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Sample records for benthic zone

  1. The role of benthic foraminifera in the benthic nitrogen cycle of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

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    N. Glock

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that foraminifera are able to use nitrate instead of oxygen as energy source for their metabolism has challenged our understanding of nitrogen cycling in the ocean. It was evident before that only prokaryotes and fungi are able to denitrify. Rate estimates of foraminiferal denitrification were very sparse on a regional scale. Here, we present estimates of benthic foraminiferal denitrification rates from six stations at intermediate water depths in and below the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. Foraminiferal denitrification rates were calculated from abundance and assemblage composition of the total living fauna in both, surface and subsurface sediments, as well as from individual species specific denitrification rates. A comparison with total benthic denitrification rates as inferred by biogeochemical models revealed that benthic foraminifera account for the total denitrification on the shelf between 80 and 250 m water depth. They are still important denitrifiers in the centre of the OMZ around 320 m (29–56% of the benthic denitrification but play only a minor role at the lower OMZ boundary and below the OMZ between 465 and 700 m (3–7% of total benthic denitrification. Furthermore, foraminiferal denitrification was compared to the total benthic nitrate loss measured during benthic chamber experiments. Foraminiferal denitrification contributes 1 to 50% to the total nitrate loss across a depth transect from 80 to 700 m, respectively. Flux rate estimates ranged from 0.01 to 1.3 mmol m−2 d−1. Furthermore we show that the amount of nitrate stored in living benthic foraminifera (3 to 705 µmol L−1 can be higher by three orders of magnitude as compared to the ambient pore waters in near surface sediments sustaining an important nitrate reservoir in Peruvian OMZ sediments. The substantial contribution of foraminiferal nitrate respiration to total benthic nitrate loss at the Peruvian margin

  2. Benthic phosphorus cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Ulrike; Sommer, Stefan; Dale, Andrew W.; Löscher, Carolin R.; Noffke, Anna; Wallmann, Klaus; Hensen, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) that impinge on continental margins favor the release of phosphorus (P) from the sediments to the water column, enhancing primary productivity and the maintenance or expansion of low-oxygen waters. A comprehensive field program in the Peruvian OMZ was undertaken to identify the sources of benthic P at six stations, including the analysis of particles from the water column, surface sediments, and pore fluids, as well as in situ benthic flux measurements. A major fraction of solid-phase P was bound as particulate inorganic P (PIP) both in the water column and in sediments. Sedimentary PIP increased with depth in the sediment at the expense of particulate organic P (POP). The ratio of particulate organic carbon (POC) to POP exceeded the Redfield ratio both in the water column (202 ± 29) and in surface sediments (303 ± 77). However, the POC to total particulate P (TPP = POP + PIP) ratio was close to Redfield in the water column (103 ± 9) and in sediment samples (102 ± 15). This suggests that the relative burial efficiencies of POC and TPP are similar under low-oxygen conditions and that the sediments underlying the anoxic waters on the Peru margin are not depleted in P compared to Redfield. Benthic fluxes of dissolved P were extremely high (up to 1.04 ± 0.31 mmol m-2 d-1), however, showing that a lack of oxygen promotes the intensified release of dissolved P from sediments, whilst preserving the POC / TPP burial ratio. Benthic dissolved P fluxes were always higher than the TPP rain rate to the seabed, which is proposed to be caused by transient P release by bacterial mats that had stored P during previous periods when bottom waters were less reducing. At one station located at the lower rim of the OMZ, dissolved P was taken up by the sediments, indicating ongoing phosphorite formation. This is further supported by decreasing porewater phosphate concentrations with sediment depth, whereas solid-phase P concentrations were comparatively

  3. Synthesis of benthic flux components in the Patos Lagooncoastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    King, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this work is to synthesize components of benthic flux in the Patos Lagoon coastal zone, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Specifically, the component of benthic discharge flux forced by the terrestrial hydraulic gradient is 0.8 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux associated with the groundwater tidal prism are both 2.1 m3 d-1; components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity wave setup are both 6.3 m3 d-1; the component of benthic discharge flux that transports radium-228 is 350 m3 d-1; and components of benthic discharge and recharge flux forced by surface-gravity waves propagating over a porous medium are both 1400 m3 d-1. (All models are normalized per meter shoreline.) Benthic flux is a function of components forced by individual mechanisms and nonlinear interactions that exist between components. Constructive and destructive interference may enhance or diminish the contribution of benthic flux components. It may not be possible to model benthic flux by summing component magnitudes. Geochemical tracer techniques may not accurately model benthic discharge flux or submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). A conceptual model provides a framework on which to quantitatively characterize benthic discharge flux and SGD with a multifaceted approach.

  4. Denitrification, nitrate turnover, and aerobic respiration by benthic foraminiferans in the oxygen minimum zone off Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Cedhagen, Tomas;

    2008-01-01

    Population density, nitrate turnover, and oxygen respiration of benthic foraminiferans were investigated in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off the Chilean coast. Live foraminiferans were found predominantly in the upper 3 mm of the sediment, and the nitrate accumulating species Nonionella cf. stella...

  5. Benthic phosphorus cycling in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomnitz, Ulrike; Sommer, Stefan; Dale, Andrew W.;

    2016-01-01

    (TPP = POP + PIP) ratio was close to Redfield in the water column (103 ± 9) and in sediment samples (102 ± 15). This suggests that the relative burial efficiencies of POC and TPP are similar under low-oxygen conditions and that the sediments underlying the anoxic waters on the Peru margin are not...... depleted in P compared to Redfield. Benthic fluxes of dissolved P were extremely high (up to 1.04 ± 0.31 mmol m-2 d-1), however, showing that a lack of oxygen promotes the intensified release of dissolved P from sediments, whilst preserving the POC/TPP burial ratio. Benthic dissolved P fluxes were always...... higher than the TPP rain rate to the seabed, which is proposed to be caused by transient P release by bacterial mats that had stored P during previous periods when bottom waters were less reducing. At one station located at the lower rim of the OMZ, dissolved P was taken up by the sediments, indicating...

  6. Biodiversity of the benthic shellfish in the intertidal zone of the Liusha Bay, Leizhou Peninsula

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    Sheng Ke

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An analysis was conducted of species composition, spatial-temporal distribution and biodiversity of benthic shellfish in the intertidal zone of the Liusha Bay, Leizhou Peninsula, where shellfish are intensively framed. Areas sampled in 2008 and 2009 included seagrass beds (SGB, cultured shellfish areas (CSA and non-cultured areas (NCA. We found (1 97 shellfish species, of which 58 occurred in the NCA and 49 in the SGB. Cerithidea cingulata and Batillaria zonalis were dominant species in all three areas. (2 In the SGB and NCA, biomass and abundance of shellfish reached highest values in September and lowest in May. In the SGB and CSA, highest biomass and abundance of shellfish occurred in the high-tidal zone, followed by the mid-tidal zone and low-tidal zone. (3 Highest Margalef richness index and Shannon-Wiener index values were estimated for the NCA while the highest Pielou evenness index values was obtained for the CSA. Based on an analysis of K-dominance curves, the CSA was most severely disturbed. In summary, an unstable community structure and reduced biodiversity of shellfish was evident in the intertidal zone of the SGB and CSA. Improvements to both community structure and biodiversity of benthic shellfish in these areas are likely to result from reducing the intensity of shellfish culturing and extending seagrass coverage and mix-typed sediment.

  7. Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemence, Caulle; Meryem, Mojtahid; Karoliina, Koho; Andy, Gooday; Gert-Jan, Reichart; Gerhard, Schmiedl; Frans, Jorissen

    2014-05-01

    Benthic foraminifera from the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone: towards a paleo-oxygenation proxy. C. Caulle1, M. Mojtahid1, K. Koho2,3, A. Gooday4, G. J. Reichart2,3, G. Schmiedl5, F. Jorissen1 1UMR CNRS 6112 LPG-BIAF, University of Angers, 2 bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers Cedex 2Utrecht University, Faculty of Geosciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands 3Royal Netherland Institute for Sea Research (Royal NIOZ), Landsdiep 4, 1797 SZ 't Horntje (Texel) 4Southampton Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 5Department of Geosciences, University of Hamburg, Bundesstraße 55, 20146 Hamburg, Germany The thermohaline circulation oxygenates the deep ocean sediment and therefore enables aerobic life on the sea-floor. In the past, interruption of this deep water formation occurred several times causing hypoxic to anoxic conditions on the sea-floor leading to major ecological turnover. A better understanding of the interaction between climate and bottom water oxygenation is therefore essential in order to predict future oceanic responses. Presently, permanent (stable over decadal timescale) low-oxygen conditions occur naturally at mid-water depths in the northern Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea). Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) are key areas to understand the hypoxic-anoxic events and their impact on the benthic ecosystem. In this context, a good knowledge of the ecology and life cycle adaptations of the benthic foraminiferal assemblages living in these low oxygen areas is essential. A series of multicores were recovered from three transects showing an oxygen gradient across the OMZ: the Murray Ridge, the Oman margin and the Indian margin. The stations located at the same depths showed slightly different oxygen concentrations and large differences in organic matter content. These differences are mainly related to the geographic location in the Arabian Sea. We investigated at these stations live and dead benthic

  8. Using decision trees to predict benthic communities within and near the German Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the North Sea.

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    Pesch, Roland; Pehlke, Hendrik; Jerosch, Kerstin; Schröder, Winfried; Schlüter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In this article a concept is described in order to predict and map the occurrence of benthic communities within and near the German Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the North Sea. The approach consists of two work steps: (1) geostatistical analysis of abiotic measurement data and (2) calculation of benthic provinces by means of Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and GIS-techniques. From bottom water measurements on salinity, temperature, silicate and nutrients as well as from punctual data on grain size ranges (0-20, 20-63, 63-2,000 mu) raster maps were calculated by use of geostatistical methods. At first the autocorrelation structure was examined and modelled with help of variogram analysis. The resulting variogram models were then used to calculate raster maps by applying ordinary kriging procedures. After intersecting these raster maps with punctual data on eight benthic communities a decision tree was derived to predict the occurrence of these communities within the study area. Since such a CART tree corresponds to a hierarchically ordered set of decision rules it was applied to the geostatistically estimated raster data to predict benthic habitats within and near the EEZ. PMID:17680336

  9. Depletion of oxygen, nitrate and nitrite in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone cause an imbalance of benthic nitrogen fluxes

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    Sommer, S.; Gier, J.; Treude, T.; Lomnitz, U.; Dengler, M.; Cardich, J.; Dale, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are key regions for fixed nitrogen loss in both the sediments and the water column. During this study, the benthic contribution to N cycling was investigated at ten sites along a depth transect (74-989 m) across the Peruvian OMZ at 12°S. O2 levels were below detection limit down to ~500 m. Benthic fluxes of N2, NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, H2S and O2 were measured using benthic landers. Flux measurements on the shelf were made under extreme geochemical conditions consisting of a lack of O2, NO3- and NO2- in the bottom water and elevated seafloor sulphide release. These particular conditions were associated with a large imbalance in the benthic nitrogen cycle. The sediments on the shelf were densely covered by filamentous sulphur bacteria Thioploca, and were identified as major recycling sites for DIN releasing high amounts of NH4+up to 21.2 mmol m-2 d-1 that were far in excess of NH4+ release by ammonification. This difference was attributed to dissimilatory nitrate (or nitrite) reduction to ammonium (DNRA) that was partly being sustained by NO3- stored within the sulphur oxidizing bacteria. Sediments within the core of the OMZ (ca. 200-400 m) also displayed an excess flux of N of 3.5 mmol m-2 d-1 mainly as N2. Benthic nitrogen and sulphur cycling in the Peruvian OMZ appears to be particularly susceptible to bottom water fluctuations in O2, NO3- and NO2-, and may accelerate the onset of pelagic euxinia when NO3- and NO2- become depleted.

  10. Benthic assemblages of a temperate estuarine system in South America: Transition from a freshwater to an estuarine zone

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    Cortelezzi, Agustina; Capítulo, Alberto Rodrigues; Boccardi, Lucía; Arocena, Rafael

    2007-12-01

    The objectives of the present study were to describe the species composition, diversity and distribution of the zoobenthic assemblages, to estimate the abundance and biomass of the dominant species, and to identify the main environmental factors determining the distribution patterns of the invertebrates from a freshwater to an estuarine zone in a temperate estuary of South America. The Río de la Plata estuary is a microtidal system characterized by a high concentration of suspended solids. Fifty-three taxa of meso- and macro-invertebrates were identified in the samples collected during November and December 2001. Molluscs, annelids, crustaceans and nematodes were found at 90% of the sampling sites. Molluscs comprised up to about 90% of the total zoobenthos biomass: the remaining percentage corresponded mainly to annelids and less to nematodes and crustaceans. An ecocline along the salinity gradient could be observed for the benthic assemblages from the freshwater to the estuarine zone in Rio de la Plata. A Canonical Correspondence Analysis shows that results from sampling sites in the outer zone were strongly related to salinity, depth and pH and less to oxygen and percentage of clay. The results from stations in the inner zone, and part of the middle zone, were mainly related to the occurrence of sand and contents of NH 4+-N, NO 3--N, and PO 43--P.

  11. Benthic Macrofaunal Assemblage in the Arid Zone Mangroves of Gulf of Kachchh - Gujarat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The total benthic macrofauna consisting of 62 species in 5 groups, viz. crustaceans (18), gastropods (17), bivalves (16), polychaetes (9) and fishes (2), was recorded in western Kachchh mangroves near Gujarat. The population densities of benthic macrofauna ranged from 424 to 2393 ind.m-2, the diversity ranged from 1.84 to 2.45 bits ind.-1, the richness varied between 0.82 and 0.98, and the evenness varied between 0.64 and 0.81. Two maximum diversity values were recorded during winter and summer. The salinity ranged from 34 to 44, temperature varied between 17 and 37 ℃, and the acidity ranged from 7 to 8.9.

  12. Assessment of Streamside Management Zones for Conserving Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities Following Timber Harvest in Eastern Kentucky Headwater Catchments

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    Joshua K. Adkins

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Headwater streams generally comprise the majority of stream area in a watershed and can have a strong influence on downstream food webs. Our objective was to determine the effect of altering streamside management zone (SMZ configurations on headwater aquatic insect communities. Timber harvests were implemented within six watersheds in eastern Kentucky. The SMZ configurations varied in width, canopy retention and best management practice (BMP utilization at the watershed scale. Benthic macroinvertebrate samples collected one year before and four years after harvest indicated few differences among treatments, although post-treatment abundance was elevated in some of the treatment streams relative to the unharvested controls. Jaccard index values were similar across SMZ treatments after logging, indicating strong community overlap. These findings suggest that stream invertebrate communities did respond to the timber harvest, though not negatively. Results also suggest that SMZ criteria for aquatic habitats in steeply sloping topography, including at least 50 percent canopy retention and widths of at least 16.8 m, appear to be adequate for protecting benthic macroinvertebrate communities from logging impacts.

  13. Epi-benthic megafaunal zonation across an oxygen minimum zone at the Indian continental margin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hunter, W.R.; Oguri, K.; Kitazato, H.; Ansari, Z.A.; Witte, U.

    (Ambrose. 1993; Hudson and Wigham 2003), and by selectively removing labile organic matter from the sediment (Miller, et al., 2000; Ginger, et al., 2001). Within an oxygen minimum zone the megafauna have been observed feeding at multiple trophic levels... abundance and assemblage structure change across the Indian margin OMZ, correlated to the changes in the ambient oxygen availability and sediment organic matter content. Assemblage structure was investigated at multiple spatial scales (Magurran, 2004...

  14. Benthic macrofauna of sandy intertidal zone at Santos estuarine system, São Paulo, Brazil

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    T.N. Corbisier

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Species composition, faunal density, species diversity and zonation patterns of benthic macrofauna, as well as its relation to sediment characteristics were examined and compared in three sandy beaches on the polyhaline area at Santos estuarine system in the State of São Paulo. Samples were collected quarterly during one year (July/1977 - May/1978. Low, mean and high intertidal levels were sampled. Polyehaetes dominated the fauna, both in terms of numbers of species and numbers of individuals. The community structure of Ponta da Praia beach was characterized by high density, low diversity (H' and evenness (J', due to the dominance of the spionid Scolelepis squamata. At Vicente de Carvalho the fauna was characterized by the dominance of the polyehaetes Laeonereis acuta and Capitella capitata and presented low density, high diversity and evenness. At Bertioga Channel, intermediate values were observed and the fauna was dominated by Scololepis squamata andLaeonereis acuta. The sediment texture was responsible for those figures, although some differences in diversity may be explained by differences in wave energy. The low number of crustaceans and molluscs suggests the effect of the estuarine pollution upon the fauna. The zonation pattern of both species distribution and community structure differed at the studied sites; it was not correlated with sediment characteristics which were relatively uniform down shore; however, the lowest diversity was observed at the high level in all sites.Neste trabalho foi estudada a macrofauna bentônica da zona entremarés arenosa da área polihalina do sistema estuarino de Santos. A composição em espécies, densidade e diversidade e o padrão de zonação da fauna foram analisados e comparados, bem como sua relação com as características do sedimento em três praias arenosas. As amostras foram coletadas trimestralmente durante o período de um ano (julho/1977 - maio/1978. Em cada local, foram amostrados os n

  15. Biofilm and Diatom Succession on Polyethylene (PE and Biodegradable Plastic Bags in Two Marine Habitats: Early Signs of Degradation in the Pelagic and Benthic Zone?

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    Andreas Eich

    Full Text Available The production of biodegradable plastic is increasing. Given the augmented littering of these products an increasing input into the sea is expected. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that degradation of plastic starts within days to weeks. Little is known about the early composition and activity of biofilms found on biodegradable and conventional plastic debris and its correlation to degradation in the marine environment. In this study we investigated the early formation of biofilms on plastic shopper bags and its consequences for the degradation of plastic. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic were tested in the Mediterranean Sea for 15 and 33 days. The samples were distributed equally to a shallow benthic (sedimentary seafloor at 6 m water depth and a pelagic habitat (3 m water depth to compare the impact of these different environments on fouling and degradation. The amount of biofilm increased on both plastic types and in both habitats. The diatom abundance and diversity differed significantly between the habitats and the plastic types. Diatoms were more abundant on samples from the pelagic zone. We anticipate that specific surface properties of the polymer types induced different biofilm communities on both plastic types. Additionally, different environmental conditions between the benthic and pelagic experimental site such as light intensity and shear forces may have influenced unequal colonisation between these habitats. The oxygen production rate was negative for all samples, indicating that the initial biofilm on marine plastic litter consumes oxygen, regardless of the plastic type or if exposed in the pelagic or the benthic zone. Mechanical tests did not reveal degradation within one month of exposure. However, scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis displayed potential signs of degradation on the plastic surface, which differed between both plastic types. This study indicates that the early biofilm formation

  16. Biofilm and Diatom Succession on Polyethylene (PE) and Biodegradable Plastic Bags in Two Marine Habitats: Early Signs of Degradation in the Pelagic and Benthic Zone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, Andreas; Mildenberger, Tobias; Laforsch, Christian; Weber, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The production of biodegradable plastic is increasing. Given the augmented littering of these products an increasing input into the sea is expected. Previous laboratory experiments have shown that degradation of plastic starts within days to weeks. Little is known about the early composition and activity of biofilms found on biodegradable and conventional plastic debris and its correlation to degradation in the marine environment. In this study we investigated the early formation of biofilms on plastic shopper bags and its consequences for the degradation of plastic. Samples of polyethylene and biodegradable plastic were tested in the Mediterranean Sea for 15 and 33 days. The samples were distributed equally to a shallow benthic (sedimentary seafloor at 6 m water depth) and a pelagic habitat (3 m water depth) to compare the impact of these different environments on fouling and degradation. The amount of biofilm increased on both plastic types and in both habitats. The diatom abundance and diversity differed significantly between the habitats and the plastic types. Diatoms were more abundant on samples from the pelagic zone. We anticipate that specific surface properties of the polymer types induced different biofilm communities on both plastic types. Additionally, different environmental conditions between the benthic and pelagic experimental site such as light intensity and shear forces may have influenced unequal colonisation between these habitats. The oxygen production rate was negative for all samples, indicating that the initial biofilm on marine plastic litter consumes oxygen, regardless of the plastic type or if exposed in the pelagic or the benthic zone. Mechanical tests did not reveal degradation within one month of exposure. However, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis displayed potential signs of degradation on the plastic surface, which differed between both plastic types. This study indicates that the early biofilm formation and composition

  17. The role of the benthic-hyporheic zone in controlling nitrous oxide emissions along two stream networks draining watersheds with contrasting land use

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    Marzadri, Alessandra; Dee, Martha M.; Tonina, Daniele; Tank, Jennifer L.; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas responsible of stratospheric ozone destruction. Denitrification in stream ecosystems occurs within the benthic layer at the sediment-water interface and within subsurface environments such as the hyporheic zone and results in N2O production that could be eventually emitted to the atmosphere. Here, we quantify the role of benthic and hyporheic zones as sources of N2O gas and explore the dependence of emissions from stream morphology, flow hydraulics, land use and climate using a recently-developed fully analytical framework. Variations in N2O emissions within and among catchments of contrasting land use can be explained with a new denitrification Damköhler number (DaD) that accounts for denitrification processes within both benthic and hyporheic zones. For initial model development, we found a strong relationship between DaD and stream N2O emissions using field data collected from multiple headwater streams (i.e., LINXII project) from different biomes draining contrasting land use. We then tested its generality by comparing N2O emissions predicted with DaD to those measured using a synoptic sampling campaign in two stream networks draining contrasting land use: Manistee R (Michigan, USA) and Tippecanoe R (Indiana, USA). Our dimensionless analysis shows that the effect of land use disappears after making the emissions dimensionless with respect to the nitrogen load. Reliable predictions of N2O emissions at the stream network scale can be obtained from a limited amount of information, consisting in relatively easy to obtain biogeochemical and hydromorphological quantities.

  18. Comparison of benthic foraminifera inside and outside a sulphur-oxidizing bacterial mat from the present oxygen-minimum zone off Pakistan (NE Arabian Sea)

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    Erbacher, Jochen; Nelskamp, Susanne

    2006-05-01

    Assemblages of live (Rose-Bengal-stained) and dead benthic foraminifera and stable oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of live benthic foraminifera were studied in and outside a bacterial mat composed of the large sulphur-oxidizing bacteria Thioploca and Beggiatoa from the oxygen-minimum zone off Pakistan (NE Arabian Sea). Two cores from the same Multicorer retrieved a bacterial mat and ambient sediment. The dominant species ( Globobulimina affinis, G. turgida, Bolivina pacifica, B. pseudopunctata, Uvigerina peregrina and Buliminella tenuata) in both cores are characteristic for dysoxic oxygen minimum zone conditions. The most significant difference between the two cores is the reduced number of stained benthic foraminifera (SBF) in the top 0.5 cm of the bacterial mat. Faunal densities of stained species are more than four times higher in the sediment surface sample (0-0.5 cm) outside the bacterial mat, at a distance of only 1.5 m. All stained species, however, observed outside the Beggiatoa/Thioploca mat were also observed in the core with the mat. Two species, Virgulinella fragilis and Bolivina dilatata, occur exclusively in the core with the bacterial mat. The diversity within the bacterial mat core is thus slightly higher than outside. Furthermore, the abundances of the species Buliminella morgani, B. tenuata and Alliatina primitiva are substantially higher in the bacterial mat than outside. Globobuliminids, on the other hand, seem to prefer the conditions outside the bacterial mat and are five times more frequent in the core taken outside the bacterial mat. Benthic foraminifers inhabit a broader microhabitat range outside the bacterial mat (˜5 cm) than within (3.5 cm). A marked decrease in SBF abundances was observed at the level of a black sulphur-rich layer which is interpreted to mark the shallow redox front below the bacterial mat. Stable carbon isotope analyses on live benthic foraminifera do not support a relation of the investigated Beggiatoa

  19. Does water level affect benthic macro-invertebrates of a marginal lake in a tropical river-reservoir transition zone?

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    Zerlin, R A; Henry, R

    2014-05-01

    Benthic macro-invertebrates are important components of freshwater ecosystems which are involved in ecological processes such as energy transfer between detritus and consumers and organic matter recycling. The aim of this work was to investigate the variation in organism richness, diversity and density of benthic fauna during the annual cycle in Camargo Lake, a lake marginal to Paranapanema River, southeast Brazil. The correlation of environmental factors with community attributes of the macro-benthic fauna was assessed. Since Camargo Lake is connected to the river, we tested the hypothesis that water level variation is the main regulating factor of environmental variables and of the composition and abundance of benthic macro-invertebrates. The results indicated that lake depth varied with rainfall, being the highest at the end of the rising water period and the lowest at the beginning of this period. The sediment granulometry was more heterogeneous at the bottom of the lake by the end of the high water period. The benthic macro-invertebrate fauna was composed by 15 taxa. The Diptera order was represented by seven taxa and had greater richness in relation to other taxa. This group was responsible for 60% of the total abundance of organisms, followed by Ephemeroptera (22%) and Anellida (16%). Significant differences were observed over time in total richness and, in density of Narapa bonettoi, Chaoborus, Ablabesmyia gr. annulata, Chironomus gigas, Larsia fittkau, and Procladius sp. 2. Total taxa richness correlated negatively with water pH, transparency, conductivity, and bottom water oxygen. Higher positive correlations were found between the densities of some taxa and bottom water oxygen, conductivity and very fine sand, silt + clay of sediment, while negative correlations were recorded with organic matter, and fine, medium and coarse sand, bottom water temperature, mean temperature and rainfall. The significant temporal difference in water level was associated

  20. Bathymetric preference of four major genera of rectilinear benthic foraminifera within oxygen minimum zone in Arabian Sea off central west coast of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Mazumder; Rajiv Nigam

    2014-04-01

    Fifty two surface sediment samples collected from the region off Goa, central west coast of India from water depths of 15–3300 m were analyzed with special emphasis on foraminiferal content. Rectilinear benthic foraminiferal morphogroup shows a high relative abundance within Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), both shallow marine (50–60 m water depth) and intermediate to deep water (150–1500 m water depth). We gave special emphasis on four rectilinear foraminiferal genera, namely Fursenkoina, Bolivina, Bulimina and Uvigerina to observe their individual distribution among OMZ. We found genus Fursenkoina predominates at the shallow water OMZ, within the water depth zone of 50–60 m. Within 150–1500 m water depth, which is considered as intermediate to deep water OMZ in this region, genus Uvigerina shows its highest abundance above 1000 m water depth, whereas genus Bulimina shows its affinity with deeper water environment (< 1000 m water depth). Genus Bolivina does not show any such depth preference, except its higher abundance in only intermediate to deep water OMZ. This depth differentiation among four rectilinear benthic foraminiferal genera presents the basic data for palaeoclimatic study based on the extent and intensity of OMZ along with the palaeobathymetry study.

  1. Cold seep and oxygen minimum zone associated sources of margin heterogeneity affect benthic assemblages, diversity and nutrition at the Cascadian margin (NE Pacific Ocean)

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    Guilini, Katja; Levin, Lisa A.; Vanreusel, Ann

    2012-04-01

    Hydrate Ridge (HR), located on the northeastern Pacific margin off Oregon, is characterized by the presence of outcropping hydrates and active methane seepage. Additionally, permanent low oxygen conditions overlay the benthic realm. This study evaluated the relative influence of both seepage and oxygen minima as sources of habitat heterogeneity and potential stress-inducing features on the bathyal metazoan benthos (primarily nematodes) at three different seep and non-seep HR locations, exposed to decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentrations with increasing water depth. The nematode seep communities at HR exhibited low diversity with dominance of only one or two genera (Daptonema and Metadesmolaimus), elevated average individual biomass and δ13C evidence for strong dependance on chemosynthesis-derived carbon, resembling deep-sea seeps worldwide. Although the HR seep habitats harbored a distinct nematode community like in other known seep communities, they differed from deep-sea seeps in well-oxygenated waters based on that they shared the dominant genera with the surrounding non-seep sediments overlain by oxygen-deficient bottom water. The homogenizing effect of the oxygen minimum zone on the seep nematode assemblages and surrounding sediments was constant with increasing water depth and concomitant greater oxygen-deficiency, resulting in a loss of habitat heterogeneity.

  2. Benthic Cover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic cover (habitat) maps are derived from aerial imagery, underwater photos, acoustic surveys, and data gathered from sediment samples. Shallow to...

  3. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzato, L.; Van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic aquatic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient in these sediments. Moreover, metazoans directly consume labile particulate organic matter resources and thus compete with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  4. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pozzato

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic aquatic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient in these sediments. Moreover, metazoans directly consume labile particulate organic matter resources and thus compete with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  5. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian Sea's oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzato, L.; Van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isotope tracer experiments performed under in situ oxygen conditions in sediments from inside and outside the Arabian Sea's oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to study the importance of the microbial loop in this setting. Particulate organic matter, added as phytodetritus, was processed by bacteria, protozoa and metazoans, while dissolved organic matter was processed only by bacteria and there was very little, if any, transfer to higher trophic levels within the 7 day experimental period. This lack of significant transfer of bacterial-derived carbon to metazoan consumers indicates that the bacterial loop is rather inefficient, in sediments both inside and outside the OMZ. Moreover, metazoans directly consumed labile particulate organic matter resources and thus competed with bacteria for phytodetritus.

  6. St. Croix, USVI Land-sea characterization of East End Marine Park to evaluate zones and support management plan review: 2011 benthic habitat assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below. The intent of this work is five fold: 1) To spatially...

  7. An End-to-End DNA Taxonomy Methodology for Benthic Biodiversity Survey in the Clarion-Clipperton Zone, Central Pacific Abyss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian G. Glover

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen increased survey and sampling expeditions to the Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ, central Pacific Ocean abyss, driven by commercial interests from contractors in the potential extraction of polymetallic nodules in the region. Part of the International Seabed Authority (ISA regulatory requirements are that these contractors undertake environmental research expeditions to their CCZ exploration claims following guidelines approved by the ISA Legal and Technical Commission (ISA, 2010. Section 9 (e of these guidelines instructs contractors to “…collect data on the sea floor communities specifically relating to megafauna, macrofauna, meiofauna, microfauna, nodule fauna and demersal scavengers”. There are a number of methodological challenges to this, including the water depth (4000–5000 m, extremely warm surface waters (~28 °C compared to bottom water (~1.5 °C and great distances to ports requiring a large and long seagoing expedition with only a limited number of scientists. Both scientists and regulators have recently realized that a major gap in our knowledge of the region is the fundamental taxonomy of the animals that live there; this is essential to inform our knowledge of the biogeography, natural history and ultimately our stewardship of the region. Recognising this, the ISA is currently sponsoring a series of taxonomic workshops on the CCZ fauna and to assist in this process we present here a series of methodological pipelines for DNA taxonomy (incorporating both molecular and morphological data of the macrofauna and megafauna from the CCZ benthic habitat in the recent ABYSSLINE cruise program to the UK-1 exploration claim. A major problem on recent CCZ cruises has been the collection of high-quality samples suitable for both morphology and DNA taxonomy, coupled with a workflow that ensures these data are made available. The DNA sequencing techniques themselves are relatively standard, once good samples have been

  8. Benthic foraminifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Nigam, R.

    less prone to diagenetic changes and degrade in a more arbitrary manner, indicating that their degradation is not only depend on test architecture, but also the physical/mechanical processes (Berkeley et al., 2009). There is a net, and species... (Nolet and Corliss, 1990). Differences in the abundance of oxygen-sensitive and dissolution-prone benthic foraminiferal species between the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Holocene in the abyssal waters of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico were used...

  9. Acoplamiento pelágico-bentónico: respuesta de la zona bentónica profunda a la sedimentación del florecimiento invernal de diatomeas en el lago oligotrófico Alchichica, Puebla, México Pelagic-benthic coupling: deep benthic zone response to winter diatom bloom sinking in oligotrophic Lake Alchichica, Puebla, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alcocer

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio es reconocer la existencia de un acoplamiento pelágico-bentónico en el lago oligotrófico tropical Alchichica evaluando la respuesta de la zona bentónica profunda a la sedimentación del florecimiento invernal de diatomeas. Se midió la biomasa fitoplanctónica en la columna de agua a lo largo de un ciclo anual, al igual que la concentración de clorofila a sedimentaria. Alchichica es un lago monomíctico cálido con un periodo de circulación invernal y estratificación el resto del año. La presencia de turbulencia y nutrimentos durante el periodo de circulación favorecen el desarrollo de un florecimiento de diatomeas compuesto por especies de talla grande (p. e., Cyclotella alchichicana, las cuales se sedimentan al no ser consumidas en su totalidad. La zona bentónica profunda del lago responde a la sedimentación del florecimiento invernal de diatomeas con el desarrollo y permanencia por un periodo prolongado de anoxia hipolimnética, lo que a su vez, impide el establecimiento y desarrollo de fauna bentónica en el Lago Alchichica, favorece la pérdida interna de nitrógeno por desnitrificación y consecuentemente, conlleva a que el nitrógeno sea el elemento que más frecuentemente límite el crecimiento fitoplanctónico.The aim of this study is to recognize the existence of a pelagic-benthic coupling in the oligotrophic, tropical Lake Alchichica through analysis of the response of the deep benthic zone to the winter diatom bloom deposition. The water column phytoplankton biomass and the sedimentary chlorophyll a were analyzed along an annual cycle. Alchichica is a warm monomictic lake circulating in winter and stratified over the rest of the year. The presence of turbulence and nutrient availability during the mixing period, favor the development of a diatom bloom composed by large species (e. g., Cyclotella alchichicana which are not totally consumed and settle down. The deep benthic zone responds to

  10. Secondary productivity of benthic macrofaunal community in intertidal zone of Lianzhou Bay, China%廉州湾滨海湿地潮间带大型底栖动物群落次级生产力

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何斌源; 赖廷和; 王欣; 潘良浩; 曹庆先

    2013-01-01

    A seasonal investigation was conducted on the dynamic changes of benthic macrofaunal community in the three types of intertidal habitats,i.e.,bare flat,mangrove forest,and Cyperus malaccensis saltmarsh,in Lianzhou Bay in January,April,July,and October,2011,and the Brey's empirical formula was applied to estimate the secondary productivity of benthic macrofaunal community in the three habitats.A total 156 species belonging to 8 phyla of intertidal benthic macrofauna were collected,among which,136,85,and 29 species were recorded in bare flat,mangrove forest,and saltmarsh habitats,respectively.The average species abundance per sampling station was 9.5±4.8 species in bare flat,9.5±3.9 species in mangrove forest,and 5.9±1.9 species in saltmarsh,respectively.In all the three habitats,the percentages of different categories to total species followed the same decreasing order of Mollusk > Arthropod > Annelid >Chordate > other categories.The community structure of the benthic macrofauna in saltmarsh had smaller change,with Ilyoplax ningpoensis significantly dominated.In mangrove forest and bare flat,the dominant species changed with the water salinity.In the intertidal zone of Lianzhou Bay,the average secondary productivity of the benthic macrofaunal community was 15.88 g· m-2· a-1,and that in bare flat,mangrove forest,and saltmarsh was 16.16 g · m-2· a-1,9.97 g · m-2 · a-1,and 3.88 g · m-2 · a-1,respectively.The average P/B ratio in the intertidal zone was 0.70,and that in bare flat,mangrove forest,and saltmarsh was 0.70,0.65,and 1.02,respectively.The annual secondary production in the intertidal zone was 14623 t (FM).Water salinity and vegetation type were the major factors affecting the community structure of the intertidal benthic macrofauna,and further,the spatial distribution of the secondary productivity of the benthic macrofauna in Lianzhou Bay.%于2011年1月、4月、7月和10月开展广西廉州湾的

  11. Benthic Habitat and Zone Maps of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands 1999 - Prepared by Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Collected by NOAA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There are 30 habitat and zone PDF products. This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science,...

  12. Benthic Habitat and Zone Maps of St. Thomas and St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands - Prepared by Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Collected by NOAA, 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ther are 25 habitat and zone PDF products. This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science,...

  13. Benthic Habitat and Zone Maps of Puerto Rico 1999 - Prepared by Visual Interpretation from Remote Sensing Imagery Collected by NOAA, 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — There are 208 habitat and zone maps of Puerto Rico and is major islands. This project is a cooperative effort between the National Ocean Service, National Centers...

  14. Temporal changes of environmental impact in the coastal marine area in front of a former mining zone, detected by means of benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Elena; Bergamin, Luisa; Maggi, Chiara; Ausili, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera are increasingly used to assess environmental quality of present and past marine environments. They are suitable for the study of ancient environments because their hard and small shells are preserved and abundant in sediment and an adequate number of them can be collected by small samples of sediment cores, supplying reliable data for a statistical approach. The study of foraminiferal assemblages, associated to sediment abiotic parameters, allows to define the anthropogenic impact along the time; reference conditions may be recognized in deep uncontaminated levels. The Sulcis Iglesiente Guspinese area (SW Sardinia, Italy) was affected in past times by intensive mining, which started in mid 19th century and ceased in 1990s. The marine area of Cala Domestica is located few kilometers from the mining district, where mainly galena and sphalerite were exploited. The area houses buildings for storage of minerals receives drainage material from mineral dumps determining a strong enrichment for several metals in the coastal sediments. Sediment core SI/69 was collected by means of vibrocorer in front of Cala Domestica beach, during a vast sampling survey aimed to environmental characterization of marine sediments. The core was subsampled in the laboratory, and a total of 28 levels were collected. Microfaunal, grain size and chemical (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) analyses were carried out on different aliquots of the same level. The quantitative analysis on benthic foraminifera was based on the count of at least 300 specimens per sample. Faunal parameters such as Foraminiferal Number (FN i.e. number of specimens / 1 g dry sediment) and species diversity (- index and H-index) were considered as potential indicators of environmental status. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed a group of strongly correlated metals (Ba, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mn, Pb and Zn), associated to the superficial samples. These elements displayed a typical profile along

  15. Effects of Forested Streamside Management Zone Widths and Thinning on Carbon Dynamics and Benthic Macroinvertebrates for Pine Plantations in the Piedmont of Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Wadl, Erica Fritz

    2008-01-01

    To protect the integrity of the United Stateâ s waters, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 promoted the establishment of Best Management Practices (BMPs) for forestry. A commonly used BMP is the reservation of Streamside Management Zones (SMZs). In this study the effectiveness of three different SMZ widths, 30.5 m (100 ft), 15.3 m (50 ft), and 7.6 m (25 ft), as well as thinning in 15.3 m SMZs were studied. The objectives of the study were to determine the effects these SMZ tr...

  16. Methane-Carbon Flow into the Benthic Food Web at Cold Seeps – A Case Study from the Costa Rica Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Helge; Linke, Peter; Knittel, Katrin; MacPherson, Enrique; Boetius, Antje; Brückmann, Warner; Larvik, Gaute; Wallmann, Klaus; Schacht, Ulrike; Omoregie, Enoma; Hilton, David; Brown, Kevin; Rehder, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp.) feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as −53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other 13C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus. PMID:24116017

  17. Methane-carbon flow into the benthic food web at cold seeps--a case study from the Costa Rica subduction zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Niemann

    Full Text Available Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp. feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as -53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other (13C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus.

  18. Methane-carbon flow into the benthic food web at cold seeps--a case study from the Costa Rica subduction zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Helge; Linke, Peter; Knittel, Katrin; MacPherson, Enrique; Boetius, Antje; Brückmann, Warner; Larvik, Gaute; Wallmann, Klaus; Schacht, Ulrike; Omoregie, Enoma; Hilton, David; Brown, Kevin; Rehder, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Cold seep ecosystems can support enormous biomasses of free-living and symbiotic chemoautotrophic organisms that get their energy from the oxidation of methane or sulfide. Most of this biomass derives from animals that are associated with bacterial symbionts, which are able to metabolize the chemical resources provided by the seeping fluids. Often these systems also harbor dense accumulations of non-symbiotic megafauna, which can be relevant in exporting chemosynthetically fixed carbon from seeps to the surrounding deep sea. Here we investigated the carbon sources of lithodid crabs (Paralomis sp.) feeding on thiotrophic bacterial mats at an active mud volcano at the Costa Rica subduction zone. To evaluate the dietary carbon source of the crabs, we compared the microbial community in stomach contents with surface sediments covered by microbial mats. The stomach content analyses revealed a dominance of epsilonproteobacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to the free-living and epibiotic sulfur oxidiser Sulfurovum sp. We also found Sulfurovum sp. as well as members of the genera Arcobacter and Sulfurimonas in mat-covered surface sediments where Epsilonproteobacteria were highly abundant constituting 10% of total cells. Furthermore, we detected substantial amounts of bacterial fatty acids such as i-C15∶0 and C17∶1ω6c with stable carbon isotope compositions as low as -53‰ in the stomach and muscle tissue. These results indicate that the white microbial mats at Mound 12 are comprised of Epsilonproteobacteria and that microbial mat-derived carbon provides an important contribution to the crab's nutrition. In addition, our lipid analyses also suggest that the crabs feed on other (13)C-depleted organic matter sources, possibly symbiotic megafauna as well as on photosynthetic carbon sources such as sedimentary detritus. PMID:24116017

  19. St. Croix, USVI Land-sea characterization of East End Marine Park to evaluate zones and support management plan review: 2011 benthic habitat assessment (NODC Accession 0125270 and 0125236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below. The intent of this work is five fold: 1) To spatially...

  20. Assemblage of benthic diatoms and culturable heterotrophs in shallow-water hydrothermal vent of the D. Joao de Castro Seamount, Azores in the Atlantic Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Mohandass, C.; Cardigos, F.; DeCosta, P.M.; Santos, R.S.; Colaco, A.

    . In this recently described vent site, we have studied species diversity of benthic diatoms and heterotrophic microorganisms and their metal tolerance. Species diversity of benthic diatoms was marginally higher in white than the yellow zone. A higher number...

  1. NEPR Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  2. Biodiversity in Benthic Ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, Nikolai; Carl, J. D.

    Foreword: This proceeding is based on a set of papers presented at the second Nordic Benthological Meeting held in Silkeborg, November 13-14, 1997. The main theme of the meeting was biodiversity in benthic ecology and the majority of contributions touch on this subject. In addition, the proceeding...

  3. Benthic fauna around Mauritius island, southwest Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Distribution of benthic fauna in the Exclusive Economic Zone of Mauritius was studied during September-October 1987. Mean faunal density (macro+meio) and dry weight biomass was 10848 no.m/2 and 228.8 mg.m/2, respectively. The macrofauna was dominat...

  4. Benthic diatoms in lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Gottschalk, Steffi

    2014-01-01

    In order to protect or improve surface waters ecosystem response to pressures needs to be quantified. Diatoms are frequently used for assessing ecological status in streams and for reconstructing water quality of lakes. However, ecological status assessment of European lakes based on extant diatom assemblages is rare. The overall aim of this thesis is to facilitate the application of benthic diatoms in water quality assessment of boreal lakes, using methods developed for stream assessmen...

  5. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  6. Benthic fauna of mangrove environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    The distribution, abundance and importance of benthic fauna in a mangrove environment has been discussed. This ecosystem is enriched with terrestrial, aquatic, marshy and mudflat species mangrove environment. Qualitative and quantitative...

  7. National Benthic Infaunal Database (NBID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NBID is a quantitative database on abundances of individual benthic species by sample and study region, along with other synoptically measured environmental...

  8. Rates of Ocean Acidification: Decoupling of Planktic and Benthic Extinctions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.; Alegret, L.

    2012-12-01

    Deep-sea benthic organisms derive food from export of organic matter produced in the photic zone, so that pelagic and benthic productivity are coupled, suggesting that severe extinction of plankton and benthos in the geological past should have been coupled. An asteroid impact at the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary (~65 Ma), however, caused mass extinction of calcifying plankton (foraminifera and nannoplankton), whereas benthic calcifyers (foraminifera) did not suffer significant extinction. Also, pelagic calcifyers did not suffer severe extinction during the carbon-cycle perturbation and global warming at the Paleocene-Eocene (P/E) boundary 10 myr later, when deep-sea benthic foraminifera did. The K/Pg extinction has been interpreted as darkness-caused collapse of productivity, but this is not supported by the lack of benthic extinction. To evaluate extinction mechanisms, we compared benthic foraminiferal and stable isotope records at ODP sites in the Pacific, SE Atlantic and Southern Oceans. Across the K/Pg boundary, the decrease in export productivity was moderate, regionally variable, and insufficient to explain the mass extinction at higher levels of the food chain. Across the P/E boundary, productivity increased in epicontinental seas and on continental margins, whereas pelagic productivity may have declined (increased trophic resource continuum). We thus found no evidence that the different benthic and pelagic extinction patterns at K/Pg and P/E were linked to changes in (export) productivity. Instead, the difference between planktic and benthic extinction patterns may have been caused by the occurrence of ocean acidification at different rates. Very rapid (faster than present anthropogenic) surface ocean acidification at the K/Pg boundary may have been due to influx of impact-generated nitric acid, followed by rapid oceanic buffering. This may have been a factor in the massive extinction of pelagic calcifyers, ammonites and top-level predators such as

  9. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island - Geographic Zone Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This geographic zone map was created by interpreting satellite and aerial imagery, seafloor topography (bathymetry model), and the new NEPR Benthic Habitat Map...

  10. Cascading effects from predator removal depend on resource availability in a benthic food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieben, Katrin; Rippen, Anneke D.; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    2011-01-01

    We tested joint effects of predator loss and increased resource availability on the grazers' trophic level and the propagation of trophic interactions in a benthic food web by excluding larger predatory fish from cages and manipulating nutrients in the coastal zone of the Baltic Sea. The combination

  11. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones derived from gridded bathymetry of Swains Island,Territory of American Samoa, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  12. Effects of beam and pulse trawling on the benthic ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Teal, L.R.; Depestele, J.; O'Neill, B; Craeymeersch, J.A.M.; Denderen, van, A.C.; Parker, R.; Perdon, K.J.; H. POLET; Rasenberg, M.M.M.; Vanelslander, B.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Here we study the effects of fishing trawl gear on the seabed and benthic organisms. A BACI-design experiment was used to examine the effects of a traditional beam trawl gear and the pulse trawl gear. The pulse trawl gear is gaining popularity amongst Dutch fishers in recent years due to reduced fuel costs and good sole catches.The research was carried out in the northern part of the Dutch Voordelta (southern North Sea coastal zone area, 15 – 22m deep, sandy habitat) in June 2013. In this exp...

  13. Profundal benthic invertebrates in an oligotrophic tropical lake: different strategies for coping with anoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Hernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The deep benthic communities of tropical lakes are poorly understood with respect to their composition, abundance, biomass and regulatory factors. Whereas the hypolimnia of temperate oligotrophic lakes remain oxygenated, the higher temperatures in tropical lakes frequently lead to the rapid development of hypolimnetic anoxia independent of trophic status. The deep benthic communities of tropical lakes must therefore develop strategies to respond to anoxic conditions. The dynamics of the deep benthic community of Lake Alchichica were studied over 15 months. We hypothesized that the sedimentation of the winter diatom bloom constitutes an input of high-quality food that contributes to the establishment and development of the deep benthic community. However, the remineralization of this organic matter leads to the prompt development of hypolimnetic anoxia, thus limiting the establishment and/or persistence of the deep benthic community. In contrast with the diverse littoral benthic community (50 taxa in Lake Alchichica, only two species constitute its deep benthic community, the ostracod Candona cf. patzcuaro and the chironomid Chironomus cf. austini, which combined exhibit a low density (1197±1976 ind m-2 and biomass (16.13±30.81 mg C m-2. C. patzcuaro is dominant and is present throughout the year, whereas Ch. austini is recorded only when the bottom water of the lake is oxygenated. A comparison with the analogous but temperate Lake Mergozzo in Italy illustrates the role that anoxia plays in tropical lakes by diminishing not only taxonomic richness (13 versus 2 spp. in temperate versus tropical lakes, respectively but also abundance (1145 versus 287 ind m-2, respectively. C. patzcuaro is found throughout the annual cycle of the lake’s profundal zone, entering into diapause during the anoxic period and recovering as soon as the profundal zone reoxygenates. Ch. austini has adjusted its life cycle to use the habitat and available resources while

  14. Mechanisms of temporary adhesion in benthic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodou, D.; Breedveld, P.; Winter, J.C.F.; Dankelman, J.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive systems are ubiquitous in benthic animals and play a key role in diverse functions such as locomotion, food capture, mating, burrow building, and defence. For benthic animals that release adhesives, surface and material properties and external morphology have received little attention compa

  15. Benthic exchange and biogeochemical cycling in permeable sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettel, Markus; Berg, Peter; Kostka, Joel E

    2014-01-01

    The sandy sediments that blanket the inner shelf are situated in a zone where nutrient input from land and strong mixing produce maximum primary production and tight coupling between water column and sedimentary processes. The high permeability of the shelf sands renders them susceptible to pressure gradients generated by hydrodynamic and biological forces that modulate spatial and temporal patterns of water circulation through these sediments. The resulting dynamic three-dimensional patterns of particle and solute distribution generate a broad spectrum of biogeochemical reaction zones that facilitate effective decomposition of the pelagic and benthic primary production products. The intricate coupling between the water column and sediment makes it challenging to quantify the production and decomposition processes and the resultant fluxes in permeable shelf sands. Recent technical developments have led to insights into the high biogeochemical and biological activity of these permeable sediments and their role in the global cycles of matter.

  16. Spatial-temporal feeding dynamics of benthic communities in an estuary-marine gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonio, Emily S.; Kasai, Akihide; Ueno, Masahiro; Ishihi, Yuka; Yokoyama, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yoh

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the fluctuations of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in benthic consumers and their potential food sources to determine the spatial and temporal variations in the utilization of available organic matter, indicating the origin and pathways of energy from Yura Estuary to Tango Sea, Japan. Field samplings were conducted from the upper estuary to offshore with sampling frequency of twice per season from April (spring) 2006 to February (winter) 2007. The δ13C signatures of the upper and lower estuary benthos showed depleted and in wide range (-28.9‰ to -13.5‰) compared to the enriched and within narrow range signatures of marine benthos (-20.6‰ to -14.0‰) in all seasons. On the contrary, the δ15N signatures of benthic communities showed decreasing trend seaward and summer values were different from the other seasons. Using the dual isotope and multisource mixing models, we estimated the relative contributions of potential food sources to the benthos diet. River POM played an important source of energy for the estuarine benthos, especially in winter when river discharge was high. Marine POM served as an important alternative food for the estuarine benthos from spring to autumn when seawater intruded the bottom estuary. Benthic microalgae were the major food source at the shallow coast throughout the year, while marine POM fueled the deep coast and offshore benthic food webs. Spatial and temporal feeding variations in estuarine benthic communities were driven by the hydrology of the estuary, whereas primary production and transport of food source dictated diet variations of marine benthic communities. The elucidation of the dynamic energy subsidy among aquatic systems highlights the importance of the land-sea transition zones that is crucial for benthic secondary productions.

  17. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Johnston Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  18. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 20 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (20 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  19. Bathymetric Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Zones 40 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas, Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Zones are derived from gridded (40 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry, collected aboard R/V AHI and NOAA ship Hi'ialakai. BPI Zones was created using the Benthic...

  20. Feasibility of remote sensing benthic microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingmark, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Results of data analyses from multispectral scanning data are presented. The data was collected in July 1977 for concentration of chlorophyll in benthic microalgae (mainly diatoms) on an estuary mudflat.

  1. BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL ALIENS IN WILLAPA BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthic macrofaunal samples were collected at random stations in Willapa Bay, WA, in four habitats [eelgrass (Zostera marina), Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis), ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)] in 1996 and in seven habitats (Z...

  2. Benthic Habitats of the Florida Keys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The benthic habitats of the Florida Keys were mapped from a series of 450 aerial photographs. Ecologists outlined the boundaries of specific habitat types by...

  3. A biodiversidade bentônica em lagoa marginal ao rio Paranapanema na zona de sua desembocadura, na represa de Jurumirim - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i4.166 The benthic biodiversity in a lake marginal to the Paranapanema river in its mouth zone into Jurumirim reservoir- DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.166

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Cristina Souza Davanso

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo principal verificar a biodiversidade bentônica em áreas do fundo da lagoa do Coqueiral, zona de desembocadura do rio Paranapanema, na represa de Jurumirim, Estado de São Paulo. Foram selecionados dezoito pontos de amostragem, englobando áreas rasas e áreas profundas. As coletas foram feitas em intervalos trimestrais ao longo de um ano; também foram analisadas as variáveis físicas e químicas da água (nível, transparência, temperatura, oxigênio dissolvido, pH e condutividade elétrica. Amostras do sedimento, para análise da fauna e de fatores abióticos (granulometria e conteúdo orgânico, foram recolhidas em tréplicas, utilizando como coletor a draga de Petersen. O material foi triado e analisado sob microscópio estereoscópico. Contagem e identificação dos organismos foram realizadas, e densidade, abundância relativa, riqueza taxonômica e índice de dominância foram calculados. A análise revelou uma fauna com baixa diversidade e a dominância de Chironomidae e Ephemeroptera. Domínio de Ephemeroptera, constituído por Campsurus, ocorreu no período mais quente do ano e com baixa profundidade da lagoa. A distribuição dos organismos teve como principais fatores determinantes profundidade, transparência, pH e temperatura da água. Na comparação feita entre áreas rasas e profundas, foi observada uma menor densidade de organismos nas regiões profundas.Coqueiral lake is a marginal lake located at the southeast São Paulo State, in the mouth zone of the Paranapanema river into Jurumirim Reservoir and it has high connectivity with the Paranapanema river. This work aimed to verify the benthic biodiversity in areas of the lake bottom. 18 sampling sites in the lake were selected, including shallow and deep areas. The samples were taken every three months during one year. Physical and chemical water variables (level, transparency, dissolved oxygen, pH, and electric conductivity were

  4. Can a rapid underwater video approach enhance the benthic assessment capability of the National Coastal Condition Assessmentin the Great Lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the U.S. National Coastal Condition Assessment (NCCA) field survey in summer 2010, over 400 sites in the nearshore zone of the U.S. Great Lakes were sampled. As a supplement to core NCCA benthic taxonomy and sediment chemistry, underwater video images of the bottom condition ...

  5. How to react to shallow water hydrodynamics: The larger benthic foraminifera solution

    OpenAIRE

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic foraminifera inhabit the photic zone to provide their endosymbiotic algae with light. Because of the hydrodynamic conditions of shallow water environments, tests of larger foraminifera can be entrained and transported by water motion. To resist water motion, these foraminifera have to build a test able to avoid transport or have to develop special mechanisms to attach themselves to substrate or to hide their test below sediment grains. For those species which r...

  6. Recruitment and Succession in a Tropical Benthic Community in Response to In-Situ Ocean Acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Derse Crook; Kristy J Kroeker; Potts, Donald C.; Mario Rebolledo-Vieyra; Hernandez-Terrones, Laura M.; Adina Paytan

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification is a pervasive threat to coral reef ecosystems, and our understanding of the ecological processes driving patterns in tropical benthic community development in conditions of acidification is limited. We deployed limestone recruitment tiles in low aragonite saturation (Ωarag) waters during an in-situ field experiment at Puerto Morelos, Mexico, and compared them to tiles placed in control zones over a 14-month investigation. The early stages of succession showed relatively l...

  7. Divergent ecosystem responses within a benthic marine community to ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeker, Kristy J.; Micheli, Fiorenza; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Martz, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification is predicted to impact all areas of the oceans and affect a diversity of marine organisms. However, the diversity of responses among species prevents clear predictions about the impact of acidification at the ecosystem level. Here, we used shallow water CO2 vents in the Mediterranean Sea as a model system to examine emergent ecosystem responses to ocean acidification in rocky reef communities. We assessed in situ benthic invertebrate communities in three distinct pH zones ...

  8. Benthic dinoflagellates from Red Sea, Egypt: Early records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin El Semary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates from Red Sea are hardly studied, in particular the benthic forms. Samples collected from shallow intertidal zone, Ain Sokhna, Egypt were microscopically examined. Three genera with seven species were recorded. The most frequently-encountered was Katodinium sp., a small mushroom-like with epitheca being consistently larger than hypotheca. Light micrographs revealed the presence of a nucleus in the hyposome and descending cingulum. Scanning electromicrographs (SEM confirmed this orientation and revealed the presence of apical pore system. Another species showed similarity to the mushroom-like morphology but with large conical episome and small hyposome. Heterotrophic, naked Gyrodinium cf dominans and Gyrodinium sp. were also observed where in the former, there were conspicuous longitudinal striations. A frequently-observed species had naked Gyrodinium-like morphology but with much smaller size. One photosynthetic species had a characteristic stigma similar to type B eyespot in “dinotoms” and episome being slightly larger than hyposome. Gymnodinium sp. with sulcus extending slightly in the episome but deeply to the end of hyposome was also recorded. This genus is reported to be mostly toxic and its presence should be monitored. Finally, this study presents some early records for benthic dinophytes from rather underexplored locality and raises alerts about genus with reported toxicity.

  9. Molar tooth carbonates and benthic methane fluxes in Proterozoic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bing; Dong, Lin; Xiao, Shuhai; Lang, Xianguo; Huang, Kangjun; Peng, Yongbo; Zhou, Chuanming; Ke, Shan; Liu, Pengju

    2016-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are ptygmatically folded and microspar-filled structures common in early- and mid-Proterozoic (~2,500-750 million years ago, Ma) subtidal successions, but extremely rare in rocks dimethyl sulphide and methanethiol) in euxinic or H2S-rich seawaters that were widespread in Proterozoic continental margins. In this convergence zone, methyl sulphides served as a non-competitive substrate supporting methane generation and methanethiol inhibited anaerobic oxidation of methane, resulting in the buildup of CH4, formation of degassing cracks in sediments and an increase in the benthic methane flux from sediments. Precipitation of crack-filling microspar was driven by methanogenesis-related alkalinity accumulation. Deep ocean ventilation and oxygenation around 750 Ma brought molar tooth structures to an end.

  10. History of benthic research in the English Channel: From general patterns of communities to habitat mosaic description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvin, Jean-Claude

    2015-06-01

    combined to allow the description of benthic habitats using numerous descriptors. These approaches were mainly applied on a local scale, leading to the identification of habitat mosaics mainly in coarse sands, gravels and pebbly areas which cover 80% of the EC seabed. They also allowed the enrichment of the EUNIS habitat classification for infralittoral and circalittoral zones taking into account the scale of observations of benthic habitats. Moreover, several recommendations for future benthic studies are proposed within a HABITAT approach.

  11. Seasonal rates of benthic primary production in a Greenland fjord measured by aquatic eddy correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Attard, Karl; Glud, Ronnie; McGinnis, Daniel F.;

    2014-01-01

    . Substantial benthic gross primary production (GPP) was measured year-round. The highest GPP rates were measured during the spring, up to 5.7 mmol O2 m22 h21 (136.8 mmol O2 m22 d21), and even at low light levels (, 80 mmol quanta m22 s21) during late autumn and winter we measured rates of up to 1.8 mmol O2 m22...... saturation indices (Ik) were as low as 11 mmol quanta m22 s21 in the winter. On an annual timescale, the average areal rate of benthic GPP was 11.5 mol O2 m22 yr21, which is , 1.4 times higher than the integrated gross pelagic primary production of the , 30–50 m deep photic zone of the fjord. These results...... document the importance of benthic photosynthesis on an ecosystem level and indicate that the benthic phototrophic compartment should be accounted for when assessing carbon and nutrient budgets as well as responses of coastal Arctic ecosystems to climate change....

  12. Recruitment of benthic animals as a function of petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in the sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. W.; Riley, R. G.; Bean, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Three separate field installations, consisting of clean and oiled sediment in fiberglass trays, were placed in the intertidal zone of Sequim Bay, Washington to determine rates of hydrocarbon depuration and recruitment of benthic organisms. Detailed chemical analysis, using glass capillary gas chromatography, and GC/MS, were conducted such that individual components and hydrocarbon classes associated with the sediment after varying periods of field depuration could be quantitated. Depuration rates of hydrocarbon types in sediment receiving oil on the surface decreased in the order of saturates, methylnaphthalenes and methylphenanthrenes. The time to 50% depuration (half-time) for these coarse sediments was approximately 100 days, while sediment mixed with oil had only decreased by about 20 to 30% by 100 days. Levels of the aromatics (naphthalenes and phenanthrenes) in the two systems followed the general pattern, but very little loss was exhibited when oil was mixed with sediment. No substantial inhibition of benthic organism recruitment was produced by either type of sediment contamination. There was a tendency for suppression of populations of mature and juvenile bivalves (Mysella tumida) at the last sampling interval for all three installations. Future sampling of these populations and further analyses of all benthic organisms may provide a better evaluation of effects of specific hydrocarbon components in sediments on benthic recruitment. These results are discussed in light of oil spill studies and other field experiments.

  13. Data-Driven Approach to Benthic Cover Type Classification Using Bathymetric LiDAR Waveform Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Kumpumäki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A data-driven method for describing the benthic cover type based on full-waveform bathymetric LiDAR data analysis is presented. The waveform of the bathymetric LiDAR return pulse is first modeled as a sum of three functions: a Gaussian pulse representing the surface return, a function modeling the backscatter and another Gaussian pulse modeling the return from the bottom surface. Two sets of variables are formed: one containing features describing the bottom return and the other describing various conditions, such as water quality and the depth of the seabed. Regression analysis is used to eliminate the effect of the condition variables on the features, after which the features are mapped onto a cell lattice using a self-organizing map (SOM. The cells of the SOM are grouped into seven clusters using the neighborhood distance matrix method. The clustering result is evaluated using the seabed substrate map based on sonar measurements, as well as delineation of photic zones in the study area. High correspondence between the clusters and the substrate type/photic zone has been obtained indicating that the proposed clustering method adequately describes the benthic cover in the study area. The bottom return pulse waveforms corresponding to the clusters and a cluster map of the study area are also presented. The method can be used for clustering full waveform bathymetric LiDAR data acquired from large areas to discover the structure of benthic cover types and to focus the field studies accordingly.

  14. Microphytobenthos in ecotoxicology: a review of the use of marine benthic diatoms in bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Cristiano V M; Blasco, Julián; Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    Contamination in coastal zones is an increasing problem that adversely affects biological diversity and the functioning of coastal ecosystems. Sediment is an important compartment of these zones since large quantities of diverse contaminants can accumulate there. Whole-sediment toxicity assays are of increasing importance, and several assay methods using mainly invertebrates have been developed. However, an important part of the benthic community, the microphytobenthos (represented principally by benthic diatoms and cyanobacteria), has surprisingly been neglected. Recently, comprehensive studies have been conducted using benthic marine microalgae with the object of establishing a toxicity assay method for sediment samples. The main results published to date in the literature and obtained by our own team have been compiled and are discussed in this review. The value and feasibility of using certain organisms of the microphytobenthos group in ecotoxicology studies are also discussed, and a sediment quality guideline based on multivariate procedure has been derived from data obtained in previous studies. Finally, future perspectives for research in this field are discussed. PMID:20493528

  15. Microbial to reef scale interactions between the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis and benthic algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, Katie L; Rodriguez-Mueller, Beltran; Youle, Merry; Marhaver, Kristen L; Vermeij, Mark J A; Smith, Jennifer E; Rohwer, Forest L

    2012-04-22

    Competition between reef-building corals and benthic algae is of key importance for reef dynamics. These interactions occur on many spatial scales, ranging from chemical to regional. Using microprobes, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and underwater surveys, we examined the interactions between the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis and four types of benthic algae. The macroalgae Dictyota bartayresiana and Halimeda opuntia, as well as a mixed consortium of turf algae, caused hypoxia on the adjacent coral tissue. Turf algae were also associated with major shifts in the bacterial communities at the interaction zones, including more pathogens and virulence genes. In contrast to turf algae, interactions with crustose coralline algae (CCA) and M. annularis did not appear to be antagonistic at any scale. These zones were not hypoxic, the microbes were not pathogen-like and the abundance of coral-CCA interactions was positively correlated with per cent coral cover. We propose a model in which fleshy algae (i.e. some species of turf and fleshy macroalgae) alter benthic competition dynamics by stimulating bacterial respiration and promoting invasion of virulent bacteria on corals. This gives fleshy algae a competitive advantage over corals when human activities, such as overfishing and eutrophication, remove controls on algal abundance. Together, these results demonstrate the intricate connections and mechanisms that structure coral reefs.

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: BENTHIC (Benthic Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains benthic habitats, including coral reef and hardbottom, seagrass, algae, and others in [for] South Florida. Vector polygons in the data set...

  17. Predicting estuarine benthic production using functional diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dolbeth

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We considered an estuarine system having naturally low levels of diversity, but attaining considerable high production levels, and being subjected to different sorts of anthropogenic impacts and climate events to investigate the relationship between diversity and secondary production. Functional diversity measures were used to predict benthic production, which is considered as a proxy of the ecosystem provisioning services. To this end, we used a 14-year dataset on benthic invertebrate community production from a seagrass and a sandflat habitat and we adopted a sequential modeling approach, where abiotic, trait community weighted means (CWM and functional diversity indices were tested by generalized linear models (GLM, and their significant variables were then combined to produce a final model. Almost 90% of variance of the benthic production could be predicted by combining the number of locomotion types, the absolute maximum atmospheric temperature (proxy of the heat waves occurrence, the type of habitat and the mean body mass, by order of importance. This result is in agreement with the mass ratio hypothesis, where ecosystem functions/services can be chiefly predicted by the dominant trait in the community, here measured as CWM. The increase of benthic production with the number of locomotion types may be seen as greater possibility of using the resources available in the system. Such greater efficiency would increase production. The other variables were also discussed in line of the previous hypothesis and taking into account the general positive relationship obtained between production and functional diversity indices. Overall, it was concluded that traits representative of wider possibilities of using available resources and higher functional diversity are related with higher benthic production.

  18. Box-modeling of the impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and benthic remineralization on the nitrogen cycle of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Su

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralization influence the marine nitrogen cycle, and hence ultimately also marine primary production. The biological and biogeochemical relations of the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP to nitrogen deposition, benthic denitrification and phosphate regeneration are analysed in a prognostic box model of the oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in the ETSP. In the model, atmospheric nitrogen deposition based on estimates for the years 2000–2009 is offset by half by reduced N2 fixation, with the other half transported out of the model domain. Both model- and data-based benthic denitrification are found to trigger nitrogen fixation, partly compensating for the NO3− loss. Since phosphate is the ultimate limiting nutrient in the model, enhanced sedimentary phosphate regeneration under suboxic conditions stimulates primary production and subsequent export production and NO3− loss in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ. A sensitivity analysis of the local response to both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralization indicates dominant stabilizing feedbacks in the ETSP, which tend to keep a balanced nitrogen inventory, i.e., nitrogen input by atmospheric deposition is counteracted by decreasing nitrogen fixation; NO3− loss via benthic denitrification is partly compensated by increased nitrogen fixation; enhanced nitrogen fixation stimulated by phosphate regeneration is partly removed by the stronger water-column denitrification. Even though the water column in our model domain acts as a NO3− source, the ETSP including benthic denitrification might become a NO3− sink.

  19. Flow of light energy in benthic photosynthetic microbial mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Najjar, Mohammad Ahmad A.

    2010-12-15

    The work in this thesis demonstrates the assessment of the energy budget inside microbial mat ecosystems, and the factors affecting light utilization efficiency. It presents the first balanced light energy budget for benthic microbial mat ecosystems, and shows how the budget and the spatial distribution of the local photosynthetic efficiencies within the euphotic zone depend on the absorbed irradiance (Jabs). The energy budget was dominated by heat dissipation on the expense of photosynthesis. The maximum efficiency of photosynthesis was at light limiting conditions When comparing three different marine benthic photosynthetic ecosystems (originated from Abu-Dhabi, Arctic, and Exmouth Gulf in Western Australia), differences in the efficiencies were calculated. The results demonstrated that the maximum efficiency depended on mat characteristics affecting light absorption and scattering; such as, photopigments ratio and distribution, and the structural organization of the photosynthetic organisms relative to other absorbing components of the ecosystem (i.e., EPS, mineral particles, detritus, etc.). The maximum efficiency decreased with increasing light penetration depth, and increased with increasing the accessory pigments (phycocyanin and fucoxanthin)/chlorophyll ratio. Spatial heterogeneity in photosynthetic efficiency, pigment distribution, as well as light acclimation in microbial mats originating from different geographical locations was investigated. We used a combined pigment imaging approach (variable chlorophyll fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging), and fingerprinting approach. For each mat, the photosynthetic activity was proportional to the local pigment concentration in the photic zone, but not for the deeper layers and between different mats. In each mat, yield of PSII and E1/2 (light acclimation) generally decreased in parallel with depth, but the gradients in both parameters varied greatly between samples. This mismatch between pigments concentration

  20. Benthic habitat mapping using hyperspectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Reyes, Miguel; Goodman, James A.; Castrodad-Carrau, Alexey; Jiménez-Rodriguez, Luis O.; Hunt, Shawn D.; Armstrong, Roy

    2006-09-01

    Benthic habitats are the different bottom environments as defined by distinct physical, geochemical, and biological characteristics. Remote sensing is increasingly being used to map and monitor the complex dynamics associated with estuarine and nearshore benthic habitats. Advantages of remote sensing technology include both the qualitative benefits derived from a visual overview, and more importantly, the quantitative abilities for systematic assessment and monitoring. Advancements in instrument capabilities and analysis methods are continuing to expand the accuracy and level of effectiveness of the resulting data products. Hyperspectral sensors in particular are rapidly emerging as a more complete solution, especially for the analysis of subsurface shallow aquatic systems. The spectral detail offered by hyperspectral instruments facilitates significant improvements in the capacity to differentiate and classify benthic habitats. This paper reviews two techniques for mapping shallow coastal ecosystems that both combine the retrieval of water optical properties with a linear unmixing model to obtain classifications of the seafloor. Example output using AVIRIS hyperspectral imagery of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii is employed to demonstrate the application potential of the two approaches and compare their respective results.

  1. Comparison of ecological diversity and species composition of macroalgae, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish assemblages between two tropical rocky reefs

    OpenAIRE

    Verónica C. García-Hernández; Héctor Reyes-Bonilla; Balart, Eduardo F; Eduardo Ríos-Jara; Lluch-Cota, Salvador E.; Elisa Serviere-Zaragoza

    2014-01-01

    Within the marine environment, the rocky shores are recognized for their high species diversity and particularly transitional zones represent areas of biotic mix, promoted by historical and ecological natural variations that allow the presence of taxa from different regions and which present dissimilar biological traits. An extensive survey describes the benthic macroalgae, macroinvertebrates (molluscs, crustaceans, and echinoderms), and fish assemblages at two rocky reefs, Islas Marietas and...

  2. Divergent ecosystem responses within a benthic marine community to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristy J; Micheli, Fiorenza; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Martz, Todd R

    2011-08-30

    Ocean acidification is predicted to impact all areas of the oceans and affect a diversity of marine organisms. However, the diversity of responses among species prevents clear predictions about the impact of acidification at the ecosystem level. Here, we used shallow water CO(2) vents in the Mediterranean Sea as a model system to examine emergent ecosystem responses to ocean acidification in rocky reef communities. We assessed in situ benthic invertebrate communities in three distinct pH zones (ambient, low, and extreme low), which differed in both the mean and variability of seawater pH along a continuous gradient. We found fewer taxa, reduced taxonomic evenness, and lower biomass in the extreme low pH zones. However, the number of individuals did not differ among pH zones, suggesting that there is density compensation through population blooms of small acidification-tolerant taxa. Furthermore, the trophic structure of the invertebrate community shifted to fewer trophic groups and dominance by generalists in extreme low pH, suggesting that there may be a simplification of food webs with ocean acidification. Despite high variation in individual species' responses, our findings indicate that ocean acidification decreases the diversity, biomass, and trophic complexity of benthic marine communities. These results suggest that a loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function is expected under extreme acidification scenarios.

  3. Benthic foraminiferal assemblage formation: Theory and observation for the European Arctic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubere, Paul; Rayray, Shan

    2016-09-01

    We use theory and observation to determine how benthic foraminiferal populations living in a range of sedimentary microenvironments are translated into fossil assemblages along the continental margin of the European Arctic. We examine downcore stained (cell tracker green and rose Bengal) and total species shell abundances through the sediment mixing (bioturbation) zone. This, in combination with porewater geochemical measurements, allows us to establish zones of production and destruction for species' shells, and deduce how the fossil record is being generated by the living community. For many taxa, shell production is high in the upper, oxic, sedimentary layer, but destruction in this zone is also high. Hence, contribution to the fossil record is biased to more infaunal populations and species. Taxa producing near, or below, the anoxic boundary of the sediments are particularly important to the developing fossil record of the fjord environment. We find that taxon relative and absolute abundances change continuously through the biologically active sediment profile. This has implications for reconstructing paleoenvironments using benthic foraminiferal assemblages, and potentially for the geochemistry of individual fossil taxa.

  4. Benthic invertebrate fauna in the islets of Namuseom and Bukhyeongjeseom off Busan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Hwang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the benthic invertebrate fauna inhabiting in the subtidal zone in and around the islets of Namuseom and Bukhyeongjeseom off the coast of Busan by SCUBA diving in September 2013. As a consequence, it was confirmed that a total of 6 phyla, 14 classes, 20 orders, 46 families, and 73 species of zoobenthos inhabit in and around those islets. The total number of species surveyed by taxon during the study is 22 species of Arthropoda (30%, 20 species of Mollusca (27%, 15 species of Cnidaria (21%, 10 species of Echinodermata (14%, four species of Poridera (5%, and two species of Chordata.

  5. Benthic invertebrate fauna in the islets of Namuseom and Bukhyeongjeseom off Busan

    OpenAIRE

    Hosung Hwang; Jisoon Kang; In-Young Cho; Dong-Won Kang; Woon Kee Paek; Seok Hyun Lee

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the benthic invertebrate fauna inhabiting in the subtidal zone in and around the islets of Namuseom and Bukhyeongjeseom off the coast of Busan by SCUBA diving in September 2013. As a consequence, it was confirmed that a total of 6 phyla, 14 classes, 20 orders, 46 families, and 73 species of zoobenthos inhabit in and around those islets. The total number of species surveyed by taxon during the study is 22 species of Arthropoda (30%), 20 species of Mollusca (...

  6. Benthic-Pelagic Coupling in Biogeochemical and Climate Models: Existing Approaches, Recent developments and Roadblocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediments are key components in the Earth System. They host the largest carbon reservoir on Earth, provide the only long term sink for atmospheric CO2, recycle nutrients and represent the most important climate archive. Biogeochemical processes in marine sediments are thus essential for our understanding of the global biogeochemical cycles and climate. They are first and foremost, donor controlled and, thus, driven by the rain of particulate material from the euphotic zone and influenced by the overlying bottom water. Geochemical species may undergo several recycling loops (e.g. authigenic mineral precipitation/dissolution) before they are either buried or diffuse back to the water column. The tightly coupled and complex pelagic and benthic process interplay thus delays recycling flux, significantly modifies the depositional signal and controls the long-term removal of carbon from the ocean-atmosphere system. Despite the importance of this mutual interaction, coupled regional/global biogeochemical models and (paleo)climate models, which are designed to assess and quantify the transformations and fluxes of carbon and nutrients and evaluate their response to past and future perturbations of the climate system either completely neglect marine sediments or incorporate a highly simplified representation of benthic processes. On the other end of the spectrum, coupled, multi-component state-of-the-art early diagenetic models have been successfully developed and applied over the past decades to reproduce observations and quantify sediment-water exchange fluxes, but cannot easily be coupled to pelagic models. The primary constraint here is the high computation cost of simulating all of the essential redox and equilibrium reactions within marine sediments that control carbon burial and benthic recycling fluxes: a barrier that is easily exacerbated if a variety of benthic environments are to be spatially resolved. This presentation provides an integrative overview of

  7. Modification of benthic communities by territorial damselfish: a multi-species comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    The effects of territorial damselfish on coral reef benthos have been well-studied for a few relatively large-bodied species with visually distinct territories. Despite a growing body of research demonstrating their abundance, and their effects on algae, corals and other grazers, there has been little research on the effects of the territorial damselfish community as a whole. This study investigated the space occupation, territory composition, and diet of ten damselfish species at three locations: Magnetic and Orpheus Islands (Great Barrier Reef), and Kimbe Bay (Papua New Guinea). Territories were measured, and the composition of benthic communities inside and outside territories was assessed both in situ and from algal collections. The stomach contents of territorial damselfishes were also quantified. Although the larger, previously well-studied species had the most visible effect on the benthic community in their territories, all the smaller species also significantly affected the algal composition, normally with an increase of palatable algae. However, the composition of algal assemblages inside the territories of different species varied considerably. Damselfish territories were highly individual, not just among species, but also among locations. Diets were diverse and indicated a greater degree of omnivory and detritivory than previously thought. At all locations, territories occupied a substantial proportion of the substratum: >25% on Magnetic Island, >50% at Orpheus Island, and ˜50% in Kimbe Bay. Within individual zones, this figure was as high as 70%. The contribution of territorial damselfishes to a range of benthic patterns and processes is considerable, and future benthic studies may need to distinguish more closely between territory and non-territory areas.

  8. Bathymetric and regional changes in benthic macrofaunal assemblages on the deep Eastern Brazilian margin, SW Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Angelo Fraga; Berenguer, Vanessa; Ribeiro-Ferreira, Venina P.

    2016-05-01

    Deep-sea continental slopes have valuable mineral and biological resources in close proximity to diverse, undersampled and fragile marine benthic ecosystems. The eastern Brazilian Continental Margin (19.01°S to 21.06°S, 37.88°W to 40.22°W) is an important economic region for both fishing and oil industries, but is poorly understood with respect to the structure of the soft-sediment benthic fauna, their regional distribution and their bathymetric patterns. To identify spatial and temporal patterns of benthic macrofaunal assemblages on the slope (400 to 3000 m), the Espirito Santo Basin Assessment Project (AMBES, coordinated by Cenpes-Petrobras) sampled 42 stations across the Brazilian Eastern Slope during both Summer 2012 and Winter 2013. We found a significant decrease in macrofaunal abundance at the 400 m isobath along the slope near the northern region of the Espirito Santo Basin, suggesting benthic responses to upwelling events towards the south in Campos Basin and southern Espirito Santo Basin. The taxonomic diversity and assemblage composition also changed significantly across depth zones with mid-slope peaks of diversity at 1000-1300 m. In general, macrofaunal assemblages were strongly related to slope depth, suggesting a strong influence of productivity gradients and water mass distribution on this oligotrophic margin. Sediment grain size was marginally important to macrofaunal composition on the upper slope. In general, macrofaunal assemblages on the slope of Espirito Santo Basin are similar to other areas of the SE Brazilian margin, but regional changes in response to productivity and depth need to be considered for management strategies in the face of increasing economic activities off-shore.

  9. A comparison of benthic infaunal abundance on two abyssal plains in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Andrew G.

    1981-05-01

    Benthic macro-infauna were sampled in the northeast Pacific Ocean at 12 stations on an east-west transect across Cascadia and Eastern Tufts abyssal plains to determine ecological effects of continental influences and depth on those communities. The two plains, separated by the East Pacific Rise, differ in depth and distance from the continental margin. Tufts Plain lies to the west; primary production in the overlying water and the amount of organic carbon in the surface sediments are lower than for the Cascadia Plain region. Five benthic ecological zones were distinguished: (1) Cascadia Plain Slope-Base; (2) Eastern Cascadia Plain; (3) Cascadia Deep-Sea Channel; (4) Western Cascadia Plain; and (5) Eastern Tufts Plain. These differ in faunal biomass, numerical density, gross composition of the fauna by phyla, and composition of sediment. Comparatively, the slope-base environment supports the most abundant fauna. The numerical density of infauna on Eastern Tufts Plain is similar to that on Eastern and Western Cascadia Plain; however, the biomass tends to be lower in the deeper, more distant environment. It is concluded that these differences in the benthic fauna are probably caused by varying levels of input from primary production in overlying waters and differences in the transport of organic-rich particles off the continental shelf. Distance-related environmental characteristics are shown to be critical in the deep sea for controlling benthic community structure. On Cascadia Abyssal Plain, a plateau-like feature, the gross structure of communities changes with increasing distance from the continent but at constant depth. Faunal densities, biomass, and composition by phyla lie within the range of values normally associated with upper abyssal environments.

  10. Benthic macroinvertebrates in Italian rice fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lupi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Rice fields can be considered man-managed temporary wetlands. Five rice fields handled with different management strategies, their adjacent channels, and a spring were analysed by their benthic macroinvertebrate community to i evaluate the role of rice agroe- cosystem in biodiversity conservation; ii find indicator species which can be used to compare the ecological status of natural wetlands with rice agroecosystems; and iii find the influence of environmental variables on biodiversity. Different methods of data analysis with increasing degree of complexity – from diversity index up to sophisticated multivariate analysis – were used. The investigation provided a picture of benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting rice agroecosystems where 173 taxa were identified, 89 of which detected in rice paddies. Among them, 4 phyla (Mollusca, Annelida, Nematomorpha, and Arthropoda, 8 classes (Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Oligochaeta, Hirudinea, Gordioida, Insecta, Branchiopoda, and Malacostraca, 24 orders, 68 families, 127 genera and 159 species have been found. Ten threatened and 3 invasive species were detected in the habitats examined. The information obtained by the different methods of data analysis allowed a more comprehensive view on the value of the components of rice agroecosystems. Data analyses highlighted significant differences between habitats (feeding channel and rice field, with higher diversity observed in channels, and emphasised the role of the water chemical-physical parameters. The period of water permanence in rice fields resulted to be only one of the factors influencing the community of benthic macroinvertebrates. The presence of rare/endangered species allowed characterising some stations, but it was less informative about management strategies in rice paddies because most of these species were absent in rice fields.

  11. Benthic Habitat Variations Over Tidal Ridges, North Sea, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, T.A.G.P. van; Dalfsen, J.A. van; Lancker, V. van; Overmeeren, R.A. van; Heteren, S. van; Doornenbal, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Marine ecosystems on continental shelves endure an increasing burden of human activity offshore, and the impacts on benthic habitats are not well known. An improved understanding of how benthic habitats vary in relation to substrate types and seabed features is therefore essential to both scientists

  12. Tolerance of benthic foraminifera (Protista : Sarcodina) to hydrogen sulphide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moodley, L.; Schaub, B.; Van der Zwaan, G.J.; Herman, P.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Benthic foraminifera are dominant members of tb meiofauna, commonly occurring below the anoxic-oxic interface in marine sediments. The absence of oxygen in marine coastal sediments is often correlated with the formation of hydrogen sulphide. In this study the tolerance of benthic foraminifera (from

  13. Benthic Macroinvertebrate Communities in Agriculturally Impaired Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginija Pliuraite

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE This work presents research into the taxonomic composition of macroinvertebrate communities in streams that are under the influence of agricultural pollution A total of 67 macroinvertebrate taxa (including 61 identified species belonging to 40 families have been identified in the explored streams. The greatest species richness is recorded for the Trichoptera (18 species/1 taxa and Mollusca (12 species. The molluscs Gyraulus albus, amphipods Gammarus pulex, caddisflies Hydropsyche pellucidula and oligochaetes are detected in all examined streams. There, the number of total benthic macroinvertebrate taxa is highly variable, ranging from 16 to 40. Results show that the examined streams depending on the benthic macroinvertebrate taxonomic composition and predominance of seperate macroinvertebrate groups undergo different pollution. Intolerant to pollution taxa such as Plecoptera, which are the most sensitive to pollution insects, have been found only in 5 of 12 examined streams and in low abundances. The richness and diversity of macrozoobenthos in some streams appear to respond to the water quality deterioration. The present study has found out that in the stream where the total macroinvertebrate taxa, EPT taxa richness are the lowest and a relative abundance of gatherers is the highest, the values of NH4-N, NO3-N, total N, PO4-P and total P in the stream water are the highest, too.

  14. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  15. Delimiting oceanographic provinces to determine drivers of mesoscale patterns in benthic megafauna: A case study in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacharité, Myriam; Jørgensen, Lis Lindal; Metaxas, Anna; Lien, Vidar S.; Skjoldal, Hein Rune

    2016-08-01

    Communities of benthic megafauna in the deep waters of continental shelves (> 100 m) are important components of marine ecosystems. In high-latitude ecosystems, this fauna is increasingly impacted by human activities and climate variability. In this study, we provide baseline knowledge on the oceanographic conditions affecting its distribution in the Barents Sea in the vicinity of the Polar Front - an oceanic front occurring at the transition zone between the Atlantic and Arctic water masses. We used fields of temperature and currents from an ocean circulation model (Regional Ocean Modelling System - ROMS) to derive variables divided into 3 groups relevant to bottom fauna (temperature, water column structure and bottom currents) expressing either mean conditions or temporal variability over 10 years (2001-2010). Benthic megafauna was surveyed in summer 2011 at 139 sites. To analyze the relationship between spatial variability in the composition of benthic megafauna (i.e., β-diversity) and oceanographic conditions, we: (1) used generalized dissimilarity modelling (GDM) and (2) delimited oceanographic provinces (i.e., regions of similar conditions) for each group of variables using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by cluster analysis. Turnover in benthic megafauna was explained by 7 oceanographic variables (temperature: 4, water column structure: 2, bottom currents: 1), depth and geographic distance (56.7% of total deviance explained). Concurrently, patterns in oceanographic provinces among the 3 groups of variables coincided with results from the GDM, where provinces derived from temperature were sharply delimited relative to the other groups. We concluded that the spatial structure of the environment is important in the relationship between spatial variability of benthic megafauna and oceanographic conditions in shelf deep waters. Ocean models are powerful tools to study this relationship, but the way in which their inherent uncertainty affects the

  16. Benthic indicators: From subjectivity to objectivity - Where is the line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Bellan, Gérard; Bellan-Santini, Denise

    2010-07-01

    Over the last few years, the interest in using benthic indicators to assess marine environments has increased dramatically after a rather long period of relative stagnation, mostly due to the need to assess the status of coastal marine waters required by North American and European regulations. Numerous papers on this topic have been published in the domain of ecology, using a variety of different terms to refer to two categories of information: benthic species and the status of benthic communities. Nowadays, the abundant literature on these two categories makes it possible to comment on (1) the definition of the different terms used by benthic researchers, (2) the current increase of papers of rising complexity about benthic indicators, and (3) the subjectivity and objectivity involved in using benthic indicators. Faced with the increase in the number of methods, we recommend pragmatism and thus the transfer of simple methods to the research consultancies that are responsible for assessing benthic quality in numerous impact studies. Using certain procedures, such as the "sentinel species", the best professional judgement (BPJ) and taxonomic sufficiency (TS), should clearly be encouraged. PMID:20413132

  17. Spatial distribution maps for benthic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per S.

    1999-01-01

    ecosystems, were selected. These species are supposed to be good indicators of marine ecosystem health. The hydroacoustic measurements comprise preprocessed echo sounder recordings and side-scan sonar data forming a large and unique collection of datasets based on 4 field campaigns in Øresund...... of the distribution maps and to be combined with biogeochemical models describing spatiotemporal population dynamics. Finally, the use of side-scan sonar data is illustrated in a data fusion exercise combining side-scan sonar data with the results based on echo sounder measurements. The feasible use of side......-scan sonar for mapping of benthic communities remains an open task to be studied in the future. The data processing methodology developed is a contribution to the emerging field of hydroacoustic marine biology. The method of penalised maximum pseudo-likelihood for estimation of the Ising model under a huge...

  18. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in a subtropical reservoir and their effects over the benthic macroinvertebrate community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme de Souza Beghelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the influences of the environment spatial heterogeneity on benthic macroinvertebrates considering transverse and longitudinal gradients as also seasonality. METHODS: Four samplings were performed: two in the wet and two in the dry season in the riverine, transitional and lacustrine zones in the littoral and profundal regions of Itupararanga reservoir, SP, Brazil. Abiotic characterization of the water and of the sediment was performed. The biotic characterization was based on richness, dominance, diversity, and density of organisms, as well as on the relative abundance of predominant taxa. Two-way ANOSIM analyses were performed for both biotic and abiotic components, in order to test the significance of the differences in the longitudinal and transverse directions as well as of the differences between seasons. RESULTS: Compartmentalization was present in both directions, longitudinal and transverse. In a general way, the littoral region presented higher diversity values when compared with the profundal region, and the riverine zone presented high densities and high percentage of taxons, which usually indicate organic pollution. The differentiation between the transitional and lacustrine zones was determined mainly by taxonomic composition. Seasonality was also observed and the transportation of small particles, the entrance of nutrients, and the presence of macrophytes were considered as determinants for differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these results demonstrate the responses of benthic macroinvertebrate communities considering distinct sources of variation: longitudinal heterogeneity, determined by the increasing distance from the forming rivers that leads to a gradient of physical and chemical conditions; transverse heterogeneity, determined by the proximity with the land environment and depth differences. Seasonal heterogeneity was recorded during the period of this research and

  19. Puerto Rico Land-Based Threat to Benthic Habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set describes the potential threat of sediment delivery and land-based sources of pollution to benthic habitats. This dataset is derived from NOAA's...

  20. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Aransas Bay 2004 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  1. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Baffin Bay 2004 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  2. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Lower Laguna Madre 2004 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  3. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Lower Laguna Madre 2004 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  4. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Espiritu Santo Bay 2007 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing and new digital multi-spectral imagery and create digital benthic...

  5. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Espiritu Santo Bay 2007 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing and new digital multi-spectral imagery and create digital benthic...

  6. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Espiritu Santo Bay 2007 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing and new digital multi-spectral imagery and create digital benthic...

  7. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Lower Laguna Madre 2004 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  8. Atlantic Deep-Water Canyons (Benthic Landers) 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Each benthic lander contains a programmable sediment trap which can take 12 monthly samples, plus instruments to record temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen,...

  9. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  10. Shallow-water Benthic Habitats in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico were mapped and characterized using visual interpretation...

  11. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Redfish Bay 2004 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  12. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Aransas Bay 2004 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  13. WASP7 BENTHIC ALGAE - MODEL THEORY AND USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The standard WASP7 eutrophication module includes nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, dissolved oxygen-organic matter interactions, and phytoplankton kinetics. In many shallow streams and rivers, however, the attached algae (benthic algae, or periphyton, attached to submerged substr...

  14. Estimation of sediment properties during benthic impact experiments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.

    Sediment properties, such as water content and density, have been used to estimate the dry and wet weights, as well as the volume of sediment recovered and discharged, during benthic impact experiments conducted in the Pacific and Indian Oceans...

  15. Northeast Puerto Rico and Culebra Island - Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  16. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Lower Laguna Madre 2004 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  17. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - San Antonio Bay 2007 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  18. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - San Antonio Bay 2007 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  19. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - San Antonio Bay 2007 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  20. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - San Antonio Bay 2007 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  1. USVI Land-Based Threat to Benthic Habitats

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set describes the potential threat of sediment delivery and land-based sources of pollution to benthic habitats. This dataset is derived from NOAA's...

  2. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  3. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Espiritu Santo Bay 2007 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing and new digital multi-spectral imagery and create digital benthic...

  4. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Baffin Bay 2004 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  5. Benthic grab data from October 1999 in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NOAA Office for Coastal Management worked together to map benthic habitats within Apalachicola Bay,...

  6. Recruitment and Succession in a Tropical Benthic Community in Response to In-Situ Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Elizabeth Derse; Kroeker, Kristy J; Potts, Donald C; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Hernandez-Terrones, Laura M; Paytan, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification is a pervasive threat to coral reef ecosystems, and our understanding of the ecological processes driving patterns in tropical benthic community development in conditions of acidification is limited. We deployed limestone recruitment tiles in low aragonite saturation (Ωarag) waters during an in-situ field experiment at Puerto Morelos, Mexico, and compared them to tiles placed in control zones over a 14-month investigation. The early stages of succession showed relatively little difference in coverage of calcifying organisms between the low Ωarag and control zones. However, after 14 months of development, tiles from the low Ωarag zones had up to 70% less cover of calcifying organisms coincident with 42% more fleshy algae than the controls. The percent cover of biofilm and turf algae was also significantly greater in the low Ωarag zones, while the number of key grazing taxa remained constant. We hypothesize that fleshy algae have a competitive edge over the primary calcified space holders, coralline algae, and that acidification leads to altered competitive dynamics between various taxa. We suggest that as acidification impacts reefs in the future, there will be a shift in community assemblages away from upright and crustose coralline algae toward more fleshy algae and turf, established in the early stages of succession. PMID:26784986

  7. Recruitment and Succession in a Tropical Benthic Community in Response to In-Situ Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Elizabeth Derse; Kroeker, Kristy J.; Potts, Donald C.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Hernandez-Terrones, Laura M.; Paytan, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Ocean acidification is a pervasive threat to coral reef ecosystems, and our understanding of the ecological processes driving patterns in tropical benthic community development in conditions of acidification is limited. We deployed limestone recruitment tiles in low aragonite saturation (Ωarag) waters during an in-situ field experiment at Puerto Morelos, Mexico, and compared them to tiles placed in control zones over a 14-month investigation. The early stages of succession showed relatively little difference in coverage of calcifying organisms between the low Ωarag and control zones. However, after 14 months of development, tiles from the low Ωarag zones had up to 70% less cover of calcifying organisms coincident with 42% more fleshy algae than the controls. The percent cover of biofilm and turf algae was also significantly greater in the low Ωarag zones, while the number of key grazing taxa remained constant. We hypothesize that fleshy algae have a competitive edge over the primary calcified space holders, coralline algae, and that acidification leads to altered competitive dynamics between various taxa. We suggest that as acidification impacts reefs in the future, there will be a shift in community assemblages away from upright and crustose coralline algae toward more fleshy algae and turf, established in the early stages of succession. PMID:26784986

  8. Recruitment and Succession in a Tropical Benthic Community in Response to In-Situ Ocean Acidification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Derse Crook

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a pervasive threat to coral reef ecosystems, and our understanding of the ecological processes driving patterns in tropical benthic community development in conditions of acidification is limited. We deployed limestone recruitment tiles in low aragonite saturation (Ωarag waters during an in-situ field experiment at Puerto Morelos, Mexico, and compared them to tiles placed in control zones over a 14-month investigation. The early stages of succession showed relatively little difference in coverage of calcifying organisms between the low Ωarag and control zones. However, after 14 months of development, tiles from the low Ωarag zones had up to 70% less cover of calcifying organisms coincident with 42% more fleshy algae than the controls. The percent cover of biofilm and turf algae was also significantly greater in the low Ωarag zones, while the number of key grazing taxa remained constant. We hypothesize that fleshy algae have a competitive edge over the primary calcified space holders, coralline algae, and that acidification leads to altered competitive dynamics between various taxa. We suggest that as acidification impacts reefs in the future, there will be a shift in community assemblages away from upright and crustose coralline algae toward more fleshy algae and turf, established in the early stages of succession.

  9. A survey of benthic assemblages of foraminifera in tropical coastal waters of pulau pinang, malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhat, Fatin Izzati; Yahya, Khairun; Talib, Anita; Ahmad, Omar

    2013-08-01

    The distribution of benthic Foraminifera throughout the coastal waters of Taman Negara Pulau Pinang (Penang National Park), Malaysia was studied to assess the impact of various anthropogenic activities, such as fishing, ecotourism and floating cage culture. Samples were obtained at 200 m intervals within the subtidal zone, extending up to 1200 m offshore at Teluk Bahang, Teluk Aling, Teluk Ketapang and Pantai Acheh. The depth within coastal waters ranged between 1.5 m and 10.0 m, with predominantly muddy substrate at most stations. Water quality analysis showed little variation in micronutrient (nitrite, NO2; nitrate, NO3; ammonia, NH4 and orthophosphate, PO4) concentrations between sampling stations. Temperature (29.6±0.48°C), salinity (29.4±0.28 ppt), dissolved oxygen content (5.4±0.95 mg/l) and pH (8.5± 0.13) also showed little fluctuation between stations. A total of nine genera of foraminifera were identified in the study (i.e., Ammonia, Elphidium, Ammobaculites, Bigenerina, Quinqueloculina, Reopax, Globigerina, Textularia and Nonion). The distribution of benthic foraminifera was dominated by opportunistic groups that have a high tolerance to anthropogenic stressors. Ammonia had the highest frequency of occurrence (84.7%), followed by Bigenerina (50%), Ammobaculites (44.2%) and Elphidium (38.9%). The Ammonia-Elphidium Index (AEI) was used to describe the hypoxic condition of benthic communities at all sites. Teluk Bahang had the highest AEI value. The foraminiferal assemblages and distribution in Teluk Bahang, Teluk Aling, Teluk Ketapang and Pantai Acheh showed no correlation with physical or chemical environmental parameters. PMID:24575240

  10. A survey of benthic assemblages of foraminifera in tropical coastal waters of pulau pinang, malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhat, Fatin Izzati; Yahya, Khairun; Talib, Anita; Ahmad, Omar

    2013-08-01

    The distribution of benthic Foraminifera throughout the coastal waters of Taman Negara Pulau Pinang (Penang National Park), Malaysia was studied to assess the impact of various anthropogenic activities, such as fishing, ecotourism and floating cage culture. Samples were obtained at 200 m intervals within the subtidal zone, extending up to 1200 m offshore at Teluk Bahang, Teluk Aling, Teluk Ketapang and Pantai Acheh. The depth within coastal waters ranged between 1.5 m and 10.0 m, with predominantly muddy substrate at most stations. Water quality analysis showed little variation in micronutrient (nitrite, NO2; nitrate, NO3; ammonia, NH4 and orthophosphate, PO4) concentrations between sampling stations. Temperature (29.6±0.48°C), salinity (29.4±0.28 ppt), dissolved oxygen content (5.4±0.95 mg/l) and pH (8.5± 0.13) also showed little fluctuation between stations. A total of nine genera of foraminifera were identified in the study (i.e., Ammonia, Elphidium, Ammobaculites, Bigenerina, Quinqueloculina, Reopax, Globigerina, Textularia and Nonion). The distribution of benthic foraminifera was dominated by opportunistic groups that have a high tolerance to anthropogenic stressors. Ammonia had the highest frequency of occurrence (84.7%), followed by Bigenerina (50%), Ammobaculites (44.2%) and Elphidium (38.9%). The Ammonia-Elphidium Index (AEI) was used to describe the hypoxic condition of benthic communities at all sites. Teluk Bahang had the highest AEI value. The foraminiferal assemblages and distribution in Teluk Bahang, Teluk Aling, Teluk Ketapang and Pantai Acheh showed no correlation with physical or chemical environmental parameters.

  11. Benthic ammonia oxidizers differ in community structure and biogeochemical potential across a riverine delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damashek, Julian; Smith, Jason M; Mosier, Annika C; Francis, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the extensive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by vastly increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. This debate surrounding ammonium inputs highlights the importance of understanding the rates of, and controls on, nitrogen (N) cycling processes across the delta. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (which codes for the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase). There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The benthic ammonia oxidizers in this nutrient-rich aquatic ecosystem may be important players in its overall nutrient cycling, and their community structure and biogeochemical function appear related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways, including benthic

  12. Natural disturbance shapes benthic intertidal macroinvertebrate communities of high latitude river deltas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchwell, Roy T.; Kendall, Steve J.; Blanchard, Amy L.; Dunton, Kenneth H.; Powell, Abby N.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike lower latitude coastlines, the estuarine nearshore zones of the Alaskan Beaufort Sea are icebound and frozen up to 9 months annually. This annual freezing event represents a dramatic physical disturbance to fauna living within intertidal sediments. The main objectives of this study were to describe the benthic communities of Beaufort Sea deltas, including temporal changes and trophic structure. Understanding benthic invertebrate communities provided a baseline for concurrent research on shorebird foraging ecology at these sites. We found that despite continuous year-to-year episodes of annual freezing, these estuarine deltas are populated by a range of invertebrates that represent both marine and freshwater assemblages. Freshwater organisms like Diptera and Oligochaeta not only survive this extreme event, but a marine invasion of infaunal organisms such as Amphipoda and Polychaeta rapidly recolonizes the delta mudflats following ice ablation. These delta sediments of sand, silt, and clay are fine in structure compared to sediments of other Beaufort Sea coastal intertidal habitats. The relatively depauperate invertebrate community that ultimately develops is composed of marine and freshwater benthic invertebrates. The composition of the infauna also reflects two strategies that make life on Beaufort Sea deltas possible: a migration of marine organisms from deeper lagoons to the intertidal and freshwater biota that survive the 9-month ice-covered period in frozen sediments. Stable isotopic analyses reveal that both infaunal assemblages assimilate marine and terrestrial sources of organic carbon. These results provide some of the first quantitative information on the infaunal food resources of shallow arctic estuarine systems and the long-term persistence of these invertebrate assemblages. Our data help explain the presence of large numbers of shorebirds in these habitats during the brief summer open-water period and their trophic importance to migrating

  13. Photobiology of the deep twilight zone and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Talbot H.

    1997-02-01

    Photobiology in the twilight zone of the deep sea depends on faint light of two, or possibly three, origins: sunlight, bioluminescence and some visible radiation near the bottom associated with hydrothermal vents. The deep twilight zone also contains two quite distinct ecosystems: the vast open ocean pelagic regime far from the shore and the bottom as well as the far less expansive benthic regime with quite different characteristic animals that live on, in or near the sea bo10 Most of the whole ocean's benthic regime with a mean depth over 3000m is well below the twilight zone, which eliminates sunlight as a light source there. Many of the most familiar deepsea animals with their spectacular arrays of dennal light organs and remarkable eyes are from the pelagic 19, 25 The less familiar benthic fishes and crustaceans sometimes have curious internal light organs powered by bacteria13 and occasional incredibly modified eyes.30 With the exception of those on the fishing rods of most female deepsea anglerfish, where the light is produced by symbiotic bacteria, all the numerous light organs of pelagic deepsea fishes are generally believed to manage their own chemiluminescence independent of luminous bacteria.17

  14. Partially repeatable genetic basis of benthic adaptation in threespine sticklebacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Priscilla A; Glazer, Andrew M; Killingbeck, Emily E; Agoglia, Rachel M; Baek, Jiyeon; Carsanaro, Sara M; Lee, Anthony M; Cleves, Phillip A; Schluter, Dolph; Miller, Craig T

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which convergent adaptation to similar ecological niches occurs by a predictable genetic basis remains a fundamental question in biology. Threespine stickleback fish have undergone an adaptive radiation in which ancestral oceanic populations repeatedly colonized and adapted to freshwater habitats. In multiple lakes in British Columbia, two different freshwater ecotypes have evolved: a deep-bodied benthic form adapted to forage near the lake substrate, and a narrow-bodied limnetic form adapted to forage in open water. Here, we use genome-wide linkage mapping in marine × benthic F2 genetic crosses to test the extent of shared genomic regions underlying benthic adaptation in three benthic populations. We identify at least 100 Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) harboring genes influencing skeletal morphology. The majority of QTL (57%) are unique to one cross. However, four genomic regions affecting eight craniofacial and armor phenotypes are found in all three benthic populations. We find that QTL are clustered in the genome and overlapping QTL regions are enriched for genomic signatures of natural selection. These findings suggest that benthic adaptation has occurred via both parallel and nonparallel genetic changes. PMID:26947264

  15. Modelling benthic biophysical drivers of ecosystem structure and biogeochemical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Nicholas; Bruggeman, Jorn; Lessin, Gennadi; Allen, Icarus

    2016-04-01

    The fate of carbon deposited at the sea floor is ultimately decided by biophysical drivers that control the efficiency of remineralisation and timescale of carbon burial in sediments. Specifically, these drivers include bioturbation through ingestion and movement, burrow-flushing and sediment reworking, which enhance vertical particulate transport and solute diffusion. Unfortunately, these processes are rarely satisfactorily resolved in models. To address this, a benthic model that explicitly describes the vertical position of biology (e.g., habitats) and biogeochemical processes is presented that includes biological functionality and biogeochemical response capturing changes in ecosystem structure, benthic-pelagic fluxes and biodiversity on inter-annual timescales. This is demonstrated by the model's ability to reproduce temporal variability in benthic infauna, vertical pore water nutrients and pelagic-benthic solute fluxes compared to in-situ data. A key advance is the replacement of bulk parameterisation of bioturbation by explicit description of the bio-physical processes responsible. This permits direct comparison with observations and determination of key parameters in experiments. Crucially, the model resolves the two-way interaction between sediment biogeochemistry and ecology, allowing exploration of the benthic response to changing environmental conditions, the importance of infaunal functional traits in shaping benthic ecological structure and the feedback the resulting bio-physical processes exert on pore water nutrient profiles. The model is actively being used to understand shelf sea carbon cycling, the response of the benthos to climatic change, food provision and other societal benefits.

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: BENTHIC (Benthic habitat polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains known locations of patchy and continuous seagrass and oyster reef habitat for the Upper Coast of Texas benthic habitat data. This data set...

  17. mkk_benthic_habitats - Benthic habitat of the coral reef ecosystem on the south shore of Molokai Hawaii.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A benthic habitat polygon coverage has been created of the coral reef ecosystem on the south shore of Moloka'i. Polygons were hand-digitized from visual...

  18. Parameterisation of clastic sediments including benthic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobertz, B.; Harff, J.; Bohling, B.

    2009-02-01

    The sediment transport processes in the south-western Baltic Sea are predicted by means of a numerical model in the project DYNAS. There are two sediment parameters that influence the results of modelling remarkably: critical shear stress velocity and bottom roughness. This paper presents the way how to parameterise these factors and extrapolate them into the investigation area. The critical shear stress velocity is parameterised basing on grain size data, combining approximations after Hjulström [Hjulström, F., 1935: Studies in the morphological activity of rivers as illustrated by the river Fyris. Geological Institution of University of Uppsala: Bulletin (25): 221-528.], Shields [Shields, A., 1936: Anwendung der Ähnlichkeits-Mechanik und der Turbulenzforschung auf die Geschiebebewegung. Mitteilungen der Preussischen Versuchsanstalt für Wasserbau und Schiffahrt (26): 26 pp.] and Bohling [Bohling, B., 2003: Untersuchungen zur Mobilität natürlicher und anthropogener Sedimente in der Mecklenburger Bucht. unpublished doctoral thesis, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald/Germany, 156 pp.]. The roughness length, in the case of absence of macro zoo-benthos and their structures, is parameterised basing on grain size too employing Soulsby [Soulsby, R.L., 1997: Dynamics of Marine Sands: a Manual for Practical Applications. London, Thomas Telford Publications. 249 pp.], Nielsen [Nielsen, P., 1983: Analytical determination of nearshore wave height variation due to refraction shoaling and friction. Coastal Engineering 7, 233-251.] and Yalin [Yalin, M.S., 1977: Mechanics of Sediment Transport. Pergamon Press, New York. 298 pp.]. No equivalent simple parameterisations for biologically caused bed roughness exist. Here, findings of Friedrichs [Friedrichs, M., 2004: Flow-induced effects of macro zoo-benthic structures on the near-bed sediment transport. Dissertation, Universität Rostock, 80 S.] and estimations by the DYNAS

  19. Benthic macrofauna of elongated, shallow-water pockmarks in the Inner Oslofjord, Norway : limnologi marin biologi bløtbunn bunndyr artsdiversitet

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    A large number of round and elongated pockmarks were recently discovered in the Oslofjord, Norway. Pockmarks are formed by expulsion of fluid, most commonly methane or ground water. The elongated shape is a believed to be a result of either strong bottom currents, linear sub-surface weakness zones, the merging of circular pockmarks, or a combination of these factors. The seeping of methane may generate high microbial production, providing a stable nutrient supply to the benthic fauna. Some sp...

  20. Community shelter use in response to two benthic decapod predators in the Long Island Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Dugan; Crivello, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate community shelter effects of two invasive decapod species, Hemigrapsus sanguineus and Carcinus maenas, in the Long Island Sound (LIS), we deployed artificial shelters in the intertidal and immediate subtidal zones. These consisted of five groups during the summer: a control, a resident H. sanguineus male or female group, and a resident C. maenas male or female group. We quantified utilization of the shelters at 24 h by counting crabs and fish present. We found significant avoidance of H. sanguineus in the field by benthic hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.) and significant avoidance of C. maenas by the seaboard goby (Gobiosoma ginsburgi). The grubby (Myoxocephalus aenaeus) avoided neither treatment, probably since it tends to be a predator of invertebrates. H. sanguineus avoided C. maenas treatments, whereas C. maenas did not avoid any treatment. Seasonal deployments in the subtidal indicated cohabitation of a number of benthic species in the LIS, with peak shelter use corresponding with increased predation and likely reproductive activity in spring and summer for green crabs (C. maenas), hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.), seaboard gobies (G. ginsburgi), and grubbies (Myoxocephalus aenaeus). PMID:27547570

  1. Community shelter use in response to two benthic decapod predators in the Long Island Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, David M; Reagan, Dugan; Crivello, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    To investigate community shelter effects of two invasive decapod species, Hemigrapsus sanguineus and Carcinus maenas, in the Long Island Sound (LIS), we deployed artificial shelters in the intertidal and immediate subtidal zones. These consisted of five groups during the summer: a control, a resident H. sanguineus male or female group, and a resident C. maenas male or female group. We quantified utilization of the shelters at 24 h by counting crabs and fish present. We found significant avoidance of H. sanguineus in the field by benthic hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.) and significant avoidance of C. maenas by the seaboard goby (Gobiosoma ginsburgi). The grubby (Myoxocephalus aenaeus) avoided neither treatment, probably since it tends to be a predator of invertebrates. H. sanguineus avoided C. maenas treatments, whereas C. maenas did not avoid any treatment. Seasonal deployments in the subtidal indicated cohabitation of a number of benthic species in the LIS, with peak shelter use corresponding with increased predation and likely reproductive activity in spring and summer for green crabs (C. maenas), hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.), seaboard gobies (G. ginsburgi), and grubbies (Myoxocephalus aenaeus). PMID:27547570

  2. Box-modelling of the impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition and benthic remineralisation on the nitrogen cycle of the eastern tropical South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bei; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralisation influence the marine nitrogen cycle, and hence ultimately also marine primary production. The biological and biogeochemical relations in the eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) among nitrogen deposition, benthic denitrification and phosphorus regeneration are analysed in a prognostic box model of the oxygen, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in the ETSP. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition ( ≈ 1.5 Tg N yr-1 for the years 2000-2009) is offset by half in the model by reduced N2 fixation, with the other half transported out of the model domain. Model- and data-based benthic denitrification in our model domain are responsible for losses of 0.19 and 1.0 Tg Tg N yr-1, respectively, and both trigger nitrogen fixation, partly compensating for the NO3- loss. Model- and data-based estimates of enhanced phosphate release via sedimentary phosphorus regeneration under suboxic conditions are 0.062 and 0.11 Tg N yr-1, respectively. Since phosphate is the ultimate limiting nutrient in the model, even very small additional phosphate inputs stimulate primary production and subsequent export production and NO3- loss in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). A sensitivity analysis of the local response to both atmospheric deposition and benthic remineralisation indicates dominant stabilising feedbacks in the ETSP, which tend to keep a balanced nitrogen inventory; i.e. nitrogen input by atmospheric deposition is counteracted by decreasing nitrogen fixation; NO3- loss via benthic denitrification is partly compensated for by increased nitrogen fixation; enhanced nitrogen fixation stimulated by phosphate regeneration is partly counteracted by stronger water-column denitrification. Even though the water column in our model domain acts as a NO3- source, the ETSP including benthic denitrification might be a NO3- sink.

  3. Benthic algal vegetation in Isfjorden, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Fredriksen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benthic algal vegetation was investigated at 10 sites in Isfjorden, Svalbard. Five sites were visited during summer 2010 and five during summer 2012. Both the littoral and sublittoral vegetation were sampled, the littoral by hand-picking and use of a throwable rake and the sublittoral using a triangular dredge. A total of 88 different taxa were registered, comprising 17 Chlorophyta, 40 Ochrophyta, 30 Rhodophyta and the Xantophyceae Vaucheria sp. The green algae Ulvaria splendens (Ruprecht Vinogradova was recorded in Svalbard for the first time. Most of the sites consisted of hard bottom substrate, but one site, Kapp Wijk, consisted of loose-lying calcareous red algae (rhodoliths and had species not recorded elsewhere. The sublittoral at the other sites was dominated by kelp. Molecular analysis confirmed the presence of the red alga Ceramium virgatum and a dwarf form of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. This study provides a baseline for future studies investigating changes in the vegetation due to environmental changes.

  4. Benthic algal communities : recovery from experimental acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.A.; Findlay, D.L.; Kasian, S.E.M. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Freshwater Inst.; Baulch, H.M. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Trent Univ., Peterborough, ON (Canada); Armstrong, L.M. [Ducks Unlimited Canada, Stonewall, MB (Canada). Inst. for Wetland and Waterfowl Research; McNicol, D.K. [Canadian Wildlife Service, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Vinebrooke, R.D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    2009-11-15

    This study evaluated the hypothesis that chemical recovery promotes the rapid recovery of benthic algal communities in formerly acidified lakes. The study was conducted at an experimental lake in Ontario over a 10 year period of pH recovery that followed a 10 year period of experimental acidification from a pH of 6.7 to 4.5. A reference lake in the region was also studied to account for regional changes during the study period. Changes in the epilithon on rock surfaces included lower cyanobacterial biomass following the acidification as well as increases in diatoms and greens. Acidification-induced increases in respiration prevented epilithic metabolic recovery. Prior declines in photosynthesis were reversed. Blooms of metaphytic filamentous green algae with a higher pH occurred during the recovery period. The recovery of many aggregate functional and taxonomic properties lagged behind reductions in acidity. Incomplete chemical recovery and the absence of functionally important biota were attributed to incomplete algal recovery at the lake. 59 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  5. Benthic foraminifera and trace element distribution: a case-study from the heavily polluted lagoon of Venice (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccioni, Rodolfo; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Marsili, Andrea; Mana, Davide

    2009-01-01

    Living benthic foraminiferal assemblages were studied in surface samples collected from the lagoon of Venice (Italy) in order to investigate the relationship between these sensitive microorganisms and trace element pollution. Geochemical analysis of sediments shows that the lagoon is affected by trace element pollution (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Hg) with the highest concentrations in its inner part, which corresponds to the Porto Marghera industrial area. The biocenosis are largely dominated by Ammonia tepida, Haynesina germanica and Cribroelphidium oceanensis and, subordinately, by Aubignyna perlucida, Ammonia parkinsoniana and Bolivina striatula. Biotic and abiotic factors were statistically analyzed with multivariate technique of cluster analysis and principal component analysis. The statistical analysis reveals a strong relationship between trace elements (in particular Mn, Pb and Hg) and the occurrence of abnormalities in foraminiferal tests. Remarkably, greater proportions of abnormal specimens are usually found at stations located close to the heaviest polluted industrial zone of Porto Marghera. This paper shows that benthic foraminifera can be used as useful and relatively speedy and inexpensive bio-indicators in monitoring the health quality of the lagoon of Venice. It also provides a basis for future investigations aimed at unraveling the benthic foraminiferal response to human-induced pollution in marine and transitional marine environments. PMID:19733368

  6. Effects of hypoxia caused by mussel farming on benthic foraminifera in semi-closed Gamak Bay, South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon Gyu; Jeong, Da Un; Lee, Jung Sick; Choi, Yang Ho; Lee, Moon Ok

    2016-08-15

    Seawater monitoring and geochemical and benthic foraminiferal analysis of sediments were conducted to identify the effects of hypoxia created by a mussel farm on benthic foraminifera in a semi-closed bay. Extremely polluted reductive conditions with a high content of organic matter (OM) at >12.0% and oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) with dissolved oxygen (DO) <0.4mg∙L(-1) were formed below the mussel farm in the northwest area of Gamak Bay, and gradually diffused toward the south. Highly similar patterns of variation were observed in species diversity, abundance frequency, and benthic foraminiferal assemblage distributed from Elphidium subarcticum-Ammonia beccarii in the northwest area through E. subarcticum-A. beccarii-Trochammina hadai, E. subarcticum-A. beccarii-Elphidiumclavatum, and E. clavatum-Ammonia ketienziensis in the southern area. These phenomena were caused by hydrodynamics in the current water mass. It was thought that E. subarcticum is a bioindicator of organic pollution caused by the mussel farm. PMID:27267115

  7. Benthic substrate classification map: Gulf Islands National Seashore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Dawn; Flocks, James; Twichell, Dave; Rose, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The 2005 hurricane season was devastating for the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Hurricane Katrina caused significant degradation of the barrier islands that compose the Gulf Islands National Seashore (GUIS). Because of the ability of coastal barrier islands to help mitigate hurricane damage to the mainland, restoring these habitats prior to the onset of future storms will help protect the islands themselves and the surrounding habitats. During Hurricane Katrina, coastal barrier islands reduced storm surge by approximately 10 percent and moderated wave heights (Wamsley and others, 2009). Islands protected the mainland by preventing ocean waves from maintaining their size as they approached the mainland. In addition to storm protection, it is advantageous to restore these islands to preserve the cultural heritage present there (for example, Fort Massachusetts) and because of the influence that these islands have on marine ecology. For example, these islands help maintain a salinity regime favorable to oysters in the Mississippi Sound and provide critical habitats for many migratory birds and endangered species such as sea turtles (Chelonia mydas, Caretta caretta, and Dermochelys coriacea), Gulf sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi), and piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2009a). As land manager for the GUIS, the National Park Service (NPS) has been working with the State of Mississippi and the Mobile District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide a set of recommendations to the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) that will guide restoration planning. The final set of recommendations includes directly renourishing both West Ship Island (to protect Fort Massachusetts) and East Ship Island (to restore the French Warehouse archaeological site); filling Camille Cut to recreate a continuous Ship Island; and restoring natural regional sediment transport processes by placing sand in the littoral zone just east of Petit Bois

  8. Determining productivity of transferred benthic biofilms within wetlands differing in anthropogenic stressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal biofilms are a fundamental contributor to wetland productivity. The films maintain high turnover rates, nutrient uptake and storage capacities are prevalent in shallow water as well as over large littoral zones. This study investigated biofilm transfer techniques as a means of accelerating carbon capture, plant production, and colonization in reclaimed oil sand wetlands affected by process water. The study examined the productivity of transferred biofilms and their ability to accelerate succession; methods of transferring biofilms; and the community composition of algae in relation to other substrates. Microcosms with 4 types of substrates were submersed in experimental trenches containing either process water or natural water. Dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and biomass standing crop sampling was conducted at intervals throughout a 1-year period. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the substrate types. Results of the study will be used to assess the impacts of oil sands process affected materials (OSPM) on benthic biofilm productivity and the initial carbon accumulation process.

  9. Spatial analyses of benthic habitats to define coral reef ecosystem regions and potential biogeographic boundaries along a latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Walker

    Full Text Available Marine organism diversity typically attenuates latitudinally from tropical to colder climate regimes. Since the distribution of many marine species relates to certain habitats and depth regimes, mapping data provide valuable information in the absence of detailed ecological data that can be used to identify and spatially quantify smaller scale (10 s km coral reef ecosystem regions and potential physical biogeographic barriers. This study focused on the southeast Florida coast due to a recognized, but understudied, tropical to subtropical biogeographic gradient. GIS spatial analyses were conducted on recent, accurate, shallow-water (0-30 m benthic habitat maps to identify and quantify specific regions along the coast that were statistically distinct in the number and amount of major benthic habitat types. Habitat type and width were measured for 209 evenly-spaced cross-shelf transects. Evaluation of groupings from a cluster analysis at 75% similarity yielded five distinct regions. The number of benthic habitats and their area, width, distance from shore, distance from each other, and LIDAR depths were calculated in GIS and examined to determine regional statistical differences. The number of benthic habitats decreased with increasing latitude from 9 in the south to 4 in the north and many of the habitat metrics statistically differed between regions. Three potential biogeographic barriers were found at the Boca, Hillsboro, and Biscayne boundaries, where specific shallow-water habitats were absent further north; Middle Reef, Inner Reef, and oceanic seagrass beds respectively. The Bahamas Fault Zone boundary was also noted where changes in coastal morphologies occurred that could relate to subtle ecological changes. The analyses defined regions on a smaller scale more appropriate to regional management decisions, hence strengthening marine conservation planning with an objective, scientific foundation for decision making. They provide a framework

  10. Quo vadis NW Black Sea benthic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traian Gomoiu, Marian

    2016-04-01

    The author briefly presents a general review on the evolution trends of benthic ecosystems at the Romanian Black Sea coast, referring to some recent data from the literature. The Black Sea represents a "unicum hydrobiologicum" by some of its basic characteristics, such as: 1. a large semi-enclosed basin with an intense exchange of waters; 2. a sea receiving a large amount of fresh water, especially in its northwestern sector, brought by the Danube, Dnieper and Dniester Rivers; 3. a large meromictic sea - euxinic-azoic below depths of 150 - 200 m; 4. around the sea there is a large filter-holding belt consisting of bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Modiolula phaseolina); 5. a sea having in its northwestern sector a large area covered by red algae of the genus Phyllophora; 6. a sea undergoing, in the last 50 years, intense environmental pressures (pollution by large rivers and direct discharges of wastewater from urban areas, the development of maritime traffic, overfishing by bottom trawling, coastal facilities and especially by many defense works of the new port); 7. a sea registering in the last decades of the past century many events of eutrophication; 8. a sea enriching its biodiversity by alien species. After the political and socio-economic changes triggered by the events of 1989 and especially after Romania's accession to EU, the state of the northwestern Black Sea coastal ecosystems, has recorded positive changes: • Decrease in environmental pressures; • Decreasing pollutant / fertilizing discharges into the Danube; • Reduction of domestic sewage quantities from coastal settlements; • Improvement in the quality of the wastewater discharged into the sea; • Reduction of active fishing by bottom trawling; • Adopting and implementing a national / international set of guidelines concerning marine environment; • Adopting regulations on the protection of the marine environment against pollution in marine economy: transport / shipping, tourism

  11. Structure of Benthic Communities along the Taiwan Latitudinal Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Deulofeu, Lauriane; Denis, Vianney; De Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Hsieh, Hernyi Justin; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2016-01-01

    The distribution and the structure of benthic assemblages vary with latitude. However, few studies have described benthic communities along large latitudinal gradients, and patterns of variation are not fully understood. Taiwan, lying between 21.90°N and 25.30°N, is located at the center of the Philippine-Japan arc and lies at the northern margin of coral reef development. A wide range of habitats is distributed along this latitudinal gradient, from extensive fringing coral reefs at the southern coast to non-reefal communities at the north. In this study, we examined the structure of benthic communities around Taiwan, by comparing its assemblages in four regions, analyzing the effects of the latitudinal gradient, and highlighting regional characteristics. A total of 25 sites, 125 transects, and 2,625 photographs were used to analyze the benthic communities. Scleractinian corals present an obvious gradient of increasing diversity from north to south, whereas macro-algae diversity is higher on the north-eastern coast. At the country scale, Taiwanese coral communities were dominated by turf algae (49%). At the regional scale, we observed an important heterogeneity that may be caused by local disturbances and habitat degradation that smooths out regional differences. In this context, our observations highlight the importance of managing local stressors responsible for reef degradation. Overall, this study provides an important baseline upon which future changes in benthic assemblages around Taiwan can be assessed. PMID:27513665

  12. Naturally Ocurring Polyphosphate-accumulating Bacteria in Benthic Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, N. A.; Saia, S. M.; Walter, M. T.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Regan, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), known to store excess phosphorus (P) as polyphosphate (poly-P), influence P transport in the environment. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater has long served as a basis to study bacterial PAOs, yet little research has genetically identified similar organisms in natural settings. Aerobic/anaerobic cycles, used to select for PAOs in EBPR, can result from changing environmental conditions such as night/day cycles for benthic biofilms. Benthic biofilms from eight Pennsylvanian streams were studied for naturally-occurring bacterial PAOs similar to those typically found in EBPR systems. PAOs were confirmed in the benthic biofilms by a characteristic yellow fluorescent emission from DAPI staining. Cells containing yellow fluorescence were separated from the rest of the sample using a flow cytometer, resulting in a physically enriched culture of PAOs from the benthic biofilms. Amplicon-based metagenomic sequencing will reveal the phylogeny of bacteria responsible for poly-P accumulation in these benthic biofilms. Sequencing data will be used to develop fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) probes, and hybridizations will be performed on DAPI-stained cells to confirm poly-P accumulation by targeted phylotypes. Identifying PAOs in natural settings is a critical step towards studying environments that support high concentrations of PAOs, serving as significant factors in the P cycle. PAOs can then be connected to P transport models to help understand and mitigate P pollution in agricultural watersheds.

  13. Sea Carousel—A benthic, annular flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Carl L.; Grant, J.; Daborn, G. R.; Black, K.

    1992-06-01

    A benthic annular flume (Sea Carousel) has been developed and tested to measure in situ the erodibility of cohesive sediments. The flume is equipped with three optical backscatter sensors, a lid rotation switch, and an electromagnetic (EM) flow meter capable of detecting azimuthal and vertical components of flow. Data are logged at rates up to 10·66 Hz. Erodibility is inferred from the rate of change in suspended sediment concentration detected in the annulus. The energy-density/wave number spectrum of azimuthal flow showed peaks in the energy spectrum at paddle rotation wave numbers (k) of 14 and 7 m -1 (macroturbulent time scales) but were not significant. Friction velocity ( U*), measured (1) at 1 Hz using a flush-mounted hot-film sensor, and (2) derived from measured velocity profiles in the inner part of the logarithmic layer gave comparable results for Ū* 0·32 m s -1. Radial velocity gradients were proportional to ( Ū y - 0·32 m s -1). Maximum radial differences in U* were 10% for Ū y = 0·5 ms -1. Suspended sediment mass concentration ( S) in the annulus resulted in a significant decrease (10·5%) in Ū* derived by method (1) over the range 0calibration with changes in S. Subaerial deployments of Sea Carousel caused severe substrate disturbance, water losses, and aeration of the annulus. Submarine deployments produced stable results, though dispersion of turbid flume water took place. Results clearly demonstrated the existence of 'Type I' and 'Type II' erosion documented from laboratory studies.

  14. Linkages between benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages and landscape stressors in the US Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    We used multiple linear regression analysis to investigate relationships between benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in the nearshore region of the Laurentian Great Lakes and landscape characteristics in adjacent watersheds. Benthic invertebrate data were obtained from the 201...

  15. Benthic foraminifera as proxy for oxygen-depleted conditions off the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Saraswat, R.

    In order to study the response of benthic foraminifera, especially the rectilinear bi- and tri-serial benthic foraminifera (RBF) to oxygen-depleted conditions from the Arabian Sea off central west coast of India, 103 surface sediment samples...

  16. Linkages between reef fish demographics and benthic habitat characteristics in Tutuila, American Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitats play vital roles in the distribution and abundances of marine resources. Understanding how fish populations respond to variability of benthic...

  17. Niche separation by littoral-benthic Chydoridae (Cladocera, Crustacea in a deep lake - potential drivers of their distribution and role in littoral-pelagic coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Adamczuk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Niche separation of 22 species of benthic Chydoridae was examined in a depth gradient in the littoral zone of a deep Lake Piaseczno (eastern Poland, by using a trap sampler. Individual species showed high segregation across the littoral zone according to depth, macrophyte biomass, total organic carbon (TOC, conductivity and pH, of which the depth turned out to be the most important. The species Acroperus harpae, Alona affinis, Alonella nana, Leydigia acanthocercoides, Pseudochydorus globosus, Pleuroxus trigonellus and Pleuroxus aduncus were found in the whole littoral zone, but the remaining Chydoridae species displayed clear spatial distribution, e.g. Coronatella rectangula, Acroperus elongatus, Alona guttata, Alonella excisa, Alonella exigua, Rhychotalona falcata, Monospilus dispar and Pleuroxus truncatus settled the shallower parts of the littoral, whereas Eurycercus lamellatus, Camptocercus rectirostris, Pleuroxus laevis, Graptoleberis testudinaria, Alona costata, Pleuroxus uncinatus and Alona intermedia were found mainly in areas located 3-6 m deep. To find out the role of Chydoridae in littoral-pelagic food web coupling, the contribution of chydorids to total number of Cladocera in the guts of fish was estimated showing that they are an important intervening link in nutrient movement from the littoral to the pelagic zone, as their contribution to the total cladoceran number found in guts of fish caught in the pelagic zone was even as high as 98%. This study provides more insight into the nature of constraints associated with littoral-benthic cladocerans’ habitat preferences and their importance in littoral-pelagic coupling.

  18. Benthic plastic debris in marine and fresh water environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Patricia L

    2015-08-01

    This review provides a discussion of the published literature concerning benthic plastic debris in ocean, sea, lake, estuary and river bottoms throughout the world. Although numerous investigations of shoreline, surface and near-surface plastic debris provide important information on plastic types, distribution, accumulation, and degradation, studies of submerged plastic debris have been sporadic in the past and have become more prominent only recently. The distribution of benthic debris is controlled mainly by combinations of urban proximity and its association with fishing-related activities, geomorphology, hydrological conditions, and river input. High density plastics, biofouled products, polymers with mineral fillers or adsorbed minerals, and plastic-metal composites all have the potential to sink. Once deposited on the bottoms of water basins and channels, plastics are shielded from UV light, thus slowing the degradation process significantly. Investigations of the interactions between benthic plastic debris and bottom-dwelling organisms will help shed light on the potential dangers of submerged plastic litter. PMID:26129903

  19. 20th century human pressures drive reductions in deepwater oxygen leading to losses of benthic methane-based food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Simon; Millet, Laurent; Verneaux, Valérie; Lami, Andrea; David, Etienne; Murgia, Laurie; Parent, Claire; Musazzi, Simona; Gauthier, Emilie; Bichet, Vincent; Magny, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater lakes play a key role in the global carbon cycle as sinks (organic carbon sequestration) and sources (greenhouse gas emissions). Understanding the carbon cycle response to environmental changes is becoming a crucial challenge in the context of global warming and the preponderance of human pressures. We reconstructed the long-term (1500 years) evolution of trophic functioning of the benthic food web, based on methanotrophic ancient DNA and chironomid isotope analyses). In addition, human land use is also reconstructed in three different lakes (eastern France, Jura Mountains). Our findings confirm that the benthic food web can be highly dependent on methane-derived carbon (up to 50% of the chironomid biomass) and reveal that the activation of this process can correspond to a natural functioning or be a consequence of anthropic perturbation. The studied lakes also showed a similar temporal evolution over the last century with the disappearance of the profundal aquatic insects (Chironomidae, Diptera), considered as keystone for the whole lake food web (e.g., coupling benthic-pelagic), inducing a potential collapse in the transfer of methane to top consumers. This functional state, also called the dead zone expansion, was caused by the change in human land-use occurring at the beginning of the 20th century. The strong modification of agro-pastoral practices (e.g., fertilization practices, intensive grazing, and sewage effluent) modified the influx of nutrients (by diffuse and/or point-source inputs) and induced a significant increase in the trophic status and organic matter sedimentation to reach unprecedented values. Further studies should be planned to assess dead zone expansion and, according to the regime shift theory, to provide environmental tipping points for sustainable resource management.

  20. Enhanced benthic response to upwelling of the Indonesian Throughflow onto the southern shelf of Timor-Leste, Timor Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Daniel M.; Brinkman, Richard; Trott, Lindsay A.; Silva, Fernando; Pereira, Francisco; Wagey, Tonny

    2013-03-01

    Benthic microbial metabolism and bacterial diagenetic pathways were measured along the southern shelf of Timor-Leste during an upwelling event in the winter SE monsoon season. Vertical profiles of water properties and bottom water nutrient concentrations, and operational ocean modeling showed subsurface upwelling from the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) along the southern shelf west of longitude 126°25'E and surface upwelling at the far eastern end of the shelf. Warm surface waters above the halocline had salinities of 33.6 to 33.9 overlying cooler ITF water with salinities of 34.4 to 34.6. Beneath the zone of subsurface upwelling and stratification, sediment chlorophyll a (range: 2.8-4.4 µg g-1) and phaeopigment (range: 4.5-7.0 µg g-1) concentrations were sufficient to fuel very rapid rates of benthic oxygen consumption (range: 89.9-142.3 mmol m-2 day-1) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) release (range: 108.1-148.9 mmol m-2 day-1) across the sediment-water interface, and DIC (range: 94.7-142.5 mmol m-2 day-1) and NH4+ (range: 13.3-19.9 mmol m-2 day-1) production from incubated surface (0-10 cm) sediments. Molar ratios of DIC/NH4+ production were lower (range: 6.6-7.7) in fine-grained sediments under the subsurface upwelling regime than in sandy, possibly scoured sediments under surface upwelling (range: 11.9-21.2) where there was no evidence of benthic enrichment. It is proposed that subsurface upwelling along the widest portions of the shelf stimulates phytoplankton production, leading to deposition of fresh phytodetritus that is rapidly decomposed on the seafloor. These zones of high biological activity may attract and support large populations of pelagic fish and cetaceans that have been caught for centuries along the south coast.

  1. Preliminary results from a shallow water benthic grazing study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, N.L.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2005-01-01

    The nutrient-rich, shallow waters of San Francisco Bay support high rates of primary production, limited not by nutrients but by light availability and benthic grazing (Alpine and others 1992; Cloern 1982). Phytoplankton blooms are an important food source for upper trophic levels. Consequently animal populations, such as fish, may suffer under conditions of high benthic bivalve grazing. It has been hypothesized that several species of fish are suffering as a result of severe decreases in available phytoplankton since the introduction of Potamocorbula amurensis into San Francisco Bay (Feyrer 2003).

  2. Controlling benthic release of phosphorus in different Baltic Sea scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitkänen, Heikki; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Hansen, Jørgen L. S.;

    The general aim of the PROPPEN project was to study whether it is possible to counteract near-bottom anoxia and excess benthic nutrient release ("internal loading") in the Baltic Sea by artificial oxygenation in cost-efficient and socio-economically beneficial ways. Two pilot sites were selected ...... to counteract anoxia and benthic release of nutrients in coastal marine conditions in the Baltic Sea. The project undertook monitoring of the pilot tests, modelling of effects at different scales, risk management, cost effectiveness and cost benefit analysis....

  3. Production by intertidal benthic animals and limits to their predation by shorebirds : a heuristic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis

    1987-01-01

    This review examines the question whether the cumulative amount of benthic biomass removed by feeding shorebirds on a certain intertidal area is limited by the renewal rate of benthic food stocks. Limitations of current methods to estimate both predatory impact by shorebirds and harvestable benthic

  4. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, P.

    2013-01-01

    on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies reveal that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly...

  5. Light availability in the coastal ocean: impact on the distribution of benthic photosynthetic organisms and contribution to primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Gattuso

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the major features of the coastal zone is that part of its sea floor receives a significant amount of sunlight and can therefore sustain benthic primary production by seagrasses, macroalgae, microphytobenthos and corals. However, the contribution of benthic communities to the primary production of the global coastal ocean is not known, partly because the surface area where benthic primary production can proceed is poorly quantified. Here, we use a new analysis of satellite (SeaWiFS data collected between 1998 and 2003 to estimate, for the first time at a nearly global scale, the irradiance reaching the bottom of the coastal ocean. The following cumulative functions provide the percentage of the surface of the coastal zone receiving an irradiance greater than Ez:

    PaNon-polar=28.80−16.69 log10(Ez+0.84 log102(Ez+0.83 log103(Ez


    PaArctic=16.01−15.67 log10(Ez+2.03 log102(Ez+1.00 log103(Ez

    Data on the constraint of light availability on the major benthic primary producers and net primary production are reviewed. Some photosynthetic organisms can grow deeper than the nominal bottom limit of the coastal ocean (200 m. The minimum irradiance required varies from 0.4 to 5.1 mol photons m−2 d−1 depending on the group considered. The daily compensation irradiance of benthic communities ranges from 0.24 to 4.4 mol photons m−2 d−1. Data on benthic irradiance and light requirements are combined to estimate the surface area of the coastal ocean where

  6. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  7. Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic nitrogen in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary and implications for selective organic matter degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON and carbon (DOC in sediment pore waters was determined at nine locations along the St. Lawrence Estuary and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in the sedimentary particulate organic matter (POM reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. Based on pore water profiles we estimated the benthic diffusive fluxes of DON and DOC. Our results show that DON fluxed out of the sediments at significant rates (110 to 430 μmol m−2 d−1. DON fluxes were positively correlated with sedimentary POM reactivity and sediment oxygen exposure time (OET, suggesting direct links between POM quality, aerobic remineralization and the release of DON to the water column. DON fluxes were on the order of 30% to 64% of the total benthic inorganic fixed N loss due to denitrification, and often exceeded the diffusive nitrate fluxes into the sediments. Hence they represented a large fraction of the total benthic N exchange. This result is particularly important in light of the fact that DON fluxes are usually not accounted for in estuarine and coastal zone nutrient budgets. The ratio of the DON to nitrate flux increased from 0.6 in the Lower Estuary to 1.5 in the Gulf. In contrast to DON, DOC fluxes did not show any significant spatial variation along the Laurentian Channel (LC between the Estuary and the Gulf (2100 ± 100μmol m−2 d−1, suggesting that production and consumption of labile DOC components proceed at similar rates, irrespective of the overall benthic characteristics and the reactivity of POM. As a consequence, the molar C/N ratio of dissolved organic matter (DOM in pore water and the overlying bottom water varied significantly along the transect, with lowest C/N in the Lower Estuary (5–6 and highest C/N (> 10 in the Gulf. We observed large differences between the C/N of pore water DOM with respect to POM, and the degree of

  8. Benthic Species Richness of U.S. Pacific Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the spatial distribution of biodiversity is of paramount importance due to the potential consequences of its loss on human welfare. We demonstrate that biodiversity of soft-bottomed estuarine benthic organisms can be predicted with relatively high accuracy at multi...

  9. Benthic primary production and mineralization in a High Arctic fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attard, Karl; Hancke, Kasper; Sejr, Mikael K.;

    2016-01-01

    Coastal and shelf systems likely exert major influence on Arctic Ocean functioning, yet key ecosystem processes remain poorly quantified. We employed the aquatic eddy covariance (AEC) oxygen (O2) flux method to estimate benthic primary production and mineralization in a High Arctic Greenland fjord...

  10. BENTHIC MACROFAUNA-HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN TWO PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habitat-based ecological risk assessments rely, in part, on estimates of the ecological value of the habitats at risk. As part of a larger programmatic effort to estimate estuarine habitat values, we determined benthic macrofauna-habitat relationships for 8 intertidal habitats i...

  11. Bipolar gene flow in deep-sea benthic foraminifera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, J.; Fahrni, J.; Lecroq, B.;

    2007-01-01

    -sea foraminiferal species (Epistominella exigua, Cibicides wuellerstorfi and Oridorsalis umbonatus), separated by distances of up to 17 000 km. Our results contrast with the substantial level of cryptic diversity usually revealed by molecular studies, of shallow-water benthic and planktonic marine organisms. The...

  12. Distribution of benthic foraminifera within oxygen minima zone, off central west coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumder, A.; Henriques, P.J.; Nigam, R.

    by the coastal mountains known as the "Western Ghats", extending in a roughly north- south direction with a width of 50-60 km. They are composed of Precambrian gneisses, schists, granites and charnockites covered by extensive laterite capping and rich iron ore...

  13. Habitat heterogeneity and its influence on benthic biodiversity in oxygen minimum zones

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gooday, A.J.; Bett, B.J.; Escobar, E.; Ingole, B.S.; Levin, L.A.; Neira, C.; Raman, A.V.; Sellanes, J.

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2 Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-305 Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F., Mexico..., Department of Zoology, Andhra University, Waltair, Visakhapatnam 530003, India 6 Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Departamento de Biología Marina, Universidad Católica del Norte, Larrondo 1281, Coquimbo, Chile. 7 Centro de Investigación Oceanográfica en el...

  14. Zoning Districts, Zoning, Published in 2002, Freelance.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Zoning Districts dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2002. It is described as 'Zoning'. Data by this publisher are often...

  15. Eutrophication in the northern Adriatic Sea: Benthic fluxes and nutrient budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berelson, W.M.; Hammond, D.E. (Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)); Giordani, P. (Inst. di Geologia Marina-CNR, Bologna (Italy))

    1990-01-09

    The northern Adriatic Sea has been plagued by problems of eutrophication. This area is relatively shallow (maximum depth = 60m), becoming stratified during the summer months which inhibits oxygen transport to bottom waters. Anthropogenic nutrient loading in rivers entering the northern Adriatic has increased nutrient input to this system and stimulated algai growth. Five stations in the western Adriatic (south of the Po River Delta) were occupied during September, 1988 and benthic flux chambers used to measure nutrient fluxes. These sites included 3 stations previously studied in 1982. Flux measurements of dissolved silica, nitrate, oxygen, ammonia, phosphate, CO[sub 2], alkalinity and radon were made during 24 hour incubations of flux chambers (area covered - 0.07 m[sup 2], volume = [approximately]81) that were continuously stirred and sampled periodically. Nutrient fluxes measured were generally consistent with the fluxes measured previously in June, 1982 except for radon fluxes which were 203 times greater in the earlier field season. There was a general trend in nutrient fluxes to decrease offshore, a pattern probably controlled by the sedimentation patterns because fine grained, organic matter-rich sediment are concentrated in a zone near shore. Average regional fluxes were (in mmol m[sup -2]d[sup -1], negative values indicate flux into sediment): Oxygen (-12), CO[sub 2] (19), Alkalinity (4), Silica (3.3), Ammonia (1.5), Phosphate (0.1) and Nitrate (0.3). The carbon/ammonia flux ratio is about twice the C/N ratio in marine phytoplankton, suggesting that large amounts of denitrification may be occuring in these sediments. Comparisons of benthic fluxes and sediment burial rates indicate that 50-90% of the carbon, silica, phosphorus and nitrogen arriving at the sediment-water interface is recycled before burial. The nutrient input to the water column from NW Adriatic sediments is about equal to the input from coastal rivers.

  16. Benthic Ammonia Oxidizers Differ in Community Structure and Biogeochemical Potential Across a Riverine Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian eDamashek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen pollution in coastal zones is a widespread issue, particularly in ecosystems with urban or agricultural watersheds. California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, at the landward reaches of San Francisco Bay, is highly impacted by both agricultural runoff and sewage effluent, leading to chronically high nutrient loadings. In particular, the massive discharge of ammonium into the Sacramento River has altered this ecosystem by increasing ammonium concentrations and thus changing the stoichiometry of inorganic nitrogen stocks, with potential effects throughout the food web. To date, however, there has been little research examining N biogeochemistry or N-cycling microbial communities in this system. We report the first data on benthic ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities and potential nitrification rates for the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, focusing on the functional gene amoA (encoding the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase. There were stark regional differences in ammonia-oxidizing communities, with ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB outnumbering ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA only in the ammonium-rich Sacramento River. High potential nitrification rates in the Sacramento River suggested these communities may be capable of oxidizing significant amounts of ammonium, compared to the San Joaquin River and the upper reaches of San Francisco Bay. Gene diversity also showed regional patterns, as well as phylogenetically unique ammonia oxidizers in the Sacramento River. The community structure and biogeochemical function of benthic ammonia oxidizers appears related to nutrient loadings. Unraveling the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of N cycling pathways is a critical step toward understanding how such ecosystems respond to the changing environmental conditions wrought by human development and climate change.

  17. The impact of global warming and anoxia on marine benthic community dynamics: an example from the Toarcian (Early Jurassic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Danise

    Full Text Available The Pliensbachian-Toarcian (Early Jurassic fossil record is an archive of natural data of benthic community response to global warming and marine long-term hypoxia and anoxia. In the early Toarcian mean temperatures increased by the same order of magnitude as that predicted for the near future; laminated, organic-rich, black shales were deposited in many shallow water epicontinental basins; and a biotic crisis occurred in the marine realm, with the extinction of approximately 5% of families and 26% of genera. High-resolution quantitative abundance data of benthic invertebrates were collected from the Cleveland Basin (North Yorkshire, UK, and analysed with multivariate statistical methods to detect how the fauna responded to environmental changes during the early Toarcian. Twelve biofacies were identified. Their changes through time closely resemble the pattern of faunal degradation and recovery observed in modern habitats affected by anoxia. All four successional stages of community structure recorded in modern studies are recognised in the fossil data (i.e. Stage III: climax; II: transitional; I: pioneer; 0: highly disturbed. Two main faunal turnover events occurred: (i at the onset of anoxia, with the extinction of most benthic species and the survival of a few adapted to thrive in low-oxygen conditions (Stages I to 0 and (ii in the recovery, when newly evolved species colonized the re-oxygenated soft sediments and the path of recovery did not retrace of pattern of ecological degradation (Stages I to II. The ordination of samples coupled with sedimentological and palaeotemperature proxy data indicate that the onset of anoxia and the extinction horizon coincide with both a rise in temperature and sea level. Our study of how faunal associations co-vary with long and short term sea level and temperature changes has implications for predicting the long-term effects of "dead zones" in modern oceans.

  18. Benthic Oxygen Uptake in the Arctic Ocean Margins - A Case Study at the Deep-Sea Observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathalot, Cecile; Rabouille, Christophe; Sauter, Eberhard; Schewe, Ingo; Soltwedel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The past decades have seen remarkable changes in the Arctic, a hotspot for climate change. Nevertheless, impacts of such changes on the biogeochemical cycles and Arctic marine ecosystems are still largely unknown. During cruises to the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN in July 2007 and 2008, we investigated the biogeochemical recycling of organic matter in Arctic margin sediments by performing shipboard measurements of oxygen profiles, bacterial activities and biogenic sediment compounds (pigment, protein, organic carbon, and phospholipid contents). Additional in situ oxygen profiles were performed at two sites. This study aims at characterizing benthic mineralization activity along local bathymetric and latitudinal transects. The spatial coverage of this study is unique since it focuses on the transition from shelf to Deep Ocean, and from close to the ice edge to more open waters. Biogeochemical recycling across the continental margin showed a classical bathymetric pattern with overall low fluxes except for the deepest station located in the Molloy Hole (5500 m), a seafloor depression acting as an organic matter depot center. A gradient in benthic mineralization rates arises along the latitudinal transect with clearly higher values at the southern stations (average diffusive oxygen uptake of 0.49 ± 0.18 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) compared to the northern sites (0.22 ± 0.09 mmol O2 m-2 d-1). The benthic mineralization activity at the HAUSGARTEN observatory thus increases southward and appears to reflect the amount of organic matter reaching the seafloor rather than its lability. Although organic matter content and potential bacterial activity clearly follow this gradient, sediment pigments and phospholipids exhibit no increase with latitude whereas satellite images of surface ocean chlorophyll a indicate local seasonal patterns of primary production. Our results suggest that predicted increases in primary production in the Arctic Ocean could induce a larger export of more

  19. Coral Reefs at the Northernmost Tip of Borneo: An Assessment of Scleractinian Species Richness Patterns and Benthic Reef Assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarinah Waheed

    Full Text Available The coral reefs at the northernmost tip of Sabah, Borneo will be established under a marine protected area: the Tun Mustapha Park (TMP by the end of 2015. This area is a passage where the Sulu Sea meets the South China Sea and it is situated at the border of the area of maximum marine biodiversity, the Coral Triangle. The TMP includes fringing and patch reefs established on a relatively shallow sea floor. Surveys were carried out to examine features of the coral reefs in terms of scleractinian species richness, and benthic reef assemblages following the Reef Check substrate categories, with emphasis on hard coral cover. Variation in scleractinian diversity was based on the species composition of coral families Fungiidae (n = 39, Agariciidae (n = 30 and Euphylliidae (n = 15. The number of coral species was highest at reefs with a larger depth gradient i.e. at the periphery of the study area and in the deep South Banggi Channel. Average live hard coral cover across the sites was 49%. Only 7% of the examined reefs had > 75% hard coral cover, while the majority of the reef sites were rated fair (51% and good (38%. Sites with low coral cover and high rubble fragments are evidence of blast fishing, although the observed damage appeared old. Depth was a dominant factor in influencing the coral species composition and benthic reef communities in the TMP. Besides filling in the information gaps regarding species richness and benthic cover for reef areas that were previously without any data, the results of this study together with information that is already available on the coral reefs of TMP will be used to make informed decisions on zoning plans for conservation priorities in the proposed park.

  20. Benthic Oxygen Uptake in the Arctic Ocean Margins - A Case Study at the Deep-Sea Observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile Cathalot

    Full Text Available The past decades have seen remarkable changes in the Arctic, a hotspot for climate change. Nevertheless, impacts of such changes on the biogeochemical cycles and Arctic marine ecosystems are still largely unknown. During cruises to the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN in July 2007 and 2008, we investigated the biogeochemical recycling of organic matter in Arctic margin sediments by performing shipboard measurements of oxygen profiles, bacterial activities and biogenic sediment compounds (pigment, protein, organic carbon, and phospholipid contents. Additional in situ oxygen profiles were performed at two sites. This study aims at characterizing benthic mineralization activity along local bathymetric and latitudinal transects. The spatial coverage of this study is unique since it focuses on the transition from shelf to Deep Ocean, and from close to the ice edge to more open waters. Biogeochemical recycling across the continental margin showed a classical bathymetric pattern with overall low fluxes except for the deepest station located in the Molloy Hole (5500 m, a seafloor depression acting as an organic matter depot center. A gradient in benthic mineralization rates arises along the latitudinal transect with clearly higher values at the southern stations (average diffusive oxygen uptake of 0.49 ± 0.18 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 compared to the northern sites (0.22 ± 0.09 mmol O2 m-2 d-1. The benthic mineralization activity at the HAUSGARTEN observatory thus increases southward and appears to reflect the amount of organic matter reaching the seafloor rather than its lability. Although organic matter content and potential bacterial activity clearly follow this gradient, sediment pigments and phospholipids exhibit no increase with latitude whereas satellite images of surface ocean chlorophyll a indicate local seasonal patterns of primary production. Our results suggest that predicted increases in primary production in the Arctic Ocean could induce a larger

  1. Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Andrew D; Treibitz, Tali; Roberts, Paul L D; Kelly, Emily L A; Horwitz, Rael; Smith, Jennifer E; Jaffe, Jules S

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination. The diver-deployed instrument permits studies of both spatial and temporal processes such as the algal colonization and overgrowth of bleaching corals, as well as coral polyp behaviour and interspecific competition. By enabling in situ observations at previously unattainable scales, this instrument can provide important new insights into micro-scale processes in benthic ecosystems that shape observed patterns at much larger scales. PMID:27403715

  2. Ural River benthic communities response on the chemical spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ural River is the second river of the North Caspian basin, on the north-west border of the Kazakhstan and Russian. The middle flow of the Ural River is limited by the dam of Iriklin water reservoirs (about 80 km up from Orsk town, Orenburg district) to the mouth of Barbastay River (about 45 km down from Ural'sk town). On 13--17 November 1991, after an industrial incident in Orsk oil refinery enterprise effluent polluted the Ural River. An assessment of the Middle flow Ural River benthic communities by oil and phenols spill response is described. The paper is based on a study of the short-term response of benthic biocenosises compared with natural transformation of the community structure before pollution

  3. Underwater microscopy for in situ studies of benthic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Andrew D.; Treibitz, Tali; Roberts, Paul L. D.; Kelly, Emily L. A.; Horwitz, Rael; Smith, Jennifer E.; Jaffe, Jules S.

    2016-07-01

    Microscopic-scale processes significantly influence benthic marine ecosystems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. Due to the ocean's complex and dynamic nature, it is most informative to study these processes in the natural environment yet it is inherently difficult. Here we present a system capable of non-invasively imaging seafloor environments and organisms in situ at nearly micrometre resolution. We overcome the challenges of underwater microscopy through the use of a long working distance microscopic objective, an electrically tunable lens and focused reflectance illumination. The diver-deployed instrument permits studies of both spatial and temporal processes such as the algal colonization and overgrowth of bleaching corals, as well as coral polyp behaviour and interspecific competition. By enabling in situ observations at previously unattainable scales, this instrument can provide important new insights into micro-scale processes in benthic ecosystems that shape observed patterns at much larger scales.

  4. Benthic trophic status of sediments in a metropolitan area (Rio de la Plata estuary): Linkages with natural and human pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Natalia; Pita, Ana Laura; Brugnoli, Ernesto; García-Rodríguez, Felipe; Burone, Leticia; Kandratavicius, Noelia; Hutton, Marisa; Muniz, Pablo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the benthic trophic status of the Montevideo coastal zone-Rio de la Plata estuary using the quantity and the biochemical composition of sedimentary organic matter as synthetic descriptors. The spatio-temporal patterns in the biochemical composition of sedimentary organic matter were related to the presence of some natural and human pressures. Biochemical features were analyzed correlatively with the type and proximity of certain impacts to investigate the usefulness of this biochemical approach for assessing the levels of natural and anthropogenic perturbations. Chlorophyll-a, phaeopigment and the biopolymeric carbon concentrations were similar to those reported in very productive, eutrophic and anthropised estuarine areas. Total proteins (PRT) and lipids (LIP) showed the highest concentrations in the inner portion of Montevideo Bay, decreasing towards the nearby coastal areas of Punta Carretas and Punta Yeguas. Total carbohydrates (CHO) presented the lowest values in the outer stations of Montevideo Bay, but similar and higher concentrations were recorded in the inner stations of the bay and the adjacent coastal zones. PRT:CHO ratios >1 were always observed for the inner stations of Montevideo Bay thus suggesting intense detritus mineralization and an increment in their protein content due to bacterial activity. The biopolymeric carbon showed the same spatial trend observed for PRT, LPD and the PRT: CHO ratios with highest concentrations in the inner bay than in Pta. Carretas and Pta. Yeguas. Elevated contributions of PRT and LIP in the inner Montevideo Bay may be associated with anthropogenic inputs of organic matter such as sewage, food industry and petroleum hydrocarbons. Conversely, high CHO contributions in the nearby coastal areas of Pta. Carretas and Pta. Yeguas seemed to be related to autochthonous primary production and CHO temporal variability with natural oscillations in the productivity of the system. Biochemical composition of organic

  5. An assessment of seabird influence on Arctic coastal benthic communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmudczyńska-Skarbek, Katarzyna; Balazy, Piotr; Kuklinski, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    It is well recognized that seabirds, particularly those nesting in coastal colonies, can provide significant nutrient enrichment to Arctic terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about the fate of bird-derived nutrients that return to the marine environment and potentially concentrate below the colonies. To attempt to assess the influence of this potential nutrient enrichment of the coastal benthic community, samples of macroalgae, sea urchins (mainly algivores), and hermit crabs (scavengers) were collected at two Arctic localities (Spitsbergen), (1) below a mixed colony of guillemots and kittiwakes, and (2) in an adjacent geomorphologically similar location not influenced by the seabird colony. A much higher nitrogen stable isotope ratio (δ15N) and total nitrogen content were found in terrestrial plants sampled below the colony than away from it. In benthic macroalgae, however, there were no δ15N differences. This might result from the timing of an intensive growth period in macroalgae in late winter/early spring, when there is little or no runoff from the land, and/or ornithogenic nutrients being directly incorporated by phytoplankton. Sea urchins showed higher δ15N and total N in the control site comparing to the colony-influenced area, suggesting differential food sources in their diet and a role of scavenging/carnivory on higher trophic levels there. Opportunistically feeding hermit crabs showed δ15N and total N enrichment below the seabird colony, suggesting dependence on detritus derived from food chains originating from pelagic producers. Our results indicate that seabirds in the Arctic may fertilize coastal benthic communities through pelagic-benthic coupling, while having no direct impact on bottom primary production.

  6. Catalog of marine benthic algae from New Caledonia

    OpenAIRE

    Garrigue, Claire; Tsuda, R.T.

    1988-01-01

    A catalog of the marine benthic algae (#Chlorophyta, Phaeophyta$ and #Rhodophyta$) reported from New Caledonia is presented in two sections : 1. Classification; 2. Check list with references and localities. There are 35 genera, 130 species of green algae; 23 genera, 59 species of brown algae; and 79 genera, 147 species of red algae which represent a rich algal flora for the subtropics. (Résumé d'auteur)

  7. Effect of Storm Events on Benthic Nitrifying Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, A. Bryce

    1983-01-01

    Storm events resulted in a marked reduction in the benthic nitrifying activity of a stream receiving geothermal inputs of ammonium. Subsequently, nitrifying activity demonstrated a logarithmic increase until a stable activity was reached 10 to 12 days after the storm event. The rate of increase of poststorm nitrifying activity was used to calculate the nitrifier growth rate in situ (0.0075 to 0.0116 h−1) which was lower than the growth rates observed for laboratory cultures of nitrifying bact...

  8. Modern benthic foraminifer distribution in the Amerasian Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishman, S.E.; Foley, K.M.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 38 box cores were collected from the Amerasian Basin, Arctic Ocean during the U.S. Geological Survey 1992 (PI92-AR) and 1993 (PI93-AR) Arctic Cruises aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker Polar Star. In addition, the cruises collected geophysical data, piston cores and hydrographic data to address the geologic and oceanographic history of the western Arctic Ocean. This paper reports the results of the quantitative analyses of benthic foraminifer distribution data of the total (live + dead) assemblages derived from 22 box core-top samples. The results show that a distinct depth distribution of three dominant benthic foraminifer assemblages, the Textularia spp. - Spiroplectammina biformis, Cassidulina teretis and Oridorsalis tener - Eponides tumidulus Biofacies are strongly controlled by the dominant water masses within the Canada Basin: the Arctic Surface Water, Arctic Intermediate Water and Canada Basin Deep Water. The faunal distributions and their oceanographic associations in the Canada Basin are consistent with observations of benthic foraminifer distributions from other regions within the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Benthic foraminifera as biostratigraphical and paleoecological indicators:An example from Oligo-Miocene deposits in the SW of Zagros basin, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asghar Roozpeykar; Iraj Maghfouri Moghaddam

    2016-01-01

    The Asmari Formation is a predominantly carbonate lithostratigraphic unit that outcrops in the Zagros Basin. Micropaleontological studies of the Asmari Formation in the Dehdasht area led to the identifi-cation of 51 species of foraminifera taxa. Among the foraminifera, Nummulites cf. vascus, Operculin sp., Operculina complanata, Eulepidina dilatata, Eulepidina elephantine, Ditrupa sp., Miogypsina sp., Elphidium sp. 14, and Borelis melo curdica are the most important. The Lepidocyclina-Operculina-Ditrupa assemblage zone represents the RupelianeChattian age. The Aquitanian age is also defined by co-occurrence of Miogypsina sp. and Elphidium sp. 14, and finally, the first occurrence of Borelis melo curdica represents the Burdigalian. Based on faunal assemblages, the following paleoenvironmental settings are determined for the deposition of the study section: (1) the deep, offshore settings in the aphotic zone dominated by pelagic and small benthic foraminifera;(2) the low energy, turbid and low light parts of the oligophotic zone characterized by large and flat lepidocyclinids (Eulepidina) and Nummulitidae;(3) the low turbidity, deeper part of the inner ramp dominated by Miogypsinoides, Neorotalia, Lepidocyclina, Operculina and Archias; (4) the shallow, marginal marine environment exposed to salinity fluctuations (short-term salinity fluctuations or fully marine conditions) dominated by small benthic Foraminifera (Ammonia and Elphidium); (5) highly translucent, shallowest part of the inner ramp dominated by representatives of Borelis, Meandropsina and Peneroplis. The biotic assemblages represent warm tropical waters with oligotrophic to slightly mesotrophic conditions.

  10. Effects of an oil spill on benthic community production and respiration on subtropical intertidal sandflats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Hua; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2013-08-15

    This study determined effects of an oil spill on subtropical benthic community production and respiration by monitoring CO2 fluxes in benthic chambers on intertidal sandflats during emersion before and after an accidental spill. The oil spill decreased sediment chlorophyll a concentrations, altered benthic macrofaunal community, and affected ecological functioning by suppressing or even stopping microalgal production, increasing bacterial respiration, and causing a shift from an autotrophic system to a heterotrophic system. Effects of the oil spill on the macrofauna were more severe than on benthic microalgae, and affected sedentary infauna more than motile epifauna. Despite the oil spill's impact on the benthic community and carbon metabolism, the affected area appeared to return to normal in about 23 days. Our results suggest that the prompt response of benthic metabolism to exposure to petroleum hydrocarbons can serve as a useful indicator of the impact of an oil spill.

  11. Do benthic biofilters contribute to sustainability and restoration of the benthic environment impacted by offshore cage finfish aquaculture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado-Giménez, F; Piedecausa, M A; Carrasco, C; Gutiérrez, J M; Aliaga, V; García-García, B

    2011-08-01

    Benthic biofilters were deployed under a cage fish farm and in two reference locations to assess the influence of the farm on the biofilters and the surroundings, as well as to verify the usefulness of this technology as a mitigation tool. The biofilters underneath the farm recruited a fouling community practically identical to that of the control biofilters, which included a variety of trophic strategies. The former showed a higher 15N enrichment, indicating that fouling beneath the farm was benefiting from the farm waste. The waste retention efficiency was low (0.02 g N m(-2) month(-1)) beneath the farm. Benthic biofilters aggregated demersal wild fish around and within them. Pelagic wild fish also frequently used the biofilters beneath the farm, forming compact shoals around them. The increased complexity of the habitat below the fish farm enhanced biodiversity, but this improvement did not lead to the recovery of the sediments around the biofilters.

  12. USGS-NPS Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayagandhi, Amar; Brock, John; Beavers, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program recently allocated funds to initiate a benthic mapping program in ocean and Great Lakes parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. Seventy-four (ocean and Great Lakes) parks, spanning more than 5,000 miles of coastline, many affected by increasing coastal storms and other natural and anthropogenic processes, make the development of a Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) timely. The resulting maps and associated reports will be provided to NPS managers in a consistent servicewide format to help park managers protect and manage the 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. Of the 74 ocean and Great Lakes park units, the 40 parks with submerged acreage will be the focus in the early years of the SBMP. The NPS and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop (June 3-5, 2008) in Lakewood, CO. The assembly of experts from the NPS and other Federal and non-Federal agencies clarified the needs and goals of the NPS SBMP and was one of the key first steps in designing the benthic mapping program. The central needs for individual parks, park networks, and regions identified by workshop participants were maps including bathymetry, bottom type, geology, and biology. This workshop, although not an exhaustive survey of data-acquisition technologies, highlighted the more promising technologies being used, existing sources of data, and the need for partnerships to leverage resources. Workshop products include recommended classification schemes and management approaches for consistent application and products similar to other long-term NPS benthic mapping efforts. As part of the SBMP, recommendations from this workshop, including application of an improved version of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), will be tested in several pilot parks. In 2008, in conjunction with the findings of this workshop

  13. More rapid shift to a benthic niche in larger Gadus morhua juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ólafsdóttir, G Á; Gunnarsson, G S; Karlsson, H

    2015-08-01

    Trophic use by Atlantic cod Gadus morhua juveniles was examined early and late in the shift from pelagic to benthic habitats. Changes in the proportion of pelagic copepods, estimates of benthic prey indicated by isotope mixing models and stable-isotope values between sample periods suggested a gradual shift towards a benthic niche. Values of the trophic proxies, however, changed most markedly in the largest juvenile group, suggesting a more rapid trophic niche shift, and in turn competitive advantage, of larger juveniles.

  14. Benthic communities on hard substrates covered by Limnoperna fortunei Dunker (Bivalvia, Mytilidae at an estuarine beach (Río de la Plata, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando G. Spaccesi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and composition of benthic communities on hard substrates covered by the nonindigenous bivalve Limnoperna fortunei Dunker, the golden mussel, were quantified in the middle zone of the Río de la Plata Estuary (Argentina from April 2001 through March 2002. A total of 26 taxa were recorded. L. fortunei and Nematoda were the central and dominant groups, with a prodigious abundance of over 80%. The prevalence of L. fortunei, rather than the environmental variables, regulated the dynamics of the associated invertebrate fauna. The golden mussel alters both the structure and function of benthic native communities on hard substrates, allows a higher surface available for colonization and refuge, and provides food source to deposit-feeding organisms in the form of organic or residual material. The mussel also increases the abundance and diversity of taxa on hard substrata - such as Oligochaeta, Hirudinea, Tardigrada, Chironomidae, Copepoda, Tanaidacea, and Hydrachnidia. Similarities and nonparametric multidimensional-scaling analyses indicated that the benthic composition had a seasonal variation. L. fortunei has an environmental impact, an ability to invade new freshwater ambiences worldwide and ecological characteristic comparable to those of Dreissena polymorpha Pallas (the zebra mussel of North America and Europe.

  15. Do benthic biofilters contribute to sustainability and restoration of the benthic environment impacted by offshore cage finfish aquaculture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Benthic biofilters were deployed under an offshore fish farm and in control locations. → We checked the farm influence on fouling, wild fish and sediment near the biofilters. → Fouling under the cages used fish farm-derived wastes, but at low efficiency. → Wild fish were more abundant in the biofilters located below the cages. → Despite these clear benefits, sediment quality around the biofilters did not improve. - Abstract: Benthic biofilters were deployed under a cage fish farm and in two reference locations to assess the influence of the farm on the biofilters and the surroundings, as well as to verify the usefulness of this technology as a mitigation tool. The biofilters underneath the farm recruited a fouling community practically identical to that of the control biofilters, which included a variety of trophic strategies. The former showed a higher 15N enrichment, indicating that fouling beneath the farm was benefiting from the farm waste. The waste retention efficiency was low (0.02 g N m-2 month-1) beneath the farm. Benthic biofilters aggregated demersal wild fish around and within them. Pelagic wild fish also frequently used the biofilters beneath the farm, forming compact shoals around them. The increased complexity of the habitat below the fish farm enhanced biodiversity, but this improvement did not lead to the recovery of the sediments around the biofilters.

  16. A Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program for National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayegandhi, Amar; Beavers, Rebecca; Brock, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring Program directed the initiation of a benthic habitat mapping program in ocean and coastal parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. With 74 ocean and Great Lakes parks stretching over more than 5,000 miles of coastline across 26 States and territories, this Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) is essential. This program will deliver benthic habitat maps and their associated inventory reports to NPS managers in a consistent, servicewide format to support informed management and protection of 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. The NPS and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop June 3-5, 2008, in Lakewood, Colo., to discuss the goals and develop the design of the NPS SBMP with an assembly of experts (Moses and others, 2010) who identified park needs and suggested best practices for inventory and mapping of bathymetry, benthic cover, geology, geomorphology, and some water-column properties. The recommended SBMP protocols include servicewide standards (such as gap analysis, minimum accuracy, final products) as well as standards that can be adapted to fit network and park unit needs (for example, minimum mapping unit, mapping priorities). SBMP Mapping Process. The SBMP calls for a multi-step mapping process for each park, beginning with a gap assessment and data mining to determine data resources and needs. An interagency announcement of intent to acquire new data will provide opportunities to leverage partnerships. Prior to new data acquisition, all involved parties should be included in a scoping meeting held at network scale. Data collection will be followed by processing and interpretation, and finally expert review and publication. After publication, all digital materials will be archived in a common format. SBMP Classification Scheme. The SBMP will map using the Coastal and Marine Ecological

  17. Ocean acidification in the coastal zone from an organism's perspective: multiple system parameters, frequency domains, and habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G; Salisbury, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple natural and anthropogenic processes alter the carbonate chemistry of the coastal zone in ways that either exacerbate or mitigate ocean acidification effects. Freshwater inputs and multiple acid-base reactions change carbonate chemistry conditions, sometimes synergistically. The shallow nature of these systems results in strong benthic-pelagic coupling, and marine invertebrates at different life history stages rely on both benthic and pelagic habitats. Carbonate chemistry in coastal systems can be highly variable, responding to processes with temporal modes ranging from seconds to centuries. Identifying scales of variability relevant to levels of biological organization requires a fuller characterization of both the frequency and magnitude domains of processes contributing to or reducing acidification in pelagic and benthic habitats. We review the processes that contribute to coastal acidification with attention to timescales of variability and habitats relevant to marine bivalves.

  18. Linking benthic biodiversity and environmental conditions at the sea floor combining statistical and mechanistic modeling. Case study on the Black Sea's northwestern shelf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drion, Roxanne; Capet, Arthur; Gregoire, Marilaure

    2014-05-01

    The preservation of the health and biodiversity of benthic ecosystems is a crucial priority in order to achieve the Good Environmental Status (GES) of marine waters. The multiple pressures acting on the ocean, and in particular, on the coastal zone may prevent the maintenance of biodiversity either directly (e.g. trawling, dredging) or indirectly by modifying environmental conditions at the sea floor (e.g. eutrophication, pollution, acidification, warming). The management of the GES of the benthos in a changing environment and the definition of management strategies (e.g. nutrient reduction) that would preserve GES require tools able to predict the modifications of environmental conditions and to link these modifications to the status of the benthic system. Coupled biogeochemical-circulation models provide a large amount of information on physical (e.g. currents, salinity, temperature, shear stress) and biochemical conditions (e.g. oxygen, inorganic nutrients, sinking detritus) but cannot provide an information on species richness. We propose to link these aspects by applying canonical ordination techniques (e.g. Redundancy Analysis, CoInertia Analysis) on a large data set on macrobenthos collected on the Black Sea's north-western shelf with in-situ sediment data (e.g. granulometry, carbon and nitrogen content, C/N ratio, CaCO3 content) and bottom conditions (e.g. shear stress, level of oxygen stress, flux of organic matter to the sediments) provided by a three dimensional model. Beyond taxonomic description, the analysis is performed on the functional composition of the macrobenthos: A trait-based approach is used to assess the functional composition of the macrobenthos by associating the considered species to a list of biological, ecological and behavioral traits. This approach allows to appraise how local conditions determine the functional and taxonomical diversity and provides a mean to evaluate the impact of habitat alteration on the ecological role of

  19. Final report (2002-2004): Benthic macroinvertebrate communities of reconstructed freshwater tidal wetlands in the Anacostia River, Washington, D.C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittingham, K.D.; Hammerschlag, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Considerable work has been conducted on the benthic communities of inland aquatic systems, but there remains a paucity of effort on freshwater tidal wetlands. This study characterized the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of recently reconstructed urban freshwater tidal wetlands along the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. The focus of the study was on the two main areas of Kingman Marsh, which were reconstructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2000 using Anacostia dredge material. Populations from this 'new' marsh were compared to those of similarly reconstructed Kenilworth Marsh (1993) just one half mile upstream, the relic reference Dueling Creek Marsh in the upper Anacostia estuary and the outside reference Patuxent freshwater tidal marsh in an adjacent watershed. Benthic macro invertebrate organisms were collected using selected techniques for evaluation including the Ekman bottom grab sampler, sediment corer, D-net and Hester-Dendy sampler. Samples were collected at least seasonally from tidal channels, tidal mudflats, three vegetation/sediment zones (low, middle and high marsh), and pools over a 3-year period (late 2001-2004). The macroinvertebrate communities present at the marsh sites proved to be good indicators of disturbance and stress (Kingman Marsh), pollution, urban vs. rural location (Kenilworth and Patuxent), and similarities between reconstructed and remnant wetlands (Kenilworth and Dueling Creek). Macroinvertebrate density was significantly greater at Kingman Marsh than Kenilworth Marsh due to more numerous chironomids and oligochaetes. This may reflect an increase in unvegetated sediments at Kingman (even at elevations above natural mudflat) due to grazing pressure from over-abundant resident Canada geese. Unvegetated sediments yielded greater macroinvertebrate abundance but lower richness than vegetated marsh sites. Data collected from this study provides information on the extent that benthic macroinvertebrate communities can serve

  20. Benthic nutrient fluxes in the Eastern Gotland Basin (Baltic Sea) with particular focus on microbial mat ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noffke, A.; Sommer, S.; Dale, A. W.; Hall, P. O. J.; Pfannkuche, O.

    2016-06-01

    Benthic fluxes and water column distributions of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and total dissolved phosphate (PO43 -) were measured in situ at 7 sites across a redox gradient from oxic to anoxic bottom waters in the Eastern Gotland Basin (Baltic Sea). The study area was divided into the oxic zone (60 to ca. 80 m water depth, O2 > 30 μM), the hypoxic transition zone (HTZ, ca. 80 to 120 m, O2 ca. 120 m). Sediments in the HTZ were covered by mats of vacuolated sulfur bacteria. Ammonium (NH4+) fluxes in the deep basin and the HTZ were elevated at 0.6 mmol m- 2 d- 1 and 1 mmol m- 2 d- 1, respectively. Nitrate (NO3-) fluxes were directed into the sediment at all stations in the HTZ and were zero in the deep basin. PO43 - release was highest in the HTZ at 0.23 mmol m- 2 d- 1, with a further release of 0.2 mmol m- 2 d- 1 in the deep basin. Up-scaling the benthic fluxes to the Baltic Proper equals 109 kt yr- 1 of PO43 - and 266 kt yr- 1 of DIN. This is eight- and two-fold higher than the total external load of P (14 kt yr- 1) and DIN (140 kt yr- 1) in 2006 (HELCOM 2009b). The HTZ makes an important contribution to the internal nutrient loading in the Baltic Proper, releasing 70% of P (76 kt yr- 1) and 75% of DIN (200 kt yr- 1) despite covering only 51% of area.

  1. Microbial consumption of zero-valence sulfur in marine benthic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pjevac, Petra; Kamyshny, Alexey; Dyksma, Stefan; Mussmann, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Zero-valence sulfur (S°) is a central intermediate in the marine sulfur cycle and forms conspicuous accumulations at sediment surfaces, hydrothermal vents and in oxygen minimum zones. Diverse microorganisms can utilize S°, but those consuming S° in the environment are largely unknown. We identified possible key players in S° turnover on native or introduced S° in benthic coastal and deep-sea habitats using the 16S ribosomal RNA approach, (in situ) growth experiments and activity measurements. In all habitats, the epsilonproteobacterial Sulfurimonas/Sulfurovum group accounted for a substantial fraction of the microbial community. Deltaproteobacterial Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfuromonadales were also frequently detected, indicating S° disproportionation and S° respiration under anoxic conditions. Sulfate production from S° particles colonized in situ with Sulfurimonas/Sulfurovum suggested that this group oxidized S°. We also show that the type strain Sulfurimonas denitrificans is able to access cyclooctasulfur (S₈), a metabolic feature not yet demonstrated for sulfur oxidizers. The ability to oxidize S°, in particular S8 , likely facilitates niche partitioning among sulfur oxidizers in habitats with intense microbial sulfur cycling such as sulfidic sediment surfaces. Our results underscore the previously overlooked but central role of Sulfurimonas/Sulfurovum group for conversion of free S° at the seafloor surface.

  2. Benthic primary producers are promoted by groundwater-borne nutrient inputs to an oligotrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périllon, Cécile; Pöschke, Franziska; Lewandowski, Jörg; Hupfer, Michael; Hilt, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Nutrient-rich groundwater may contribute significantly to the nutrient influx to lakes. We hypothesized that benthic primary producers may benefit from these nutrients and store them at the sediment-water interface, thus potentially preventing eutrophication processes in the open water. To test this hypothesis, we performed measurements and experiments in the shallow littoral areas of the oligotrophic Lake Stechlin in Germany (4.25 km², maximum depth 70 m). Periphyton grown on artificial substrates for four weeks was sampled at three different locations with groundwater influx and three respective locations without groundwater influx in summer 2013. A comparison between these zones with and without seepage revealed that groundwater discharge increased periphyton dry weight by 56 % and its areal phosphorus accumulation by 41% in 2013. Phosphorus stored in periphyton and macrophytes accounted to up to 46% of the phosphorous present in the epilimnion in summer. In addition, we conducted experiments with flow-through chambers installed in the sediment of an area with intense groundwater influx. We measured seepage, sampled pore water and compared the biomass of periphyton grown on artificial substrate and of submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton pectinatus L.) planted in open and closed-bottom (control) chambers. In open chambers with groundwater influx, periphyton dry weight increased up to 27% and macrophyte growth rate up to 52 % in comparison to closed-bottom chambers.

  3. A decline in benthic foraminifera following the deepwater horizon event in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T Schwing

    Full Text Available Sediment cores were collected from three sites (1000-1200 m water depth in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico from December 2010 to June 2011 to assess changes in benthic foraminiferal density related to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH event (April-July 2010, 1500 m water depth. Short-lived radioisotope geochronologies (²¹⁰Pb, ²³⁴Th, organic geochemical assessments, and redox metal concentrations were determined to relate changes in sediment accumulation rate, contamination, and redox conditions with benthic foraminiferal density. Cores collected in December 2010 indicated a decline in density (80-93%. This decline was characterized by a decrease in benthic foraminiferal density and benthic foraminiferal accumulation rate (BFAR in the surface 10 mm relative to the down-core mean in all benthic foraminifera, including the dominant genera (Bulimina spp., Uvigerina spp., and Cibicidoides spp.. Cores collected in February 2011 documented a site-specific response. There was evidence of a recovery in the benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR at the site closest to the wellhead (45 NM, NE. However, the site farther afield (60 NM, NE recorded a continued decline in benthic foraminiferal density and BFAR down to near-zero values. This decline in benthic foraminiferal density occurred simultaneously with abrupt increases in sedimentary accumulation rates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH concentrations, and changes in redox conditions. Persistent reducing conditions (as many as 10 months after the event in the surface of these core records were a possible cause of the decline. Another possible cause was the increase (2-3 times background in PAH's, which are known to cause benthic foraminifera mortality and inhibit reproduction. Records of benthic foraminiferal density coupled with short-lived radionuclide geochronology and organic geochemistry were effective in quantifying the benthic response and will continue to be a valuable tool in determining

  4. The seasonal use of small-scale space by benthic species in a transiently hypoxic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doya, Carolina; Aguzzi, Jacopo; Chatzievangelou, Damianos; Costa, Corrado; Company, Joan Baptista; Tunnicliffe, Verena

    2016-02-01

    The use of small-scale space by benthos and its variation over the seasons in transiently hypoxic zones is poorly known. In this study, we examined the reciprocal spatial dispersion of the squat lobster (Munida quadrispina) and the slender sole (Lyopsetta exilis) according to oxygen concentrations at a VENUS platform of Ocean Networks Canada (ONC). This platform is located in a seasonally hypoxic zone at 96 m depth in the fjord of Saanich Inlet (British Columbia, Canada). We counted and located small as well as large squat lobsters and slender soles in digital still images during 1 year (2012-2013) also concomitantly obtained oxygen data. Images were subdivided in a squared grid to obtain relative density maps as a proxy for surface occupation and spatial autocorrelation. Pearson's chi-squared tests at a yearly scale, along with Dixon's spatial segregation index (S) for each possible pair among the studied groups, showed a significant absence of overlap. The same analyses by month and cross-correlation between oxygen and S showed that while the dispersion patterns of the large squat lobsters seemed to be driven mainly by the morphology of the seafloor, an effect of hypoxia was found in the small squat lobsters and the slender soles levels of aggregation. Small squat lobster sought seabed protrusions, such as sponges, to reach more oxygenated water. The slender sole's space occupation decreased significantly, being forced to retreat when the squat lobsters' abundance peaked as a result of what appeared to be a seasonal reproduction event in early summer. Our results contribute to the understanding of the ways in which oxygen levels modulate substrate use by benthic species in the framework of a global expansion of hypoxia in coastal and ocean areas.

  5. Root Apex Transition Zone as Oscillatory Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantisek eBaluska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Root apex of higher plants shows very high sensitivity to environmental stimuli. The root cap acts as the most prominent plant sensory organ; sensing diverse physical parameters such as gravity, light, humidity, oxygen and critical inorganic nutrients. However, the motoric responses to these stimuli are accomplished in the elongation region. This spatial discrepancy was solved when we have discovered and characterized the transition zone which is interpolated between the apical meristem and the subapical elongation zone. Cells of this zone are very active in the cytoskeletal rearrangements, endocytosis and endocytic vesicle recycling, as well as in electric activities. Here we discuss the oscillatory nature of the transition zone which, together with several other features of this zone, suggest that it acts as some kind of command centre. In accordance with the early proposal of Charles and Francis Darwins, cells of this root zone receive sensory information from the root cap and instruct the motoric responses of cells in the elongation zone.

  6. Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Pilar; Cristobo, Javier

    2014-01-01

    THE INFORMATION ABOUT THE SPONGES IN THIS DATASET IS DERIVED FROM THE SAMPLES COLLECTED DURING FIVE SPANISH ANTARCTIC EXPEDITIONS: Bentart 94, Bentart 95, Gebrap 96, Ciemar 99/00 and Bentart 2003. Samples were collected in the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea at depths ranging from 4 to 2044 m using various sampling gears. The Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions is unique as it provides information for an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean (Bellingshausen Sea). It fills an information gap on Antarctic deep-sea sponges, for which there were previously very few data. This phylum is an important part of the Antarctic biota and plays a key role in the structure of the Antarctic marine benthic community due to its considerable diversity and predominance in different areas. It is often a dominant component of Southern Ocean benthic communities. The quality of the data was controlled very thoroughly with GPS systems onboard the R/V Hesperides and by checking the data against the World Porifera Database (which is part of the World Register of Marine Species, WoRMS). The data are therefore fit for completing checklists, inclusion in biodiversity pattern analysis and niche modelling. The authors can be contacted if any additional information is needed before carrying out detailed biodiversity or biogeographic studies. The dataset currently contains 767 occurrence data items that have been checked for systematic reliability. This database is not yet complete and the collection is growing. Specimens are stored in the author's collection at the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) in the city of Gijón (Spain). The data are available in GBIF. PMID:24843257

  7. Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Rios

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The information about the sponges in this dataset is derived from the samples collected during five Spanish Antarctic expeditions: Bentart 94, Bentart 95, Gebrap 96, Ciemar 99/00 and Bentart 2003. Samples were collected in the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea at depths ranging from 4 to 2044 m using va­rious sampling gears.The Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions is unique as it provides in­formation for an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean (Bellingshausen Sea. It fills an information gap on Antarctic deep-sea sponges, for which there were previously very few data.This phylum is an important part of the Antarctic biota and plays a key role in the structure of the Antarctic marine benthic community due to its considerable diversity and predominance in different areas. It is often a dominant component of Southern Ocean benthic communities.The quality of the data was controlled very thoroughly with GPS systems onboard the R/V Hesperides and by checking the data against the World Porifera Database (which is part of the World Register of Marine Species, WoRMS. The data are therefore fit for completing checklists, inclusion in biodivers­ity pattern analysis and niche modelling. The authors can be contacted if any additional information is needed before carrying out detailed biodiversity or biogeographic studies.The dataset currently contains 767 occurrence data items that have been checked for systematic reliability. This database is not yet complete and the collection is growing. Specimens are stored in the author’s collection at the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO in the city of Gijón (Spain. The data are available in GBIF.

  8. Deep-sea benthic footprint of the deepwater horizon blowout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Montagna

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon (DWH accident in the northern Gulf of Mexico occurred on April 20, 2010 at a water depth of 1525 meters, and a deep-sea plume was detected within one month. Oil contacted and persisted in parts of the bottom of the deep-sea in the Gulf of Mexico. As part of the response to the accident, monitoring cruises were deployed in fall 2010 to measure potential impacts on the two main soft-bottom benthic invertebrate groups: macrofauna and meiofauna. Sediment was collected using a multicorer so that samples for chemical, physical and biological analyses could be taken simultaneously and analyzed using multivariate methods. The footprint of the oil spill was identified by creating a new variable with principal components analysis where the first factor was indicative of the oil spill impacts and this new variable mapped in a geographic information system to identify the area of the oil spill footprint. The most severe relative reduction of faunal abundance and diversity extended to 3 km from the wellhead in all directions covering an area about 24 km(2. Moderate impacts were observed up to 17 km towards the southwest and 8.5 km towards the northeast of the wellhead, covering an area 148 km(2. Benthic effects were correlated to total petroleum hydrocarbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and barium concentrations, and distance to the wellhead; but not distance to hydrocarbon seeps. Thus, benthic effects are more likely due to the oil spill, and not natural hydrocarbon seepage. Recovery rates in the deep sea are likely to be slow, on the order of decades or longer.

  9. Interlinking backscatter, grain size and benthic community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonigle, Chris; Collier, Jenny S.

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between acoustic backscatter, sediment grain size and benthic community structure is examined using three different quantitative methods, covering image- and angular response-based approaches. Multibeam time-series backscatter (300 kHz) data acquired in 2008 off the coast of East Anglia (UK) are compared with grain size properties, macrofaunal abundance and biomass from 130 Hamon and 16 Clamshell grab samples. Three predictive methods are used: 1) image-based (mean backscatter intensity); 2) angular response-based (predicted mean grain size), and 3) image-based (1st principal component and classification) from Quester Tangent Corporation Multiview software. Relationships between grain size and backscatter are explored using linear regression. Differences in grain size and benthic community structure between acoustically defined groups are examined using ANOVA and PERMANOVA+. Results for the Hamon grab stations indicate significant correlations between measured mean grain size and mean backscatter intensity, angular response predicted mean grain size, and 1st principal component of QTC analysis (all p response predicted mean grain size (r2 = 0.692; p response predicted grain size (p < 0.001), and QTC class (p = 0.009). Mean grain size (Clamshell) shows a significant difference between groups for mean backscatter (p = 0.001); other methods were not significant. PERMANOVA for the Hamon abundance shows benthic community structure was significantly different between acoustic groups for all methods (p ≤ 0.001). Overall these results show considerable promise in that more than 60% of the variance in the mean grain size of the Clamshell grab samples can be explained by mean backscatter or acoustically-predicted grain size. These results show that there is significant predictive capacity for sediment characteristics from multibeam backscatter and that these acoustic classifications can have ecological validity.

  10. Matching biological traits to environmental conditions in marine benthic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J.; Rogers, S. I.; Frid, C. L. J.

    2006-05-01

    The effects of variability in environmental conditions on species composition in benthic ecosystems are well established, but relatively little is known about how environmental variability relates to ecosystem functioning. Benthic invertebrate assemblages are heavily involved in the maintenance of ecological processes and investigation of the biological characteristics (traits) expressed in these assemblages can provide information about some aspects of functioning. The aim of this study was to establish and explore relationships between environmental variability and biological traits expressed in megafauna assemblages in two UK regions. Patterns of trait composition were matched to environmental conditions and subsets of variables best describing these patterns determined. The nature of the relationships were subsequently examined at two separate scales, both between and within the regions studied. Over the whole area, some traits related to size, longevity, reproduction, mobility, flexibility, feeding method, sociability and living habit were negatively correlated with salinity, sea surface temperature, annual temperature range and the level of fishing effort, and positively associated with fish taxon richness and shell content of the substratum. Between the two regions, reductions in temperature range and shell content were associated with infrequent relative occurrences of short-lived, moderately mobile, flexible, solitary, opportunistic, permanent-burrow dwelling fauna and those exhibiting reproductive strategies based on benthic development. Relationships between some traits and environmental conditions diverged within the two regions, with increases in fishing effort and shell content of the substratum being associated with low frequencies of occurrence of moderately mobile and moderately to highly flexible fauna within one region, but high frequencies in the other. These changes in trait composition have implications for ecosystem processes, with, for

  11. Accumulation of 210Po by benthic marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of polonium 210Po by various species of benthic marine seaweeds collected from 4 different points on the coast of Rio de Janeiro, showed variations by species and algal groups. The highest value found was in red alga, Plocamium brasiliensis followed by other organisms of the same group. In the group of the brown alga, the specie Sargassum stenophylum was outstanding. The Chlorophyta presented the lowest content of 210Po. The algae collected in open sea, revealed greater concentration factors of 210Po than the same species living in bays. The siliceous residue remaining after mineralization of the algae did not interfere with the detection of polonium. (author)

  12. Complexity and simplification in understanding recruitment in benthic populations

    KAUST Repository

    Pineda, Jesús

    2008-11-13

    Research of complex systems and problems, entities with many dependencies, is often reductionist. The reductionist approach splits systems or problems into different components, and then addresses these components one by one. This approach has been used in the study of recruitment and population dynamics of marine benthic (bottom-dwelling) species. Another approach examines benthic population dynamics by looking at a small set of processes. This approach is statistical or model-oriented. Simplified approaches identify "macroecological" patterns or attempt to identify and model the essential, "first-order" elements of the system. The complexity of the recruitment and population dynamics problems stems from the number of processes that can potentially influence benthic populations, including (1) larval pool dynamics, (2) larval transport, (3) settlement, and (4) post-settlement biotic and abiotic processes, and larval production. Moreover, these processes are non-linear, some interact, and they may operate on disparate scales. This contribution discusses reductionist and simplified approaches to study benthic recruitment and population dynamics of bottom-dwelling marine invertebrates. We first address complexity in two processes known to influence recruitment, larval transport, and post-settlement survival to reproduction, and discuss the difficulty in understanding recruitment by looking at relevant processes individually and in isolation. We then address the simplified approach, which reduces the number of processes and makes the problem manageable. We discuss how simplifications and "broad-brush first-order approaches" may muddle our understanding of recruitment. Lack of empirical determination of the fundamental processes often results in mistaken inferences, and processes and parameters used in some models can bias our view of processes influencing recruitment. We conclude with a discussion on how to reconcile complex and simplified approaches. Although it

  13. Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pilar Rios; Javier Cristobo

    2014-01-01

    The information about the sponges in this dataset is derived from the samples collected during five Spanish Antarctic expeditions: Bentart 94, Bentart 95, Gebrap 96, Ciemar 99/00 and Bentart 2003. Samples were collected in the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea at depths ranging from 4 to 2044 m using va­rious sampling gears.The Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions is unique as it provides in­formation for an under-explored region of the Southern Oc...

  14. Accumulation of /sup 210/Po by benthic marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouvea, R.C.; Branco, M.E.C.; Santos, P.L.; Gouvea, V.A.

    1988-08-01

    The accumulation of polonium /sup 210/Po by various species of benthic marine seaweeds collected from 4 different points on the coast of Rio de Janeiro, showed variations by species and algal groups. The highest value found was in red alga, Plocamium brasiliensis followed by other organisms of the same group. In the group of the brown alga, the specie Sargassum stenophylum was outstanding. The Chlorophyta presented the lowest content of /sup 210/Po. The algae collected in open sea, revealed greater concentration factors of /sup 210/Po than the same species living in bays. The siliceous residue remaining after mineralization of the algae did not interfere with the detection of polonium.

  15. Quantifying tidally driven benthic oxygen exchange across permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinnis, Daniel F.; Sommer, Stefan; Lorke, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    Continental shelves are predominately (approximate to 70%) covered with permeable, sandy sediments. While identified as critical sites for intense oxygen, carbon, and nutrient turnover, constituent exchange across permeable sediments remains poorly quantified. The central North Sea largely consists....... The high O-2 flux variability results from deeper sediment O-2 penetration depths and increased O-2 storage during high velocities, which is then utilized during low-flow periods. The study reveals that the benthic hydrodynamics, sediment permeability, and pore water redox oscillations are all intimately...

  16. ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF BENTHIC COMMUNITIES FROM SOMESUL CALD CATCHMENT AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Battes

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper represents a preliminary study of periphyton and zoobenthos community from the Someşul Cald catchment area. Zoobenthos was sampled seasonally during 2000. Benthic community structure was similar at the five sampling sites. Thus, mayflies and chironomids recorded high numerical percentage abundances and densities. Oligochaetes, water mites and caddisflies were identified to species level. 38 Oligochaeta, 28 water mite and 12 caddis fly species were found in the sampling period. The samplings collected in the year 2001 included 80 algal species belonging to 5 phyla. Diatoms (Bacillariophyta dominated both qualitatively and quantitatively at all sampling sites.

  17. KAHO_BenthicHabitats - Benthic habitat of the coral reef ecosystem within and adjacent to Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (KAHO) on the Kona Coast of Hawaii.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A benthic habitat polygon coverage has been created of the coral reef ecosystem within and adjacent to Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park (KAHO) on the Kona...

  18. PUHO_BenthicHabitats - Benthic habitat of the coral reef ecosystem off the coast of Puuhonua O Honaunau (PUHO) National Historical Park on the Kona Coast of Hawaii.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A benthic habitat polygon coverage has been created of the coral reef ecosystem off the coast of Pu'uhonua O Honaunau (PUHO) National Historical Park on the Kona...

  19. PUHE_BenthicHabitats - Benthic habitat of the coral reef ecosystem off the coast of Puukohola Heiau (PUHE) National Historic Site on the Kona Coast of Hawaii.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A benthic habitat polygon coverage has been created of the coral reef ecosystem off the coast of Pu'ukohola Heiau (PUHE) National Historic Site on the Kona Coast of...

  20. Analytical characterization of selective benthic flux components in estuarine and coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Benthic flux is the rate of flow across the bed of a water body, per unit area of bed. It is forced by component mechanisms, which interact. For example, pressure gradients across the bed, forced by tide, surface gravity waves, density gradients, bed–current interaction, turbulence, and terrestrial hydraulic gradients, drive an advective benthic flux of water and constituents between estuarine and coastal waters, and surficial aquifers. Other mechanisms also force benthic flux, such as chemical gradients, bioturbation, and dispersion. A suite of component mechanisms force a total benthic flux at any given location, where each member of the suite contributes a component benthic flux. Currently, the types and characteristics of component interactions are not fully understood. For example, components may interact linearly or nonlinearly, and the interaction may be constructive or destructive. Benthic flux is a surface water–groundwater interaction process. Its discharge component to a marine water body is referred to, in some literature, as submarine groundwater discharge. Benthic flux is important in characterizing water and constituent budgets of estuarine and coastal systems. Analytical models to characterize selective benthic flux components are reviewed. Specifically, these mechanisms are for the component associated with the groundwater tidal prism, and forced by surface gravity wave setup, surface gravity waves on a plane bed, and the terrestrial hydraulic gradient. Analytical models are applied to the Indian River Lagoon, Florida; Great South Bay, New York; and the South Atlantic Bight in South Carolina and portions of North Carolina.

  1. Human exploitation and benthic community structure on a tropical intertidal mudflat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.F.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2002-01-01

    Human exploitation of intertidal marine invertebrates is known to alter benthic community structure. This study describes the impact that harvesting by women and children has on the intertidal community structure of the mudflats of the Saco on Inhaca Island, Mozambique, by comparing the benthic comm

  2. Human exploitation and benthic community structure on a tropical intertidal flat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, WF; Prins, HHT

    2002-01-01

    Human exploitation of intertidal marine invertebrates is known to alter benthic community structure. This study describes the impact that harvesting by women and children has on the intertidal community structure of the mudflats of the Saco on Inhaca Island, Mozambique, by comparing the benthic comm

  3. High dissolved organic carbon release by benthic cyanobacterial mats in a Caribbean reef ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocke, H.J.; Wenzhoefer, F.; de Beer, D.; Mueller, B.; van Duyl, F.C.; Nugues, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are increasing in abundance on coral reefs worldwide. However, their impacts on biogeochemical cycling in the surrounding water and sediment are virtually unknown. By measuring chemical fluxes in benthic chambers placed over sediment covered by BCMs and sediment wi

  4. Application of the Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 to benthos in Dutch transitional and coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van W.M.G.M.; Boon, A.R.; Gittenberger, A.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Lavaleye, M.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Verschoor, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 (BEQI2) is the Dutch multi-metric index (MMI) for assessing the status and trend of benthic invertebrates in transitional and coastal waters for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). It contains the same indicators, i.e. species richness, Shannon index and AMB

  5. Application of the Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 to benthos in Dutch transitional and coastal waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loon, W.M.G.M.; Boon, A.R.; Gittenberger, A.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Lavaleye, M.S.S.; Duineveld, G.C.A.; Verschoor, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Benthic Ecosystem Quality Index 2 (BEQI2) is the Dutch multi-metric index (MMI) for assessing the status and trend of benthic invertebrates in transitional and coastal waters for the Water Framework Directive (WFD). It contains the same indicators, i.e. species richness, Shannon index and AMBI,

  6. Modeling food web interactions in benthic deep-sea ecosystems. A practical guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Van Oevelen, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea benthic systems are notoriously difficult to sample. Even more than for other benthic systems, many flows among biological groups cannot be directly measured, and data sets remain incomplete and uncertain. In such cases, mathematical models are often used to quantify unmeasured biological i

  7. Carbon flows in the benthic food web at the deep-sea observatory HAUSGARTEN (Fram Strait)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oevelen, D.; Bergmann, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Bauerfeind, E.; Hasemann, C.; Klages, M.; Schewe, I.; Soltwedel, T.; Budaeva, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    The HAUSGARTEN observatory is located in the eastern Fram Strait (Arctic Ocean) and used as long-term monitoring site to follow changes in the Arctic benthic ecosystem. Linear inverse modelling was applied to decipher carbon flows among the compartments of the benthic food web at the central HAUSGAR

  8. Food web flows through a sub-arctic deep-sea benthic community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gontikaki, E.; Van Oevelen, D.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Prof. Witte, U.

    2011-01-01

    The benthic food web of the deep Faroe–Shetland Channel (FSC) was modelled by using the linear inverse modelling methodology. The reconstruction of carbon pathways by inverse analysis was based on benthic oxygen uptake rates, biomass data and transfer of labile carbon through the food web as reveale

  9. The Effects of Oxygen Concentration on Benthic Foraminiferal Growth and Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, B.; Keating-Bitonti, C.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Many organisms use oxygen through cellular respiration in order to gain energy. For this reason, oxygen has a significant influence on organism size and growth. The amount of oxygen an organism needs depends on its metabolic demand, which is partially a function organism size (i.e., mass). The Santa Monica Basin (SMB) is an oxygen minimum zone located off the southern coast of California that maintains a steep oxygen gradient and is thus an ideal location for conducting research on how oxygen influences organism size. Here we use benthic foraminifera, widespread single-celled protists that produce shells (tests), to study the controls of oxygen on organism size. Because cell mass and cell volume are correlated, we study trends in the log test volume of four abundant species from SMB: Uvigerina peregrina, Bolivina spissa, B. argentea, Loxostomum pseudobeyrichi. These foraminifera make multi-chambered tests, thus we also count the number of chambers per specimen in order to further assess their growth under varying oxygen concentrations. We analyzed the data using quantile regressions to determine trends in not only median values of the log test volume and number of chambers as a function of oxygen concentrations, but also in the 10th, 25th, 75th, and 90th percentiles because oxygen availability often constrains the maximum and minimum size of organisms. Our results show a positive correlation between oxygen concentration and the maximum log test volumes of L. pseudobeyrichi and B. argentea, supporting our hypothesis. However, we observed a negative correlation between oxygen concentration and the maximum percentiles of log test volume in U. peregrina. Nevertheless, U. peregrina still displays a positive correlation between chamber number and oxygen concentrations in line with our hypothesis. The preponderance of trends supporting a direct correlation between log test volume or chamber number and oxygen concentration suggest that oxygen limits the maximum obtainable

  10. 青岛潮间带大型底栖海藻群落的研究%The Survey on the Community of Benthic Marine Macroalgae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨震; 王悠; 董开升; 唐学玺; 赵星

    2009-01-01

    在青岛潮间带布设了显浪咀、太平角和石老人3个断面,进行了为期1 a(2006年8月~2007年11月)的大型底栖海藻资源调查研究.结果表明:1. 青岛潮间带大型底栖海藻群落的种类组成中红藻种类最多,其次是褐藻,绿藻最少.2. 群落中大型底栖海藻的生物量有明显的季节变化:春季>夏季>秋季>冬季;生物量在垂直分布上表现出中、低潮带均大于高潮带;在水平分布上无明显差异.3. 底栖藻类群落优势种无季节性变化,第一优势种为孔石莼.4. 采集到大型底栖海藻43种,其中红藻门22属24种,占55.8%;褐藻门9属11种,占25.6%;绿藻门6属8种,占18.6%.%Three cross sections at Xianlangzui, Taipingjiao and Shilaoren in the intertidal zone of Qingdao were set and the communities of benthic marine macroalgae were investigated from August 2006 to November 2007. Results showed that: 1. In the intertidal zone of Qingdao, species of Rhodophyta played a dominant role in the composition of the benthic marine macroalgae community, followed by Phaeophyta and then Chlorophyta. 2. The biomass of the community changed with the season too, and a seasonal variation of Spring>Summer>Autumn>Winter was obtained. In the vertical distribution the biomass in the low-intertidal zone or mid-intertidal zone was greater than that in the high intertidal zone, but no remarkable difference was found among the three cross sections in the horizonal distribution. 3. The dominant species had no seasonal variation, and the first dominant specie was Ulva. pertusa Kjell. 4. During the four surveys, 43 species of benthic marine macroalgae were collected, among which 24 species(belonging to 22 genera) were Rhodophyta , 11 species(belonging to 9 genera) were Phaeophyta and 8 species(belonging to 6 genera) were Chlorophyta.

  11. Utilizing Multibeam Bathymetry and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to Expand Our Mapping Ability of Potential Rockfish Benthic Habitats in the San Juan Islands, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Slatten, K.

    2013-12-01

    In order to construct an accurate cartographic representation of the potential rockfish habitat zone in the San Juan Archipelago, Washington, bathymetric data is needed to form layers within Geographic Information Systems (GIS) that include, but are not limited to, slope, hillshade, and aspect. Backscatter data is also important in order to demonstrate the induration of the marine floor, which in turn may tell the researcher what type of sediment and substrate makes up that part of the benthic region. Once these layers are added to the GIS map, another layer (referred to as Potential Benthic Habitats) is created and inserted. This layer uses the same induration data but groups them into polygons, which are then color-coded and displayed on the map. With all the layers now pictured, it is clear that the intertidal zones are not complete. Aerial photographs are then added to fill in the gaps according to the GPS coordinates associated with the middle section of each picture. When all pictures and layers have been included, the GIS map is a somewhat three-dimensional, color-coordinated, aerial photograph enhanced depiction of Skipjack, Waldron, Orcas, and Sucia Islands. The bathymetric and backscatter data are plugged into Excel to graphically illustrate specific numbers that represent the various potential habitats. The given data support the idea that potential rockfish habitat (Sedimentary Bedrock and Fractured Bedrock) must be closely monitored and maintained in attempt to preserve and conserve the three either threatened or endangered rockfish species within the Puget Sound locale.

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  13. Anabaenolysins, novel cytolytic lipopeptides from benthic Anabaena cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Jokela

    Full Text Available Two novel cyclic lipopeptides, anabaenolysin A and anabaenolysin B, were isolated from two benthic cyanobacterial strains of the genus Anabaena. This novel class of cyanobacterial lipopeptides has a general structure of a small peptide ring consisting of four amino acids from which two are proteinogenic and two unusual; glycine(1, glycine(2, 2-(3-amino-5-oxytetrahydrofuran-2-yl-2-hydroxyacetic acid(3 and a long unsaturated C(18 β-amino acid(4 with a conjugated triene structure. They are distinguished by the presence of a conjugated dienic structure in the C18 β-amino acid present in anabaenolysin A but not in anabaenolysin B. Conjugated triene structure generates a typical UV spectrum for anabaenolysins for easy recognition. Anabaenolysin A constituted up to 400 ppm of the cyanobacterial dry weight. We found evidence of thirteen variants of anabaenolysins in one cyanobacterial strain. This suggests that the anabaenolysins are an important class of secondary metabolites in benthic Anabaena cyanobacteria. Both anabaenolysin A and B had cytolytic activity on a number of mammalian cell lines.

  14. Transfer of radiocaesium from contaminated bottom sediments to marine organisms through benthic food chains in post-Fukushima and post-Chernobyl periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezhenar, Roman; Jung, Kyung Tae; Maderich, Vladimir; Willemsen, Stefan; de With, Govert; Qiao, Fangli

    2016-05-01

    After the earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 damaged the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP), an accidental release of a large amount of radioactive isotopes into both the air and the ocean occurred. Measurements provided by the Japanese agencies over the past 5 years show that elevated concentrations of 137Cs still remain in sediments, benthic organisms, and demersal fishes in the coastal zone around the FDNPP. These observations indicate that there are 137Cs transfer pathways from bottom sediments to the marine organisms. To describe the transfer quantitatively, the dynamic food chain biological uptake model of radionuclides (BURN) has been extended to include benthic marine organisms. The extended model takes into account both pelagic and benthic marine organisms grouped into several classes based on their trophic level and type of species: phytoplankton, zooplankton, and fishes (two types: piscivorous and non-piscivorous) for the pelagic food chain; deposit-feeding invertebrates, demersal fishes fed by benthic invertebrates, and bottom omnivorous predators for the benthic food chain; crustaceans, mollusks, and coastal predators feeding on both pelagic and benthic organisms. Bottom invertebrates ingest organic parts of bottom sediments with adsorbed radionuclides which then migrate up through the food chain. All organisms take radionuclides directly from water as well as food. The model was implemented into the compartment model POSEIDON-R and applied to the north-western Pacific for the period of 1945-2010, and then for the period of 2011-2020 to assess the radiological consequences of 137Cs released due to the FDNPP accident. The model simulations for activity concentrations of 137Cs in both pelagic and benthic organisms in the coastal area around the FDNPP agree well with measurements for the period of 2011-2015. The decrease constant in the fitted exponential function of simulated concentration for the deposit-feeding invertebrates (0.45 yr-1

  15. Stable-isotope analysis of a deep-sea benthic-fish assemblage: evidence of an enriched benthic food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, M D; Ebert, D A; Cailliet, G M

    2012-04-01

    In this study, fishes and invertebrates collected from the continental slope (1000 m) of the eastern North Pacific Ocean were analysed using stable-isotope analysis (SIA). Resulting trophic positions (T(P) ) were compared to known diets and habitats from the literature. Dual isotope plots indicated that most species groups (invertebrates and fishes) sorted as expected along the carbon and nitrogen axes, with less intraspecific variability than interspecific variability. Results also indicated an isotopically distinct benthic and pelagic food web, as the benthic food web was more enriched in both nitrogen and carbon isotopes. Trophic positions from SIA supported this finding, resulting in the assignment of fishes to different trophic positions from those expected based on published dietary information. These differences can be explained largely by the habitat of the prey and the percentage of the diet that was scavenged. A mixing model estimated dietary contributions of prey similar to those of the known diet of Bathyraja trachura from stomach-content analysis (SCA). Linear regressions indicated that trophic positions calculated from SIA and SCA, when plotted against B. trachura total length for 32 individuals, exhibited similar variation and patterns. Only the T(P) from SCA yielded significant results (stomach content: P 0·05).

  16. Stable-isotope analysis of a deep-sea benthic-fish assemblage: evidence of an enriched benthic food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, M D; Ebert, D A; Cailliet, G M

    2012-04-01

    In this study, fishes and invertebrates collected from the continental slope (1000 m) of the eastern North Pacific Ocean were analysed using stable-isotope analysis (SIA). Resulting trophic positions (T(P) ) were compared to known diets and habitats from the literature. Dual isotope plots indicated that most species groups (invertebrates and fishes) sorted as expected along the carbon and nitrogen axes, with less intraspecific variability than interspecific variability. Results also indicated an isotopically distinct benthic and pelagic food web, as the benthic food web was more enriched in both nitrogen and carbon isotopes. Trophic positions from SIA supported this finding, resulting in the assignment of fishes to different trophic positions from those expected based on published dietary information. These differences can be explained largely by the habitat of the prey and the percentage of the diet that was scavenged. A mixing model estimated dietary contributions of prey similar to those of the known diet of Bathyraja trachura from stomach-content analysis (SCA). Linear regressions indicated that trophic positions calculated from SIA and SCA, when plotted against B. trachura total length for 32 individuals, exhibited similar variation and patterns. Only the T(P) from SCA yielded significant results (stomach content: P 0·05). PMID:22497394

  17. The role of benthic macrofauna on nitrogen cycling in eutrophic lake sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    This thesis concerns the role of sediment-living macrobenthos in the cycling of nitrogen species and nitrogen transformation in eutrophic freshwater sediments. In my thesis I have, employing {sup 15}N-isotope techniques in laboratory experiments, shown the importance of infaunal chironomid larvae and oligochaetes on denitrification in eutrophic lake sediments. Investigated benthic organisms not only expand the sediment surface with their permanent or non-permanent burrow constructions, they also transport water through the burrows continuously. This behaviour of intermittent water-pumping activity, provides the burrows with oxygen, and in addition, mediates the supply of nitrate to denitrifying zones. The highly dynamic oxygen climate within and narrow oxic zones around burrows, due to their radial geometry, provides a very short diffusion path for nitrate into surrounding anoxic zones. In my studies rates of denitrification were enhanced c. 3 to 6-fold by the influence of chironomids (Chironomus plumosus) and c. 2-fold by the influence of oligochaetes at comparable biomass. The difference in degree of stimulation is explained by species-specific habitat exploitation which could also be observed between different tube-dwelling species of chironomids. Besides chironomid biomass, the degree of enhancement of denitrification by chironomids was dependent on nitrate concentration in the overlying water, and water temperature. Nitrification was also seen to be stimulated by the infaunal macrobenthos but to a lesser degree than denitrification. It is suggested that bioturbated eutrophic sediment, under predominantly oxic bottom water conditions may act more pronouncedly as a sink for inorganic nitrogen relative to non-bioturbated sediment, and that bioturbated sediment above all, may be an important factor contributing to lowered transport of nitrogen to the coast. In order to sustain high nitrogen removal capacity in wetlands, ponds and lakes, it is further suggested

  18. Biomonitoring polluted sediments in Arctic regions - possibilities and challenges using benthic foraminifera. Case studies from northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Kari; Dijkstra, Noortje; Junttila, Juho; Sternal, Beata; Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Forwick, Matthias; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Biomonitoring pollution in marine environments using benthic foraminifera assemblages have proven to be a valid method for many regions. Two important reasons for their suitability are their sensitivity to changes in the environment and their rapid response time due to short life cycles. In addition, they are preserved in the sedimentary record, allowing for baseline studies of conditions prior to introduction of contaminants. Species of benthic foraminifera that appear to tolerate polluted sediments are referred to as opportunistic species. This notion is in general used for species able to dominate environments that are too stressful for most species. The high latitude setting of the northern Norwegian coastal zone experience high seasonality and, hence, largely changing conditions throughout a year: variations in water mass domination, freshwater influence, temperature and current velocity. It is possible that an environment like this is inhibited by a higher amount of opportunistic species generally thriving under high stress conditions. This might make the use of benthic foraminifera for biomonitoring more challenging, as the faunal compositions may be a result of a complex set of processes. Consequently, large datasets are necessary in order to make reliable conclusions, which in time may be used as generalized guidelines for biomonitoring in this geographical area. Here, we present preliminary results of benthic foraminiferal assemblages from two sites in Finnmark, northern Norway, which have been exposed to pollution. The main site is Repparfjorden, where the inner parts of the fjord were used as a submarine waste deposal site for mine tailings from a local copper mine during the 1970´s. Results from four marine sediment cores (10-20 cm long) containing sediments classified to be in moderate to very bad state (according to Norwegian sediment quality criteria) are presented. The contamination is seen in intervals of elevated copper content dated to the 1970

  19. Benthic buffers and boosters of ocean acidification on coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. N. Anthony

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a threat to marine ecosystems globally. In shallow-water systems, however, ocean acidification can be masked by benthic carbon fluxes, depending on community composition, seawater residence time, and the magnitude and balance of net community production (pn and calcification (gn. Here, we examine how six benthic groups from a coral reef environment on Heron Reef (Great Barrier Reef, Australia contribute to changes in seawater aragonite saturation state (Ωa. Results of flume studies showed a hierarchy of responses across groups, depending on CO2 level, time of day and water flow. At low CO2 (350–450 μatm, macroalgae (Chnoospora implexa, turfs and sand elevated Ωa of the flume water by around 0.10 to 1.20 h−1 – normalised to contributions from 1 m2 of benthos to a 1 m deep water column. The rate of Ωa increase in these groups was doubled under acidification (560–700 μatm and high flow (35 compared to 8 cm s−1. In contrast, branching corals (Acropora aspera increased Ωa by 0.25 h−1 at ambient CO2 (350–450 μatm during the day, but reduced Ωa under acidification and high flow. Nighttime changes in Ωa by corals were highly negative (0.6–0.8 h−1 and exacerbated by acidification. Calcifying macroalgae (Halimeda spp. raised Ωa by day (by around 0.13 h−1, but lowered Ωa by a similar or higher amount at night. Analyses of carbon flux contributions from four different benthic compositions to the reef water carbon chemistry across Heron Reef flat and lagoon indicated that the net lowering of Ωa by coral-dominated areas can to some extent be countered by long water residence times in neighbouring areas dominated by turfs, macroalgae and potentially sand.

  20. Benthic buffers and boosters of ocean acidification on coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. N. Anthony

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a threat to marine ecosystems globally. In shallow-water systems, however, ocean acidification can be masked by benthic carbon fluxes, depending on community composition, seawater residence time, and the magnitude and balance of net community production (NCP and calcification (NCC. Here, we examine how six benthic groups from a coral reef environment on Heron Reef (Great Barrier Reef, Australia contribute to changes in the seawater aragonite saturation state (Ωa. Results of flume studies using intact reef habitats (1.2 m by 0.4 m, showed a hierarchy of responses across groups, depending on CO2 level, time of day and water flow. At low CO2 (350–450 μatm, macroalgae (Chnoospora implexa, turfs and sand elevated Ωa of the flume water by around 0.10 to 1.20 h−1 – normalised to contributions from 1 m2 of benthos to a 1 m deep water column. The rate of Ωa increase in these groups was doubled under acidification (560–700 μatm and high flow (35 compared to 8 cm s−1. In contrast, branching corals (Acropora aspera increased Ωa by 0.25 h−1 at ambient CO2 (350–450 μatm during the day, but reduced Ωa under acidification and high flow. Nighttime changes in Ωa by corals were highly negative (0.6–0.8 h−1 and exacerbated by acidification. Calcifying macroalgae (Halimeda spp. raised Ωa by day (by around 0.13 h−1, but lowered Ωa by a similar or higher amount at night. Analyses of carbon flux contributions from benthic communities with four different compositions to the reef water carbon chemistry across Heron Reef flat and lagoon indicated that the net lowering of Ωa by coral-dominated areas can to some extent be countered by long water-residence times in neighbouring areas dominated by turfs, macroalgae and carbonate sand.

  1. Carbon fate in a large temperate human-impacted river system: Focus on benthic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Flipo, Nicolas; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rocher, Vincent; Groleau, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Fluvial networks play an important role in regional and global carbon (C) budgets. The Seine River, from the Paris urban area to the entrance of its estuary (220 km), is studied here as an example of a large human-impacted river system subject to temperate climatic conditions. We assess organic C (OC) budgets upstream and downstream from one of the world's largest wastewater treatment plants and for different hydrological conditions using a hydrobiogeochemical model. The fine representation of sediment accumulation on the river bed allows for the quantification of pelagic and benthic effects on OC export toward the estuary and on river metabolism (i.e., net CO2 production). OC export is significantly affected by benthic dynamics during the driest periods, when 25% of the inputs to the system is transformed or stored in the sediment layer. Benthic processes also substantially affect river metabolism under any hydrological condition. On average, benthic respiration accounts for one third of the total river respiration along the studied stretch (0.27 out of 0.86 g C m-2 d-1). Even though the importance of benthic processes was already acknowledged by the scientific community for headwater streams, these results stress the major influence of benthic dynamics, and thus of physical processes such as sedimentation and resuspension, on C cycling in downstream river systems. It opens the door to new developments in the quantification of C emissions by global models, whereby biogeochemical processing and benthic dynamics should be taken into account.

  2. Generalized Fibonacci zone plates

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Jie; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a family of zone plates which are produced by the generalized Fibonacci sequences and their axial focusing properties are analyzed in detail. Compared with traditional Fresnel zone plates, the generalized Fibonacci zone plates present two axial foci with equal intensity. Besides, we propose an approach to adjust the axial locations of the two foci by means of different optical path difference, and further give the deterministic ratio of the two focal distances which attributes to their own generalized Fibonacci sequences. The generalized Fibonacci zone plates may allow for new applications in micro and nanophotonics.

  3. Shanghai's Development Zones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Since the early 1980s,development zones began appearing in China.Their Success largely stems from the preferential policies they offer and the safe investment environment they work hard to create.As zones have personalities themselves,it is essential to look beyond the pamphlets and published information and get down to the nittygritty.Shanghai has more State designated Economic and Technology Development Zones than any other city in China.In the following article,we have chosen development zones located around Shanghai and conducted a comparison.

  4. Evaluation of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage for disturbance zonation in urban rivers using multivariate analysis: Implications for river management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ram Devi Tachamo; Shah, Deep Narayan

    2013-08-01

    River pollution has tremendously increased in the major cities of South Asia, where the rivers have become a repository for domestic, agricultural, municipal and industrial wastes. This study presents the evaluation of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage as a means of assessing ecological status, determining different disturbance zones and identifying environmental variables and stressors that deteriorate the river ecosystem. In total, 20 sites in 36-km stretch of the main stem of the Bagmati River and 7 sites on its tributaries were selected for sampling in the post-monsoon and pre-monsoon seasons during the time period 2008-2010. The Ganga River System Biotic Score (GRSbios) index was applied to determine the ecological status. The ecological status of the different Bagmati River stretches ranged from reference (Class 1) to extremely polluted (Class 5). We identified three types of disturbance zones along the river, ranging from minimally polluted to extremely polluted. A river corridor survey was conducted to identify any river stressing factors, revealing a sharp deterioration of the river from upstream to downstream with increasing concentrations of chloride and ortho-phosphate phosphorus. Effluents and Activities and Facilities were found to be the major stressing factors to the river ecosystem. The information gained should help water managers find the most time-efficient and cost-effective measures to address river degradation.

  5. Evaluation of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage for disturbance zonation in urban rivers using multivariate analysis: Implications for river management

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Devi Tachamo Shah; Deep Narayan Shah

    2013-08-01

    River pollution has tremendously increased in the major cities of South Asia, where the rivers have become a repository for domestic, agricultural, municipal and industrial wastes. This study presents the evaluation of benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage as a means of assessing ecological status, determining different disturbance zones and identifying environmental variables and stressors that deteriorate the river ecosystem. In total, 20 sites in 36-km stretch of the main stem of the Bagmati River and 7 sites on its tributaries were selected for sampling in the post-monsoon and pre-monsoon seasons during the time period 2008–2010. The Ganga River System Biotic Score (GRSbios) index was applied to determine the ecological status. The ecological status of the different Bagmati River stretches ranged from reference, class 1 to class 5 (extremely polluted). We identified three types of disturbance zones along the river, ranging from minimally polluted to extremely polluted. A river corridor survey was conducted to identify any river stressing factors, revealing a sharp deterioration of the river from upstream to downstream with increasing concentrations of chloride and ortho-phosphate phosphorus. Effluents and Activities and Facilities were found to be the major stressing factors to the river ecosystem. The information gained should help water managers find the most time-efficient and cost-effective measures to address river degradation.

  6. Functional response of midsummer planktonic and benthic communities in the Neva Estuary (eastern Gulf of Finland to anthropogenic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M. Golubkov

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Long-term hydrobiological research has shown that the functioning of the ecosystem of the Neva Estuary, one of the largest Baltic estuaries, has changed greatly since the beginning of the 20th century. Ineffective local water management in St. Petersburg during thelast twenty years has stimulated the development of a natural "biological plug" in the salt barrier zone in the inner part ofthe estuary and has altered the ecosystem's functioning. These changes include an increase in primary production, in the primary production:organic matter decomposition ratio, and in pelagic-benthic coupling. It has also given rise to filamentous algae blooms and intensive secondary pollution in the coastal zone of the Neva Estuary. The primary production of phytoplankton in the inner part of the estuary has reached 2.3 gC m-2, that of the filamentous algae Cladophora glomerata 5.5 gC m-2 these figures are much higher than in other regions of the Gulf of Finland.

  7. Hardy exotics species in temperate zone: can “warm water” crayfish invaders establish regardless of low temperatures?

    OpenAIRE

    Lukáš Veselý; Miloš Buřič; Antonín Kouba

    2015-01-01

    The spreading of new crayfish species poses a serious risk for freshwater ecosystems; because they are omnivores they influence more than one level in the trophic chain and they represent a significant part of the benthic biomass. Both the environmental change through global warming and the expansion of the pet trade increase the possibilities of their spreading. We investigated the potential of four “warm water” highly invasive crayfish species to overwinter in the temperate zone, so as to p...

  8. Abyssal fauna of the UK-1 polymetallic nodule exploration claim, Clarion-Clipperton Zone, central Pacific Ocean: Echinodermata

    OpenAIRE

    Glover, Adrian G.; Wiklund,Helena; Rabone, Muriel; Amon, Diva J; Smith, Craig R.; O'Hara,Tim; Mah, Christopher L.; Dahlgren, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We present data from a DNA taxonomy register of the abyssal benthic Echinodermata collected as part of the Abyssal Baseline (ABYSSLINE) environmental survey cruise ‘AB01’ to the UK Seabed Resources Ltd (UKSRL) polymetallic-nodule exploration claim ‘UK-1’ in the eastern Clarion-Clipperton Zone (CCZ), central Pacific Ocean abyssal plain. Morphological and genetic data are presented for 17 species (4 Asteroidea , 4 Crinoidea , 2 Holothuroidea and 7 Ophiuroidea ) identified by a combinat...

  9. Deconstructing the C/T OAE (~94 Ma): the Plenus Cold Event/Benthic Oxic Event and its geochemical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkyns, Hugh; Dickson, Alex; Ruhl, Micha; Van den Boorn, Sander

    2014-05-01

    The so-called Plenus Cold Event (M. geslinianum Zone: ~94 Ma) occurred during the early stages of the Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event, as defined by the characteristic positive carbon-isotope excursion in carbonate and organic matter. The event is marked in Europe by the southward invasion of a boreal fauna, including the belemnite Praeactinocamax plenus, a shift to heavier oxygen-isotope values in bulk chalk, and evidence for a drop in pCO2 based on the offset between carbon-isotope ratios in organic and carbonate carbon. TEX86 values from mid-latitude and palaeo-equatorial DSDP/ODP Atlantic sites suggest a cooling of ~4->5°C over this interval. In the Western Interior Seaway of North America, and in the equatorial proto-Atlantic, this interval was characterized by repopulation of the seafloor by benthic foraminifera (the Benthic Oxic Event), indicating regional re-oxygenation of bottom waters. Neodymium-isotope ratios from fish teeth from the English Chalk and the equatorial Atlantic indicate profound changes at this time in the composition of watermasses, whose derivation from Arctic regions is likely. Although data from south of the Equator are currently lacking, redox-sensitive geochemical species from a number of sections suggest profound regional changes in the dissolved oxygen levels of the sea floor at this time. These geochemical species include iodine (increase in I/Ca ratios as a response to increased availability of iodate as opposed to the reduced form, iodide, in seawater); sulphur-isotope ratios (decrease in δ34SCAS due to oxidation of marine pyrite in seawater and sediment) and local decrease in molybdenum-isotope ratios (δ98/95Mo) in sediment due to preferential adsorption of the lighter isotope into Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide phases stabilized under more oxygenated conditions. The predicted global increase in seawater δ98/95Mo over this interval remains to be established.

  10. Hydrographic characterization of two tidal creeks with implications for watershed land use, flushing times, and benthic production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzelli, C.; Holland, Austin F.; Sanger, D.M.; Conrads, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Many coastal ecosystems are undergoing anthropogenic stress from large increases in population and urbanization. In many regions changes in freshwater and material inputs to the coastal zone are altering the biogeochemical and biological capacities of ecosystems. Despite increased watershed inputs, large tidal volumes and flushing indicative of macrotidal estuaries can modulate the fate of introduced materials masking some of the symptoms of eutrophication. The Land Use Coastal Ecosystem Study (LU-CES) examined linkages between land use and environmental properties of Malind and Okatee Creeks in South Carolina from 2001 to 2004. The objectives of this particular study were to assess the hydrography of the two macrotidal creek ecosystems, explore differences in dissolved oxygen (DO), and develop a better understanding of the variations in primary and benthic secondary production in southeastern creek ecosystems. Depth, pH, salinity, and DO were reduced and more variable in Malind Creek than in Okatee Creek, although both creeks had strong semidiurnal frequencies in salinity time signatures. While time series analyses of DO saturation in Malind Creek revealed a dominant semidiurnal pattern, Okatee Creek had a distinctly diel DO pattern. The strongly semidiurnal fluctuations in DO and reduced flushing time indicated that biological processes were not fast enough to influence DO in Malind Creek. The Okatee Creek system had a much greater storage volume, a wider marsh, and a dominant 25-h DO frequency. These attributes contributed to an estimated 8-10 times more phytoplankton-based carbon in Okatee Creek and twice the annual benthic production. As expected from their proximity to the upland, low surface area, and high organic content, both ecosystems were net heterotrophic. This fundamental understanding of tidal creek hydrography is being used to help define linkages among differential watershed land uses, flushing characteristics, and levels of biological production

  11. Movements of the thermocline lead to high variability in benthic mixing in the nearshore of a large lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mijanur R.; Wells, Mathew G.; Howell, Todd

    2016-04-01

    The thermocline of Lake Ontario is in constant motion, and as it washes back and forth along the sloping lakebed there is a striking asymmetry in near-bed stratification and benthic turbulence between its rise and fall. Detailed field observations of the stratification and water currents from the summers of 2012 and 2013 showed that the thermocline motions had large amplitudes (as high as 15 m) and a dominant period between 16 and 17.5 h, corresponding to a near-inertial internal Poincaré wave. During the falling phase, the warmer down-slope flow was strongly stratified with near-bed water temperature gradients of 1°C m-1. In contrast during the rising phase of colder up-slope flow, there was an unstable stratification in near-bed water and large temperature overturns due to the differential advection of stratified waters, i.e., the shear-driven convective mechanism. Using a Thorpe-scale analysis of overturns, the inferred turbulent diffusivity during the up-slope flow was Kz =5 × 10-4 m2 s-1. In striking contrast during the down-slope flow, the strong stratification had lower turbulent diffusivities of Kz =10-6 m2 s-1. The near bottom region of Lake Ontario within the thermocline swash-zone has intense biological activity and the highest concentrations of invasive dreissenid mussels. We discuss the potential biological implications of the striking variability in benthic mixing and near-bed stratification for nutrient cycling in the Lake Ontario nearshore.

  12. Patterns of deep-sea genetic connectivity in the New Zealand region: implications for management of benthic ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor K Bors

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic connectivity are increasingly considered in the design of marine protected areas (MPAs in both shallow and deep water. In the New Zealand Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ, deep-sea communities at upper bathyal depths (<2000 m are vulnerable to anthropogenic disturbance from fishing and potential mining operations. Currently, patterns of genetic connectivity among deep-sea populations throughout New Zealand's EEZ are not well understood. Using the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I and 16S rRNA genes as genetic markers, this study aimed to elucidate patterns of genetic connectivity among populations of two common benthic invertebrates with contrasting life history strategies. Populations of the squat lobster Munida gracilis and the polychaete Hyalinoecia longibranchiata were sampled from continental slope, seamount, and offshore rise habitats on the Chatham Rise, Hikurangi Margin, and Challenger Plateau. For the polychaete, significant population structure was detected among distinct populations on the Chatham Rise, the Hikurangi Margin, and the Challenger Plateau. Significant genetic differences existed between slope and seamount populations on the Hikurangi Margin, as did evidence of population differentiation between the northeast and southwest parts of the Chatham Rise. In contrast, no significant population structure was detected across the study area for the squat lobster. Patterns of genetic connectivity in Hyalinoecia longibranchiata are likely influenced by a number of factors including current regimes that operate on varying spatial and temporal scales to produce potential barriers to dispersal. The striking difference in population structure between species can be attributed to differences in life history strategies. The results of this study are discussed in the context of existing conservation areas that are intended to manage anthropogenic threats to deep-sea benthic communities in the New Zealand region.

  13. From Greenland to green lakes: Cultural eutrophication and the loss of benthic pathways in lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadeboncoeur, Y.; Jeppesen, E.; Zanden, M. J. V.;

    2003-01-01

    Benthic community responses to lake eutrophication are poorly understood relative to pelagic responses. We compared phytoplankton and periphyton productivity along a eutrophication gradient in Greenland, U.S., and Danish lakes. Phytoplankton productivity increased along the phosphorus gradient...... with TP . 100 mg m23, phytoplankton were responsible for nearly 100% of primary production. Benthic contributions ranged from 5 to 80% depending on morphometry and littoral habitat composition in lakes with intermediate phosphorus concentrations. Thus, eutrophication was characterized by a switch from...... interactions, but eutrophication eroded the benthic primary production pathway....

  14. Novel developments in benthic modelling to address scientific and policy challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessin, Gennadi; Artioli, Yuri; Bruggeman, Jorn; Aldridge, John; Blackford, Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the role of benthic systems in supporting, regulating and providing marine ecosystem services requires better understanding of their functioning and their response and resilience to stressors. Novel observational methods for the investigation of dynamics of benthic-pelagic coupling in shelf seas are being developed and new data is being collected. Therefore there is an increasing demand for robust representation of benthic processes in marine biogeochemical and ecosystem models, which would improve our understanding of whole systems and benthic-pelagic coupling, rather than act as mere closure terms for pelagic models. However, for several decades development of benthic models has lagged behind their pelagic counterparts. To address contemporary scientific, policy and societal challenges, the biogeochemical and ecological model ERSEM (European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model), including its benthic sub-model, was recently recoded in a scalable and modular format adopting the approach of FABM (Framework for Aquatic Biogeochemical Models). Within the Shelf Sea Biogeochemistry research programme, a series of additional processes have been included, such as a sedimentary carbonate system, a resuspendable fluff layer, and the simulation of advective sediments. It was shown that the inclusion of these processes changes the dynamics of benthic-pelagic fluxes as well as modifying the benthic food web. Comparison of model results with in-situ data demonstrated a general improvement of model performance and highlighted the importance of the benthic system in overall ecosystem dynamics. As an example, our simulations have shown that inclusion of a resuspendable fluff layer facilitates regeneration of inorganic nutrients in the water column due to degradation of resuspended organic material by pelagic bacteria. Moreover, the composition of fluff was found to be important for trophic interactions, and therefore indirectly affects benthic community composition. Where

  15. Selective responses of benthic foraminifera to thermal pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titelboim, Danna; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Herut, Barak; Kucera, Michal; Schmidt, Christiane; Hyams-Kaphzan, Orit; Ovadia, Ofer; Abramovich, Sigal

    2016-04-01

    Predictions of future climate and recent observations point towards a trend of rising temperatures in the Middle East region. The temperature rise propagates into the marine environment, with shallow, coastal ecosystems being most affected. An ideal model system to study the effect of increased temperatures in coastal ecosystems is presented by benthic foraminifera. The persistent of thermohaline pollution at a site along the northern coast of Israel, attributed to a power and desalination plant, is used as a natural laboratory to evaluate the effects of rising temperature and salinity on benthic foraminifera living in shallow hard bottom habitats. Biomonitoring of the disturbed area and a control station shows that elevated temperature is a more significant stressor than salinity. The deleterious effect of extreme temperatures is indicated by a decrease in numerical abundances and reduced species richness, eventually leading to substantial changes in community composition. Critical temperature thresholds were observed at 30° C and 35° C, the latter observed by the most thermally tolerant species Pararotalia calcariformata, the only symbiont bearing species observed within the heated area. Common species of the shallow hard bottom habitats are almost absent from the most extreme site indicating that they presently live very close to their upper temperature threshold, and that excess warming will likely impede their future survival in the Eastern Mediterranean. Several of these species are either proven or suspected to be tropical Lessepsian. Thus, considering present models of expected north-western future expansion of Lessepsian species in the Mediterranean, our study show that it is important to consider excess warming as a major stressor that will limit their distribution.

  16. Fish-derived nutrient hotspots shape coral reef benthic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantz, Andrew A; Ladd, Mark C; Schrack, Elizabeth; Burkepile, Deron E

    2015-12-01

    Animal-derived nutrients play an important role in structuring nutrient regimes within and between ecosystems. When animals undergo repetitive, aggregating behavior through time, they can create nutrient hotspots where rates of biogeochemical activity are higher than those found in the surrounding environment. In turn, these hotspots can influence ecosystem processes and community structure. We examined the potential for reef fishes from the family Haemulidae (grunts) to create nutrient hotspots and the potential impact of these hotspots on reef communities. To do so, we tracked the schooling locations of diurnally migrating grunts, which shelter at reef sites during the day but forage off reef each night, and measured the impact of these fish schools on benthic communities. We found that grunt schools showed a high degree of site fidelity, repeatedly returning to the same coral heads. These aggregations created nutrient hotspots around coral heads where nitrogen and phosphorus delivery was roughly 10 and 7 times the respective rates of delivery to structurally similar sites that lacked schools of these fishes. In turn, grazing rates of herbivorous fishes at grunt-derived hotspots were approximately 3 times those of sites where grunts were rare. These differences in nutrient delivery and grazing led to distinct benthic communities with higher cover of crustose coralline algae and less total algal abundance at grunt aggregation sites. Importantly, coral growth was roughly 1.5 times greater at grunt hotspots, likely due to the important nutrient subsidy. Our results suggest that schooling reef fish and their nutrient subsidies play an important role in mediating community structure on coral reefs and that overfishing may have important negative consequences on ecosystem functions. As such, management strategies must consider mesopredatory fishes in addition to current protection often offered to herbivores and top-tier predators. Furthermore, our results suggest that

  17. Effects of triclosan on marine benthic and epibenthic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Monique M; Ho, Kay T; Cantwell, Mark G; Burgess, Robert M; Pelletier, Marguerite C

    2012-08-01

    Triclosan is an antimicrobial compound that has been widely used in consumer products such as toothpaste, deodorant, and shampoo. Because of its widespread use, triclosan has been detected in various environmental media, including wastewater, sewage sludge, surface waters, and sediments. Triclosan is acutely toxic to numerous aquatic organisms, but very few studies have been performed on estuarine and marine benthic organisms. For whole sediment toxicity tests, the sediment-dwelling estuarine amphipod, Ampelisca abdita, and the epibenthic mysid shrimp, Americamysis bahia, are commonly used organisms. In the present study, median lethal concentration values (LC50) were obtained for both of these organisms using water-only and whole sediment exposures. Acute 96-h water-only toxicity tests resulted in LC50 values of 73.4 and 74.3 µg/L for the amphipod and mysid, respectively. For the 7-d whole sediment toxicity test, LC50 values were 303 and 257 mg/kg (dry wt) for the amphipod and mysid, respectively. Using equilibrium partitioning theory, these whole sediment values are equivalent to interstitial water LC50 values of 230 and 190 µg/L for the amphipod and mysid, respectively, which are within a threefold difference of the observed 96-h LC50 water-only values. Triclosan was found to accumulate in polychaete tissue in a 28-d bioaccumulation study with a biota-sediment accumulation factor of 0.23 kg organic carbon/kg lipid. These data provide some of the first toxicity data for triclosan with marine benthic and epibenthic species while also indicating a need to better understand the effects of other forms of sediment carbon, triclosan ionization, and organism metabolism of triclosan on the chemical's behavior and toxicity in the aquatic environment.

  18. Holocene Deep Ocean Variability Detected with Individual Benthic Foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bova, S. C.; Herbert, T.; Fox-Kemper, B.

    2015-12-01

    Historical observations of deep ocean temperatures (>700 m water depth) show apparently unprecedented rates of warming over the past half century that parallel observed surface warming, on the order of 0.1°C/decade (Purkey and Johnson 2010). Most water masses below 700 m depth, however, have not been at the sea surface where they exchange heat and carbon with the atmosphere since well before industrialization (Gebbie and Huybers 2012). How then has the heat content of isolated deep water masses responded to climate change over the last century? In models, wave mechanisms propagate thermocline anomalies quickly (Masuda et al. 2010), but these dynamics are not fully understood. We therefore turn to the sedimentary record to constrain the bounds of earlier variability from Holocene anomalies. The oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of individual benthic foraminifera provide approximately month-long snapshots of the temperature and salinity of ambient deep water during calcification. We exploit the short lifespan of these organisms to reconstruct variability in δ18Oshell, and thus the variability in deep water temperature and salinity, during five 200-yr Holocene intervals at 1000 m water depth in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP). Modern variability in benthic foraminifer δ18O was too weak to detect but variability at 1000 m water depth in the EEP exceeded our detection limit during two Holocene intervals at high confidence (pcommunication between the surface and deep ocean that operates on human timescales, faster than previously recognized, or intrinsic variability that has not been active during the history of ocean observations are potential explanations. Further work combining models and high-resolution proxy data is needed to identify the mechanism and global extent of this type of subsurface variability in the global oceans.

  19. Benthic processes in fresh water fluffy sediments undergoing resuspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Longhi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Po river plain relict freshwater wetlands are characterised by a low free water to emergent macrophyte surface ratio, rapid infilling and fluffy sediments, undergoing frequent resuspension. Particle mixing should alter the steep gradients of dissolved gas, nutrient and organic matter quality that generally characterise sediments, with implications for benthic processes. Sediment features and solute fluxes were studied from December 2003 to February 2005 within the Busatello swamp complex (Northern Italy by means of a combination of core incubation, porewater extraction and microprofiling. At the study site, along a 10 cm vertical profile, sediment organic matter content (32.5%, porosity (0.94 and density (1.02 g cm–3 were nearly constant. Oxygen demand measured by dark core incubation (12.7-56.9 mmol m–2 d–1 was strongly correlated with water temperature. Rates agreed reasonably well with diffusive oxygen fluxes calculated from microprofiles while ammonium and phosphorus regeneration rates predicted from porewater gradients (-309.3-43.4 and -0.1-0.7 μmol m–2 d–1, respectively were significantly lower than rates measured via core incubations (-129.8-5420.5 and -120.4-35.4 μmol m–2 d–1, respectively. This is a probable consequence of insufficient vertical resolution of nutrient profiles and lack of steady state conditions. A sediment resuspension experiment, carried out under controlled laboratory conditions, indicated large instantaneous oxygen and nitrate consumption, a transient increase of denitrification rates and the rapid release of ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus. In unconsolidated sediments, resuspension and mixing of sediment particles are key processes regulating mineralisation rates and benthic-pelagic coupling.

  20. Multivariate benthic ecosystem functioning in the Arctic – benthic fluxes explained by environmental parameters in the southeastern Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Link

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of climate change on Arctic marine ecosystems and their biogeochemical cycles are difficult to predict given the complex physical, biological and chemical interactions among the ecosystem components. We studied benthic biogeochemical fluxes in the Arctic and the influence of short-term (seasonal to annual, long-term (annual to decadal and other environmental variability on their spatial distribution to provide a baseline for estimates of the impact of future changes. In summer 2009, we measured fluxes of dissolved oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, soluble reactive phosphate and silicic acid at the sediment–water interface at eight sites in the southeastern Beaufort Sea at water depths from 45 to 580 m. The spatial pattern of the measured benthic boundary fluxes was heterogeneous. Multivariate analysis of flux data showed that no single or reduced combination of fluxes could explain the majority of spatial variation, indicating that oxygen flux is not representative of other nutrient sink–source dynamics. We tested the influence of eight environmental parameters on single benthic fluxes. Short-term environmental parameters (sinking flux of particulate organic carbon above the bottom, sediment surface Chl a were most important for explaining oxygen, ammonium and nitrate fluxes. Long-term parameters (porosity, surface manganese and iron concentration, bottom water oxygen concentrations together with δ13Corg signature explained most of the spatial variation in phosphate, nitrate and nitrite fluxes. Variation in pigments at the sediment surface was most important to explain variation in fluxes of silicic acid. In a model including all fluxes synchronously, the overall spatial distribution could be best explained (57% by the combination of sediment Chl a, phaeopigments, δ13Corg, surficial manganese and bottom water oxygen concentration. We conclude that it is necessary to consider long-term environmental variability along with

  1. ZoneLib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jan Jacob; Schiøler, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    We present a dynamic model for climate in a livestock building divided into a number of zones, and a corresponding modular Simulink library (ZoneLib). While most literature in this area consider air flow as a control parameter we show how to model climate dynamics using actual control signals for...

  2. How to react to shallow water hydrodynamics: The larger benthic foraminifera solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Antonino; Hohenegger, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Symbiont-bearing larger benthic foraminifera inhabit the photic zone to provide their endosymbiotic algae with light. Because of the hydrodynamic conditions of shallow water environments, tests of larger foraminifera can be entrained and transported by water motion. To resist water motion, these foraminifera have to build a test able to avoid transport or have to develop special mechanisms to attach themselves to substrate or to hide their test below sediment grains. For those species which resist transport by the construction of hydrodynamic convenient shapes, the calculation of hydrodynamic parameters of their test defines the energetic input they can resist and therefore the scenario where they can live in. Measuring the density, size and shape of every test, combined with experimental data, helps to define the best mathematical approach for the settling velocity and Reynolds number of every shell. The comparison between water motion at the sediment-water interface and the specimen-specific settling velocity helps to calculate the water depths at which, for a certain test type, transport, deposition and accumulation may occur. The results obtained for the investigated taxa show that the mathematical approach gives reliable results and can discriminate the hydrodynamic behaviour of different shapes. Furthermore, the study of the settling velocities, calculated for all the investigated taxa, shows that several species are capable to resist water motion and therefore they appear to be functionally adapted to the hydrodynamic condition of its specific environment. The same study is not recommended on species which resist water motion by adopting hiding or anchoring strategies to avoid the effect of water motion.

  3. Impact of flow conditions on ammonium uptake and microbial community structure in benthic biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, Shai; Yanuka, Keren; Nejidat, Ali

    2010-05-01

    Excess nitrogen in surface waters is widely recognized to be a major global problem that adversely affects ecosystems, human health, and the economy. Today, most efforts to understand and model nutrient dynamics at large scales relies on macro-scale parameterization, such as mean channel geometry and velocity with uniform flow assumptions, as well as gross averages of in-situ nutrient transformation rates. However, there is increasing evidence that nutrient transformations in hyporheic zone are regulated by coupling between physical, chemical, and microbiological processes. Ignoring this greatly hinders the estimation of average biochemical transformation rates under the variable flow conditions found in aquatic systems. We used a combination of macro- and micro-scale observations in laboratory flumes to show that interplay between hydrodynamic transport, redox gradients, and microbial metabolism controls ammonium utilization by hyporheic microbial communities. Biofilm structural characteristics were quantified using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and real time PCR, while redox and pH gradients were measured using microelectrodes. We found that overlying velocities had profound effect on ammonium uptake due to mass transfer of ammonium from the bulk water to the benthic biofilms, but also due to the delivery of oxygen into the sediment bed. Under laminar flow conditions we didn't observe any change of ammonium uptake as a response to increase in overlying velocity. However, under non-laminar conditions we observe monotonic increase in ammonium uptake, with the greatest uptake under the fastest flow condition. We will discuss ammonium uptake rates results in the context of the different microbial communities and the micro-scale observations that were obtained using the microelectrodes. We anticipate that combined knowledge of the response of the microbial community and bulk nitrogen utilization rates to flow conditions will support the development of

  4. Benthic Foraminifera along a depth transect in western Bahrain: seasonal variations and environmental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Arslan; Kaminski, Michael; Tawabini, Bassam; Ramadan, Khalid Al; Babalola, Lamidi; Frontalini, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    We surveyed living benthic foraminifera in a depth transect off western Bahrain (Arabian Gulf) with the aim of understanding the seasonal population dynamics and environmental parameters. In winter, the population was found to be highest due to the large number of rotaliids, followed by miliolids. In each season, the population was found to increase along the depth transect due to the higher number of juveniles. A strong correlation is observed between foraminiferal population and sediment grain size - the juveniles are most abundant on coarser-sandy substrate. The population decreases in the spring and is lowest in the summer. Finally, the living population recovered again in the autumn with increasing juveniles/adult ratios along the depth transect. Results of species consistency and relative abundance showed that Ammonia was consistent from the shallowest to the deepest station, whereas miliolids started appearing in the deeper stations. The average numbers of Elphidium and Peneroplis also increased along the depth transect. Another seasonal effect is that juveniles of Ammonia tepida are found during each season reflecting its reproduction throughout the year, whereas Brizalina pacifica was only found during spring and autumn. The study of environmental parameters reveals that the site is subjected to eutrophication i.e. nitrates and sulfates, however, pollution by heavy metals and hydrocarbons is not significant. An assessment of 63 heavy metals in sediment samples showed that none of the metals had concentrations higher than the internationally accepted norms, which is further confirmed by values of the Foraminiferal Deformities Index of less than 2%. Likewise, no hydrocarbons were detected in the water or sediment samples. Therefore, it is concluded that the site in Bahrain is not yet adversely affected by human development, and therefore can provide baseline information for future comparison and assessment of foraminiferal assemblages in contaminated zones

  5. Aspects of benthic decapod diversity and distribution from rocky nearshore habitat at geographically widely dispersed sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Pohle

    Full Text Available Relationships of diversity, distribution and abundance of benthic decapods in intertidal and shallow subtidal waters to 10 m depth are explored based on data obtained using a standardized protocol of globally-distributed samples. Results indicate that decapod species richness overall is low within the nearshore, typically ranging from one to six taxa per site (mean = 4.5. Regionally the Gulf of Alaska decapod crustacean community structure was distinguishable by depth, multivariate analysis indicating increasing change with depth, where assemblages of the high and mid tide, low tide and 1 m, and 5 and 10 m strata formed three distinct groups. Univariate analysis showed species richness increasing from the high intertidal zone to 1 m subtidally, with distinct depth preferences among the 23 species. A similar depth trend but with peak richness at 5 m was observed when all global data were combined. Analysis of latitudinal trends, confined by data limitations, was equivocal on a global scale. While significant latitudinal differences existed in community structure among ecoregions, a semi-linear trend in changing community structure from the Arctic to lower latitudes did not hold when including tropical results. Among boreal regions the Canadian Atlantic was relatively species poor compared to the Gulf of Alaska, whereas the Caribbean and Sea of Japan appeared to be species hot spots. While species poor, samples from the Canadian Atlantic were the most diverse at the higher infraordinal level. Linking 11 environmental variables available for all sites to the best fit family-based biotic pattern showed a significant relationship, with the single best explanatory variable being the level of organic pollution and the best combination overall being organic pollution and primary productivity. While data limitations restrict conclusions in a global context, results are seen as a first-cut contribution useful in generating discussion and more in

  6. Porewater dynamics of silver, lead and copper in coastal sediments and implications for benthic metal fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnejais, Linda H.; Martin, W. R.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the conditions that lead to a diffusive release of dissolved metals from coastal sediments, porewater profiles of Ag, Cu, and Pb have been collected over seven years at two contrasting coastal sites in Massachusetts, USA. The Hingham Bay (HB) site is a contaminated location in Boston Harbor, while the Massachusetts Bay (MB) site is 11 km offshore and less impacted. At both sites, the biogeochemical cycles include scavenging by Fe-oxyhydroxides and release of dissolved metals when Fe-oxyhydroxides are reduced. Important differences in the metal cycles at the two sites, however, result from different redox conditions. Porewater sulfide and seasonal variation in redox zone depth is observed at HB, but not at MB. In summer, as the conditions become more reducing at HB, trace metals are precipitated as sulfides and are no longer associated with Fe-oxyhydroxides. Sulfide precipitation close to the sediment–water interface limits the trace metal flux in summer and autumn at HB, while in winter, oxidation of the sulfide phases drives high benthic fluxes of Cu and Ag, as oxic conditions return. The annual diffusive flux of Cu at HB is found to be significant and contributes to the higher than expected water column Cu concentrations observed in Boston Harbor. At MB, due to the lower sulfide concentrations, the association of trace metals with Fe-oxyhydroxides occurs throughout the year, leading to more stable fluxes. A surface enrichment of solid phase trace metals was found at MB and is attributed to the persistent scavenging by Fe-oxyhydroxides. This process is important, particularly at sites that are less reducing, because it maintains elevated metal concentrations at the surface despite the effects of bioturbation and sediment accumulation, and because it may increase the persistence of metal contamination in surface sediments.

  7. Benthic fluxes in a tropical estuary and their role in the ecosystem

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pratihary, A.K.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Naik, H.; Thorat, B.R.; Narvenkar, G.; Manjunatha, B.R.; Rao, V.P.

    In-situ measurements of benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients were made in the subtidal region of the Mandovi estuary during premonsoon and monsoon seasons to understand the role of sediment-water exchange processes in the estuarine ecosystem...

  8. A note on the Pavonina flabelliformis D'Orbigny (benthic foraminifera) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khare, N.

    The detailed study of the inner shelf surface sediments off Karwar (India) revealed the occurrence of a benthic foraminiferal species Pavonina flabelliformis. This is the first report of this species in the Arabian Sea. The ecological set up of P...

  9. CRED Integrated Benthic Habitat Map for French Frigate Shoals, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an integrated benthic habitat map system which consists of a number of separate map layers including multibeam bathymetry, acoustic backscatter imagery,...

  10. CRED Integrated Benthic Habitat Map for Tutuila Island, American Samoa Year 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an integrated benthic habitat map system which consists of a number of separate map layers including multibeam bathymetry, digital NOAA nautical charts,...

  11. Oxygen respiration rates of benthic foraminifera as measured with oxygen microsensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geslin, E.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Lombard, Fabien;

    2011-01-01

    of the foraminiferal specimens. The results show a wide range of oxygen respiration rates for the different species (from 0.09 to 5.27 nl cell−1 h−1) and a clear correlation with foraminiferal biovolume showed by the power law relationship: R = 3.98 10−3 BioVol0.88 where the oxygen respiration rate......Oxygen respiration rates of benthic foraminifera are still badly known, mainly because they are difficult to measure. Oxygen respiration rates of seventeen species of benthic foraminifera were measured using microelectrodes and calculated on the basis of the oxygen fluxes measured in the vicinity...... other microbenthos groups (nematodes, copepods, ostracods, ciliates and flagellates) suggests that benthic foraminifera have a lower oxygen respiration rates per unit biovolume. The total contribution of benthic foraminifera to the aerobic mineralisation of organic matter is estimated for the studied...

  12. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - Lower Laguna Madre

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  13. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Upper Laguna Madre Bay (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic habitat...

  14. Geographic Information System (GIS) characterizations of benthic habitats near South Florida coast (NODC Accession 0000600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection uses a Geographic Information System (GIS) to organize and characterize information about benthic communities and substrates, which are...

  15. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Lower Laguna Madre (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic habitat...

  16. Guam Community Coral Reef Monitoring Program, Benthic Training Surveys at Guam in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Guam community members gathered benthic cover data using a 0.25m2 quadrat with 6 intersecting points at each meter along a 25-meter transect. Members identified...

  17. Integrated ecosystem assessment of Vieques, Puerto Rico Benthic Composition Assessment and Monitoring Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA)...

  18. Experiment to decipher the effect of heavy metal cadmium on coastal benthic foraminifer Pararotalia Nipponica (Asano)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Linshy, V.N.; Saraswat, R.; Kurtarkar, S.R.; Nigam, R.

    . 2008. Culturing of benthic foraminifera for improved paleoceanographic reconstructions, Palaios, 23: 1-2. Fillipovic, V. and Raspor, B. 2003. Mettalothionein and metal levels in cystol of liver, kidney and brain in relation to growth parameters...

  19. Relationship between abundance and morphology of benthic foraminifera Epistominella exigua: Palaeoclimatic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Deopujari, A.; Nigam, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    The relationship between abundance (relative as well as absolute abundance) and morphology (size of the shell, numbers and proloculus size) of benthic foraminifera Epistominella exigua has been studied in a core to understand the influence...

  20. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISMS: DIELDRIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of the insecticide dieldrin in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it acco...

  1. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISMS: ENDRIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of the insecticide endrin in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accoun...

  2. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, Humboldt Bay, CA, 2009 (NODC Accession 0090251)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are benthic study GIS shapefiles (.shp, .shx, .prj) with associated .dbf attribute tables and specific Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata. A...

  3. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico: GeoEye Image po_483895_PS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  4. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico: GeoEye Image po_0900172_PS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  5. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico: GeoEye Image po_0072610_PS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  6. Marine Benthic Invertebrates in Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii 1994 (NODC Accession 9900151)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Planktonic larval stages of many benthic marine invertebrates are especially susceptible to environmental stress, such as the presence of pollution. Recruitment of...

  7. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Baffin Bay (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic habitat...

  8. Vieques, Puerto Rico Benthic Habitat Maps derived from 2006-2008 IKONOS imagery and orthophotography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Vieques, Puerto Rico were created by visual interpretation of remotely sensed imagery. The objective of...

  9. Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecological periodic tables for nekton and benthic macrofaunal community usage of estuarine habitats Steven P. Ferraro, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR Background/Questions/Methods The chemical periodic table, the Linnaean system of classification, and the Her...

  10. Integrated ecosystem assessment of Vieques, Puerto Rico Benthic Composition Assessment and Monitoring Data (NODC Accession 0125235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA)...

  11. NANPHAB -- Benthic Habitat polygons for North Anacapa Passage (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Benthic habitat polygon coverages have been created for marine reserve locations surrounding the Santa Barbara Basin. Diver, ROV and submersible video transects,...

  12. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Corpus Christi Bay 2004 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  13. Effects of hydraulic shellfish harvesting on benthic communities and sediment chemistry 2009-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The effects of hydraulic shellfish harvesting on the ecology of biological communities and chemistry of benthic sediments were investigated through a series of...

  14. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, Bogue Sound, North Carolina, 1992 (NODC Accession 0089465)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are benthic study GIS shapefiles (.shp, .shx, .prj) with associated .dbf attribute tables and specific Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata. A...

  15. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Corpus Christi Bay 2004 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  16. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Upper Laguna Madre Bay 2004 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  17. Nearshore Benthic Habitats of Timor-Leste Derived from WorldView-2 Satellite Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat classes were derived for nearshore waters around Timor-Leste from WorldView-2 satellite imagery. Habitat classes include different combinations of...

  18. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico: GeoEye Image po_502736_PS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  19. Surface meteorological conditions at benthic disturbance experiment site - INDEX area during austral winter 1997

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suryanarayana, A.; Murty, V.S.N.; RameshBabu, V.; Beena, B.S.

    Benthic Disturbance Experiment surveys in the Central Indian Ocean Basin yielded baseline data on surface meteorological conditions during June and August, 1997 together with sea surface temperature (SST) and could data to estimate the air-sea heat...

  20. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Yeung: Eastern Bering Sea Essential Fish Habitat Benthic Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic samples were collected between 2009-2012 in the Bering Sea to study Essential Fish Habitat. Station locations were at or near fixed stations of the AFSC...

  1. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - Espiritu Santo Bay (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to process existing and new digital multi-spectral imagery and create digital benthic habitat...

  2. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico: Ground Validation Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  3. Effect of Organic Enrichment and Hypoxia on the Biodiversity of Benthic Communities in Narragansett Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excessive input of nitrogen to coastal waters leads to eutrophication and hypoxia that reduce biodiversity and impair key ecosystem services provided by benthic communities; for example, fish and shellfish production, bioturbation, nutrient cycling, and water filtration. Hypoxia ...

  4. Benthic Exchange of Biogenic Elements in the Estuarine and Nearshore Waters of Western India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pratihary, A.K.

    In order to get a quantitative understanding of coupling between benthic regeneration and fluxes with pelagic nutrient cycles and primary productivity in shallow environments of eastern Arabian sea, biogeochemical studies were carried out at two...

  5. Pacific Remote Islands MNM: Initial Survey Instructions for Benthic Marine Cryptobiota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the survey is to expand knowledge of the biodiversity of benthic marine invertebrates that are poorly known and are generally not identified in more...

  6. St. John, USVI Benthic Composition Assessment and Monitoring Data (2002 - Present)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below.The intent of this work is five fold: 1) To spatially characterize...

  7. La Parguera, Puerto Rico Benthic Composition Assessment and Monitoring Data (2002 - Present)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below. The intent of this work is five fold: 1) To spatially...

  8. St. Croix, USVI Benthic Composition Assessment and Monitoring Data (2002 - Present)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below. The intent of this work is five fold: 1) To spatially...

  9. An experimental mesocosm study of microhabitat preferences and mobility in benthic foraminifera: Preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ernst, S.R.; Duijnstee, Ivo; Jannink, N.T.; van der Zwaan, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Three small microcosm experiments were carried out to study the microhabitat preferences and mobility of benthic foraminifera from the northern Adriatic Sea. Following initial homogenization, the foraminiferal assemblages developed a clear microhabitat partitioning in the microcosms within 20 days.

  10. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - San Antonio Bay and Espiritu Santo Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  11. Benthic communities associated with ferromanganese nodules from the Central Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Pavithran, S.; Goltekar, R.

    for grazers, shelter for burrowers and sessile organisms as well as protection for mobile fauna. It is concluded that benthic organisms like nematodes, polychaetes and foraminiferas may have strong influence on nodule formation and growth....

  12. The Benthic Boundary Layer: geochemical and oceanographic data from the GEOSTAR-2 observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Plastino

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical and oceanographic data, acquired throughout 6 months by the GEOSTAR-2 benthic observatory in southern Tyrrhenian Sea, evidenced ocean-lithosphere interactions in the 1900-m deep Benthic Boundary Layer (BBL, distinguishing two water masses with different origin and, possibly, benthic residence time. Gas concentration, helium isotopic ratios, radioactivity, temperature, salinity and vertical component of the current converged towards the indication of a BBL characterised by a colder and fresher western water (WW, which is episodically displaced by the cascading of the warmer and saltier Eastern Overflow Water (EOW. The benthic WW has higher concentration of geochemical tracers diffusing from the seafloor sediments. The data set shows the potential of long-term, continuous and multiparametric monitoring in providing unique information which cannot be acquired by traditional, short-term or single-sensor investigations.

  13. Benthic disturbance and monitoring experiment in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, R.; Nath, B.N.

    Environmental impact assessment studies for deep-sea manganese nodule mining have been initiated in the Central indian Ocean Basin since 1995. As a part of the first phase for collecting the benthic baseline data, echosounding, subbottom profiling...

  14. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, coastal Massachusetts, 1994-1996 (NODC Accession 0089463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are benthic study GIS shapefiles (.shp, .shx, .prj) with associated .dbf attribute tables and specific Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata. A...

  15. Guam Community Coral Reef Monitoring Program, Benthic Quadrat Surveys at Guam in 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Guam community members gathered benthic cover data using a 0.25m2 quadrat with 6 intersecting points at each meter along a 25-meter transect. Members identified...

  16. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Benthic Habitat Data, Willapa Bay, Washington, 1995 (NODC Accession 0089466)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are benthic study GIS shapefiles (.shp, .shx, .prj) with associated .dbf attribute tables and specific Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata. A...

  17. SANAHAB -- Benthic Habitat polygons for South Anacapa Island (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Benthic habitat polygon coverages have been created for marine reserve locations surrounding the Santa Barbara Basin. Diver, ROV and submersible video transects,...

  18. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat - San Antonio Bay (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic habitat...

  19. Kailua Bay, Oahu, Hawaii Benthic Mapping Data 1999-2001 (NODC Accession 0001239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic mapping surveys were conducted from March 1999 to January 2001 aperiodically in support of research related to sedimentology, sea level history, and reef...

  20. Baseline assessment of the benthic communities of the Flower Garden Banks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The work developed baseline information on fish and benthic communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS). Surveys employed diving,...

  1. Baseline assessment of benthic communities of the Flower Garden Banks (2010 - present): 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The proposed work develop baseline information on fish and benthic communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS). Surveys will...

  2. Baseline assessment of the fish and benthic communities of the Flower Garden Banks (NODC Accession 0118358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The proposed work develop baseline information on fish and benthic communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS). Surveys will...

  3. Baseline assessment of fish and benthic communities of the Flower Garden Banks

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The work developed baseline information on fish and benthic communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS). Surveys employed diving,...

  4. Baseline assessment of fish and benthic communities of the Flower Garden Banks (NODC Accession 0118358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The proposed work develop baseline information on fish and benthic communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS). Surveys will...

  5. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Upper Laguna Madre Bay 2004 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  6. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Corpus Christi Bay 2004 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  7. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - Lower Laguna Madre (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  8. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Corpus Christi Bay 2004 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  9. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Reprocessed DOQQ Aerial Imagery (NODC Accession 0086051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Coastal Services Center purchased services to reprocess existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  10. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Upper Laguna Madre Bay 2004 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2006 and 2007 the NOAA Office for Coastal Management purchased services to process existing digital multi-spectral imagery (ADS-40) and create digital benthic...

  11. Shallow-Water Benthic Habitats of Southwest Puerto Rico: Accuracy Assessment Site Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of two areas in Southwest Puerto Rico (PR), including the Guanica Bay/La Parguera...

  12. Mud, Macrofauna and Microbes: An ode to benthic organism-abiotic interactions at varying scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthic environments are dynamic habitats, subject to variable sources and rates of sediment delivery, reworking from the abiotic and biotic processes, and complex biogeochemistry. These activities do not occur in a vacuum, and interact synergistically to influence food webs, bi...

  13. Sediment distribution and dynamics inferred by integrated electromagnetic, optical and acoustic benthic profiling in the western Bay of Plenty (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulgemeyer, T.; von Dobeneck, T. F.; Müller, H.; Bryan, K. R.; de Lange, W. P.; Battershill, C.

    2015-12-01

    In October 2011, New Zealand experienced a marine pollution disaster after the MV RENA ran aground in the western Bay of Plenty. To estimate the transport and burial potential of contaminants, local sediment distribution and dynamics had to be assessed quickly. Our study made use of the benthic profiler NERIDIS III of the University of Bremen. 33 cross-shore profiles, each ca. 8 km long, have been surveyed. The main instrument is a controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) sensor, which is measuring the electric conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of the seafloor. High-resolution, overlapping seafloor photos have been taken by a bow-mounted digital camera. An on-board CTD with turbidity sensor complete the sensor arrangement. From the EM data, porosity and magnetite concentrations have been calculated and interpolated. The resulting maps show specific zones of magnetite enrichment, higher concentrations are correlated to low porosity. Photos have been used along with acoustic backscatter measured by a sidescan sonar to sketch out a preliminary map of sediment facies. Based on this, sides for grab sampling were selected. By taking grain size and mineralogy into account, a detailed map of the regional lithofacies could be created. Local sediment dynamics have been inferred by the observation of bedforms, the turbidity of bottom water and lithofacies. The results show two anti-parallel longshore transport paths dependent on differing weather conditions and water depths. The longshore magnetite distribution indicates that the heavy mineral fraction is mainly affected by storm-induced sediment transport. Our study demonstrates how integrated benthic profiling adds to the interpretability of data obtained by established methods. By bridging the gap between area-covering, but indirect data from hydroacoustics and precise, but punctual data from samples, benthic profiling enables fast and detailed assessment of sediment distribution and dynamics on a large scale.

  14. Benthic microbial communities of coastal terrestrial and ice shelf Antarctic meltwater ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, Stephen D. J.; McDonald, Ian R.; Herbold, Craig W.; Lee, Charles K; Cary, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    The numerous perennial meltwater ponds distributed throughout Antarctica represent diverse and productive ecosystems central to the ecological functioning of the surrounding ultra oligotrophic environment. The dominant taxa in the pond benthic communities have been well described however, little is known regarding their regional dispersal and local drivers to community structure. The benthic microbial communities of 12 meltwater ponds in the McMurdo Sound of Antarctica were investigated to ex...

  15. Consequences of increasing hypoxic disturbance on benthic communities and ecosystem functioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villnäs

    Full Text Available Disturbance-mediated species loss has prompted research considering how ecosystem functions are changed when biota is impaired. However, there is still limited empirical evidence from natural environments evaluating the direct and indirect (i.e. via biota effects of disturbance on ecosystem functioning. Oxygen deficiency is a widespread threat to coastal and estuarine communities. While the negative impacts of hypoxia on benthic communities are well known, few studies have assessed in situ how benthic communities subjected to different degrees of hypoxic stress alter their contribution to ecosystem functioning. We studied changes in sediment ecosystem function (i.e. oxygen and nutrient fluxes across the sediment water-interface by artificially inducing hypoxia of different durations (0, 3, 7 and 48 days in a subtidal sandy habitat. Benthic chamber incubations were used for measuring responses in sediment oxygen and nutrient fluxes. Changes in benthic species richness, structure and traits were quantified, while stress-induced behavioral changes were documented by observing bivalve reburial rates. The initial change in faunal behavior was followed by non-linear degradation in benthic parameters (abundance, biomass, bioturbation potential, gradually impairing the structural and functional composition of the benthic community. In terms of ecosystem function, the increasing duration of hypoxia altered sediment oxygen consumption and enhanced sediment effluxes of NH(4(+ and dissolved Si. Although effluxes of PO(4(3- were not altered significantly, changes were observed in sediment PO(4(3- sorption capability. The duration of hypoxia (i.e. number of days of stress explained a minor part of the changes in ecosystem function. Instead, the benthic community and disturbance-driven changes within the benthos explained a larger proportion of the variability in sediment oxygen- and nutrient fluxes. Our results emphasize that the level of stress to the

  16. Towards Automated Annotation of Benthic Survey Images: Variability of Human Experts and Operational Modes of Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Oscar Beijbom; Edmunds, Peter J.; Chris Roelfsema; Jennifer Smith; Kline, David I.; Neal, Benjamin P.; Matthew J Dunlap; Vincent Moriarty; Tung-Yung Fan; Chih-Jui Tan; Stephen Chan; Tali Treibitz; Anthony Gamst; B. Greg Mitchell; David Kriegman

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have heightened the need to rapidly characterize ecological changes in marine benthic communities across large scales. Digital photography enables rapid collection of survey images to meet this need, but the subsequent image annotation is typically a time consuming, manual task. We investigated the feasibility of using automated point-annotation to expedite cover estimation of the 17 dominant benthic categories from survey-images capture...

  17. The role of zooplankton in the pelagic-benthic coupling of the Southern Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Schnack-Schiel, Sigrid B.; Isla, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    [EN] Zooplankton contributes in different ways to pelagic-benthic coupling: Their faecal material is a major route of energy flow and the vertical migrations of many species as well as the production of pelagic larvae by benthic organisms represent different paths to link the two subsystems. Antarctic particle fluxes have been shown to be highly variable in size and composition within a given region and even at the same site from year to year. There are also differences throughout the water c...

  18. Amphibian and benthic macroinvertebrate response to physical and chemical properties of Themi River, Arusha, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Lyimo, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    I hypothesized that variation in physical and chemical properties and habitat destruction of the Themi River as a result of human activities would affect abundance and diversity of amphibian and benthic macroinvertebrates. Variation in habitat physical and chemical conditions, and amphibian and benthic macroinvertebrate diversity and abundance were assessed in the Themi River of Arusha municipality. These physical, chemical and biological conditions were assessed at forty sampling stations...

  19. Messinian paleoenvironmental evolution in the lower Guadalquivir Basin (SW Spain) based on benthic foraminifera.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Asensio, J.N.; Aguirre, J.; Schmiedl, G.; Civis Llovera, J.

    2012-01-01

    Benthic foraminiferal assemblages of a drill core from the lower Guadalquivir Basin (northern Gulf of Cádiz, SW Spain) have been analyzed in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironmental evolution in the vicinity of the Betic seaways during the Messinian. The core consists of marine sediments ranging from the latest Tortonian to the early Pliocene. Changes in the abundance of certain marker species, planktonic/benthic ratio (P/B ratio), paleodepth estimated with a transfer function, content of ...

  20. Modeling food web interactions in benthic deep-sea ecosystems. A practical guide

    OpenAIRE

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Van Oevelen, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Deep-sea benthic systems are notoriously difficult to sample. Even more than for other benthic systems, many flows among biological groups cannot be directly measured, and data sets remain incomplete and uncertain. In such cases, mathematical models are often used to quantify unmeasured biological interactions. Here, we show how to use so-called linear inverse models (LIMs) to reconstruct material and energy flows through food webs in which the number of measurements is a fraction of the tota...

  1. Seasonal Abundance of Benthic Communities in Coral Areas of Karah Island, Terengganu, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim*(1), Sakri; Hussin(1), Wan Mohd Rauhan Wan; Kassim(1), Zaleha; Joni(1), Zuliatini Mohamad; Zakaria(1), Mohamad Zaidi; Hajisamae, Sukree

    2006-01-01

    Benthic communities are important to marine ecosystem and form important food source for most marine organisms especially fish. Study of this biota is important as it could be an indicator to overall aquatic productivity. Benthic communities in Karah Island, Terengganu, Malaysia were studied to find their relationship with different monsoon seasons and types of substrate. Surveys were conducted 4 times; two times each during pre-monsoon phase (September - October) and post-monsoon phase (Apri...

  2. Tolerance of benthic foraminifera to anthropogenic stressors from three sites of the Egyptian coasts

    OpenAIRE

    Amani Badawi; Wafaa El-Menhawey

    2016-01-01

    Surely the coupling of natural and anthropogenic stressors combined with a lack of regulation resulted in the current threat to a large part of coastal marine biodiversity as well as coastal human societies, particularly in highly populated regions. The distribution pattern of benthic foraminifera as sensitive bio-indicator is utilized to assess human-induced impact on the coastal area, at Alexandria, Port Said and Suez cites of Egypt. Twenty-two benthic foraminiferal genera were identified a...

  3. Influence of benthic macrofauna community shifts on ecosystem functioning in shallow estuaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik eKristensen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We identify how ecosystem functioning in shallow estuaries is affected by shifts in benthic fauna communities. We use the shallow estuary, Odense Fjord, Denmark, as a case study to test our hypotheses that (1 shifts in benthic fauna composition and species functional traits affect biogeochemical cycling with cascading effects on ecological functioning, which may (2 modulate pelagic primary productivity with feedbacks to the benthic system. Odense Fjord is suitable because it experienced dramatic shifts in benthic fauna community structure from 1998 to 2008. We focused on infaunal species with emphasis on three dominating burrow-dwelling polychaetes: the native Nereis (Hediste diversicolor and Arenicola marina, and the invasive Marenzelleria viridis. The impact of functional traits in the form of particle reworking and ventilation on biogeochemical cycles, i.e. sediment metabolism and nutrient dynamics, was determined from literature data. Historical records of summer nutrient levels in the water column of the inner Odense Fjord show elevated concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- (DIN during the years 2004-2006, exactly when the N. diversicolor population declined and A. marina and M. viridis populations expanded dramatically. In support of our first hypothesis, we show that excess NH4+ delivery from the benthic system during the A. marina and M. viridis expansion period enriched the overlying water in DIN and stimulated phytoplankton concentration. The altered benthic-pelagic coupling and stimulated pelagic production may, in support of our second hypothesis, have feedback to the benthic system by changing the deposition of organic material. We therefore advice to identify the exact functional traits of the species involved in a community shift before studying its impact on ecosystem functioning. We also suggest studying benthic community shifts in shallow environments to obtain knowledge about the drivers and controls before exploring deep

  4. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    OpenAIRE

    P. Stief

    2013-01-01

    Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal–microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal–microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosys...

  5. Effects of coral reef benthic primary producers on dissolved organic carbon and microbial activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F Haas

    Full Text Available Benthic primary producers in marine ecosystems may significantly alter biogeochemical cycling and microbial processes in their surrounding environment. To examine these interactions, we studied dissolved organic matter release by dominant benthic taxa and subsequent microbial remineralization in the lagoonal reefs of Moorea, French Polynesia. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC release were assessed for several common benthic reef organisms from the backreef habitat. We assessed microbial community response to dissolved exudates of each benthic producer by measuring bacterioplankton growth, respiration, and DOC drawdown in two-day dark dilution culture incubations. Experiments were conducted for six benthic producers: three species of macroalgae (each representing a different algal phylum: Turbinaria ornata--Ochrophyta; Amansia rhodantha--Rhodophyta; Halimeda opuntia--Chlorophyta, a mixed assemblage of turf algae, a species of crustose coralline algae (Hydrolithon reinboldii and a dominant hermatypic coral (Porites lobata. Our results show that all five types of algae, but not the coral, exuded significant amounts of labile DOC into their surrounding environment. In general, primary producers with the highest rates of photosynthesis released the most DOC and yielded the greatest bacterioplankton growth; turf algae produced nearly twice as much DOC per unit surface area than the other benthic producers (14.0±2.8 µmol h⁻¹ dm⁻², stimulating rapid bacterioplankton growth (0.044±0.002 log10 cells h⁻¹ and concomitant oxygen drawdown (0.16±0.05 µmol L⁻¹ h⁻¹ dm⁻². Our results demonstrate that benthic reef algae can release a significant fraction of their photosynthetically-fixed carbon as DOC, these release rates vary by species, and this DOC is available to and consumed by reef associated microbes. These data provide compelling evidence that benthic primary producers differentially influence

  6. A study on the biodiversity of benthic invertebrates in the waters of Seogwipo, Jeju Island, Korea

    OpenAIRE

    In-Young Cho; Dong-Won Kang; Jisoon Kang; Hosung Hwang; Jeong-Hye Won; Woon Kee Paek; Su-Yuan Seo

    2014-01-01

    The biodiversity of benthic invertebrates in the intertidal and subtidal regions of Gapado, Beomseom, and Munseom islets was surveyed twice in May and September 2013 to study the state of biodiversity in Seogwipo, Jeju Island. As a result, a total of 77 species, 46 families, 25 orders, 14 classes, and nine phyla of benthic invertebrates were found. The species which were found, by taxon, consisted of the following: 26 species of Cnidaria (34%), 24 species of Mollusca (31%), seven species of C...

  7. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to reconstruct paleomonsoon from Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Manasa; Rajeev Saraswat; Rajiv Nigam

    2016-04-01

    Temporal changes in benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups were suggested as an effective proxy to reconstructpast monsoon intensity from the Arabian Sea. Here, in order to test the applicability of temporalvariation in morpho-groups to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal, we havedocumented recent benthic foraminiferal distribution from the continental shelf region of the northwesternBay of Bengal. Based on the external morphology, benthic foraminifera were categorized intorounded symmetrical (RSBF) and angular asymmetrical benthic foraminifera (AABF). Additionally, afew other dominant groups were also identified based on test composition (agglutinated, calcareous) andabundance (Asterorotalids and Nonions). The relative abundance of each group was compared with theambient physico-chemical conditions, including dissolved oxygen, organic matter, salinity and temperature.We report that the RSBF are abundant in comparatively warm and well oxygenated waters of lowsalinity, suggesting a preference for high energy environment, whereas AABF dominate relatively cold,hypersaline deeper waters with low dissolved oxygen, indicating a low energy environment. The agglutinatedforaminifera, Asterorotalids and Nonions dominate shallow water, low salinity regions, whereasthe calcareous benthic foraminiferal abundance increases away from the riverine influx regions. Foodavailability, as estimated from organic carbon abundance in sediments, has comparatively less influenceon faunal distribution in the northwestern Bay of Bengal, as compared to dissolved oxygen, temperatureand salinity. We conclude that the factors associated with freshwater influx affect the distributionof benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups in the northwestern Bay of Bengal and thus it can be used toreconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal.

  8. Ensamble de crustáceos bentónicos en un lago salino tropical Benthic crustaceans assemblage in a tropical, saline lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. del Carmen Hernández

    2010-10-01

    (Hyalella azteca, 1 isopod (Caecidotea williamsi and 2 ostracods (Limnocythere inopinata and Candona sp.. Compared to other tropical lakes the species richness is low. It is worth mentioning the high endemism found in the benthic crustaceans' assemblage of Lake Alchichica exemplified by C. williamsi, a new and recently described endemic species; additionally, it is to be expected that both, Candona as H. azteca are also new and endemic species of the lake. The benthic crustaceans were distributed from the coastal zone to the deepest part of the lake (62m displaying variable abundances and taxonomic richness. The ostracodes were the most common crustaceans collected in the littoral zone, in the slope and in the deep zone where no other species were found. Amphipods were the second most abundant group in the coastal zone and in the slope being absent from the deep zone. Isopods are associated exclusively with the tufa deposits, a characteristic habitat of the lake that runs along the slope, so that traditional sampling techniques like those used in this study were unable to collect them. The crustacean assemblage is predominantly composed by species with direct development of diverse trophic positions including herbivores (H. azteca, omnivores (C. williamsi and bacterivores (L. inopinata and Candona sp..

  9. Boron in Pariette Wetland Sediments, Aquatic Vegetation & Benthic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva, P.; Jones, C. P.; Powelson, D.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The Pariette Wetlands are comprised of 20 ponds located in Utah's Uintah Basin. Boron concentration in the Pariette Wetlands have been observed to exceed the total maximum daily limit of 750 µg L-1. Considering water flow in and out of the wetlands, boron is accumulating within the wetlands where it is sorbed to sediments and bioconcentrated by wetland plant and macro invertebrates. Since boron is an avian teratogen, an estimate of boron ingestion exposure is warranted. Samples from 3 of the 23 Pariette Wetland ponds with one pond near the inlet, one near the outlet, and one in the middle were collected. Five sampling points were designated along a 100 m transect of each pond. At each sampling point duplicate (or triplicate) samples of water, sediments, benthic organisms and wetland vegetation were collected. The sediments were collected with a KB-corer and divided at depths of 0-2 cm, 2-7 cm, and 7+ cm from the sediment surface. Sample splits were sent to the USU Bug lab for identification of invertebrate species. Whenever this transect was not intercepting vegetation, 2-3 additional sample sites were identified at the pond within stands of representative vegetation where bird nests are located. The plant parts used for boron analyses will include seeds, shoot and roots of vascular plants, as well as algae or duckweeds skimmed from the surface. Samples were processed within 2 days of collection. Water samples filtered through a 0.45 μ membrane filter were analyzed for DOC, pH and ECe. The dried and washed vegetation samples were ground and stored. The benthic organisms and macro invertebrates were netted at the water surface. The dried samples were weighed, ground and stored. Samples were weighed, oven dried and reweighed. For plant and macro-invertebrate samples, a nitric and hydrogen peroxide digestion procedure is used to dissolve environmentally available elements. The Hot Water extraction and DTPA-Sorbitol extraction were compared to estimate wetland plant

  10. BLM Solar Energy Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — Priority development areas for utility-scale solar energy facilities as identified in the Solar PEIS Record of Decision. An additional Solar Energy Zone identified...

  11. Phase zone photon sieve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Jia; Xie Chang-Qing

    2009-01-01

    A novel diffractive optical element, named phase zone photon sieve (PZPS), is presented. There are three kinds of phase plates in PZPSs: PZPS1, PZPS2, and PZPS3. Each of the PZPSs has its own structure and is made on quartz substrate by etching. The three PZPSs have stronger diffraction peak intensity than a photon sieve (PS) when the margin pinhole and zone line width are kept the same. The PZPS3 can produce a smaller central diffractive spot than the ordinary PS with the same number of zones on the Fresnel zone plate. We have given the design method for and the simulation of PZPS and PS. PZPS has potential applications in optical maskless lithography.

  12. : Seizure onset zone imaging

    OpenAIRE

    David, Olivier; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Job, Anne-Sophie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Hoffmann, Dominique,; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    International audience Stereo-electroencephalography is used to localize the seizure onset zone and connected neuronal networks in surgical candidates suffering from intractable focal epilepsy. The concept of an epileptogenicity index has been proposed recently to represent the likelihood of various regions being part of the seizure onset zone. It quantifies low-voltage fast activity, the electrophysiological signature of seizure onset usually assessed visually by neurologists. Here, we re...

  13. Contribution of planktonic and benthic food sources to the diet of the reef-forming vermetid gastropod Dendropoma petraeum in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzini, Salvatrice; Colombo, Francesca; Costa, Valentina; Mazzola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea, the vermetid Dendropoma petraeum (Monterosato, 1884) forms highly biodiverse reefs that have received increasing attention in recent years although very little is known about the food habit of this species. The main goal of this study was to describe the trophic role of planktonic and benthic food sources for D. petraeum. Specimens from three morphological zones of the reef (inner edge, cuvette and outer edge) at two sites with different wave exposure along the north-western coast of Sicily (Italy; western Mediterranean) were compared for δ 13C and δ 15N. Isotopic determinations were also carried out on potential food sources identified in epilithon, reef macroalgae and suspended particulate organic matter. δ 13C for D. petraeum showed significantly more depleted values in the more exposed conditions (i.e. the site with higher wave exposure and outer edge of the reef), while δ 15N did not differ appreciably. These results suggest greater exploitation of benthic sources in the sheltered than in the exposed site and reveal diet shift and trophic flexibility at a small spatial scale for the reef-former D. petraeum.

  14. South Equatorial Current (SEC) driven changes at DSDP Site 237, Central Indian Ocean, during the Plio-Pleistocene: Evidence from Benthic Foraminifera and Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anil K.; Das, Moumita; Bhaskar, K.

    2006-12-01

    This study attempts to analyse paleoceanographic changes in the Central Indian Ocean (Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 237), linked to monsoon variability as well as deep-sea circulation during the Plio-Pleistocene. We used factor and cluster analyses of census data of the 34 most dominant species of benthic foraminifera that enabled us to identify five biofacies: Astrononion umbilicatulum- Uvigerina proboscidea (Au-Up), Pullenia bulloides- Bulimina striata (Pb-Bs), Globocassidulina tumida- Nuttallides umbonifera (Gt-Nu), Gyroidinoides nitidula- Cibicides wuellerstorfi (Gn-Cw) and Cassidulina carinata- Cassidulina laevigata (Cc-Cl) biofacies. Knowledge of the environmental preferences of modern deep-sea benthic foraminifera helped to interpret the results of factor and cluster analyses in combination with oxygen and carbon isotope values. The biofacies indicative of high surface productivity, resulting from a stronger South Equatorial Current (Au-Up and Pb-Bs biofacies), dominate the early Pliocene interval (5.6-4.5 Ma) of global warmth. An intense Indo-Pacific 'biogenic bloom' and strong Oxygen Minimum Zone extended to intermediate depths (˜1000-2000 m) over large parts of the Indian Ocean in the early Pliocene. Since 4.5 Ma, the food supply in the Central Indian Ocean dropped and fluctuated while deep waters were corrosive (biofacies Gt-Nu, Gn-Cw). The Pleistocene interval is characterized by an intermediate flux of organic matter (Cc-Cl biofacies).

  15. Benthic boundary layer. IOS observational and modelling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near bottom currents, measured at three sites in the N.E. Atlantic, reveal the eddying characteristics of the flow. Eddies develop, migrate and decay in ways best revealed by numerical modelling simulations. Eddies control the thickness of the bottom mixed layer by accumulating and thickening or spreading and thinning the bottom waters. At the boundaries of eddies benthic fronts form providing a path for upward displacement of the bottom water. An experiment designed to estimate vertical diffusivity is performed. The flux of heat into the bottom of the Iberian basin through Discovery Gap is deduced from year long current measurements. The flux is supposed balanced by geothermal heating through the sea floor and diapycnal diffusion in the water. A diffusivity of 1.5 to 4 cm2 s-1 is derived for the bottom few hundred meters of the deep ocean. Experiments to estimate horizontal diffusivity are described. If a tracer is discharged from the sea bed the volume of sea water in which it is found increases with time and after 20 years will fill an ocean basin of side 1000 km to a depth of only 1 to 2 km. (author)

  16. Potential Marine Benthic Habitat Map of Elkhorn Slough, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, K.; Garcia-Garcia, A.; Endris, C.

    2015-12-01

    While marine benthic habitat maps have been created for a big portion of California's coastline, the Elkhorn Slough Reserve lacks one. We have tentatively mapped its types of seafloor using a well-known classification system, which includes various types of large-scale and small-scale features, bottom induration, vegetation, surface texture, and slope. Seismic lines and sediment cores were collected to create the map. CSUMB's Seafloor Mapping Lab as well as the Elkhorn Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve provided bathymetry, raster files, and shapefiles to be incorporated into the project. We divided the Slough into three main sections: the Lower, Central, and Upper Slough. Sand sediments were found in the Lower Slough, which is a high-energy environment, whilst mud or silt sediments dominated the rest of the Slough. Five classification categories were used to describe the Slough's seafloor: flat sand sediments, sloped sand sediments, flat mud sediments, sloped mud sediments, and eelgrass on sandy sediment. Bathymetry data was used to discuss the Slough's sediment erosion and accretion. This preliminary map can be used to understand the location of various marine habitats, which is important for the wildlife conservation and planning efforts in the Slough. Acknowledgments: CSUMB (chirp), Ron Eby (ESNEER), Geoff (Triton Imaging Inc.). The Non-Senate Faculty Professional Development Award 19900-433332-ESGARC and ONR grant N00014-14-1-0172 supported this research.

  17. Underwater locomotion strategy by a benthic pennate diatom Navicula sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiadao; Cao, Shan; Du, Chuan; Chen, Darong

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of diatom locomotion has been widely researched but still remains a hypothesis. There are several questionable points on the prevailing model proposed by Edgar, and some of the observed phenomena cannot be completely explained by this model. In this paper, we undertook detailed investigations of cell structures, locomotion, secreted mucilage, and bending deformation for a benthic pennate diatom Navicula species. According to these broad evidences, an updated locomotion model is proposed. For Navicula sp., locomotion is realized via two or more pseudopods or stalks protruded out of the frustules. The adhesion can be produced due to the pull-off of one pseudopod or stalk from the substratum through extracellular polymeric substances. And the positive pressure is generated to balance the adhesion because of the push-down of another pseudopod or stalk onto the substratum. Because of the positive pressure, friction is generated, acting as a driving force of locomotion, and the other pseudopod or stalk can detach from the substratum, resulting in the locomotion. Furthermore, this model is validated by the force evaluation and can better explain observed phenomena. This updated model would provide a novel aspect on underwater locomotion strategy, hence can be useful in terms of artificial underwater locomotion devices.

  18. Diversity Patterns of Benthic Macrofauna Caused by Marine Fish Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Marín

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the patterns observed in the diversity and structure of the macrofauna benthic community under the influence of fish farming. First, we explain the effects of organic enrichment on the sediment and the consequences for the inhabiting communities. We describe the diversity trends in spatial and temporal gradients affected by fish farming and compare them with those described by the Pearson and Rosenberg model. We found that in general terms, the trends of diversity and other community parameters followed the Pearson and Rosenberg model but they can vary to some extent due to sediment local characteristics or to secondary disturbances. We also show the different mechanisms by which wild fish can affect macrofauna diversity patterns under fish farming influence. In addition, we comment the importance of the macrofauna diversity in the ecosystem functions and propose some guidelines to measure functional diversity related to relevant processes at ecosystem level. We propose more research efforts in the main topics commented in this review to improve management strategies to guarantee a good status of the diversity and ecosystem functioning of sediments influenced by fish farming.

  19. New perspectives in benthic deep-sea microbial ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia eCorinaldesi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea ecosystems represent the largest and most remote biome of the biosphere. They play a fundamental role in global biogeochemical cycles and their functions allow existence of life on our planet. In the last 20 years enormous progress has been made in the investigation of deep-sea microbes, but the knowledge of the microbial ecology of the soft bottoms (representing >90% of the deep-sea floor surface is still very limited. Deep-sea sediments host the largest fractions of Bacteria, Archaea and viruses on Earth, and potentially, a high diversity. At the same time, available results from metagenomics suggest that a large fraction of microbial taxa is completely unknown to science. Estimating the diversity of deep-sea benthic microbes and understanding their functions are some of the challenges of absolute priority, not only for deep-sea microbial ecology, but also for the entire research field of life sciences. The achievement of these goals, given the importance of the deep-sea microbial life for the functioning of the global biosphere, will open new perspectives for the comprehension of adaptation processes to the impact of global changes.

  20. Total primary production and the balance between benthic and pelagic plants in different nutrient regimes in a shallow estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markager, Svend Stiig; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Dalsgaard, Tage

    on a large monitoring data set in combination with historical information we have quantified and compared the benthic and the pelagic primary production along nutrient gradients in space and time for the shallow estuary Limfjorden, Denmark. As expected, increases in nutrient load stimulated the pelagic...... production at the expense of the benthic. Phytoplankton showed a strong positive response to increased nutrient concentrations while benthic primary producers were shaded. The ecosystem thus experienced a regime shift from benthic to pelagic dominance of GPP with increasing load. However, as nutrient load...

  1. Towards an integrated view of benthic and pelagic processes in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine

    2015-04-01

    The North Sea can be classified as a semi-enclosed shelf on the western-European continent. Atlantic influences are mainly through the Fair Isle current Channel in the North, and through the Strait of Dover in the South. An anti-clockwise circulation prevails, driven by mainly semi-diurnal tides and winds. The German Bight is located in the south-eastern part of the North Sea, and is strongly influenced by continental rivers. The outflow from the rivers Scheldt, Maas and Rhine is carried towards the German Bight with the residual currents. The German rivers Ems, Weser and Elbe directly debouche into the German Bight. On the shallow shelf, the water column is completely mixed by tidal forces and wind, largely preventing downward flux of particles and instead fostering temporary deposition and resuspension, which influences benthic mineralization. Hence, complex interactions between pelagic and benthic processes occur. Previous budget calculations indicate that the nutrient inventory has to be processed several times to support observed primary production, and, depending on water depth; only 10-20% remineralisation occurs in sediments of the German Bight whereas about 50% of organic matter is remineralised in the sediments of the shallow Wadden Sea. In this presentation, we use in-situ and ex-situ field data on pelagic and benthic oxygen respiration and benthic nutrient fluxes to assess the intense mineralization activity in the German Bight, the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization. Measurements of pelagic oxygen respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic oxygen uptake measurements based on flux-chamber landers and ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores revealed that benthic remineralisation rates are about an order of magnitude smaller than pelagic rates, in agreement with previous budget estimates. Both benthic and pelagic oxygen respiration show a strong seasonality; with higher

  2. Lipophilic toxin profiles detected in farmed and benthic mussels populations from the most relevant production zones in Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carlos; Rodriguez-Unda, Nelson; Contreras, Cristóbal; Barriga, Andrés; Lagos, Néstor

    2012-01-01

    Lipophilic toxins associated with diarrhoeic toxins were found in Mytilus chilensis (Blue mussels) and Aulacomya ater (Ribbed mussels). These shellfish samples were collected from Chiloe Island, Southern Chile. The samples were tested by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). After the analysis, four toxins were found: DTX-1, DTX-3, YTX and PTX. All toxins were identified by comparing their HPLC retention times with those of analytical standards and confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1) and dinophysistoxin-3 (DTX-3) toxins were the major components within the mussel extracts. Nevertheless, the percentages of these toxins differed depending on the area they were collected from and/or the sampling date. The levels detected in Butacheuques Island for okadaic acid (OA) was 267 ± 3.5 µg OA eq kg(-1) (p Chile, which is, to date, the more complex mix of lipophilic toxins ever found in mussels samples from Southern Chile. PMID:22424031

  3. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian Sea's oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzato, L.; van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isot

  4. Sink or link? The bacterial role in benthic carbon cycling in the Arabian Sea’s oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzato, L.; van Oevelen, D.; Moodley, L.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial loop, the consumption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by bacteria and subsequent transfer of bacterial carbon to higher trophic levels, plays a prominent role in pelagic food webs. However, its role in sedimentary ecosystems is not well documented. Here we present the results of isot

  5. Assessment of Longitudinal Gradients in Nematode Communities in the Deep Northern Gulf of Mexico and Concordance with Benthic Taxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiobenthic nematode assemblages were examined at 16 stations along two transects on the eastern and western boundaries of the deep northern Gulf of Mexico (dNGOM at depths of 212–3000 m. The highest abundance (297 individuals 10 cm−2 and number of genera (71 occurred at stations near the Mississippi River delta. Number of genera decreased with increasing depth, and showed differences in community composition between the east and west regions. The dominant family, Comesomatidae, was represented by Sabatieria that was present at most shallow stations but absent at greater water depths. A significant difference in nematode feeding morphology was observed between depth groups but not between the two transects at different longitudes. Patterns of nematode community structure are congruent with harpacticoid copepods. Overall, the higher abundance and diversity of nematodes in the north-central Gulf of Mexico is consistent with findings of other benthic taxa and reflects organic material loading from the Mississippi River driving deep sea communities in the Gulf. The east-west gradient in composition of nematode communities suggests that nematode assemblages have well-defined distribution patterns similar to other meiobenthic taxa in the GOM but they are not aligned in the bathymetric zones observed in macrofauna, megafauna and demersal fishes.

  6. Predicting ecological changes on benthic estuarine assemblages through decadal climate trends along Brazilian Marine Ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Angelo F.; Netto, Sérgio A.; Pagliosa, Paulo R.; Barros, Francisco; Christofoletti, Ronaldo A.; Rosa Filho, José S.; Colling, André; Lana, Paulo C.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are threatened coastal ecosystems that support relevant ecological functions worldwide. The predicted global climate changes demand actions to understand, anticipate and avoid further damage to estuarine habitats. In this study we reviewed data on polychaete assemblages, as a surrogate for overall benthic communities, from 51 estuaries along five Marine Ecoregions of Brazil (Amazonia, NE Brazil, E Brazil, SE Brazil and Rio Grande). We critically evaluated the adaptive capacity and ultimately the resilience to decadal changes in temperature and rainfall of the polychaete assemblages. As a support for theoretical predictions on changes linked to global warming we compared the variability of benthic assemblages across the ecoregions with a 40-year time series of temperature and rainfall data. We found a significant upward trend in temperature during the last four decades at all marine ecoregions of Brazil, while rainfall increase was restricted to the SE Brazil ecoregion. Benthic assemblages and climate trends varied significantly among and within ecoregions. The high variability in climate patterns in estuaries within the same ecoregion may lead to correspondingly high levels of noise on the expected responses of benthic fauna. Nonetheless, we expect changes in community structure and productivity of benthic species at marine ecoregions under increasing influence of higher temperatures, extreme events and pollution.

  7. Benthic Collector and Grazer Communities Are Threatened by Hemlock Woolly Adelgid-Induced Eastern Hemlock Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua K. Adkins

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L. is a foundation species in eastern North America where it is under threat from the highly invasive, exotic hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae. Eastern hemlock is especially important in riparian areas of Central and Southern Appalachia, so we compared the spatial and temporal composition of benthic collector-gatherers, collector-filterers, and grazers in headwater streams with hemlock-dominated riparian vegetation to those with deciduous tree-dominated riparian vegetation to evaluate the extent to which adelgid-induced hemlock loss could influence composition and abundance of these two functional feeding groups. We found differences in benthic invertebrate abundance and family-level diversity based on riparian vegetation and sampling approach, and, often, riparian vegetation significantly interacted with location or season. Collector-gatherers and grazers were more abundant in eastern hemlock streams in the summer, when hemlock litter is readily available and deciduous litter is relatively sparse. Riparian eastern hemlock appears to exert considerable influence on benthic invertebrate functional feeding group composition in headwater stream communities, as expected with a foundation species. With the loss of eastern hemlock due to adelgid-induced mortality, we should expect to see alterations in spatial and temporal patterns of benthic invertebrate abundance and diversity, with potential consequences to both benthic and terrestrial ecosystem function.

  8. The MMCO-EOT conundrum: same benthic δ18O, different CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stap, Lennert; van de Wal, Roderik; de Boer, Bas; Bintanja, Richard; Lourens, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge on temporal variations of Earth's climate over the past 38 Myr largely stems from benthic δ18O records. These records are difficult to interpret, however, since they document combined effects of deep-sea temperature and ice volume variations. Information on CO2 is expanding, but remains highly uncertain and intermittent. Attempts to determine the long-term relations between δ18O, sea level and CO2 from proxy data suffer from paucity of data and apparent inconsistency among different records. One outstanding issue is the difference recorded in proxy CO2 data between the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (EOT) and the Middle-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO), while similar levels of benthic δ18O are shown during these time periods. Here, we take a model-based approach to deconvolute the benthic δ18O signal, and reconcile knowledge on benthic δ18O, sea level, CO2 and temperature. We obtain continuous and mutually consistent 38-Myr-long simulations of these variables, by forcing a coupled ice sheet-climate model inversely with benthic δ18O observations. We investigate the factors influencing Arctic and Antarctic polar amplification, and the relation between sea level and CO2. Furthermore, we show that different CO2 between the EOT and MMCO, as indicated by proxy data, can only be obtained if we impose erosion or tectonic movement of the Antarctic continent over time.

  9. Decadal-scale effects of benthic habitat and marine reserve protection on Philippine goatfish (F: Mullidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Garry R.; Bergseth, Brock J.; Rizzari, Justin R.; Alcala, Angel C.

    2015-09-01

    Reef fish populations can be affected by both fishing and changes in benthic habitat. Yet, partitioning these effects is often difficult, usually requiring an appropriate sampling design and long-term monitoring. Here we quantify, over a 30-yr period, the effects of benthic habitat change and no-take marine reserve (NTMR) protection on the density and species richness of a lightly harvested benthic-feeding reef fish family, the Mullidae (goatfish), at four Philippine islands. Boosted regression trees demonstrated that goatfish density and species richness had strong negative associations with hard coral cover and strong positive associations with cover of dead substratum. No-take marine reserve protection had no effect on the density or species richness of goatfish over 19 and 30 yr at Sumilon and Apo islands, respectively. However, environmental disturbances (e.g., typhoons, coral bleaching) that reduced hard coral cover subsequently led to increases in goatfish numbers for periods ranging from 2 to 8 yr. After initial increases due to benthic disturbance, goatfish populations decreased during coral recovery, occurring on timescales of 10-20 yr. This long-term, "natural experiment" demonstrated that changes to benthic habitat (bottom-up control) had a far greater effect on Philippine goatfish populations than protection from fishing (a top-down effect) in NTMRs. Given the strong positive response of goatfish populations to loss of live hard coral cover, this group of fishes may be a valuable indicator species for habitat degradation on coral reefs.

  10. Species Diversity of Macro-benthic Invertebrates in Mangrove and Seagrass Ecosystems of Eastern Bohol, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marichu C. Libres

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive survey method through actual resource assessment was conducted to determine the species diversity of macro-benthic invertebrates in the mangrove forest and seagrass beds of Eastern Bohol, Philippines namely: Anda, Candijay, Mabini, and Ubay. The 4 representative sites were chosen through random sampling. In each municipality, the researcher selected a representative area wherein 3 transects were laid perpendicular to the shoreline. The assessment in each transect covered a strip of 4 m by 50 m. All macro-benthic invertebrates intercepted within 4-meter to the left and right of the transect line were identified, counted and listed in a slate board. The data gathered were subjected to Shannon-Weiner Index and Kruskal Wallis Test. In mangrove forests, results revealed that Anda got the highest species diversity index of 1.66 with 11 species. The lowest value which is 1.15 was recorded in Candijay having only five macro-benthic invertebrate species. In the 4 municipalities, a total of 12 species representing 3 phyla were identified. In seagrass beds, 19 taxa of macro-benthic invertebrates were recorded belonging to three phyla. Based on the findings, the researcher concluded that macro-benthic invertebrates in eastern part of Bohol is diverse both in mangrove forests and seagrass beds. Moreover, there is no significant difference in the species diversity among the four representative sites.

  11. Food web flows through a sub-arctic deep-sea benthic community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontikaki, E.; van Oevelen, D.; Soetaert, K.; Witte, U.

    2011-11-01

    The benthic food web of the deep Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC) was modelled by using the linear inverse modelling methodology. The reconstruction of carbon pathways by inverse analysis was based on benthic oxygen uptake rates, biomass data and transfer of labile carbon through the food web as revealed by a pulse-chase experiment. Carbon deposition was estimated at 2.2 mmol C m -2 d -1. Approximately 69% of the deposited carbon was respired by the benthic community with bacteria being responsible for 70% of the total respiration. The major fraction of the labile detritus flux was recycled within the microbial loop leaving merely 2% of the deposited labile phytodetritus available for metazoan consumption. Bacteria assimilated carbon at high efficiency (0.55) but only 24% of bacterial production was grazed by metazoans; the remaining returned to the dissolved organic matter pool due to viral lysis. Refractory detritus was the basal food resource for nematodes covering ∼99% of their carbon requirements. On the contrary, macrofauna seemed to obtain the major part of their metabolic needs from bacteria (49% of macrofaunal consumption). Labile detritus transfer was well-constrained, based on the data from the pulse-chase experiment, but appeared to be of limited importance to the diet of the examined benthic organisms (food web. Overall, this study provided a unique insight into the functioning of a deep-sea benthic community and demonstrated how conventional data can be exploited further when combined with state-of-the-art modelling approaches.

  12. Zones of emotional labour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2011-01-01

    The paper suggests that due to the difficult nature of their work public family law caseworkers are to be included in the definition of emotional labour even though they are omitted by Hochschild. Based upon a review of the structures involved in emotional labour an explorative qualitative study is...... put forth among 25 Danish public family law caseworkers. The study points to personal, professional, and social zones of emotional labour through which the caseworkers carry out their work. Emotional labour zones mark emotion structures that may be challenging due to complex emotional intersections...

  13. Grid zone drone

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Clive; Cooper, Graham; Field, James; Thayne, Martyn; Vickers, Richard

    2014-01-01

    From 16th – 19th October 2014, co_LAB presented its newest creation, Grid Zone Drone, at Kinetica – an international exhibition providing a global platform for galleries, curatorial groups, design studios and artists working with new media art. 2014 marked the third consecutive year that the University of Lincoln has been represented at the global art fair. Grid Zone Drone represents a continuation of the group’s research into ‘drone culture’, and explores the detachment of the drone withi...

  14. A workflow for reproducing mean benthic gas fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulweiler, Robinson W.; Emery, Hollie E.; Maguire, Timothy J.

    2016-08-01

    Long-term data sets provide unique opportunities to examine temporal variability of key ecosystem processes. The need for such data sets is becoming increasingly important as we try to quantify the impact of human activities across various scales and in some cases, as we try to determine the success of management interventions. Unfortunately, long-term benthic flux data sets for coastal ecosystems are rare and curating them is a challenge. If we wish to make our data available to others now and into the future, however, then we need to provide mechanisms that allow others to understand our methods, access the data, reproduce the results, and see updates as they become available. Here we use techniques, learned through the EarthCube Ontosoft Geoscience Paper of the Future project, to develop best practices to allow us to share a long-term data set of directly measured net sediment N2 fluxes and sediment oxygen demand at two sites in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island (USA). This technical report describes the process we used, the challenges we faced, and the steps we will take in the future to ensure transparency and reproducibility. By developing these data and software sharing tools we hope to help disseminate well-curated data with provenance as well as products from these data, so that the community can better assess how this temperate estuary has changed over time. We also hope to provide a data sharing model for others to follow so that long-term estuarine data are more easily shared and not lost over time.

  15. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Braeckman

    Full Text Available Biological particle mixing (bioturbation and solute transfer (bio-irrigation contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator and Abra alba (bioturbator compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1 microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2 microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3 control microcosms and (4 microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13C of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2, which included TO(13C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food

  16. Biological vs. physical mixing effects on benthic food web dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Provoost, Pieter; Moens, Tom; Soetaert, Karline; Middelburg, Jack J; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Biological particle mixing (bioturbation) and solute transfer (bio-irrigation) contribute extensively to ecosystem functioning in sediments where physical mixing is low. Macrobenthos transports oxygen and organic matter deeper into the sediment, thereby likely providing favourable niches to lower trophic levels (i.e., smaller benthic animals such as meiofauna and bacteria) and thus stimulating mineralisation. Whether this biological transport facilitates fresh organic matter assimilation by the metazoan lower part of the food web through niche establishment (i.e., ecosystem engineering) or rather deprives them from food sources, is so far unclear. We investigated the effects of the ecosystem engineers Lanice conchilega (bio-irrigator) and Abra alba (bioturbator) compared to abiotic physical mixing events on survival and food uptake of nematodes after a simulated phytoplankton bloom. The (13)C labelled diatom Skeletonema costatum was added to 4 treatments: (1) microcosms containing the bioturbator, (2) microcosms containing the bio-irrigator, (3) control microcosms and (4) microcosms with abiotic manual surface mixing. Nematode survival and subsurface peaks in nematode density profiles were most pronounced in the bio-irrigator treatment. However, nematode specific uptake (Δδ(13)C) of the added diatoms was highest in the physical mixing treatment, where macrobenthos was absent and the diatom (13)C was homogenised. Overall, nematodes fed preferentially on bulk sedimentary organic material rather than the added diatoms. The total C budget (µg C m(-2)), which included TO(13)C remaining in the sediment, respiration, nematode and macrobenthic uptake, highlighted the limited assimilation by the metazoan benthos and the major role of bacterial respiration. In summary, bioturbation and especially bio-irrigation facilitated the lower trophic levels mainly over the long-term through niche establishment. Since the freshly added diatoms represented only a limited food source

  17. Extremely heat tolerant photosymbiosis in a shallow marine benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christiane; Danna, Titelboim; Janett, Brandt; Raphael, Morard; Barak, Herut; Sigal, Abramovich; Ahuva, Almogi-Labin; Michal, Kucera

    2016-04-01

    Thermal stress leads to the loss of algal symbionts (bleaching) in many shallow marine calcifiers including foraminifera. The bleaching threshold often occurs at water temperatures, which are likely to be exceeded in the near future due to global warming. Preadaptation represents one mechanism allowing photosymbiotic organisms to persist under warmer conditions, providing the tolerance can be carried to new habitats. Here we provide evidence for the existence of such adaptation in the benthic foraminifera Pararotalia calcariformata recently discovered in the eastern Mediterranean. We identify its symbionts as a consortium of diatom species dominated by Minutocellus polymorphus. We show that in the field, the foraminifera retains its pigments at a thermally polluted site, where peak water temperatures reach 36°C. To test whether this tolerance represents a widespread adaptation, we conducted manipulative experiments exposing populations from an unpolluted site to elevated temperatures for up to three weeks. The populations were kept in co-culture with the more thermally sensitive diatom-bearing foraminifera Amphistegina lobifera. Reduced photosynthetic activity in A. lobifera occurred at 32°C whereas photochemical stress in P. calcariformata was first observed during exposure to 36°C and chronic photoinhibition (but not mortality) first occurred at 42°C. Survivorship was high in all treatments, and growth was observed under thermal conditions similar to summer maxima at the thermally polluted site (35-36°C). The photosymbiosis in P. calcariformata is unusually thermally tolerant for a photosymbiont-bearing eukaryote. The thermal tolerance of this photosymbiosis is present in a natural environment where its thermal threshold is never realized. These observations imply that photosymbiosis in marine protists can respond to elevated temperatures by drawing on a pool of naturally occurring pre-adaptations. It also provides a perspective on the massive occurrence of

  18. Benthic foraminiferal biostratigraphy of the Aalenian-Bajocian (Middle Jurassic) boundary in the Barranco de Agua Larga section (Betic Cordillera, southern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sílvia; Canales, María Luisa; Sandoval, José; Henriques, Maria Helena

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the benthic foraminiferal assemblages recorded across the Aalenian - Bajocian boundary in the Barranco de Agua Larga section (Betic Cordillera, SE of Spain), where the ammonite record has enabled the recognition of the Gigantea Subzone in the Bradfordensis Zone (Middle Aalenian), the Concavum and Limitatum subzones in the Concavum Zone (Upper Aalenian) and the Discites Zone (Lower Bajocian). This reference section is characterized by an alternation of limestones and marly limestones corresponding to distal marine environmental conditions, where a total of 17 samples have been collected. They have provided abundant and diverse foraminiferal assemblages, constituted by well-preserved specimens displaying close similarities to those already described for the Jurassic carbonate platforms of the Boreal Realm. From the study of the samples, a total of 3139 specimens have been obtained, corresponding to 5 suborders, 11 families, 25 genus and 80 species. The representatives of the Suborder Lagenina are the most abundant, Vaginulinidae is the most abundant family and Lenticulina is the most abundant genus. From a specific level, the most abundant species are Thurammina jurensis (Franke), Lenticulina muensteri (Roemer) and Prodentalina pseudocommunis (Franke). The occurrence of Astacolus dorbignyi (Roemer) in the Gigantea Subzone has enabled the recognition of the Astacolus dorbignyi Zone. The first occurrence of Lenticulina quenstedti (Gümbel) in the Concavum Subzone has allowed the recognition of the Lenticulina quenstedti Zone. In Barranco de Agua Larga section this species co-occur with Ramulina spandeli Paalzow, the index fossil used in the establishment of the Ramulina spandeli Zone. This zone was defined in the lower part of the Discites Zone in the Murtinheira section (the Bajocian GSSP) and related to distal platform conditions. In the Iberian Basin the Ramulina spandeli Zone was recognized in the Hontoria del Pinar section, but not in the

  19. Response of Benthic Foraminifera to Organic Matter Quantity and Quality and Bioavailable Concentrations of Metals in Aveiro Lagoon (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Silva, Frederico; Laut, Lazaro L. M.; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Clemente, Iara M. M. M.; Miranda, Paulo; Figueira, Rubens; Sousa, Silvia H. M.; Dias, João M. Alveirinho

    2015-01-01

    This work analyses the distribution of living benthic foraminiferal assemblages of surface sediments in different intertidal areas of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), a polihaline and anthropized coastal lagoon. The relationships among foraminiferal assemblages in association with environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, Eh and pH), grain size, the quantity and quality of organic matter (enrichment in carbohydrates, proteins and lipids), pollution caused by metals, and mineralogical data are studied in an attempt to identify indicators of adaptability to environmental stress. In particular, concentrations of selected metals in the surficial sediment are investigated to assess environmental pollution levels that are further synthetically parameterised by the Pollution Load Index (PLI). The PLI variations allowed the identification of five main polluted areas. Concentrations of metals were also analysed in three extracted phases to evaluate their possible mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the surficial sediment. Polluted sediment in the form of both organic matter and metals can be found in the most confined zones. Whereas enrichment in organic matter and related biopolymers causes an increase in foraminifera density, pollution by metals leads to a decline in foraminiferal abundance and diversity in those zones. The first situation may be justified by the existence of opportunistic species (with high reproduction rate) that can live in low oxic conditions. The second is explained by the sensitivity of some species to pressure caused by metals. The quality of the organic matter found in these places and the option of a different food source should also explain the tolerance of several species to pollution caused by metals, despite their low reproductive rate in the most polluted areas. In this study, species that are sensitive and tolerant to organic matter and metal enrichment are identified, as is the differential sensitivity/tolerance of some species to

  20. Response of benthic foraminifera to phytodetritus in the eastern Arabian Sea under low oxygen conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enge, Annekatrin; Wukovits, Julia; Wanek, Wolfgang; Watzka, Margarete; Witte, Ursula; Hunter, William; Heinz, Petra

    2016-04-01

    At water depths between 100 and 1500 m a permanent Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) impinges on the sea floor in the eastern Arabian Sea, exposing benthic organisms to anoxic to suboxic conditions. The flux of organic matter to the sea floor is relatively high at these depths but displays seasonal variation. Deposition of relatively fresh phytodetrital material (phytoplankton remains) can occur within a short period of time after monsoon periods. Several organism groups including foraminifera are involved to different extent in the processing of phytodetritus in the OMZs of the northern Arabian Sea. A series of in situ feeding experiments were performed to study the short-term processing (nutritional demands of foraminifera at different oxygen concentrations on the continental margin in the eastern Arabian Sea. For the experiments, a single pulse of isotopically labeled phytodetritus was added to the sediment along a depth transect (540-1100 m) on the Indian Margin, covering the OMZ core and the lower OMZ boundary region. Uptake of phytodetritus within 4 days shows the relevance of phytodetritus as food source for foraminifera. Lower content of phytodetrital carbon recorded in foraminifera from more oxygenated depths shows greater food uptake by foraminifera in the OMZ core than in the OMZ boundary region. The foraminiferal assemblage living under almost anoxic conditions in the OMZ core is dominated by species typically found in eutroph environments (such as Uvigerinids) that are adapted to high flux of organic matter. The elevated carbon uptake can also result from missing food competition by macrofauna or from greater energy demand in foraminifera to sustain metabolic processes under hypoxic stress. Variable levels and ratios of phytodetrital carbon and nitrogen indicate specific nutritional demands and storage of food-derived nitrogen in some foraminifera species under near anoxia where the mean phytodetrital nitrogen content in foraminifera was elevated. In summary

  1. Aerobic methanotrophs drive the formation of a seasonal anoxic benthic nepheloid layer in monomictic Lake Lugano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, Jan; Niemann, Helge; Wenk, Christine B.; Zopfi, Jacob; Schubert, Carsten J.; Jenzer, Joël S.; Veronesi, Mauro L.; Lehmann, Moritz F.

    2014-05-01

    In the southern basin of Lake Lugano, thermal stratification of the water column during summer and autumn leads to a lack of exchange between surface and deep water masses, and consequently to seasonal bottom water anoxia, associated with high methane concentrations. With the onset of bottom water anoxia, a dense layer of high particulate matter concentration - a so-called benthic nepheloid layer (BNL) - develops in the bottom waters. A sharp redox gradient marks the upper boundary of the BNL. At its maximum, the BNL extends 15 - 30 m from the sediment into the water column. We investigated the identity of the BNL and key environmental factors controlling its formation in the framework of a seasonal study. Compound specific C-isotope measurements and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH) of suspended particulate organic matter, radioactive tracer based measurements of methane oxidation, as well as investigation of geochemical water column parameters were performed in spring and autumn. Our analyses revealed that the microbial biomass within the BNL is dominated by methanotrophic bacteria. Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) was restricted to a narrow zone at the top of the BNL, reaching maximum rates of up to 1.8 μM/day. The rates of MOx activity effectively consumed most (>99%) of the uprising methane, leading to the formation of a sharp CH4 concentration gradient and a strongly suppressed kinetic isotope effect (ɛ = -2.8o). CH4 oxidation was limited by the diffusive supply of O2 from the upper hypolimnion, implying that methanotrophy is the primary driver of the seasonal expansion of the anoxic bottom water volume, and explaining the vertical migration of the BNL in response to its own O2 consumption. The bulk organic matter extracted from the BNL was strongly depleted in 13C (δ13C methanotrophic. The cell size of methanotrophs was significantly larger than of other microbial cells, and an independent approach to quantify the contribution of methanotroph

  2. Benthic data for corals, macroalgae, invertebrates, and non-living bottom types from 12 sites in American Samoa, 2005-2009. (NODC Accession 0068364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic transects were repeated at 12 sites around Tutuila at various depths on the reef slopes and flats. Benthic coverage categories include coral species,...

  3. DNS zones revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanrooij, van Ward; Pras, Aiko; Delgado Kloos, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Recent research [Pap04b] suggests DNS reliability and performance is not up to the levels it should be due to misconfigurations. This paper checks the configuration of nameserver zones against additional requirements, recommendations and best-practices. It shows that almost one in four domains fails

  4. Evaluation of bioremediation potential of three benthic annelids in organically polluted marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mana; Ito, Katsutoshi; Ohta, Kohei; Hano, Takeshi; Onduka, Toshimitsu; Mochida, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Kazunori

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possible remedial effects of three marine benthic annelids on organically polluted sediments from the waters of Hatsukaichi Marina, Hiroshima, Japan. Two polychaetes, Perinereis nuntia and Capitella cf. teleta, and an oligochaete, Thalassodrilides sp., were incubated in sediments for 50 days. Their effects on physicochemical properties such as organic matter (loss on ignition), redox potential (Eh), acid volatile sulfides (AVS), and degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed. The polychaetes P. nuntia and C. cf. teleta significantly increased Eh level and decreased AVS level compared with the oligochaete Thalassodrilides sp. and control (without benthic organisms). Total PAH concentration significantly decreased from the initial level with all three groups; Thalassodrilides sp. had a marked ability to reduce PAHs in sediment. These results indicate that benthic organisms have species-specific remediation properties and ecological functions in organically polluted sediments. PMID:27565306

  5. Autofluorescence imaging system to discriminate and quantify the distribution of benthic cyanobacteria and diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc Jaap; Middelboe, Mathias;

    2015-01-01

    Observation of benthic photoautotrophs on sediment surfaces shows a single algal layer without distinction between photosynthetic groups. Until now it has not been possible to distinguish between benthic photosynthetic microorganisms, i.e. cyanobacteria and diatoms, at μm to mm scales using...... a single nondisruptive system. Chlorophyll autofluorescence can be used to distinguish different photoautotrophic groups if the correct excitation light is applied. Using this principle, a nonintrusive technique was developed to study the spatial distribution of benthic cyanobacteria and diatoms. By means...... of a charge coupled device camera, diatoms and cyanobacteria could be identified by blue light (470 nm) excitation and amber light (600 nm) excitation, respectively. By this approach, diatom or cyanobacterial dominance could be easily distinguished using the blue over amber ratio. We applied this method...

  6. Modelling impacts and recovery in benthic communities exposed to localised high CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessin, Gennadi; Artioli, Yuri; Queirós, Ana M; Widdicombe, Stephen; Blackford, Jerry C

    2016-08-15

    Regulations pertaining to carbon dioxide capture with offshore storage (CCS) require an understanding of the potential localised environmental impacts and demonstrably suitable monitoring practices. This study uses a marine ecosystem model to examine a comprehensive range of hypothetical CO2 leakage scenarios, quantifying both impact and recovery time within the benthic system. Whilst significant mortalities and long recovery times were projected for the larger and longer term scenarios, shorter-term or low level exposures lead to reduced projected impacts. This suggests that efficient monitoring and leak mitigation strategies, coupled with appropriate selection of storage sites can effectively limit concerns regarding localised environmental impacts from CCS. The feedbacks and interactions between physiological and ecological responses simulated reveal that benthic responses to CO2 leakage could be complex. This type of modelling investigation can aid the understanding of impact potential, the role of benthic community recovery and inform the design of baseline and monitoring surveys. PMID:27289279

  7. Contrasting time trends of organic contaminants in Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Nico W; Riddle, Martin J; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; van Franeker, Jan Andries

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that pelagic Antarctic seabirds show significant decreases in concentrations of some persistent organic pollutants. Trends in Adélie penguins and Southern fulmars fit in a general pattern revealed by a broad literature review. Downward trends are also visible in pelagic fish, contrasting sharply with steady or increasing concentrations in Antarctic benthic organisms. Transfer of contaminants between Antarctic pelagic and benthic food webs is associated with seasonal sea-ice dynamics which may influence the balance between the final receptors of contaminants under different climatic conditions. This complicates the predictability of future trends of emerging compounds in the Antarctic ecosystem, such as of the brominated compounds that we detected in Antarctic petrels. The discrepancy in trends between pelagic and benthic organisms shows that Antarctic biota are still final receptors of globally released organic contaminants and it remains questionable whether the total environmental burden of contaminants in the Antarctic ecosystem is declining.

  8. Empirical approaches to more accurately predict benthic-pelagic coupling in biogeochemical ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Andy; Stolpovsky, Konstantin; Wallmann, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The recycling and burial of biogenic material in the sea floor plays a key role in the regulation of ocean chemistry. Proper consideration of these processes in ocean biogeochemical models is becoming increasingly recognized as an important step in model validation and prediction. However, the rate of organic matter remineralization in sediments and the benthic flux of redox-sensitive elements are difficult to predict a priori. In this communication, examples of empirical benthic flux models that can be coupled to earth system models to predict sediment-water exchange in the open ocean are presented. Large uncertainties hindering further progress in this field include knowledge of the reactivity of organic carbon reaching the sediment, the importance of episodic variability in bottom water chemistry and particle rain rates (for both the deep-sea and margins) and the role of benthic fauna. How do we meet the challenge?

  9. Quantifying pelagic-benthic coupling in the North Sea: Are we asking the right question?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, K.; Cedhagen, T.

    2002-01-01

    The coupling between pelagic and benthic processes occurs through the signals sent between the water column and the seabed. Huge methodological challenges are associated with the quantification of the signals being sent between these two domains - especially in a relatively shallow and heavily...... is devoted to obtaining more and better data describing this exchange. Efforts to quantify exchange between the water column and the sediment must continue. However, such studies will not, in themselves, lead to a quantification of pelagic-benthic coupling in the North Sea. We identify here other areas...... of study that we consider to be important in order to, ultimately, quantify the pelagic-benthic coupling on the basin-scale. Current knowledge on regional annual differences in new production (i.e., that which leads to the production of new organic material and, ultimately, sedimentation from the water...

  10. Methods for collecting benthic invertebrate samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate communities are evaluated as part of the ecological survey component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These biological data are collected along with physical and chemical data to assess water-quality conditions and to develop an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. The objectives of benthic invertebrate community characterizations are to (1) develop for each site a list of tax a within the associated stream reach and (2) determine the structure of benthic invertebrate communities within selected habitats of that reach. A nationally consistent approach is used to achieve these objectives. This approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection and methods and equipment for qualitative multihabitat sampling and semi-quantitative single habitat sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data within and among study units.

  11. Benthic solute exchange and carbon mineralization in two shallow subtidal sandy sediments: Effect of advective pore-water exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cook, Perran L. M.; Wenzhofer, Frank; Glud, Ronnie N.;

    2007-01-01

    proceeded predominantly through sulfate reduction when benthic mineralization rates were high and advective pore-water flow low as a result of poorly developed topography. Previous studies of benthic mineralization in shallow sandy sediments have generally ignored these dynamics and, hence, have overlooked...

  12. Evaluation of Environmental Factors to Determine the Distribution of Functional Feeding Groups of Benthic Macroinvertebrates Using an Artificial Neural Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonschot, P.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    Functional feeding groups (FFGs) of benthic macroinvertebrates are guilds of invertebrate taxa that obtain food in similar ways, regardless of their taxonomic affinities. They can represent a heterogeneous assemblage of benthic fauna and may indicate disturbances of their habitats. The proportion of

  13. Random forest algorithm yields accurate quantitative prediction models of benthic light at intertidal sites affected by toxic Lyngbya majuscula blooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kehoe; K. O’ Brien; A. Grinham; D. Rissik; K.S. Ahern; P. Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that targeted high frequency monitoring and modern machine learning methods lead to highly predictive models of benthic light flux. A state-of-the-art machine learning technique was used in conjunction with a high frequency data set to calibrate and test predictive benthic lights models

  14. Effects of Management Legacies on Stream Fish and Aquatic Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Michael C.; Schultz, Randall D.

    2014-09-01

    Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages often provide insight on ecological conditions for guiding management actions. Unfortunately, land use and management legacies can constrain the structure of biotic communities such that they fail to reflect habitat quality. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns in fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage structure, and evaluate relationships between biota and habitat characteristics in the Chariton River system of south-central Iowa, a system likely influenced by various potential management legacies (e.g., dams, chemical removal of fishes). We sampled fishes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and physical habitat from a total of 38 stream reaches in the Chariton River watershed during 2002-2005. Fish and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were dominated by generalist species tolerant of poor habitat quality; assemblages failed to show any apparent patterns with regard to stream size or longitudinal location within the watershed. Metrics used to summarize fish assemblages and populations [e.g., presence-absence, relative abundance, Index of Biotic Integrity for fish (IBIF)] were not related to habitat characteristics, except that catch rates of piscivores were positively related to the depth and the amount of large wood. In contrast, family richness of benthic macroinvertebrates, richness of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera taxa, and IBI values for benthic macroinvertebrates (IBIBM) were positively correlated with the amount of overhanging vegetation and inversely related to the percentage of fine substrate. A long history of habitat alteration by row-crop agriculture and management legacies associated with reservoir construction has likely resulted in a fish assemblage dominated by tolerant species. Intolerant and sensitive fish species have not recolonized streams due to downstream movement barriers (i.e., dams). In contrast, aquatic insect assemblages reflected aquatic habitat, particularly

  15. Mapping ecosystem services provided by benthic habitats in the European North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon eGalparsoro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mapping and assessing the ecosystem services provided by benthic habitats are a highly valuable source of information for understanding their current and potential benefits to society. The main objective of this investigation is to assess and map the ecosystem services provided by benthic habitats of the European North Atlantic Ocean, in the context of Mapping and Assessment of Ecosystems and their Services (MAES programme, the European Biodiversity Strategy and the implementation of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive. In total, 62 habitats have been analysed in relation to 12 ecosystem services over 1.7 million km2. Results indicated that more than 90% of the mapped area provides biodiversity maintenance and food provision services; meanwhile grounds providing reproduction and nursery services are limited to half of the mapped area. Benthic habitats generally provide more services closer to shore than offshore and in shallower waters. This gradient is likely to be explained by difficult access (i.e. distance and depth and lack of scientific knowledge for most of the services provided by distant benthic habitats. This research has provided a first assessment of the benthic ecosystem services at Atlantic European scale, with the provision of ecosystem services maps and their general spatial distribution patterns. Related to the objectives of this research, the conclusions are: (i benthic habitats provide a diverse set of ecosystem services, being the food provision and biodiversity maintenance services the ones that are more extensively represented. In addition, other regulating and cultural services are provided in a more limited area; and (ii the ecosystem services assessment categories are significantly related to the distance to the coast and with depth (higher near the coast and in shallow waters.

  16. Assessing the suitability of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups to reconstruct paleomonsoon from Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasa, M.; Saraswat, Rajeev; Nigam, Rajiv

    2016-04-01

    Temporal changes in benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups were suggested as an effective proxy to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Arabian Sea. Here, in order to test the applicability of temporal variation in morpho-groups to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal, we have documented recent benthic foraminiferal distribution from the continental shelf region of the northwestern Bay of Bengal. Based on the external morphology, benthic foraminifera were categorized into rounded symmetrical (RSBF) and angular asymmetrical benthic foraminifera (AABF). Additionally, a few other dominant groups were also identified based on test composition (agglutinated, calcareous) and abundance (Asterorotalids and Nonions). The relative abundance of each group was compared with the ambient physico-chemical conditions, including dissolved oxygen, organic matter, salinity and temperature. We report that the RSBF are abundant in comparatively warm and well oxygenated waters of low salinity, suggesting a preference for high energy environment, whereas AABF dominate relatively cold, hypersaline deeper waters with low dissolved oxygen, indicating a low energy environment. The agglutinated foraminifera, Asterorotalids and Nonions dominate shallow water, low salinity regions, whereas the calcareous benthic foraminiferal abundance increases away from the riverine influx regions. Food availability, as estimated from organic carbon abundance in sediments, has comparatively less influence on faunal distribution in the northwestern Bay of Bengal, as compared to dissolved oxygen, temperature and salinity. We conclude that the factors associated with freshwater influx affect the distribution of benthic foraminiferal morpho-groups in the northwestern Bay of Bengal and thus it can be used to reconstruct past monsoon intensity from the Bay of Bengal.

  17. Carbon fate in a large temperate human-impacted river system: focus on benthic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Flipo, Nicolas; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rocher, Vincent; Groleau, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade, several studies highlighted the important role of fluvial networks in regional and global carbon (C) budgets. Therefore, for sustainable C management, in-river C processing needs to be well understood. The Seine River from the Paris urban area to the entrance of its estuary (220 km) is studied here as a pertinent example of a large human impacted river system subject to temperate climatic conditions. We assess organic C (OC) budgets up- and downstream one of the world's largest waste water treatment plants and for different hydrological conditions through hydro-biogeochemical distributed modelling. The fine representation of sediment accumulation on the river bed allows the quantification of the effect of pelagic and benthic processes on OC export towards the estuary and on river metabolism (i.e. net CO2 emission). OC export is significantly affected by benthic dynamics during the driest periods, when 25 % of the inputs to the system is transformed or stored in the sediment layer. River metabolism is also significantly affected by benthic processes, whatever the hydrological conditions. On average, benthic respiration accounts for one third of the total ecosystem respiration along the studied stretch (0.23 out of 0.86 gC.m-2.d-1). These results stress the major influence of benthic dynamics, and thus of physical processes such as sedimentation and re-suspension on C cycling, in large human-impacted temperate river systems and on C export to the estuaries. Even though the importance of benthos processes was already acknowledged by the scientific community for headwater streams, this work highlights its importance for downstream river systems and opens the door to new developments in the quantification of C emissions by global models, in which biogeochemical processing and benthic dynamics must be taken into account.

  18. Benthic Foraminifera, Food in the Deep Sea, and Limits to Bentho-Pelagic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.; Boscolo-Galazzo, F.; Arreguin-Rodrigu, G. J.; Ortiz, S.; Alegret, L.

    2015-12-01

    The deep-sea is the largest habitat on Earth, contains highly diverse biota, but is very little known. Many of its abundant benthic biota (e.g., nematodes) are not preserved in the fossil record. Calcareous and agglutinated benthic foraminifera (unicellular eukaryotes, Rhizaria; efficient dispersers) and ostracodes (Animalia, Crustacea; non-efficient dispersers) are the most common organisms providing a fossil record of deep-sea environments. Very little food is supplied to the deep-sea, because organic matter produced by photosynthesis is largely degraded before it arrives at the seafloor. Only a few % of organic matter is carried to the ocean bottom by 'marine snow', with its particle size and behavior in the water column controlled by surface ecosystem structure, including type of dominant primary producers (diatoms, cyanobacteria). Food supply and its seasonality are generally seen as the dominant control on benthic assemblages (combined with oxygenation), providing bentho-pelagic coupling between primary and benthic productivity. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages (composition and density) thus are used widely to estimate past productivity, especially during episodes of global climate change, ocean acidification, and mass extinction of primary producers. We show that some environmental circumstances may result in interrupting bentho-pelagic coupling, e.g. through lateral supply of organic matter along continental margins (adding more refractory organic matter), through trophic focusing and/or fine particle winnowing on seamounts (giving an advantage to suspension feeders), and through carbonate undersaturation (giving advantage to infaunal over epifaunal calcifyers). In addition, increased remineralization of organic matter combined with increased metabolic rates may cause assemblages to reflect more oligotrophic conditions at stable primary productivity during periods of global warming. As a result, benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates must be carefully

  19. Drivers of abundance and community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates in Ottawa River sediment near Chalk River Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, M.J.; Rowan, D.; Silke, R.; Carr, J., E-mail: bondm@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    The Ottawa River has received effluent from Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) for more than 60 years. Some radionuclides and contaminants released in effluents are bound rapidly to particles and deposited in bottom sediments where they may be biologically available to benthic invertebrates and other aquatic biota. As part of a larger ecological assessment, we assess the potential impact of contaminated sediments in the vicinity of CRL on local benthic community structure. Using bivariate and multivariate approaches, we demonstrate that CRL operations have had little impact on the local benthic community. Despite elevated anthropogenic radionuclide activity concentrations in sediment near CRL's process outfall, the benthic community is no less abundant or diverse than what is observed upstream at background levels. The Ottawa River benthic invertebrate community is structured predominantly by natural physical and biological conditions in the sediment, specifically sediment water content and organic content. These natural habitat conditions have a stronger influence on macroinvertebrate communities than sediment contamination. (author)

  20. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - MDC_EnterpriseZone

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Polygon feature class of Miami Dade County Enterprise Zones. Enterprise Zones are special areas in the county where certain incentives from the State are available...

  1. Zonation of macrofauna across sandy beaches and surf zones along the Dutch coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Janssen

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available On nine beaches and two transects in the surf zone along the Dutch coast the presence of benthic macrofauna was studied in relation to basic abiotic characteristics. According to Short's classification system, Dutch beaches are mesotidal and dissipative (Ω = 8.6, and the RTR is low (1.52-1.27, which means that they are not tide-dominated. BSI ranged from 1.4 to 1.1 for the northern and western Dutch coasts respectively and had an overall value of 1.2. The rates of exposure of the beaches varied between 8 and 12, and are therefore regarded as sheltered to moderately exposed. The Dutch beaches display a geographical trend in beach types. Those of the Wadden Sea islands in the northern part of the Netherlands are dissipative, flat, fine-grained, and host high densities of many species of benthic macrofauna. The beaches along the western Dutch coast are less dissipative, steeper, with a higher mean grain size; the species diversity and abundance there are lower. Species diversity and abundance on the beaches increase from the high- to the low-water line. The maximum number of species was found between 0 and -1 m relative to the mean tidal level. The abundance peaks just above the mean tidal level, while the biomass reaches a maximum at the mean tidal level.     Species diversity and abundance are low in the surf zone, but increase towards deeper water. Species numbers are high and the abundance is very high in the trough between the two bars.     The relation between the diversity and abundance of macrobenthic species on the one hand, and the sediment composition, water column depth, and position between the bars on the other show a clear pattern of zonation for the beach, surf zone and near-shore: (1 a supralittoral zone with insects and air-breathing crustaceans, (2 a midshore zone, with intertidal species, (3 a lower shore zone, whose species extend into the shallow surf zone, and (4 a zone of sublittoral fauna in the trough between the

  2. Benthic invertebrate bioassays with toxic sediment and pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesy, John P.; Rosiu, Cornell J.; Graney, Robert L.; Henry, Mary G.

    1990-01-01

    The relative sensitivities of bioassays to determine the toxicity of sediments were investigated and three methods of making the sample dilutions required to generate dose-response relationships were compared. The assays studied were: (a) Microtox®, a 15-min assay ofPhotobacterium phosphoreum bioluminescence inhibition by pore water; (b) 48-h Daphnia magnalethality test in pore water; (c) 10-d subchronic assay of lethality to and reduction of weight gain by Chironomus tentans performed in either whole sediment or pore water; (d) 168-h acute lethality assay of Hexagenia limbata in either whole sediment or pore water. The three methods of diluting sediments were: (a) extracting pore water from the toxic location and dilution with pore water from the control station; (b) diluting whole sediment from the toxic location with control whole sediment from a reference location, then extracting pore water; and (c) diluting toxic, whole sediment with whole sediment from a reference location, then using the whole sediment in bioassays. Based on lethality, H. limbata was the most sensitive organism to the toxicity of Detroit River sediment. Lethality of D. magna in pore water was similar to that of H. limbata in whole sediment and can be used to predict effects of whole sediment toxicity to H. limbata. The concentration required to cause a 50% reduction in C. tentans growth (10-d EC50) was approximately that which caused 50% lethality of D. magna (48-h LC50) and was similar to the toxicity that restricts benthic invertebrate colonization of contaminated sediments. While the three dilution techniques gave similar results with some assays, they gave very different results in other assays. The dose-response relationships determined by the three dilution techniques would be expected to vary with sediment, toxicant and bioassay type, and the dose-response relationship derived from each technique needs to be interpreted accordingly.

  3. ZONE OF COOPERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The China-ASEAN Economic Zone is attracting more and more investors from both Southeast Asia and China Compared with other countries that have established free trade areas with ASEAN, China owns millions of unique advantages. Millions, after all, is the quantity of Chinese living in ASEAN countries. "With ties of blood, geography and commerce, business people of Chinese descent can be the best candidates to pro-

  4. Cape Verde Frontal Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Zenk, Walter; Klein, Birgit; Schröder, Michael

    1991-01-01

    The term Cape Verde Frontal Zone is introduced to characterize the southeastern corner of the subtropical gyre circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean far west of the upwelling area off the Mauretanean shelf. Two water mass fronts, one overlying the other, are identified with a quasi-synoptic set of CTD-OZ and nutrient data from November 1986. In the warm water sphere we encounter North and South Atlantic Central Water (NACWISACW) superimposed on extensions of Mediterranean outflow and Antarc...

  5. The uncomfortable comfort zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Whenever we achieve the satisfaction of our expectations and anxiety dissolves, we feel as if we were in a comfort zone – safe, complete, free from risks and in peace with ourselves. We might even have a little taste of heaven when we feel that we have fulfilled our duty. And as a fact, scientists are entitled to this kind of reward… but not for too long! In science, to enter a comfort zone can be as pleasant as dangerous. On one hand we may have a safe ground available to develop new modes of reasoning, protocols and theories. And on the other, we may stay stuck in a conventional but fragile ground, missing opportunities to reveal novel secrets or to address edge issues. ... The community of HD researchers seems to have entered a new comfort zone when nanostructures were found in HD. Nanostructures have been raised to the level of ultimate evidence doing away with Avogadro’s limit and leading homeopathy and HD research into mainstream science. We really should enjoy this moment and collect more information about the HD phenomenon. However, we must be wary to not fall into a trap.

  6. Occurrence and food habits of the round goby in the profundal zone of southwestern Lake Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M.G.; Dittman, D.E.; O'Gorman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the ecology of round goby (Neogobius melanostomus), an invasive benthic fish, in the profundal zone of the Great Lakes. In April 2002–2005 we caught increasing numbers of round gobies with a bottom trawl in the 45–150 m depth range of southwestern Lake Ontario. In 2005, we examined gut contents of 30 round gobies from each of three depths, 55, 95, and 130 m, and qualitatively compared gut contents with density of benthic invertebrates determined by Ponar grabs. Round goby guts contained mostly Dreissena spp. and opposum shrimp, Mysis relicta (Mysis); the frequency of occurrence of dreissenids in guts decreased with depth, whereas the frequency of occurrence of Mysis in guts increased with depth. Abundance of these invertebrates in the environment followed the same pattern, although dreissenids of optimum edible size (3–12 mm) were still abundant (1,373/m2) at 130 m, where round gobies primarily consumed Mysis, suggesting that round gobies may switch from dreissenids to more profitable prey when it is available. Other food items were ostracods and fish, with ostracods generally eaten by smaller round gobies and fish eaten by larger round gobies. Occurrence and increasing abundance of round gobies in the profundal zone and predation on Mysis by round goby could have far-reaching consequences for the Lake Ontario fish community.

  7. Utilisation of Intensive Foraging Zones by Female Australian Fur Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Andrew J.; Costa, Daniel P.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Within a heterogeneous environment, animals must efficiently locate and utilise foraging patches. One way animals can achieve this is by increasing residency times in areas where foraging success is highest (area-restricted search). For air-breathing diving predators, increased patch residency times can be achieved by altering both surface movements and diving patterns. The current study aimed to spatially identify the areas where female Australian fur seals allocated the most foraging effort, while simultaneously determining the behavioural changes that occur when they increase their foraging intensity. To achieve this, foraging behaviour was successfully recorded with a FastLoc GPS logger and dive behaviour recorder from 29 individual females provisioning pups. Females travelled an average of 118 ± 50 km from their colony during foraging trips that lasted 7.3 ± 3.4 days. Comparison of two methods for calculating foraging intensity (first-passage time and first-passage time modified to include diving behaviour) determined that, due to extended surface intervals where individuals did not travel, inclusion of diving behaviour into foraging analyses was important for this species. Foraging intensity ‘hot spots’ were found to exist in a mosaic of patches within the Bass Basin, primarily to the south-west of the colony. However, the composition of benthic habitat being targeted remains unclear. When increasing their foraging intensity, individuals tended to perform dives around 148 s or greater, with descent/ascent rates of approximately 1.9 m•s-1 or greater and reduced postdive durations. This suggests individuals were maximising their time within the benthic foraging zone. Furthermore, individuals increased tortuosity and decreased travel speeds while at the surface to maximise their time within a foraging location. These results suggest Australian fur seals will modify both surface movements and diving behaviour to maximise their time within a foraging patch

  8. Utilisation of intensive foraging zones by female Australian fur seals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Hoskins

    Full Text Available Within a heterogeneous environment, animals must efficiently locate and utilise foraging patches. One way animals can achieve this is by increasing residency times in areas where foraging success is highest (area-restricted search. For air-breathing diving predators, increased patch residency times can be achieved by altering both surface movements and diving patterns. The current study aimed to spatially identify the areas where female Australian fur seals allocated the most foraging effort, while simultaneously determining the behavioural changes that occur when they increase their foraging intensity. To achieve this, foraging behaviour was successfully recorded with a FastLoc GPS logger and dive behaviour recorder from 29 individual females provisioning pups. Females travelled an average of 118 ± 50 km from their colony during foraging trips that lasted 7.3 ± 3.4 days. Comparison of two methods for calculating foraging intensity (first-passage time and first-passage time modified to include diving behaviour determined that, due to extended surface intervals where individuals did not travel, inclusion of diving behaviour into foraging analyses was important for this species. Foraging intensity 'hot spots' were found to exist in a mosaic of patches within the Bass Basin, primarily to the south-west of the colony. However, the composition of benthic habitat being targeted remains unclear. When increasing their foraging intensity, individuals tended to perform dives around 148 s or greater, with descent/ascent rates of approximately 1.9 m•s-1 or greater and reduced postdive durations. This suggests individuals were maximising their time within the benthic foraging zone. Furthermore, individuals increased tortuosity and decreased travel speeds while at the surface to maximise their time within a foraging location. These results suggest Australian fur seals will modify both surface movements and diving behaviour to maximise their time within a

  9. Blasting of broken marble zones

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Stojceski, Igor; Dambov, Ilija

    2015-01-01

    On receipt of marble blocks appear deformed zones with presence of cracks and other deformities and very small cracks with different azimuth in the rocky massif. The fastest and economical way to bring this zone are removed by applying the methods of blasting. Before blasting, these tables - zones are limited by the block, making the cuts with diamond wire because explosive action may cause of surrounding quality marble blocks. Keywords: blasting, crashed zones, cracks, marble ...

  10. Response of invertebrates from the hyporheic zone of chalk rivers to eutrophication and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacioglu, Octavian; Moldovan, Oana Teodora

    2016-03-01

    Whereas the response of lotic benthic macroinvertebrates to different environmental stressors is a widespread practice nowadays in assessing the water and habitat quality, the use of hyporheic zone invertebrates is still in its infancy. In this study, classification and regression trees analysis were employed in order to assess the ecological requirements and the potential as bioindicators for the hyporheic zone invertebrates inhabiting four lowland chalk rivers (south England) with contrasting eutrophication levels (based on surface nitrate concentrations) and magnitude of land use (based on percentage of fine sediments load and median interstitial space). Samples of fauna, water and sediment were sampled twice, during low (summer) and high (winter) groundwater level, at depths of 20 and 35 cm. Certain groups of invertebrates (Glossosomatidae and Psychomyiidae caddisflies, and riffle beetles) proved to be good indicators of rural catchments, moderately eutrophic and with high fine sediment load. A diverse community dominated by microcrustaceans (copepods and ostracods) were found as good indicators of highly eutrophic urban streams, with moderate-high fine sediment load. However, the use of other taxonomic groups (e.g. chironomids, oligochaetes, nematodes, water mites and the amphipod Gammarus pulex), very widespread in the hyporheic zone of all sampled rivers, is of limited use because of their high tolerance to the analysed stressors. We recommend the use of certain taxonomic groups (comprising both meiofauna and macroinvertebrates) dwelling in the chalk hyporheic zone as indicators of eutrophication and colmation and, along with routine benthic sampling protocols, for a more comprehensive water and habitat quality assessment of chalk rivers.

  11. Application of Multiple Index Development Approaches to Benthic Invertebrate Data from the Virginian Biogeographic Province, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work had indicated that the Virginian Province Index did not perform well in a smaller estuarine complex. While it was hoped that the existing Chesapeake Bay Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity, with its greater number of metrics and habitat separation would be more adapt...

  12. Nearshore marine benthic invertebrates moving north along the U.S. Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous species have shifted their ranges north in response to global warming. We examined 21 years (1990-2010) of marine benthic invertebrate data from the National Coastal Assessment’s monitoring of nearshore waters along the US Atlantic coast. Data came from three bioge...

  13. 2010 NCCA oligochaete trophic index results to inform benthic index development for the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over 400 sites were sampled in the nearshore of the U.S. Great Lakes during the National Coastal Condition Assessment (NCCA) field survey in summer 2010. To assess benthic ecological condition, 393 PONARs were attempted, and collected macroinvertebrates were identified and enume...

  14. Towards a framework for the quantitative assessment of trawling impact on the seabed and benthic ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijnsdorp, A. D.; Bastardie, Francois; Bolam, S.G.;

    2016-01-01

    A framework to assess the impact of mobile fishing gear on the seabed and benthic ecosystem is presented. The framework that can be used at regional and local scales provides indicators for both trawling pressureand ecological impact. It builds on high-resolution maps of trawlingintensity and con...

  15. Response of sedimentary nucleic acids to benthic disturbance in the Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, C.E.G.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Information on the response of nucleic acids (i.e., DNA and RNA) to simulated benthic disturbance was obtained from samples collected from eight sediment cores (0-10 cm) located in the Central Indian Basin (CIB). In general the total sedimentary DNA...

  16. Determining the impacts of trawling on benthic function in European waters : a biological traits approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolam, Stefan; Kenny, Andrew; Garcia, Clement;

    on benthic ecosystem functioning over much larger spatial scales than previously undertaken. Biological traits information from 887 stations across European waters (Norwegian, UK, Belgian, Dutch, Danish waters, the Mediterranean and Black Sea) were analysed to: i) quantify the relationships between infaunal...

  17. Spatial scale and the diversity of benthic cyanobacteria and diatoms in a salina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, U.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Kühl, Michael;

    1999-01-01

    We characterized the richness of benthic cyanobacteria and diatoms in a salina system using traditional and molecular biological methods. After determining the different morphotypes and 16S rRNA genes present in various localities within this hypersaline system, an analysis of the increase...

  18. Development and application of a sediment toxicity test using the benthic cladoceran Chydorus sphaericus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, T.; Greve, G.D.; Ter Laak, T.L.; Boivin, M.E.Y.; Veuger, B.; Gortzak, G.; Dumfries, S.; Lücker, S.M.G.; Kraak, M.H.S.; Admiraal, W.; Geest, H.G.

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on the development and application of a whole sediment toxicity test using a benthic cladoceran Chydorus sphaericus, as an alternative for the use of pelagic daphnids. A C. sphaericus laboratory culture was started and its performance under control conditions was optimised. The te

  19. Development and application of a sediment toxicity test using the benthic cladoceran Chydorus sphaericus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Dekker; G.D. Greve; W. Admiraal; T.L. ter Laak; M.E. Boivin; B. Veuger

    2006-01-01

    This study reports on the development and application of a whole sediment toxicity test using a benthic cladoceran Chydorus sphaericus, as an alternative for the use of pelagic daphnids. A C. sphaericus laboratory culture was started and its performance under control conditions was optimised. The te

  20. Spatial variation in lake benthic macroinvertebrate ecological assessment: a synthesis of European case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandin, Leif Leonard; Solimini, Angelo G.

    2012-01-01

    Baltic, Atlantic, and Mediterranean). The goal of the papers was to assess the main environmental factors and how they affected benthic macroinvertebrate variation at different ecological scales and thus better our basic understanding of how changes in these environmental variables can be tracked using...

  1. Macroecological drivers of archaea and bacteria in benthic deep-sea ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Molari, Massimiliano; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Bacteria and archaea dominate the biomass of benthic deep-sea ecosystems at all latitudes, playing a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles, but their macroscale patterns and macroecological drivers are still largely unknown. We show the results of the most extensive field study conducted so far to investigate patterns and drivers of the distribution and structure of benthic prokaryote assemblages from 228 samples collected at latitudes comprising 34°N to 79°N, and from ca. 400- to 5570-m depth. We provide evidence that, in deep-sea ecosystems, benthic bacterial and archaeal abundances significantly increase from middle to high latitudes, with patterns more pronounced for archaea, and particularly for Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. Our results also reveal that different microbial components show varying sensitivities to changes in temperature conditions and food supply. We conclude that climate change will primarily affect deep-sea benthic archaea, with important consequences on global biogeochemical cycles, particularly at high latitudes. PMID:27386507

  2. Benthic microalgal production in the Arctic: Applied methods and status of the current database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, Ronnie Nøhr; Woelfel, Jana; Karsten, Ulf;

    2009-01-01

    The current database on benthic microalgal production in Arctic waters comprises 10 peer-reviewed and three unpublished studies. Here, we compile and discuss these datasets, along with the applied measurement approaches used. The latter is essential for robust comparative analysis and to clarify ...

  3. Benthic foraminiferal fauna turnover at 2.1 Ma in the northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG BaoQi; JIAN ZhiMin; WANG PinXian

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of benthic foraminifera from ODP Site 1146 in the northern South China Sea (SCS)shows that abundance of Bulimina alazanensis, sometimes up to about 90%, decreased gradually since 3.2 Ma, especially at 2.1 Ma. Abundance of other benthic foraminiferal species, Globobulimina subglobosa and Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi, increased after 2.1 Ma. Comparison with changes in oxygen and carbon isotopes of planktonic and benthic foraminifera shows that high abundance values of B.alazanensis corresponded with lower values of oxygen isotope, but for carbon isotope, high values of the species were consistent with heavier carbon Isotope of benthic foraminifera and lighter carbon isotope of planktonic foraminifera, respectively, and vice versa. Considering factors such as uplift of Bashi Strait, expansion of the North Hemisphere Glaciation, strengthening of East Asian winter monsoon and variations in oxygen and carbon isotope of foraminifera, changes of B. alazanensis in ODP Site 1146 suggest that the source of deep water masses of the northern South China Sea changed from the warm Pacific deep water with high oxygen content to Pacific Intermediate water with Iow oxygen content at 2.1 Ma. In addition, the strengthened East Asian winter monsoon resulted in increased primary productivity, high nutrient and suboxic bottom water. Variations in species of B. alazanensis seemed to be unable to tolerate environmental stress induced by deep water masses and productivity changes.

  4. Coral reef condition and benthic sedimentation threat in four regions of south Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scleractinian corals, gorgonian octocorals, sponges and fishes were assessed near the cities of LaParguera, Guánica, Guayanilla, and Jobos along the southern coast of Puerto Rico in November – December 2010. Survey sites were targeted near areas with varying benthic...

  5. Length-weight relationships of 216 North Sea benthic invertebrates and fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinson, L.; Greenstreet, S.P.R.; Reiss, H.; Callaway, R.; Craeymeersch, J.A.M.; Boois, de I.J.

    2010-01-01

    Size-based analyses of marine animals are increasingly used to improve understanding of community structure and function. However, the resources required to record individual body weights for benthic animals, where the number of individuals can reach several thousand in a square metre, are often pro

  6. Metal-induced shifts in benthic macroinvertebrate community composition in Andean high altitude streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Loayza-Muro; R. Elías-Letts; J.K. Marticorena-Ruíz; E.J. Palomino; J.F. Duivenvoorden; M.H.S. Kraak; W. Admiraal

    2010-01-01

    High altitude creates unique challenging conditions to biota that limit the diversity of benthic communities. Because environmental pollution may add further stress to life at high altitude, the present study explored the effect of metal pollution on the macroinvertebrate community composition in An

  7. Benthic macroinvertebrate surveys in Chequamegon Bay in support of invasive species early detection research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes the impetus and approach for MED invasive species early detection research generally and presents preliminary results concerning benthic composition and non-native species found in the 2013 Chequamegon Bay survey. The audience is a group of researchers...

  8. Shedding light on DOC release by benthic primary producers and its consumption by bioeroding sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The effect of light on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release of benthic primary producers (BPPs) was investigated on the coral reefs of Curaçao. Incubation experiments revealed a positive relation between the DOC release of four Caribbean reef algae (Cladophora sp., Dictyota menstrualis, Lobophora

  9. Habitat modification drives benthic trophic diversity in an intertidal soft-bottom ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zee, Els M.; Tielens, Elske; Holthuijsen, Sander; Donadi, Serena; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; van der Veer, Henk W.; Piersma, Theunis; Olff, Han; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2015-01-01

    In intertidal soft-bottom ecosystems, ecosystem engineers such as reef-building bivalves, can strongly affect the associated benthic community by providing structure and stabilizing the sediment. Although several engineering species have declined dramatically in the past centuries, the consequences

  10. The benthic hydroid fauna of the Chafarinas Islands (Alborán Sea, western Mediterranean)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peña Cantero, A.L.; García Carrascosa, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The benthic hydroid fauna of the Chafarinas Islands (Western Mediterranean), collected during a survey in the summer of 1991, has been studied. A total of 86 species, 20 athecate hydroids and 66 thecate hydroids, has been recorded. For every species, the synonymy, a survey of the material studied an

  11. The impact of artisanal fishery on a tropical intertidal benthic fish community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, WF; van Schie, AMP; Jocene, DF; Mabote, ABP; Guissamulo, A

    2001-01-01

    We examined the benthic fishes and artisanal fishery in the intertidal flats of Inhaca Island, Mozambique. Results of a questionnaire indicated that catches had decreased, and that piscivorous fish have disappeared. Results of a catch sampling study indicated that current catch rates are low, <2 kg

  12. Microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae determine sediment organic matter composition in shallow photic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardison, A.K.; Canuel, E.A/; Anderson, I.C.; Tobias, C.R.; Veuger, B.; Waters, M.N.

    2013-01-01

    Microphytobenthos and benthic macroalgae play an important role in system metabolism within shallow coastal bays. However, their independent and interactive influences on sediment organic matter (SOM) are not well understood. We investigated the influence of macroalgae and microphytobenthos on SOM q

  13. DMSP in Corals and Benthic Algae from the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, A. D.; Jones, G. B.; Jones, R. J.

    2002-10-01

    In this study the first measurements of DMSP in six species of corals and ten species of benthic algae collected from four coral reefs in the Great Barrier Reef are reported, together with DMSP measurements made on cultured zooxanthellae. Concentrations ranged from 21 to 3831 (mean=743) fmol DMSP zooxanthellae -1 in corals, 0·16 to 2·96 nmol DMSP cm -2 (mean=90) for benthic macroalgae, and 48-285 fmol DMSP zooxanthellae -1 (mean=153) for cultured zooxanthellae. The highest concentrations of DMSP in corals occurred in Acropora formosa (mean=371 fmol DMSP zooxanthellae -1) and Acropora palifera (mean=3341 fmol DMSP zooxanthellae -1) with concentrations in A. palifera the highest DMSP concentrations reported in corals examined to date. As well as inter-specific differences in DMSP, intra-specific variation was also observed. Adjacent colonies of A. formosa that are known to have different thermal bleaching thresholds and morphologically distinct zooxanthellae, were also observed to have different DMSP concentrations, with the zooxanthellae in the colony that bleached containing DMSP at an average concentration of 436 fmol zooxanthellae -1, whilst the non-bleaching colony contained DMSP at an average concentration of 171 fmol zooxanthellae -1. The results of the present study have been used to calculate the area normalized DMSP concentrations in benthic algae (mean=0·015 mmol m -2) and corals (mean=2·22 mmol m -2) from the GBR. This data indicates that benthic algae and corals are a significant reservoir of DMSP in GBR waters.

  14. Nematode species diversity as indicator of stressed benthic environment along the central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nanajkar, M.R.; Ingole, B.S.

    community as a tool for assessing the benthic environment. Total 32 meiofaunal samples were collected from the sub-tidal regions along the central west coast of India. Sediment samples were collected on board CRVSagar-Sukti (cruise no. SASU-60 and 105...

  15. Eutrophication and Hypoxia Degrade Ecosystem Functions and Services of Narragansett Bay Benthic Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excessive input of nitrogen to estuaries and coastal waters leads to eutrophication; the resulting organic matter over-enrichment of the sediments and seasonal hypoxia of the bottom water have well-known deleterious effects on benthic community biodiversity, abundance, and biomas...

  16. Carbon and nitrogen flows through the benthic food web of a photic subtidal sandy sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evrard, V.P.E.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Heip, C.H.R.; Huettel, M.; Xenopoulos, M.A.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen flows within the food web of a subtidal sandy sediment were studied using stable isotope natural abundances and tracer addition. Natural abundances of 13C and 15N stable isotopes of the consumers and their potential benthic and pelagic resources were measured. δ13C data revealed

  17. Temperature calibration of Mg/Ca ratios in the intermediate water benthic foraminifer Hyalinea balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenthal, Y.; Morley, A.; Barras, C.; Katz, M.E.; Jorissen, F.; Reichart, G.-J.; Oppo, D.W.; Linsley, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Core top samples from Indonesian and northeast Atlantic depth transects were used to calibrate Mg/Ca and δ18O in tests of the calcitic benthic foraminifer Hyalinea balthica to bottom water temperature between 4°C and 13°C. This shallow infaunal species is primarily abundant in neritic to upper bathy

  18. Effects of heavy metals on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in New Zealand streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, C.W. [National Inst. of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton (New Zealand); Clements, W.H. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Fishery and Wildlife Biology

    1998-11-01

    The authors performed chemical analyses of heavy metals in water and periphyton, toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and an indigenous mayfly (Deleatidium sp.), and field surveys of benthic macroinvertebrates to estimate the degree of metal pollution in three catchments in the Coromandel Peninsula of New Zealand. Good agreement was found between toxicity tests and measures of benthic community structure, particularly at stations with the highest metal levels. Responses of benthic communities at stations with low or moderate levels of metal contamination were variable and were probably confounded by factors other than heavy metals. Effects of heavy metals on benthic communities in New Zealand streams were similar to those reported for metal-polluted streams in North America and Europe, suggesting that responses to metal contamination are predictable. Abundance and species richness of mayflies, number of taxa in the orders Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera, and total taxonomic richness were the best indicators of heavy metals in New Zealand streams. In contrast, the quantitative macroinvertebrate community index (QMCI), a biotic index proposed for assessing effects of organic enrichment in New Zealand streams, could not distinguish between reference and metal-polluted streams. The poor performance of the QMCI was primarily due to incorrect tolerance scores for some taxa to heavy metals. Because of concerns regarding the subjective assignment of tolerance values to species, the authors recommend that tolerance values for dominant species in New Zealand streams should be verified experimentally in stream microcosms.

  19. Marine benthic habitat mapping of the West Arm, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Timothy O.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Powell, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    Seafloor geology and potential benthic habitats were mapped in West Arm, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, Alaska, using multibeam sonar, groundtruthed observations, and geological interpretations. The West Arm of Glacier Bay is a recently deglaciated fjord system under the influence of glacial and paraglacial marine processes. High glacially derived sediment and meltwater fluxes, slope instabilities, and variable bathymetry result in a highly dynamic estuarine environment and benthic ecosystem. We characterize the fjord seafloor and potential benthic habitats using the recently developed Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NatureServe. Due to the high flux of glacially sourced fines, mud is the dominant substrate within the West Arm. Water-column characteristics are addressed using a combination of CTD and circulation model results. We also present sediment accumulation data derived from differential bathymetry. These data show the West Arm is divided into two contrasting environments: a dynamic upper fjord and a relatively static lower fjord. The results of these analyses serve as a test of the CMECS classification scheme and as a baseline for ongoing and future mapping efforts and correlations between seafloor substrate, benthic habitats, and glacimarine processes.

  20. Effects of mussel farms on the benthic nitrogen cycle on the Swedish west coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, MS; Engström, P; Lindahl, O;

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemical impact of 3 long-line mussel farms (M1, M2 and M3) in Lysekil, Sweden, was investigated from before farm establishment until 1.5 yr after operation had begun. Sedimentation, benthic N flux, total oxygen uptake (TOU) and sulfate reduction rate (SRR) were all significantly...

  1. Microbial to reef scale interactions between the reef-building coral Montastraea annularis and benthic algae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. Barott; B Rodriguez-Mueller; M. Youle; K.L. Marhaver; M.J.A. Vermeij; J.E. Smith; F.L. Rohwer

    2012-01-01

    Competition between reef-building corals and benthic algae is of key importance for reef dynamics. These interactions occur on many spatial scales, ranging from chemical to regional. Using microprobes, 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and underwater surveys, we examined the interactions between the reef-buil

  2. Benthic marine calcifiers coexist with CaCO3-undersaturated seawater worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrato, M.; Andersson, A. J.; Ries, J. B.; Aronson, R. B.; Lamare, M. D.; Koeve, W.; Oschlies, A.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. D.; Thatje, S.; Amsler, M.; Vos, S. C.; Jones, D. O. B.; Ruhl, H. A.; Gates, A. R.; McClintock, J. B.

    2016-07-01

    Ocean acidification and decreasing seawater saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals have raised concerns about the consequences to marine organisms that build CaCO3 structures. A large proportion of benthic marine calcifiers incorporate Mg2+ into their skeletons (Mg-calcite), which, in general, reduces mineral stability. The relative vulnerability of some marine calcifiers to ocean acidification appears linked to the relative solubility of their shell or skeletal mineralogy, although some organisms have sophisticated mechanisms for constructing and maintaining their CaCO3 structures causing deviation from this dependence. Nevertheless, few studies consider seawater saturation state with respect to the actual Mg-calcite mineralogy (ΩMg-x) of a species when evaluating the effect of ocean acidification on that species. Here, a global dataset of skeletal mole % MgCO3 of benthic calcifiers and in situ environmental conditions spanning a depth range of 0 m (subtidal/neritic) to 5600 m (abyssal) was assembled to calculate in situ ΩMg-x. This analysis shows that 24% of the studied benthic calcifiers currently experience seawater mineral undersaturation (ΩMg-x states when investigating the impact of CO2-induced ocean acidification on benthic marine calcification.

  3. Toxicity Testing of Silver Nanoparticles in Artificial and Natural Sediments Using the Benthic Organism Lumbriculus variegatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajala, Juho Elias; Mäenpää, Kimmo; Vehniäinen, Eeva-Riikka;

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in industrial and consumer products worldwide has resulted in their release to aquatic environments. Previous studies have mainly focused on the effects of AgNP on pelagic species, whereas few studies have assessed the risks to benthic invertebrate...

  4. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühring, Solveig I.; Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Kamp, Anja;

    2006-01-01

    investigated the pathway of settling particulate organic carbon through the benthic food web. The diatom Ditylum brightwellii was labelled with the stable carbon isotope 13C and injected into incubation chambers. On-board incubations lasted 12, 30 and 132 h, while the in situ experiment was incubated for 32 h...

  5. Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on caribbean coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocke, Hannah J.; Polerecky, Lubos; De Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised are

  6. Marine Benthic Habitats and Seabed Suitability Mapping for Potential Ocean Current Energy Siting Offshore Southeast Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Mulcan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the legal framework for ocean current energy policy and regulation to develop a metric for assessing the biological and geological characteristics of a seabed area with respect to the siting of OCE devices, a framework of criteria by which to assess seabed suitability (seabed suitability framework that can facilitate the siting, and implementation of ocean current energy (OCE projects. Seafloor geology and benthic biological data were analyzed in conjunction with seafloor core sample geostatistical interpolation to locate suitable substrates for OCE anchoring. Existing submarine cable pathways were considered to determine pathways for power transmission cables that circumvent biologically sensitive areas. Suitability analysis indicates that areas east of the Miami Terrace and north of recently identified deep-sea coral mounds are the most appropriate for OCE siting due to abundance of sand/sediment substrate, existing underwater cable route access, and minimal biological presence (i.e., little to no benthic communities. Further reconnaissance requires higher resolution maps of geological substrate and benthic community locations to identify specific OCE development locations, classify benthic conditions, and minimize potentially negative OCE environmental impacts.

  7. Benthic metabolism in shallow coastal ecosystems of the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavier, J.; Chauvaud, L.; Amice, E.; Lazure, P.; van der Geest, M.; Labrosse, P.; Diagne, A.; Carlier, A.; Chauvaud, S.

    2014-01-01

    Benthic primary production and respiration were investigated at 4 sites representative of the major coastal communities bordering the Sahara Desert in the Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania, Western Africa. These sites correspond to intertidal Zostera noltii beds (270 km(2)), intertidal bare sediments (88 km

  8. Benthic diatom composition in isolated forested wetlands subject to drying: implications for monitoring and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of bioindicators for wetlands, especially ephemerally hydrated depressional and isolated wetlands, can be problematic because of seasonal hydrology and target organism biology. To determine if benthic diatoms could be used as a year-round biological indicator of w...

  9. Estimates the Effects of Benthic Fluxes on the Water Quality of the Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.; Huh, I. A.; Park, S.; Choi, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs located in highly populated and industrialized regions receive discharges of nutrients and pollutants from the watershed that have great potential to impair water quality and threaten aquatic life. The Euiam reservoir is a multiple-purpose water body used for tourism, fishery, and water supply and has been reported as eutrophic since 1990s. The external nutrients loading is considered to be the main cause of eutrophication of water bodies, and control strategies therefore focus on its reduction. However, algae blooms often continue even after external nutrients loading has been controlled, being benthic nutrient loading the main source of nutrients in the water column. Attempts to quantify benthic nutrients fluxes and their role as a source of nutrients to the water column have produced ambiguous results. Benthic flux is dependent on the upward flow of pore water caused by hydrostatic pressure, molecular diffusion, and mixing of sediment and water. In addition, it is controlled by dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, pH values and temperature in the overlying water. Therefore, linking a benthic flux to a water quality model should give us more insight on the effects of benthic fluxes to better quantify nutrient concentration within an entire reservoir system where physical, chemical, biological properties are variable. To represent temporal and spatial variations in the nutrient concentrations of the reservoir, a three-dimensional time variable model, Generalized Longitudinal-Lateral-Vertical Hydrodynamic and Transport (GLLVHT) was selected. The GLLVHT model is imbedded within the Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surface waters (GEMSS). The computational grid of the three-dimensional model was developed using the GIS. The horizontal grid is composed of 580 active cells at the surface layer with spacing varies from 54.2 m to 69.8 m. There are 15 vertical layers with uniform thickness of 1.9 m resolution. To calibrate the model, model prediction for

  10. A newly developed dispersal metric indicates the succession of benthic invertebrates in restored rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengqing; Sundermann, Andrea; Stoll, Stefan; Haase, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Dispersal capacity plays a fundamental role in the riverine benthic invertebrate colonization of new habitats that emerges following flash floods or restoration. However, an appropriate measure of dispersal capacity for benthic invertebrates is still lacking. The dispersal of benthic invertebrates occurs mainly during the aquatic (larval) and aerial (adult) life stages, and the dispersal of each stage can be further subdivided into active and passive modes. Based on these four possible dispersal modes, we first developed a metric (which is very similar to the well-known and widely used saprobic index) to estimate the dispersal capacity for 802 benthic invertebrate taxa by incorporating a weight for each mode. Second, we tested this metric using benthic invertebrate community data from a) 23 large restored river sites with substantial improvements of river bottom habitats dating back 1 to 10years, b) 23 unrestored sites very close to the restored sites, and c) 298 adjacent surrounding sites (mean±standard deviation: 13.0±9.5 per site) within a distance of up to 5km for each restored site in the low mountain and lowland areas of Germany. We hypothesize that our metric will reflect the temporal succession process of benthic invertebrate communities colonizing the restored sites, whereas no temporal changes are expected in the unrestored and surrounding sites. By applying our metric to these three river treatment categories, we found that the average dispersal capacity of benthic invertebrate communities in the restored sites significantly decreased in the early years following restoration, whereas there were no changes in either the unrestored or the surrounding sites. After all taxa had been divided into quartiles representing weak to strong dispersers, this pattern became even more obvious; strong dispersers colonized the restored sites during the first year after restoration and then significantly decreased over time, whereas weak dispersers continued to increase

  11. The truth is out there: measured, calculated and modelled benthic fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, Svetlana; Protsenko, Elizaveta

    2016-04-01

    In a modern Earth science there is a great importance of understanding the processes, forming the benthic fluxes as one of element sources or sinks to or from the water body, which affects the elements balance in the water system. There are several ways to assess benthic fluxes and here we try to compare the results obtained by chamber experiments, calculated from porewater distributions and simulated with model. Benthic fluxes of dissolved elements (oxygen, nitrogen species, phosphate, silicate, alkalinity, iron and manganese species) were studied in the Baltic and Black Seas from 2000 to 2005. Fluxes were measured in situ using chamber incubations (Jch) and at the same time sediment cores were collected to assess the porewater distribution at different depths to calculate diffusive fluxes (Jpw). Model study was carried out with benthic-pelagic biogeochemical model BROM (O-N-P-Si-C-S-Mn-Fe redox model). It was applied to simulate biogeochemical structure of the water column and upper sediment and to assess the vertical fluxes (Jmd). By the behaviour at the water-sediment interface all studied elements can be divided into three groups: (1) elements which benthic fluxes are determined by the concentrations gradient only (Si, Mn), (2) elements which fluxes depend on redox conditions in the bottom water (Fe, PO4, NH4), and (3) elements which fluxes are strongly connected with organic matter fate (O2, Alk, NH4). For the first group it was found that measured fluxes are always higher than calculated diffusive fluxes (1.5changing redox conditions some processes in the bottom water and/or on the sediment surface (oxidation, adsorption, particles dissolution, etc.) are faster than diffusion and play an important role in the benthic flux formation for these elements. For the third group measured fluxes could be often overestimated, especially for coastal shallow stations, up to 50%, because of intensive decomposition of OM and/or organisms respiration in the isolated bottom

  12. Effects of Benthic Flux on Dissolved-Mercury Distributions in Camp Far West Reservoir, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, J. S.; Alpers, C. N.; Marvin-Dipasquale, M.; Topping, B. R.; Carter, J. L.; Stewart, A. R.; Fend, S. V.; Parchaso, F.; Moon, G. E.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Agee, J. L.; Kieu, L. H.

    2003-12-01

    Benthic flux measurements of dissolved mercury species were made on sediment cores from Camp Far West Reservoir, a reservoir in which elevated mercury levels in sport fish had previously been documented. The reservoir is located downstream of historic hydraulic placer-gold mining and ore processing activities in the Bear River watershed of the northern Sierra Nevada. Field and laboratory studies were conducted in April and November of 2002 (one of the driest years on record for the area) to provide the first direct measurements of the benthic flux of dissolved mercury species between bottom sediment and the water column at three locations within the reservoir. Ancillary data, including nutrient and ligand fluxes, and benthic biological characterizations, were also gathered to provide a water-quality framework with which to interpret the mercury results. The following are the major observations made from interdependent physical, biological, and chemical data. Bottom water total mercury (HgT) concentrations ranged from 2.94 to 18.3 pM. Dissolved HgT benthic fluxes were generally higher in April than in November 2002 (based on site averages from replicate cores). HgT fluxes of 36.3 and -28.4 pmoles-m-2-h-1 were measured in cores from the deep site which was suboxic in November, contrasting with positive fluxes of 306 and 272 pmoles-m-2-h-1 at that site in April 2002 when the bottom water was oxic. All six measurements of HgT flux in April 2002 and five of six in November 2002 resulted in positive values (i.e., out of the sediment into the overlying water column). Consistent with benthic fluxes for HgT, dissolved MeHg fluxes were: (a) generally positive in April 2002, (b) negligible at all sites in November 2002, and (c) at least two orders of magnitude lower than total-mercury fluxes, roughly consistent with concentration differences between species. Observed concentration ranges for MeHg in bottom water ranged from less than the detection limit (0.20 pM) at the two

  13. Cyanobacteria-derived nitrogen uptake by benthic invertebrates in Lake Taihu: a mesocosm study using 15N labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eutrophication of lakes can lead to dominance by cyanobacteria, which are hardly used by zooplankton due to their low nutrition value. However, sedimented cyanobacterial detritus may be a useful source for benthic invertebrates. We studied the Microcystis-derived nitrogen incorporation in benthic invertebrates in Lake Taihu using stable isotopic nitrogen (15N as a tracer. The δ15N of all organisms increased significantly with time after addition of the labeled Microcystis detritus. δ15N values of POM and periphyton peaked earlier than for benthic invertebrates, and the maximum levels were also higher than bivalves, snails and worms (Limnodrilus spp.. Among benthic invertebrates, Radix swinhoei peaked later than other invertebrates, but the maximum level and the excess 15N of the last sampling day were higher. At the end of the experiment, approximately 70% of the added 15N was retained in the benthic food web, while only a small fraction (less than 1% of the added detritus 15N occurred in the pelagic food web. Our results suggest that nitrogen from cyanobacteria can be incorporated more in benthic than pelagic food webs and cyanobacterial blooms may contribute to the development of benthic animals.

  14. Importance of benthic production to fish populations in Lake Mead prior to the establishment of quagga mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umek, John; Chandra, Sudeep; Rosen, Michael; Wittmann, Marion; Sullivan, Joe; Orsak, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Limnologists recently have developed an interest in quantifying benthic resource contributions to higher-level consumers. Much of this research focuses on natural lakes with very little research in reservoirs. In this study, we provide a contemporary snapshot of the food web structure of Lake Mead to evaluate the contribution of benthic resources to fish consumers. In addition, we document the available food to fishes on soft sediments and changes to the invertebrate community over 2 time periods. Benthic invertebrate food availability for fishes is greater in Las Vegas Bay than Overton Arm. Las Vegas Bay is dominated by oligochaetes, whose biomass increased with depth, while Overton Arm is dominated by chironomids, whose biomass did not change with depth. Diet and isotopic measurements indicate the fish community largely relies on benthic resources regardless of basin (Las Vegas Bay >80%; Overton Arm >92%); however, the threadfin shad likely contribute more to largemouth and striped bass production in Overton Arm versus Las Vegas Bay. A 2-time period analysis, pre and post quagga mussel establishment and during lake level declines, suggests there is no change in the density of benthic invertebrates in Boulder Basin, but there were greater abundances of select taxa in this basin by season and depth than in other basins. Given the potential of alterations as a result of the expansion of quagga mussel and the reliance of the fishery on benthic resources, future investigation of basin specific, benthic processes is recommended.

  15. Conservation unit and water quality: the influence of environmental integrity on benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessé Renan Scapini Sobczak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a Conservation Unit (CU in maintaining the quality of freshwater habitats and to evaluate the influence of environmental integrity on benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. METHODS: The research was conducted at sampling sites located within and outside of the CU in the Alto Uruguai region, southern Brazil, and included two stages: (i the collection of benthic macroinvertebrates and (ii the application of a Rapid Assessment Protocol (RAP to characterise the habitat quality. RESULTS: A total of 1,362 benthic macroinvertebrates were collected during the study, totalling 30 taxa. The densities within and outside the CU were significantly different (F= 160.08; p= 0.05, and the Shannon diversity and taxa richness followed the same pattern (F= 118.72, p= 0.05; and F= 176.33, p= 0.04, respectively. In contrast, the Pielou equitability did not differ within and outside the CU (F= 0.19, p= 0.74. The biotic index (Biological Monitoring Working Party indicated that water quality was good or very good in the majority of cases. Most of the sampling sites were classified as ‘natural’ according to the RAP. The taxa richness was significantly related to habitat diversity (F= 7.24; p = 0.05, but no significant relationship was found between the habitat diversity and the Shannon diversity (F= 2.13, p = 0.22. CONCLUSION: The CU was effective for the conservation of water quality and the freshwater biodiversity of benthic macroinvertebrates. The results show that the environmental integrity was related to the distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates, primarily to the taxa richness. More detailed investigations need to be developed to better understand these relationships and to take into account the temporal scale. An analysis of the most significant sources of stress on the aquatic life outside the area is recommended.

  16. The habitat type and trophic state determine benthic macroinvertebrate communities in lowland shallow lakes of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Benthic macroinvertebrates play important roles in shallow lake ecosystems. Several studies based on qualitative comparisons of the amount of macrophytes were carried out to relate benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages to habitat conditions in shallow lakes. Our main aim was to analyze the effects of habitat type and trophic state on taxonomic composition and abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates in lowland shallow lakes based on quantitative classification of habitat types. The benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were investigated in eight shallow lakes of eastern China in four seasons. A total of 33 species was collected from these lakes, including four Oligochaeta, eight Chironomidae, eight Gastropoda, four Bivalvia and nine other miscellaneous species. According to the ratio of the dry weight of macrophytes to the dry weight of phytoplankton, the study lakes were separated into three lake types; macrophyte-dominated, transitional, and algae-dominated regions. The total abundance of macroinvertebrates was significantly higher in the group of algae-dominated regions than in the macrophyte-dominated regions. Scrapers had the highest abundance in the macrophyte-dominated regions. Univariate and multivariate analyses results showed that abundance, biomass and characteristic species of benthic macroinvertebrates were affected by their habitat types. The abundance and biomass of macroinvertebrates showed significant positive correlations with the trophic state index (TSI. TSI and turbidity were significantly correlated with DC1 (Axis 1 of detrended correspondence analysis, while Chlorophyll a and the ratio of the dry weight of macrophytes to the dry weight of phytoplankton were significantly correlated with DC2. The findings indicated that the habitat type and trophic state were the key factors determining the structure of macroinvertebrate assemblages in lowland shallow lakes. Our study was one of the few studies that had demonstrated the

  17. Differential bioaccumulation of potentially toxic elements in benthic and pelagic food chains in Lake Baikal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Tomasz M; Pastukhov, Mikhail V; Leeves, Sara A; Farkas, Julia; Lierhagen, Syverin; Poletaeva, Vera I; Jenssen, Bjørn M

    2016-08-01

    Lake Baikal is located in eastern Siberia in the center of a vast mountain region. Even though the lake is regarded as a unique and pristine ecosystem, there are existing sources of anthropogenic pollution to the lake. In this study, the concentrations of the potentially toxic trace elements As, Cd, Pb, Hg, and Se were analyzed in water, plankton, invertebrates, and fish from riverine and pelagic influenced sites in Lake Baikal. Concentrations of Cd, Hg, Pb and Se in Lake Baikal water and biota were low, while concentrations of As were similar or slightly higher compared to in other freshwater ecosystems. The bioaccumulation potential of the trace elements in both the pelagic and the benthic ecosystems differed between the Selenga Shallows (riverine influence) and the Listvenichnyĭ Bay (pelagic influence). Despite the one order of magnitude higher water concentrations of Pb in the Selenga Shallows, Pb concentrations were significantly higher in both pelagic and benthic fish from the Listvenichnyĭ Bay. A similar trend was observed for Cd, Hg, and Se. The identified enhanced bioavailability of contaminants in the pelagic influenced Listvenichnyĭ Bay may be attributed to a lower abundance of natural ligands for contaminant complexation. Hg was found to biomagnify in both benthic and pelagic Baikal food chains, while As, Cd, and Pb were biodiluted. At both locations, Hg concentrations were around seven times higher in benthic than in pelagic fish, while pelagic fish had two times higher As concentrations compared to benthic fish. The calculated Se/Hg molar ratios revealed that, even though Lake Baikal is located in a Se-deficient region, Se is still present in excess over Hg and therefore the probability of Hg induced toxicity in the endemic fish species of Lake Baikal is assumed to be low. PMID:27130338

  18. Pleistocene oceanographie changes indicated by deep sea benthic foraminifera in the northern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ajai K.; Srinivasan, M. S.

    1994-12-01

    An attempt has been made to understand the Pleistocene bottom water history in response to the paleoclimatic changes in the northern Indian Ocean employing quantitative analyses of deep sea benthic foraminifera at the DSDP sites 219 and 238. Among the 150 benthic foraminifera recorded a few species show dominance with changing percent frequencies during most of the sequence. The dominant benthic foraminiferal assemblages suggest that most of the Pleistocene bottom waters at site 219 and Early Pleistocene bottom waters at site 238 are of North Indian Deep Water (NIDW) origin. However, Late Pleistocene assemblage at site 238 appears to be closely associated with a water mass intermediate between North Indian Deep Water (NIDW) and Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Uvigerina proboscidea is the most dominant benthic foraminiferal species present during the Pleistocene at both the sites. A marked increase in the relative abundance of U. proboscidea along with less diverse and equitable fauna during Early Pleistocene suggests a relative cooling, an intensified oceanic circulation and upwelling of nutrient rich bottom waters resulting in high surface productivity. At the same time, low sediment accumulation rate during Early Pleistocene reveals increased winnowing of the sediments possibly due to more corrosive and cold bottom waters. The Late Pleistocene in general, is marked by relatively warm and stable bottom waters as reflected by low abundance of U. proboscidea and more diverse and equitable benthic fauna. The lower depth range for the occurrence of Bulimina aculeate in the Indian Ocean is around 2300 m, similar to that of many other areas. B. aculeata also shows marked increase in its abundance near the Pliocene/Pleistocene boundary while a sudden decrease in the relative abundance of Stilostomella lepidula occurs close to the Early/Late Pleistocene boundary.

  19. Smartphones and Time Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  20. Parapapillary atrophy: histological gamma zone and delta zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jost B Jonas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine histomorphometrically the parapapillary region in human eyes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The histomorphometric study included 65 human globes (axial length:21-37 mm. On anterior-posterior histological sections, we measured the distance Bruch's membrane end (BME-optic nerve margin ("Gamma zone", BME-retinal pigment epithelium (RPE ("Beta zone", BME-beginning of non-occluded choriocapillaris, and BME-beginning of photoreceptor layer. "Delta zone" was defined as part of gamma zone in which blood vessels of at least 50 µm diameter were not present over a length of >300 µm. Beta zone (mean length:0.35±0.52 mm was significantly (P = 0.01 larger in the glaucoma group than in the non-glaucomatous group. It was not significantly (P = 0.28 associated with axial length. Beta zone was significantly (P = 0.004 larger than the region with occluded choriocapillaris. Gamma zone (mean length:0.63±1.25 mm was associated with axial length (P50 µm diameter within gamma zone was present only in highly axially elongated globes and was not related with glaucoma. Beta zone (Bruch's membrane without RPE was correlated with glaucoma but not with globe elongation. Since the region with occluded choriocapillaris was smaller than beta zone, complete loss of RPE may have occurred before complete choriocapillaris closure.

  1. Occurrence of benthic microbial nitrogen fixation coupled to sulfate reduction in the seasonally hypoxic Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Bertics

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide occurrence of marine hypoxic regions, benthic nitrogen (N cycling within these areas is poorly understood and it is generally assumed that these areas represent zones of intense fixed N loss from the marine system. Sulfate reduction can be an important process for organic matter degradation in sediments beneath hypoxic waters and many sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB have the genetic potential to fix molecular N (N2. Therefore, SRB may supply fixed N to these systems, countering some of the N lost via microbial processes, such as denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The objective of this study was to evaluate if N2 fixation, possibly by SRB, plays a role in N cycling within the seasonally hypoxic sediments from the Eckernförde Bay, Baltic Sea. Monthly samplings were performed over the course of one year to measure nitrogenase activity (NA and sulfate reduction rates, to determine the seasonal variations in bioturbation (bioirrigation activity and important benthic geochemical profiles, such as sulfur and N compounds, and to monitor changes in water column temperature and oxygen concentrations. Additionally, at several time points, the active N-fixing community was examined via molecular tools. Integrated rates of N2 fixation (approximated from NA and sulfate reduction showed a similar seasonality pattern, with highest rates occurring in August (approx. 22 and 880 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively and October (approx. 22 and 1300 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42− respectively, and lowest rates occurring in February (approx. 8 and 32 nmol cm−3 d−1 of N and SO42−, respectively. These rate changes were positively correlated with bottom water temperatures and previous reported plankton bloom activities, and negatively correlated with bottom water oxygen concentrations. Other variables that also appeared to play a role in rate determination were bioturbation, bubble irrigation and winter storm

  2. Development and application of a new comprehensive image-based classification scheme for coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Christopher

    The coastal (terrestrial) and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf show a unique biophysical succession of marine features from a highly urbanized, developed coastal region in the north (i.e. northern Miami-Dade County) to a protective marine sanctuary in the southeast (i.e. Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary). However, the establishment of a standard bio-geomorphological classification scheme for this area of coastal and benthic environments is lacking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis and answer the research question of whether new parameters of integrating geomorphological components with dominant biological covers could be developed and applied across multiple remote sensing platforms for an innovative way to identify, interpret, and classify diverse coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf. An ordered manageable hierarchical classification scheme was developed to incorporate the categories of Physiographic Realm, Morphodynamic Zone, Geoform, Landform, Dominant Surface Sediment, and Dominant Biological Cover. Six different remote sensing platforms (i.e. five multi-spectral satellite image sensors and one high-resolution aerial orthoimagery) were acquired, delineated according to the new classification scheme, and compared to determine optimal formats for classifying the study area. Cognitive digital classification at a nominal scale of 1:6000 proved to be more accurate than autoclassification programs and therefore used to differentiate coastal marine environments based on spectral reflectance characteristics, such as color, tone, saturation, pattern, and texture of the seafloor topology. In addition, attribute tables were created in conjugation with interpretations to quantify and compare the spatial relationships between classificatory units. IKONOS-2 satellite imagery was determined to be the optimal platform for applying the hierarchical classification scheme

  3. The Near Zone to Far Zone Transformation (N2F)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackfield, Donald T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Poole, Brian R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-11

    N2F is a C/C++ code used to calculate the far zone electromagnetic (EM) field, given E and H near zone field data. The method used by N2F can be found in Ref. 1 and 2. N2F determines the far field EΦ and Eθ in spherical coordinates for near zone data calculated in either Cartesian or Cylindrical geometry.

  4. Food web architecture and basal resources interact to determine biomass and stoichiometric cascades along a benthic food web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael D Guariento

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of predators and resources on primary producers has been a major focus of interest in ecology. Within this context, the trophic cascade concept especially concerning the pelagic zone of lakes has been the focus of the majority of these studies. However, littoral food webs could be especially interesting because base trophic levels may be strongly regulated by consumers and prone to be light limited. In this study, the availability of nutrients and light and the presence of an omnivorous fish (Hyphessobrycon bifasciatus were manipulated in enclosures placed in a humic coastal lagoon (Cabiúnas Lagoon, Macaé - RJ to evaluate the individual and interactive effects of resource availability (nutrients and light and food web configuration on the biomass and stoichiometry of periphyton and benthic grazers. Our findings suggest that light and nutrients interact to determine periphyton biomass and stoichiometry, which propagates to the consumer level. We observed a positive effect of the availability of nutrients on periphytic biomass and grazers' biomass, as well as a reduction of periphytic C∶N∶P ratios and an increase of grazers' N and P content. Low light availability constrained the propagation of nutrient effects on periphyton biomass and induced higher periphytic C∶N∶P ratios. The effects of fish presence strongly interacted with resource availability. In general, a positive effect of fish presence was observed for the total biomass of periphyton and grazer's biomass, especially with high resource availability, but the opposite was found for periphytic autotrophic biomass. Fish also had a significant effect on periphyton stoichiometry, but no effect was observed on grazers' stoichiometric ratios. In summary, we observed that the indirect effect of fish predation on periphyton biomass might be dependent on multiple resources and periphyton nutrient stoichiometric variation can affect consumers' stoichiometry.

  5. Morphogenetic role of F-actin meshwork in chamber formation: immunolabeling results from symbiont bearing benthic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszka, Jaroslaw; Raitzsch, Markus; Bijma, Jelle; Höher, Nicole; Bickmeyer, Ulf; Rivera-Ingraham, Georginia; Topa, Paweł; Kaczmarek, Karina; Mewes, Antje; Bowser, Samuel; Travis, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Foraminifera are excellent tracers of palaeoceanographic conditions recorded in their shell (test) morphology and chemical composition. Understanding foraminiferal morphology controlled by chamberwise growth can be reduced to processes of chamber formation. However, little is known about how foraminifera control the shape of the chamber wall to be biosynthesized and precipitated. Searching for fundamental morphogenetic features involved in biomineralization, we focused on foraminifers, which belong to the class Globothalamea. The most critical condition to run experiments was to have convenient access to early stages of chamber formation in any species of cultured benthic foraminifers. We have tested small foraminifers collected from the tidal flats of the North Sea. All species, including Ammonia, Haynesina, and Elphidium, turned out to be unsuitable due to their reproduction seasonality and/or unpredictability. The problem was solved by using symbiont bearing Amphistegina lessonii cultured in small aquaria. In well treated cultures, such foraminifera often reproduce on a glass wall surface, serving as a continuous source of juveniles. They tend to regularly construct chambers. Another important point is that symbiont bearing foraminifers usually do not construct opaque protective cysts from detritus that disturb observations. All these features facilitate immunolabeling experiments observed under confocal microscopy. Therefore, for the first time, we managed to label cytoskeleton proteins during the chamber formation in Foraminifera. The results show that the shape of chamber is predefined by a meshwork of F-actin, which acts as a dynamic organic scaffold most likely responsible for distribution and docking of biomineralizing molecules (glycoproteins). The F-actin meshwork interacts with microtubules and all associated proteins, which are involved in the morphogenesis of biomineralized structures. Foraminifera, like other eukaryotic cells, can form active

  6. Empowerment Zones and Enterprise Districts - Volusia County Enterprise Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Florida's Enterprise Zone Program encourages economic growth and investment in distressed areas by offering tax advantages and incentives to businesses that are...

  7. Major methodological constraints to the assessment of environmental status based on the condition of benthic communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, João Paulo; Pinto, Vanessa; Sá, Erica; Silva, Gilda; Azeda, Carla; Pereira, Tadeu; Quintella, Bernardo; Raposo de Almeida, Pedro; Lino Costa, José; José Costa, Maria; Chainho, Paula

    2014-05-01

    The Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) was published in 2008 and requires Member States to take the necessary measures to achieve or maintain good environmental status in aquatic ecosystems by the year of 2020. The MSFD indicates 11 qualitative descriptors for environmental status assessment, including seafloor integrity, using the condition of the benthic community as an assessment indicator. Member States will have to define monitoring programs for each of the MSFD descriptors based on those indicators in order to understand which areas are in a Good Environmental Status and what measures need to be implemented to improve the status of areas that fail to achieve that major objective. Coastal and offshore marine waters are not frequently monitored in Portugal and assessment tools have only been developed very recently with the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD). The lack of historical data and knowledge on the constraints of benthic indicators in coastal areas requires the development of specific studies addressing this issue. The major objective of the current study was to develop and test and experimental design to assess impacts of offshore projects. The experimental design consisted on the seasonal and interannual assessment of benthic invertebrate communities in the area of future implementation of the structures (impact) and two potential control areas 2 km from the impact area. Seasonal benthic samples were collected at nine random locations within the impact and control areas in two consecutive years. Metrics included in the Portuguese benthic assessment tool (P-BAT) were calculated since this multimetric tool was proposed for the assessment of the ecological status in Portuguese coastal areas under the WFD. Results indicated a high taxonomic richness in this coastal area and no significant differences were found between impact and control areas, indicating the feasibility of establishing adequate control areas in marine

  8. Multiscale patterns in the diversity and organization of benthic intertidal fauna among French Atlantic estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Hugues; Gouillieux, Benoît; Alizier, Sandrine; Amouroux, Jean-Michel; Bachelet, Guy; Barillé, Anne-Laure; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Derolez, Valérie; Desroy, Nicolas; Grall, Jacques; Grémare, Antoine; Hacquebart, Pascal; Jourde, Jérôme; Labrune, Céline; Lavesque, Nicolas; Meirland, Alain; Nebout, Thiebaut; Olivier, Frédéric; Pelaprat, Corine; Ruellet, Thierry; Sauriau, Pierre-Guy; Thorin, Sébastien

    2014-07-01

    Based on a parallel sampling conducted during autumn 2008, a comparative study of the intertidal benthic macrofauna among 10 estuarine systems located along the Channel and Atlantic coasts of France was performed in order to assess the level of fauna similarity among these sites and to identify possible environmental factors involved in the observed pattern at both large (among sites) and smaller (benthic assemblages) scales. More precisely this study focused on unraveling the observed pattern of intertidal benthic fauna composition and diversity observed at among-site scale by exploring both biotic and abiotic factors acting at the among- and within-site scales. Results showed a limited level of similarity at the among-site level in terms of intertidal benthic fauna composition and diversity. The observed pattern did not fit with existing transitional water classification methods based on fish or benthic assemblages developed in the frame of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). More particularly, the coastal plain estuaries displayed higher among-site similarity compared to ria systems. These coastal plain estuaries were characterized by higher influence of river discharge, lower communication with the ocean and high suspended particulate matter levels. On the other hand, the ria-type systems were more dissimilar and different from the coastal plain estuaries. The level of similarity among estuaries was mainly linked to the relative extent of the intertidal “Scrobicularia plana-Cerastoderma edule” and “Tellina tenuis” or “Venus” communities as a possible consequence of salinity regime, suspended matter concentrations and fine particles supply with consequences on the trophic functioning, structure and organization of benthic fauna. Despite biogeographical patterns, the results also suggest that, in the context of the WFD, these estuaries should only be compared on the basis of the most common intertidal habitat occurring throughout all

  9. Nairu en zone heureuse

    OpenAIRE

    Reynès, Frédéric; Lemoine, Matthieu; Veroni, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Cette étude spéciale propose des estimations du niveau non inflationniste du taux de chômage (Nairu) pour la zone euro agrégée, pour la France, l’Italie et l’Allemagne. Une équation d’inflation, qui dépend de l’écart du taux de chômage au Nairu, est estimée par le filtre de Kalman. Le modèle le plus simple, qui considère le Nairu comme une marche aléatoire, a des capacités prédictives limitées. Il diagnostique un taux de chômage inférieur au Nairu à l’horizon de notre prévision. Il est con...

  10. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  11. The zone of alienation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years after the nuclear disaster, people still live and die in Chernobyl. Thousands of people continue to live and work there. Roughly 500 have moved back into their old homes inside the alienation zone. Fewer than half still alive. Medical researchers in the area insist that immune systems are weakened by doses of radiation far lower than previously thought. However, an European Union sponsored study concluded that Chernobyl's toll has been exaggerated. Thus, while 760 children in the contaminated area have developed thyroid cancer, only three have died as a result. Yet in and around Chernobyl, people carry on their lives and the Ukrainian Government says it can't afford to close the plant without billions of dollars in Western aid. ills

  12. Methane-Stimulated Benthic Marine Nitrogen Fixation at Deep-Sea Methane Seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekas, A. E.; Orphan, V.

    2011-12-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (the conversion of N2 to NH3) is a critical process in the oceans, counteracting the production of N2 gas by dissimilatory bacterial metabolisms and providing a source of bioavailable nitrogen to many nitrogen-limited ecosystems. Although current measurements of N2 production and consumption in the oceans indicate that the nitrogen cycle is not balanced, recent findings on the limits of nitrogen fixation suggest that the perceived imbalance is an artifact of an incomplete assessment of marine diazotrophy. One currently poorly studied and potentially underappreciated habitat for diazotrophic organisms is the sediments of the deep-sea. In the present study we investigate the distribution and magnitude of benthic marine diazotrophy at several active deep-sea methane seeps (Mound 12, Costa Rica; Eel River Basin, CA, USA; Hydrate Ridge, OR, USA; and Monterey Canyon, CA, USA). Using 15N2 and 15NH4 sediment incubation experiments followed by single-cell (FISH-NanoSIMS) and bulk isotopic analysis (EA-IRMS), we observed total protein synthesis (15N uptake from 15NH4) and nitrogen fixation (15N update from 15N2). The highest rates of nitrogen fixation observed in the methane seep sediment incubation experiments were over an order of magnitude greater than those previously published from non-seep deep-sea sediments (Hartwig and Stanley, Deep-Sea Research, 1978, 25:411-417). However, methane seep diazotrophy appears to be highly spatially variable, with sediments exhibiting no nitrogen fixation originating only centimeters away from sediments actively incorporating 15N from 15N2. The greatest spatial variability in diazotrophy was observed with depth in the sediment, and corresponded to steep gradients in sulfate and methane. The maximum rates of nitrogen fixation were observed within the methane-sulfate transition zone, where organisms mediating the anaerobic oxidation of methane are typically in high abundance. Additionally, incubation

  13. Vertical migratory rhythms of benthic diatoms in a tropical intertidal sand flat: Influence of irradiance and tides

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C.

    Vertical migratory behavior of benthic diatoms is one of the adaptive strategies employed for a life in intertidal habitats. Irradiance and tides are considered to be the key factors governing vertical migration. Experiments were carried out...

  14. Geographic Information System (GIS) characterizations of benthic community data near the Florida Panhandle, 1970-1985 (NODC Accession 0000603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection uses a Geographic Information System (GIS) to organize and characterize information about benthic communities and substrates, which are...

  15. Fish, Benthic and Urchin Survey Data from Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries Management Area (HFMA), Maui since 2008 (NCEI Accession 0146683)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data are summary fish, benthic and urchin data from belt transect surveys conducted by the NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Program within the Kahekili Herbivore Fisheries...

  16. National Status and Trends, Benthic Surveillance Project Chemistry Data, 1984-1992, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Status and Trends (NSandT) Benthic Surveillance Project Chemistry data file reports the trace concentrations of a suite of chemical contaminants in...

  17. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Rose, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  18. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Kingman, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  19. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Farallon de Pajaros, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  20. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Aguijan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  1. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Swains, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  2. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Ofu & Olosega, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  3. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Tinian, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  4. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Rota, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  5. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Alamagan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  6. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  7. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Saipan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  8. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Jarvis, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  9. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Kure, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  10. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Maug, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  11. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Palmyra, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  12. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Guguan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  13. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Sarigan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  14. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Hawaii, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  15. Accuracy Assessment Sites - Moderate-Depth Benthic Habitats of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands (2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the moderate-depth marine environment of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands were created using a combination of semi-automated classification and...

  16. Accuracy Assessment Sites (Mean Location) - Moderate-Depth Benthic Habitats of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands (2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic habitat maps of the moderate-depth marine environment of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands were created using a combination of semi-automated classification and...

  17. St. John, USVI benthic habitat assessment and monitoring data (2001 - 2011) using fine-scale survey methodology (NODC Accession 0125236)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This fish and benthic composition database is the result of a multifaceted effort described below. The intent of this work is five fold: 1) To spatially...

  18. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  19. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  20. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Tutuila, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...