP1 behave similarly and seem to act in the long term as a granular filler effect. SBP2 presents positive results comparing to the other mixtures: it maintains the hydraulic conductivity and the chemical resistance. Chemical analysis confirms that all specimens are subjected to Na(+) dissolution and Ca(2+) retention which are more pronounced for prehydrated specimen. The short term effect of prehydration and the positive effect of SBP2 are also confirmed. PMID:27156365

  6. Effects of high grade bentonite on performance, organ weights and serum biochemistry during aflatoxicosis in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Indresh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of different levels of High Bentonite on growth performance, organ weight and serum biochemistry in broiler fed on diets containing aflatoxin. Materials and Methods: A total of 360 day-old commercial broiler chicks were divided at random into 8 dietary treatment groups of 42 chicks each having 3 replicates. Dietary levels of aflatoxin (0.5 ppm and High-grade bentonite (0.5, 0.75 and 1.00% were tested in a completely randomized design manner, forming a total of 8 dietary treatments each with three replicates. Body weight and feed intake were recorded weekly. At 5 wk, six birds from each treatment were sacrificed and liver, kidney, gizzard, pancreas, spleen, bursa of Fabricius and thymus were extracted and weighed. The serum samples were analyzed for total proteins, uric acid, serum albumin, serum globulin and the activities of gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT, alanine amino transferase (ALT and for antibody titers against Newcastle disease (ND and infectious bursal disease (IBD using ELISA technique. Results: A significant (P<0.05 decrease in body weight, feed consumption, relative weights of bursa, thymus, serum protein, anti body titers against NDV and IBDV, and increase in FCR, mortality, relative weight of liver, kidney, and the activity of Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT was observed. However, the relative weights of gizzard, pancreas, spleen, serum albumin, uric acid and the activity of Alanine Amino Transferase (ALT were not influenced by inclusion of AF or HGB. Conclusion: The addition of HGB restored the harmful effects of AF on body weight, feed consumption, FCR, mortality, relative weight of liver, kidney, serum protein, IBDV and NDV. Supplementation of high grade bentonite at 1.0 per cent level was found to be beneficial in ameliorating the adverse effects of aflatoxin (AF in broiler chickens. [Vet World 2013; 6(6.000: 313-317

  7. The effect of zeolite,bentonite and sepiolite minerals onheavy metal uptake by sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N . Esmaeilpour Fard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mining, industrial and agricultural activities can result in considerable soil pollution by heavy metals (HMs. One of the methods to control this pollution is application of adsorbent minerals. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of adsorbent minerals (bentonite, zeolite and sepiolite on transfer of some heavy metals (i.e., Pb, Zn and Cd from soil to tissues of sunflower (Heliantus annuus L.. Treatments included: Non-polluted soil, HM-polluted soil, polluted soil + bentonite, polluted soil + zeolite, and polluted soil + sepiolite. Sunflower seeds were planted in different pots containing the above treated soils. After 70 days of growth, plants were harvested and HMs content was measured. Results revealed that the uptake of HMs from non-polluted soil was lower than that of other treatments. In the polluted soil + sepiolite treatment, the added sepiolite increased plant Cd and Zn uptake by 0.37 and 7.17 mg/kg, respectively. However, the differences in HMs uptake were not significant for other treatments. Zeolite addition decreased plant uptake of Zn and Cd by about 12 and 0.21 mg/kg, respectively, while bentonite addition reduced Pb uptake by about 3.05 mg/kg, without any significant difference for the other treatments. Zn uptake was higher by about 12.2 mg/kg in plant shoots as compared to plant roots. On the contrary, the roots took up higher amounts of Cd and Pb, as compared to the shoots. Despite high concentration of the HMs in the polluted soils, considerable tendency of sunflower for uptake, and a high adsorption capacity of the applied minerals, the HMs uptake by sunflower and surface adsorption by the minerals were very low, probably due to HMs precipitation in the soil.

  8. Development of polymer nanocomposites with regional bentonite clay; Desenvolvimento de nanocompositos polimericos com argila bentonitica regional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Edcleide M.; Leite, Amanda M.D.; Paz, Rene A. da; Medeiros, Keila M. de; Melo, Tomas J.A., E-mail: edcleide@dema.ufcg.edu.br [Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais da UFCG, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Barbosa, Josiane D.V. [SENAI/CIMATEC, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Barbosa, Renata [Universidade Federal do Piaui, UFPI, Teresina, PI (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    nanocomposites with regional bentonite clay were prepared by melt intercalation technique. The clays were studied without modification and modified with four quaternary ammonium salts. It was evidenced by X-ray diffraction that salts were incorporated into the clay structure thus confirming its organophilization. The nanocomposites were evaluated by means of thermal mechanic and flammability tests where presented properties significantly improved their pure polymers. The process of biodegradation of obtained bio nanocomposites was accelerated by the presence of clay. The produced membranes from nanocomposites have potential in the oil-water separation. (author)

  9. Gas migration through bentonitic engineered barrier systems and through non-indurated clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This extended abstract summarises briefly the main conclusions and perspectives of the research work carried out in the frame of gas migration from a radioactive waste disposal through bentonitic engineered barrier systems (EBS) and non-indurated natural clay formations. After a description of the most important experimental results and the conceptual model evolution, we will focus on the safety relevant issues and the way the gas migration through such media is currently treated in performance assessment for different types of waste. Finally, the remaining open questions will be addressed at the end of this paper. Further insights are provided in the EC/NEA status report. (authors)

  10. Survey on current status of laboratory test method and experimental consideration for material containing bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the joint study between CRIEPI and JAEA, in order to establish laboratory test method of bentonite, literature survey as well as laboratory tests were conducted to find factors affecting the results of laboratory tests for bentonite and to estimate their degree of influence. Countermeasures against the factors are also investigated in this joint study. This report showed hydraulic conductivity tests and swelling pressure tests those are important in the low-level radioactive waste disposal. 1. Hydraulic conductivity. According to the results of literature survey, it is revealed that constant pressure permeability test and consolidation test are currently used for measuring hydraulic conductivity of bentonite and that (1) hydraulic gradient, (2) local seepage flow between lateral surface of the specimen and lateral wall of the container, (3) water pressure which is applied to the specimen, (4) degree of saturation and (5) size of the specimen possibly affect the results of the constant pressure permeability test, (6) friction between lateral surface of the specimen and lateral wall of the container accompanied by deformation of the specimen, (7) consolidation pressure together with factors (8), (9) affect the results of the consolidation test. As a result of investigation, it is concluded that it is currently desirable to use the constant pressure permeability test for compacted bentonite because there seems no major affecting factor which cannot be removed. 2. Swelling pressure. According to the literature survey, confined type testing apparatuses and apparatuses which are similar to the consolidation test apparatuses are used for measuring swelling pressure. Factors affecting results of swelling pressure tests are saturation of the specimen, size of the specimen and difference of apparatus. Saturation of the specimen set in confined type testing apparatus can be raised easily by one-dimensional infiltration of water through the specimen and by applying

  11. Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of Bentonite Buffer in a Deep Geological HLW Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Cho, W. J.; Lee, J. O

    2008-08-15

    This work aims to investigate the influence of bentonite buffer and backfill, which will role as important engineered barriers, on the thermo-mechanical behaviors of a disposal system at a deep underground HLW repository. It will contribute to the disposal system development and performance assessment of the system. In this study, three-dimensional computer simulations were carried out with a consideration of the thermal and mechanical characteristics of the buffer and backfill for the investigation of the behavior of buffer and backfill under different disposal conditions. The understanding of the near field response to the variation of buffer and backfill properties will contribute to the development of an adequate buffer and backfill design in disposal conditions as well as the selection of a disposal site. The following conclusions could be drawn from the three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupling analysis for investigating the possible influence of the bentonite buffer on the thermo-mechanical behavior around an underground repository, which is located at several hundred meters deep underground. o The bentonite swelling pressure can influence on the mechanical behavior of canister. Further detailed modeling is required in the future. o It is required to consider the water content and density of bentonite as important design parameters, because it was found that those influence the thermo-mechanical behavior of near field significantly. o A horizontal deposition hole and multi-level repository can results different maximum temperatures, stress concentration, and the required time for the maximum temperatures of canister, buffer, and rock compared to those of vertical deposition hole and single level repository. o Even though, the same laboratory results were used for driving the parameters for the plastic models used in the modeling, the mechanical behaviors were different. It is, therefore, required to use adequate plastic models for buffer and backfill

  12. Advancement of experimentation for measuring hydraulic conductivity of bentonite using high-pressure consolidation test apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the geological disposal facility of high-level radioactive wastes, it is important to grasp the hydraulic conductivity characteristic of bentonite. The purpose of this study is the advancement of the examination method for the measurement of a more reliable hydraulic conductivity using high-pressure consolidation test apparatus (maximum consolidation pressure 10MPa). Consequently, it succeeded in improving the reliability of data by raising the resolution of displacement used for an examination, increasing to 80 the number of measurement data for 2 minutes after making each consolidation pressure act on the occasion of measurement and adopting the data of a high consolidation pressure (more than 5.88MPa) stage. (author)

  13. Polyester-Bentonite Clay Composite: Synthesis, Characterization and Application as Anticorrosive Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Chitra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available New polyester-bentonite clay composite was prepared and characterized by FTIR, TGA, SEM& XRD. The XRD and SEM studies are quite supportive of well dispersed polymer clay composite formation. The thermal stability of the polymer was significantly improved as indicated by TGA. The composite was evaluated for its inhibition performance for mild steel corrosion in 1M H2SO4 by weight loss, polarization and electrochemical impedance techniques. The studies reveal that the clay composite was an excellent adsorption type inhibitor and obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Electrochemical studies showed that the polymer composite was a mixed inhibitor retarding both anodic metal dissolution and cathodic hydrogen evolution.

  14. On the formation of a moving redox-front by α-radiolysis of compacted water saturated bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of an expanding volume containing the radiolytically formed oxidants H2O2 and O2 has been studied in α-irradiated compacted water saturated bentonite (ρ = 2.12 gxcm-3). The G-values (0.67±0.05), (0.64±0.07) for H2O2 and O2 respectively are in fair agreement with the corresponding G-values obtained in experiments with synthetic ground water. From the leaching of γ-irradiated bentonite it is concluded that only a fraction of the Fe2+ content is easily accessible as scavenger for the radiolytically formed oxidants. (orig.)

  15. Nutrient losses from cattle co-digestate slurry during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Perazzolo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Among environmental issues related to intensive livestock activity, emissions to air from manure management are of increasing concern. Thus the knowledge of the effect of treatment application on subsequent emissions from manure is required to assess the environment impact of management solutions. This work addresses the effect of anaerobic digestion and phase separation on emissions during storage by studying nitrogen losses from lab-scale stores and field pilot-scale stores of a co-digestate cattle slurry and its respective separated fractions. Lab-scale experiment was carried in temperature-controlled room where each fraction (untreated, separated liquid and separated solid was stored in duplicate for a period of 32 days in 30 L vessel. Pilot-scale experiment was carried out both during the cold season and during warm season for 90 days of storage. In both experimentations samples of the manure were analysed periodically for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN, total ammonia nitrogen, dry matter and volatile solids and pH. These analyses allow estimating nitrogen losses in different storage conditions. Effects of mechanical separation and season were assessed by ANOVA (Wilcoxon test, P<0.05. In temperature controlled conditions nitrogen losses measured account for 13% and 26% of TKN for unseparated and separated slurries respectively. In field conditions during cold season nutrient losses were limited. On average unseparated and separated slurries lost respectively 6.8% and 12.6% of their initial TKN content. Much higher were the TKN losses from the slurries examined in warm season where losses raised up to 40% of the initial TKN content. Generally mechanical separation increases nutrient losses, but the differences were not significant in field conditions. The results highlighted that nutrient losses, in particular the nitrogen ones, can be considerable especially during summer storage. The latter, in case of separated slurries, are mainly related

  16. Integrated system for coal-methanol liquefaction and slurry pipeline transportation. Final report. [In slurry transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W.F.; Davidson, J.K.; Horton, J.H.; Summers, C.W.

    1980-03-31

    The engineering economics of an integrated coal-to-methanol conversion system and coal-in-methanol transportation system are examined, under the circumstances of the western coalfields, i.e., long distances from major markets and scarcity of water in the vicinity of the mines. The transportation economics are attractive, indicating tariffs of approximately 40 cents per million Btu per thousand miles for the coal-methanol pipeline vs 60 cents via coal-water pipelines and upwards of a dollar via rail. Energy consumption is also less in the coal-methanol pipeline than in the coal-water pipeline, and about equal to rail. It is also concluded that, by a proper marriage of the synthetic fuel (methanolization) plant to the slurrification plant, most, and in some cases all, of the water required by the synthetic fuel process can be supplied by the natural moisture of the coal itself. Thus, the only technology which presently exists and by which synthetic fuel from western coal can displace petroleum in the automotive fuel market is the integrated methanol conversion and tranportation system. The key element is the ability of the methanol slurry pipeline to accept and to deliver dry (1 to 5% moisture) coal, allowing the natural coal moisture to be used as synthesis feedstock in satisfaction of the large water requirement of any synthetic fuel plant. By virtue of these unique properties, this integrated system is seen as the only means in the foreseeable future whereby western coal can be converted to synthetic fuel and moved to distant markets.

  17. Mineralogical investigations of the interaction between iron corrosion products and bentonite from the NF-PRO Experiments (Phase 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milodowski, A.E.; Cave, M.R.; Kemp, S.J.; Taylor, B.H.; Vickers, B.P.; Green, K.A.; Williams, C.L.; Shaw, R.A. (British Geological Survey (United Kingdom))

    2009-01-15

    This report summarises the findings of a programme of work under taken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB, to characterise the mineralogical alteration of compacted bentonite from experiments designed to study the interaction between iron corrosion and bentonite. The experiments were undertaken by Serco Assurance (Culham Laboratory, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom), and were co-funded by SKB within the EU Framework 6 NF-PRO Project. Reacted bentonite residues from three NF-PRO Experiments - NFC12, NFC16 and NFC17 were examined by BGS using; X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD); petrographical analysis with backscattered scanning electron microscopy (BSEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) techniques, cation exchange capacity (CEC) and exchangeable cation analysis; and sequential chemical extraction. Bentonite immediately adjacent to corroding steel was found to have interacted with Fe released from the corroding metal. This resulted in the formation of narrow haloes of altered bentonite around the corroding steel wires, in which the clay matrix was significantly enriched in Fe. Detailed petrographical observation found no evidence for the formation of discrete iron oxide or iron oxyhydroxide phases within the clay matrix but appeared to show that the clay particles themselves had become enriched in Fe. XRD observations indicated a slight increase in d002/d003 peak ratio, which could possibly be accounted for by a small amount of substitution of Fe into the octahedral layers of the montmorillonite. If correct, then this alteration might represent the early stages of conversion of the dioctahedral montmorillonite to an iron-rich dioctahedral smectite such as nontronite. Alternatively, the same effect may have been produced as a result of the displacement of exchangeable interlayer cations by Fe and subsequent conversion to form additional Fe-rich octahedral layers. In either case, the XRD results are consistent with the petrographical

  18. Mineralogical investigations of the interaction between iron corrosion products and bentonite from the NF-PRO Experiments (Phase 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises the findings of a programme of work under taken by the British Geological Survey (BGS) on behalf of SKB, to characterise the mineralogical alteration of compacted bentonite from experiments designed to study the interaction between iron corrosion and bentonite. The experiments were undertaken by Serco Assurance (Culham Laboratory, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom), and were co-funded by SKB within the EU Framework 6 NF-PRO Project. Reacted bentonite residues from three NF-PRO Experiments - NFC12, NFC16 and NFC17 were examined by BGS using; X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD); petrographical analysis with backscattered scanning electron microscopy (BSEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) techniques, cation exchange capacity (CEC) and exchangeable cation analysis; and sequential chemical extraction. Bentonite immediately adjacent to corroding steel was found to have interacted with Fe released from the corroding metal. This resulted in the formation of narrow haloes of altered bentonite around the corroding steel wires, in which the clay matrix was significantly enriched in Fe. Detailed petrographical observation found no evidence for the formation of discrete iron oxide or iron oxyhydroxide phases within the clay matrix but appeared to show that the clay particles themselves had become enriched in Fe. XRD observations indicated a slight increase in d002/d003 peak ratio, which could possibly be accounted for by a small amount of substitution of Fe into the octahedral layers of the montmorillonite. If correct, then this alteration might represent the early stages of conversion of the dioctahedral montmorillonite to an iron-rich dioctahedral smectite such as nontronite. Alternatively, the same effect may have been produced as a result of the displacement of exchangeable interlayer cations by Fe and subsequent conversion to form additional Fe-rich octahedral layers. In either case, the XRD results are consistent with the petrographical

  19. Flow resistance of ice slurry in bends and elbow pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niezgoda-Żelasko, B.; Żelasko, J.

    2014-08-01

    The present paper covers the flow of ice slurry made of a 10.6% ethanol solution through small-radius bends and elbow pipes. The paper presents the results of experimental research on the flow resistances of Bingham-fluid ice slurry in bends and elbows. The research, performed for three pipe diameters and a relative bend radius of 1<=D/di<=2, has made it possible to take into consideration the influence of friction resistances as well the of the flow geometry on the total local resistance coefficients. The study attempts to make the local resistance coefficient dependent on the Dean number defined for a generalized Reynolds number according to Metzner-Reade

  20. Studies on Slurry Design Fundamentals for Advanced CMP Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Basim, G. B.

    2013-06-14

    New developments and device performance requirements in microelectronics industry add to the challenges in chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process. One of the recently introduced materials is germanium which enables improved performance through better channel mobility in shallow trench isolation (STI) applications. This paper reports on the slurry design alternatives for Ge CMP with surfactant mediation to improve on the silica/germanium selectivity using colloidal silica slurry. In addition to the standard CMP tests to evaluate the material removal rates, atomic force microscopy (AFM) based wear tests were also conducted to evaluate single particle-surface interaction of the polishing system. Furthermore, nature of the surface oxide film of germanium was studied through contact angle measurements and surface roughness tested by AFM. It was observed that the CMP selectivity of the silica/germanium system and defectivity control were possible with a reasonable material removal rate value by using self-assembled structures of cationic surfactants.