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Sample records for benin

  1. Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    Focus in this discussion of Benin is on the following: the people; geography; history; government and political conditions; economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Benin. The population totaled 3.8 million in 1983 with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The infant mortality rate is 45/1000 and life expectancy 46.9 years. The population comprises about 20 sociocultural groups. 4 groups -- the Fon, Aja, Bariba, and Yoruba -- account for more than half of the population. The name was changed from Dahomey to the People's Republic of Benin in 1975. 2 years after the military coup d'etat in 1972, Marxism-Leninism was declared the guiding philosophy of the new government. Marxism-Leninism remains the official doctrine, but the government has moved to take account of popular resistance to a radical social transformation, as well as problems encountered in attempting to establish a centrally directed economy. Benin is ranked as 1 of the world's 35 poorest countries. The commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors are all experiencing severe problems. The government's newest 5 year plan for 1983-88 places a stronger emphasis on developing agriculture. In so doing, the government hopes to assure its own domestic needs and to become a supplier of basic foodstuffs to the region. Benin's Armed Forces number about 3000 personnel. Benin is a member of the Non-Aligned Movement and the Organization of African Unity. Relations with France are important because of historical, cultural, economic, and aid links. After 1972, relations between the US and Benin became strained as Benin moved to strengthen its ties with the Soviet Union and other socialist countries and mounted harsh propaganda attacks on the US.

  2. Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    In 1988, Benin had a population of 4 million and an annual growth rate of 3.6%. Life expectancy was 49 years, and infant mortality stood at 116/1000 live births. Primary school enrollment is about 65%, with 6 years of compulsory education, and the adult literacy rate is only 11%. Of the labor force of 1.9 million, 72% are engaged in agriculture. Benin's gross domestic product was US$1497 million in 1987, with an annual growth rate of 7.1% and a per capita income of $374. Despite the Marxist-Leninist ideology of the Kerekou Government, many government-controlled sectors of the economy are being privatized and private foreign firms have been authorized to operate in Benin's transport sector. These changes have been necessitated by heavy losses suffered by nationalized industries and the worsening economic situation. Benin's economy, heavily dependent on regional trade and the export of cotton and crude oil, has been severely affected by ineffective government policies, regional recession, the collapse of world commodity prices, heavy external debt, balance of payment deficits, and very low foreign exchange reserves and liguidity. The 5-Year Plan (1983-88) emphasized the development of agriculture and the goal of becoming a supplier of basic foodstuffs to the region.

  3. Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J F

    1989-02-01

    In response to the acceleration of population growth in the People's Republic the Benin, the government there is now planning a comprehensive national population policy as well as practical plans to implement it. Benin is a country, slightly smaller than Pennsylvania, situated on the west coast of Africa. It has an estimated population of 4.5 million. Against the backdrop of the present bleak economic picture, Benin's demographic structure and trends are comparable to the situation of many sub-saharan countries. Since World War II, figures show a fairly rapid decline in mortality although mortality rates remain high. The lack of any fertility decline has resulted in a youthful age structure and, in conjunction with mortality decline, a rise in the rate of natural increase, from 2.7 in 1978 to 3.2 in 1987. The current rate of contraceptive prevalence is estimated at 6% of women at risk. The rapid population growth has led to increased demand for social services. However, given the poor economy the government is presently unable to satisfy these demands. If the population policy planned is successful, it could serve as a catalyst to redesign Benin's future development strategies.

  4. Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The launch of the project Strengthening the Capacity to Adapt to Climate Change in Rural Benin coincided with the floods of 2007 that ravaged crops and destroyed close to 50 villages. Through their extension experience with rural producers, IDID-ONG recognized just how vulnerable these people were to climate ...

  5. in benin city, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CURRENT PRACTICES IN INFANT NUTRITION. IN BENIN CITY, NIGERIA. U.H. Oparaocha, O.M.Ibadin, C.D. Muogbo. The Roding Medical Centre, Victoria Island, Lagos and Departments of Child Health,. University of Benin/Teaching Hospital, Benin City,. ABSTRACT. A community based prospective study was carried out ...

  6. Building capacity in Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    sigp1. Building capacity in. Benin. Training of technical staff of municipalities in the Okpara Basin of Benin in the use of GIS tools for water management, hydrological .... Practical exercises allowed participants to define the catchment area of the ...

  7. Benin: country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, A

    1987-10-01

    Since 1972, Benin has had an official Marxist-Leninist ideology; however, centralized state control contributed to economic stagnation and a search for capital investment. A special section of the World Bank is advising the Government of Benin on public sector reform and privatization, and an agreement with the International Monetary Fund seems likely. At present, 65% of Benin's labor force is engaged in subsistence agriculture, most of which is collectivized, and the gross national product per capita is US$260. The main cash crops are seed cotton and palm oil kernels used in soap and margarine. While women occupy key trade positions in the south of Benin, they are very oppressed in the north. Benin has a population of 4 million. The infant mortality rate is 115/1000 lives births and life expectancy is 43 years. Only 21% of the population has access to clean water. 40% of men, compared to just 17% of women, are literate.

  8. IDRC in Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    supported agricultural research has helped improve small farm opera- tions in Benin. For example, the Songhai. Centre trains farmers to arrest environ- mental degradation and adopt effective agricultural techniques that will help them earn a profit.

  9. INTERNATIONALISATION OF BENIN ART WORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Chika Joseph Ananwa

    2014-01-01

    The artworks of Benin are all about events and achievements, actual or mythical that occurred in the past. These art works was grounded on traditional values and religious beliefs, which also displayed iconographic affinities. Until 15th century A.D, Benin art items were not known outside the ancient Benin kingdom and commanded very little monetary and aesthetic values.The internationalisation of Benin artworks first occurred by accident, because the Europeans that made it possible, were not ...

  10. INTERNATIONALISATION OF BENIN ART WORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Joseph Ananwa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The artworks of Benin are all about events and achievements, actual or mythical that occurred in the past. These art works was grounded on traditional values and religious beliefs, which also displayed iconographic affinities. Until 15th century A.D, Benin art items were not known outside the ancient Benin kingdom and commanded very little monetary and aesthetic values.The internationalisation of Benin artworks first occurred by accident, because the Europeans that made it possible, were not aware of the art items before coming to the continent. The coming of the Portuguese in 1472 was the first of such event then the Benin artworks were used as exchange for Portuguese goods. The second was the looting of Benin art items, by the British soldiers, in 1897, in what was tagged Benin Punitive Expedition.Other aspects of internationalisation include the display of Benin art items at various museums across the world Benin artworks uploaded in the internet and artefacts on display at various private museums.The aim of this research is to find out why, when and how the Benin artworks became internationalised. This paper also looks at the extent, impact and significances of internationalisation of Benin artworks.

  11. Benin City, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    24-48 hours after DAMA, 20.7% of cases were re-adrnitted. Parental fear of accumulation of hospital bills was the commonest reason for DAMA. Mean duration of ..... more health decision—making role in Ilesha than in. Benin City. The reason for this difference is not clear. However, our finding is in consonance with what.

  12. Benin - Access to Financial Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The performance evaluation undertaken included administrative financial data from MFIs and MSMEs which received grants under the Benin Compact as well as survey data...

  13. Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS The Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine (BJPM) is the Official Journal of the Association of Resident Doctors (ARD), University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City. The Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine (BJPM) will consider in principle, manuscripts ...

  14. FY15 Benin Country Opinion Survey Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    The Country Opinion Survey in Benin assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Benin perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Benin on 1) their views regarding the general environment in Benin;...

  15. Benin - Access to Land - Urban

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This is not a performance evaluation by an independent evaluator, but rather a review by the MCC former Benin Access to Land Project Lead of project implementation,...

  16. Characteristics of Commercial Motorcyclists in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the characteristics of commercial motorcyclists in Ugbowo, Benin-city. A cross-sectional and descriptive study was carried out among commercial motorcyclists in Ugbowo, Benin-city, Edo State. A total of 252 commercial motorcyclists were involved in the study. A cluster sampling method ...

  17. Vegetation patterns and environmental gradients in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adomou, A.

    2005-01-01

    Key words: West Africa, Benin, vegetation patterns, floristic areas, phytogeography, chorology, floristic gradients, climatic factors, water availability, Dahomey Gap, threatened plants, biodiversity, conservation.Understanding plant species distribution patterns and the underlying factors is a

  18. Exposition and Synthesis of Benin Bronze Casting: Emphasis on the Olotan Casters of Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeta, Chris Funke

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of Western education to Nigeria has brought in its wake great strides toward development. Changes in Benin dates far back to the dawn of the 20th century. This paper investigates the critical role of education in development. The paper integrates interview data collected from bronze casters in Benin. The first section of the paper…

  19. Provision of Adequate Water Supply in Benin Province: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work examines the performance of the local governments in the provision of adequate sources of potable water in their different areas of jurisdiction in the Benin Province. The work covers the four Native Administration areas of Benin, Esan, Afemai and Asaba Divisions, which made up the Benin Province during ...

  20. Clinical Profile Of Atopic Dermatitis In Benin City, Nigeria | Onunu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the clinical presentation and management problems of atopic dermatitis in Benin City, Nigeria. Design: A 15-year retrospective study from May 1985 to April 2000. Setting: Dermatology clinics of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. Subjects: All new cases of atopic dermatitis ...

  1. Informing and involving farmers in Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    développement économique et social, and the Groupe de recherche et d'appui aux initiatives de base pour un ... The project is based on Benin's network of rural municipalities or “communes”. Meteorological pre-alert ... the effects these climate extremes have on them,” explains agro-economist and project leader Saïd ...

  2. Analysis of pineapple production systems in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V.N.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.; Agbossou, E.K.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    In Benin, pineapple is an important fruit crop, mainly grown in the Atlantic department. The overall quality of the two cultivars grown, ‘Sugarloaf’ and ‘Smooth Cayenne’, does not meet the requirements for some outlets and the heterogeneity in fruit quality within and between lots is high. This

  3. Informing and involving farmers in Benin

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC

    can do his or her part in addressing climate change.” The project is based on Benin's network of rural municipalities or “communes”. Meteorological pre-alert committees in. 35 municipalities will bring stakeholders together in collecting and sharing information on the risks of drought and tropical storms, among other hazards.

  4. Main neurosurgical pathologies in Benin Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Jean Thierry Gandaho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benin republic is a very low-income French-speaking country in West Africa The development of Neurosurgery in the Republic of Benin took off with the arrival of the first Beninese neurosurgeons in the year 2003. Aims: This study aims to evaluate patients' attendance in a public neurosurgical center, and appreciate populations' affordability to a new specialty. Settings and Design: In the year 2004, the Benin Armed Forces established the first Department of Neurosurgery in the Nation's Military Teaching Hospital. From the public authorities, that was a proof of motivation to develop this specialty in the Benin Republic. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional survey (September 2003 to December 2009 of the total neurosurgical patient population managed in a public pioneer hospital in a developing country. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were captured and analyzed with the SPSS software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA and presented in descriptive statistics such as frequencies and proportions. Results: 2908 new patients, civilians, and militaries were registered. The surgical treatment was offered adult (86% as well as pediatric (14% patients. Spinal degenerative diseases (52.1% were the most common pathology; neurotraumatology emergency cases (8.4% appeared low in representation. Three-quarters of patients experienced financial difficulties to procure the required radiologic investigations and although 609 (20.94% benefited from surgery, most patients could not pay for the surgical operations as well as the perioperative care. Conclusions: In spite of the great constraints of this country's privately-funded health-care delivery system on the affordability of neurosurgical treatment for the average Beninese, this study demonstrates a globally increasing attendance of the department.

  5. Presentation of colorectal cancers in Benin-City, Nigeria | Eze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death worldwide, and the prevalence in Nigeria appears to be increasing due to a shift to western diets. We undertook a retrospective analysis of colorectal cancers seen at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City from January 1983 to December 2002.

  6. The Epidemiological features of lymphoid malignancies in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... 15 (May 1st 1996-April 30th 2010) years study of all patients who had lymph node biopsy at the Department of Haematology and Pathology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. ... Conclusion: Future research into environmental agents and genetic makeup/HLA typing of patients can be carried out.

  7. The political economy of warfare in nineteeth century Benin kingdom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines how the interactions of politics and economy influenced the changing perspective on warfare in nineteenth century Benin Kingdom. The study investigates how the combined political and economic behaviour of Benin affected the rebuilding of military power as instrument of political policy in furtherance ...

  8. Childhood urinary tract infection in Benin City: pathogens and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-microbial sensitivity pattern of bacterial isolates implicated in urinary tract infection (UTI) amongst children was studied using the disc diffusion method. The prospective study was carried out in 65 children managed for urinary tract infection in the paediatric facilities of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin ...

  9. Assessment of Facilities and Best Practices in Orphanages in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    security, the availability of potable water, playground/ playing materials and the adequacy of child-caregivers ratio was used to obtain ... Institute of Child Health, College of Medical Sciences, University of Benin, PMB 1154, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. Journal of ..... such as visit to amusement parks, etc. Access to quality ...

  10. Mortality In Childhood Tuberculosis In Benin City, Nigeria – Analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and nine consecutive cases of childhood tuberculosis seen at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City between January 1993 and December 1997 were retrospectively analysed with a view to documenting trend in tuberculosis related deaths, their epidemiology and predictors of mortality.

  11. All projects related to Benin | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The goal of this action research project is to reduce teen pregnancy in Benin by developing and promoting an innovative, evidence-based intervention combining sexual and reproductive health, self-esteem, and empowerment that targets adolescents. Topic: Gender. Region: Benin. Program: Maternal and Child Health.

  12. Paediatric endocrine disorders as seen at the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In most developing countries, data on the prevalence and distribution of paediatric endocrine disorders is lacking. Objective: To describe the pattern of endocrine disorders seen in the Department of Child Health, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Nigeria between 2004 to 2013.

  13. Analysis of internet usage by University of Benin Students | Fidelis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the use of the internet amongst students of the faculty of physical and life sciences, University of Benin, Benin-City, Nigeria. The survey technique was adopted for this study since a large number of people were involved. A total of 400 questionnaires were distributed. A total of 371 were returned, given ...

  14. Participatory development of weed management technologies in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissoh, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: permanent land use, weeds, indigenous knowledge, integrated crop and soil management, participatory learning, co-researchWeeds constitute a major constraint to agricultural production in the Republic of Benin. Agricultural intensification and the evolution towards permanent cropping

  15. Economic analyses of maize storage innovations in southern Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adegbola, P.

    2010-01-01

    Key words: Storage innovations, maize, information sources, farmers’ perceptions, adoption and modification, treatment effects, sample selection bias, correction function approach, technology abandonment, cross-sectional and panel data, Benin.
    Maize is a staple food and an important source of

  16. Insecticide resistance status in Anopheles gambiae in southern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbel Vincent

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae has become a serious concern to the future success of malaria control. In Benin, the National Malaria Control Programme has recently planned to scaling up long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS for malaria prevention. It is, therefore, crucial to monitor the level and type of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae, particularly in southern Benin where reduced efficacy of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs and IRS has previously been reported. Methods The protocol was based on mosquito collection during both dry and rainy seasons across forty districts selected in southern Benin. Bioassay were performed on adults collected from the field to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to insecticide-impregnated papers (permethrin 0.75%, delthamethrin 0.05%, DDT 4%, and bendiocarb 0.1% following WHOPES guidelines. The species within An. gambiae complex, molecular form and presence of kdr and ace-1 mutations were determined by PCR. Results Strong resistance to permethrin and DDT was found in An. gambiae populations from southern Benin, except in Aglangandan where mosquitoes were fully susceptible (mortality 100% to all insecticides tested. PCR showed the presence of two sub-species of An. gambiae, namely An. gambiae s.s, and Anopheles melas, with a predominance for An. gambiae s.s (98%. The molecular M form of An. gambiae was predominant in southern Benin (97%. The kdr mutation was detected in all districts at various frequency (1% to 95% whereas the Ace-1 mutation was found at a very low frequency (≤ 5%. Conclusion This study showed a widespread resistance to permethrin in An. gambiae populations from southern Benin, with a significant increase of kdr frequency compared to what was observed previously in Benin. The low frequency of Ace-1 recorded in all populations is encouraging for the use of bendiocarb as an alternative insecticide to

  17. A phytogeographic survey of Southern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Paradis

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available Southern Benin has a dry subequatoriai climate with a rainfall gradient from 850 mm in the west to 1 500 mm in the east, the geomorphology is varied and the vegetation has been subjected to strong human influence. There are numerous plant formations, namely: 1, forest islands which are probably relics of the primitive vegetation and include (a dense semi-deciduous forests of several types, (b swamp forests of two types, (c periodically flooded forest of two types, (d Lophira lanceolata  (Hutchinson & Dalziel, 1954-72 woodlands and (e mangrove swamps; 2, formations which are probably derived and include (a thickets of several types, (b tree savannas and shrub savannas, (c grassy savannas and prairies varying according to soil characteristics and (d halophytic grasslands; and 3, floating vegetation on fresh-water lakes.

  18. Neonatal intestinal obstruction in Benin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osifo Osarumwense

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal obstruction is a life threatening condition in the newborn, with attendant high mortality rate especially in underserved subregion. This study reports the aetiology, presentation, and outcome of intestinal obstruction management in neonates. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of neonatal intestinal obstruction at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin, Nigeria, between January 2006-June 2008. Data were collated on a structured proforma and analysed for age, sex, weight, presentation, type/date of gestation/delivery, aetiology, clinical presentation, associated anomaly, treatment, and outcome. Results: There were 71 neonates, 52 were males and 19 were females (2.7:1. Their age range was between 12 hours and 28 days (mean, 7.9 ± 2.7 days and they weighed between 1.8 and 5.2 kg (average, 3.2 kg. The causes of intestinal obstruction were: Anorectal anomaly, 28 (39.4%; Hirschsprung′s disease, 8 (11.3%′ prematurity, 3 (4.2%; meconeum plug, 2 (2.8%; malrotation, 6 (8.5%; intestinal atresia, 8 (11.3%; necrotising enterocolitis (NEC, 4 (5.6%; obstructed hernia, 4 (5.6%; and spontaneous gut perforation, 3 (4.2%. Also, 27 (38% children had colostomy, 24 (33.8% had laparotomy, 9 (12.8% had anoplasty, while 11 (15.4% were managed nonoperatively. A total of 41 (57.7% neonates required incubator, 26 (36.6% needed total parenteral nutrition, while 15 (21.1% require d paediatric ventilator. Financial constraint, late presentation, presence of multiple anomalies, aspiration, sepsis, gut perforation, and bowel gangrene were the main contributors to death. Neonates with lower obstructions had a better outcome compared to those having upper intestinal obstruction ( P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Outcomes of intestinal obstruction are still poor in our setting; late presentation, financial constraints, poor parental motivation and lack of basic facilities were the major determinants of mortality.

  19. Alternative method for vegetables cultivation in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Recchia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developing countries populations, which are already vulnerable and food insecure, are likely to be the most seriously affected by the effects of climate change, e.g. yield decreases and price increases for the most important agricultural crops. The IPCC’s Fourth Assessment Report for Africa describes a trend of warming at a rate faster than the global average and increasing aridity: in many parts of Africa, it seems that warmer climates and changes in precipitation will destabilise agricultural production and aggravates food security. The present work concerns the vegetables cultivation in the Parakou region in Benin, where agriculture employs approximately 70% of the active population and contributes to 36% of the Gross Domestic Product and 88% of export earnings. However, the agricultural sector has been regarded as unproductive with low adaptation capacities because of structural factors (e.g. high level of poverty among rural populations, weak mechanization and intensification of production modes, but also because of natural constraints (e.g. poor management of water and soils, leading to soil degradation. Considering the aridity, the low carbon content and the reduced level of nutrients available in the soil, the use of an hydroponic module has been hypothesised. In this way sufficient yields of the crops may be assured and no agricultural machines will be needed for the tillage operations. In addition, the nutrients can be added to the growing solution using residual materials as poultry manure, ashes and green wastes. In order to verify if some construction or maintenance problems can occur and if a growing solution can be easily obtained using agricultural wastes, some tests have been carried out. Moreover laboratory analyses have been done for different solutions that may be adopted with different shares of water, poultry manure, ashes and green wastes. The tests have indicated that the hydroponic module could be used in Benin

  20. Application of Queuing Theory to Petrol Stations in Benin-City Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on a study conducted on five petrol stations in Benin City, namely: Oando petrol station Akpakpava, AP petrol station Ugbowo, Total petrol station Iselu, NNPC petrol station Benin-Auchi Road and NNPC Mega filling station Benin-Sapele Road. The average arrival rate of customers per hour for the five ...

  1. Oral ulcerative lesions: a review of 55 cases in Benin-City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aims to determine the incidence, age, gender, site and treatment outcome of oral ulcerative lesions in Benin City, Nigeria. Method: This is a 3-year retrospective review of all ulcerative oral lesions seen at the Dental Centre, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria. The medical records ...

  2. The root causes of ineffective and inefficient healthcare technology management in Benin public health sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houngbo, T.; Zweekhorst, M.B.M.; Bunders- Aelen, J.G.F.; Coleman, H.L.S.; Medenou, D.; Dakpanon, L.Y.; de Cock Buning, Tjard

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to identify the root causes and solutions of main problems facing Healthcare Technology Management in Benin׳s public health sector. Conducted in Benin from 2008 to 2010, two surveys were used with key actors in Healthcare Technology Management. The first survey was based on 377

  3. INEQUALITY PROFILE IN BENIN | Adebgidi | Annales des Sciences ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INEQUALITY PROFILE IN BENIN. ... Several analytical tools were used: density curves, non-parametric regressions, indice of Gini and Atkinson, and Lorenz's curves. ... Plusieurs outils analytiques y ont été appliqués : courbes de densité, régressions non-paramétriques, indices de Gini et Atkinson, et courbes de Lorenz.

  4. Strategies for Effective Governance in Nigeria: University of Benin in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents strategies for effective governance in Nigeria with emphasis on the University of Benin.The question of good and effective governance has captured the attention of University Managers. Governing Councils of Universities have also made this issue a critical prerequisite in their quest for excellence.

  5. climate variability and implications for maize production in benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    E.K. AGBOSSOU, C. TOUKON, P.B.I. AKPONIKPÈ1 and A. AFOUDA2. Faculté des ... ABSTRACT. To better assess the occurrence of climate variability and change and related effects on crop production for ... 1971-1990, and (iv) that maize crop during its development in Benin is more likely to be subject to dry dekads.

  6. Prevalence and antenatal determinants of orofacial clefts in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence and antenatal determinants of cleft lip and palate were determined. Result: Cleft lip and palate were often encountered in clinical practice in Benin City with a prevalence of 1.35%. The results showed that orofacial clefts were commoner in females and that the combined unilateral cleft lip and palate was the ...

  7. Enjeux politiques et ethniques dans le champ sportif au Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article is devoted to the analysis of the sports phenomenon and to its political and ethnic instrumentality in Benin. Since this French-speaking country in Africa south of the Sahara broke with Marxist and Leninist regime (which lasted seventeen years), through "the National Conference" in 1990; a democratic and liberal ...

  8. Availability and affordability of antiglaucoma drugs in Benin city ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness. Affordability and availability are key factors that determine access to effective treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate the availability and affordability of antiglaucoma medicines in Benin City. A cross sectional survey of the major drug distribution sectors was conducted.

  9. Tourism and Facilities Development in Three Art Traditions of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Abstract. The three traditions of Bronze casting, wood carving and the royal costumes have given an endearing identity globally to the ancient city and kingdom of. Benin. Yet, the bronze casting and wood carving traditions have not received as much encouragement from the government and corporate organizations as.

  10. Tourism and Facilities Development in Three Art Traditions of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The three traditions of Bronze casting, wood carving and the royal costumes have given an endearing identity globally to the ancient city and kingdom of Benin. Yet, the bronze casting and wood carving traditions have not received as much encouragement from the government and corporate organizations as they have ...

  11. Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine - Vol 11, No 1 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serodynamics Of Treponema Pallidum In Serum Of Pregnant Women In Benin City · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. KO Ibadin, OI Enabulele, NO Eghafona, AP Osemwenkha. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bjpm.v11i1.48842 ...

  12. Assessment of Anthropogenic Activities on Water Quality of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of water quality was conducted from June to December, 2011 in five stations along the stretch of the Benin River between Ajimele and Koko town in attempt to assess and determine the source of anthropogenic activities affecting the river. Twentyfour parameters have been monitored on 5 sampling stations on a ...

  13. Glycaemic Control amongst Persons with Diabetes Mellitus in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study set out to find the level of glycaemic control amongst persons with diabetes mellitus in Benin City. Methods: Forty two persons with diabetes had their glycaemic control assessed by measuring the level of their glycated haemoglobin. Other data collected included age, sex, duration of diabetes, type of ...

  14. Microbiota of Tayohounta, a fermented baobab flavour food of Benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... natto or thai thua-nao (Leejeerajumnean et al., 2001). As such, many volatile compounds were found in Beninese afitin, iru and sonru (Azokpota et al., 2008). Such researches have, however, never been performed on any baobab products. In Benin, thirty five baobab food products have been recorded ...

  15. Histopathological pattern of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Benin City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective analysis of nasopharyngeal tissue biopsies sent to the department of histopathology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital over a ten year period (January 2000 to December 2009) was carried out to define the histopathological pattern of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Nigerian patients in Edo state.

  16. Colonial Rule and Industrialization in Esan, Benin Province, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colonial Rule and Industrialization in Esan, Benin Province, Nigeria: A Case Study of Institutional Adaptation. ... in cottage industries which included cloth weaving (textile), basket and rope weaving, wood carving (art and craft), blacksmithing, pottery, soap and palm oil processing, palm wine tapping and food processing.

  17. autism among primary school pupils in benin metropolis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emeka Egbochuku

    Abstract. The study investigated the existence of autism among primary school pupils in. Benin City. The rationale for this study was as a result of the growing concern about autism worldwide. Knowledge about this disorder is still limited. Most parents and teachers still do not understand its diagnosis, symptoms and effects.

  18. Vertical price leadership on local maize markets in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, W.E.; Lutz, C.; Tilburg, van A.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract This paper considers vertical price relationships between wholesalers and retailers on five local maize markets in Benin. We show that the common stochastic trend and the long-run disequilibrium error must explicitly be considered to correctly interpret the restrictions on the

  19. Psychological impact of infertility among women in Benin City, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infertility has profound negative consequences especially for women in developing countries. The study evaluated the psychological impact of infertility among women in Benin City, Nigeria. The study was conducted between October 2004 and April 2006. A total of the 312 women (mean age = 31.27 years, SEM ± 0.32) ...

  20. A phytosociological study of riparian forests in Benin (West Africa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natta, A.K.; Sinsin, B.; Maesen, van der L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Floristic ordination and classification of riparian forests in Benin were derived from a comprehensive floristic inventory. TWINSPAN classification and DCA analysis of a data set of 818 plant species and 180 releve's yielded 12 plant communities. Importance of waterways, relief, topography, latitude

  1. Physico- Chemical characteristics of compost (Cotonou, Benin, West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work was led the town of Cotonou in Benin and particularly on the vegetable garden site of Houéyiho. It involved the valorization of the waste of this site by proceeding the aerobic composting of the biodegradable fraction of municipal solid waste collected in the markets. This consists among other rotten fruits of various ...

  2. Airborne microflora in an hospital environment of University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken to determine typical concentrations of airborne bacteria and fungi (microflora) in Teaching Hospital environment in Benin City in the tropical rainforest environment of Nigeria. Aerial sampling was conducted at various hospital wards each day. The air samples were collected thrice daily, that is, in the ...

  3. Informing and involving farmers in Benin | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Dec 10, 2010 ... These are some of the questions at the heart of an action research project engaging the broad spectrum of relevant stakeholders to strengthen rural Benin's capacity to adapt to climate change. The project brings together researchers, farmers, and local decision-makers to find ways of sharing knowledge on ...

  4. Subsidence patterns in the Nigerian sector of Benin (Dahomey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The application of one-dimensional (1-D) backstripping analysis was used to determine subsidence patterns in three offshore wells (Ayetoro – 1, Baba – 1 and Epiya – 1) located in the Nigeria sector of Benin (Dahomey) Basin. Biostratigraphic data obtained in the three wells indicated that the oldest sediment penetrated ...

  5. Parasitic contamination of fruits and vegetables in Benin city, Edo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables helps in protecting the human body from diseases and also has a positive impact on body-weight regulation and related conditions, including diabetes and hypertension. This study was conducted to determine the parasitic contamination of fruits and vegetables in Benin ...

  6. Assessment of groundwater quality of Benin City, Edo state, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of groundwater of Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria was investigated between February and July 2008. Water samples were collected from functional bore holes from five locations (stations 1 – 5) and analyzed for physico-chemical parameters including heavy metals. Data obtained were compared with World ...

  7. Stem Cell Research-Concept And Controversies | Kalu | Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  8. Stem Cell Research-Concept And Controversies | Kalu | Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Stem Cell Research-Concept And Controversies.

  9. Synopsis Of Diabetes Mellitus | Ogedengbe | Benin Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Synopsis Of Diabetes Mellitus. OS Ogedengbe ...

  10. Prevalence of Malocclusion among School children in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malocclusion in Benin City. A total of 441 school children, 229 males and 212 females of mean age 13.52 years ± 1.83 who had no previous history of orthodontic treatment were assessed for occlusal, space and dental anomalies. Angle's classification was used to ...

  11. Identification of Standards for Pharmaceutical Care in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of this study is to identify practice standards that can be effectively applied in the implementation of pharmaceutical care in Nigeria. Method: The survey instrument (a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire) was distributed to pharmacists in Benin City. Each questionnaire contained the 52 suggested practice ...

  12. Wages in Benin. WageIndicator survey 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.; Ngeh Tingum, E.; Sena Alinsato, A.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey in Benin, conducted between the 15th and 19th of October 2012. The survey aimed to measure in detail the wages earned by Beninese workers, including the self-employed. In total 2,002 persons were interviewed

  13. Microbiota of Tayohounta, a fermented baobab flavour food of Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chadare, F.J.; Jonkman, J.; Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hounhouigan, J.D.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present work provides data on the microbial composition of Tayohounta, a product of natural fermentation of baobab seed kernels. Samples were collected from 3 different small scale producers from Benin at the end of the fermentation process. Microorganisms were enumerated and identified using

  14. Awareness and knowledge of prostate cancer among men in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cancer of the prostate is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly male population. The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of prostate cancer among men in Benin City, Nigeria. This cross sectional study included 402 men above 40 years. A structured questionnaire was administered to each ...

  15. Insect Pest occurrence on Cultivated Amaranthus Spp in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amaranthus is one of those rare plants whose leaves are eaten as vegetables and seeds as cereal. Unfortunately, one of the major factors limiting the productivity of Amaranthus is the incidence of insect pests attack. The aim of this study was to determine the insect pest occurrence on cultivated Amaranths in Benin City, ...

  16. Medicinal plants used to treat malaria in Southern Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maesen, van der L.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    People in Benin who cannot resort to allopathic medicines provided by the pharmaceutical industry use many species of plants to alleviate malaria symptoms. Complicated mixtures of different parts of several plant species are employed orally or as a bathing substance. The inventory of 85 species and

  17. Accidental childhood poisoning in Benin City: Still a problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian children. Reports on AP are infrequent in Nigeria. This retrospective descriptive study examined the prevailing pattern of accidental childhood poisoning in Benin City. Accidental poisonings were identified in 226 (3.3%) of the cases during the 10 – year period. The children were aged 9 months to 5 years with peak ...

  18. Features and perceptions of menopausal women in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study of 533 randomly selected Nigerian women in Benin City, Edo State who had experienced at least 24 continuous months of amenorrhea using a structured questionnaire. Results: The ages of the women studied ranged between 47 and 78 years; mean 57.4 ± 6.3 years. The mean ...

  19. Central Political Institutions in Benin and Balance of Power Under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the nature and character of central political institutions in Benin and how these institutions checkmated one another. Such institutions included the Oba, the Uzama, the Eghaevbo orders, the Edaiken, the lyoba and the state council. It dwells in particular on the place of the Iyase (Prime Minister) in ...

  20. Typhoid ileal perforation in children in Benin city | Osifo | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Typhoid ileal perforation is a common complication of typhoid fever, a multi-systemic infection, which is endemic in many developing countries. Objective: This study reviews and compares the incidence, morbidity and mortality at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital with other referral centres located in ...

  1. Hepatitis-B Vaccination Status Among Dental Surgeons in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The development of success-oriented hepatitis-B vaccine uptake approach among dental surgeons is dependent on the availability of comprehensive baseline data. Objective: To determine the hepatitis-B vaccination status among dental surgeons in Benin City. Materials and Methods: This ...

  2. Putting tested options into practice in Benin | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-04-21

    Apr 21, 2011 ... Saïd K. Hounkponou, Project Leader, Initiatives pour un développement intégré durable (IDID The launch of the project Strengthening the Capacity to Adapt to Climate Change in Rural Benin coincided with the floods of 2007 that ravaged crops and destroyed close to 50 villages. Through their extension ...

  3. Impacts des usines textiles sur l'environnement au Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Textile factories in Benin have consequences on the environment, in spite of the advantages which they offer. resent research aims to analyze the sources of pollution and the nature of the pollutants in worn water and the sediments and identifies the impacts of these pollutants on the resources of the region. In order to ...

  4. Sedimentological characteristics of Ajali sandstone in the Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcrop mapping as well as textural, mineralogical and structural studies of sandstone in the Auchi locality were carried out in order to interpret depositional environment of Ajali Sandstone in the Benin flank of Anambra Basin. Two major lithologic units were identified: the lower bioturbated shale and overlying sandstone ...

  5. Geology and Petroleum Systems of the Offshore Benin Basin (Benin Géologie et système pétrolier du bassin offshore du Benin (Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaki C.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the tectonosedimentary development and petroleum system of the Offshore Benin Basin (OBB. In accordance with structural development, the stratigraphic succession of this basin was divided into 4 sequences: pre-rift (up to Late Jurassic; rift (Neocomian to Lower Cretaceous; transitional (Cenomanian to Santonian and post-rift (Maastrichtian-Holocene sequences. Only one Upper Cretaceous petroleum system is well known within this basin. Source rocks of this system contain Type II-III kerogens with a TOC (Total Organic Carbon average of 2.9%. Oil is produced from sandstone facies within Abeokuta formation. Currently exploration data and geochemical characteristics of bituminous sands which outcrop in some onshore areas of the Dahomey Embayment point to the existence of another petroleum system of Lower Cretaceous age (Neocomian to Albian in this basin. Cet article résume l’évolution tectono-sédimentaire et le système pétrolier du Bassin Offshore du Bénin (BOB. Conformément à l’évolution structurale, la succession stratigraphique de ce bassin a été divisée en quatre séquences : anté-rift (allant jusqu’à la fin du Jurassique; rift (Néocomien-Crétacé inférieur; transitionnelle (Cénomanien-Santonien et post-rift (Maastrichtien-Holocène. Un seul système pétrolier d’âge Crétacé supérieur a été identifié avec certitude dans ce bassin. Les roches mères de ce système contiennent du kérogène de Type II-III, avec un COT (Carbone Organique Total moyen de 2,9 %. L’huile est produite à partir des faciès gréseux de la formation d’Abeokuta. Les données actuelles d’exploration et les caractéristiques géochimiques des sables bitumineux qui affleurent par endroits dans la partie continentale de la baie du Dahomey mettent en évidence l’existence d’un autre système pétrolier d’âge Crétacé inférieur (Néocomien à Albien dans ce bassin.

  6. Sources of Stress among Undergraduate Students in the University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria: Implications for Counselling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alika, Ijeoma Henrietta

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the role of inadequate facilities/accommodation, poor health, emotional problems, socio-economic status and poor time management as sources of stress among University of Benin undergraduates. The research instrument used was a questionnaire. The survey method was adopted for the study. Seven hundred and fifty respondents were…

  7. Amenagement et politique linguistques: La politique des langues au Benin (Language Management and Language Policy: The Politics of Language in Benin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaoui, Nazam

    2001-01-01

    Distinguishing between language management and language policy, examines the politics of language in Benin from independence to the present. Describes the politics of language in Dahomey, the early policies of Benin, and the Republican politics of language, arising from the national constitutional convention and striving to address the needs of…

  8. Categorizing the Occult: Vodun, Sorcery and Religious Beliefs In Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    confronted with this difficulty. Both because the vodun, as a recognized religion in the country - equal to Islam and Christianity - , plays an important role in society as well as in individual life, but also because all area of social life are on one level or another influenced by beliefs and practices...... characterized as witchcraft or occult. Reflecting upon earlier research and particularly on the choice of terminology of the occult in writing on religion and political change in Benin (PhD thesis 2008), this paper seeks to clarify some of the epistemological, academic and historical reasons that have formed...... the popular and academic understanding of three key terms (vodun, sorcery and occult). The paper will thus both focus on the role of religious encounters during early Christian missions in Benin and on the recent expansion of evangelical churches and strengthen of neo vodun cults as well as on the dynamics...

  9. [The ethical challenges of health policies in Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngnihin, R A

    2017-05-22

    Over the past two decades, new challenges in public health have sparked renewed interest in health policy ethics in the world. But in Africa in general and Benin in particular, public health ethics as an approach of intervention, remains embryonic. By aiming the well-being of the population, the health policy in Benin is implicitly ethics. But it is too focused on medical logic and operates at the expense of ethics-oriented approach, clearly expressed in terms of strategies assessed by an independent body before, during and after their implementation, based on the relevance, the efficiency, the equity, the transparency, the social justice... In a context of lack of access to information sources or credible knowledge, health policies recipients do not seem able to exercise their autonomy.

  10. [Differential mortality according to region of residence in Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laourou, H M

    1995-01-01

    "The first mortality tables of Benin elaborated by direct estimation for the whole country deal with relatively different regional realities. It is in this regard that the data, whether it is death from multiround surveys or information about survival of parents, allows one to distinguish between the North (with a higher mortality) and the South (which has a lower mortality). Moreover, this differential study reveals that the level of male adult mortality after 35 years in the South, is well above the national average, probably because of the increase in deaths through violence (road accident or victim of a fire) in this part of Benin....The originality of this study is to have highlighted the mortality differentials at almost all age groups of life...." (SUMMARY IN ENG AND ITA) excerpt

  11. Solar retinopathy in Benin City, Nigeria | Ukponmwan | West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Il s'agit d'un rapport des cas de trois patients qui étaient à l'université de la cité de benin, avec un diagnostic d'une maculopathie solaire. Il y avait une bonne guérison visuelle chez deux de ces patients. Ce rapport démontre l'effet d'un regard direct du soleil sur la rétine. Nous tenons conseiller le grand public nigerian ...

  12. Cartographie des directions dominantes des vents au Benin : Outil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cartographie des directions dominantes des vents au Benin : Outil de conception et de dimensionnement des ouvrages. ... nous avons, après la collecte des informations météorologiques, procédé : - à l'analyse des données (directions) des six stations météorologiques principales conformément aux méthodes statistiques.

  13. Oral hygiene in primary schoolchildren in Benin City, Nigeria.

    OpenAIRE

    Alakija, W

    1981-01-01

    Oral hygiene was assessed in children from two primary schools in Benin City, Nigeria. Good oral hygiene was not related to the socioeconomic class of the children but to the method of cleaning the teeth. Girls had better oral hygiene than boys. It is suggested that the local method of using chewing sticks should be encouraged, and emphasis placed on frequency and thoroughness of use.

  14. Clinicopathological Study of Carcinoma of the Breast in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude anatomoclinique du cancer du sein à Benin City. La morbidité et la mortalité occasionnées par le cancer du sein demeure toujours une source de souci pour les chirurgiens dans plusieurs pays. Depuis 10 ans, janvier 1987 jusqu'à décembre 1996, 117 malades ont présente le cancer du sein au Centre Hospitalier ...

  15. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection during pregnancy in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paschale, Massimo; Ceriani, Cristina; Romanò, Luisa; Cerulli, Teresa; Cagnin, Debora; Cavallari, Serena; Ndayake, Joseph; Zaongo, Dieudonné; Diombo, Kouma; Priuli, Gianbattista; Viganò, Paolo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the cause of enterically transmitted non-A, non-C hepatitis (an infection that is particularly severe during pregnancy) in tropical and subtropical countries. As there are no published data concerning the prevalence of HEV antibodies in Benin, their presence was investigated in pregnant women undergoing routine HIV screening in a rural area in northern Benin and in pregnant women with acute non-A, non-C hepatitis. A total of 278 serum samples were collected from asymptomatic pregnant women in 2011 were tested for HEV and hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies, and the HEV IgM-positive samples were further tested for HEV-RNA. A further seven samples of pregnant women with acute non-A, non-C hepatitis collected during episodes of acute hepatitis in 2005 were also analysed. Of the 278 samples collected in 2011, 16.19% were positive for HEV IgG and 1.44% for HEV IgM (none positive for HEV-RNA), and 99.64% were positive for total HAV antibodies (none positive for HAV IgM). Six of the seven samples collected in 2005 were positive for HEV IgG and IgM, and two were also positive for HEV-RNA. The circulation of HEV infection is significant among pregnant women in Benin, in whom the consequences may be fatal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Health and Environment Project In Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Edou

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In 1989, the Republic of Benin was facing great social and economic upheavals. In 1990, the Canadian and American Mennonite missionaries created the Bethesda Health Care Centre.  In 1993, assessment of the hospital activities showed that many people were coming back to the centre repeatedly with the same illnesses linked to sanitation aspects and living conditions. The Community Development and Environmental Protection Department (DCAM was thus established to face this great challenge. It quickly helped the community and the local authorities to establish a waste management system.  The Programme for Sanitation and Protection of the Environment (PrAPE was designed and funded by the French Embassy and Evangelische Entwicklungsdienst V.e (EED, a German Christian organization. Households then began to subscribe for the collection of their wastes. Bethesda began to assist other communities to put in place waste management systems. Today, it is working throughout the country with many municipalities. While the programme was being implemented, we discovered that the community needed to be supported in their revenue generating activities. We set up in 1996, a solidarity-based microfinance system. The savings of some people were used to grant credit to others. This community bank has developed into a large bank today. In 2006, a system of mutual insurance was put in place. A complete integrated system to address the basic needs of the community was thus set up.En 1989, la République du Bénin a été confrontée à d’importants bouleversements sociaux et économiques. En 1990, des missionnaires mennonites canadiens et américains ont créé le Centre de santé Bethesda. En 1993, l’évaluation des activités hospitalières a montré que de nombreuses personnes revenaient à plusieurs reprises au centre avec les mêmes maladies liées à des problèmes d’assainissement et aux conditions de vie. Le département Développement Communautaire et

  17. Governance, marketing and innovations in Beninese pineapple supply chains : a survey of smallholder farmers in South Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arinloye, D.D.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the study was to identify an innovative approach that could overcome market quality and price information asymmetry issues in pineapple supply chain in Benin. Two case studies were conducted in Benin and Ghana, with an in-depth survey of 219 farmers in Benin. The study mapped the

  18. Benin things of the river: The art of Margaret Omoragbon and Rose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of Benin and its arts organizations, the predominantly patriarchal guilds of bronze and wood workers, has resulted in other art forms, especially those involving women, being marginalized in mainstream research. Female artists have also been ignored in Benin's art history, a problem of gender bias worthy of ...

  19. Trace metals in some benthic fishes of the Ikpoba river dam, Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trace metals in some benthic fishes of the Ikpoba river dam, Benin City, Nigeria. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... and Mormyrus macrophthalmus netted from two locations (Okhoro and Low lift pump sites) on the Ikpoba River Dam, Benin City, Nigeria were determined using atomic absorption spectrometric technique.

  20. Edo N'ekue Phenomenon: A Study in Pre-colonial Benin Imperialism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the case of pre-colonial Benin and some parts of Eastern Yoruba land, their relations always ran against the tide. But the issue for ... The piece also seeks an explanation to the avalanche of titles of Benin origin found today in not only Akure, Owo and Ado but also in Ita-Ogbolu, Igbara-Oke, etc. The paper concludes ...

  1. Timing of hospital arrival in stroke patients in Benin City Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to observe the time of arrival to hospital of stroke patients in Benin City, Edo state and to present the predictors of delayed presentation after acute stroke. Method: This is an observational cross sectional study which was carried out in the medical wards of Central Hospital, Benin City ...

  2. Ecoles coraniques d'hier et ecoles arabes d'aujourd'hui au Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mots clés : Ecoles coraniques, écoles arabes. Koranic schools of yesterday and Arabics Schools of today in Benin: To educate for what ends? The democratic renewal that Benin knows since the quick strengths conference of the nation of February 1990 opened the way to the democratization of the education with in the ...

  3. Regional trade and border markets between Niger, Benin and Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Olivier; Tenikué, Michel; Kuepié, Mathias

    The objective of this methodological paper is to identify a number of products or sectors whose trade is relevant for border regions in West Africa. Focusing on Niger, Benin and Nigeria, we start with contextualising the importance of border markets by quantifying the changes in the relative values...... and volumes of imports and exports passing through border posts. In a second step, we determine which are the products most commonly found among the imports and exports of the border posts. The study shows that seven products are recognised as being heavily imported, subject to significant trade from large...

  4. Disease, religion and medicine: smallpox in nineteenth-century Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumonni, Elisée

    2012-12-01

    The essay examines, with special reference to smallpox, the perception and interpretation of disease in pre-colonial Dahomey, present-day Republic of Benin. Because disease is seen primarily as a punishment from the gods and not just as a medical problem or a bodily disorder, traditional cult priests play a leading role in making diagnoses and prescribing remedies, mostly based on medicinal plants. The prominence of Sakpata, god of smallpox, coupled with the influence of its priests is evaluated within the context of Dahomey's political history and the spread of the disease. This pivotal position was to constitute a challenge to the French colonial campaign to vaccinate against smallpox.

  5. Dynamics of cholera epidemics from Benin to Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sandra; Dongdem, Anthony Zunuo; Opare, David; Cottavoz, Paul; Fookes, Maria; Sadji, Adodo Yao; Dzotsi, Emmanuel; Dogbe, Michael; Jeddi, Fakhri; Bidjada, Bawimodom; Piarroux, Martine; Valentin, Ouyi Tante; Glèlè, Clément Kakaï; Rebaudet, Stanislas; Sow, Amy Gassama; Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Koivogui, Lamine; Dunoyer, Jessica; Bellet, Francois; Garnotel, Eric; Thomson, Nicholas; Piarroux, Renaud

    2018-04-09

    The countries of West Africa are largely portrayed as cholera endemic, although the dynamics of outbreaks in this region of Africa remain largely unclear. To understand the dynamics of cholera in a major portion of West Africa, we analyzed cholera epidemics from 2009 to 2015 from Benin to Mauritania. We conducted a series of field visits as well as multilocus variable tandem repeat analysis and whole-genome sequencing analysis of V. cholerae isolates throughout the study region. During this period, Ghana accounted for 52% of the reported cases in the entire study region (coastal countries from Benin to Mauritania). From 2009 to 2015, we found that one major wave of cholera outbreaks spread from Accra in 2011 northwestward to Sierra Leone and Guinea in 2012. Molecular epidemiology analysis confirmed that the 2011 Ghanaian isolates were related to those that seeded the 2012 epidemics in Guinea and Sierra Leone. Interestingly, we found that many countries deemed "cholera endemic" actually suffered very few outbreaks, with multi-year lulls. This study provides the first cohesive vision of the dynamics of cholera epidemics in a major portion of West Africa. This epidemiological overview shows that from 2009 to 2015, at least 54% of reported cases concerned populations living in the three urban areas of Accra, Freetown, and Conakry. These findings may serve as a guide to better target cholera prevention and control efforts in the identified cholera hotspots in West Africa.

  6. A Conceptual Approach to the Study of Song and Music in Benin Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ighile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to provide a theoretical framework for the appreciation of music among the Benin, a strategic ethnic group in Nigeria. It investigates how concepts such as folk and popular song, music, noise, speech and sound find their relevant expression and place in the socio-cultural, economic, moral and even psychological setting of the Benin world. Finally, it is discovered that a conceptual approach is crucial, not only to the situation of the Benin oral literary values within a Western ideological context, but also in the facilitation of an objective evaluation of critical aspects of the life of people.

  7. Kulturní kontakty a kolaps království Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Půtová

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with historic cultural contacts between Europeans and the Benin Empire, one of the most significant native African cultural centres between the 15th and the 17th century. The study focuses particularly on the development of the Benin Empire on the background of acculturation and diffusion of European cultural elements and complexes. The study describes the first contacts between Europeans and the Benin Empire and the subsequent business activities, including slave trade. Special attention is paid to European colonial expansion that culminated in the 1897 British invasion which led to the conquest of the Benin City. The aim of the study is to draw attention to the role of the exogenous cultural change and acculturation processes, which caused the fall of once a socially, economically, politically and culturally stable African empire.

  8. Yam (Dioscorea spp.) responses to the environmental variability in the Guinea Sudan zone of Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, Afio; Struik, P.C.; Richards, P.; Zoundjihékpon, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the morphological characteristics and agronomic potentials of yam varieties (Dioscorea spp.) collected across the Guinea Sudan transition zone of Benin. Dioscorea cayenensis - D. rotundata varieties were characterized as wingless; some varieties were spineless, others had few or

  9. Bacteriospermia and Sperm Quality in Infertile Male Patient at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibadin, O. K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Male Urogenital tract infection plays an important role in men infertility. Asymptomtic bacteriospermia has been regarded as of the contributing factor to male infertility. In this study, 87 semen samples of infertile men attending the Human Reproduction Research Programme and Invitrofertilization unit (HRRP/IVF of University Benin Teaching Hospital were evaluated Bacteriologically using standard Bacterial culture method. Standard semen analysis was performed according to WHO guidelines. Among the total cases, 36 (41.4% showed at least one pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus (16.1%, Staphylococcus Saprophyticus (9.1%, Escherichia Coli (6.9% Proteus mirabilis (3.4% Klebsiella spp (2.3% Pseudomonas aerouginosa (1.1% and Proteus vulgaris (2.3%. There was a significant relation between bacteriospermia and the rate of number of total motility and morphologically abnormal sperms (p 0.05. It seems that leukocytopermia is not a good maker to predict bacteriospermia.

  10. Education traditionnelle au Benin, la place du sacre dans les rites initiatiques. (Traditional Education in Benin: the Sacred Place in Initiation Rites.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenum, Jean-Claude

    1999-01-01

    Shows how education among traditional communities in Benin is an initiatory process where acquisition of practical knowledge is interwoven with religion and custom. States that rites of passage, tests, and acquisition of appropriate forms of knowledge may mark an individual's developmental stages. Describes several specific forms of education.…

  11. Molecular characterization of DDT resistance in Anopheles gambiae from Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djègbè, Innocent; Agossa, Fiacre R; Jones, Christopher M; Poupardin, Rodolphe; Cornelie, Sylvie; Akogbéto, Martin; Ranson, Hilary; Corbel, Vincent

    2014-08-29

    Insecticide resistance in the mosquito vector is the one of the main obstacles against effective malaria control. In order to implement insecticide resistance management strategies, it is important to understand the genetic factors involved. In this context, we investigated the molecular basis of DDT resistance in the main malaria vector from Benin. Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes were collected from four sites across Benin and identified to species/molecular form. Mosquitoes from Cotonou (M-form), Tori-Bossito (S-form) and Bohicon (S-form) were exposed to DDT 4% at a range of exposure times (30 min to 300 min). Another batch of mosquitoes from Cotonou and Malanville were exposed to DDT for 1 hour and the survivors 48 hours post exposure were used to quantify metabolic gene expression. Quantitative PCR assays were used to quantify mRNA levels of metabolic enzymes: GSTE2, GSTD3, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2. Expression (fold-change) was calculated using the ∆∆Ct method and compared to susceptible strains. Detection of target-site mutations (L1014F, L1014S and N1575Y) was performed using allelic discrimination TaqMan assays. DDT resistance was extremely high in all populations, regardless of molecular form, with no observed mortality after 300 min exposure. In both DDT-survivors and non-exposed mosquitoes, GSTE2 and GSTD3 were over-expressed in the M form at 4.4-fold and 3.5-fold in Cotonou and 1.5-fold and 2.5-fold in Malanville respectively, when compared to the susceptible strain. The CYP6M2 and CYP6P3 were over-expressed at 4.6-fold and 3.8-fold in Cotonou and 1.2-fold and 2.5-fold in Malanville respectively. In contrast, no differences in GSTE2 and CYP6M2 were observed between S form mosquitoes from Tori-Bossito and Bohicon compared to susceptible strain. The 1014 F allele was fixed in the S-form and at high frequency in the M-form (0.7-0.914). The frequency of 1575Y allele was 0.29-0.36 in the S-form and nil in the M-form. The 1014S allele was detected in the S

  12. Issues of Sustainability of Coastal Groundwater Resources: Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Mullen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The largest city in Benin, West Africa (Cotonou, is reliant upon groundwater for its public water supply. This groundwater is derived from the Godomey well field which is located approximately 5 Km north of the coast of the Atlantic Ocean and in close proximity to Lake Nokoue—a shallow lake containing water with elevated concentration of chloride and other elements. Historical data indicate increased chloride concentration in a number of wells nearest to the lake, with unknown contribution from groundwater encroachment from the coastal area. Hence, there is substantial interest in better characterizing this groundwater system for the purpose of determining appropriate management practices and degree of sustainability. Among the efforts attempted to date are a series of numerical models ranging from assessment of flow to a recent effort to include density-dependent transport from the lake. In addition, substantial field characterization has been pursued including assessment of shallow water chemistry along the region of the coastal lagoon and border of the lake, characterization of hydraulic response to pumpage in the aquifer system, estimation of the distribution of electrical resistivity with depth along the coastal lagoons, and installation of multi-level piezometers at seven locations in the lake. When integrated across methods, these numerical and field results indicate that the lake remains a primary concern in terms of a source of salinity in the aquifer. Further, the coastal region appears to be more complex than previously suggested and may represent a future source of salt-water encroachment as suggested by current presence of saline waters at relatively shallow depths along the coast. Finally, hydraulic testing suggests that both natural and pumping-based fluctuations in water levels are present in this system. Substantial additional characterization and modeling efforts may provide a significantly greater understanding of the

  13. Village-Level Identification of Nitrate Sources: Collaboration of Experts and Local Population in Benin, Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, P.; Silliman, S. E.; Boukari, M.; Atoro, I.; Azonsi, F.

    2005-12-01

    Deteriorating groundwater quality, as represented by high nitrates, in the Colline province of Benin, West Africa was identified by the Benin national water agency, Direction Hydraulique. For unknown reasons the Colline province had consistently higher nitrate levels than any other region of the country. In an effort to address this water quality issue, a collaborative team was created that incorporated professionals from the Universite d'Abomey-Calavi (Benin), the University of Notre Dame (USA), Direction l'Hydraulique (a government water agency in Benin), Centre Afrika Obota (an educational NGO in Benin), and the local population of the village of Adourekoman. The goals of the project were to: (i) identify the source of nitrates, (ii) test field techniques for long term, local monitoring, and (iii) identify possible solutions to the high levels of groundwater nitrates. In order to accomplish these goals, the following methods were utilized: regional sampling of groundwater quality, field methods that allowed the local population to regularly monitor village groundwater quality, isotopic analysis, and sociological methods of surveys, focus groups, and observations. It is through the combination of these multi-disciplinary methods that all three goals were successfully addressed leading to preliminary identification of the sources of nitrates in the village of Adourekoman, confirmation of utility of field techniques, and initial assessment of possible solutions to the contamination problem.

  14. High rates of parasite recrudescence following intermittent preventive treatment with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine during pregnancy in Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moussiliou, Azizath; Sissinto-Savi De Tove, Yolande; Doritchamou, Justin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite widespread parasite resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) its use for intermittent preventative treatment during pregnancy remains the policy in Benin and throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: In a prospective study, 982 pregnant women were recruited in Benin...

  15. Common causes of morbidity and mortality amongst diabetic admissions at the university of Benin teaching hospital, Benin city, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eregie, A.; Unadike, B.C.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and Nigeria is no exception. To determine the morbidity and mortality in patients admitted with Diabetes Mellitus in a tertiary teaching hospital of Nigeria, through retrospective analysis of admission and death records. Admission and death certificate records from the medical wards of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, were retrospectively analysed from 1, August 2003 to 31, July 2004. Data included age, gender, total numbers of admissions and those due to Diabetes Mellitus, the indications for admissions, presenting symptoms and method of diagnoses in diabetic patients, mortality rates and causes of death. Data obtained were analysed using chi square. Out of 1567 medical admissions, 852(54.4%) were males and 715(45.6%) females. Diabetes was detected in 145(9.3%) patients [81(55.9%) males, 64(44.1%) females]. The mean age of diabetic patients was 53.6+16.1 years (range 18 - 94 years). Poor glycaemic control (29%) and diabetic foot syndrome (23.4%) were the most common reasons for admission in diabetic cases. The overall mortality rate among medical admissions was 21.8%, with diabetes accounting for 6.7% deaths. Within the cohort of diabetic cases, mortality was 15.9%, with significantly higher mortality in those aged > 65 years (p < 0.05). The most common causes of death in diabetic cases were Cerebrovascular disease and complications associated with the foot syndrome, accounting for 26.1% and 21.7% of deaths respectively; the least common causes of death in diabetic patients were Malaria, Hepatic Encephalopathy, and Carcinoma of the Cervix, accounting for 4.4% of deaths. Cerebrovascular disease was the most frequent cause of mortality among admitted diabetic patients with diabetic foot syndrome (a preventable complication) as the second most frequent cause of mortality. Increased screening for diabetes mellitus morbidities in the clinic and community

  16. Nutritional Characteristics of Forage Grown in South of Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Musco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to provide recommendations on the most useful forage species to smallholder farmers, eleven grass and eleven legume forages grown in Abomey-Calavi in Republic of Benin were investigated for nutritive value (i.e. chemical composition and energy content and fermentation characteristics (i.e. gas and volatile fatty acid production, organic matter degradability. The in vitro gas production technique was used, incubating the forages for 120 h under anaerobic condition with buffalo rumen fluid. Compared to legume, tropical grass forages showed lower energy (8.07 vs 10.57 MJ/kg dry matter [DM] and crude protein level (16.10% vs 19.91% DM and higher cell wall content (neutral detergent fiber: 63.8% vs 40.45% DM, respectively. In grass forages, the chemical composition showed a quite high crude protein content; the in vitro degradability was slightly lower than the range of tropical pasture. The woody legumes were richer in protein and energy and lower in structural carbohydrates than herbaceous plants, however, their in vitro results are influenced by the presence of complex compounds (i.e. tannins. Significant correlations were found between chemical composition and in vitro fermentation characteristics. The in vitro gas production method appears to be a suitable technique for the evaluation of the nutritive value of forages in developing countries.

  17. Geochronology and geochemistry of upper proterozoic granites from Southern Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordani, U.G.; Kawashita, K.; Vancini, K.R.B.; Cadoppi, P.; Sacchi, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Upper Proterozoic basement of Benin, like that of nearby Nigeria and like the polycyclic basement of Central Hoggar, belongs to the hinterland of the Pharusian Chain (Pan-African Trans-Saharan Belt) generated by the collision between the (passive) margin of the West African craton and the (reactivated) margin of the Tuareg Shield and its southern extension. Rb-Sr dating of sub alkaline, meta-aluminums, syn-Kinematic granite forming tabular bodies near Dassa-Zoume and near Save yielded two WR isochron ages of 650 ± 35 Ma (I.R. = 0.7043) and 705 ± 70 Ma (I.R. = 0.7045). Emplacement of these bodies was clearly controlled by trans current movements along the Kandi Fault System. The analyzed granites are comparable with those of Central Hoggar and North-Central Nigeria on the ground of field, geochronological and geochemical data; they also display some affinities with the late-tectonic granites of the Adrar des Iforas. They are expected to find their Brazilian continuation in the Chaval Granitoids west of Fortaleza, but data for comparison are inadequate. (author)

  18. Nutritional Characteristics of Forage Grown in South of Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musco, Nadia; Koura, Ivan B.; Tudisco, Raffaella; Awadjihè, Ghislain; Adjolohoun, Sebastien; Cutrignelli, Monica I.; Mollica, Maria Pina; Houinato, Marcel; Infascelli, Federico; Calabrò, Serena

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide recommendations on the most useful forage species to smallholder farmers, eleven grass and eleven legume forages grown in Abomey-Calavi in Republic of Benin were investigated for nutritive value (i.e. chemical composition and energy content) and fermentation characteristics (i.e. gas and volatile fatty acid production, organic matter degradability). The in vitro gas production technique was used, incubating the forages for 120 h under anaerobic condition with buffalo rumen fluid. Compared to legume, tropical grass forages showed lower energy (8.07 vs 10.57 MJ/kg dry matter [DM]) and crude protein level (16.10% vs 19.91% DM) and higher cell wall content (neutral detergent fiber: 63.8% vs 40.45% DM), respectively. In grass forages, the chemical composition showed a quite high crude protein content; the in vitro degradability was slightly lower than the range of tropical pasture. The woody legumes were richer in protein and energy and lower in structural carbohydrates than herbaceous plants, however, their in vitro results are influenced by the presence of complex compounds (i.e. tannins). Significant correlations were found between chemical composition and in vitro fermentation characteristics. The in vitro gas production method appears to be a suitable technique for the evaluation of the nutritive value of forages in developing countries. PMID:26732328

  19. The benefits of redesigning Benin's vaccine supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shawn T; Schreiber, Benjamin; Cakouros, Brigid E; Wateska, Angela R; Dicko, Hamadou M; Connor, Diana L; Jaillard, Philippe; Mvundura, Mercy; Norman, Bryan A; Levin, Carol; Rajgopal, Jayant; Avella, Mélanie; Lebrun, Caroline; Claypool, Erin; Paul, Proma; Lee, Bruce Y

    2014-07-07

    New vaccine introductions have put strains on vaccine supply chains around the world. While increasing storage and transportation may be the most straightforward options, it is also important to consider what financial and operational benefits can be incurred. In 2012, suboptimal vaccine coverage and impending vaccine introductions prompted the Republic of Benin's Ministry of Health (MOH) to explore ways to improve their vaccine supply chain. Working alongside the Beninese MOH, we utilized our computational model, HERMES, to explore the impact on cost and vaccine availability of three possible options: (1) consolidating the Commune level to a Health Zone level, (2) removing the Commune level completely, and (3) removing the Commune level and expanding to 12 Department Stores. We also analyzed the impact of adding shipping loops during delivery. At baseline, new vaccine introductions without any changes to the current system increased the logistics cost per dose ($0.23 to $0.26) and dropped the vaccine availability to 71%. While implementing the Commune level removal scenario had the same capital costs as implementing the Health Zone scenario, the Health Zone scenario had lower operating costs. This increased to an overall cost savings of $504,255 when implementing shipping loops. The best redesign option proved to be the synergistic approach of converting to the Health Zone design and using shipping loops (serving ten Health Posts/loop). While a transition to either redesign or only adding shipping loops was beneficial, implementing a redesign option and shipping loops can yield both lower capital expenditures and operating costs. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical composition and sources of atmospheric aerosols at Djougou (Benin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouafo-Leumbe, Marie-Roumy; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Liousse, Catherine; Pont, Veronique; Akpo, Aristide; Doumbia, Thierno; Gardrat, Eric; Zouiten, Cyril; Sigha-Nkamdjou, Luc; Ekodeck, Georges Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    In the framework of the INDAAF (International Network to study Deposition and Atmospheric chemistry in AFrica) program, atmospheric aerosols were collected in PM2.5 and PM10 size fractions at Djougou, Benin, in the West Africa, from November, 2005 to October, 2009. Particulate carbon, ionic species, and trace metals were analyzed. Weekly PM2.5 and PM10 total mass concentrations varied between 0.7 and 47.3 µg m-3 and 1.4-148.3 µg m-3, respectively. We grouped the aerosol chemical compounds into four classes: dust, particulate organic matter (POM), elemental carbon (EC), and ions. We studied the annual variation of each class to determine their contribution in the total aerosol mass concentration and finally to investigate their potential emission sources. On an annual basis, the species presented a well-marked seasonality, with the peak of mass concentration for both sizes registered in dry season, 67 ± 2 to 86 ± 9 versus 14 ± 9 to 34 ± 5% in wet season. These values emphasized the seasonality of the emissions and the relative weak interannual standard deviation indicates the low variability of the seasonality. At the seasonal scale, major contributions to the aerosol chemistry in the dry season are: dust (26-59%), POM (30-59%), EC (5-9%), and ions (3-5%), suggesting a predominance of Sahelian and Saharan dust emissions and biomass burning source in this season. In the wet season, POM is predominant, followed by dust, EC, and ions. These results point out the contribution of surrounded biofuel combustion used for cooking and biogenic emissions during the wet season.

  1. An Assessment of Four Centuries m(15th-19th) of Benin Art Production in Evaluating the Role of the Craft Guild System in Benin Polity

    OpenAIRE

    Agbontaen, K. A.

    1997-01-01

    The artistic traditions of pre-colonial Benin were firmly established in the peoples way of life and maintained by traditional craft guilds specially designed for this purpose. The establishment of the guild system became a solid foundation for handicraft industries to emerge as an integral part of the economic, social and administrative organisation in the kingdom. The European contact which began in the fifteenth century coincided with the height of political powers of the kingdom. Such con...

  2. Shrimp quality and safety management along the supply chain in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dabade, D.S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This thesis focuses on quality and safety management of tropical shrimp (Penaeus spp.) using Benin (West Africa) as an example of a shrimp exporting country. The entire supply chain, from fishing areas (brackish waters) to shrimp processing plants, was investigated. The

  3. Ocular morbidities in a targeted high-risk urban population in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ocular morbidities in a targeted high-risk urban population in Benin City, Edo State. RO Momoh, CU Ukponmwan, AI Osahon, MO Uhumwangho, VW Okeigbemen, OA Dawodu, AE Omoti, OT Edema, MJ Erameh, OJ Olubor, MU Olowolayeimo, JC Ezechila ...

  4. Iron Store of Pregnant Women with Hemoglobin SS and SC in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reactive protein (CRP) was also assayed to rule out ... KEY WORDS: Benin City, iron status, pregnancy, sickle‑cell hemoglobin. Access this article online .... the determination of the hematological indices, and also put into a universal bottle for the ...

  5. The Quest for Honor and Citizenship in Post-Slavery Borgu (Benin)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    2015-01-01

    that is increasingly being contested in a number of forms. The paper explores the heritage of slavery in its cultural, spatial, social, economic, and political dimensions. The author sheds light on the concept of honor that is a central dimension of social and political life in West Africa. In nowadays Benin, Gando...

  6. Weed flora of University of Benin in terms of diversity and richness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Weeds are as important as man to himself and its environment. Weed flora in terms of diversity and richness of University of Benin, Ugbowo campus were determined from four habitable parts using two ecological models: Margalef species richness (d) and Shannon-Wiener diversity (H). Primary data were collected from an ...

  7. Morbidity And Mortality Among Road Users In Benin-City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns of morbidity and mortality among drivers and passengers of cars involved in road traffic accidents in Benin-City Nigeria from August 2002-July 2003 as a base line data. Methods: Eighty-seven car drivers and passengers who were studied were part of a larger study, involved in ...

  8. Networking, social capital and gender roles in the cotton system in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maboudou Alidou, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cotton production in Benin, West Africa, is intertwined with colonialism, which contributed to the trans­formation of the crop’s production system from traditional to modern. Through­out the years, the importance of the crop for the stakeholders varied. The last decades have witnessed a growing

  9. Determinants of crop-livestock integration by small farmers in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the numerous work conducted on integrated crop-livestock systems, very little is known about factors determining farmers' trend to integrate. Our study aimed at a socioeconomic characterization of endogenous crop-livestock integration in Benin and identification of determinants of farmers' decision to use these ...

  10. Quality of farmers' varieties of sorghum and derived foods as perceived by consumers in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayodé, A.P.P.; Adegbidi, A.; Hounhouigan, J.D.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Culinary and sensory characteristics of sorghum crops and derived foods in northern Benin were investigated using rapid appraisal and quantitative survey methods. Three food categories were identified: pastes, porridges, and beverages. In the main town, all of these are encountered. In other areas,

  11. Cervical vertebrae staging in pre-orthodontic patients in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: The first six cervical vertebrae of 105 untreated orthodontic patients attending the clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital were assessed on the cephalometric radiograph to determine the stages of maturation. Correlations between age, gender, type of malocclusion and skeletal maturation stages were ...

  12. A Study of the Solid Waste Chain in Benin Metropolis, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benin metropolis like other fast urbanizing towns and cities in Nigeria is faces with a solid waste management problem. Solid waste is seen in huge heaps on any piece of unused land, around buildings, in the open market places and in drainage and water ways. The work reported in this paper involves a study of the path ...

  13. Are the Ukwuanis Benin or Igbo? a study of origin and migration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This method is most appropriate for this work because it offered the opportunity to interrogate the traditions of origins of the different Ukwuani clans. The findings indicate that Ukwuani people are Igbo in origin, and the claim of origin from Benin which textbook generalizations tended to portray is a recent contraption made ...

  14. Insect fauna associated with Anacardium occidentale (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboton, C; Onzo, A; Ouessou, F I; Goergen, G; Vidal, S; Tamò, M

    2014-01-01

    Cashew, Anacardium occidentale L. (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae), is an important cash crop in Benin. However, its production is threatened by several biotic factors, especially insects. In Benin, very few studies have focused on insects and just listed species commonly found on cashew worldwide. The present investigation fills this gap by presenting an exhaustive inventory of insect species associated with this crop in the country. The survey was carried out from September 2009 to August 2010 in 22 cashew orchards (5 young and 17 mature) distributed over three major agroecological zones where cashew is most produced in the country. Insects were collected using chemical knock-down technique and visual observation followed by capture with sweep net. In addition, infested plant organs were sampled and incubated to collect emerging insects. In total, 262 insect species were recorded and identified. Among them, the wood borer Apate terebrans Pallas, the leafminer Eteoryctis gemoniella Stainton, and the mirid bugs Helopeltis schoutedeni Reuter., and Helopeltis anacardii Miller., appeared as the most important insect species attacking cashew in Benin. Beneficial insects encountered included some predators, parasitoids, and pollinators. Few vertebrate predators were also recorded on the trees. Differences in agroecological conditions or in field cleanliness did not affect the number of insect species encountered in the cashew orchards. The results of this study represent an important baseline data for the design and implementation of strategies for cashew protection in Benin. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  15. The Origin and Development of the Guild of Bronze Casters of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Benin Kingdom is one of the forest kingdoms located in West Africa which became famous for its arts, especially its art of bronze casting. The art of bronze casting flourished under the guild system established by Oba Oguola in 1280AD. The guild of bronze casters was the most important guild that existed in the ...

  16. Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'Guessan, R.; Boko, P.; Odjo, A.; Knols, B.G.J.; Akogbeto, M.; Rowland, M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Method Eight-week trial conducted in experimental

  17. Budgeting and Funding of the Library at the University of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osagie, Roseline O.; Orheruata, Matilda U.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study on funding of the library at the University of Benin in relation to the recurrent budget implementation during the 1992/93 to 1996/97 academic sessions. The findings indicated that the library depended on the central administrations's allocation for its funding. It also showed that the University of…

  18. 16 Benin Video Film Rising: Peddie Okao on “The Eye of the Sun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    commitment to talent development and artistic excellence - developing talents, critical ... industry. The following is the transcript of my conversation with him on the 8th of March, 2015 in Benin City. Omoera Good morning, sir. I am honoured to be granted this ... Human Capital Development; Dynamic but effective Film.

  19. Using agronomic tools to improve pineapple quality and its uniformity in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V.N.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: Ananas comosus; Benin; cultural practices; fruit quality; hapas; heterogeneity; planting material; slips; suckers; supply chain; variation in quality; variation within crop; vigour.

    Poor average quality and uniformity in quality have become major issues

  20. Indigenous Knowledge of Shea Processing and Quality Perception of Shea Products in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honfo, G.F.; Linnemann, A.R.; Akissoe, N.H.; Soumanou, M.M.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2012-01-01

    A survey among 246 people belonging to 14 ethnic groups and living in 5 different parklands in Benin revealed different practices to process shea kernels (namely boiling followed sun drying and smoking) and extract shea butter. A relation between parklands, gathering period, and sun-drying

  1. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of shea butter sold on Benin markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honfo, G.F.; Hell, K.; Akissoe, N.H.; Linnemann, A.R.; Coulibaly, O.

    2012-01-01

    Shea butter, a fat from the nuts of shea tree, is of great nutritional and commercial value for local communities of Africa. The sanitary and physicochemical qualities of shea butter sold in Benin markets are unknown. This study assesses the quality characteristics of 54 samples of shea butter

  2. Formation a la securite routiere et permis de conduire au Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The only ticket that bestows the right to the automotive conduct in Benin is the driver's license. In spite of the proliferation of the driving school, and the gleaming result obtaining to the different exams of the driver's license, and in spite of the multiple efforts of the actors in charge of the road security, one notes an upsurge of ...

  3. Study of the nature of urban flood in Benin City, Edo State; Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In consonance with dominance of the clay soil in the study area, bulk density is high. It is therefore concluded that the soil condition is a major determinant of flooding in Benin City. The flooding problems has resulted in traffic congestion and lost of man-hours giving rise to lopsided concentration of vehicular traffic.

  4. Fatal gunshots to the head and neck regions in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the magnitude of fatal gunshot injuries to the head and neck in Benin City. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a prospective study of fatal gun shots to the head and neck region with respect to age, sex, intent for the gunshots, type of gun, area of the head and neck affected and who did the ...

  5. Adolescents and HIV/AIDS: an update of cases seen in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty four new glaucoma patients at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital were interviewed to determine the acceptance of surgery, reasons for refusal, and factors affecting acceptability of surgery as an initial treatment option. Fifty patients (32.5%) accepted surgery while 89 (57.8%) refused. The main ...

  6. Effect of commercial diets quality on bio-economic performances of broilers in Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houndonougbo, F M; Chwalibog, André; Chrysostome, C A A M

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the quality of commercial poultry feeds in Benin. The performances of 396 unsexed broilers chickens Ross 308 fed with a control diet (R1) and five commercial diets (R2 to R6) were evaluated. Broilers fed commercial diets showed significantly low (P <0.001...

  7. Towards sustainable vegetable production around agro-pastoral dams in Northern Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kpéra, G.N.; Segnon, Alcade C.; Saïdou, Aliou; Mensah, Guy A.; Aarts, Noelle; Zijpp, van der Akke J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rehabilitation and optimized utilization of agro-pastoral dams (APDs), especially for vegetable production, has been recently promoted to boost agricultural production and ensure food security in Benin. However, little information was available on APDs' agricultural potentials and

  8. Performance of 300 level medical students of the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was a retrospective study aimed at evaluating the performance of 300 level Medical Students of the University of Benin in the Second Professional MBBS degree examinations consisting of Anatomy, Biochemistry and Physiology. Score sheets from 2002/2003 to 2011/2012 academic sessions were obtained from ...

  9. Gender discrimination and its impact on income, productivity, and technical efficiency: evidence from Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinkingninhoun-Mêdagbé, F.M.; Diagne, A.; Simtowe, F.; Agboh-Noameshie, A.R.; Adegbola, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the occurrence and impact of gender discrimination in access to production resources on the income, productivity, and technical efficiency of farmers. Through an empirical investigation of farmers from Koussin-Le´le´, a semi-collective irrigated rice scheme in central Benin, we

  10. Fitness to drive among commercial intercity drivers in Benin-City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unfit drivers are prone to road traffic accident, therefore their health is paramount in ensuring the safety of road users. To determine the fitness to drive among commercial intercity bus drivers in Benin City, Edo State Material and methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 194 ...

  11. The attitudes of clergy in Benin City, Nigeria towards persons with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    illness. NG Igbinomwanhia, BO James, JO Omoaregba. Department of Clinical Services, Federal Psychiatric Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. Abstract ... This study aimed to determine the attitudes of clergy towards persons with mental illness. Method: ..... illness such as depression, acute stress disorders and anxiety.

  12. Networking, social capital and gender roles in the cotton system in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maboudou Alidou, G.

    2014-01-01

    Cotton production in Benin, West Africa, is intertwined with colonialism, which contributed to the trans­formation of the crop’s production system from traditional to modern. Through­out the years, the importance of the crop for the stakeholders varied. The last decades have witnessed

  13. Adolescent and Adult Reasoning about Gender Roles and Fairness in Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conry-Murray, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This study examined reasoning about gender roles in a traditional society in Benin, West Africa. Ninety-seven male and female adolescents and adults evaluated conflicts between a husband and a wife over gender norms to determine whether gender norms, are judged to be moral or conventional. Although most attributed decision-making power to the…

  14. Genetic and Environmental Impact on Iron, Zinc, and Phytate in Food Sorghum Grown in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayodé, A.P.P.; Linnemann, A.R.; Hounhouigan, J.D.; Nout, M.J.R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Seventy-six farmers' varieties of sorghum from Benin were distinguished by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and clustered into 45 distinct genotypes. The genotype clusters were evaluated for their Fe, Zn, and phytate concentrations to assess the impact of genetic and environmental

  15. Craft Guilds and the Sustenance of Pre-Colonial Benin Monarchy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benin was one of the major kingdoms that thrived in the forest region of West Africa from about c.900 to1897 when she was conquered by the British expeditionary forces and integrated into the Protectorate of Southern Nigeria. The resilience and sustenance of the kingdom and her monarchy for this long period has been ...

  16. Poverty Of Parents And Child Labour In Benin City: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work starts from the basic premise that poverty, a major problem of rapid urbanization in developing nations, is a major contributory factor in the growth and exacerbation of child labour. Child labour in Benin City reflect prevalent urban poverty which compel parents to send children of school age to work to boost family ...

  17. Platform for resource management : case studies of success or failure in Benin and Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangbegnon, C.

    1998-01-01

    The present book focuses on platforms for (natural) resource management. It analyses various case studies in Benin and Burkina Faso. Conditions for collective resource management in conflict and interdependent situations are the most critical issues. The present study raises the importance

  18. Increased incidence of gang rape in Benin-City, Nigeria: Is this a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: All cases of sexual assault reported to the police in Edo state and its environs are usually referred to either Central Hospital, Benin City or the Police clinic for medical examination and issuing of medical reports. This study is a descriptive retrospective audit of all cases of gang-rape victims, attended ...

  19. Asymptomatic malaria in children under 5 years old in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria remains one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in endemic areas, primarily affecting children under five years of age, particularly in the sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to determine asymptomatic malaria infection among children under 5 years in Benin City, Edo State ...

  20. Characteristics and Health of Turkey Husbandry in Ouaké, North-Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attakpa, E.Y.; Aplogan, L.G.; Akossou, A.Y.J.; Bosma, R.H.

    2011-01-01

    Sanitary constraints of raising turkey in north-west Benin were studied by using a survey and Haemagglutination Inhibition Test (HIT) to detect antibodies of Newcastle Disease (ND) and Avian Influenza (AI). We tested 85 serums from 7- to 24-month-old turkeys raised in 19 farms. ND prevalence rate

  1. A religion of film : experiencing Christianity and videos beyond semiotics in rural Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merz, Johannes Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Three Christian films have become popular in the Commune of Cobly of today’s Republic of Benin, notably the American “Jesus Film” (1979), the American-Ivorian film “La Solution” (1994) and the Beninese video film “Yatin: Lieu de souffrance” (2002). The discussion centres on how people receive and

  2. Biodiversity and Status of Cetaceans in Benin, West Africa: an Initial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No published literature is available on the whales and dolphins of Benin. A first insight in the cetacean biodiversity based on stranding, capture and sighting records, as well as a preliminary assessment of status, is provided. Seven species were authenticated: humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae, common bottlenose ...

  3. People's response to policy change in agricultural development organization : the Benin case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tossou, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    This book is about change. It deals with the way in which social actors, be they individuals or groups, involved in the agricultural development of Benin reconstruct for themselves the new policy context in order to develop relevant strategies translating policy measures into practical

  4. Microbial Quality of Ready-to-Eat Salad Sold in Benin City, Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the microbial quality of ready-to-eat vegetable salads obtained from three fast food centres in Benin City, Edo state, Nigeria. Across the counter samples of salad were collected from randomly selected locations within the city and subjected to microbial culture in Nutrient and MacConkey agar media for ...

  5. Lifelong Learning as an Instrument for Human Capital Development in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biao, Idowu

    2015-01-01

    A review of the Benin education system shows that it is still heavily school-based. Yet, a high level of wastage is currently being recorded at school level (about 50% success rate at primary level, about 40% success rate at high school level and about 1% enrolment rate of qualified candidates and success rate at tertiary level), leading to the…

  6. Technical and institutional constraints of a cotton pest management strategy in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togbe, C.E.; Zannou, E.T.; Vodouhè, S.; Haagsma, R.; Gbehounou, G.; Kossou, D.K.; Huis, van A.

    2012-01-01

    A pest management strategy entitled Staggered Targeted Control (in French Lutte Étagée Ciblée, known as LEC) has been promoted in Benin since 1988 as an alternative to the conventional spraying strategy in order to reduce production costs and improve cotton yield and quality. Many cotton growers are

  7. The process of short- and long-term price integration in the Benin maize market.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutz, C.; Tilburg, van A.; Kamp, van der B.J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the methodology used to study the price integration process in spatially separated spot markets, and applies it to the Benin maize market. An autoregressive distributed lag model is derived to take into account the sluggishness of price adjustments. Hypothesis testing concerns

  8. morbidity and mortality among road users in benin-city,nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emmanuel Ameh

    and passengers of cars involved in road traffic accidents in Benin-City Nigeria from August 2002-July. 2003 as a base line data. Methods: Eighty-seven car drivers and passengers who were studied were part of a larger study, involved in a road traffic accident and brought to the accident and emergency units of either the.

  9. Gender roles in cotton production and management of related organizations in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maboudou Alidou, G.; Niehof, A.

    2013-01-01

    Women’s productive roles have generated important debates, heuristic as well as practical, in the scientific and development community. In Benin, women farmers are playing a key role, particularly in agriculture and cotton production, where they are involved throughout the production process.

  10. Management of agro-pastoral dams in Benin: stakeholders, institutions and rehabilitation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kpéra, G.N.; Aarts, N.; Saïdou, A.; Tossou, R.C.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Mensah, G.A.; Sinsin, B.A.; Kossou, D.K.; van der Zijpp, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Agro-pastoral dams are waterholes constructed to provide water for livestock and for agricultural development. In Benin, agro-pastoral dams are managed by dam management committees. This study seeks to (1) characterize the stakeholders involved in agro-pastoral dam use and management, (2) identify

  11. Management of agro-pastoral dams in Benin: Stakeholders, institutions and rehabilitation research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kpera, G.N.; Aarts, N.; Saidou, A.; Tossou, R.C.; Eilers, C.H.A.M.; Mensah, G.A.; Sinsin, B.; Kossou, D.K.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Agro-pastoral dams are waterholes constructed to provide water for livestock and for agricultural development. In Benin, agro-pastoral dams are managed by dam management committees. This study seeks to (1) characterize the stakeholders involved in agro-pastoral dam use and management, (2) identify

  12. Using agronomic tools to improve pineapple quality and its uniformity in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassinou Hotegni, V.N.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: Ananas comosus; Benin; cultural practices; fruit quality; hapas; heterogeneity; planting material; slips; suckers; supply chain; variation in quality; variation within crop; vigour. Poor average quality and uniformity in quality have become major issues in agri-food

  13. 36 Mycoflora of Some Smoked Fish Varieties in Benin City Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    Mycoflora of Some Smoked Fish Varieties in Benin City Nigeria. 1Wogu, M.D and 2Iyayi, A. D. doi: 10.4314/ejesm.v4i1.4. Abstract. A study of the mycoflora of six locally available and commonly consumed dried fish species namely; Ethmalosa fimbriata (bonga fish), Tilapia sp. (Banda mangala) Gadus morhua (stock fish), ...

  14. Fitness to Drive among Commercial Intercity Drivers in Benin-City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    UNIBEN

    Background: Unfit drivers are prone to road traffic accident, therefore their health is paramount in .... road safer. METHODOLOGY. One hundred and ninety-four commercial intercity bus drivers in Benin City, Edo State were interviewed in a descriptive cross sectional ... brachial artery was auscultated while the cuff was slowly ...

  15. Impact of colonial rule on oil palm production in Benin, 1897-1960 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By the close of the nineteenth century, the British colonial rule was imposed on Benin, one of the forest peoples of southern Nigeria, thus bringing her independence and the sovereignty of its ruling Oba to an end. It was the largest and most viable in terms of agricultural and forest resources. This is in comparison to other ...

  16. Evidence for the molecular heterogeneity of sickle cell anemia chromosomes bearing the betaS/Benin haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrinos, George P; Samperi, Piera; Lo Nigro, Luca; Kollia, Panagoula; Schiliro, Gino; Papadakis, Manoussos N

    2005-09-01

    There are at least four distinct African and one Asian chromosomal backgrounds (haplotypes) on which the sickle cell mutation has arisen. Additionally, previous data suggest that the beta(S)/Bantu haplotype is heterogeneous at the molecular level. Here, we report the presence of the (A)gamma -499 T-->A variation in sickle cell anemia chromosomes of Sicilian and North African origin bearing the beta(S)/Benin haplotype. Being absent from North American beta(S)/Benin chromosomes, which were studied previously, this variation is indicative for the molecular heterogeneity of the beta(S)/Benin haplotype. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Pattern of skin diseases at university of Benin teaching hospital, Benin city, Edo State, South-South Nigeria: a 12 month prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukonu, Agwu Bob; Eze, E U

    2012-04-28

    This study aims to look at the pattern and incidence of skin diseases seen in Dermatology/Venereology clinic at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South Zone, Nigeria and compare it with other zones of Nigeria. This was a prospective study on pattern and incidence of skin diseases in new patients presenting at the Dermatology/ Venereology outpatient clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Edo State, South-South, Nigeria, from September 2006 to August 2007. All patients were seen by the researchers. Diagnosis were made clinically and sometimes with the support of histopathology. A total number of 4786 patients were seen during the study period and these comprised 2647 HIV/AIDS patients and 2112 pure Dermatological patients. Out of 4786 patients, 755 (15.8%) were new patients. The new patients comprised 96 (12.7%) children patients (< 15 years) and 659 (83.7%) adult patients (>15years). The ages of the patients ranged from 2 weeks to 80 years and more than two-third were < 40 years. There were 354 males (46.9%) and 401 females (53.1%). This represents female: male ratio of 1.1: 1. Eczematous dermatitis accounted for 20.9% of the skin diseases and was the most common of the skin diseases observed. This is consistent with observation from other zones in Nigeria. Other skin diseases observed in order of frequencies include: Papulosqamous disorder (9.0%), Infectious skin diseases like fungal, viral, bacterial and parasitic infestation, at 7.9%, 7.7%, 2.3% and 2.1% respectively. Pigmentary disorders (5.0%), hair disorders (4.2%) and Benign neoplastic skin disease (6.5%). All the patients that had neurofibromatosis were females (1.9%). HIV-related skin diseases were observed to have increased remarkably (7.9%) with Kaposi's sarcoma, papular pruritic eruptions and drug eruptions being the commonest mode of presentation. The current pattern of skin diseases in Benin City, South-South Nigeria seems to follow a

  18. An Inquiry into Institutional Support for the Benin Video-Film Culture in Nollywood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Omoera

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today hundreds of indigenous movies are produced yearly in Benin, Ebira, Fulfulde, Ijaw, among other hinterland Nigerian languages, besides the so-called dominant Nollywood films of Igbo/English, Yoruba, and Hausa language expressions. Employing both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, this paper inquires into the level of institutional support the Benin language video-film industry gets from development agents, including the government. There are so many untapped cultural, artistic, and economic potentials for Nigeria’s movie-making and entertainment industry in the hinterlands which can further boost its Unique Selling Point in the national and global arenas. Regrettably, these micro-national film cultures remain largely under-explored and under-theorized, but have been demonstrated to be representationally consequential in terms of production output, audience reception, and opportunities for contending views, and voices. It is in this respect that a fuller reflection on, and influence of issues in Nollywood film cultures have become needful. This is to enable film scholars, enthusiasts, theorists, critics, and entrepreneurs to better understand and navigate the boundless cultural, artistic and economic potentials of Nollywood against the background of the kind of support it gets/should get from relevant development agents. Focusing on the Benin film industry situation, this paper finds that a significant percentage of the sampled audience holds that the support the Benin video-film enjoys is very marginal in spite of its noticeable potentials. Consequently, it recommends greater support from relevant authorities for the emergent industry by way of provision of accessible credit facilities, training schools, and requisite technologies to strengthen the capacities of its practitioners, and enhance the production of more culturally germane Benin video-films, and ultimately contribute to Nigeria’s gross domestic product (GDP.

  19. Completeness of Digital Accessible Knowledge of Plants of Benin and Priorities for Future Inventory and Data Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Cossi Ganglo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of and access to primary biodiversity data are critical components in informed decision-making regarding sustainable use of biological resources and conservation of biodiversity. Primary biodiversity data are increasingly available from Benin, but information about completeness of this information across the country is still lacking for most groups. This study analyzed the Digital Accessible Knowledge regarding the plants of Benin to identify gaps in both geographic and environmental dimensions. Many gaps exist in plant data for Benin, particularly in the northern most departments; central and southern Benin are better known, but some gaps remain even there. The resulting view of Beninese Digital Accessible Knowledge can guide future inventory and data discovery efforts.

  20. Transactional sex and sexual harassment between professors and students at an urban university in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    This paper adds to discussion of transactional sex relationships in Africa by examining the distinction between transactional sex and sexual harassment in the context of professor-student relationships and their inherent power dynamics. By exploring the ways in which female university students in urban Benin toe the line between empowered agent and victim, I show how the power differential between professor and student obstructs the professor's ability to objectively determine consent, and examine why, in spite of this differential, male professors are frequently perceived as the victims of these relationships. Ethnographic data were gathered through participant observation on a public university campus in Benin and in-depth interviews and focus groups with 34 students and 5 professors from that university. Findings suggest that the problem of sexual harassment on campus will be difficult to address so long as transactional sex relationships between professors and students are permitted to continue.

  1. Decision-making for the selection of sites and energy systems suited to Benin needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semassou, Clarence

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the wind sites and the solar possibilities of Benin led the works towards the energy systems, of the autonomous photovoltaic type, coupled with batteries of storage. These appropriate energy systems were analyzed, modelled and optimized. The criteria of optimization arise from a survey realized in near the persons in charge who take care of questions of electrification in rural areas, of selected professionals who play a major role in the decision-making of the projects of electrification in rural areas, local associations which benefited from these projects in Benin, from technicians and from users of these systems. These criteria are organized into a hierarchy according to the method AMDEC. A method of adapted optimization was realized; she appeals to an original vision of levelheadedness. (author) [fr

  2. [Research Ethics in Partnership with Benin : A call for Solidarity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Michel

    2017-05-22

    Over the last decade, research ethics has developed in Benin partly through a partnership with Quebec. This partnership has evolved using TCPS2, the Canadian framework in research ethics. In doing so, three main values were put forward : respect for human dignity, respect for cultural diversity and solidarity. Over that time period, research ethics in Benin has structured through new Research Ethics Committees (REC) and though participation of those involved in research with human beings. REC members, researchers and students have acquired the needed tools to resolve most of the ethical dilemmas that could arise in the future making it one of the positive results of this partnership. Retrospectively, it has also been a situation where the Van Rensselaer Potter's perspective on bioethics has emerged in a French-speaking context where the spoken language and the French cultural approach is of great importance.

  3. [North-South cooperation on transfusion and hematology teaching: A Benin experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafia, E; Anani, L; Glitho, S; Bankole, C; Fachinan, H; Py, J-Y; Domenech, J; Martenot, B; Colombat, P; Chobli, M; Zohoun, I

    2015-06-01

    Hematologic diseases are a significant part of health disorders in Benin. As an example, anemia is the second cause of hospitalization, measuring up to 7.9% all over the country (National Plan of Sanitary Development, 2009-2018). By contrast, there is only one active hematologist in the country. Thanks to two partnerships, on one hand between the health sciences faculty in Cotonou (Benin) and the medicine one in Tours (France), and on the other hand between the Beninese Blood Transfusion National Agency and the French Blood Establishment, a first blood transfusion and hematology formation was held in Cotonou on December 2014. Among other benefits, was created an hematology-transfusion network in order to facilitate relations between Beninese hospital doctors, with the support of the two French partner institutions. The article describes this progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Proportion of Urinary Schistosomiasis among HIV-Infected Subjects in Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinbo Frederick Olusegun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis, and the effect of CD4+ T cell counts and demographics on its prevalence among HIV-positive patients in Benin City, Nigeria.Methods: Urine and blood samples were collected from 2000 HIV-positive subjects. A wet preparation of the urine deposit was examined microscopically to identify ova of Schistosoma haematobium. The blood specimens were analyzed using the flow cytometry for CD4 + T-lymphocyte count.Results: An overall prevalence rate of 0.3% was reported. Gender and CD4 count <200 cells/µL did not affect the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis, while HIV patients that were single had significantly higher prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis (p=0.002.Conclusion: The prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis among HIV patients in Benin City is low. CD4+ count did not affect the prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis.

  5. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in women in Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piras Franca

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer ranks as the first most frequent cancer among women in Benin. The major cause of cervical cancer now recognized is persistent infection of Human Papillomavirus (HPV. In Benin there is a lack of screening programs for prevention of cervical cancer and little information exists regarding HPV genotype distribution. Methods Cervical cells from 725 women were examined for the presence of viral DNA by means of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR multiplex-based assay with the amplification of a fragment of L1 region and of E6/E7 region of the HPV genome, and of abnormal cytology by Papanicolaou method. The association between HPV status and Pap test reports was evaluated. Socio-demographic and reproductive characteristics were also related. Results A total of 18 different HPV types were identified, with a prevalence of 33.2% overall, and 52% and 26.7% among women with and without cervical lesions, respectively. Multiple HPV infections were observed in 40.2% of HPV-infected women. In the HPV-testing group, the odds ratio for the detection of abnormal cytology was 2.98 (95% CI, 1.83-4.84 for HPV positive in comparison to HPV negative women. High risk types were involved in 88% of infections, most notably HPV-59, HPV-35, HPV-16, HPV-18, HPV-58 and HPV-45. In multiple infections of women with cytological abnormalities HPV-45 predominated. Conclusions This study provides the first estimates of the prevalence of HPV and type-specific distribution among women from Benin and demonstrates that the epidemiology of HPV infection in Benin is different from that of other world regions. Specific area vaccinations may be needed to prevent cervical cancer and the other HPV-related diseases.

  6. Reparation a morale justice for Africa: the Benin (Nigeria) in perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Osaherumwen Idahosa; John Afeagbokhai Onimhawo; Solomon Ijeweimen Ikhidero

    2017-01-01

    The paper offered a review of Africa’s moral call for reparation. It emphasized among other things that the continued underdevelopment and marginalization of the African continent today, is not unconnected with the trilogy of slavery, imperialism and colonialism. From the perspective of the British expedition of the Great Benin Kingdom in 1897, the paper highlighted how the African continent had been brutalized to strengthen the economies of their colonial overlords. The paper anchored its ca...

  7. Platform for resource management : case studies of success or failure in Benin and Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Dangbegnon, C.

    1998-01-01

    The present book focuses on platforms for (natural) resource management. It analyses various case studies in Benin and Burkina Faso. Conditions for collective resource management in conflict and interdependent situations are the most critical issues. The present study raises the importance of socio-economic sustainability. It aims at incorporating social perspective within economic growth by focusing on stakeholders needs and by learning with them to respond to evolving conditions.&l...

  8. Variations of wave energy power in shoaling zone of Benin coastal zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias A. Houekpoheha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Today, we observe at the population level, that the improvement in comfort is accompanied by an increase in the electrical energy required. The predicted exhaustion of fossil energy resources maintains some speculation. Their unequal geographical distribution justifies the energy dependence of Benin overlooked from outside. So it is urgent to explore the various sources of renewable energy available to Benin. In this work, using measurements made ​​by the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA-Benin as part of the extension of the port of Cotonou, with Boussinesq equations (Peregrine and Stokes waves dispersion relation, we characterized the variations of various swell parameters (height, wavelength, velocities in the shoaling zone on the study site and proceeded to estimate variations in wave energy power from deep waters to the bathymetric breaking point. Finally, the zone with high energy power (where the conversion of this energy into electrical energy would be profitable of these waves is highlighted on the site, the local water depth at the point of breaking waves is evaluated and results obtained allowed to justify the very energetic character take by these swells on this coast when they are close to the beach.

  9. Assessment of the Contamination of Some Foodstuffs by Escherichia coli O157 in Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honoré Sourou Bankole

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157 is a pathogenic bacterium causing haemorrhagic colitis. It represents a serious public health problem in Northern America and Europe, which can plague Africa. Most cases of mentioned poisoning were related to contaminated meat products and vegetables. The present work aimed to estimate the prevalence of E. coli O157 in meat and vegetables in Benin. For this purpose, 6 lots of faeces samples from pigs and 8 from cattle were collected at the farms on the outskirts of Cotonou. Similarly, 20 samples of carcasses, 20 samples of intestines and stomach, and 20 surfaces samples of slaughtering equipment were taken. Vegetables and environment materials in gardens have also been sampled for 84 samples. Bacteriological analyses revealed a percentage of contamination of 50% for pig faeces and 25% for cattle ones. All the meats from stalling parks have been contaminated by this bacterium. For vegetables, 14.6% of samples were contaminated by E. coli O157. The presence of this pathovar in animal breeding and slaughtering environment and in the gardens shows that Benin is not aware of the risks of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of contaminated products. Therefore, it urges including that germ in a systematic search during safety control of food products in Benin.

  10. The prevalence of byssinosis among cotton workers in the north of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, A V; Schlünssen, V; Agodokpessi, G; Sigsgaards, T; Fayomi, B

    2014-10-01

    Cotton is the main agricultural export product in Benin. Cotton dust is thus present in the air during the handling and processing of cotton. This dust contains a mixture of substances including ground up plant matter, fibres, bacteria, fungi, soil, pesticides, noncotton matter, and other contaminants. While cotton processing is decreasing in industrialized countries, it is increasing in developing countries. Cotton processing, particularly in the early processes of spinning, can cause byssinosis. To determine the respiratory effects of cotton dust exposure among cotton mill workers in Benin. In a cross-sectional study, 109 workers exposed to cotton dust and 107 unexposed workers were studied. The International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH) questionnaire was used for data collection on respiratory symptoms. For each worker, crossshift pulmonary function was performed with a dry spirometer. Based on the severity of respiratory symptoms and spirometry byssinosis was defined and classified according to the criteria of Schilling, et al. The mean ± SD age of the exposed and unexposed workers was 46.3 ± 7.8 and 37.0 ± 8.3 years, respectively (pcotton mill workers in Benin is high and needs prompt attention of health care workers and policymakers.

  11. Lifelong learning as an instrument for human capital development in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biao, Idowu

    2015-10-01

    A review of the Benin education system shows that it is still heavily school-based. Yet, a high level of wastage is currently being recorded at school level (about 50% success rate at primary level, about 40% success rate at high school level and about 1% enrolment rate of qualified candidates and success rate at tertiary level), leading to the unintentional creation of a large population of unskilled and unproductive youths and adults. Integrated education systems which hold great potential and opportunities for both initial and continuing education remain hardly explored and virtually untapped. Yet, the challenges of the 21st century are such that only the unveiling and continuous cultivation of multi-faceted human capital can help individual citizens lead both a productive and fulfilled life. Formal education alone or non-formal education alone, irrespective of how well each is delivered, is no longer sufficient in facing up to the multifarious challenges of the 21st century. If education is to serve Benin beneficially in this century, the current national system of education must be reoriented to free up citizens' human capital through the implementation of an integrated educational system. This article proposes a new national education system which is rooted in the concept of lifelong learning and combines formal and non-formal systems of education for Benin.

  12. System redesign of the immunization supply chain: Experiences from Benin and Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Wendy; Jaillard, Philippe; Assy, Emmanuelle; Brown, Shawn T; Matsinhe, Graça; Dekoun, Mawutondji; Lee, Bruce Y

    2017-04-19

    Evidence suggests that immunization supply chains are becoming outdated and unable to deliver needed vaccines due to growing populations and new vaccine introductions. Redesigning a supply chain could result in meeting current demands. The Ministries of Health in Benin in Mozambique recognized known barriers to the immunization supply chain and undertook a system redesign to address those barriers. Changes were made to introduce an informed push system while consolidating storage points, introducing transport loops, and increasing human resource capacity for distribution. Evaluations were completed in each country. Evaluation in each country indicated improved performance of the supply chain. The Effective Vaccine Management (EVM) assessment in Benin documented notable improvements in the distribution criteria of the tool, increasing from 40% to 100% at the district level. In Mozambique, results showed reduced stockouts at health facility level from 79% at baseline to less than 1% at endline. Coverage rates of DTP3 also increased from 68.9% to 92.8%. Benin and Mozambique are undertaking system redesign in order to respond to constraints identified in the vaccine supply chain. Results and learnings show improvements in supply chain performance and make a strong case for system redesign. These countries demonstrate the feasibility of system redesign for other countries considering how to address outdated supply chains. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Alpha-tocopherol levels in milk of exclusively breast-feeding mothers in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibadin, Okoeguale Michael; Osubor, Chijindu Christopher; Onoberhie, Peter Ajokpoghene

    2009-06-01

    The influence of prolonged breastfeeding on breast-milk alpha tocopherol was assessed in 112 lactating mothers practicing exclusive breast-feeding on term infants. The cross sectional study was carried out between May 1st and 30th, 2005 at the University of Benin/University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City among lactating mothers. Employing the Quaife's method, mean alpha-tocopherol values were determined in spot samples of breast milk. Though not significant mean Breast-milk (BM) alpha-tocopherol tended to decline with maternal age (p > 0.05) parity (p > 0.05) and duration of breastfeeding. Similarly, family socio-economic status did not significantly influence mean BM alpha-tocopherol levels. Exclusive and or prolonged breast feeding do not predispose the infant to low vitamin E supplies through the breast milk. Further studies are advocated to evaluate the effects of other biosocial variables on the levels of BM anti-oxidant vitamins including alpha-tocopherol.

  14. Natural Interactions between S. haematobium and S. guineensis in the Republic of Benin

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    Hélène Moné

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease which affects millions of people around the world, particularly in Africa. In this continent, different species are able to interbreed, like Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma guineensis, two schistosome species infecting humans. The Republic of Benin is known to harbor S. haematobium, but its geographical situation in between Nigeria, Mali, and Burkina Faso, where S. guineensis was found, raises the question about the possible presence of S. haematobium/S. guineensis hybrids in this country. We conducted morphological analyses on schistosome eggs and molecular analyses on schistosome larvae (high resolution melting (HRM analysis and gene sequencing in order to detect any natural interaction between these two species of schistosomes. The morphological results showed the presence of three egg morphotypes (S. haematobium, S. guineensis, and intermediate. Three genotypes were detected by ITS2 rDNA HRM analysis: S. haematobium, S. guineensis, and hybrid, and their percentages confirmed the results of the morphological analysis. However, sequencing of the CO1 mtDNA gene showed that all the samples from Benin belonged to S. haematobium. Our results provide the first evidence of introgression of S. guineensis genes in S. haematobium in Benin.

  15. The Prevalence of Byssinosis among Cotton Workers in the North of Benin

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    AV Hinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cotton is the main agricultural export product in Benin. Cotton dust is thus present in the air during the handling and processing of cotton. This dust contains a mixture of substances including ground up plant matter, fibres, bacteria, fungi, soil, pesticides, noncotton matter, and other contaminants. While cotton processing is decreasing in industrialized countries, it is increasing in developing countries. Cotton processing, particularly in the early processes of spinning, can cause byssinosis. Objective: To determine the respiratory effects of cotton dust exposure among cotton mill workers in Benin. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 109 workers exposed to cotton dust and 107 unexposed workers were studied. The International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH questionnaire was used for data collection on respiratory symptoms. For each worker, crossshift pulmonary function was performed with a dry spirometer. Based on the severity of respiratory symptoms and spirometry byssinosis was defined and classified according to the criteria of Schilling, et al. Results: The mean±SD age of the exposed and unexposed workers was 46.3±7.8 and 37.0±8.3 years, respectively (p<0.001. The mean FEV1 predicted value for the exposed and unexposed workers was 76.3% and 77.3%, respectively. The prevalence of grade 3 byssinosis was 21.1% (95% CI: 13.4–28.9 in exposed workers and 8.4% (95% CI: 3.1–13.7 in unexposed workers (p=0.006. On Mondays, the exposed workers had more respiratory symptoms than unexposed workers; for grade 3 byssinosis, the prevalence was 13.8% in exposed and 4.7% in unexposed workers (p=0.011. Conclusion: The prevalence of respiratory symptoms and byssinosis among cotton mill workers in Benin is high and needs prompt attention of health care workers and policymakers.

  16. Suicidal behaviour and related risk factors among school-aged youth in the Republic of Benin.

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    Jason R Randall

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Research on factors associated with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts has been conducted largely in developed countries. Research on West African countries in particular is lacking. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Global School-based Health Survey conducted in Benin in 2009. This was a cross-sectional study of three grades, spanning Junior and Senior High, which sampled a total of 2,690 adolescents. Data on the occurrence of demographic, psycho-social and socio-environmental risk factors were tested using multinomial logistic regression for their association with suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. RESULTS: The survey indicated that 23.2% had thought about suicide and 28.3% had made a suicide attempt in the previous year. Anxiety, loneliness, being bullied, alcohol misuse, illicit drug use, and lack of parental support were independently related to the ideation outcomes, suicidal ideation without planning and suicidal ideation with planning. Multinomial regression analysis, using one suicide attempt and multiple suicide attempts as outcomes, revealed that female sex, anxiety, loneliness, being physically attacked, and illicit drug use were associated these outcomes. DISCUSSION: The prevalence of suicide attempts reported in the survey is relatively high. It is possible that there are cultural factors that could explain this finding. Our research indicates that many factors are related to the occurrence of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among youth in Benin. Illicit drug use and violence in particular are associated with a high rate of suicide attempts in Benin. Measures to address these issues may reduce the risk of self-inflicted violence.

  17. VOLATILE CONSTITUENTS AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF ESSENTIAL OIL FROM Securidaca longepedunculata Fers. GROWING IN BENIN

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    Dominique C.K. Sohounhloue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of roots bark of Securidacaca longepedunculata Fers. (Polygalaceae growing in Savalou, Biguinan and Gbegrou (Benin were analyzed using capillary GC and GC/MS. Seven compounds representing (99.5%; 99.1%; 99.3% respectively of the oils were identified. The major compound was found to be methyl salicylate respectively (98.0%; 98.6%; 98.7%. The antimicrobial activity of these oils was found to be high, and medium antiradical activity was observed.

  18. Yeast dynamics during spontaneous fermentation of mawe and tchoukoutou, two traditional products from Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greppi, Anna; Rantisou, Kalliopi; Padonou, Wilfrid

    2013-01-01

    Mawe and tchoukoutou are two traditional fermented foods largely consumed in Benin, West Africa. Their preparations remain as a house art and they are the result of spontaneous fermentation processes. In this study, dynamics of the yeast populations occurring during spontaneous fermentations...... of mawe and tchoukoutou were investigated using both culture-dependent and -independent approaches. For each product, two productions were followed. Samples were taken at different fermentation times and yeasts were isolated, resulting in the collection of 177 isolates. They were identified by the PCR...

  19. Indigenous knowledge of shea processing and quality perception of shea products in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honfo, Fernande G; Linnemann, Anita R; Akissoe, Noël H; Soumanou, Mohamed M; van Boekel, Martinus A J S

    2012-01-01

    A survey among 246 people belonging to 14 ethnic groups and living in 5 different parklands in Benin revealed different practices to process shea kernels (namely boiling followed sun drying and smoking) and extract shea butter. A relation between parklands, gathering period, and sun-drying conditions was established. Moisture content and appearance of kernels were the selection criteria for users of shea kernels; color was the main characteristic to buy butter. Constraints to be solved are long processing times, lack of milling equipment and high water requirements. Best practices for smoking, sun drying, and roasting operations need to be established for further improvement.

  20. Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Cabbage with Minimized Pesticide Residues in Southern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustin Vidogbéna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cabbage (Brassicaceae is one of the most frequently consumed exotic vegetables in Benin and also the most affected by insects. To meet growing food demand, farmers rely heavily on synthetic pesticides that are harmful for themselves, consumers and the environment. Integrated pest management has been proposed as the means to improve vegetable productivity and quality in many developing countries. One approach is to substitute pesticides with physical barriers to insects, like nets. Here, we assess consumers’ perceptions about cabbage and their purchasing behavior towards cabbage that was produced using these nets in two major cities in Benin. Results indicate that consumers are aware of the health risks associated with intensive use of pesticides but were not able to recognize the quality difference between cabbage produced under nets from those using pesticides. All consumers were willing to pay a price premium for cabbage with minimized pesticides residues compared with conventionally produced cabbage, the average premium being 38%. Women, older, highly educated consumers and those able to distinguish cabbage qualities were willing to pay the most. We suggest that farmers will obtain higher prices if their production of cabbage with preferred characteristics is accompanied by an improved marketing strategy.

  1. Diversity of the Neglected and Underutilized Crop Species of Importance in Benin

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    A. Dansi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the plant species that are cultivated for food across the world are neglected and underutilized. To assess their diversity in Benin and identify the priority species and establish their research needs, a survey was conducted in 50 villages distributed throughout the country. The study revealed 41 neglected and underutilized crop species (NUCS among which 19 were identified as of priority base on 10 criteria among which included their extent and degree of consumption. Reasons for neglect vary with the producers and the agricultural technicians. Market surveys revealed that NUCS are important source of household incomes and substantially contribute to poverty reduction. Review of the literature available revealed that most of the species are rich in nutrients and have some proven medicinal values and the promotion of their use would help in combating malnutrition and improving the health status of the local populations. The knowledge gaps and research needs are immense on most of the species identified as no concrete scientific data is nationally available. In terms of research, almost all has to be done starting from basic ethnobotanical investigation. The results will help the scientists and students willing to conduct research on NUCS in Benin to better orient their research programs.

  2. [Economic hardship and fallout on households of the management of hydrocephalus in Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandaho, Hugues Jean-Thierry; Hounton, Sennen Houesse; Kelani, Amina; Darga, Christian; Hoinsou-Hans, Isaac; Agbani, Florence; Lalya, Francis; Koumakpayi, Sikiratou; Ayivi, Blaise

    2017-04-27

    Objectives: The socioeconomic profile of households and families of children attending hospital for hydrocephalus were documented and analysed. Main costs related to diagnosis and care were reviewed. The emotional fallout and social well-being of families were also analysed. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study (January 2006 to January 2015) was based on costs borne by households and families for neurosurgical care of children with hydrocephalus. Results: Sixty children (1 day to 12 years old) had been hospitalized for hydrocephalus in Cotonou-Benin. In 19 cases, the families were single-parent families. In 44 cases, the parents were self-employed workers or private company employees. Public servants, eligible for national health system assistance, accounted for a mere 16 cases. Twenty six children did not receive any financial support, whereas the total average care-related out-of-pocket expenditure for families during the hospital stay was approximately €1,777 (1,117,500 FCFA), i.e. almost 14 times the average monthly income reported by the parents (82,600 FCFA – approximately €120). After hospitalization, 31 mothers had lost their jobs and 21 couples experienced marital issues and their plans to have children. Twelve recent separations were recorded, as well as one indirect maternal death related to depression. Conclusion: In Benin Republic, surgical care for paediatric hydrocephalus represents catastrophic out-of-pocket expenditures for households and families and other living expenses. Families experience significant emotional fallout with effects on couple relationships and survival.

  3. SEMINAL PLASMA LEVELS OF LEAD AND MERCURY IN INFERTILE MALES IN BENIN CITY, NIGERIA

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    Emokpae MA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Studies on environmental exposure to toxic metals and their effects on male reproductive function are scare in our setting. This study evaluates the levels of lead and mercury in seminal plasma of infertile males who are non-occupationally exposed in Benin City, Nigeria and to determine the relationship between seminal quality and these toxic metals. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 subjects participated in this study which includes 60 infertile males on routine visit to the infertility clinics in Benin City and 20 fertile males as controls. The concentration of lead in seminal plasma was assayed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer while the concentration of mercury was measured using inductively coupled plasma Mass spectrometry. Semen analyses were performed using standard techniques as recommended by World Health Organization. Results: Mean seminal plasma lead and mercury levels were significantly higher (p<0.001 in infertile males compared with controls. Mercury and lead correlated negatively (p<0.001 with sperm count, progressive motility, total motility and morphology but not with semen volume. There was no significant correlation between toxic metals and sperm indices in fertile males (controls. Conclusion: The levels of the studied toxic metals were higher in seminal plasma of infertile males and appear to have adverse effect on seminal indices in non -occupationally exposed males.

  4. Evolving pattern of anaesthesia for caesarean section experience at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasun, F E; Idehen, H O; Edomwonyi, N P

    2013-01-01

    The WHO puts caesarean section rate in Nigeria at 1.8%. This is much higher in teaching, specialist and referral hospitals. In our centre University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), the average annual rate is 33.4%. General anaesthesia is the predominant choice for caesarean section (C/S) in most centres. The trend is increasing towards regional anaesthesia. Many studies have reported the trend in several centres. This study examined the evolving pattern in our centre. To examine the evolving pattern of anaesthetic technique for caesarean section, at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. A ten-year retrospective period (2001-2010), data were pooled from the computerized data system of the department of obstetrics and gynaecology. Also, anaesthetic chart and staff records from the department of anaesthesiology were studied. Information about C/S, anaesthetic method and anaesthetist profile were derived from these sources. The data were analysed and presented as simple frequency and nominal data. Six thousand, six hundred and eleven C/S were done over the 10-year period. Emergency C/S was 82%, while 12% were elective cases. Average annual rate of anaesthetic technique used was regional anaesthesia 76.5% and general anaesthesia 23.5%. The use of regional anaesthesia grew from 30% in 2001, to 89% in 2010. Number of anaesthetists increased from 22 in 2001 to 37 in 2010. The study shows an increasing use of regional anaesthesia for C/S, predominantly subarachnoid blockade.

  5. The Dilemmas of Monogamy: Pleasure, Discipline and the Pentecostal Moral Self in the Republic of Benin

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    Sitna Quiroz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on ethnographic research in the Republic of Benin, this article explores how Pentecostal teachings on marriage and the management of sexual pleasure contribute to shaping converts’ moral selves. For Pentecostals, fidelity towards God, when single and fidelity between partners, once married, is presented as the ideal model of partnership to which every “Born-Again” should aspire. In the context where polygamous unions are socially accepted, Pentecostal pastors teach that a satisfactory sexual life restricted to marriage is the means of building successful monogamous unions. However, sexual satisfaction might not always guarantee marital success, especially when people face problems of infertility. The author suggests that the disciplinary regimes that these teachings promote contribute to shaping new modes of intimacy, which are compatible with societal changes but often contradict the extant social norms and ideals of reproduction. Moral dilemmas arising from this tension are the key to understanding how Pentecostal Christianity shapes the moral self. The article addresses how Pentecostals in Benin navigate and negotiate cultural continuities and discontinuities in relation to church authority and family life.

  6. Body image perception and mental health of in-school adolescents in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otakpor, Alexander Ndubuisi; Ehimigbai, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Perception of one's physical appearance is important in the development of the concept of body image. Desire to achieve the unrealistic image of 'physical perfection' often make adolescents feel discontented; thus leading to mental health problems. To assess body image perception (BIP) and its relationship with mental health of secondary school adolescents in Benin City, Nigeria. The study was cross-sectional and descriptive, conducted in senior secondary schools in Benin City. Six hundred randomly selected subjects completed the 28-item General Health Questionnaire, the appearance evaluation (AE) and body areas satisfaction (BAS) subscales of the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ), and a sociodemographic data collection sheet. Cross tabulation of categorical variables and correlation analysis was performed by means of SPSS version 19.0, with level of significance set atP= 0.05. Two hundred and twenty three (36.7%) and 46.2% of the respondents were dissatisfied with their appearance and discrete aspects of their bodies, respectively. The prevalence of probable psychiatric morbidity was 35.4%. AE and BAS subscales of the MBSRQ had significant but weak negative correlation with psychiatric morbidity (r = -0.195,P= 0.000; r = -0.097,P= 0.018, respectively). BIP was significantly associated with psychiatric morbidity. Subjects who were less satisfied with their general appearance and discrete aspects of their body screened positive for general psychiatric morbidity.

  7. Pattern and outcome of children admitted for burns in Benin City, mid-western Nigeria

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    Oludiran O

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Children are a vulnerable to burns, an injury, which is often preventable. A study of the profile of cases of children admitted for burns will provide background information to suggest locally doable preventive strategies as well as supply basic information for future reference. We studied the records of 62 children aged 0-16 years, admitted for burns, at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, between January 2002 and December 2006. There were 34 male and 28 female children. Children under three years constituted 56.5%. Whereas the leading cause of burns in all the children was flame burns from kerosene explosions (52%, scalds were responsible for 68.6% of cases in those under three. The extent of burn injury ranged from 6 to 50% and most of them presented late. 64.6% were discharged within three weeks. Wound sepsis and post burn contractures were the most frequently encountered complications (19.4% and 9.7% respectively. There were two deaths (3.2% related to sepsis. Particular attention to burn safety precautions in children (especially, in the> 3 years age group, safer storage and dispensing of combustible chemicals particularly petroleum products is advocated. Fire safety awareness, correct first aid measures and early presentation in the hospital will reduce morbidity and mortality. Early physiotherapy and splinting strategies will reduce contractures. There is the need locally for the establishment of specialized burn centres both to treat these children and to stimulate interest in burn management.

  8. The Necessity of Mobile Phone Technologies for Public Health Surveillance in Benin

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    Yaovi M. G. Hounmanou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted in March 2016 to assess the need of mobile phone technologies for health surveillance and interventions in Benin. Questionnaires were administered to 130 individuals comprising 25 medical professionals, 33 veterinarians, and 72 respondents from the public. All respondents possess cell phones and 75%, 84%, and 100% of the public, medical professionals, and veterinarians, respectively, generally use them for medical purposes. 75% of respondents including 68% of medics, 84.8% of veterinarians, and 72.2% of the public acknowledged that the current surveillance systems are ineffective and do not capture and share real-time information. More than 92% of the all respondents confirmed that mobile phones have the potential to improve health surveillance in the country. All respondents reported adhering to a nascent project of mobile phone-based health surveillance and confirmed that there is no existing similar approach in the country. The most preferred methods by all respondents for effective implementation of such platform are phone calls (96.92% followed by SMS (49.23% and smart phone digital forms (41.53%. This study revealed urgent needs of mobile phone technologies for health surveillance and interventions in Benin for real-time surveillance and efficient disease prevention.

  9. Vergence findings and horizontal vergence dysfunction among first year university students in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovenseri-Ogbomo, Godwin O; Eguegu, Ovigwe Peter

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the prevalence of vergence dysfunctions among first year university students in Nigeria and to document the measures that define the vergence system of the visual system. A cross-sectional study of first year students of the University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria, who presented for the mandatory eye examination as part of their medical examinations required for clearance was conducted. A battery of tests that defines the vergence system including near and far phoria, positive and negative fusional vergence amplitudes at far and near, near point of convergence (NPC) and AC/A ratio were measured using conventional clinical protocols. The prevalence of vergence dysfunction among 212 first year university students who satisfied the inclusion criteria and gave consent to participate was 12.7%, with convergence insufficiency being the most common vergence dysfunction. Blurred vision, headache and diplopia were the most frequently reported visual symptoms. There is a considerable prevalence of previously undiagnosed vergence dysfunctions in this population of students. The study underscored the need to carry out a thorough binocular vision assessment as part of the battery of tests administered to newly admitted students in this community to forestall any adverse effect the presence of vergence dysfunctions might have on the academic activity of university students. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Congenital hydrocele: prevalence and outcome among male children who underwent neonatal circumcision in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, O D; Osaigbovo, E O

    2008-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and spontaneous resolution of congenital hydrocele diagnosed in male neonates who underwent circumcision at our centre. All male neonates presented for circumcision at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria between January 2002 and December 2006 were examined for the presence of hydrocele. Those diagnosed with this condition were recruited and followed up in a surgical outpatient clinic for 2 years. The number of cases of spontaneous resolution and age at which this occurred were documented on a structured pro forma. A total of 2715 neonates were circumcised and 128 (4.7%) were diagnosed with 163 cases of hydrocele, while 27 cases in 25 (0.9%) children failed to resolve at the age of 2 years. Neonatal hydrocele was bilateral in 112 (68.7%), and there were 20 (12.3%) right and 31 (19.0%) left. Among those with hydrocele, 28.1% were delivered preterm and resolution was spontaneous in many of them, with no observed significant statistical difference to those delivered full term (P=0.4740). Of the 163 hydrocele cases, 136 (83.4%) resolved spontaneously by age 18 months with peak resolution at 4-6 months. No spontaneous resolution occurred after 18 months and no hydrocele-related complication occurred during follow up. Neonates with congenital hydrocele should be observed for spontaneous resolution for at least 18 months before being subjected to surgery.

  11. Occurrence of Aspergillus section Flavi and section Nigri and aflatoxins in raw cashew kernels (Anacardiumoccidentale L.) from Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamboni, Y.; Frisvad, J.C.; Hell, K.; Linnemann, A.R.; Nout, M.J.R.; Tamo, M.; Nielsen, K.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Smid, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of Aspergillus section Flavi and A. section Nigri in cashew nuts harvested in the Northern Guinea (NG) and Southern Sudanian (SS) agro-ecological zones of Benin. Also, the presence of aflatoxins was investigated. For detection of fungal

  12. Peste des petits ruminants in Benin: Persistence of a single virus genotype in the country for over 42 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adombi, C.M.; Waqas, A.; Dundon, W.G.; Li, S.; Daojin, Y.; Kakpo, L.; Aplogan, G.L.; Diop, M.; Lo, M.M.; Silber, R.; Loitsch, A.; Diallo, A.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a contagious and often fatal disease affecting sheep and goats. Currently, it is endemic in Africa, the Middle and Near East, the Indian subcontinent and China. Understanding the molecular epidemiology and evolution of PPR virus (PPRV) can assist in the control of the transboundary spread of this economically important disease. We isolated PPRV from pathological and swab samples collected 42 years apart (1969 and 2011) in Benin, West Africa, and sequenced the full genome of two isolates (Benin/B1/1969 and Benin/ 10/2011). Phylogenetic analysis showed that all of the characterized isolates clustered within viral lineage II and that the 2011 isolates fell into two distinct subgroups. Comparison of the full genome sequences revealed a 95.3% identity at the nucleotide level, while at the protein level, the matrix protein was the most conserved between the two viruses with an identity of 99.7% and only one amino acid substitution over the 42-year sampling period. An analysis of specific amino acid residues of known or putative function did not identify any significant changes between the two viruses. A molecular clock analysis of complete PPRV genomes revealed that the lineage II viruses sampled here arose in the early 1960s and that these viruses have likely persisted in Benin since this time. (author)

  13. Identity Dynamics and Conflict in Collaborative Processes: The Case of Participatory Management of Protected Areas in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idrissou Aboubacary, L.; Aarts, M.N.C.; Leeuwis, C.; Paassen, van A.

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this paper investigated the role of identity construction in the emergence and escalation of conflict in the participatory management of protected areas in Benin. The study shows that social identity salience was dynamic and played an important role in the emergence and

  14. Multi-stakeholder innovation processes in African smallholder farming: key lessons and policy recommendations from Benin, Kenya and South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triomphe, B.; Floquet, A.; Waters-Bayer, A.; Kamau, G.; Berg, van den J.; Letty, B.; Mongbo, R.; Crane, T.; Almekinders, C.J.M.; Sellamna, N.; Vodouhe, S.D.; Oudwater, N.

    2014-01-01

    Within the context of the European-funded JOLISAA FP7 project (JOint Learning in Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), several agricultural innovation experiences focused on smallholders were assessed in Benin, Kenya and South Africa. Fifty-six cases were characterised through review of grey

  15. Multi-governance choices by smallholder farmers in the pineapple supply chain in Benin: An application of transaction cost theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arinloye, A.A.D.D.; Hagelaar, J.L.F.; Linnemann, A.R.; Pascucci, S.; Coulibaly, O.; Omta, S.W.F.; Boekel, van T.

    2012-01-01

    The present study validates the new construct “Multi-governance choices”, to sharpen our understanding of how and why smallholder farmers select among alternative governance structures. Primary data were collected from a sample of 219 pineapple farmers in Southern Benin. Results from a multivariate

  16. Natural infection of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) by toxigenic fungi and mycotoxin contamination in Benin, West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houssou, P.A.; Ahohuendo, B.C.; Fandohan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Natural infection of cowpea by toxigenic fungi and mycotoxin contamination in Benin, West Africa were studied. Cowpea samples were collected at harvest (T0) and after three months of storage (T3) from the four agro-ecological zones of the country. A total of 92 representative samples were analyse...

  17. Fostering demand-oriented service delivery? A historical reconstruction of first experiences with 'private funding, public delivery' extension in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gbehi, C.; Leeuwis, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines newly emerging patterns of agricultural extension in the context of wider liberalization of agricultural input supply, marketing and credit provision in Benin. It assesses whether the promises of privatisation were met in the case of the Sasakawa Global 2000 project. Thus, it

  18. Five Years After; the Impact of a Participatory Technology Development Programme as Perceived by Smallholder Farmers in Benin and Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, B.; Kobina, A.C.; Gogan, A.C.; Sakyi-Dawson, O.; Kossou, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The article reports effects on livelihoods of a participatory technology development effort in Benin and Ghana (2001–2006), five years after it ended. Design: The study uses data from all smallholders who participated in seven experimental groups, each facilitated by a PhD researcher.

  19. Repetitive Discrepancy between Espoused and In-Use Action Theories for Fishery Intervention in Grand-Popo, Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouevi, Augustin T.; Van Mierlo, Barbara; Leeuwis, Cees

    2011-01-01

    In order to be able to adapt successfully to eco-challenges, interest in change-oriented learning is growing around the world. The authors of this paper aim to assess the occurrence of learning for effective action-taking in successive fishery problem-solving interventions in the municipality of Grand-Popo, South-Western Benin, where interventions…

  20. Farmers' knowledge and perception of cotton pests and pest control practices in Benin: results of a diagnostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinzogan, A.A.C.; Huis, van A.; Kossou, D.K.; Jiggins, J.L.S.; Vodouhè, S.

    2004-01-01

    Cotton production constraints in Benin as perceived by farmers were studied from May to July 2003. The knowledge, perceptions and practices of farmers growing cotton under different pest management regimes were analysed. The methods used were open and semi-structured interviews with groups and

  1. The discursive construction of conflict in participatory forest management: the case of the Agoua forest restoration in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idrissou, L.; Aarts, N.; van Paassen, A.; Leeuwis, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Agoua Forest in Benin was declared a protected area in 1953 and subsequently managed by means of a coercion system, which, however, did not prevent its deforestation. In 2002, a participatory management process was designed to restore this forest. Although the project managers and local

  2. The Discursive Construction of Confl ict in Participatory Forest Management: The Case of the Agoua Forest Restoration in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idrissou Aboubacary, L.; Aarts, N.; Paassen, van A.; Leeuwis, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Agoua Forest in Benin was declared a protected area in 1953 and subsequently managed by means of a coercion system, which, however, did not prevent its deforestation. In 2002, a participatory management process was designed to restore this forest. Although the project managers and local

  3. THE PROCESS OF SHORT-TERM AND LONG-TERM PRICE INTEGRATION IN THE BENIN MAIZE MARKET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUTZ, C; VANTILBURG, A; VANDERKAMP, BJ

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews the methodology used to study the price integration process in spatially separated spot markets, and applies if to the Benin maize market. An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Model is derived to take into account the sluggishness of price adjustments. Hypothesis testing concerns

  4. Physical Science Teachers' Attitudes to and Factors Affecting Their Integration of Technology Education in Science Teaching in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelani, Raphael R.; Gado, Issaou

    2018-01-01

    Following the calls of international conferences related to the teaching of science and technology, technology education (TE) was integrated as a component of physical sciences programmes in Benin, West Africa. This study investigates physical science teachers' attitudes towards the integration of TE topics in secondary school science curricula in…

  5. Land tenure and substainable soil fertility management in central Benin: towards the establishment of a cooperation space among stakeholders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saidou, A.; Tossou, R.; Kossou, D.; Sambieni, S.; Richards, P.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    Tenure arrangements were studied in central Benin, with special attention to factors diminishing or enhancing mutual trust between landowners and migrant farmers. Two contrasting tenure arrangement systems occur. The first is found in Ouoghi village, where landowners and villagers are organized

  6. Genetic variability in yam cultivars from Guinea-Sudan of Benin assessed by random amplified polymorphic DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zannou, A.; Agbicodo, E.; Zoundjihékpon, J.; Struik, P.C.; Ahanchédé, A.; Kossou, D.K.; Sanni, A.

    2009-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea spp.) is an important food and cash crop in the Guinea-Sudan zone of Benin. The genetic diversity of about 70 cultivars of Dioscorea cayenensis/Dioscorea rotundata (Guinea yam) and about 20 cultivars of Dioscorea alata (water yam) was analysed using random amplified polymorphic DNA

  7. Effect of Participatory Research on Farmers' Knowledge and Practice of IPM: The Case of Cotton in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Codjo Euloge; Haagsma, Rein; Aoudji, Augustin K. N.; Vodouhê, Simplice D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the effect of participatory research on farmers' knowledge and practice of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Benin. The participatory field experiments were carried out during the 2011-2012 cotton growing season, and focused on the development and application of pest management knowledge. Methodology: A…

  8. Reconstituting a rainforest patch in southern Benin for the protection of threatened plants

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    Peter Neuenschwander

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In a twenty-year effort at Drabo, southern Benin, small remnant forests, young fallow and agricultural fields were linked and rehabilitated to develop a 14 ha forest reserve. Forest regrowth was encouraged by managing the natural growth of the local fallow vegetation and by bringing in seeds and other propagules from forest islands of Benin. The succession to shade-tolerant woody forest species of Guineo-Congolian origin at the expense of extra-regional herbs, the co-existence of species with slightly different requirements, and the fate of exotic trees in this natural forest are described. A quantitative assessment of a homogeneous lot indicated 397 trees per ha, with stem diameters >10 cm, 43.7% of them below 20 cm, and a rich undergrowth of 72600 smaller plants per ha, proof of active rejuvenation. Only 4.2% of all plants resulted from the 1041 introduction events, i.e., species per date, mostly of the 253 plant species that were new to Drabo. A total of 635 species were recorded, but 50 did not survive and four are yet to be identified. In June 2016, the total of 581 known living species included 224 trees. Among all plants, 244 hailed from the Guineo-Congolian zone with 17 of Upper Guinean and four of Lower Guinean origin, 113 from the three savannah zones, and 224 were of extra-regional origin. Overall, 72.8% of all woody plants, such as many climbers, all shrubs and trees, were of forest and savanna origin (GC, SG, SZ and S, whereas 70.4% of all herbs came from other regions (At, PAL and Pt. Only 7.0% of all species from the GC zone were in decline; but the further away the plants originated from, the larger the decline in numbers and vigour, up to 64.6% among plants of pan-tropical origin. Particularly pan-tropical herbs became ever rarer, with 80.0% of them declining and confined to the few open spaces along paths. In 2017 the forest harboured 52 threatened species, with threat categories EW, CR, EN or VU on the Red List of Benin, out

  9. Determinants of cord care practices among mothers in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhulimhen-Iyoha, B I; Ibadin, M O

    2012-01-01

    Mothers care for their infants' umbilical cord stump in various ways. Different cord care practices have been documented; some are beneficial while others are harmful. Who and what influence the cord care practiced by mothers have, however, not been fully explored particularly in the study locale. The objective of this study was to determine the factors that influence cord care practices among mothers in Benin City. The study subjects included 497 mothers who brought their babies to Well Baby/Immunization Clinic at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH), Benin City, Edo State, between July and August 2009. A structured questionnaire served as an instrument to extract information on their biodata and possible determinants of cord care practices. Significantly older women (P=0.023), educated mothers (P=0.029), and those who had male babies (P=0.013) practiced beneficial cord stump care practices. Beneficial cord care practice increased with increasing maternal educational status. The best predictors of beneficial cord care practices are maternal level of education (P=0.029) and infant's sex (P=0.013). The use of harmful cord care practices was more common among mothers who delivered outside the Teaching hospitals. Most (71.2%) of the mothers were aware of hygienic/beneficial cord care. The choices of cord care methods eventually practiced by mothers were influenced mainly by the disposition of nurses (51.3%), participants' mothers (32.0%), and their mothers-in-law (5.8%). There was no significant relationship between cord care practice on one hand and maternal parity, tribe, and socioeconomic classes on the other. The need for female education is again emphasized. The current findings strongly justify the need for public enlightenment programs, using the mass media and health talks in health facilities, targeting not only women of reproductive age but also secondary audience like their mothers, mothers-in-law, nurses, and attendants at health facilities

  10. Efficacy and safety of Camosunate for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

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    Damien Uyagu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nigeria, nearly 110 million clinical cases of malaria are diagnosed per year, thus being a major public health problem. The problems of resistance resulted in the introduction of the artemisinin based combinations (ACT by the WHO. Artesunate and amodiaquine (AS+AQ is at present the world’s second most widely used ACT. This study is an assessment of the efficacy and safety of Camosunate (a brand of AS+AQ; Geneith Pharmaceutical Ltd., Oshodi, Lagos in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria conducted at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH. A cross-sectional assessment of the efficacy and safety of Camosunate was conducted over a period of one year using 120 patients selected after stratification, by random sampling technique. All recruited patients had slide-proven uncom- plicated malaria and were followed up for 28 days on commencement of Camosunate. Data was collected using a structured interviewer- administered questionnaire and was analysed using SPSS version 15. The overall efficacy of Camosunate was found to be 95.8%. Treatment was well tolerated as testified by the fact that there was no case withdrawal due to adverse drug reaction (ADR or treatment emergent signs and symptoms (TESS. Also no evidence of toxicity was recorded. Camosunate is highly efficacious and well tolerated in this area of Nigeria and justifies its use as a first line treatment for uncomplicated malaria.

  11. Using information technology for an improved pharmaceutical care delivery in developing countries. Study case: Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edoh, Thierry Oscar; Teege, Gunnar

    2011-10-01

    One of the problems in health care in developing countries is the bad accessibility of medicine in pharmacies for patients. Since this is mainly due to a lack of organization and information, it should be possible to improve the situation by introducing information and communication technology. However, for several reasons, standard solutions are not applicable here. In this paper, we describe a case study in Benin, a West African developing country. We identify the problem and the existing obstacles for applying standard ECommerce solutions. We develop an adapted system approach and describe a practical test which has shown that the approach has the potential of actually improving the pharmaceutical care delivery. Finally, we consider the security aspects of the system and propose an organizational solution for some specific security problems.

  12. Social structure of lions (Panthera leo) is affected by management in Pendjari Biosphere Reserve, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogbohossou, Etotépé A; Bauer, Hans; Loveridge, Andrew; Funston, Paul J; De Snoo, Geert R; Sinsin, Brice; De Iongh, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    Lion populations have undergone a severe decline in West Africa. As baseline for conservation management, we assessed the group structure of lions in the Pendjari Biosphere Reserve in Benin. This reserve, composed of one National Park and two Hunting Zones, is part of the WAP transboundary complex of protected areas. Overall mean group size was 2.6±1.7 individuals (n = 296), it was significantly higher in the National Park (2.7±1.7, n = 168) than in the Hunting Zones (2.2±1.5, n = 128). Overall adult sex ratio was even, but significantly biased towards females (0.67) in the National Park and towards males (1.67) in the Hunting Zones. Our results suggest that the Pendjari lion population is affected by perturbations, such as trophy hunting.

  13. Social structure of lions (Panthera leo is affected by management in Pendjari Biosphere Reserve, Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etotépé A Sogbohossou

    Full Text Available Lion populations have undergone a severe decline in West Africa. As baseline for conservation management, we assessed the group structure of lions in the Pendjari Biosphere Reserve in Benin. This reserve, composed of one National Park and two Hunting Zones, is part of the WAP transboundary complex of protected areas. Overall mean group size was 2.6±1.7 individuals (n = 296, it was significantly higher in the National Park (2.7±1.7, n = 168 than in the Hunting Zones (2.2±1.5, n = 128. Overall adult sex ratio was even, but significantly biased towards females (0.67 in the National Park and towards males (1.67 in the Hunting Zones. Our results suggest that the Pendjari lion population is affected by perturbations, such as trophy hunting.

  14. Sellers to Preventive and Control Measures on Bird Flu, Benin City, Nigeria

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    V. Y. Adam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigated was the knowledge of preventive measures of avian influenza from farmers, live chicken sellers, and poultry veterinarian in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. A cross-sectional descriptive study using standardized questionnaire was conducted. Respondents included 236 poultry farmers, live chicken sellers (LCS, and veterinarian aged 12–70 years in contact with birds through husbandry. The study duration was from October 2010 to May 2011. Participants knowledge on transmission sources showed low understanding with highest being from bird-bird (57.3%. The medium most commonly utilized was electronic media (82.5% as information source. Respondents thought that vaccination of birds (80.6% would prevent infection. Farmers’ education on bird flu needs to be improved through veterinary public health and health promotion approach. Nonpharmaceutical preventive measures such as hand washing freely and avoidance of eye, nose, and mouth touching must be improved.

  15. Characteristics and health of Turkey husbandry in ouaké, north-benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attakpa, E Y; Aplogan, L G; Akossou, A Y J; Bosma, R H

    2011-01-01

    Sanitary constraints of raising turkey in north-west Benin were studied by using a survey and Haemagglutination Inhibition Test (HIT) to detect antibodies of Newcastle Disease (ND) and Avian Influenza (AI). We tested 85 serums from 7- to 24-month-old turkeys raised in 19 farms. ND prevalence rate was 54% but reactions on four sub-types of AI were negative. Mortality rates varied from 55 to 100% for 0-30 day-old flocks; 30% for 1- to 4-month-old; and 15% for older turkeys. Next to ND, probable causes of mortality are Fowl pox, Gumboro disease, scabies, coccidiosis, histomonosis, capillariosis and colibacillosis. Only one farmer who fed and vaccinated the poults, and provided clean housing for them got a lower mortality rate of 11% in turkeys less than 4-month-old. The question remains why most farmers do not apply these simple practices: are they unaware or are the technologies not profitable?

  16. Endogenous knowledge of four leafy vegetables used by rural populations in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihotogbe-Sossa, Carole N A; Akissoe, Noël H; Anihouvi, Victor B; Ahohuendo, Bonaventure C; Ahanchede, Adam; Sanni, Ambaliou; Hounhouigan, D Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Leafy vegetables are sources of diet diversification and could contribute to food and nutritional security in African rural areas. However, in some places, little is known about if, how, and why leafy vegetables are consumed. Processing and preservation methods, food forms, and consumption determinants of four leafy vegetables (Sesamum radiatum, Ceratotheca sesamoïdes, Acmella uliginosa and Justicia tenella), known to contribute to the diet of rural populations in the Center and Northern parts of Benin, were investigated. Three hundred randomly selected households were investigated, using rapid appraisal and quantitative survey methods, descriptive statistics and correspondence analysis. Processing methods to prepare sauces varied depending on sociocultural groups. Cooking of fresh leaves predominated, while sun drying was the usual practice of preserving these leafy vegetables. Consumption frequencies were associated with sociocultural groups, food habits, and availability in living areas.

  17. Detection of Mycobacterium ulcerans in the Environment Predicts Prevalence of Buruli Ulcer in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R.; Benbow, Mark E.; Campbell, Lindsay P.; Johnson, Christian R.; Sopoh, Ghislain; Barogui, Yves; Merritt, Richard W.; Small, Pamela L. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium ulcerans is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer (BU). In West Africa there is an association between BU and residence in low-lying rural villages where aquatic sources are plentiful. Infection occurs through unknown environmental exposure; human-to-human infection is rare. Molecular evidence for M. ulcerans in environmental samples is well documented, but the association of M. ulcerans in the environment with Buruli ulcer has not been studied in West Africa in an area with accurate case data. Methodology/Principal Finding Environmental samples were collected from twenty-five villages in three communes of Benin. Sites sampled included 12 BU endemic villages within the Ouheme and Couffo River drainages and 13 villages near the Mono River and along the coast or ridge where BU has never been identified. Triplicate water filtrand samples from major water sources and samples from three dominant aquatic plant species were collected. Detection of M. ulcerans was based on quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results show a significant association between M. ulcerans in environmental samples and Buruli ulcer cases in a village (p = 0.0001). A “dose response” was observed in that increasing numbers of M. ulceran- positive environmental samples were associated with increasing prevalence of BU cases (R2 = 0.586). Conclusions/Significance This study provides the first spatial data on the overlap of M. ulcerans in the environment and BU cases in Benin where case data are based on active surveillance. The study also provides the first evidence on M. ulcerans in well-defined non-endemic sites. Most environmental pathogens are more broadly distributed in the environment than in human populations. The congruence of M. ulcerans in the environment and human infection raises the possibility that humans play a role in the ecology of M. ulcerans. Methods developed could be useful for identifying new areas where humans may be at high risk for BU

  18. Spatial Analysis of Anthropogenic Landscape Disturbance and Buruli Ulcer Disease in Benin.

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    Lindsay P Campbell

    Full Text Available Land use and land cover (LULC change is one anthropogenic disturbance linked to infectious disease emergence. Current research has focused largely on wildlife and vector-borne zoonotic diseases, neglecting to investigate landscape disturbance and environmental bacterial infections. One example is Buruli ulcer (BU disease, a necrotizing skin disease caused by the environmental pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU. Empirical and anecdotal observations have linked BU incidence to landscape disturbance, but potential relationships have not been quantified as they relate to land cover configurations.A landscape ecological approach utilizing Bayesian hierarchical models with spatial random effects was used to test study hypotheses that land cover configurations indicative of anthropogenic disturbance were related to Buruli ulcer (BU disease in southern Benin, and that a spatial structure existed for drivers of BU case distribution in the region. A final objective was to generate a continuous, risk map across the study region. Results suggested that villages surrounded by naturally shaped, or undisturbed rather than disturbed, wetland patches at a distance within 1200 m were at a higher risk for BU, and study outcomes supported the hypothesis that a spatial structure exists for the drivers behind BU risk in the region. The risk surface corresponded to known BU endemicity in Benin and identified moderate risk areas within the boundary of Togo.This study was a first attempt to link land cover configurations representative of anthropogenic disturbances to BU prevalence. Study results identified several significant variables, including the presence of natural wetland areas, warranting future investigations into these factors at additional spatial and temporal scales. A major contribution of this study included the incorporation of a spatial modeling component that predicted BU rates to new locations without strong knowledge of environmental factors

  19. Bendiocarb, a potential alternative against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae in Benin, West Africa

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    Irish Seth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector in Benin has developed high level of resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, which is a serious concern to the future use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN and indoor residual spraying (IRS. In this context, one of the pathways available for malaria vector control would be to investigate alternative classes of insecticides with different mode of action than that of pyrethroids. The goal of this study was to evaluate under field conditions the efficacy of a carbamate (bendiocarb and an organophosphate (fenitrothion against pyrethroid-resistant An. gambiae s.s. Methods Wild populations and females from laboratory colonies of five days old An. gambiae were bio-assayed during this study. Two pyrethroids (deltamethrin and alphacypermethrin, an organophosphate (fenitrothion, a carbamate (bendiocarb and a mixture of an organophosphate (chlorpyriphos + a pyrethroid deltamethrin were compared in experimental huts as IRS treatments. Insecticides were applied in the huts using a hand-operated compression sprayer. The deterrency, exophily, blood feeding rate and mortality induced by these insecticides against An. gambiae were compared to the untreated control huts. Results Deltamethrin, alphacypermethrin and bendiocarb treatment significantly reduced mosquito entry into the huts (p An. gambiae (in the first month and 77.8% (in the fourth month. Bendiocarb and the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin mortality rates ranged from 97.9 to 100% the first month and 77.7-88% the third month respectively. Conclusion After four months, fenitrothion, bendiocarb and the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin performed effectively against pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles. These results showed that bendiocarb could be recommended as an effective insecticide for use in IRS operations in Benin, particularly as the mixture chlorpyriphos/deltamethrin does not have WHOPES authorization and complaints were mentioned

  20. Predictive factors of plasma HIV suppression during pregnancy: a prospective cohort study in Benin.

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    Lise Denoeud-Ndam

    Full Text Available To investigate the factors associated with HIV1 RNA plasma viral load (pVL below 40 copies/mL at the third trimester of pregnancy, as part of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT in Benin.Sub study of the PACOME clinical trial of malaria prophylaxis in HIV-infected pregnant women, conducted before and after the implementation of the WHO 2009 revised guidelines for PMTCT.HIV-infected women were enrolled in the second trimester of pregnancy. Socio-economic characteristics, HIV history, clinical and biological characteristics were recorded. Malaria prevention and PMTCT involving antiretroviral therapy (ART for mothers and infants were provided. Logistic regression helped identifying factors associated with virologic suppression at the end of pregnancy.Overall 217 third trimester pVLs were available, and 71% showed undetectability. Virologic suppression was more frequent in women enrolled after the change in PMTCT recommendations, advising to start ART at 14 weeks instead of 28 weeks of pregnancy. In multivariate analysis, Fon ethnic group (the predominant ethnic group in the study area, regular job, first and second pregnancy, higher baseline pVL and impaired adherence to ART were negative factors whereas higher weight, higher antenatal care attendance and longer ART duration were favorable factors to achieve virologic suppression.This study provides more evidence that ART has to be initiated before the last trimester of pregnancy to achieve an undetectable pVL before delivery. In Benin, new recommendations supporting early initiation were well implemented and, together with a high antenatal care attendance, led to high rate of virologic control.

  1. Farmers’ Adaptation Strategies to Climate Change and Their Implications in the Zou Department of South Benin

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    Adégnandjou Mahouna Roland Fadina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is a global phenomenon. Its impact on agricultural activities in developing countries has increased dramatically. Understanding how farmers perceive climate change and how they adapt to it is very important to the implementation of adequate policies for agricultural and food security. This paper aims to contribute to an understanding of farmers’ adaptation choices, determinants of the adaptation choices and the long-term implications of the adaptation choices. Data were collected from 120 respondents in the Zou Department of Benin. A binary logit model was used to analyze the factors influencing household decisions to adapt to climate change. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was estimated to analyze the factors influencing households’ choice of adaptation strategies to climate change. The results show that farmers have a developed perception of climate change. These changes are translated by rainfall disturbances (rainfall delays, early cessation, bad rainfall distribution etc., shortening of the small dry season, increasing of temperature and sometimes, violent winds. The survey reveals that Benin farmers adopt many strategies in response to climate change. These strategies include “Crop–livestock diversification and other good practices (mulching, organic fertilizer,” “Use of improved varieties, chemical fertilizers and pesticides,” “Agroforestry and perennial plantation” and “Diversification of income-generating activities.” The findings also reveal that most of the respondents use these strategies in combination. From the binary logit model, we know that “farming experience” and “educational level of household head” positively influence adaptation decisions. The result of the multinomial logit analysis shows that farming experience, educational level, farm size and gender have a significant impact on climate change adaptation strategies. Based on in-depth analysis of each strategy, we

  2. Mapping of initiatives to increase membership in mutual health organizations in Benin

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    Turcotte-Tremblay Anne-Marie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mutual health organizations (MHO have been implemented across Africa to increase access to healthcare and improve financial protection. Despite efforts to develop MHOs, low levels of both initial enrolment and membership renewals continue to threaten their financial viability. The purpose of this study was to map initiatives implemented to increase the pool of MHO members in Benin. Methods A multiple case study was conducted to assess MHOs supported by five major promoters in Benin. Three months of fieldwork resulted in 23 semi-structured interviews and two focus groups with MHO promoters, technicians, elected members, and health professionals affiliated with the MHOs. Fifteen non-structured interviews provided additional information and a valuable source of triangulation. Results MHOs have adopted a wide range of initiatives targeting different entry points and involving a variety of stakeholders. Initiatives have included new types of collective health insurance packages and efforts to raise awareness by going door-to-door and organizing health education workshops. Different types of partnerships have been established to strengthen relationships with healthcare professionals and political leaders. However, the selection and implementation of these initiatives have been limited by insufficient financial and human resources. Conclusions The study highlights the importance of prioritizing sustainable strategies to increase MHO membership. No single MHO initiative has been able to resolve the issue of low membership on its own. If combined, existing initiatives could provide a comprehensive and inclusive approach that would target all entry points and include key stakeholders such as household decision-makers, MHO elected members, healthcare professionals, community leaders, governmental authorities, medical advisors, and promoters. There is a need to evaluate empirically the implementation of these interventions. Mechanisms

  3. Quantifying the domestic market in herbal medicine in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Diana; Towns, Alexandra; Legba, Sènan Ingrid; Swier, Jorik; Brière, Solène; Sosef, Marc; van Andel, Tinde

    2014-02-12

    Herbal medicine markets are essential in understanding the importance of medicinal plants amongst a country's inhabitants. They are also instrumental in identifying plant species with resource management priorities. To document the diversity of the medicinal plant market in Benin (West Africa), to quantify the weight of traded species in order to evaluate their economic value, and to make a first assessment of their vulnerability for commercial extraction. We quantitatively surveyed 22 market stalls of 16 markets in the country's eight largest urban areas. We collected all plant (parts) following standard botanical methods and recorded uses, prices and local names, and weighed and counted the numbers of sales units. We recorded 307 medicinal products corresponding to ca. 283 species. Thirty-five species were encountered in at least 25% of the surveyed stalls, from which ten are locally endangered or red-listed by the IUCN. Examples of vulnerable species included Caesalpinia bonduc, which has been declared extinct in the wild but is largely cultivated in home gardens, and was exploited for its seeds, roots, and leaves, and Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides which was harvested for its bark, roots, and leaves. Other top-selling fruits and seeds included red-listed species: Monodora myristica, Xylopia aethiopica, and Schrebera arborea. Top-selling woody plant parts included the roots of Sarcocephalus latifolius, Mondia whitei, and the barks of Khaya senegalensis and Pteleopsis suberosa. All but Sarcocephalus latifolius and Pteleopsis subersosa were species with some threat status. Plants sold at the market were mainly used for ritual purposes, women's health, and to treat malaria and its symptoms. Our results suggest that the domestic medicinal plant market in Benin is of substantial economic importance. A volume of approximately 655 metric tons worth 2.7 million USD is offered for sale annually. Traditional spiritual beliefs seem to be a major driving force behind the trade

  4. Metazoan parasite communities of catfishes (Teleostei: Siluridae) in Benin (West Africa).

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    Tossavi, Nounagnon Darius; Gbankoto, Adam; Adité, Alphonse; Ibikounlé, Moudachirou; Grunau, Christoph; Sakiti, Gilbert Nestor

    2014-11-01

    The need for more precise information on the effect of dry season on fish parasite communities in Benin lead us to undergo a focus during this season in one of the major sites of collection fry by fish farmers.Metazoan parasites were then inventoried in 166 specimens of catfishes which constituted of C larias gariepinus, Clarias ebriensis, Synodontis schall, Synodontis nigrita, and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus (Teleostei: Siluridae). Those fishes were collected from fishermen of Agonlin-Lowé at the side of Oueme River in south Benin from November 2011 to March 2012. In total, 12 parasite species were listed comprising three Monogena (Gyrodactylus sp., Synodontella sp., and Protoancylodiscoides chrysichthes), three Cestoda (Stoeksia pujehuni, Lytocestus sp., and Cestode indeterminate), five Nematoda (Paracamallanus cyathopharynx, Procamallanus laevionchus, Cithariniella petterae, Synodontisia thelastomoides, and nematode indeterminate), and one indeterminated Copepod species. Total infestation rate varied between 83.87 and 100% for the different fish species. This was high but independent of fish sex (χ(2) = 1.669, df = 4, nonsignificant). The highest mean intensity and mean abundance were, respectively, 44 and 13.33. Monogenea and Nematoda have elevated frequency of dominance, and their presence in the host is significantly correlated (r = -0.999; p < 0.05). Clariids were highly infected by Nematoda. Except for P. laevionchus and Proteoancylodiscoides, respectively, in C. gariepinus and in C. nigrodigitatus, the parasites showed clumped distribution. The component community diversity, as measured by the Shannon index (H'), revealed that S. schall had the most parasite diversity.

  5. Hepatitis-B vaccination status among dental surgeons in benin city, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, Cc; Ehizele, Ao; Uche, I; Erhabor, P

    2012-01-01

    The development of success-oriented hepatitis-B vaccine uptake approach among dental surgeons is dependent on the availability of comprehensive baseline data. To determine the hepatitis-B vaccination status among dental surgeons in Benin City. This questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of dental surgeons in Benin City was conducted in May 2011. The questionnaire elicited information on demography, occupational risk rating of contracting hepatitis-B infection, hepatitis-B vaccination status, barriers to uptake of hepatitis vaccine, and suggestions on how to improve hepatitis-B vaccination rates among dental surgeons. Participation rate in the study was 93.3%. More than half (51.4%) of the respondents were 20-30 years old and 52 (74.3%) were males. The occupational risk of contracting hepatitis-B infection among dental surgeons was rated as either high or very high by 51 (72.9%) of the respondents. Amongst the respondents, 14 (20.0%) had received three doses of the hepatitis-B vaccine, 34 (48.6%) either two doses or a single dose, and 22 (31.4%) were not vaccinated. The major barriers reported among the respondents who were not vaccinated were lack of opportunity and the fear of side effects of the vaccines. The suggested ways to increase the vaccination rate among the respondents in descending order include: Making the vaccine available at no cost (51.4%), educating dentists on the merits of vaccination (17.1%), and using the evidence of vaccination as a requirement for annual practicing license renewal (14.3%) and for the employment of dental surgeons (11.4%) and others (2.9%). This study revealed low prevalence of complete hepatitis-B vaccination among the respondents. Improvement in uptake following the respondents' recommendations will serve as a template in developing success-oriented strategies among stakeholders.

  6. Is chloroquine chemoprophylaxis still effective to prevent low birth weight? Results of a study in Benin

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    Kiniffo Richard

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In areas of stable transmission, malaria during pregnancy is associated with severe maternal and foetal outcomes, especially low birth weight (LBW. To prevent these complications, weekly chloroquine (CQ chemoprophylaxis is now being replaced by intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in West Africa. The prevalence of placental malaria and its burden on LBW were assessed in Benin to evaluate the efficacy of weekly CQ chemoprophylaxis, prior to its replacement by intermittent preventive treatment. Methods In two maternity clinics in Ouidah, an observational study was conducted between April 2004 and April 2005. At each delivery, placental blood smears were examined for malaria infection and women were interviewed on their pregnancy history including CQ intake and dosage. CQ was measured in the urine of a sub-sample (n = 166. Multiple logistic and linear regression were used to assess factors associated with LBW and placental malaria. Results Among 1090 singleton live births, prevalence of placental malaria and LBW were 16% and 17% respectively. After adjustment, there was a non-significant association between placental malaria and LBW (adjusted OR = 1.43; P = 0.10. Multiple linear regression showed a positive association between placental malaria and decreased birth weight in primigravidae. More than 98% of the women reported regular chemoprophylaxis and CQ was detectable in 99% of urine samples. Protection from LBW was high in women reporting regular CQ prophylaxis, with a strong duration-effect relationship (test for linear trend: P Conclusion Despite high parasite resistance and limited effect on placental malaria, a CQ chemoprophylaxis taken at adequate doses showed to be still effective in reducing LBW in Benin.

  7. The Benin Experience: How Computational Modeling can lead to Major Vaccine Policy Changes in Low and Middle Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Schreiber, Benjamin; Wateska, Angela R.; Connor, Diana L.; Dicko, Hamadou M.; Jaillard, Philippe; Mvundura, Mercy; Levin, Carol; Avella, Mélanie; Haidari, Leila A.; Brown, Shawn T.

    2015-01-01

    While scientific studies can show the need for vaccine policy or operations changes, translating scientific findings to action is a complex process that needs to be executed appropriately for change to occur. Our Benin experience provided key steps and lessons learned to help computational modeling inform and lead to major policy change. The key steps are: engagement of Ministry of Health, identifying in-country “champions,” directed and efficient data collection, defining a finite set of realistic scenarios, making the study methodology transparent, presenting the results in a clear manner, and facilitating decision-making and advocacy. Generating scientific evidence is one component of policy change. Enabling change requires orchestration of a coordinated set of steps that heavily involve key stakeholders, earn their confidence, and provide them with relevant information. Our Benin EVM+CCEM+HERMES Process led to a decision to enact major changes and could serve as a template for similar approaches in other countries. PMID:25900134

  8. Female genital mutilation among Edo people: the complications and pattern of presentation at a pediatric surgery unit, Benin City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, David Osarumwese; Evbuomwan, Iyekoretin

    2009-03-01

    This prospective study on female genital mutilation among Edo people was based on female children and parents who presented on account of it at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, between January 2002 and December 2007. During the period, 51 female children aged 10 days and 18 years presented with complications following genital mutilation. Twenty-nine were brought by their parents for mutilation while 67 parents interviewed believed strongly on female genital mutilation with 47 mothers mutilated. Religio-cultural and superstitious beliefs were the main indications and the type of mutilation ranged from excision of clitoridal tip in 10 (19.6%) children to complete excision of the clitoris, labia minora and inner layer of majora in 7 (13.7%). Complications ranged from clitoridal cyst formation in 21 (41.2%) to life threatening infections with one mortality due to tetanus infection.

  9. The neem Azadirachta indica as a means to control soil nematodes and its application in vegetable cultures in Benin

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    Colin, JE.

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neem extracts for pest control is less common in nematology than in entomology. The purpose of this paper is to make a short review of the agronomical potential of the neem tree, with particular emphasis on its role for the control of deleterious nematodes. A specifie case for the control of Meloidogyne, which was carried out in Benin, is presented.

  10. Stratigraphy and properties of soil profiles along transects in Burkina Faso and Benin and their influence on phytodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Anne, Cheikh Amadou Tidiane

    2013-01-01

    This thesis aims to analyse in a first step the physical and chemical properties of soil profiles along pedomorphological transects in different land used conditions (protected, partly protected as well as cultivated and pastured areas) in North West Benin and in South East Burkina Faso. The information about soils, which are carried out in consideration of the pedogenesis processes like weathering types, saprolitisation, formation of laterite crusts and denudation within the planation surfac...

  11. Cotton pest management practices and the selection of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae population in Northern Benin

    OpenAIRE

    Yadouleton, A.; Martin, T.; Padonou, G.; Chandre, Fabrice; Asidi, A.; Djogbénou, Luc; Dabiré, R.; Aikpon, R.; Boko, M.; Glitho, I.; Akogbeto, M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pyrethroid insecticides, carbamate and organophosphate are the classes of insecticides commonly used in agriculture for crop protection in Benin. Pyrethroids remain the only class of insecticides recommended by the WHO for impregnation of bed nets. Unfortunately, the high level of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l., threatens to undermine the success of pyrethroid treated nets. This study focuses on the investigation of agricultural practices in cotton growing...

  12. Genetic characterization of the honeybee ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor from Benin (West Africa) using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelomey, Aude E; Paraiso, Armand; Sina, Haziz; Legout, Hélène; Garnery, Lionel; Baba-Moussa, Lamine

    2017-05-01

    Varroa destructor is one of the scourges of global beekeeping. It was detected for the first time in Benin in 2011 on the honeybee Apis mellifera adansonii. The aim of this study was to identify the strain of Varroa sp. found and study its genetic diversity. In total 183 Varroa mites were sampled in 21 municipalities in Benin. The COI intergenic region of each mite mtDNA was amplified by PCR. The SacI restriction enzyme was used to determine the strains of Varroa sp. Only the Korean (K) haplotype, identical to the most prevalent strain in Africa, was detected. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Varroa mites with eight microsatellite loci (Simple Sequence Repeats) indicated a very low diversity of genotypes. Thus, V. destructor populations from Benin appear to make up a single group. Their clonal wealth ranges from 0.00 to 0.47. This study is an important step forward in the monitoring of the infestation of V. destructor.

  13. Evidence of multiple mechanisms of alphacypermethrin and deltamethrin resistance in ticks Rhipicephalus microplus in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessinou, Roland Eric; Akpo, Yao; Sidick, Aboubakar; Adoligbe, Camus; Youssao Abdou Karim, Issaka; Akogbeto, Martin; Farougou, Souaïbou

    2018-03-01

    Ticks are obligate haematophagous arthropods, causing heavy losses in affected livestock. The objective of this study is to investigate phenotypic and genotypic resistance in Rhipicephalus microplus populations from Benin. Engorged female adult ticks were collected from cattle in two districts of Benin. Bioassays, biochemical and molecular tests were carried out on these ticks to determine the phenotypic, enzymatic and genetic status of resistance. Results of bioassays showed high resistance factors (RF > 41). The molecular tests showing the presence of the domain II mutation and absence of the domain III mutation in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene. Biochemical tests showed increased activity of esterases, multifunction oxidases and glutathione transferases in resistant samples. Genotyping the samples showed high levels of heterozygous genotypes (73.36% and 63.30%) as compared to homozygous susceptible and resistant genotypes (23.3% and 10%) respective at Samiondji and Betecoucou. A correlation between phenotype resistance and presence of the domain II mutation at the voltage gated sodium channel gene was observed suggesting that this could be associated with resistance. Target site mutation and metabolic detoxification are mechanisms of resistance to pyrethroids in R. microplus tick populations from Benin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Precipitation chemistry and wet deposition in a remote wet savanna site in West Africa: Djougou (Benin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpo, A. B.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Laouali, D.; Delon, C.; Liousse, C.; Adon, M.; Gardrat, E.; Mariscal, A.; Darakpa, C.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the IDAF (IGAC/DEBITS/AFrica) international program, this study aims to study the chemical composition of precipitation and associated wet deposition at the rural site of Djougou in Benin, representative of a West and Central African wet savanna. Five hundred and thirty rainfall samples were collected at Djougou, Benin, from July 2005 to December 2009 to provide a unique database. The chemical composition of precipitation was analyzed for inorganic (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, NH4+, K+, NO3-, Cl-, SO42-) and organic (HCOO-, CH3COO-, C2H5COO-, C2O42-) ions, using ion chromatography. The 530 collected rain events represent a total of 5706.1 mm of rainfall compared to the measured pluviometry 6138.9 mm, indicating that the collection efficiency is about 93%. The order of total annual loading rates for soluble cations is NH4+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > K+. For soluble anions the order of loading is carbonates > HCOO- > NO3- > CH3COO- > SO42- > Cl- > C2O42- > C2H5COO-. In the wet savanna of Djougou, 86% of the measured pH values range between 4.7 and 5.7 with a median pH of 5.19, corresponding to a VWM (Volume Weighed Mean) H+ concentration of 6.46 μeq·L-1. This acidity results from a mixture of mineral and organic acids. The annual sea salt contribution was computed for K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and SO42- and represents 4.2% of K+, 41% of Mg2+, 1.3% of Ca2+, and 7.4% of SO42-. These results show that K+, Ca2+, SO42-, and Mg2+ were mainly of non-marine origin. The marine contribution is estimated at 9%. The results of the chemical composition of rainwater of Djougou indicates that, except for the carbonates, ammonium has the highest VWM concentration (14.3 μeq·L-1) and nitrate concentration is 8.2 μeq·L-1. The distribution of monthly VWM concentration for all ions is computed and shows the highest values during the dry season, comparing to the wet season. Identified nitrogenous compound sources (NOx and NH3) are domestic animals, natural emissions from savanna soils, biomass

  15. Exploring implementation practices in results-based financing: the case of the verification in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Matthieu; Bertone, Maria Paola; Barthes, Olivier

    2017-03-14

    Results-based financing (RBF) has been introduced in many countries across Africa and a growing literature is building around the assessment of their impact. These studies are usually quantitative and often silent on the paths and processes through which results are achieved and on the wider health system effects of RBF. To address this gap, our study aims at exploring the implementation of an RBF pilot in Benin, focusing on the verification of results. The study is based on action research carried out by authors involved in the pilot as part of the agency supporting the RBF implementation in Benin. While our participant observation and operational collaboration with project's stakeholders informed the study, the analysis is mostly based on quantitative and qualitative secondary data, collected throughout the project's implementation and documentation processes. Data include project documents, reports and budgets, RBF data on service outputs and on the outcome of the verification, daily activity timesheets of the technical assistants in the districts, as well as focus groups with Community-based Organizations and informal interviews with technical assistants and district medical officers. Our analysis focuses on the actual practices of quantitative, qualitative and community verification. Results show that the verification processes are complex, costly and time-consuming, and in practice they end up differing from what designed originally. We explore the consequences of this on the operation of the scheme, on its potential to generate the envisaged change. We find, for example, that the time taken up by verification procedures limits the time available for data analysis and feedback to facility staff, thus limiting the potential to improve service delivery. Verification challenges also result in delays in bonus payment, which delink effort and reward. Additionally, the limited integration of the verification activities of district teams with their routine tasks

  16. Utilization and farmers' knowledge on pigeonpea diversity in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayenan, Mathieu Anatole Tele; Danquah, Agyemang; Ahoton, Léonard Essehou; Ofori, Kwadwo

    2017-06-20

    Understanding factors driving farmers' uses of crop genetic resources is a key component not only to design appropriate conservation strategies but also to promote sustainable production. However, in Benin, limited information is available on farmers' knowledge related to pigeonpea uses and conservation. This study aimed at i) identifying and investigating the different uses of pigeonpea in relation with socio-cultural factors, namely age, gender, ethnic group and respondents' residence, ii) assessing pigeonpea varieties richness at household level and iii) evaluating the extent and distribution of pigeonpea varieties. Three hundred and two farmers were surveyed using structured questionnaire. Direct observation, field visit and focus group discussion were carried out. Association between number of varieties maintained at household level and socio-cultural variables was tested. Mann-Whitney test was used to assess whether the number of varieties held by households headed by men and women were different. Distribution and extent of diversity was assessed through four cells analysis. Farmers in Benin mainly grow pigeonpea for its grains for home consumption. Pigeonpea's stem and leaves are used for medicinal purposes to treat malaria, dizziness, measles, and eye infection. The ethnic group and the locality of residence of farmers influenced on the use of pigeonpea for medicinal purposes (P  0.05) between the number of varieties held by household and the age of the respondent, number of years of experience in pigeonpea cultivation, the size of household, number of family members engaged in agricultural activities and gender. Farmers used criteria including seed colors, seed size, plant height, maturity groups and cooking time to classify their varieties. Varieties with white seed coat color were the most grown while varieties with black, red or mottled seed coat color are being abandoned and deserve to be conserved. Knowledge on medicinal uses of pigeonpea is

  17. Performance-Based Financing to Strengthen the Health System in Benin: Challenging the Mainstream Approach

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    Elisabeth Paul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Performance-based financing (PBF is often proposed as a way to improve health system performance. In Benin, PBF was launched in 2012 through a World Bank-supported project. The Belgian Development Agency (BTC followed suit through a health system strengthening (HSS project. This paper analyses and draws lessons from the experience of BTC-supported PBF alternative approach – especially with regards to institutional aspects, the role of demand-side actors, ownership, and cost-effectiveness – and explores the mechanisms at stake so as to better understand how the “PBF package” functions and produces effects. Methods An exploratory, theory-driven evaluation approach was adopted. Causal mechanisms through which PBF is hypothesised to impact on results were singled out and explored. This paper stems from the co-authors’ capitalisation of experiences; mixed methods were used to collect, triangulate and analyse information. Results are structured along Witter et al framework. Results Influence of context is strong over PBF in Benin; the policy is donor-driven. BTC did not adopt the World Bank’s mainstream PBF model, but developed an alternative approach in line with its HSS support programme, which is grounded on existing domestic institutions. The main features of this approach are described (decentralised governance, peer review verification, counter-verification entrusted to health service users’ platforms, as well as its adaptive process. PBF has contributed to strengthen various aspects of the health system and led to modest progress in utilisation of health services, but noticeable improvements in healthcare quality. Three mechanisms explaining observed outcomes within the context are described: comprehensive HSS at district level; acting on health workers’ motivation through a complex package of incentives; and increased accountability by reinforcing dialogue with demand-side actors. Cost-effectiveness and

  18. The oral hygiene status of institution dwelling orphans in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojahanon, P I; Akionbare, O; Umoh, A O

    2013-01-01

    Orphans like other vulnerable children face a number of challenges including limited or no access to basic health care including oral health care, which is one of their unmet health care needs. Neglected oral health care is associated with the development and progression of periodontal diseases among others. To determine the oral hygiene status of institution dwelling orphans. Thirty eight orphans from four orphanages in Benin City, Edo State of Nigeria were clinically examined and their oral hygiene status determined using the simplified oral hygiene index of Greene and Vermillion (OHI-S). Seventy-three percent of the orphans were found to have fair oral hygiene comprising mostly of those aged 6-13 years. More females were in this category while more males presented with poor oral hygiene status. More orphans presented with fair oral hygiene that indicated inadequate oral care. There was poor oral health education and limited access to services. There is need for these to be improved as a solution to poor oral health status of these vulnerable children.

  19. A Healing Cult Met with the Baatombu from the North of Benin: The Kaawo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Mohamed

    2007-04-01

    Some remarkable studies have been devoted to the healing cults in Africa; but few of them focus on the role played by their therapeutic processes in the healing of the patient. This paper aims to show the real implication of the techniques mobilized in a healing process by a cult named Kaawo on the Baatombu in Northern Benin; and of which the data have been collected between 1995 and 2002. The outcomes of the study show the techniques used, such as prayer, sacrifice, divination, witchcraft, gesture and postures, as being real healing operators that have inductive properties with direct effect on the 'disease'. Here, the healing efficiency is all the more significant as the troubles from which the subjects suffer are either of psychosomatic or psychofunctional type, and relating rather to an existential malaise than an organic disorder. In this process, the priest/healer's conviction in the efficiency of the treatment prescribed to the patient, and the faith of the latter in the efficiency of the treatment received, maximize the potential of healing. It is clear that such results move away from the classical clinical approach that consists of assessing the consequences of a disease by examining symptoms it generates-and contributes to opening up some avenues for as yet fairly unexplored research opportunities.

  20. Prevalence and zoonotic aspects of small ruminant mange in the lateritic and waterlogged zones, southern Benin

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    Sahidou Salifou

    Full Text Available An epidemiological survey was undertaken from March to September 2010 to assess the prevalence and zoonotic aspects of scabies in small ruminants in two agro-ecological zones in southern Benin. Small ruminant (n = 444 smallholders and 1,807 of their animals (1,233 West African dwarf goats and 574 West African dwarf sheep were included in the study. The animals underwent physical examination and, when scabies-like lesions were found, crusts and integument scrapings were collected for microscopic parasitological tests. The samples collected in each survey were coded in accordance with the owner-animal pairings in order to assess the degree of correlation between mange cases in humans (smallholders and their animals. The overall prevalence of scabies was 28.33% and 9.5% in animals and smallholders (human cases respectively. Infestations were significantly (p < 0.001 more frequent in goats (39.6% than in sheep. The uniqueness of the etiological agent (Sarcoptes scabiei, the very high predictive value of human scabies in infected farms (83.67% and a very high odds ratio (OR = 2,019.25 indicate that small ruminant scabies has been transmitted to smallholders by their animals. Close contact between these smallholders and their animals was a determining factor in this interspecies communicability of sarcoptic mange.

  1. Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Infants and Mothers in Benin and Potential Sources of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodeau-Livinec, Florence; Glorennec, Philippe; Cot, Michel; Dumas, Pierre; Durand, Séverine; Massougbodji, Achille; Ayotte, Pierre; Le Bot, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Lead in childhood is well known to be associated with poor neurodevelopment. As part of a study on maternal anemia and offspring neurodevelopment, we analyzed blood lead level (BLL) with no prior knowledge of lead exposure in 225 mothers and 685 offspring 1 to 2 years old from Allada, a semi-rural area in Benin, sub-Saharan Africa, between May 2011 and May 2013. Blood samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Environmental assessments in households and isotopic ratio measurements were performed for eight children with BLL > 100 µg/L. High lead levels (BLL > 50 µg/L) were found in 44% of mothers and 58% of children. The median BLL was 55.1 (interquartile range 39.2–85.0) and 46.6 (36.5–60.1) µg/L, respectively. Maternal BLL was associated with offspring’s consumption of piped water and animals killed by ammunition. Children’s BLL was associated with presence of paint chips in the house and consumption of animals killed by ammunition. In this population, with 98% of children still breastfed, children’s BLL was highly associated with maternal BLL on multivariate analyses. Environmental measures and isotopic ratios supported these findings. Offspring may be highly exposed to lead in utero and probably via breastfeeding in addition to lead paint exposure. PMID:26978384

  2. Snail intermediate host/Schistosoma haematobium relationships from three transmission sites in Benin (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibikounlé, Moudachirou; Mouahid, Gabriel; Mintsa Nguema, Rodrigue; Sakiti, Nestor; Massougbodji, Achille; Moné, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The relationships between three strains of Schistosoma haematobium (Doh, Sô-Tchanhoué and Toho-Todougba; from Benin, West Africa) and their snail hosts were assessed by measurement of several life-history traits, including the infection rate; pre-patent period; cercarial production of each parasite strain; and growth, fecundity and survival of the host snails. Adaptations to its local snail host was found for the Toho-Todougba strain and included a short pre-patent period, a long patent period and production of more cercariae in its local snail host. In contrast, the life-history traits of the Doh and Sô-Tchanhoué strains indicated non-local adaptations, as some sympatric host-parasite combinations were not compatible, the highest infection rates occurred in the allopatric snail Bulinus wrighti, and the duration of cercarial production was short because of the high level of mortality of the snails. Furthermore, snail reproduction ceased following infection by each of the three parasite strains, and the life-history traits were not influenced by the miracidial dose.

  3. Control of pyrethroid-resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes with chlorfenapyr in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guessan, Raphael; Boko, Pelagie; Odjo, Abiba; Knols, Bart; Akogbeto, Martin; Rowland, Mark

    2009-04-01

    To compare the efficacy of chlorfenapyr applied on mosquito nets and as an indoor residual spray against populations of Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in an area of Benin that shows problematic levels of pyrethroid resistance. Eight-week trial conducted in experimental huts. Indoor residual spraying killed 82.9% of An. gambiae overall (mean mortality: 79.5%) compared to 53.5% overall (mean mortality: 61.7%) in the hut containing the lower dosed ITN. Analysis of data on a fortnightly basis showed high levels of mosquito mortality and blood-feeding inhibition during the first few weeks after treatment. Control of C. quinquefasciatus by the IRS and ITN interventions showed a similar trend to that of An. gambiae and though the average level of mortality was lower it was still much higher than with pyrethroid treatments against this population. Chlorfenapyr's reputation for being rather slow acting was evident particularly at lower dosages. The treatments showed no evidence of excito-repellent activity in this trial. Chlorfenapyr has the potential to control pyrethroid resistant populations of A. gambiae. There is a need to develop long-lasting formulations of chlorfenapyr to prolong its residual life on nets and sprayed surfaces. On nets it could be combined with a contact irritant pyrethroid to give improved protection against mosquito biting while killing pyrethroid-resistant mosquitoes that come into contact with the net.

  4. The assessment of CD4 lymphocyte counts in patients with chronic periodontitis in Benin City, Nigeria

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    Ophori Endurance Anthony

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the CD4 lymphocyte counts in patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Methods: A total of eighty patients and twenty control subjects attending Central Hospital and University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH, Nigeria were recruited for the study. Three millilitres of blood sample was collected from each subject, put into ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA bottle and mixed thoroughly. CD4 cell counts were determined using the Cyflow SL-3 method. Results: The results showed that subjects within the age of 51-60 years had the highest cases of periodontitis (32.5%. Females were more affected (61.25% than the males (38.75%. Based on the CD4 counts among the subjects, 60 (75% had greater than 700 cells/毺 L; 12 (15% between 500-700 cells/毺 L and only 8(10% had less than 500 cells/毺 L which showed that CD4 counts increased in the peripheral blood of the subjects. Conclusions: The need to properly brush the teeth and encourage regular cleanings by the dentist is further encouragedc for the prevention of periodontal disease.

  5. Why do households invest in sanitation in rural Benin: Health, wealth, or prestige?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elena; Günther, Isabel

    2014-10-01

    Seventy percent of the rural population in sub-Saharan Africa does not use adequate sanitation facilities. In rural Benin, as much as 95% of the population does not use improved sanitation. By analyzing a representative sample of 2000 rural households, this paper explores why households remain without latrines. Our results show that wealth and latrine prices play the most decisive role for sanitation demand and ownership. At current income levels, sanitation coverage will only increase to 50% if costs for construction are reduced from currently 190 USD to 50 USD per latrine. Our analysis also suggests that previous sanitation campaigns, which were based on prestige and the allure of a modern lifestyle as motives for latrine construction, have had no success in increasing sanitation coverage. Moreover, improved public health, which is the objective of public policies promoting sanitation, will not be effective at low sanitation coverage rates. Fear at night, especially of animals, and personal harassment, are stated as the most important motivational factors for latrine ownership and the intention to build one. We therefore suggest changing the message of sanitation projects and introduce new low-cost technologies into rural markets; otherwise, marketing strategies will continue to fail in increasing sanitation demand.

  6. Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Infants and Mothers in Benin and Potential Sources of Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Bodeau-Livinec

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lead in childhood is well known to be associated with poor neurodevelopment. As part of a study on maternal anemia and offspring neurodevelopment, we analyzed blood lead level (BLL with no prior knowledge of lead exposure in 225 mothers and 685 offspring 1 to 2 years old from Allada, a semi-rural area in Benin, sub-Saharan Africa, between May 2011 and May 2013. Blood samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Environmental assessments in households and isotopic ratio measurements were performed for eight children with BLL > 100 µg/L. High lead levels (BLL > 50 µg/L were found in 44% of mothers and 58% of children. The median BLL was 55.1 (interquartile range 39.2–85.0 and 46.6 (36.5–60.1 µg/L, respectively. Maternal BLL was associated with offspring’s consumption of piped water and animals killed by ammunition. Children’s BLL was associated with presence of paint chips in the house and consumption of animals killed by ammunition. In this population, with 98% of children still breastfed, children’s BLL was highly associated with maternal BLL on multivariate analyses. Environmental measures and isotopic ratios supported these findings. Offspring may be highly exposed to lead in utero and probably via breastfeeding in addition to lead paint exposure.

  7. Remaking Nigeria’s Urbanism: Assessing and Redressing the Dearth of Open Spaces in Benin City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndubisi Onwuanyi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Unplanned land use in most Nigerian cities has meant that all urban land needs are not adequately provided for within their landscapes. Open spaces are either conspicuously missing or inadequate. There is a tendency for existing open spaces to be lost to urban development pressure and a disregard for zoning. This paper identifies available and accessible open spaces in Benin City and assesses their adequacy using as a guide standards established in two selected international jurisdictions, discusses the potential benefits of open space to the city on the one hand and its residents on the other given the incipient impacts of global warming and climate change, and the prospects of mitigation by greening the city even in its already built-up state. Data is sourced from journals, reports, archival records and inspections of the urban environment. The findings confirm a great dearth of open spaces as well as deteriorating urban environmental conditions which have implications for health, well-being and urban sustainability. The recommendations are that future expansions of the city space incorporate adequate provisions for open spaces, whilst within the existing built-up city, solutions be sought in the creation of greenways, green paths, private green spaces, promoting street trees and the conversion of brownfield sites to green areas.

  8. Maize Fungal Growth Control with Scopoletin of Cassava Roots Produced in Benin

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    Rafiatou Ba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical contamination of food is among the main public health issues in developing countries. With a view to find new natural bioactive products against fungi responsible for chemical contamination of staple food such as maize, the antifungal activity tests of scopoletin extracted from different components of the cassava root produced in Benin were carried out. The dosage of scopoletin from parts of the root (first skin, second skin, whole root, and flesh was done by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. The scopoletin extract was used to assess the activity of 12 strains (11 strains of maize and a reference strain. The presence of scopoletin was revealed in all components of the cassava root. Scopoletin extracted from the first skin cassava root was the most active both as inhibition of sporulation (52.29 to 87.91% and the mycelial growth (36.51–80.41%. Scopoletin extract from the cassava root skins showed significant inhibitory activity on the tested strains with fungicide concentration (MFC between 0.0125 mg/mL and 0.1 mg/mL. The antifungal scopoletin extracted from the cassava root skins may be well beneficial for the fungal control of the storage of maize.

  9. Formation des enseignants dans une perspective d'education permanente au benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboton, Sébastien; Moussa, Yaya Mede

    1994-05-01

    The history of teacher training in Benin, which provides evidence of social and cultural change, suggests that a system of lifelong education should be introduced which unites formal, non-formal and informal education, all of which already exist in embryo. The education originally given to every member of society was a continuing progression from initiate to initiator, a lifelong education that involved, among other things, knowledge of agricultural production. This traditional system was disrupted by the reorganization of teacher training after 1945. Recurrent training of teachers remained inadequate because of limited external funding for in-service training, the lack of teachers, the suspension of recruitment and the closure of teacher training colleges. The 1975 reform, through the initiative known as Operation Education and Development, envisaged links between school and social environment, allying intellectual work with production. This meant a radical change in the role of the teacher, who was confronted with technical advance and was obliged to enter a difficult continuing process of self-training. Furthermore, population growth and the restrictions imposed by the World Bank have brought about developments in both lifelong learning and apprenticeship. These two elements are brought together under an initiative known as Production Scolaire Artisanale, designed for out-of-school learners and artisans. The author concludes that the creation of a coherent system of voluntary education would be possible in a society that was itself favourably disposed to education.

  10. Five thousand years of tropical lake sediment DNA records from Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremond, L.; Favier, C.; Ficetola, G. F.; Tossou, M. G.; Akouégninou, A.; Gielly, L.; Giguet-Covex, C.; Oslisly, R.; Salzmann, U.

    2017-08-01

    Until now, sedimentary DNA (sedDNA) studies have only focused on cold and temperate regions were DNA is relatively well preserved. Consequently, the tropics, where vegetation is hyperdiverse and natural archives are rare, have been neglected and deserve attention. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to barcode sedDNA from Lake Sele, localized in the tropical lowlands of Benin (Africa), and compared the taxonomic diversity detected by DNA analyses with pollen assemblages. Plant sedDNA was successfully amplified from 33 of the 34 successfully extracted samples. In total, 43 taxa were identified along the 5000 years spanned by the sediment: 22 taxa were identified at the family level and 21 at the genus level. The plant diversity recovered through sedDNA from Lake Sele showed a specific local signal and limited overlapping with pollen. Introduced plants, grown and cultivated close to the water, such as sweet potato, were also well recorded by sedDNA. It appears, therefore, to be a promising approach to studying past diversity in tropical regions, and could help in tracking the introduction and history of agriculture. This is the first time this method has been used in the field of domestication and dissemination of several specific crops, and the results are very encouraging.

  11. Farmers’ Responses to Changing Hydrological Trends in the Niger Basin Parts of Benin

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    Ganiyu Titilope Oyerinde

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sub-Saharan Africa is highly vulnerable to climate change given its low capacities of resilience to the enormous challenges climate change will pose. Research aimed at evaluating changes in hydrological trends and methods of adaptation was conducted in the Niger Basin parts of Benin at the peak of the rainy season in the year 2012. Rainfall and river discharge were analyzed from 1950–2010 in order to generate patterns of changes in the region. Structured questionnaires were used to evaluate the perceptions of 14 farming communities on climate-related issues and their methods of adaptations. Mann-Kendall and Pettit trend analyses were conducted for rainfall and river discharge. The findings indicated that significant decreases characterized rainfall and river discharge in the period of study. Flash flood was considered the major challenge faced in the region according to more than 90% of crop, animal, and fish farmers. Aside from that, decrease in water availability was identified as an additional challenge. Irrigation, diversification, water treatment, drainage, small dams, and dikes were reported as the common adaptation mechanisms in the catchments. This study will help in designing sustainable adaptation mechanisms to abrupt changes in the hydrology of the region.

  12. Ethnic differences in use values and use patterns of Parkia biglobosa in Northern Benin.

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    Koura, Kourouma; Ganglo, Jean C; Assogbadjo, Achille E; Agbangla, Clément

    2011-12-07

    African locust bean tree (Parkia biglobosa) is a multipurpose species used widely in arid Africa by local communities. The present study focused on ethnic differences in use values and use patterns of P. biglobosa in Northern Benin, where the species widely grows. The use values according to the various ethnic groups in the study area have been evaluated in detail for P. biglobosa. From 13 ethnic groups, 1587 people were interviewed in the study area using semi-structured questionnaires. Principal Component Analysis was applied to analyze the use value and the use patterns of P. biglobosa for the different ethnic groups. All interviewees in the study area knew at least one use of P. biglobosa. The various uses identified were medicinal (47%), handicraft and domestic (3%), medico-magic (1%), veterinary (1%), cultural (1%), food (25%) and commercial (22%). The various parts involved in these types of uses were: fruits [shell (2%), pulp (22%) and seeds (36%)], bark (17%), leaves (9%), roots (3%), flowers (1%) and branches (10%). The ethnic group consensus values for P. biglobosa parts showed that the seeds are used the most. The interviewees diversity value (ID) and equitability value (IE) indicated that knowledge concerning P. biglobosa use was distributed homogeneously among the ethnic groups. P. biglobosa is well-known and used in different ways by the local populations in the study area. Local knowledge on the species is diversified and influenced by ethnic group. Ethnic differences in use values and use patterns of the species were evident in this study.

  13. Insecticide dissipation from soil and plant surfaces in tropical horticulture of southern Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Ingrid; Laabs, Volker; Atcha-Ahowé, Cyrien; James, Braima; Amelung, Wulf

    2009-06-01

    In Sub-Saharan Africa, horticulture provides livelihood opportunities for millions of people, especially in urban and peri-urban areas. Although the vegetable agroecosystems are often characterized by intensive pesticide use, risks resulting therefrom are largely unknown under tropical horticultural conditions. The objective of this study therefore was to study the fate of pesticides in two representative horticultural soils (Acrisol and Arenosol) and plants (Solanum macrocarpon L.) after field application and thus to gain first insight on environmental persistence and dispersion of typical insecticides used in vegetable horticulture in Benin, West Africa. On plant surfaces, dissipation was rapid with half lives ranging from 2 to 87 h (alpha-endosulfan < beta-endosulfan < deltamethrin). Soil dissipation was considerably slower than dissipation from plant surfaces with half-lives ranging from 3 (diazinon) to 74 d (total endosulfan), but persistence of pesticides in soil was still reduced compared to temperate climates. Nevertheless, for deltamethrin and endosulfan, a tendency for mid-term accumulation in soil upon repeated applications was observed. The soil and plant surface concentrations of the metabolite endosulfan sulfate increased during the entire trial period, indicating that this compound is a potential long-term pollutant even in tropical environments.

  14. Reparation a morale justice for Africa: the Benin (Nigeria in perspective

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    Stephen Osaherumwen Idahosa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper offered a review of Africa’s moral call for reparation. It emphasized among other things that the continued underdevelopment and marginalization of the African continent today, is not unconnected with the trilogy of slavery, imperialism and colonialism. From the perspective of the British expedition of the Great Benin Kingdom in 1897, the paper highlighted how the African continent had been brutalized to strengthen the economies of their colonial overlords. The paper anchored its call for reparation on the premise that, reparation is not only recognized in international law, it has been paid to countries of the world whose dehumanizing experiences are not even as pathetic as those of Africa’s over 500 years of abject treatment, damages and destruction occasioned by slavery, imperialism and colonialism. It unveiled also the scholarly argument opposed to reparation. The work thus proposes that reparations from the western countries to Africa should be on cooperative and partnership basis. This should be in favour of development through deliberate international efforts in recompensing Africa for all the ills visited on her by the west.

  15. Physicochemical properties and composition of pignut (Jatropha curcas) non-conventional oil from different regions of Benin; Proprietes physico-chimiques et composition de l'huile non conventionnelle de pourghere (Jatropha curcas) de differentes regions du Benin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossou Sika Salome, Kpoviessi; Accrombessi, G.C.; Kossouoh, C. [Universite d' Abomey-Calavi, Lab. de Chimie Organique, Faculte des Sciences et Technique, Cotonou (Benin); Soumanou, M.M. [Universite d' Abomey-Calavi, Lab. de Recherche en Chimie et Biologie Appliquees, College Polytechnique Universitaire, Cotonou (Benin); Moudachirou, M. [Universite d' Abomey-Calavi, Lab. de Pharmacognosie et des Huiles Essentielles(FSS/FAST/UAC), (Benin)

    2004-11-01

    The non-conventional oils extracted from pignut seeds in eight localities of Benin have been studied. Oil content of seeds was in the range of 40 to 60%. Oil samples of different localities showed liquid and unsaturated oils and contained mainly oleic acid (43 to 53%), linoleic acid (20 to 32%) and palmitic acid (13 to 15%). Un-saponifiable content of these samples did not exceed 4%, except at Bohicon (5,5%) and Akiza (8,4%). These oils are used in the formulation of biofuels for the energy production. (authors)

  16. The first phylogeographic population structure and analysis of transmission dynamics of M. africanum West African 1--combining molecular data from Benin, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

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    Florian Gehre

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium africanum is an important cause of tuberculosis (TB in West Africa. So far, two lineages called M. africanum West African 1 (MAF1 and M. africanum West African 2 (MAF2 have been defined. Although several molecular studies on MAF2 have been conducted to date, little is known about MAF1. As MAF1 is mainly present in countries around the Gulf of Guinea we aimed to estimate its prevalence in Cotonou, the biggest city in Benin. Between 2005-06 we collected strains in Cotonou/Benin and genotyped them using spoligo- and 12-loci-MIRU-VNTR-typing. Analyzing 194 isolates, we found that 31% and 6% were MAF1 and MAF2, respectively. Therefore Benin is one of the countries with the highest prevalence (37% of M. africanum in general and MAF1 in particular. Moreover, we combined our data from Benin with publicly available genotyping information from Nigeria and Sierra Leone, and determined the phylogeographic population structure and genotypic clustering of MAF1. Within the MAF1 lineage, we identified an unexpected great genetic variability with the presence of at least 10 sub-lineages. Interestingly, 8 out of 10 of the discovered sub-lineages not only clustered genetically but also geographically. Besides showing a remarkable local restriction to certain regions in Benin and Nigeria, the sub-lineages differed dramatically in their capacity to transmit within the human host population. While identifying Benin as one of the countries with the highest overall prevalence of M. africanum, this study also contains the first detailed description of the transmission dynamics and phylogenetic composition of the MAF1 lineage.

  17. Assessment of water, sanitation, and hygiene practices and associated factors in a Buruli ulcer endemic district in Benin (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roch Christian; Boni, Gratien; Barogui, Yves; Sopoh, Ghislain Emmanuel; Houndonougbo, Macaire; Anagonou, Esai; Agossadou, Didier; Diez, Gabriel; Boko, Michel

    2015-08-19

    Control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) requires multiple strategic approaches including water, sanitation and hygiene services (WASH). Buruli ulcer (BU), one of the 17 NTDs, remains a public health issue in Benin particularly in the district of Lalo. The availability of water as well as good hygiene are important for the management of Buruli ulcer particularly in the area of wound care one of the main component of the treatment of BU lesions. Given the growing importance of WASH in controlling NTDs and in order to assess the baseline for future cross-cutting interventions, we report here on the first study evaluating the level of WASH and associated factors in Lalo, one of the most BU-endemic districts in Benin. A cross-sectional study was carried to assess WASH practices and associated factors in the district of Lalo. Data were collected from 600 heads of household using structured pretested questionnaire and observations triangulated with qualitative information obtained from in-depth interviews of patients, care-givers and community members. Univariate and multivariate analysis were carried to determine the relationships between the potential associated factors and the sanitation as well as hygiene status. BU is an important conditions in the district of Lalo with 917 new cases detected from 2006 to 2012. More than 49 % of the household surveyed used unimproved water sources for their daily needs. Only 8.7 % of the investigated household had improved sanitation facilities at home and 9.7 % had improved hygiene behavior. The type of housing as an indicator of the socioeconomic status, the permanent availability of soap and improved hygiene practices were identified as the main factors positively associated with improved sanitation status. In the district of Lalo in Benin, one of the most endemic for BU, the WASH indicators are very low. This study provides baseline informations for future cross-cutting interventions in this district.

  18. Rapid screening for co-infection of HIV and HCV in pregnant women in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, M U; Aluyi, H S A; Anukam, K C

    2009-09-01

    Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) are both major global health concerns as they cause high mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. However, while data exists for the co-infection in other countries, little or no information can be found with regard to the sero-prevalence of HIV and HCV co-infection in Nigeria, albeit in pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics in Benin City, Nigeria. The objective of the study was to determine the sero-prevalence of HIV and HCV among pregnant women seeking antenatal care in Benin City. In determining the sero-prevalence in a cross-sectional study, 200 pregnant women, aged between 15 and 49 years were screened for HIV and HCV using rapid screening test kits. Using closed ended structured questionnaires; the respondents volunteered socio-demographic information associated with risk factors of HIV and HCV acquisition. Results indicated sero-prevalence of HIV and HCV in the sampled population was 3% and 5% respectively. Thirty three percent of the pregnant women that were HCV positive were co-infected with HIV-1 infection. HIV sero-prevalence was highest in the age group, 25-29 representing 5.1%, while HCV sero-prevalence was noted highest among the women in the age group 30-34 years, representing 7.9%. Two percent of the pregnant women had equivocal (ambivalent) HIV-1 results. The study has shown a prevalence of HIV-HCV co-infection among the tested pregnant women in Benin City and more epidemiological surveys are needed in larger scale to decipher the prevalence in other states of Nigeria.

  19. Anthropological perspectives on water availability, water quality and water managament in the IMPETUS research areas of Benin and Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirscht, H.; Bollig, M.; Casciarri, B.; Casimir, M.; Rössler, M.; Bako-Arifari, N.

    2003-04-01

    The anthropological research in the framework of the interdisciplinary IMPETUS West Africa-project focuses on water availability, water quality and on social problems and conflicts concerning the management of this sometimes scarce or polluted resource. The northern project area, the catchment of the Drâa river in Southern Moroco, is characterised by a very low precipitation rate and an overall shortage of available water, a situation which has been aggravated by a drought in recent years. But even in the much moister southern research region, the catchment of the river Ouémé in Benin, water is not always available in the required quantity and quality. Although Morocco and Benin share no common cultural or ethnic identities, local 'traditional' water management institutions exist in both countries. The common objective of anthropological research is to identify and analyse these institutions on a micro- or mezzo-level, and to look into the social and cultural processes which lead to a sustainable - or ineffective - use of water. The prime research unit for anthropologists is the household, which is in general congruent with the basic economic unit. It is obvious that gender relations are an important aspect to consider if one looks into the management of water resources. Women are often in charge of supplying the household with drinking water, and in Benin many women are farmers, who, according to local concepts, spend more time on the fields than men. In addition, social changes caused by the shortage of water and their consequences for water management systems are investigated. In Morocco, the emigration of young men is a reaction to the recent droughts, transforming the household structure and gender relations in rural settlements. In return, the investment of the remittances into agriculture, for instance the purchase of motor-pumps for irrigation, affects the water management by circumventing traditional social and politically accepted water distribution

  20. E-Learning and North-South collaboration: the experience of two public health schools in France and Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edouard, Guévart; Dominique, Billot; Moussiliou, Paraïso Noël; Francis, Guillemin; Khaled, Bessaoud; Serge, Briançon

    2009-10-14

    Distance learning (e-learning) can facilitate access to training. Yet few public health E-learning experiments have been reported; institutes in developing countries experience difficulties in establishing on-line curricula, while developed countries struggle with adapting existing curricula to realities on the ground. In 2005, two schools of public health, one in France and one in Benin, began collaborating through contact sessions organised for Nancy University distance-learning students. This experience gave rise to a partnership aimed at developing training materials for e-Learning for African students. The distance-learning public health course at Nancy teaches public health professionals through a module entitled "Health and Development." The module is specifically tailored for professionals from developing countries. To promote student-teacher exchanges, clarify content and supervise dissertations, contact sessions are organized in centres proximate and accessible to African students. The Benin Institute's main feature is residential team learning; distance-learning courses are currently being prepared. The two collaborating institutions have developed a joint distance-learning module geared toward developing countries. The collaboration provides for the development, diffusion, and joint delivery of teaching modules featuring issues that are familiar to African staff, gives the French Institute credibility in assessing research work produced, and enables modules on specific African issues and approaches to be put online. While E-learning is a viable educational option for public health professionals, periodic contact can be advantageous. Our analysis showed that the benefit of the collaboration between the two institutions is mutual; the French Institute extends its geographical, cultural and contextual reach and expands its pool of teaching staff. The Benin Institute benefits from the technical partnership and expertise, which allow it to offer distance

  1. E-Learning and North-South collaboration: the experience of two public health schools in France and Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillemin Francis

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distance learning (e-learning can facilitate access to training. Yet few public health E-learning experiments have been reported; institutes in developing countries experience difficulties in establishing on-line curricula, while developed countries struggle with adapting existing curricula to realities on the ground. In 2005, two schools of public health, one in France and one in Benin, began collaborating through contact sessions organised for Nancy University distance-learning students. This experience gave rise to a partnership aimed at developing training materials for e-Learning for African students. The distance-learning public health course at Nancy teaches public health professionals through a module entitled "Health and Development." The module is specifically tailored for professionals from developing countries. To promote student-teacher exchanges, clarify content and supervise dissertations, contact sessions are organized in centres proximate and accessible to African students. The Benin Institute's main feature is residential team learning; distance-learning courses are currently being prepared. Outcome: The two collaborating institutions have developed a joint distance-learning module geared toward developing countries. The collaboration provides for the development, diffusion, and joint delivery of teaching modules featuring issues that are familiar to African staff, gives the French Institute credibility in assessing research work produced, and enables modules on specific African issues and approaches to be put online. Lessons learned: While E-learning is a viable educational option for public health professionals, periodic contact can be advantageous. Our analysis showed that the benefit of the collaboration between the two institutions is mutual; the French Institute extends its geographical, cultural and contextual reach and expands its pool of teaching staff. The Benin Institute benefits from the technical

  2. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV patients in Benin City, Nigeria

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    Frederick Olusegun Akinbo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the presence of intestinal parasites and their correlation with CD4+ T-cell counts and demographics among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients in Benin City, Nigeria. Stool specimens from 2,000 HIV-positive patients and 500 controls (HIV-negative individuals were examined for ova, cysts, or parasites, using standard procedures. In addition, patient's blood samples were analyzed for CD4 counts by flow cytometry. An overall prevalence rate of 15.3% was observed among HIV-positive patients while 6.2% was noted among non-HIV subjects. HIV status was a significant (P<0.0001 risk factor for acquiring intestinal parasitic infections. Male gender, CD4 count <200cell/µl, and diarrhea were significantly associated with an increased prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among HIV-positive patients. The level of education, occupation, and source of water among HIV patients significantly (P<0.0001 affected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most predominant parasite in both HIV-positive patients and controls. A CD4 count <200 cells/µl was significantly associated with only Isospora belli and Cryptosporidium infections. The presence of pathogenic intestinal parasites such as A. lumbricoides, hookworm, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Trichuris trichiura, and Taenia species among HIV-infected persons should not be neglected. Cryptosporidium species and I. belli were the opportunistic parasites observed in this study. Routine screening for intestinal parasites in HIV-positive patients is advocated.

  3. Findings in patients from Benin with osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction-confirmed Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommelet, Virginie; Vincent, Quentin B; Ardant, Marie-Françoise; Adeye, Ambroise; Tanase, Anca; Tondeur, Laura; Rega, Adelaide; Landier, Jordi; Marion, Estelle; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Chauty, Annick

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is known to cause Buruli ulcer (BU), a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. However, M. ulcerans infections are not limited to skin, and osteomyelitis, still poorly described in the literature, occurs in numerous young patients in Africa. In a retrospective matched case-control study conducted in a highly endemic area in Benin, we analyzed demographic, clinical, biological, and radiological features in all patients with M. ulcerans infections with bone involvement, identified from a cohort of 1257 patients with polymerase chain reaction-proved M. ulcerans infections. The 81 patients studied had a median age of 11 years (interquartile range, 7-16 years) and were predominantly male (male-female ratio, 2:1). Osteomyelitis was observed beneath active BU lesions (60.5%) or at a distance from active or apparently healed BU lesions (14.8%) but also in patients without a history of BU skin lesions (24.7%). These lesions had an insidious course, with nonspecific clinical findings leading to delayed diagnosis. A comparison with findings in 243 age- and sex-matched patients with BU without osteomyelitis showed that case patients were less likely to have received BCG immunization than controls (33.3% vs 52.7%; P = .01). They were also at higher risk of longer hospital stay (118 vs 69 days; P = .001), surgery (92.6% vs 63.0%; P = .001), and long-term crippling sequelae (55.6% vs 15.2%; P ulcerans osteomyelitis, with one-fourth of patients having no apparent history of BU skin lesions, including during the current course of illness. Delays in treatment contributed to the high proportion (55.6%) of patients with crippling sequelae. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Driver-related risk factors in commercial motorcycle (okada) crashes in Benin City, Nigeria.

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    Iribhogbe, Pius Ehiawaguan; Odai, Emeka Danielson

    2009-01-01

    There has been global concern regarding road traffic injuries. Motorcyclists constitute a high proportion of fatalities in road traffic crashes. Commercial motorcyclists (Okadas) constitute a unique group in this regard. The purpose of this study was to evaluate driver-related risk factors in Okada accidents in Benin City, Nigeria. This was a prospective study. Interviewers administered questionnaires which were used to assess Okada drivers during a two-month period (November-December 2006). A total of 996 Okada drivers were interviewed, 995 males and one female. Their ages ranged from 16-80 years with a mean age of 36.4 +/-2.4 years. In the majority of cases, the maximum educational level achieved was primary or secondary. The majority of Okada drivers (82.8%) took to the Okada business as a last resort. Driver's licenses for Okada operation were possessed by 73.5% of drivers, but only 27.2% had taken a road test before being given a license. No form of training on the use of Okadas was received by 45% of drivers before they commenced operations. Crash helmets were owned by 56.4%, but they did not use them on a regular basis. Inconvenience was the reason provided for poor compliance by 52.7% of drivers. Regular intake of alcohol was present in 39.8% of drivers. Okada drivers are mainly young males with a low level of education who are ill-prepared and ill-equipped for the road. This is a recipe for traffic crash-related injuries and fatal motorcycle crashes. There is an urgent need for job creation, better licensing procedures, road safety education, national legislation, and enforcement of crash helmet laws as well as alcohol breath tests for Okada drivers in Nigeria.

  5. Density and spatial distribution of Parkia biglobosa pattern in Benin under climate change

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    Fafunkè Titilayo Dotchamou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkia biglobosa is an indigenous species which, traditionally contributes to the resilience of the agricultural production system in terms of food security, source of income, poverty reduction and ecosystem stability. Therefore, it is important to improve knowledge on its density, current and future spatial distribution. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the tree density, the climate change effects on the spatial distribution of the species in the future for better conservation. The modeling of the current and future geographical distribution of the species is based on the principle of Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt on a total of 286 occurrence points from field work and Global Biodiversity Information Facility GBIF-Data Portal-(www.gbif.org. Two climatic models (HadGEM2_ES and Csiro_mk3_6_0 have been used under two scenarios RCP 2.6 and RCP 8.5 for the projection of the species distribution at the horizon 2050. The correlation analyses and Jackknife test have helped to identify seven variables which are less correlated (r < 0.80 with highest modeling participation. The soil, annual precipitation (BIO12 and temperature (diurnal average Deviation are the variables which have mostly contributed to performance of the models. Currently, 53% of national territory, spread from north to south is very suitable to the cultivation of P. biglobosa. The scenarios have predicted at the horizon 2050, a loss of the habitats which are currently very suitable for the cultivation and conservation of P. biglobosa, to the benefit of moderate and weak habitats. 51% and 57% are the highest proportion of this lost which will be registered with HadGEM2_ES model under two scenarios. These results revealed that the suitable habitat of the species is threatened by climate change in Benin. In order to limit damage such as decreased productivity, extinction of species, some appropriate solutions must be found.

  6. Fluoride in Water Intake and Prevalence of Dental Fluorosis Stains among Children in Central Benin

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    Alphonse S. Avocefohoun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dental fluorosis is caused by excessive uptake of fluoride, characterized by brown enamel mottling that starts with white spots, while bones and virtually every organ can be affected by well-known anti-thyroid characteristics of the flourine. The aim of our work, was to establish the relationship between the consumption of fluoride-rich water and the prevalence of dental fluorosis in school children aged between 6 and 12 years old in Djidja (Benin. Methods: An investigation of fluorosis case-finding was conducted by a dentist and water points near the schools were collected to determine their fluoride concentration. Results: A prevalence of 20.53% (115 over 560 school children sample were reported to have severe dental fluorosis, a. The fluorine content analysis of the water sample collected from the seven water points close to each school or residence in the target population revealed an average fluoride ion content of 2.20 mg/L in the drinking water of schoolchildren in the study area. The values vary from 1.51 mg/L to 3.02 mg/L and largely higher than the recommendations of WHO (0.7 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L. From this study, it should be remembered that fluorosis does not vary with sex. The highest frequencies are obtained with schoolchildren in the 8 to 11 age group, and fluorine water levels vary from place to place. These results are in fact consistent with the results of a good number of authors. In addition, body surfaces between 1501 and 1520 have the highest prevalence of dental fluorosis in our study population. It is therefore urgent to treat these waters in order to reverse the thorny public health problem of dental fluorosis.

  7. Structural Characterization of Prosopis africana Populations (Guill., Perrott., and Rich. Taub in Benin

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    Towanou Houètchégnon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural characterization of Prosopis africana of Benin was studied on the basis of forest inventory conducted in three different vegetation types (savannah, fallow, and field and three climate zones. The data collected in 139 plots of 1000 m2 each related to the diameter at breast (1.3 m above ground, total height, identification, and measurement of DBH related P. africana species height. Tree-ring parameters such as Blackman and Green indices, basal area, average diameter, height of Lorey, and density were calculated and interpreted. Dendrometric settings of vegetation type and climate zone (Guinea, Sudan-Guinea, and Sudan were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA. There is a significant difference in dendrometric settings according to the type of vegetation and climate zone. Basal area, density, and average diameter are, respectively, 4.47 m2/ha, 34.95 stems/ha, and 37.02 cm in the fields; 3.01 m2/ha, 34.74 stems/ha, and 33.66 cm in fallows; 3.31 m2/ha, 52.39 stems/ha, and 29.61 cm in the savannahs. The diameter distribution and height observed at the theoretical Weibull distribution show that the diameter and height of the populations of the species are present in all positively skewed distributions or asymmetric left, a characteristic of single-species stands with predominance of young individuals or small diameters or heights.

  8. Vitiligo on black skin: epidemiological and clinical aspects in dermatology, Cotonou (Benin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dégboé, Bérénice; Atadokpèdé, Félix; Saka, Bayaki; Adégbidi, Hugues; Koudoukpo, Christiane; Yédomon, Hubert; do Ango-Padonou, Florencia

    2017-01-01

    Vitiligo is unsightly on darkly pigmented skin and leads important stigmatization because of the mix-up with leprosy. We analyzed retrospectively the epidemiological and clinical patterns of vitiligo on darkly pigmented skin between 1988 and 2008 in the Department of Dermatology in Cotonou (Benin). The diagnosis was made based on the clinical characteristics of vitiligo. Two hundred and forty-six patients were seen, representing 0.9% of new consultations. The gender ratio was 1 : 1, and the mean age of patients was 25.9 years. The mean duration of the lesions was 30.9 months. Among the 246 patients, an associated pathology was found in 26% of cases. These included atopy (23.2%), diabetes (1.6%), thyroid disease (0.8%), and alopecia (0.4%). A family history of vitiligo was present in 1.2% of cases. The sites of the lesions were in descending order of frequency: head (60.6%), lower limbs (40.2%), upper limbs (33.3%), trunk (22.4%), genitals (13.0%), and neck (8.9%). On the head, the most common sites affected were the lips (65.1%), cheek (20.8%), and ears (16.8%). According to the different clinical forms, vitiligo was achromic (76%), speckled (12.6%), and trichromic (11.4%). Vitiligo vulgaris was the commonest form of the disease (52.4%), followed by localized vitiligo (36.2%), segmental vitiligo (9.8%), and vitiligo universalis (1.6%). Triggering factors were identified in 4.5% of patients. Our survey shows that the patterns of vitiligo are similar to that reported from other African countries with a few distinguishing particularities. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Humanised care and a change in practice in a hospital in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Noriko; Perrin, Xavier R; Vodounon, Joséf A; Gozo, Michel K; Matsumoto, Yasuyo; Uchida, Sanae; Sugiura, Yasuo

    2012-08-01

    to describe the process of introduction and implementation of humanised care (humanised childbirth); to determine how the practice of humanised care affects midwives, obstetricians, and other service providers in the hospital; and to determine the factors influencing the change in practice. a qualitative study with grounded theory approach. A semi-structured, in-depth individual interview was conducted for data collection with open coding and a constant comparative analysis until the saturation of concepts. mothers' and children's hospital functioning as a top referral centre in Benin. 16 hospital staff, including 6 midwives. humanised care was initiated by midwives with hesitation and difficulties. Midwives and obstetricians learned that a supportive environment for women could produce a positive birth outcome without medication. Communication between the midwives and women and their families improved with a higher level of appreciation of the care provided by the midwives among the women and their families. Humanised care appears to affect the professional value of midwives, their levels of job satisfaction, and their personal motivation for work towards improving their performance. A positive influence on obstetricians and other staff was observed. These individuals were inspired to make changes in hospital culture to improve care, to avoid unnecessary interventions, and to improve communication. Important factors in achieving favourable results were the leadership and commitment of the hospital management team and the recognition and support they extended towards the hospital staff, especially the midwives. a system of humanised care that stresses improved communication between the women giving birth, their families, and care providers, based on respect for women's dignity and liberty, and avoidance of unnecessary intervention can be promoted with proper managerial support. This system can promote favourable changes in hospital practice, which are helpful in

  10. Ethnic differences in use values and use patterns of Parkia biglobosa in Northern Benin

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    Koura Kourouma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African locust bean tree (Parkia biglobosa is a multipurpose species used widely in arid Africa by local communities. The present study focused on ethnic differences in use values and use patterns of P. biglobosa in Northern Benin, where the species widely grows. The use values according to the various ethnic groups in the study area have been evaluated in detail for P. biglobosa. Methods From 13 ethnic groups, 1587 people were interviewed in the study area using semi-structured questionnaires. Principal Component Analysis was applied to analyze the use value and the use patterns of P. biglobosa for the different ethnic groups. Results All interviewees in the study area knew at least one use of P. biglobosa. The various uses identified were medicinal (47%, handicraft and domestic (3%, medico-magic (1%, veterinary (1%, cultural (1%, food (25% and commercial (22%. The various parts involved in these types of uses were: fruits [shell (2%, pulp (22% and seeds (36%], bark (17%, leaves (9%, roots (3%, flowers (1% and branches (10%. The ethnic group consensus values for P. biglobosa parts showed that the seeds are used the most. The interviewees diversity value (ID and equitability value (IE indicated that knowledge concerning P. biglobosa use was distributed homogeneously among the ethnic groups. Conclusions P. biglobosa is well-known and used in different ways by the local populations in the study area. Local knowledge on the species is diversified and influenced by ethnic group. Ethnic differences in use values and use patterns of the species were evident in this study.

  11. Postweaning Exposure to Aflatoxin Results in Impaired Child Growth: A Longitudinal Study in Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yunyun; Hounsa, Assomption; Egal, Sharif; Turner, Paul C.; Sutcliffe, Anne E.; Hall, Andrew J.; Cardwell, Kitty; Wild, Christopher P.

    2004-01-01

    Aflatoxins are dietary contaminants that are hepatocarcinogenic and immunotoxic and cause growth retardation in animals, but there is little evidence concerning the latter two parameters in exposed human populations. Aflatoxin exposure of West African children is known to be high, so we conducted a longitudinal study over an 8-month period in Benin to assess the effects of exposure on growth. Two hundred children 16–37 months of age were recruited from four villages, two with high and two with low aflatoxin exposure (50 children per village). Serum aflatoxin–albumin (AF-alb) adducts, anthropometric parameters, information on food consumption, and various demographic data were measured at recruitment (February) and at two subsequent time points (June and October). Plasma levels of vitamin A and zinc were also measured. AF-alb adducts increased markedly between February and October in three of the four villages, with the largest increases in the villages with higher exposures. Children who were fully weaned at recruitment had higher AF-alb than did those still partially breast-fed (p < 0.0001); the major weaning food was a maize-based porridge. There was no association between AF-alb and micronutrient levels, suggesting that aflatoxin exposure was not accompanied by a general nutritional deficiency. There was, however, a strong negative correlation (p < 0.0001) between AF-alb and height increase over the 8-month follow-up after adjustment for age, sex, height at recruitment, socioeconomic status, village, and weaning status; the highest quartile of AF-alb was associated with a mean 1.7 cm reduction in growth over 8 months compared with the lowest quartile. This study emphasizes the association between aflatoxin and stunting, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Aflatoxin exposure during the weaning period may be critical in terms of adverse health effects in West African children, and intervention measures to reduce exposure merit investigation

  12. [Analysis of interventions designed to improve clinical supervision of student nurses in Benin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otti, André; Pirson, Magali; Piette, Danielle; Coppieters T Wallant, Yves

    2017-12-05

    The absence of an explicit and coherent conception of the articulation between theory and practice in the reform of nursing training in Benin has resulted in poor quality clinical supervision of student nurses. The objective of this article is to analyze two interventions designed to improve the quality of supervision. A student welcome booklet developed by means of a consultative and provocative participatory approach was tested with twelve student nurses versus a control group. Content analysis of the data collected by individual semi-directed interviews and during two focus groups demonstrated the value of this tool. Student nurses were also taught to use to training diaries inspired by the ?experiential learning? Training diaries were analysed using a grid based on the descriptive elements of the five types of Scheepers training diaries (2008). According to the student nurses, the welcome booklet provided them with structured information to be used as a reference during their training and a better understanding of their teachers, and allowed them to situate the resources of the training course with a lower level of stress. Fifty-eight per cent of the training diaries were are mosaics, reflecting the reflective practice and self-regulated learning of student nurses. This activity also promoted metacognitive dialogue with their supervisors. The student welcome booklet appeared to facilitate integration of student nurses into the clinical setting and promoted professional and organizational socialization. The training diary improved the quality of clinical learning by repeated reflective observation of student nurses and helped to maintain permanent communication with the supervisors.

  13. National-level differences in the adoption of environmental health technologies: a cross-border comparison from Benin and Togo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, Kelly J; Pattanayak, Subhrendu K; Sills, Erin O

    2015-03-01

    Environmental health problems such as malaria, respiratory infections, diarrhoea and malnutrition pose very high burdens on the poor rural people in much of the tropics. Recent research on key interventions-the adoption and use of relatively cheap and effective environmental health technologies-has focused primarily on the influence of demand-side household-level drivers. Relatively few studies of the promotion and use of these technologies have considered the role of contextual factors such as governance, the enabling environment and national policies because of the challenges of cross-country comparisons. We exploit a natural experimental setting by comparing household adoption across the Benin-Togo national border that splits the Tamberma Valley in West Africa. Households across the border share the same culture, ethnicity, weather, physiographic features, livelihoods and infrastructure; however, they are located in countries at virtually opposite ends of the institutional spectrum of democratic elections, voice and accountability, effective governance and corruption. Binary choice models and rigorous non-parametric matching estimators confirm that households in Benin are more likely than households in Togo to plant soybeans, build improved cookstoves and purchase mosquito nets, ceteris paribus. Although we cannot identify the exact mechanism for the large and significant national-level differences in technology adoption, our findings suggest that contextual institutional factors can be more important than household characteristics for technology adoption. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  14. First Insight into a Nationwide Genotypic Diversity ofMycobacterium tuberculosisamong Previously Treated Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases in Benin, West Africa.

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    Affolabi, Dissou; Sanoussi, N'Dira; Codo, Sergio; Sogbo, Fréderic; Wachinou, Prudence; Massou, Faridath; Kehinde, Aderemi; Anagonou, Séverin

    2017-01-01

    Molecular studies on tuberculosis (TB) are rare in low-resource countries like Benin, where data on molecular study on previously treated TB cases is unavailable. From January to December 2014, all smear- and culture-positive previously treated pulmonary TB patients from all TB clinics were systematically recruited. Drug susceptibility testing and spoligotyping were performed on all isolates. Of the 100 patients recruited, 71 (71.0%) were relapse cases and 24 (24.0%) were failure cases, while 5 (5.0%) were default cases. Resistance rate to any first-line drug was 40.0%, while 12.0% of strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR) and no strain was extensively drug-resistant (XDR). A total of 40 distinct spoligotypes were found to be corresponding to a genotypic diversity of 40.0%. ST61 was the most predominant spoligotype with prevalence of 33.0%. In all, 31 single spoligotypes and nine clusters were observed with 2 to 33 strains per cluster giving a clustering rate of 69.0%. Euro-American (Lineage 4) was the most prevalent lineage (74.0%) and Lineage 2 was associated with resistance to streptomycin. This first insight into genetic diversity of previously treated pulmonary TB patients in Benin showed a relatively high genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis .

  15. First Insight into a Nationwide Genotypic Diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among Previously Treated Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases in Benin, West Africa

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    Dissou Affolabi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Molecular studies on tuberculosis (TB are rare in low-resource countries like Benin, where data on molecular study on previously treated TB cases is unavailable. Materials and Methods. From January to December 2014, all smear- and culture-positive previously treated pulmonary TB patients from all TB clinics were systematically recruited. Drug susceptibility testing and spoligotyping were performed on all isolates. Results. Of the 100 patients recruited, 71 (71.0% were relapse cases and 24 (24.0% were failure cases, while 5 (5.0% were default cases. Resistance rate to any first-line drug was 40.0%, while 12.0% of strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR and no strain was extensively drug-resistant (XDR. A total of 40 distinct spoligotypes were found to be corresponding to a genotypic diversity of 40.0%. ST61 was the most predominant spoligotype with prevalence of 33.0%. In all, 31 single spoligotypes and nine clusters were observed with 2 to 33 strains per cluster giving a clustering rate of 69.0%. Euro-American (Lineage 4 was the most prevalent lineage (74.0% and Lineage 2 was associated with resistance to streptomycin. Conclusion. This first insight into genetic diversity of previously treated pulmonary TB patients in Benin showed a relatively high genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  16. Characterization of Potential Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria Isolated from Maize (Zea mays L. in Central and Northern Benin (West Africa

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    Nadège A. Agbodjato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aims to characterize Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR isolated from maize roots in five agroecological zones of central and northern Benin. Sixty samples were collected at the rate of four samples per village and three villages per agroecological zone. Rhizobacteria strains were isolated from these samples and biochemically characterized. These strains were analyzed for some of their PGPR traits like ammonia production and hydrogen cyanide following conventional methods. Microbiological investigation of these samples has shown that maize rhizospheres in central and northern Benin contain a high diversity of microorganisms. A total of nine species of maize Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria were identified. Those PGPR include five Bacillus species (B. polymyxa, B. pantothenticus, B. anthracis, B. thuringiensis, and B. circulans, three Pseudomonas species (P. cichorii, P. putida, and P. syringae, and Serratia marcescens. The microbial diversity does not depend on the soil types. The microbial density, generally high, varies according to both soil types and agroecological zones. All Serratia strains (100% have produced ammonia, whereas 80% of Bacillus and 77.77% of Pseudomonas produced this metabolite. The hydrogen cyanide was produced by all isolates (100% independent of their genus. These results suggest the possibility to use these rhizobacteria as biological fertilizers to increase maize production.

  17. Knowledge and practice of food hygiene and safety among food handlers in fast food restaurants in Benin City, Edo State.

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    Isara, A R; Isah, E C

    2009-09-01

    To assess the knowledge and practice of food hygiene and safety among food handlers in fast food restaurants in Benin City, Edo State. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out among 350 respondents who were selected by means of a systematic sampling method and interviewed using a semi-structured researcher-administered questionnaire. An observational checklist was thereafter used to inspect their personal hygiene status. The mean age of the food handlers was 26.4 +/- 6.1 years. Two hundred and twenty eight (65.1%) were females while 34.9% were males. A majority (98%) of the respondents had formal education. There was good knowledge and practice of food hygiene and safety among the respondents. Knowledge was significantly influenced by previous training in food hygiene and safety (p = 0.002). Food handlers who had worked for longer years in the fast food restaurants had better practice of food hygiene and safety (p = 0.036). The level of education of respondents did not significantly influenced their practice of food hygiene and safety (p = 0.084). Although, 299 (85.4%) food handlers were generally clean, skin lesions was seen in 4 (7.3%) of them. This study showed good knowledge and practice of food hygiene and safety by food handlers in the fast food restaurants in Benin City, but there is need for improvement through training and retraining of food handlers by the management of the restaurants and the local government authorities.

  18. HLA Class II Allele, Haplotype, and Genotype Associations with Type 1 Diabetes in Benin: A Pilot Study

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    Kaossarath A. Fagbemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several studies have reported the implication of HLA-DR/DQ loci in the susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D. Since no such study has yet been performed in Benin, this pilot one aimed at assessing HLA class II allele, haplotype, and genotype associations with T1D. Material and Methods. Class II HLA genotyping was performed in 51 patients with T1D and 51 healthy unrelated controls by means of the PCR-SSP method. The diagnosis of T1D was set up according to American Diabetes Association criteria. Odds ratio (OR and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI were calculated to assess the associations between T1D and HLA alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes. Results. Participants were aged 1–24 years. T1D was significantly associated with DR3, DQA1∗05:01, DQB1∗02:01, and DR3-DR4. No significant associations were observed with DR4, DQB1∗03:02, and DQB1∗06:02. Conclusion. Certain HLA class II alleles, haplotypes, and genotypes were related to T1D and may be used as genetic susceptibility markers to T1D in Benin.

  19. Satellite data as a basis for planning studies of infrastructure and related rural development in Atacora Province, Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, T. E.

    Landsat satellite data has been used to provide information for integrated land resources, agriculture and rural access road planning in Atacora Province, Benin, to ensure that correct decisions are made on the location of feeder roads and best use is made of the terrain. A significant aspect of the interpretation programme involved using a method of terrain evaluation and land classification to provide a framework for planning and assessing all subsequent development projects and highway engineering activities within the Province. Use of this terrain classification, in conjunction with further sequential satellite coverage, is considered as a basis for monitoring and subsequently analysing the rleationship between feeder road construction and induced benefits within the rural agricultural development sector, and for the establishment of a system of data storage. The value of a data storage system is evaluated as a means of preventing wasteful repetition of survey effort and facilitating the transfer of relevant data on rural development to similar areas within Benin and throughout West Africa.

  20. Evaluation of the fungal microflora infesting pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L. Millspaugh in southern Benin and associated mycological hazards

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    Euloge Adjou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Pigeon pea is a perennial legume with a good nutritional value. Unfortunately, it is also a substrate for fungi contamination. Then, a qualitative semi-structured survey was carried out in the main production areas of pigeon pea in southern Benin. This survey was coupled with samples collection. A total of 60 samples of pigeon pea were collected and analyzed for associated fungal microflora by using a taxonomic schemes primarily based on morphological characters of mycelium and conidia. Obtained results indicated a low technological valorization of pigeon pea seeds in southern Benin and their used only in direct consumption after cooking. Microbiological analyses revealed the high contamination of pigeon pea seeds by fungi, with the most occurrence of Aspergillus (71.42%, followed by Fusarium (26.19%. Fungal species such as Aspergillus ochraceus, A. parasiticus, A. flavus and Fusarium oxysporum were also detected in analyzed samples. Taking into account the toxicity of the secondary metabolites produced by these fungi, mycological hazards are discussed and important methods for the control of mycotoxin-contamination are further provided. More attention should be paid to the mycological quality of this legume, in order to protect the consumers’ health.

  1. Migration, Social Demands and Environmental Change amongst the Frafra of Northern Ghana and the Biali in Northern Benin

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    Papa Sow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of environmental change and degradation on human populations, including the possibility of sharp increases in the number of people considered “environmental migrants” have gained considerable attention. Migrating communities may try to distribute their members along particular lines of kinship, gender, marriage and/or services linked to land exploitation and agriculture. This paper explores archives and narratives of African migrants in northwestern Benin and northeastern Ghana. These regions have been marked by severe ecological change and resource deterioration over the years, as well as changes in marital patterns, family relations and customary practices. In the case of Benin, the paper looks at different ethnic groups that migrated from neighboring countries to the study region. It then focuses on the Biali, who undertake marriage journeys after practicing rituals, which are often related to agricultural activities. The Frafra (Ghana, who, in their bid to out-migrate as a livelihood/coping strategy in the advent of environmental deterioration and rainfall variability, are confronted with high bride prices, changing family relations and customary practices. The paper concludes by highlighting socio-cultural changes that ensue in the face of outmigration among different ethnic groups, especially the Biali and Frafra, and the relationship between non-environmental and environmental factors, and mobility strategies.

  2. Effects of farmers' practices of fertilizer application and land use types on subsequent maize yield and nutrient uptake in central Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saidou, A.; Kossou, D.; Acakpo, K.; Richards, P.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Four on-farm experiments in central Benin examined whether land-use succession and fertilizer treatments for prior cotton would sustain subsequent maize crop yields and achieve balanced plant nutrition. Treatments consisted of three prior land use successions, i.e. before planting maize (egusi

  3. The political ecology of land management in the oil palm based cropping system on the Adja Plateau in Benin. NJAS - Wageningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yemadje, H.R.M.; Crane, T.A.; Vissoh, V.P.; Mongbo, R.L.; Richards, P.; Kossou, D.K.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    The Adja plateau (Benin) is densely populated by tenant and landowner farmers engaged in oil palm based cropping. Landowners use oil palm sap for the production of sodabi (a local spirit), and an oil palm fallow (if no crops are grown beneath the palms) to restore soil fertility. In this area,

  4. Violence Against Women at the Workplace in Honduraa, Benin, Moldova, Indonesia: a survey by CNV Internationaal, University of Amsterdam/AIAS, WageIndicator Foundation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Besamusca, J.; van Klaveren, M.; Zerain, A.; Osse, P.; Ceccon, D.; Pralitasari, N.; Flores, A.; Sèna Alinsato, A.; Popescu, A.; Ahmad, A.

    2015-01-01

    The research focussed on violence against women at the workplace in four countries: Honduras, Indonesia, Moldova, and Benin. Each country report starts with an overview concerning the female workforce in that country, followed by a description of the legal framework concerning violence at work. It

  5. [Evaluation survey of the acceptability of the condom in Benin (Come district)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourn, L; Yacoubou, M; Zohoun, T

    1990-09-01

    250 males aged 15-50 years in the district of Come, Benin, were surveyed in March 1989 for this study of the acceptability of condoms. The survey was part of a program to improve AIDS-prevention strategies. The district of Come is located on an important international highway near the border with Togo. The adolescent population is large and sexually active. The questionnaire was self-administered by respondents literate in French and was administered by interviews for illiterate respondents. The sample was systematically selected from electoral and secondary school lists. Among the 246 respondents completing the survey, 54.4% were married, 43.9% were single, and 1.63% were divorced. 255 of subjects reported having had acute urethritis of venereal origin at least once during the 2 years preceding the survey. 100 reported using some means of protection during intercourse and 146 (59.3%) did not. Only 6 of the 246 had not been informed of the protective benefits of the condom. Among the 146 not using any protection, 24 cited as the reason decrease of pleasure, 20 difficulty of acquisition, 6 lack of knowledge of condoms, 10 belief that the partner was healthy, 4 fear of condom failure, and 82 no reason. 88 of the 100 reporting they used protection used condoms alone or with spermicide. The others used spermicidal creams such as Neo-Sampoon. Among the 88 using condoms, 22 did so regularly, 20 from time to time, and 46 rarely. 14 of 46 single men and 8 of 40 married men reported using condoms regularly. 77.2% of the condom users had secondary educations and 15.9% had university educations. 76 of the 88 experienced annoyances during condom use, with 23 citing lack of contact with the partner, 17 decreased experienced tearing of a condom, 4 developed infections despite condom use, and 2 complained of the frustration of their partners because of delayed ejaculation. 30% obtained their condoms in pharmacies and 70% did so at family planning or health centers.

  6. Functional diversity of home gardens and their agrobiodiversity conservation benefits in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbedomon, Rodrigue Castro; Salako, Valère Kolawolé; Fandohan, Adandé Belarmain; Idohou, Alix Frank Rodrigue; Glèlè Kakaї, Romain; Assogbadjo, Achille Ephrem

    2017-11-25

    Understanding the functional diversity of home gardens and their socio-ecological determinants is essential for mainstreaming these agroforestry practices into agrobiodiversity conservation strategies. This paper analyzed functional diversity of home gardens, identified the socio-ecological drivers of functions assigned to them, and assessed the agrobiodiversity benefits of home gardens functions. Using data on occurring species in home garden (HG) and functions assigned to each species by the gardeners, the study combined clustering and discriminant canonical analyses to explore the functional diversity of 360 home gardens in Benin, West Africa. Next, multinomial logistic models and chi-square tests were used to analyze the effect of socio-demographic characteristics of gardeners (age, gender, and education level), agro-ecological zones (humid, sub-humid, and semi-arid), and management regime (single and multiple managers) on the possession of a functional type of home gardens. Generalized linear models were used to assess the effect of the functions of home gardens and the determinant factor on their potential in conserving agrobiodiversity. Seven functional groups of home gardens, four with specific functions (food, medicinal, or both food and medicinal) and three with multiple functions (more than two main functions), were found. Women owned most of home gardens with primarily food plant production purpose while men owned most of home gardens with primarily medicinal plant production purposes. Finding also showed that multifunctional home gardens had higher plant species diversity. Specifically, crops and crop wild relatives occurred mainly in home gardens with food function while wild plant species were mostly found in home gardens with mainly medicinal function. Home gardening is driven by functions beyond food production. These functions are mostly related to direct and extractive values of home gardens. Functions of home gardens were gendered, with women

  7. The impact of the expansion of urban vegetable farming on malaria transmission in major cities of Benin

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    Kindé Gazard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urban agricultural practices are expanding in several cities of the Republic of Benin. This study aims to assess the impact of such practices on transmission of the malaria parasite in major cities of Benin. Method A cross sectional entomological study was carried out from January to December 2009 in two vegetable farming sites in southern Benin (Houeyiho and Acron and one in the northern area (Azèrèkè. The study was based on sampling of mosquitoes by Human Landing Catches (HLC in households close to the vegetable farms and in others located far from the farms. Results During the year of study, 71,678 female mosquitoes were caught by HLC of which 25% (17,920/71,678 were Anopheles species. In the areas surveyed, the main malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum was transmitted in the south by Anopheles gambiae s.s. Transmission was high during the two rainy seasons (April to July and October to November but declined in the two dry seasons (December to March and August to September. In the north, transmission occurred from June to October during the rainy season and was vehicled by two members of the An. gambiae complex: Anopheles gambiae s.s. (98% and Anopheles arabiensis (2%. At Houeyiho, Acron and Azèrèkè, the Entomological Inoculation Rates (EIRs and the Human Biting Rates (HBRs were significantly higher during the dry season in Households Close to Vegetable Farms (HCVF than in those located far from the vegetable areas (HFVF (p 0.05. The knock-down resistance (kdr mutation was the main resistance mechanism detected at high frequency (0.86 to 0.91 in An. gambiae s.l. at all sites. The ace-1R mutation was also found but at a very low frequency ( Conclusion These findings showed that communities living close to vegetable farms are permanently exposed to malaria throughout the year, whereas the risk in those living far from such agricultural practices is limited and only critical during the rainy seasons. Measures must be

  8. Screening for Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Anti-Retroviral Naïve AIDS Patients in Benin City, Nigeria

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    Favour Osazuwa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cryptococcus neoformans is the most incriminated fungal pathogen causing meningitis in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS patients, and is known to constitute a major cause of deaths in AIDS patients. This study thus aimed to determine the baseline sero-prevalence of Cryptococcus neoformans infection in anti-retroviral naïve (ART-naïve AIDS patients using the serum Cryptococcal antigen (crag detection method. Baseline effect of variation in CD4 counts, as well as sex and age with sero-positivity for crag were also determined.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study included 150 (61 males and 89 females ART-naïve AIDS patients attending the Human Immunodeficiency Virus clinic (HIV at the University of Benin Teaching hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, within the period from February 2011- July 2011. Forty (18 males and 22 females HIV positive outpatients with CD4 counts >200 cells/µl who were ART-naive were recruited and used as controls. The sero-prevalence of crag in the patients and the control group was measured using the cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination system (CALAS (Meridian Bioscience, Europe and CD4 counts were measured using flow cytometry (Partec flow cytometer, Germany.Results: Of the 150 ART-naïve AIDS patients with CD4 counts £200 cells/µL; 19 (12.7% were positive for serum Cryptococcal antigen. ART-naïve AIDS patients with CD4 count ≤50 cells/µl had the highest prevalence of serum crag. Lower CD4 counts were significantly associated with positivity for serum crag (p<0.001. Age and sex had no significant effect on the sero-positivity for serum crag. One (2.5% of the controls was sero-positive for crag. Thus, serum crag was significantly associated with AIDS but not with HIV (p<0.001.Conclusion: This study uncovers a high prevalence of crag in ART- naïve AIDS patients in Benin City. The prevalence of crag was higher in ART-naïve AIDS patients with lower CD4 counts. There is an urgent need to

  9. Magnitude of cardiovascular risk factors in rural and urban areas in Benin: findings from a nationwide steps survey.

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    Yessito Corine Nadège Houehanou

    Full Text Available To describe and compare the prevalences of CVRF in urban and rural populations of Benin.Subjects were drawn from participants in the Benin Steps survey, a nationwide cross-sectional study conducted in 2008 using the World Health Organisation (WHO stepwise approach to surveillance of chronic disease risk factors. Subjects aged above 24 and below 65 years were recruited using a five-stage random sampling process within households. Sociodemographic data, behavioral data along with medical history of high blood pressure and diabetes mellitus were collected in Step 1. Anthropometric parameters and blood pressure were measured in Step 2. Blood glucose and cholesterol levels were measured in Step 3. CVRF were defined according to WHO criteria. The prevalences of CVRF were assessed and the relationships between each CVRF and the area of residence (urban or rural, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models.Of the 6762 subjects included in the study, 2271 were from urban areas and 4491 were from rural areas. High blood pressure was more prevalent in urban than in rural areas, 29.9% (95% confidence intervals (95% CI: 27.4, 32.5 and 27.5% (95% CI: 25.6, 29.5 respectively, p = 0.001 (p-value after adjustment for age and gender. Obesity was more prevalent in urban than in rural areas, 16.4% (95% CI: 14.4, 18.4 and 5.9% (95% CI: 5.1, 6.7, p<0.001. Diabetes was more prevalent in urban than in rural areas, 3.3% (95% CI: 2.1, 4.5 and 1.8% (95% CI: 1.2, 2.4, p = 0.004. Conversely, daily tobacco smoking was more prevalent in rural than in urban areas, 9.3% (95% CI: 8.1, 10.4 and 4.3% (95% CI: 3.1, 5.6, p<0.001. No differences in raised blood cholesterol were noted between the two groups.According to our data, CVRF are prevalent among adults in Benin, and variations between rural and urban populations are significant. It may be useful to take account of the heterogeneity in the prevalence of CVRF when planning and implementing preventive

  10. Tectonometamorphic evolution of Ghana, Togo and Benin in the light of the Pan-African/Brasiliano orogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaing, C.; Triboulet, C.; Feybesse, J. L.; Chèvremont, P.

    1993-02-01

    The South Pan-African belt of West Africa (Ghana, Togo and Benin province) can be divided into three domains: (1) the external nappes thrust over the West African craton, derived from passive-margin sedimentary deposits (Middle to Late Proterozoic) and displaying middle- to high-pressure metamorphism, such as the Kanté and Atacora nappes; (2) the intermediate nappes including the suture-zone rocks with eclogitic assemblages (protoliths ca. 800 Ma), and mainly monocyclic metasedimentary rock and orthogneiss, that are found in central Togo and northwest Benin; (3) the internal nappes composed of high-grade commonly anatectic gneiss (anatexis ca. 600 Ma), including orthogneiss (Eburnian plutons), elongated granulite belts, reworked Archean basement, and an intrusive granite and charnockite association (ca. 600 Ma), which are exposed in Benin and Nigeria. The P- T- t- d paths calculated from rocks in these three domains show a prograde-retrograde evolution: (1) an initial clockwise evolution related to an early burial stage ( HP- HT in the intermediate nappes) followed by oblique thrusting in a SW direction, that caused nappe stacking and subsequent uplift; (2) a second anti-clockwise evolution with late temperature and pressure increases, only recorded in the more internal units. This temperature increase was a consequence of the previous crustal thickening with subsequent doming, extension and anatexis. The pressure increase was related to movement along the Kandi fault, working as a dextral strike-slip fault with a transpressional component under late E-W shortening. The retrograde trend corresponds to the final uplift. The evolution of the belt can thus be divided into three successive stages: (1) a first stage was characterized by an oblique collision inducing SW oblique thrusting with associated syn-foliation reverse metamorphism; (2) during a second stage anatectic doming took place; followed by (3) a third stage at still high temperature with dextral wrench

  11. Trans-abdominal ultrasonic findings correlated with CD4+ counts in adult HIV-infected patients in Benin, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B O-E Igbinedion

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to document the abdominal ultrasound findings in HIV infected patients and compare it with their CD4+ count. Patients and method: 300 confirmed HIV positive patients had abdominal ultrasonography done at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital from November 2007 to January 2008. Each patient’s sonographic findings were correlated with their CD4+ category using the WHO’s HIV classification index. Result: Splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, renomegaly, hyperechoic splenic parenchyma, increased renal echogenicity and lymphadenopathy are among the common sonographic findings. However, few of these findings correlated statistically with the CD4+ count. Conclusion: The versatile diagnostic tool, ultrasound, should continue to be an important imaging equipment in several impoverished communities. In the evaluation of HIV infected patients, its use is invaluable and should be promoted.

  12. Health seeking behaviour and household health expenditures in Benin and Guinea: the equity implications of the Bamako Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucat, A; Gandaho, T; Levy-Bruhl, D; de Bethune, X; Alihonou, E; Ortiz, C; Gbedonou, P; Adovohekpe, P; Camara, O; Ndiaye, J M; Dieng, B; Knippenberg, R

    1997-06-01

    Curative and preventive care utilization in Bamako Initiative health centres in Guinea and Benin increased significantly. Service based data and household survey results are compared and interpreted to evaluate the equity aspects of the Bamako Initiative programmes in these settings. Improvements in the use of preventive services are shared by the richer and poorer groups of the population. Inequities are more apparent regarding curative area. An important part of the population is not using Bamako Initiative Health Centres for financial reasons. However, the poor were found to use these Health Centres relatively more than richer socio-economic groups. Challenges of the future are identified and recommendations made as to how to tackle the problem of true indigence.

  13. Assessing Silicon Availability in Soils of Rice-Growing Lowlands and Neighboring Uplands in Benin and Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S. Abe

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is known as a beneficial nutrient in the cultivation of rice, playing a key role in photosynthesis enhancement, lodging resistance and tolerance to various environmental stress. The present study aimed to examine available Si content in both lowland soils (n = 29 and neighboring upland soils (n = 21 collected from Benin and Nigeria and to evaluate the validity of the assessment results through a pot experiment. Our results revealed that the acetate-buffer method predicted Si concentration in rice straw at the harvest stage (R2 = 0.68, P 0.05, and 76% of the uplands and 38% of the lowlands were deficient (< 50 mg/kg in acetate-buffer soluble Si. These findings suggest that the Si-deficiency soils prevail across the study area, making rice plants starved for Si and prone to environmental stress.

  14. Data quality assessment in the routine health information system: an application of the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glèlè Ahanhanzo, Yolaine; Ouendo, Edgard-Marius; Kpozèhouen, Alphonse; Levêque, Alain; Makoutodé, Michel; Dramaix-Wilmet, Michèle

    2015-09-01

    Health information systems in developing countries are often faulted for the poor quality of the data generated and for the insufficient means implemented to improve system performance. This study examined data quality in the Routine Health Information System in Benin in 2012 and carried out a cross-sectional evaluation of the quality of the data using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling method. The results confirm the insufficient quality of the data based on three criteria: completeness, reliability and accuracy. However, differences can be seen as the shortcomings are less significant for financial data and for immunization data. The method is simple, fast and can be proposed for current use at operational level as a data quality control tool during the production stage. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine © The Author 2014; all rights reserved.

  15. Current floristic composition, life form and productivity of the grasslands in the Hunting Zone of Djona (Benin)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahoudji, Myrese C.; Teka, Oscar; Axelsen, Jørgen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This paper addressed temporal changes in floristic composition, plant communities’ structures and productivity of grasslands. The study was conducted in the Hunting zone of Djona in the Transboundary Biosphere Reserve of W (TBRW) Benin. Methodology and Results: For these purpose 30...... plots of 900m² were used and “phytosociological relevés” were done following ecological uniformity, floristic homogeneity and samples representativeness to established plants communities. Biomass was estimated in 30 plots of 100 m². Results showed that the greatest productivity value (8320 ± 0.21 kg DM....../ha) was observed in Andropogon gayanus-Schizachyrium sanguineum grassland. The dominant life forms in all plants communities of the study area are the phanerophytes followed by therophytes. For chorological types, all plants communities are dominated by the species of the Sudanian base element and species...

  16. Addressing diarrhea prevalence in the West African Middle Belt: social and geographic dimensions in a case study for Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arouna Aminou

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In West Africa, the Northern Sahelian zone and the coastal areas are densely populated but the Middle Belt in between is in general sparsely settled. Predictions of climate change foresee more frequent drought in the north and more frequent flooding in the coastal areas, while conditions in the Middle Belt will remain moderate. Consequently, the Middle Belt might become a major area for immigration but there may be constraining factors as well, particularly with respect to water availability. As a case study, the paper looks into the capacity of the Middle Belt zone of Benin, known as the Oueme River Basin (ORB, to reduce diarrhea prevalence. In Benin it links to the Millennium Development Goals on child mortality and environmental sustainability that are currently farthest from realization. However, diarrhea prevalence is only in part due to lack of availability of drinking water from a safe source. Social factors such as hygienic practices and poor sanitation are also at play. Furthermore, we consider these factors to possess the properties of a local public good that suffers from under provision and requires collective action, as individual actions to prevent illness are bound to fail as long as others free ride. Methods Combining data from the Demographic Health Survey with various spatial data sets for Benin, we apply mixed effect logit regression to arrive at a spatially explicit assessment of geographical and social determinants of diarrhea prevalence. Starting from an analysis of these factors separately at national level, we identify relevant proxies at household level, estimate a function with geo-referenced independent variables and apply it to evaluate the costs and impacts of improving access to good water in the basin. Results First, the study confirms the well established stylized fact on the causes of diarrhea that a household with access to clean water and with good hygienic practices will, irrespective of

  17. Addressing diarrhea prevalence in the West African Middle Belt: social and geographic dimensions in a case study for Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, Saket; Keyzer, Michiel A; Arouna, Aminou; Sonneveld, Ben G J S

    2008-04-23

    In West Africa, the Northern Sahelian zone and the coastal areas are densely populated but the Middle Belt in between is in general sparsely settled. Predictions of climate change foresee more frequent drought in the north and more frequent flooding in the coastal areas, while conditions in the Middle Belt will remain moderate. Consequently, the Middle Belt might become a major area for immigration but there may be constraining factors as well, particularly with respect to water availability. As a case study, the paper looks into the capacity of the Middle Belt zone of Benin, known as the Oueme River Basin (ORB), to reduce diarrhea prevalence. In Benin it links to the Millennium Development Goals on child mortality and environmental sustainability that are currently farthest from realization. However, diarrhea prevalence is only in part due to lack of availability of drinking water from a safe source. Social factors such as hygienic practices and poor sanitation are also at play. Furthermore, we consider these factors to possess the properties of a local public good that suffers from under provision and requires collective action, as individual actions to prevent illness are bound to fail as long as others free ride. Combining data from the Demographic Health Survey with various spatial data sets for Benin, we apply mixed effect logit regression to arrive at a spatially explicit assessment of geographical and social determinants of diarrhea prevalence. Starting from an analysis of these factors separately at national level, we identify relevant proxies at household level, estimate a function with geo-referenced independent variables and apply it to evaluate the costs and impacts of improving access to good water in the basin. First, the study confirms the well established stylized fact on the causes of diarrhea that a household with access to clean water and with good hygienic practices will, irrespective of other conditions, not suffer diarrhea very often. Second

  18. The influence of sawmill wood wastes on the distribution and population of macroinvertebrates at Benin River, Niger Delta area, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoro, Francis O; Osakwe, Emeka I

    2006-05-01

    The impact of sawmill wood wastes on the distribution of benthic macroinvertebrates at the Sapele section of Benin River, Niger Delta, Nigeria, was investigated from March 2005 to August 2005. A total of 434 individuals were collected by kick-sampling method, representing 21 taxa of benthic macroinvertebrates. Three stations, 1, 2, and 3, were selected from upstream of the site, receiving wood wastes discharge, the impacted site and its down stream, respectively. Among the water quality variables, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxigen demand (BOD(5)), nitrate-nitrogen, phosphate-phosphorus, transparency, and alkalinity were significantly different (Pmacroinvertebrates, especially the intolerant species. The wood waste discharge not only altered the water chemistry, but also stimulated the abundance of less-sensitive macroinvertebrate species.

  19. Effect of cow colostrum on the performance and survival rate of local newborn piglets in Benin Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbokounou, Aristide Mahoutin; Ahounou, Gbênangnon Serge; Youssao Abdou Karim, Issaka; Mensah, Guy Apollinaire; Koutinhouin, Bénoît; Hornick, Jean-Luc

    2017-02-01

    The effect of bovine colostrum, including its thermally labile compounds, on the survival and growth performance of local breed piglets reared by their mother, in Benin, was evaluated over a 49-day trial. Three groups of 16 piglets, stemming from two primiparous sows belonging to a unique traditional farm, were respectively fed for the first 48 h of life with either bovine colostrum heated to 85 °C for 30 min, or thawed bovine colostrum, or colostrum from the mother. Thereafter, the animals that received bovine colostrum turned back to their mother. At day 21, almost all piglets from the group that received heated colostrum died. The highest total weight gain was obtained in the group that received thawed bovine colostrum (P ˂ 0.01), followed by the group left with the mother. Corresponding average daily gains (ADGs) were 56, 34 and 2 g/day, respectively (P ˂ 0.05). At the end of the trial, the treatment effect was highly significant on the survival of piglets (100% in the thawed colostrum group vs. 00 and 50%, respectively, in the heated colostrum group and in the group left with the mother). At day 49, numerically higher weight and ADGs were obtained in the group that received thawed cow colostrum. Thawed bovine colostrum improved the growth performance and piglet survival in the local pig breed in Benin, probably owing to thermally labile components. Bovine colostrum may be used in our farms in order to reduce pre-weaning mortality, improve the profitability of livestock farmers, and ensure survival of traditional farms. The use of bovine colostrum on farms could be facilitated by collaboration between pig farmers and bovine farmers. It could also be facilitated by the creation of a colostrum bank.

  20. Quantifying trade-offs between future yield levels, food availability and forest and woodland conservation in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duku, Confidence; Zwart, Sander J; van Bussel, Lenny G J; Hein, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Meeting the dual objectives of food security and ecosystem protection is a major challenge in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). To this end agricultural intensification is considered desirable, yet, there remain uncertainties regarding the impact of climate change on opportunities for agricultural intensification and the adequacy of intensification options given the rapid population growth. We quantify trade-offs between levels of yield gap closure, food availability and forest and woodland conservation under different scenarios. Each scenario is made up of a combination of variants of four parameters i.e. (1) climate change based on Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs); (2) population growth based on Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs); (3) cropland expansion with varying degrees of deforestation; and (4) different degrees of yield gap closure. We carry out these analyses for three major food crops, i.e. maize, cassava and yam, in Benin. Our analyses show that in most of the scenarios, the required levels of yield gap closures required to maintain the current levels of food availability can be achieved by 2050 by maintaining the average rate of yield increases recorded over the past two and half decades in addition to the current cropping intensity. However, yields will have to increase at a faster rate than has been recorded over the past two and half decades in order to achieve the required levels of yield gap closures by 2100. Our analyses also show that without the stated levels of yield gap closure, the areas under maize, cassava and yam cultivation will have to increase by 95%, 102% and 250% respectively in order to maintain the current levels of per capita food availability. Our study shows that food security outcomes and forest and woodland conservation goals in Benin and likely the larger SSA region are inextricably linked together and require holistic management strategies that considers trade-offs and co-benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. [Management of malaria in Benin: evaluation of the practices of healthcare professionals following the introduction of artemisinin derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogouyemi-Hounto, A; Kinde-Gazard, D; Nahum, A; Abdillahi, A; Massougbodji, A

    2009-12-01

    In 2004 the policy for malaria management in Benin changed when the National Malaria Coordination Program (NMCP) introduced artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Up to that time, chloroquine had been used for first-line therapy against uncomplicated malaria and sulfadoxine pyrimethamine had been used in case of failure. Artemisinin derivatives have been used for monotherapy in Benin since 2002. The purpose of this transverse study carried out among public and private centers in Cotonou from March 16 to May 17, 2005 was to determine the impact of the switch to ACT on the practices of healthcare professionals. Medical centers were randomly selected from each stratum after identification and stratification of all facilities in the healthcare pyramid. A survey questionnaire was sent to healthcare workers. A total of 690 health workers responded to the questionnaire. Most responders (95.5%) were familiar with artemisinin but a lower percentage (89.6%) prescribed them. Responders were less knowledgable about ACT drugs and Coartem was the best known combination in the minds of prescribers. Biological diagnosis was available for 50% of patients. Artemisinine (derivates) were mainly prescribed as a second choice treatment and as monotherapy whether for severe or uncomplicated malaria. They were prescribed to pregnant women in 34.6% of the cases. Dosage was incorrect in 26.1% of cases in adults and 20.9% of cases in children. These findings indicate that more effort is needed to inform healthcare workers. This is especially urgent since the country is now considering revising its malaria management policy to make ACT available at all levels of the healthcare system. An effective information campaign must be set up to ensure that health workers and drug retailers throughout the country are duly informed of the new malaria treatment policy.

  2. Influence of smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function indices in sawmill workers in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugheoke, A J; Ebomoyi, M I; Iyawe, V I

    2006-01-01

    The study was done to assess the influence of smoking on respiratory symptoms and respiratory function in sawmill workers in Benin City. 150 sawmill workers who were all males and aged between 18 and 50 years, and had been in continuous employment in sawmill factories for a minimum of one year were studied. They were selected by a two-stage random sampling process from sawmills in Benin City. These were compared to 150 age and sex matched controls in order to determine the effect of sawdust exposure on the respiratory system. Questionnaire was used to elicit morbidity patterns and anthropometric measurements were also made. Respiratory rates, Peak Expiratory Flow Rates and Blood Pressures were measured in both groups. Respiratory symptoms were more common among sawmill workers compared to the controls. Smoking by some of these workers further aggravated their respiratory symptoms. Although blood pressure was similar in both groups, Respiratory rates were higher and Peak Flow Rates were lower in the sawmill workers compared to the controls (20.83 +/- 2.02 cycles/minute and 516.72 +/- 38.48 L/minute for the sawmill workers; 15.45 +/- 1.23 cycles/minute and 575.37 +/- 27.34 L/minute for the controls, respectively). Less than 5% of the sawmill workers wore protective devices/clothing, and health and safety standards were neither practiced nor enforced. The findings suggest that respiratory symptoms especially sputum production and chest pain are common in sawmill workers. Respiratory function is compromised in these workers.

  3. Scientific authorship and collaboration network analysis on malaria research in Benin: papers indexed in the web of science (1996-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azondekon, Roseric; Harper, Zachary James; Agossa, Fiacre Rodrigue; Welzig, Charles Michael; McRoy, Susan

    2018-01-01

    To sustain the critical progress made, prioritization and a multidisciplinary approach to malaria research remain important to the national malaria control program in Benin. To document the structure of the malaria collaborative research in Benin, we analyze authorship of the scientific documents published on malaria from Benin. We collected bibliographic data from the Web Of Science on malaria research in Benin from January 1996 to December 2016. From the collected data, a mulitigraph co-authorship network with authors representing vertices was generated. An edge was drawn between two authors when they co-author a paper. We computed vertex degree, betweenness, closeness, and eigenvectors among others to identify prolific authors. We further assess the weak points and how information flow in the network. Finally, we perform a hierarchical clustering analysis, and Monte-Carlo simulations. Overall, 427 publications were included in this study. The generated network contained 1792 authors and 116,388 parallel edges which converted in a weighted graph of 1792 vertices and 95,787 edges. Our results suggested that prolific authors with higher degrees tend to collaborate more. The hierarchical clustering revealed 23 clusters, seven of which form a giant component containing 94% of all the vertices in the network. This giant component has all the characteristics of a small-world network with a small shortest path distance between pairs of three, a diameter of 10 and a high clustering coefficient of 0.964. However, Monte-Carlo simulations suggested our observed network is an unusual type of small-world network. Sixteen vertices were identified as weak articulation points within the network. The malaria research collaboration network in Benin is a complex network that seems to display the characteristics of a small-world network. This research reveals the presence of closed research groups where collaborative research likely happens only between members. Interdisciplinary

  4. Allometric models and aboveground biomass stocks of a West African Sudan Savannah watershed in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, Adéyèmi; Lautenbach, Sven; Orekan, Vincent Oladokoun Agnila; Kyei-Baffour, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    The estimation of forest biomass changes due to land-use change is of significant importance for estimates of the global carbon budget. The accuracy of biomass density maps depends on the availability of reliable allometric models used in combination with data derived from satellites images and forest inventory data. To reduce the uncertainty in estimates of carbon emissions resulting from deforestation and forest degradation, better information on allometric equations and the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass stocks in each land use/land cover (LULC) class is needed for the different ecological zones. Such information has been sparse for the West African Sudan Savannah zone. This paper provides new data and results for this important zone. The analysis combines satellite images and locally derived allometric models based on non-destructive measurements to estimate aboveground biomass stocks at the watershed level in the Sudan Savannah zone in Benin. We compared three types of empirically fitted allometric models of varying model complexity with respect to the number of input parameters that are easy to measure at the ground: model type I based only on the diameter at breast height (DBH), type II which used DBH and tree height and model type III which used DBH, tree height and wood density as predictors. While for most LULC classes model III outperformed the other models even the simple model I showed a good performance. The estimated mean dry biomass density values and attached standard error for the different LULC class were 3.28 ± 0.31 (for cropland and fallow), 3.62 ± 0.36 (for Savanna grassland), 4.86 ± 1.03 (for Settlements), 14.05 ± 0.72 (for Shrub savanna), 45.29 ± 2.51 (for Savanna Woodland), 46.06 ± 14.40 (for Agroforestry), 94.58 ± 4.98 (for riparian forest and woodland), 162 ± 64.88 (for Tectona grandis plantations), 179.62 ± 57.61 (for Azadirachta indica plantations), 25.17 ± 7.46 (for Gmelina arborea plantations

  5. Allometric models and aboveground biomass stocks of a West African Sudan Savannah watershed in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adéyèmi Chabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The estimation of forest biomass changes due to land-use change is of significant importance for estimates of the global carbon budget. The accuracy of biomass density maps depends on the availability of reliable allometric models used in combination with data derived from satellites images and forest inventory data. To reduce the uncertainty in estimates of carbon emissions resulting from deforestation and forest degradation, better information on allometric equations and the spatial distribution of aboveground biomass stocks in each land use/land cover (LULC class is needed for the different ecological zones. Such information has been sparse for the West African Sudan Savannah zone. This paper provides new data and results for this important zone. The analysis combines satellite images and locally derived allometric models based on non-destructive measurements to estimate aboveground biomass stocks at the watershed level in the Sudan Savannah zone in Benin. Results We compared three types of empirically fitted allometric models of varying model complexity with respect to the number of input parameters that are easy to measure at the ground: model type I based only on the diameter at breast height (DBH, type II which used DBH and tree height and model type III which used DBH, tree height and wood density as predictors. While for most LULC classes model III outperformed the other models even the simple model I showed a good performance. The estimated mean dry biomass density values and attached standard error for the different LULC class were 3.28 ± 0.31 (for cropland and fallow, 3.62 ± 0.36 (for Savanna grassland, 4.86 ± 1.03 (for Settlements, 14.05 ± 0.72 (for Shrub savanna, 45.29 ± 2.51 (for Savanna Woodland, 46.06 ± 14.40 (for Agroforestry, 94.58 ± 4.98 (for riparian forest and woodland, 162 ± 64.88 (for Tectona grandis plantations, 179.62 ± 57.61 (for Azadirachta indica plantations, 25.17

  6. Violence Against Women at the Workplace in Honduraa, Benin, Moldova, Indonesia: a survey by CNV Internationaal, University of Amsterdam/AIAS, WageIndicator Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Tijdens, K.; Besamusca, J.; van Klaveren, M.; Zerain, A.; Osse, P.; Ceccon, D.; Pralitasari, N.; Flores, A.; Sèna Alinsato, A.; Popescu, A.; Ahmad, A.

    2015-01-01

    The research focussed on violence against women at the workplace in four countries: Honduras, Indonesia, Moldova, and Benin. Each country report starts with an overview concerning the female workforce in that country, followed by a description of the legal framework concerning violence at work. It then tries to provide an overview of the institutional responses to violence at work. Although data on the incidence of violence against women at work are mostly quite scarce, the research tries to ...

  7. Molecular detection of establishment and geographical distribution of Brazilian isolates of Neozygites tanajoae, a fungus pathogenic to cassava green mite, in Benin (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agboton, Bonaventure V; Hanna, Rachid; von Tiedemann, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Diagnostic PCR with two specific primer pairs (NEOSSU and 8DDC) were used to monitor the establishment and geographical distribution of Brazilian isolates of Neozygites tanajoae Delalibera, Hajek and Humber (Entomophthorales: Neozygitaceae) released in Benin for the biological control of the cassava green mite, Mononychellus tanajoa (Bondar) (Acari: Tetranychidae). A total of 141 cassava fields were visited and samples of M. tanajoa suspected to be infected by N. tanajoae were collected in 60 fields distributed between the coastal Southern Forest Mosaic (SFM) and the Northern Guinea Savanna (NGS) zones of Benin, West Africa. Analysis of DNA samples of dead mites using the species specific NEOSSU primers revealed the presence of N. tanajoae in 46 fields. The second country specific pair of primers 8DDC revealed the presence of Brazilian isolates of N. tanajoae in 36 fields, representing 78.3% of fields positive for N. tanajoae. Brazilian isolates occurred from SFM to NGS zones in Benin, however, they were concentrated in fields located within former release zones (e.g. Department of Ouémé in the South and Borgou in the North). In contrast, the indigenous African isolates of N. tanajoae were evenly distributed in the sub-humid and humid savannah zones of the country. The mean infection rate of M. tanajoa with indigenous isolates of N. tanajoae was relatively low (5.3%) compared to Brazilian isolates (28%), indicating a higher biocontrol potential of the latter. This first post-release monitoring using PCR techniques showed that the Brazilian strains of N. tanajoae is well established in Benin and spread effectively in this area.

  8. Bialaba Migrants from the Northern of Benin to Nigeria, in Search of Productive Land—Insights for Living with Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Dreier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The concept of Environmental Migration has been broadly discussed by the international scientific community. Especially developing countries will have to develop strategies to cope with a rising number of people migrating at national and international levels due to climatic changes and environmental degradation. This paper will critically analyze the term Environmental Migration and sets it in relation to a case study conducted in northwest Benin in August/October of 2013 with Bialaba, analyzing their temporary migration pattern to Nigeria. The aim is to reveal current discussions on the term “Environmental Migration”/“Environmental Migrant” and to discuss its conceptual limits. The qualitative study in this working paper was conducted in the form of 36 interviews with farmers in the Dassari watershed North of Benin and surrounding villages as well as with stakeholders of the local government and NGOs active in the research area. Research results are presented in the following paper to clarify migration motives for the Bialaba of northwest Benin towards Nigeria aiming to stimulate discussions on the topic and to promote new research pathways.

  9. Management of moderate malnutrition by the “the positive deviance” and “grand-mother” approaches in Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoussa Hounkpatin, Waliou; Edjekpoto, Castellie

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The malnutrition of young children is becoming more and more worrying and is today a major public health problem in developing countries in general and in Benin particularly. The positive deviance and grand-mother approach are two endogenous solutions jointly used to combat moderate malnutrition in rural communities in Benin in the framework of the Community Nutrition Program (PNC) implemented by the NGO PLAN-BENIN. The results of PNC’s interventions in 16 villages in the commune of “Ouinhi” show that, on 1494 children screened, 999 children (66.9 %) have good nutritional status; 492 Children (33%) are moderately underweighted and 03 children (0.2%) are severely underweighted. These results showing the nutritional situation of these communities are returned in general assembly. After this, exchanges are carried out with the community about the peremptory measures opening of “Homes of Learning and Nutritional Rehabilitation” (FARN) for the moderate malnourished children. The severe cases and those with complications are referred to the Health Center of Recovery and Nutritional Education. The FARN is organized for a period of 12 days (six days per week), in the houses of one of the community members or in public square. It admits to a maximum of 15 malnourished children who are registered on a sheet. The FARN organized at the location of moderately malnourished children have been already carried out in three villages (Ahicon, Gbokpago and Zaloko) just after the restitution of screening results and FARN preparation meetings. On 52 moderates malnourished children having participated to the FARN in these 3 villages, 41 children (78.8%) have a satisfactory weight gain ≥ 400 g, whereas 09 children are below (< 400 g) of weight gain required. Note that the weight of the children is taken the first day of opening of the FARN and the last day of the end of the FARN. In the objective to follow the children admitted to the FARN, home visits are organized

  10. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: Associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.; Benbow, M.E.; Brenden, T.O.; Qi, J.; Johnson, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Buruli ulcer (BU) disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover) play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country) support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide) associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2) identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters) to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results: Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion: Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For example

  11. Costing the supply chain for delivery of ACT and RDTs in the public sector in Benin and Kenya.

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    Shretta, Rima; Johnson, Brittany; Smith, Lisa; Doumbia, Seydou; de Savigny, Don; Anupindi, Ravi; Yadav, Prashant

    2015-02-05

    Studies have shown that supply chain costs are a significant proportion of total programme costs. Nevertheless, the costs of delivering specific products are poorly understood and ballpark estimates are often used to inadequately plan for the budgetary implications of supply chain expenses. The purpose of this research was to estimate the country level costs of the public sector supply chain for artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) from the central to the peripheral levels in Benin and Kenya. A micro-costing approach was used and primary data on the various cost components of the supply chain was collected at the central, intermediate, and facility levels between September and November 2013. Information sources included central warehouse databases, health facility records, transport schedules, and expenditure reports. Data from document reviews and semi-structured interviews were used to identify cost inputs and estimate actual costs. Sampling was purposive to isolate key variables of interest. Survey guides were developed and administered electronically. Data were extracted into Microsoft Excel, and the supply chain cost per unit of ACT and RDT distributed by function and level of system was calculated. In Benin, supply chain costs added USD 0.2011 to the initial acquisition cost of ACT and USD 0.3375 to RDTs (normalized to USD 1). In Kenya, they added USD 0.2443 to the acquisition cost of ACT and USD 0.1895 to RDTs (normalized to USD 1). Total supply chain costs accounted for more than 30% of the initial acquisition cost of the products in some cases and these costs were highly sensitive to product volumes. The major cost drivers were found to be labour, transport, and utilities with health facilities carrying the majority of the cost per unit of product. Accurate cost estimates are needed to ensure adequate resources are available for supply chain activities. Product volumes should be considered when costing supply chain

  12. Buruli ulcer disease prevalence in Benin, West Africa: associations with land use/cover and the identification of disease clusters

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    Brenden Travis O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Buruli ulcer (BU disease, caused by infection with the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans, is an emerging infectious disease in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. Although vectors and modes of transmission remain unknown, it is hypothesized that the transmission of BU disease is associated with human activities in or around aquatic environments, and that characteristics of the landscape (e.g., land use/cover play a role in mediating BU disease. Several studies performed at relatively small spatial scales (e.g., within a single village or region of a country support these hypotheses; however, if BU disease is associated with land use/cover characteristics, either through spatial constraints on vector-host dynamics or by mediating human activities, then large-scale (i.e., country-wide associations should also emerge. The objectives of this study were to (1 investigate associations between BU disease prevalence in villages in Benin, West Africa and surrounding land use/cover patterns and other map-based characteristics, and (2 identify areas with greater and lower than expected prevalence rates (i.e., disease clusters to assist with the development of prevention and control programs. Results Our landscape-based models identified low elevation, rural villages surrounded by forest land cover, and located in drainage basins with variable wetness patterns as being associated with higher BU disease prevalence rates. We also identified five spatial disease clusters. Three of the five clusters contained villages with greater than expected prevalence rates and two clusters contained villages with lower than expected prevalence rates. Those villages with greater than expected BU disease prevalence rates spanned a fairly narrow region of south-central Benin. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that interactions between natural land cover and human alterations to the landscape likely play a role in the dynamics of BU disease. For

  13. Impact of a malaria-control project in Benin that included the integrated management of childhood illness strategy.

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    Rowe, Alexander K; Onikpo, Faustin; Lama, Marcel; Osterholt, Dawn M; Deming, Michael S

    2011-12-01

    To estimate the impact of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy on early-childhood mortality, we evaluated a malaria-control project in Benin that implemented IMCI and promoted insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). We conducted a before-and-after intervention study that included a nonrandomized comparison group. We used the preceding birth technique to measure early-childhood mortality (risk of dying before age 30 months), and we used health facility surveys and household surveys to measure process indicators. Most process indicators improved in the area covered by the intervention. Notably, because ITNs were also promoted in the comparison area children's ITN use increased by about 20 percentage points in both areas. Regarding early-childhood mortality, the trend from baseline (1999-2001) to follow-up (2002-2004) for the intervention area (13.0% decrease; P < .001) was 14.1% (P < .001) lower than was the trend for the comparison area (1.3% increase; P = .46). Mortality decreased in the intervention area after IMCI and ITN promotion. ITN use increased similarly in both study areas, so the mortality impact of ITNs in the 2 areas might have canceled each other out. Thus, the mortality reduction could have been primarily attributable to IMCI's effect on health care quality and care-seeking.

  14. Histopathological and ultrastructural studies of a Henneguya species (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) infesting the intestine of Clarias gariepinus from Benin (West Africa).

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    Tossavi, Nounagnon Darius; Gbankoto, Adam; Yessoufou, Akadiri; Escande, Marie-Line; Dimitri, Gorand; Ribou, Anne-Cécile; Moutaïrou, Kabirou; Sakiti, Gilbert Nestor

    2015-03-01

    Fish culture is the best alternative to fill the gap between natural fish catches and estimated needs of populations in animal protein consumption. In West Africa, this goal required to have suitable fishes for aquaculture which are Clariidae and Tilapia. Clarias gariepinus (Clariidae) fetches a higher price than tilapias as it can be sold alive at the market but a high infestation by Henneguya leads to decrease this commercial value. Those reasons lead us to perform studies on seasonal variations, histopathological aspects and life cycle of Henneguya sp. infecting the intestine of C. gariepinus using light and electron microscope. From November 2011 to December 2012, 339 specimens were collected from Ouémé River (Benin) and examined. An overall prevalence of 7.37 % was recorded for plasmodia of Henneguya sp. Parasite occurrence did not vary significantly between seasons (χ(2) = 12.235; df = 3; p > 0.05), nor sexes (χ(2) = 2.992; df = 7; p > 0.05) while differences were significant between classes of weight (χ(2) = 39.929; df = 5; p < 0.05). The highest prevalence was recorded in host ranging from 300 to 374 g. Histopathological analysis showed that the mass continuous development of the plasmodium produced thickening of the intestine wall and compressed neighboring tissues and destroyed villi and smooth muscle layers. The stages of the parasite development including sporogenesis, capsulogenesis, and valvogenesis were asynchronous. Investigations are still running by molecular approaches in order to identify accurately this species.

  15. Pastoralists in a changing environment: The competition for grazing land in and around the W Biosphere Reserve, Benin Republic.

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    Tamou, Charles; Ripoll-Bosch, Raimon; de Boer, Imke J M; Oosting, Simon J

    2018-04-01

    Pastoralists face increasing competition for land with crop farmers and nature in and around the W Biosphere Reserve (WBR) in Benin. Our aim was to describe and analyse land use changes in order to understand their drivers, and to describe and analyse the viewpoints of relevant stakeholders in order to understand the competition for land. To this end, remote sensing data, regional statistics, and survey data were collected. We found that crop land expansion around the WBR was the direct driver of decrease of the grazing land area. Population growth and rising demand for food crops, and government support to the cotton sector were indirect drivers of grazing land reduction. Furthermore, competing claims on land among users arose from the complex interaction of crop expansion, presence of WBR and the way it is governed, the lack of support to pastoralists, and the increasing shift of pastoralists' lifestyle into one of settled crop farmers. Pastoralism is under threat and its survival depends on the successful implementation of policies to support pastoralists and protect grazing lands.

  16. Food contamination in fast food restaurants in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria: Implications for food hygiene and safety.

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    Isara, A R; Isah, E C; Lofor, P V O; Ojide, C K

    2010-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of food contamination in the fast food restaurants operating in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. Three hundred and fifty food handlers were selected by means of a systematic sampling method and interviewed using a semi-structured researcher-administered questionnaire. One hundred and sixty-eight samples of ready-to-eat food and 45 stool samples were collected and analysed in the laboratory for the presence of bacteria (excluding anaerobic bacteria). More than half of the respondents (n=184, 52.6%) had no training in food hygiene and safety. Only 149 (42.6%) respondents knew that micro-organisms can contaminate food. The prevalence of food contamination in the fast food restaurants was found to be 37.5%. Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly isolated bacteria, while salad, meat pie and fried rice were the most commonly contaminated foods. There is need for the relevant local authorities to ensure that the food sold to consumers in fast food restaurants is safe, wholesome and fit for human consumption in order to prevent outbreaks of food-borne illnesses. Also, there should be regular training/retraining and health education of these food handlers in all aspects of food hygiene and safety. Copyright 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hemostatic activity screening and skin toxicity of sap of Jatropha multifida L. (Euphorbiaceae used in traditional medicine (Benin

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    Dougnon Tamègnon Victorien

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the hemostatic potential of Jatropha multifida (J. multifida‘s sap as traditional medicine in Benin attributed hemostatic properties to this substance. Methods: Several hemostatic tests such as blood coagulation time, Quick time, activated cephalin Time, test of milk precipitation and dosage of total proteins of blood samples were performed at 37 曟. Skin toxicity tests were also realized on 14 Wistar rats. Results: Prothrombin time revealed that prior to thromboplastin‘s addition, there was precipitation of the plasma in all tubes except for the control tube (T0. After addition of thromboplastin, plasma in control tube coagulated in 78 seconds while plasma in tests tubes were not coagulated (>15 min (P15 min (P<0.05. Blood coagulation time decreased regardless of the administered dose of sap. Time of milk‘s precipitation showed the sap rushes milk proteins. This was confirmed by the determination of total proteins in serum, proteins which decreased by over 40% with 1/4 dilution for example (P<0.05. Sap hasn’t also any irritant effect on the skin of animals (the irritation score obtained was 0.00. Conclusions: It has been proved that using sap of J. multifida has some effects on hemostasis, so its usage in traditional medicine is justified. Moreover, it has no skin toxicity so its usage as local hemostatic is recommended.

  18. Detection of adenoviruses and rotaviruses in drinking water sources used in rural areas of Benin, West Africa.

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    Verheyen, Jens; Timmen-Wego, Monika; Laudien, Rainer; Boussaad, Ibrahim; Sen, Sibel; Koc, Aynur; Uesbeck, Alexandra; Mazou, Farouk; Pfister, Herbert

    2009-05-01

    Diseases associated with viruses also found in environmental samples cause major health problems in developing countries. Little is known about the frequency and pattern of viral contamination of drinking water sources in these resource-poor settings. We established a method to analyze 10 liters of water from drinking water sources in a rural area of Benin for the presence of adenoviruses and rotaviruses. Overall, 541 samples from 287 drinking water sources were tested. A total of 12.9% of the sources were positive for adenoviruses and 2.1% of the sources were positive for rotaviruses at least once. Due to the temporary nature of viral contamination in drinking water sources, the probability of virus detection increased with the number of samples taken at one test site over time. No seasonal pattern for viral contaminations was found after samples obtained during the dry and wet seasons were compared. Overall, 3 of 15 surface water samples (20%) and 35 of 247 wells (14.2%) but also 2 of 25 pumps (8%) tested positive for adenoviruses or rotaviruses. The presence of latrines within a radius of 50 m in the vicinity of pumps or wells was identified as being a risk factor for virus detection. In summary, viral contamination was correlated with the presence of latrines in the vicinity of drinking water sources, indicating the importance of appropriate decision support systems in these socioeconomic prospering regions.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity and hepatitis B surface antigenemia (HBSAG) among blood donors in Benin city, Edo state, Nigeria.

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    Umolu, Patience Idia; Okoror, Lawrence Ehis; Orhue, Philip

    2005-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B virus are blood borne pathogens that can be transmitted through blood transfusion and could pose a huge problem in areas where mechanisms of ensuring blood safety are suspect. This study became necessary in a population where most of the blood for transfusion is from commercial blood donors. A total of 130 donors comprising 120 commercial donors and 10 voluntary donors were tested for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B surface antigen in Benin city using Immunocomb HIV - 1 and 2 Biospot kit and Quimica Clinica Aplicada direct latex agglutination method respectively. Thirteen (10%) samples were HIV seropositive and 7(5.8%) were HBsAg positive. The age bracket 18 - 25years had the highest numbers of donors and also had the highest number of HBsAg positive cases (7.8%) while the age group 29 - 38years had highest number of HIV seropositive cases. High prevalence of HIV antibodies and Hepatitis B surface antigen was found among commercial blood donors. Appropriate and compulsory screening of blood donors using sensitive methods, must be ensured to prevent post transfusion hepatitis and HIV.

  20. Environmental Geophysical Study of the Groundwater Mineralization in a Plot of the Cotonou Littoral Zone (South Benin

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    Yalo Nicaise

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical investigations comprising electrical resistivity and electromagnetic conductivities methods were deployed in a 350 m2 sector, strewn with 11 wells. Within the framework of an environmental study on a small scale in the south of Benin, the water conductivity of these wells was measured to determine in a direct way mineralization of the coastal water table in the littoral zone. This environmental study aimed to prospect by the geophysical methods the space extension of the water table mineralization obtained by direct measurements of water conductivity in the well and the depth of the fresh water/salted water interface in the coastal aquifer. Electromagnetic measurements of conductivities made it possible to chart a gradient of mineralization in the northwest direction. The logs of vertical electric soundings showed a deepening of the fresh water/salted water interface in the southern part and its rupture in the northern part. The electrical resistivities of the interface are sensitive to the degree of its mineralization. It has been observed that the geophysical methods in electrical and electromagnetic prospection are a great contribution to the environmental study of the water table mineralization in the littoral zone for a sustainable management of the water resource.

  1. Prevalence of Malaria and Anemia among Pregnant Women Attending a Traditional Birth Home in Benin City, Nigeria

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    Bankole Henry Oladeinde

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence of malaria and anemia among pregnant women attending a traditional birth center as well as the effect of herbal remedies, gravidity, age, educational background and malaria prevention methods on their prevalence.Methods: Blood specimens were collected from 119 pregnant women attending a Traditional Birth Home in Benin City, Nigeria. Malaria parasitemia was diagnosed by microscopy while anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL.Results: The prevalence of malaria infection was (OR=4.35 95% CI=1.213, 15.600; p=0.016 higher among primigravidae (92.1%. Pregnant women (38.5% with tertiary level of education had significantly lower prevalence of malaria infection (p=0.002. Malaria significantly affected the prevalence of anemia (p<0.05. Anemia was associated with consumption of herbal remedies (OR=2.973; 95% CI=1.206, 7.330; p=0.017. The prevalence of malaria parasitemia and anemia were not affected by malaria prevention methods used by the participants.Conclusion: The overall prevalence of malaria infection and anemia observed in this study were 78.9% and 46.2%, respectively. Higher prevalence of malaria infection was associated with primigravidae and lower prevalence with tertiary education of subjects. Anemia was associated with consumption of herbal remedies. There is urgent need to control the prevalence of malaria and anemia among pregnant women attending traditional birth homes.

  2. Prevalence of Malaria and Anemia among Pregnant Women Attending a Traditional Birth Home in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeinde, Bankole Henry; Omoregie, Richard; Odia, Ikponmwosa; Oladeinde, Oladapo Babatunde

    2012-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of malaria and anemia among pregnant women attending a traditional birth center as well as the effect of herbal remedies, gravidity, age, educational background and malaria prevention methods on their prevalence. Blood specimens were collected from 119 pregnant women attending a Traditional Birth Home in Benin City, Nigeria. Malaria parasitemia was diagnosed by microscopy while anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL. The prevalence of malaria infection was (OR=4.35 95% CI=1.213, 15.600; p=0.016) higher among primigravidae (92.1%). Pregnant women (38.5%) with tertiary level of education had significantly lower prevalence of malaria infection (p=0.002). Malaria significantly affected the prevalence of anemia (p<0.05). Anemia was associated with consumption of herbal remedies (OR=2.973; 95% CI=1.206, 7.330; p=0.017). The prevalence of malaria parasitemia and anemia were not affected by malaria prevention methods used by the participants. The overall prevalence of malaria infection and anemia observed in this study were 78.9% and 46.2%, respectively. Higher prevalence of malaria infection was associated with primigravidae and lower prevalence with tertiary education of subjects. Anemia was associated with consumption of herbal remedies. There is urgent need to control the prevalence of malaria and anemia among pregnant women attending traditional birth homes.

  3. Some suitable grasses and legumes for ley pastures in Sudanian Africa: the case of the Borgou region in Benin

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    Buldgen A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Sudanian region of Africa, agricultural systems are under increasing pressure because of human and animal population growth, climate changes, extensive practises, decreasing prices for cash crops, etc. Possibilities of intensification in smallholder farming systems of the Borgou region in Benin are limited due to difficulties to pay for external inputs. Therefore, rural communities rely heavily on low input technologies to increase crop production and animal feed. Cultivated forages are of better-feed quality for ruminants compared to weed fallows. Their integration in cropping system through ley pastures has the potential to increase not only animal feed availability but also to improve soil fertility. This paper reviews some possible grass and legume species that can be used for that purpose with a special focus on the strengths and weaknesses of the species in terms of soil and climate suitability, forage production, nutritive value and soil fertility restoration. The choice of one or several among them as leys in pure stands or mixed forage crops must be taken carefully considering the balance between advantages and disadvantages of the species, the available financial and technical inputs and the adaptation to the local environment.

  4. Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Among Gram Negative Bacilli Recovered from Cattle Feces In Benin City, Nigeria

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    Helen Oroboghae OGEFERE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL among Gram negative bacteria isolated from cattle feces in Benin City, Nigeria. A total of 250 Gram negative bacteria isolates were recovered from cattle feces and were processed microbiologically using standard techniques. Emergent colonies were identified and antibacterial susceptibility tests were determined using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All bacterial isolates were screened for the presence of ESBL using the double-disc synergy method. A total of 37 (14.8% isolates were positive for ESBL, with 33 (13.2% indicated by ceftazidime, while only 4 (1.6% were indicated by both ceftazidime and cefotaxime (P < 0.0001. Of the Gram negative bacterial isolates recovered, Salmonella species was the most prevalent ESBL-producer with 55.0% prevalence (P = 0.0092, while no isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced ESBL. ESBL-positive isolates showed poor susceptibility to the tested antibacterial agents in comparison with non-ESBL-producers and imipenem was the most active antibiotic. The prevalence of ESBL among Gram negative bacilli recovered from cattle feces was 14.8%. The study advises prudent use of antibiotics in the treatment of cattle and harps on improved hygiene in managing cattle, as they are potential reservoirs of ESBL-producing organisms.

  5. The discursive construction of conflict in participatory forest management: The case of the Agoua forest restoration in Benin

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    Latifou Idrissou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Agoua Forest in Benin was declared a protected area in 1953 and subsequently managed by means of a coercion system, which, however, did not prevent its deforestation. In 2002, a participatory management process was designed to restore this forest. Although the project managers and local communities agreed to a plan at the beginning of the process, the plan was not implemented because conflict arose in the course of the process. In this paper, an interactional framing approach was used to analyse the emergence of this conflict, which ended in an impasse. This study showed that the conflict was constructed and evolved mainly in stakeholders′ discourses, even without changes in actual forest management and use. Moreover, it became clear that stakeholders constructed different frames in different conversation contexts: stakeholders, who share a set of perceptions, norms, and expectations as constructed and expressed in their talks (we-groups, constructed stereotypes and stigmas, blaming the other party and presenting themselves as innocent victims. In conversations involving all stakeholders, people did not reveal their real thoughts, either about each other or about the proposals for conflict resolution. This study shows the relevance and agency of discourse in conflict, and the importance of the interactional framing approach in understanding participatory management, and conflict dynamics. It reveals how by means of discourses, farmers in the Agoua Forest succeeded in handling the conflict, with the effect that little has been done in the project′s decision to implement the plan.

  6. Tree Plantation Will not Compensate Natural Woody Vegetation Cover Loss in the Atlantic Department of Southern Benin

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    Toyi, MS.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study deals with land use and land cover changes for a 33 years period. We assessed these changes for eight land cover classes in the south of Benin by using an integrated multi-temporal analysis using three Landsat images (1972 Landsat MSS, 1986 Landsat TM and 2005 Landsat ETM+. Three scenarios for the future were simulated using a first-order Markovian model based on annual probability matrices. The contribution of tree plantations to compensate forest loss was assessed. The results show a strong loss of forest and savanna, mainly due to increased agricultural land. Natural woody vegetation ("forest", "wooded savanna" and "tree and shrub savanna" will seriously decrease by 2025 due to the expansion of agricultural activities and the increase of settlements. Tree plantations are expected to double by 2025, but they will not compensate for the loss of natural woody vegetation cover. Consequently, we assist to a continuing woody vegetation area decrease. Policies regarding reforestation and forest conservation must be initiated to reverse the currently projected tendencies.

  7. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility.

  8. Professional changes induced by a redesigned immunization supply chain in the Comé Health Zone, Benin.

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    Guillermet, Elise; Alfa, Daleb Abdoulaye; Gbodja, Romule; Jaillard, Philippe

    2017-04-19

    At the end of 2013, the Government of Benin and Agence de Médecine Préventive (AMP) launched a demonstration project in Comé Health Zone (HZ) to optimize the vaccine supply chain. A key part of the demonstration project was the creation of an "informed push model" of vaccine distribution supported by a new logistician position at the health zone (district) level. At the conclusion of the demonstration project in 2015, the authors conducted an anthropological study consisting of semi-structured interviews with 62 participants to assess how the new model changed the professional identities, roles, responsibilities, and practices of personnel involved in vaccine management during and just after the demonstration project end in Comé HZ. The study found that health workers considered the logistician as a key player in enabling them to perform their public health mission, notably by improving knowledge and practices in vaccine management, providing supportive supervision, and improving the availability of vaccines and other supplies so that immunization sessions could occur more reliably and professionally within the communities they served. The demonstration project was widely accepted among study participants. The study was approved by the Cotonou Ethics Committee (CER-ISBA No. 56 dated 09/04/2015). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Vegetable Contamination by the Fecal Bacteria of Poultry Manure: Case Study of Gardening Sites in Southern Benin

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    Séraphin C. Atidégla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted in southern Benin to assess the contamination of vegetables by fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, and fecal streptococci as one consequence of the intensification of vegetable cropping through fertilization with poultry manure. For this purpose, on-farm trials were conducted in 2009 and 2010 at Yodo-Condji and Ayi-Guinnou with three replications and four fertilization treatments including poultry manure and three vegetable crops (leafy eggplant, tomato, and carrot. Sampling, laboratory analyses, and counts of fecal bacteria in the samples were performed in different cropping seasons. Whatever the fertilization treatment, the logs of mean fecal bacteria count per g of fresh vegetables were variable but higher than AFNOR criteria. The counts ranged from 8 to 10 fecal coliforms, from 5 to 8 fecal streptococci, and from 2 to 6 Escherichia coli, whereas AFNOR criteria are, respectively, 0, 1, and 0. The long traditional use of poultry manure and its use during the study helped obtain this high population of fecal pathogens. Results confirmed that the contamination of vegetables by fecal bacteria is mainly due to the use of poultry manure. The use of properly composted poultry manure with innovative cropping techniques should help reduce the number and incidence of pathogens.

  10. Study on Strategic Planning of Road and Bridge Infrastructure Development in City Planning: Taking Porto-novo City of Benin Republic as Example

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    Boko-haya Dossa Didier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern about the townlet infrastructure construction in developing country is one of the crucial part of county town planning and development. By taking the overall planning and design in a case study of Porto-novo city at Republic of Benin, this paper analyzes the characteristics and opportunities of Porto-novo city and puts forward corresponding infrastructure construction strategy. In the end, the paper comes up with specific plan of planning and design under the background of Porto-novo's planning of development strategy.

  11. ‘Rowing against the current’: the policy process and effects of removing user fees for caesarean sections in Benin

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    Cresswell, Jenny A; Makoutodé, Patrick; De Brouwere, Vincent; Witter, Sophie; Filippi, Veronique; Kanhonou, Lydie G; Goufodji, Sourou B; Lange, Isabelle L; Lawin, Lionel; Affo, Fabien; Marchal, Bruno

    2018-01-01

    Background In 2009, the Benin government introduced a user fee exemption policy for caesarean sections. We analyse this policy with regard to how the existing ideas and institutions related to user fees influenced key steps of the policy cycle and draw lessons that could inform the policy dialogue for universal health coverage in the West African region. Methods Following the policy stages model, we analyse the agenda setting, policy formulation and legitimation phase, and assess the implementation fidelity and policy results. We adopted an embedded case study design, using quantitative and qualitative data collected with 13 tools at the national level and in seven hospitals implementing the policy. Results We found that the initial political goal of the policy was not to reduce maternal mortality but to eliminate the detention in hospitals of mothers and newborns who cannot pay the user fees by exempting a comprehensive package of maternal health services. We found that the policy development process suffered from inadequate uptake of evidence and that the policy content and process were not completely in harmony with political and public health goals. The initial policy intention clashed with the neoliberal orientation of the political system, the fee recovery principles institutionalised since the Bamako Initiative and the prevailing ideas in favour of user fees. The policymakers did not take these entrenched factors into account. The resulting tension contributed to a benefit package covering only caesarean sections and to the variable implementation and effectiveness of the policy. Conclusion The influence of organisational culture in the decision-making processes in the health sector is often ignored but must be considered in the design and implementation of any policy aimed at achieving universal health coverage in West African countries. PMID:29564156

  12. Impact Of Thermotherapy And Chlorothalonil On Plantlets Production Of Some Genotypes Of Cassava Manihot Esculenta Crantz Produce In Benin

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    J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cassava Manihot esculenta is a starchy root plant of great economic importance in sub-Saharan Africa and particularly in Benin. Its production is confronted to virus diseases which cause a considerable losses of yield. This work aims to determine the impact of thermotherapy and chlorothalonil in the production of cassava material of plantation. Cuttings of four varieties RB89509 BEN86052 9102319 92B0057 are cultivated under two conditions of thermotherapy and a control under greenhouse during 4 weeks. These different conditions are a closed drying oven with 16 hours photoperiod at 40 C the day and 36C the night a drying oven Binder with photoperiod of 12 hours at 38C the day and 28C the night and the control carried out under the conditions of the greenhouse. The media used was Murashige and Skoog MS added with various amounts of chlorothalonil 0.6 gl and 2gl and control without chlorothalonil. Both techniques of thermotherapy eliminate the virus symptoms of cassava at the rate of 0 seedling infected in thermotherapy against 16 seedlings in natural condition. The technique of closed drying oven significantly favors the production of nodes at 5 level p0.000 and shoots p0.02 on the other hand Binder drying oven has no significant effect on the production of shoots p0.68. The chlorothalonil had a positive effect on in vitro infestations elimination of cassava p0.05 but influenced the growth and development of cassava explants by reducing of nodes production p0.01 without a lethal effect on the plantlets until the dose of 2gl.

  13. At-Risk Serum Cholesterol Profile at Both Ends of the Nutrition Spectrum in West African Adults? The Benin Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Després

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, using as cut-offs 1.03 mmol/L in men and 1.29 mmol/L in women, was observed in more than 25% apparently healthy adults (n = 541 in a cross-sectional study on nutrition transition and cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRF in Benin, West Africa. Both overweight/obesity (35.3% and underweight (11.3% were present, displaying the double burden of malnutrition. We examined in more depth the association of low HDL-C with nutrition and with other CMRF. Metabolic syndrome components were assessed, plus the ratio of total cholesterol (TC/HDL-C and serum homocysteine. Insulin resistance was based on Homeostasis Model Assessment. We also measured BMI and body composition by bio-impedance. Dietary quality was appraised with two non-consecutive 24 h recalls. Low HDL-C was associated with much higher TC/HDL-C and more abdominal obesity in men and women and with more insulin resistance in women. The rate of low HDL-C was highest (41.9% among the overweight/obese subjects (BMI ≥ 25, but it also reached 31.1% among the underweight (BMI < 18.5, compared with 17.3% among normal-weight subjects (p < 0.001. Lower dietary micronutrient adequacy, in particular, in vitamins A, B3, B12, zinc and calcium, was associated with low HDL-C when controlling for several confounders. This suggests that at-risk lipoprotein cholesterol may be associated with either underweight or overweight/obesity and with poor micronutrient intake.

  14. Assessing the economic burden of illness for tuberculosis patients in Benin: determinants and consequences of catastrophic health expenditures and inequities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laokri, Samia; Dramaix-Wilmet, Michèle; Kassa, Ferdinand; Anagonou, Séverin; Dujardin, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    To inform policy-making, we measured the risk, causes and consequences of catastrophic expenditures for tuberculosis and investigated potential inequities. Between August 2008 and February 2009, a cross-sectional study was conducted among all (245) smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients of six health districts from southern Benin. A standardised survey questionnaire covered the period of time elapsing from onset of tuberculosis symptoms to completion of treatment. Total direct cost exceeding the conventional 10% threshold of annual income was defined as catastrophic and used as principal outcome in a multivariable logistic regression. A sensitivity analysis was performed while varying the thresholds. A pure gradient of direct costs of tuberculosis in relation to income was observed. Incidence (78.1%) and intensity (14.8%) of catastrophic expenditure were high; varying thresholds was insensitive to the intensity. Incurring catastrophic expenditure was independently associated with lower- and middle-income quintiles (adjusted odd ratio (aOR) = 36.2, 95% CI [12.3-106.3] and aOR = 6.4 [2.8-14.6]), adverse pre-diagnosis stage (aOR = 5.4 [2.2-13.3]) and less education (aOR = 4.1[1.9-8.7]). Households incurred important days lost due to TB, indebtedness (37.1%), dissaving (51.0%) and other coping strategies (52.7%). Catastrophic direct costs and substantial indirect and coping costs may persist under the 'free' tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment strategy, as well as inequities in financial hardship. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plasmodium falciparum and intestinal parasitic co-infections in HIV-infected patients in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Frederick Olusegun; Okaka, Christopher Ehis; Omoregie, Richard

    2012-05-14

    Human co-infection with Plasmodium falciparum and helminthes is ubiquitous throughout Africa. This study aimed to determine the co-infections of Plasmodium falciparum infection in HIV and intestinal parasitic infections, and their immunological distribution, in Benin City, Nigeria. A total of 2,000 stool specimens from HIV-positive patients and 500 controls (HIV-negative individuals) were examined for ova, cysts, or parasites using standard procedures. In addition, patients' blood samples were analyzed for CD4 counts by flow cytometry and examined for Plasmodium falciparum by microscopy. The prevalence of single parasitic infection among HIV patients was 18.1% in males and 16.9% among females with no significant difference (p = 0.536) while gender was a risk factor in multiple parasitic infections (male versus female: 4.2% and 1.8% OR = 2.384; 95% CI = 1.371, 4.147) (p = 0.0025). Increasing age was not associated with increased risk of both single and multiple parasitic infections (p = 0.083; p = 0.248). CD4 + T cell count less than 200 cells/µl was a risk factor for acquiring single and multiple parasitic infections among HIV patients (OR = 5.565; 95% CI = 4.136, 7.486; p = 0.0001; OR = 4.283; 95% CI = 2.424, 7.566; p = 0.0001). The most common co-infection observed was between Plasmodium falciparum and Ascaris lumbricoides 43% (10) among HIV patients. This study provides evidence of co-infections between Plasmodium falciparum and intestinal parasites. Diagnosis of parasitic infections among HIV patients is advocated as this will enhance better management of HIV-infected patients.

  16. Surgical management of head trauma: problems, results, and perspectives at the departmental teaching hospital of Borgou, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatigba, Holden O; Savi de Tove, Mensa K; Tchaou, Blaise A; Mensah, Emile; Allode, Allexandre S; Padonou, Jijoho

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report our neurosurgical experience with traumatic brain injury (TBI) at a departmental teaching hospital in Benin. This was a descriptive study performed from January 2008 to June 2010. It concerned patients who received surgical treatment after a brain trauma. Conditions for surgical care were based on imaging data or exclusively on clinical symptoms (disorders of consciousness associated with focal signs). Sixty-two patients underwent surgical management during the study period. They accounted for 5% of the TBI cases hospitalized. There were 56 (90.3%) men and 6 (9.7%) women. The average age of patients was 26.38 ± 14.76 years. The main cause of injury was road traffic accident (80.6%). The mean time of admission to the surgical room was 27.59 ± 20.71 hours. The indication for surgery was based on clinical data in 17 (27.4%) patients, clinical and x-ray data in 27 (43.6%) patients, and computed tomography scan data in 18 (29%) patients. A burr-hole exploration was performed in 17 (27.4%) patients. Repair of depressive fracture or cerebral wound and evacuation of hematoma were mainly performed (75.8%). Complete recovery was observed in 34 (54.9%) patients. Sequels were observed in 10 (16.1%) patients. The postoperative mortality was 29% (n = 18). This mortality was 76.5% among 17 patients for whom burr-hole exploration was performed (P = 0.00000). Surgical treatment of TBI is a common activity in our practice, despite the difficulties. Good imaging and enhanced prevention could improve care and reduce TBI severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Firewood yield and profitability of a traditional Daniellia oliveri short-rotation coppice on fallow lands in Benin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avohou, T. Hermane [Laboratory of Applied Ecology, University of Abomey Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou (Benin); Bioversity International, West and Central Africa Office, 08 BP 0932 Cotonou (Benin); Houehounha, Remy; Glele-Kakai, Romain; Assogbadjo, Achille Ephrem; Sinsin, Brice [Laboratory of Applied Ecology, University of Abomey Calavi, 01 BP 526 Cotonou (Benin)

    2011-01-15

    Sub-Saharan Africa has a great diversity of local coppicing species which are exploited in traditional short coppice systems for firewood. Biomass yield and profitability of these systems as well as their responses to silvicultural improvement are little known. This study evaluated the firewood yield and the profitability of a traditional Daniellia oliveri short-rotation coppice on fallow lands in central Benin. Two weed management options were considered: (1) the weedy option, usually practiced by locals, which experienced grass competition and bushfires, and (2) the weed-free option, which consisted in periodic removal of grasses and other species. Destructive measurements and allometric equations were used to estimate biomass yield in 12 plots over 42 months. A cost-benefit analysis model based on the net present value and the benefit-cost ratio was used to compare the profitability of the two management options. Biomass accumulation rate averaged 1.08 {+-} 0.20 tonnes of dry matter ha{sup -1} year{sup -1} (t DM ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}) in weedy conditions. Weed removal improved 3.5 times this rate in weed-free plots (3.83 {+-} 0.47 t DM ha{sup -1} year{sup -1}). After 42 months, total biomass reached 3.67 {+-} 0.65 t DM ha{sup -1} in weedy plots and 11.63 {+-} 0.76 t DM ha{sup -1} in weed-free plots. Most of the biomass ({>=}88%) was marketable in local markets. Coppice exploitation was profitable after 24 months for both management options. Weed removal improved the profits three times. A sensitivity analysis showed that both options were still profitable with up to 25% increase of labour and transport costs, 25% decrease of biomass price and 12% increase of the discount rate. (author)

  18. Variation of heavy metal concentrations in water and freshwater fish in Niger Delta Waters - a case study of Benin river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.O.; Okolo, P.O.

    2003-01-01

    Levels of Cd, Cr, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined in water and fish samples from three different locations in the Benin river. The sampling points were chosen such that Gbokoda, a village between Koko and Ogheye where a flow station (Olague flow station or crude oil well) is situated serves as a pollution point source and Koko as a baseline concentration point. Three species of fish each, that are top feeder, Tilapia mariae (which is herbivorous and feeds mainly on floating phytoplankton), middle feeder, Pseudotolithus elongates (that is ominivorous) and bottom feeder, Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus (also ominivorous) were used for the study. The mean wet weight of the species sampled at the different locations ranged between 385.17 - 417.44g. The maximum concentration levels observed in water samples for Cd, Cr, Fe, Pb and Zn were 3.50 x 10/sup -4/g.1, 1.24 x 10/sup -3/g/l, 3.10 x 10/sup -3/g/l and 1.50 x 10/sup -3/g/l, respectively. The mean concentration levels determined for the various species of fish are: for Cd, Tilapia mariae 7.30 x 10/sup -5/, Pseudotolithus elongates 8.67 x 10/sup -4/ nigrodigitatus 1.581 x 10/sup -4, for Fe, Tilapia mariae 5.500 x 10/sup -3/, Pseudotolithus elongates 4.700 x 10/sup -3/ and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus 3.9133 x 10/sup -3/ for Zn, Tilapia mariae 4.4240 x 10/sup -3/, Pseudotolithus elongates 3.4100 x 10/sup -3/ and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus 9.6730 x 10/sup -3/ for Zn, Tilapia mariae 5.467 x 10/sup -3/, Pseudotolithus elongates 5.067 x 10/sup -3/ and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus 8.833 x 10/sup -3/. (all values are g/g of fish).(author)

  19. The influence of storage practices on aflatoxin contamination in maize in four agroecological zones of Benin, west Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell; Cardwell; Setamou; Poehling

    2000-10-15

    Aflatoxin level in 300 farmers' stores in four agro-ecological zones in Benin, a west African coastal country, were determined over a period of 2 years. At sampling a questionnaire was used to evaluate maize storage practices. Farmers were asked what storage structure they used, their storage form, storage period, pest problems in storage and what was done against them. Beninese farmers often changed their storage structures during the storage period, transfering the maize from a drying or temporary store to a more durable one. Most of the farmers complained about insects damaging stored maize. Often, storage or cotton insecticides were utilized against these pests. Regression analysis identified those factors that were associated with increased or reduced aflatoxin.Maize samples in the southern Guinea and Sudan savannas were associated with higher aflatoxin levels and the forest/savanna mosaic was related to lower toxin levels. Factors associated with higher aflatoxin were: storage for 3-5 months, insect damage and use of Khaya senegalensis-bark or other local plants as storage protectants. Depending on the agroecological zone, storage structures that had a higher risk of aflatoxin development were the "Ago", the "Secco", the "Zingo" or storing under or on top of the roof of the house. Lower aflatoxin levels were related to the use of storage or cotton insecticides, mechanical means or smoke to protect against pests or cleaning of stores before loading them with the new harvest. Fewer aflatoxins were found when maize was stored in the "Ago" made from bamboo or when bags were used as secondary storage containers.

  20. Firewood yield and profitability of a traditional Daniellia oliveri short-rotation coppice on fallow lands in Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avohou, T. Hermane; Houehounha, Remy; Glele-Kakai, Romain; Assogbadjo, Achille Ephrem; Sinsin, Brice

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has a great diversity of local coppicing species which are exploited in traditional short coppice systems for firewood. Biomass yield and profitability of these systems as well as their responses to silvicultural improvement are little known. This study evaluated the firewood yield and the profitability of a traditional Daniellia oliveri short-rotation coppice on fallow lands in central Benin. Two weed management options were considered: (1) the weedy option, usually practiced by locals, which experienced grass competition and bushfires, and (2) the weed-free option, which consisted in periodic removal of grasses and other species. Destructive measurements and allometric equations were used to estimate biomass yield in 12 plots over 42 months. A cost-benefit analysis model based on the net present value and the benefit-cost ratio was used to compare the profitability of the two management options. Biomass accumulation rate averaged 1.08 ± 0.20 tonnes of dry matter ha -1 year -1 (t DM ha -1 year -1 ) in weedy conditions. Weed removal improved 3.5 times this rate in weed-free plots (3.83 ± 0.47 t DM ha -1 year -1 ). After 42 months, total biomass reached 3.67 ± 0.65 t DM ha -1 in weedy plots and 11.63 ± 0.76 t DM ha -1 in weed-free plots. Most of the biomass (≥88%) was marketable in local markets. Coppice exploitation was profitable after 24 months for both management options. Weed removal improved the profits three times. A sensitivity analysis showed that both options were still profitable with up to 25% increase of labour and transport costs, 25% decrease of biomass price and 12% increase of the discount rate. (author)

  1. Predictors of health worker performance after Integrated Management of Childhood Illness training in Benin: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Laura C; Onikpo, Faustin; Kouamé, Julien; Piercefield, Emily; Lama, Marcel; Deming, Michael S; Rowe, Alexander K

    2015-07-21

    Correct treatment of potentially life-threatening illnesses (PLTIs) in children under 5 years, such as malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhea, can substantially reduce mortality. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy has been shown to improve treatment of child illnesses, but multiple studies have shown that gaps in health worker performance remain after training. To better understand factors related to health worker performance, we analyzed 9,330 patient consultations in Benin from 2001-2002, after training one of the first cohorts of 32 health workers in IMCI. With data abstracted from patient registers specially designed for IMCI-trained health workers, we examined associations between health facility-, health worker-, and patient-level factors and 10 case-management outcomes for PLTIs. Altogether, 63.6% of children received treatment for all their PLTIs in accordance with IMCI guidelines, and 77.8% received life-saving treatment (i.e., clinically effective treatment, even if not exactly in accordance with IMCI guidelines). Performance of individual health workers varied greatly, from 15-88% of patients treated correctly, on average. Multivariate regression analyses identified several factors that might have influenced case-management quality, many outside a manager's direct control. Younger health workers significantly outperformed older ones, and infants received better care than older children. Children with danger signs, those with more complex illnesses, and those with anemia received worse care. Health worker supervision was associated with improved performance for some outcomes. A variety of factors, some outside the direct control of program managers, can influence health worker practices. An understanding of these influences can help inform the development of strategies to improve performance.

  2. Change in Heavy Rainfall Characteristics over the Ouémé River Basin, Benin Republic, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Hounkpè

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change has severe impacts on natural resources, food production and consequently on food security especially in developing countries. Likely accentuated by climate change, flooding is one of the disasters that affects people and destroies agricultural land and products. At different governance levels and scales, appropriate responses are needed. Cluster analysis using scaled at-site characteristics was used to determine homogeneous rainfall regions. A methodology for detecting change was applied to heavy daily rainfall of 34 stations across the Ouémé basin, Benin, in order to assess potential change in its characteristics. The spatial variability of the detected changes in return periods was analyzed using the kriging interpolation method. For this analysis, up to 92 years (1921–2012 of rainfall data were used. Three homogeneous regions were found by the cluster analysis. For all studied return periods, 82% of the stations showed statistically significant change in daily precipitation, among which 57% exhibited a positive change and 43% negative change. A positive change is associated with an increase in heavy rainfall over the area of concern. An analysis of the interpolated change in heavy rainfall of different return periods revealed an east-west gradient from negative to positive along the lower Ouémé basin (Region 2. From the middle to the upper Ouémé (Region 1 and 3, a decreasing tendency of heavy rainfall is dominant mainly for the non-homogeneous period. This result of the complex pattern of changes could be veritable information for decision makers and consequently for development of appropriate adaptation measures.

  3. Information and Communication Technology Literacy Skills and Class Instruction: a Comprehensive Perception Survey of University of Benin First Year Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke O. Obasuyi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of class instruction (GST 111 – use of library on University of Benin (UNIBEN first year students’ information and communication technology (ICT literacy skills. The study adopted the survey research method using the questionnaire as research instrument. First year students in the 2013/2014 academic session constituted the population of study. Simple random and total enumeration sampling methods were used to collect data from students in five out of twelve faculties in the university. The questionnaire used is a 4-point likert scale instrument: SA (Strongly agreed = 4; A (Agreed = 3; D (Disagreed = 2; and SD (Strongly disagreed = 1. Data was collected at the end of the first semester when the GST 111 – use of library was concluded. Results revealed that Computer, Software, Internet, WWW and ICT literacy skills of the students are high. There is a significant difference in Computer, Software, Internet and WWW and ICT literacy skills of the students per faculty. Majority (65% of the students are skillful in ICT use. Class instruction is very well perceived by the students and it positively influenced students’ ICT literacy skills. Gender and secondary school attended did not influence students’ ICT literacy skills. There is no significant difference between male and female students’ ICT literacy skills as well as students that attended private or public secondary schools. It is therefore concluded that the students are highly ICT literate and class instruction (GST 111 – use of library course mainly influenced the students’ ICT literacy skills thus the class instruction programme in the university is adequate and effective.

  4. In vitro biological effects of two anti-diabetic medicinal plants used in Benin as folk medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothon, Fifa T D; Debiton, Eric; Avlessi, Felicien; Forestier, Christiane; Teulade, Jean-Claude; Sohounhloue, Dominique K C

    2013-03-01

    Extracts from Polygonum senegalensis (Polygonaceae) and Pseudocedrela kotschyi (Meliaceae) are two important traditionally used medicinal plants in rural Benin to treat many diseases and notably type 2 diabetes. The aim of the study was to investigate the α-glucosidase inhibition, antioxidant and antibacterial activities of those plants extract: Polygonum senegalensis leaves, and Pseudocedrela kotschyi root. Hydro-alcoholic (50%) extracts were analyzed for their phytochemical content and tested for their inhibition potency on α-glucosidase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Antioxidant activities were assessed using the DPPH, ORAC, FRAP and DCFH-DA (cell based) assay. Finally, the antibacterial activity was evaluated using MIC determination on four Gram-positive cocci (Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium difficile, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus), three Gram-negative bacilli (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae), and the yeast Candida albicans. Each extract presented significant α-glucosidase inhibition and antioxidant activities. Polygonum senegalensis leaf extracts were the most active in each in vitro assay with an IC50 = 1.5 μg/ml for α-glucosidase inhibition and an IC50 = 6.8 μg/ml for DPPH scavenging, - 4.5 μmol Fe II/g of dry matter - 9366 μmol Trolox / g DW - for FRAP and ORAC values, respectively. IC50 = 2.3 μg GA / ml for DCFH-DA assay. Concerning its antibacterial activity, a growth inhibitory effect was observed only against three Gram negative bacilli: B. subtilis, E. faecalis, S. aureus and the yeast C. albicans at high concentration. The results showed that the semi alcoholic extract of the two studied plants possess α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, antioxidant potency, and low antibacterial effect.

  5. Managing the agricultural calendar as coping mechanism to climate variability: A case study of maize farming in northern Benin, West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaine N. Yegbemey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays climate variability and change are amongst the most important threats to sustainable development, with potentially severe consequences on agriculture in developing countries. Among many available coping mechanisms, farmers adjust some of their farming practices. This article aims at exploring observed changes in the agricultural calendar as a response to climate variability in northern Benin. Interviews with local experts (agricultural extension officers and local leaders such as heads of farmer and village organisations and group discussions with farmers were organised. A household survey was also conducted on 336 maize producers to highlight the factors affecting decisions to adjust the agricultural calendar as a coping mechanism against climate variability. As a general trend, the duration of the cropping season in northern Benin is getting longer with slight differences among and within agro-ecological zones, implying a higher risk of operating under time-inefficient conditions. Farmers receive very limited support from agricultural extension services and therefore design their agricultural calendar on the basis of personal experience. Socio-economic characteristics, maize farming characteristics as well as farm location determine the decision to adjust the agricultural calendar. Consequently, providing farmers with climate related information could ensure a rational and time-efficient management of the agricultural calendar. Moreover, research and extension institutions should help in establishing and popularising clear agricultural calendars while taking into account the driving forces of behaviours towards the adjustment of farming practices as a climate variability response.

  6. Scaling up the Benefits of Smallholder Forestry beyond Timber: Success story of Teak (Tectona grandis L.f. Leaves Marketing in Southern Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoudji, AKN.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The marketing of teak (Tectona grandis L.f. leaves was studied in southern Benin, in order to seek out opportunities for increased financial returns in smallholder tree growing. A survey was carried out across the commercialization system. Seventy-six traders were interviewed in nine markets purposely selected, based on their functions in the commercialization system. Respondents provided information on their marketing functions, the costs borne, and their revenues. The marketing system was led by women who controlled the main functions. Three categories of traders were identified, namely collectors-wholesalers-retailers, collectors-retailers, and retailers. The commercialization of teak leaves increases the return from tree growing. Traders' monthly revenue was XOF 4,659–15,927 (USD 9.3–31.9 during the rainy season and XOF 6,621–21,655 (USD 13.2–43.3 during the dry season. As substitute for polyethylene bags in food packaging, teak leaves offer a potential to tackle environmental pollution in southern Benin. The study shows the necessity to consult beneficiaries to ensure the proper selection of tree species in farm forestry programs.

  7. Morphological Variation and Ecological Structure of Iroko (Milicia excelsa Welw. C.C. Berg) Populations across Different Bio geographical Zones in Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouinsavi, C.; Sokpon, N.

    2010-01-01

    Iroko (Milicia excelsa) is a commercially important timber tree species formerly known by local people in Benin. Because of the highly attractive technological properties of its wood and its multipurpose uses, the species was subjected to intensive human pressure. Apart from strong climate oscillation during the Pleistocene, human caused habitat fragmentation through continuous land clearing for agriculture, extensive forests exploitation and urbanization induced the occurrence of many isolated forest plots and trees species among which Milicia excelsa trees. As fragmentation was proved to have deleterious effects on genetic diversity within a species and its morphological structure, it was of interest to investigate the current demographic, morphological and genetic structure of M. excelsa before coming up with conservation strategies. In the current study, morphological variation and ecological structure of M. excelsa populations were assessed in Benin using transect sampling method and multivariate analyses including principal component, cluster and canonical discriminant analyses. On the basis of morphological parameters, M. excelsa individuals and populations were clustered into four and discrimination of groups indicated that most of variations were highly related to edaphic factors and annual rainfall. Erratic diameter distribution was found for many populations although most of them showed bell shaped diameter distribution.

  8. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women receiving ante-natal care in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeinde, Bankole H; Omoregie, Richard; Oladeinde, Oladapo B

    2015-01-01

    A good proportion of pregnant women patronize traditional birth homes in Nigeria for ante-natal care. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors, and susceptibility profile of etiologic agents of urinary tract infection among ante-natal attendees in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria. Clean-catch urine was collected from 220 pregnant women attending a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria. Urine samples were processed, and microbial isolates identified using standard bacteriological procedures. A cross-sectional study design was used. The prevalence of urinary tract infection among pregnant women was 55.0%, significantly affected by parity and gestational age (Pinfection was recorded among 13(10.7%) pregnant women, and was unaffected by maternal age, parity, gravidity, gestational age, and educational status. Irrespective of trimester Escherichia coli was the most prevalent etiologic agent of urinary tract infection, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. The flouroquinolones were the most effective antibacterial agents, while Sulphamethoxazole-trimetoprim, Amoxicillin, Nalidixic acid, and Nitrofurantoin had poor activity against uropathogens isolated. The prevalence of urinary tract infection among pregnant women was 55.0% and significantly affected by gestational age and parity. The most prevalent etiologic agent observed was Escherichia coli. With the exception of the flouroquinolones, aminoglycoside, and Amoxicillin-cluvanate, the activity of other antibiotics used on uropathogens were poor. Health education of the traditional birth attendant and her clients by relevant intervention agencies is strongly advocated.

  9. Evidence for perennial malaria in rural and urban areas under the Sudanian climate of Kandi, Northeastern Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govoetchan, Renaud; Gnanguenon, Virgile; Azondékon, Roseric; Agossa, Rodrigue Fiacre; Sovi, Arthur; Oké-Agbo, Frédéric; Ossè, Razaki; Akogbéto, Martin

    2014-02-24

    In arid settings, droughts usually lead to periods of very low or no malaria transmission. However, in rural Kandi (Sonsoro) in northeastern Benin, several malaria cases are often diagnosed during dry seasons. The underlying factors accounting for this phenomenon remain unknown. The entomological profile of Sonsoro has been studied compared to a location in urban Kandi (Gansosso) for a period of one year. During this period, Anopheles larval habitats were investigated and populations of Anopheles gambiae s.l. were sampled by human landing catches in both areas. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) were conducted on vector specimens and the entomological inoculation rates (EIR) were determined per season (wet versus dry) in each area. In addition, during the severe drought period, Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs) were conducted on school children under the age 10 years in these areas to provide a global view of drought-malaria prevalence and to perform a crossing with entomological data in Kandi. Overall, An. gambiae s.l. was particularly abundant in rural Kandi compared to the urban area with a significant decrease of vector density in both sites during the dry season. In this period, larval sampling data identified household water sources as potential breeding sites in urban and rural Kandi. We also observed a significant seasonal variation of the infectivity rate in both areas but for each period (season), the EIR was higher in the rural site than in the urban. Data of P. falciparum detection was the reflection of entomological findings. The drought-malaria prevalence was 5.5 times higher in rural Kandi as compared to urban Kandi. The presence of a permanent water site and the low level of urbanization in rural Kandi were identified as a risk factor. Our data showed a high level of malaria transmission in the municipality of Kandi. Household water source plays an important role in maintaining the

  10. Results of the first mapping of soil-transmitted helminths in Benin: Evidence of countrywide hookworm predominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibikounlé, Moudachirou; Onzo-Aboki, Ablavi; Doritchamou, Justin; Tougoué, Jean-Jacques; Boko, Pélagie Mimonnou; Savassi, Boris S; Siko, Edoux Joel; Daré, Aboudou; Batcho, Wilfrid; Massougbodji, Achille; Kindé-Gazard, Dorothée Akoko; Kaboré, Achille

    2018-03-01

    National mapping of soil-transmitted helminth infections (STH) was conducted for the first time in all of the 77 districts of Benin (West Africa) from 2013 to 2015. This mapping aimed to provide basic epidemiological data essential for the implementation of the national strategy against the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the context of achieving the WHO target of controlling these infections by 2020. In each district, 5 schools were purposively selected in 5 villages and 50 school-children (25 girls and 25 boys) from ages 8 to 14 years were randomly enrolled in each school. In total, 19,250 stool samples of school children (9,625 girls and 9,625 boys) from 385 schools were examined by Kato-Katz technique. The three major species of STH (hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura) were observed with intra- and inter-specific variations in the prevalence and the intensity of these parasites. Hookworm infection was present in all of the surveyed districts with an average prevalence of 17.14% (95% CI 16.6%-17.6%). Among the infected schoolchildren, at national level, 90.82%, 6.73% and 2.45% of infections were of light, moderate and heavy parasite intensities respectively. A. lumbricoides infection, with a national average prevalence of 5.35% (95% CI 5.00%-5.60%),was the second most prevalent STH, and 84.37%, 14.27% and 1.36% of the infections were of light, moderate and heavy parasite intensities, respectively. T. trichiura had a national average prevalence of 1.15% (95% CI 0.90%-1.20%) and 80.45%, 13.18% and 6.36% infections were of light, moderate and heavy parasite intensities, respectively. The national cumulative prevalence of the three STH infections was 22.74% (95% CI 22.15%-23.33%), with58.44% (45/77) of the districts requiring mass treatment according to WHO recommendations. In all of the surveyed districts, multiple infections by STH species were common, and boys seemed more at risk of hookworm and Ascaris infections. This first national

  11. China rubra for side-effects of quinine: a prospective, randomised study in pregnant women with malaria in Cotonou, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danno, Karine; Rerolle, Frédéric; de Sigalony, Sylvie; Colas, Aurélie; Terzan, Laurence; Bordet, Marie-France

    2014-07-01

    In endemic areas, gestational malaria is responsible for low birth weight and maternal anaemia. Quinine is the reference treatment for acute malaria in pregnant women, irrespective of term. However, quinine administration is associated with various side-effects. We evaluated the impact of the homeopathic medicine China rubra 7CH on the side-effects of quinine used as treatment for acute malaria in pregnant women in Cotonou, Benin. This prospective, comparative, randomised study was carried out between June and December 2007 in the Saint Jean-Baptiste Medical Centre, Cotonou. Women were included if they were >3 months pregnant and had a clinical diagnosis of malaria confirmed by a positive thick blood smear. The study population was divided into two groups: (i) patients who presented between the 1st and 15th of each month and who received China rubra 7CH plus quinine (China group); and (ii) patients who presented from the 16th to the end of each month and who received treatment with quinine only (Standard group). The aim was to compare the frequency of side-effects of quinine in the two groups until day 6 after the start of treatment. Neither the patients nor the care givers were blinded to study treatment. Statistical comparison of the two groups was carried out with an alpha risk fixed at 5%. 211 women were recruited: 105 received quinine plus China rubra 7CH (China group) and 106 received quinine only (Standard group). A decrease in proportion of patients presenting with side-effects was observed in the China group from day 0 to day 6 of follow-up (53.9%-23.3%) whereas the proportion of patients with side-effects in the Standard group did not change significantly (85.9% on day 0 vs. 82.5% on day 6). Ninety-six (72.4%) patients in the China group and 103 (97.2%) in the Standard group reported at least one side-effect during follow-up (p quinine used for the treatment of acute malaria in pregnant women. Copyright © 2014 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by

  12. Groundwater contamination in relation with the increasing urbanization rate in Africa. Case of Cotonou and Porto Novo (Benin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeloui, Diane; Celle-Jeanton, Hélène; Huneau, Frédéric; Boukari, Moussa; Alassane, Abdelkarim; Garel, Emilie; Lavastre, Véronique; Bertrand, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    More than one billion people in the world still have no access to sufficient resources in drinking water (United Nation, 2014). In particular, large cities in Africa have to face several problems: 1) population growth associated with the strongest urbanization rate increase (5% per year) of the world leading to a dramatic increase in good-quality water needs, 2) low levels of solid waste management and sanitation services, 3) insufficient or disconnected water supply services, 4) low knowledge of water resources availabilities. The situation in Benin is a relevant illustration of the problems that Africa has to face to. As many other coastal urban areas in Africa (Showers, 2002; Re et al., 2011), Cotonou and Porto Novo cities have seen a rapid increase of their population as these towns constitute a corridor of transit for the imports and the exports in the nearby countries. Hence, they are very attractive for job hunters, and constitute the administrative centers for the whole country. This rapid population growth amplifies the problem of water supply and may generate serious impacts on groundwater resources: depletion due to overexploitation, salinization due to seawater intrusion and pollution linked to human activities. In order to insure a safe water supply in the context of increasing urbanization and population in the coastal area of Cotonou and Porto Novo, the identification of the main sources of pollution is essential for the implementation of long-term water management procedures. Based on two field campaigns carried out in January-2012 (dry season) and August-2012 (rainy season), hydrochemical analysis have been realized on groundwater sampled from boreholes drilled in the CTA (Continental Terminal Aquifer) and wells dug in the QCA (Quaternary Coastal Aquifer) in order to investigate the origin of salinization and the present time extension of the nitrate contamination. Historical data have also been collected from previous studies in order to

  13. From novice to expert: agroecological competences of children orphaned by AIDS compared to non-orphans in Benin

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    Price Lisa L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AIDS has created new vulnerabilities for rural African households due to prime-age adult mortality and is assumed to lead to impairment of the intergenerational transfer of farming knowledge. There has been scant research to date, however, on the impacts of parental death on farming knowledge of children made orphans by AIDS. The question we investigate is if there is a difference in agricultural expertise between AIDS affected and non-affected adults and children. Methods The research was carried out in rural Benin with 77 informants randomly selected according to their AIDS status: 13 affected and 13 non-affected adults; 13 paternal, 13 maternal and 13 double orphans; and 12 non-orphan children. Informants descriptions from pile sorting exercises of maize and cowpea pests were categorized and then aggregated into descriptions based form (morphology and function (utility and used to determine whether the moving from novice to expert is impaired by children orphaned by AIDS. Differences and similarities in responses were determined using the Fischer exact test and the Cochran-Mantzel-Haenszel test. Results No significant differences were found between AIDS affected and non-affected adults. Results of the study do reveal differences in the use of form and function descriptors among the children. There is a statistically significant difference in the use of form descriptors between one-parent orphans and non-orphans and in descriptors of specific damages to maize. One-parent paternal orphans were exactly like non-affected adults in their 50/50 balanced expertise in the use of both form and function descriptors. One-parent orphans also had the highest number of descriptors used by children overall and these descriptors are spread across the various aspects of the knowledge domain relative to non-orphans. Conclusions Rather than a knowledge loss for one-parent orphans, particularly paternal orphans, we believe we are witnessing

  14. Comparative analysis of diversity and utilization of edible plants in arid and semi-arid areas in Benin.

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    Segnon, Alcade C; Achigan-Dako, Enoch G

    2014-12-23

    Agrobiodiversity is said to contribute to the sustainability of agricultural systems and food security. However, how this is achieved especially in smallholder farming systems in arid and semi-arid areas is rarely documented. In this study, we explored two contrasting regions in Benin to investigate how agroecological and socioeconomic contexts shape the diversity and utilization of edible plants in these regions. Data were collected through focus group discussions in 12 villages with four in Bassila (semi-arid Sudano-Guinean region) and eight in Boukoumbé (arid Sudanian region). Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 180 farmers (90 in each region). Species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were estimated based on presence-absence data obtained from the focus group discussions using species accumulation curves. Our results indicated that 115 species belonging to 48 families and 92 genera were used to address food security. Overall, wild species represent 61% of edible plants collected (60% in the semi-arid area and 54% in the arid area). About 25% of wild edible plants were under domestication. Edible species richness and diversity in the semi-arid area were significantly higher than in the arid area. However, farmers in the arid area have developed advanced resource-conserving practices compared to their counterparts in the semi-arid area where slash-and-burn cultivation is still ongoing, resulting in natural resources degradation and loss of biodiversity. There is no significant difference between the two areas for cultivated species richness. The interplay of socio-cultural attributes and agroecological conditions explains the diversity of food plants selected by communities. We conclude that if food security has to be addressed, the production and consumption policies must be re-oriented toward the recognition of the place of wild edible plants. For this to happen we suggest a number of policy and strategic decisions as well as research

  15. Effect of essential oil from fresh leaves of Ocimum gratissimum L. on mycoflora during storage of peanuts in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjou, Euloge S; Kouton, Sandrine; Dahouenon-Ahoussi, Edwige; Soumanou, Mohamed M; Sohounhloue, Dominique C K

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of essential oil from fresh leaves of Sweet Fennel (Ocimum gratissimum) on mycoflora and Aspergillus section Flavi populations in stored peanuts. Aspergillus, Fusarium and Mucor spp. were the most common genera identified from peanuts at post-harvest in Benin by using a taxonomic schemes primarily based on morphological characters of mycelium and conidia. The isolated fungi include Aspergillus niger, A. parasiticus, A. flavus, A. ochraceus, Fusarium graminearum, F. solani, F. oxysporum and Mucor spp. The most prevalent fungi recorded were A. niger (94.18 %), A. flavus (83.72 %), A. parasiticus (77.90 %), A. ochraceus (72.09 %), F. graminearum (59.30 %) and F. oxysporum (51.16 %). Antifungal assay, performed by the agar medium assay, indicated that essential oil exhibited high antifungal activity against the growth of A. flavus, A. parasiticus, A. ochraceus and F. oxysporium. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the essential oil was found to be 7.5 μl/ml for A. flavus and A. parasiticus and 5.5 μl/ml for A. ochraceus and F. oxysporium. The minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) was recorded to be 8.0 μl/ml for A. flavus and A. parasiticus, 6,5 μl/ml for A. ochraceus and 6.0 μl/ml for F. oxysporium. The essential oil was found to be strongly fungicidal and inhibitory to aflatoxin production. Chemical analysis by GC/MS of the components of the oil led to the identification of 31 components characterized by myrcene (6.4 %), α-thujene (8.2 %), p-cymene (17.6 %), γ-terpinene (20.0 %), and thymol (26.9 %) as major components. The essential oil of Sweet Fennel, with fungal growth and mycotoxin inhibitory properties, offers a novel approach to the management of storage, thus opening up the possibility to prevent mold contamination in stored peanuts.

  16. Assessment of malocclusion in pre-school children in Benin City using the incisor classification of malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ize-Iyamu, I N; Umweni, A A

    2006-09-01

    This study was aimed at analysing the incisors as a means of classifying malocclusion in pre-school children Incisal classification is not common but is a simple and reliable means of assessing malocclusion, especially in pre-school children. The classification is mainly used to describe the incisal relationship of cases in verbal and written communication between clinicians. Angle's classification holds when the first permanent molars are in place, but in the pre-school child, between the ages of 2-4 years, the first permanent molars may not have erupted. The methods of classifying malocclusion in pre-school children carried out by Foster and Hamilton (1969) and Baume (1950) took into consideration other parameters without the use of the incisors as a means of classifying malocclusion. The incisor classification would then be a more reliable means of analyzing the malocclusion and evaluating the need for early management. A sample of 505 pre-school children between the ages of 2-4 years of age were randomly selected from day care centres and pre-schools in three local government areas of Benin City, Edo State. The incisors were examined and classified using the British Standard Classification of Malocclusion. The results showed that the incisal Class I malocclusion was seen in 90.6% Class II in 2.4% (class II div 1 in 1.8% and class II div 2 in 0.6%) and the incisal class III in 7% of the total sample studied. The 4-year-old age group exhibited a higher frequency of malocclusion in the Class I, Class II div 1 and Class III groups, and showed no significant decrease with age (P > 0.05). Girls showed a higher frequency for a tendency to malocclusion than boys. Our findings show that the most common type of malocclusion seen in pre-school children is the incisal class I, followed by the incisal class III with the class II having the smallest number. The assessment of malocclusion using the incisal classification was fast and easy to use, and was able to detect those

  17. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

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    Maarten H D Larmuseau

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample

  18. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vessi, Andrea; Jobling, Mark A; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Primativo, Giuseppina; Biondi, Gianfranco; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Ottoni, Claudio; Decorte, Ronny; Rickards, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY) has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample. Therefore, the uniquely

  19. Hemoglobin J Guantanamo [alpha 2 beta 2 128 (H6) Ala----Asp] in association with hemoglobin C and alpha-thalassemia in a family from Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajcman, H; Baudin-Chich, V; Kister, J; Feo, C; Gombaud-Saintonge, G; Bohn, B; Marden, M; Pagnier, J; Poyart, C; Dodé, C

    1988-07-01

    Hemoglobin J (HbJ), Guantanamo, which had been described but once in the literature, was found in a family originating from Benin; this second case was found to be in association with hemoglobin C (HbC) and alpha-thalassemia. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedures and microsequencing were used for characterization of the aminoacid substitution. The main hematological disorder, in relation with the instability of Hb J Guantanamo, seems to be a worsening of the rheological properties of the red blood cells (RBC), as demonstrated by ektacytometric studies. Oxygen-binding properties of the RBC were almost normal, but a slight decrease in cooperativity and lowered Bohr and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) effects were observed for pure stripped Hb J Guantanamo. The expression of the electrophoretic charge difference was partly masked, as is often observed when the structural abnormality is situated in or near a contact area.

  20. A Field Study in Benin to Investigate the Role of Mosquitoes and Other Flying Insects in the Ecology of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogo, Barnabas; Djenontin, Armel; Carolan, Kevin; Babonneau, Jeremy; Guegan, Jean-François; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, the third mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy, is caused by the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans. There is at present no clear understanding of the exact mode(s) of transmission of M. ulcerans. Populations affected by Buruli ulcer are those living close to humid and swampy zones. The disease is associated with the creation or the extension of swampy areas, such as construction of dams or lakes for the development of agriculture. Currently, it is supposed that insects (water bugs and mosquitoes) are host and vector of M. ulcerans. The role of water bugs was clearly demonstrated by several experimental and environmental studies. However, no definitive conclusion can yet be drawn concerning the precise importance of this route of transmission. Concerning the mosquitoes, DNA was detected only in mosquitoes collected in Australia, and their role as host/vector was never studied by experimental approaches. Surprisingly, no specific study was conducted in Africa. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of mosquitoes (larvae and adults) and other flying insects in ecology of M. ulcerans. This study was conducted in a highly endemic area of Benin. Mosquitoes (adults and larvae) were collected over one year, in Buruli ulcer endemic in Benin. In parallel, to monitor the presence of M. ulcerans in environment, aquatic insects were sampled. QPCR was used to detected M. ulcerans DNA. DNA of M. ulcerans was detected in around 8.7% of aquatic insects but never in mosquitoes (larvae or adults) or in other flying insects. This study suggested that the mosquitoes don't play a pivotal role in the ecology and transmission of M. ulcerans in the studied endemic areas. However, the role of mosquitoes cannot be excluded and, we can reasonably suppose that several routes of transmission of M. ulcerans are possible through the world.

  1. Biodiversity of aerobic endospore-forming bacterial species occurring in Yanyanku and Ikpiru, fermented seeds of Hibiscus sabdariffa used to produce food condiments in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbobatinkpo, Pélagie B; Thorsen, Line; Nielsen, Dennis S; Azokpota, Paulin; Akissoe, Noèl; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Jakobsen, Mogens

    2013-05-15

    Yanyanku and Ikpiru made by the fermentation of Malcavene bean (Hibiscus sabdariffa) are used as functional additives for Parkia biglobosa seed fermentations in Benin. A total of 355 aerobic endospore-forming bacteria (AEFB) isolated from Yanyanku and Ikpiru produced in northern and southern Benin were identified using phenotypic and genotypic methods, including GTG5-PCR, M13-PCR, 16S rRNA, gyrA and gyrB gene sequencing. Generally, the same 5-6 species of the genus Bacillus predominated: Bacillus subtilis (17-41% of isolates), Bacillus cereus (8-39%), Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (9-22%), Bacillus licheniformis (3-26%), Bacillus safensis (8-19%) and Bacillus altitudinis (0-19%). Bacillus aryabhattai, Bacillus flexus, and Bacillus circulans (0-2%), and species of the genera Lysinibacillus (0-14%), Paenibacillus (0-13%), Brevibacillus (0-4%), and Aneurinibacillus (0-3%) occurred sporadically. The diarrheal toxin encoding genes cytK-1, cytK-2, hblA, hblC, and hblD were present in 0%, 91% 15%, 34% and 35% of B. cereus isolates, respectively. 9% of them harbored the emetic toxin genetic determinant, cesB. This study is the first to identify the AEFB of Yanyanku and Ikpiru to species level and perform a safety evaluation based on toxin gene detections. We further suggest, that the gyrA gene can be used for differentiating the closely related species Bacillus pumilus and B. safensis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A care pathway analysis of tuberculosis patients in benin: Highlights on direct costs and critical stages for an evidence-based decision-making.

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    Samia Laokri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Free tuberculosis control fail to protect patients from substantial medical and non-medical expenditure, thus a greater degree of disaggregation of patient cost is needed to fully capture their context and inform policymaking. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample of six health districts of Southern Benin. From August 2008 to February 2009, we recruited all smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients treated under the national strategy in the selected districts. Direct out-of-pocket costs associated with tuberculosis, time delays, and care-seeking pattern were collected from symptom onset to end of treatment. RESULTS: Population description and outcome data were reported for 245 patients of whom 153 completed their care pathway. For them, the median overall direct cost was USD 183 per patient. Payments to traditional healers, self-medication drugs, travel, and food expenditures contributed largely to this cost burden. Patient, provider, and treatment delays were also reported. Pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment stages were the most critical stages, with median expenditure of USD 43 per patient and accounting for 38% and 29% of the overall direct cost, respectively. However, financial barriers differed depending on whether the patient lived in urban or rural areas. CONCLUSIONS: This study delivers new evidence about bottlenecks encountered during the TB care pathway. Financial barriers to accessing the free-of-charge tuberculosis control strategy in Benin remain substantial for low-income households. Irregular time delays and hidden costs, often generated by multiple visits to various care providers, impair appropriate patient pathways. Particular attention should be paid to pre-diagnosis and intensive treatment. Cost assessment and combined targeted interventions embodied by a patient-centered approach on the specific critical stages would likely deliver better program outcomes.

  3. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in relation to CD4 counts and anaemia among HIV-infected patients in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Frederick O; Okaka, Christopher E; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic infections continue to take their toll on HIV positive patients by influencing the blood qualitatively and quantitatively. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in relation to anaemia and CD4 counts among HIV-infected patients in Benin City, Nigeria. Using a serial sampling method, a total of 2000 HIV-infected patients were recruited on their first visit prior to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital from August 2007 to August 2009. Stool and blood samples were collected from each patient. The stool samples were processed using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique to microscopically identify the oocysts of Cryptosporidium species, Isospora belli, Cyclospora species and spores of Microsporidium species while saline and iodine preparations were used for identifying the ova, cysts and parasites of Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Taenia spp and other parasites. The blood specimens were equally analyzed using the flow cytometry for CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and autoanalyzer - sysmex kx - 21 for haemoglobin concentration. The overall prevalence of anaemia was 93.3% while 18% had parasitic infections. There was a significant relationship between CD4 count <200cells/microL and anaemia (P<0.0001). Cryptosporidium species (P= 0.005), A. lumbricoides (P=0.035), hookworm and Taenia species (P=0.014) were associated with anaemia. Anaemia was associated with CD4 count while Cryptosporidium species, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and Taenia species were the intestinal parasitic agents associated with anaemia. In conclusion the prevalence of anaemia in HIV-infected patients is high low CD4 count is a significant risk factor of acquiring anaemia. Except for isosporiasis, cryptosporidiosis, A. lumbricoides, hookworm and Taenia species in HIV infected individuals are parasitic agents associated with anaemia. Routine screening for intestinal parasites and

  4. An interdisciplinary scenario analysis to assess the water availability and water consumption in the Upper Ouémé catchment in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giertz, S.; Diekkrüger, B.; Jaeger, A.; Schopp, M.

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents an interdisciplinary scenario analysis to assess the influence of global and regional change on future water availability and water consumption in the Upper Ouémé catchment in central Benin. For the region three development scenarios were evolved. These scenarios are combined with climate change scenarios based on the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). In the modelling approach the quantification of the land use/land cover change is performed by the cellular automata model CLUE-S. The future climate scenarios are computed with the regional climate model REMO driven by the global ECHAM model. Using this data different land use and climate change scenarios can be calculated with the conceptual hydrological model UHP-HRU to assess the effects of global changes on the future water availability in Benin. To analyse the future water availability also the water consumption has to be taken into account. Due to high population growth an increase in water need in the future is expected for the region. To calculate the future household water consumption data from a regional survey and demographic projections are used. Development of the water need for animal husbandry is also considered. The first test run of the modelling approach was performed for the development scenario 'business as usual' combined with the IPCC scenario B2 for the year 2025. This test demonstrates the applicability of the approach for an interdisciplinary scenario analysis. A continuous run from 2000-2025 will be simulated for different scenarios as soon as the input data concerning land use/land cover and climate are available.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of merozoite surface protein-1 and merozoite surface protein-2 in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from children in South of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogouyèmi-Hounto, Aurore; Gazard, Dorothée Kinde; Ndam, Nicaise; Topanou, Elsa; Garba, Olivia; Elegbe, Pancras; Hountohotegbe, Tatiana; Massougbodji, Achille

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum by analyzing the polymorphism of the msp-1 and msp-2 genes and the multiplicity of infection in children with uncomplicated malaria in southern Benin. Blood samples of children with fever or history of fever with thick smear positive P. falciparum were collected on filter paper. After extraction of DNA by Chelex®, the samples underwent nested PCR. 93 isolates from children were genotyped. For the msp-1 gene, the K1 and R033 sequences were the most represented in the study population with 85.2% and 83% prevalence, respectively. Regarding the msp-2 gene, the FC27 family was more highly represented with 99% prevalence against 81.5% for 3D7. Mixed infections accounted for 80.4% of the samples. Twenty-five alleles were identified for msp-1 and 28 for msp-2. Fourteen and ten alleles belonged to the K1 (100-500 bp) and MAD20 (100-500 bp) families, respectively. The RO33 sequence did not show any polymorphism, with only one variant (160 bp) detected. The msp-2 gene was present as 16 FC27 family fragments (250-800 bp) and 12 of the 3D7 family (350-700 bp). The multiplicity of infection was estimated at 3.8 for msp-1 and 3.9 for msp-2 with 77 (87.5%) and 84 (91.3%) samples harboring more than one parasite genotype for msp-1 and msp-2, respectively. The multiplicity of infection (MOI) was influenced neither by age nor by parasite density. This study shows a significant diversity of P. falciparum in southern Benin with an MOI unaffected by age or by parasite density. © A. Ogouyèmi-Hounto et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2013.

  6. Good performances but short lasting efficacy of Actellic 50 EC Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) on malaria transmission in Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïkpon, Rock; Sèzonlin, Michel; Tokponon, Filémon; Okè, Mariam; Oussou, Olivier; Oké-Agbo, Frédéric; Beach, Raymond; Akogbéto, Martin

    2014-05-30

    The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) has been using pirimiphos methyl for the first time for indoor residual spraying (IRS) in Benin. The first round was a success with a significant decrease of entomological indicators of malaria transmission in the treated districts. We present the results of the entomological impact on malaria transmission. Entomologic parameters in the control area were compared with those in intervention sites. Mosquito collections were carried out in three districts in the Atacora-Dongo region of which two were treated with pirimiphos methyl (Actellic 50EC) (Tanguiéta and Kouandé) and the untreated (Copargo) served as control. Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations were sampled monthly by human landing catch. In addition, window exit traps and pyrethrum spray catches were performed to assess exophagic behavior of Anopheles vectors. In the three districts, mosquito collections were organized to follow the impact of pirimiphos methyl IRS on malaria transmission and possible changes in the behavior of mosquitoes. The residual activity of pirimiphos methyl in the treated walls was also assessed using WHO bioassay test. A significant reduction (94.25%) in human biting rate was recorded in treated districts where an inhabitant received less than 1 bite of An. gambiae per night. During this same time, the entomological inoculation rate (EIR) dramatically declined in the treated area (99.24% reduction). We also noted a significant reduction in longevity of the vectors and an increase in exophily induced by pirimiphos methyl on An. gambiae. However, no significant impact was found on the blood feeding rate. Otherwise, the low residual activity of Actellic 50 EC, which is three months, is a disadvantage. Pirimiphos methyl was found to be effective for IRS in Benin. However, because of the low persistence of Actellic 50EC used in this study on the treated walls, the recourse to another more residual formulation of pirimiphos methyl is required.

  7. A Field Study in Benin to Investigate the Role of Mosquitoes and Other Flying Insects in the Ecology of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

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    Barnabas Zogo

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer, the third mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy, is caused by the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans. There is at present no clear understanding of the exact mode(s of transmission of M. ulcerans. Populations affected by Buruli ulcer are those living close to humid and swampy zones. The disease is associated with the creation or the extension of swampy areas, such as construction of dams or lakes for the development of agriculture. Currently, it is supposed that insects (water bugs and mosquitoes are host and vector of M. ulcerans. The role of water bugs was clearly demonstrated by several experimental and environmental studies. However, no definitive conclusion can yet be drawn concerning the precise importance of this route of transmission. Concerning the mosquitoes, DNA was detected only in mosquitoes collected in Australia, and their role as host/vector was never studied by experimental approaches. Surprisingly, no specific study was conducted in Africa. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of mosquitoes (larvae and adults and other flying insects in ecology of M. ulcerans. This study was conducted in a highly endemic area of Benin.Mosquitoes (adults and larvae were collected over one year, in Buruli ulcer endemic in Benin. In parallel, to monitor the presence of M. ulcerans in environment, aquatic insects were sampled. QPCR was used to detected M. ulcerans DNA. DNA of M. ulcerans was detected in around 8.7% of aquatic insects but never in mosquitoes (larvae or adults or in other flying insects.This study suggested that the mosquitoes don't play a pivotal role in the ecology and transmission of M. ulcerans in the studied endemic areas. However, the role of mosquitoes cannot be excluded and, we can reasonably suppose that several routes of transmission of M. ulcerans are possible through the world.

  8. An interdisciplinary scenario analysis to assess the water availability and water consumption in the Upper Ouémé catchment in Benin

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    S. Giertz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interdisciplinary scenario analysis to assess the influence of global and regional change on future water availability and water consumption in the Upper Ouémé catchment in central Benin. For the region three development scenarios were evolved. These scenarios are combined with climate change scenarios based on the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. In the mo-delling approach the quantification of the land use/land cover change is performed by the cellular automata model CLUE-S. The future climate scenarios are computed with the regional climate model REMO driven by the global ECHAM model. Using this data different land use and climate change scenarios can be calculated with the conceptual hydrological model UHP-HRU to assess the effects of global changes on the future water availability in Benin. To analyse the future water availability also the water consumption has to be taken into account. Due to high population growth an increase in water need in the future is expected for the region. To calculate the future household water consumption data from a regional survey and demographic projections are used. Development of the water need for animal husbandry is also considered. The first test run of the modelling approach was performed for the development scenario 'business as usual' combined with the IPCC scenario B2 for the year 2025. This test demonstrates the applicability of the approach for an interdisciplinary scenario analysis. A continuous run from 2000–2025 will be simulated for different scenarios as soon as the input data concerning land use/land cover and climate are available.

  9. A Field Study in Benin to Investigate the Role of Mosquitoes and Other Flying Insects in the Ecology of Mycobacterium ulcerans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogo, Barnabas; Djenontin, Armel; Carolan, Kevin; Babonneau, Jeremy; Guegan, Jean-François; Eyangoh, Sara; Marion, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer, the third mycobacterial disease after tuberculosis and leprosy, is caused by the environmental mycobacterium M. ulcerans. There is at present no clear understanding of the exact mode(s) of transmission of M. ulcerans. Populations affected by Buruli ulcer are those living close to humid and swampy zones. The disease is associated with the creation or the extension of swampy areas, such as construction of dams or lakes for the development of agriculture. Currently, it is supposed that insects (water bugs and mosquitoes) are host and vector of M. ulcerans. The role of water bugs was clearly demonstrated by several experimental and environmental studies. However, no definitive conclusion can yet be drawn concerning the precise importance of this route of transmission. Concerning the mosquitoes, DNA was detected only in mosquitoes collected in Australia, and their role as host/vector was never studied by experimental approaches. Surprisingly, no specific study was conducted in Africa. In this context, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of mosquitoes (larvae and adults) and other flying insects in ecology of M. ulcerans. This study was conducted in a highly endemic area of Benin. Methodology/Principal Findings Mosquitoes (adults and larvae) were collected over one year, in Buruli ulcer endemic in Benin. In parallel, to monitor the presence of M. ulcerans in environment, aquatic insects were sampled. QPCR was used to detected M. ulcerans DNA. DNA of M. ulcerans was detected in around 8.7% of aquatic insects but never in mosquitoes (larvae or adults) or in other flying insects. Conclusion/Significance This study suggested that the mosquitoes don't play a pivotal role in the ecology and transmission of M. ulcerans in the studied endemic areas. However, the role of mosquitoes cannot be excluded and, we can reasonably suppose that several routes of transmission of M. ulcerans are possible through the world. PMID:26196901

  10. Development of vegetable farming: a cause of the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae in urban areas of Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadouleton, Anges William M; Asidi, Alex; Djouaka, Rousseau F; Braïma, James; Agossou, Christian D; Akogbeto, Martin C

    2009-01-01

    Background A fast development of urban agriculture has recently taken place in many areas in the Republic of Benin. This study aims to assess the rapid expansion of urban agriculture especially, its contribution to the emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Anopheles gambiae. Methods The protocol was based on the collection of sociological data by interviewing vegetable farmers regarding various agricultural practices and the types of pesticides used. Bioassay tests were performed to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to various agricultural insecticides and biochemical analysis were done to characterize molecular status of population of An. gambiae. Results This research showed that: (1) The rapid development of urban agriculture is related to unemployment observed in cities, rural exodus and the search for a balanced diet by urban populations; (2) Urban agriculture increases the farmers' household income and their living standard; (3) At a molecular level, PCR revealed the presence of three sub-species of An. gambiae (An. gambiae s.s., Anopheles melas and Anopheles arabiensis) and two molecular forms (M and S). The kdr west mutation recorded in samples from the three sites and more specifically on the M forms seems to be one of the major resistance mechanisms found in An. gambiae from agricultural areas. Insecticide susceptibility tests conducted during this research revealed a clear pattern of resistance to permethrin (76% mortality rate at Parakou; 23.5% at Porto-Novo and 17% at Cotonou). Conclusion This study confirmed an increase activity of the vegetable farming in urban areas of Benin. This has led to the use of insecticide in an improper manner to control vegetable pests, thus exerting a huge selection pressure on mosquito larval population, which resulted to the emergence of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. PMID:19442297

  11. Land use scenarios development and impacts assessment on vegetation carbon/nitrogen sequestration in the West African Sudan savanna watershed, Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabi, A.

    2015-12-01

    ackground: Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+), being developed through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) requires information on the carbon/nitrogen stocks in the plant biomass for predicting future climate under scenarios development. The development of land use scenarios in West Africa is needed to predict future impacts of change in the environment and the socio-economic status of rural communities. The study aims at developing land use scenario based on mitigation strategy to climate change as an issue of contributing for carbon and nitrogen sequestration, the condition 'food focused' as a scenario based crop production and 'financial investment' as scenario based on an economic development pathway, and to explore the possible future temporal and spatial impacts on vegetation carbon/nitrogen sequestration/emission and socio-economic status of rural communities. Preliminary results: BEN-LUDAS (Benin-Land Use DyNamic Simulator) model, carbon and nitrogen equations, remote sensing and socio-economic data were used to predict the future impacts of each scenario in the environment and human systems. The preliminary results which are under analysis will be presented soon. Conclusion: The proposed BEN-LUDAS models will help to contribute to policy decision making at the local and regional scale and to predict future impacts of change in the environment and socio-economic status of the rural communities. Keywords: Land use scenarios development, BEN-LUDAS, socio-economic status of rural communities, future impacts of change, assessment, West African Sudan savanna watershed, Benin

  12. Cotton pest management practices and the selection of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae population in Northern Benin

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    Yadouleton Anges

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrethroid insecticides, carbamate and organophosphate are the classes of insecticides commonly used in agriculture for crop protection in Benin. Pyrethroids remain the only class of insecticides recommended by the WHO for impregnation of bed nets. Unfortunately, the high level of pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l., threatens to undermine the success of pyrethroid treated nets. This study focuses on the investigation of agricultural practices in cotton growing areas, and their direct impact on larval populations of An. gambiae in surrounding breeding sites. Methods The protocol was based on the collection of agro-sociological data where farmers were subjected to semi-structured questionnaires based on the strategies used for crop protection. This was complemented by bioassay tests to assess the susceptibility of malaria vectors to various insecticides. Molecular analysis was performed to characterize the resistance genes and the molecular forms of An. gambiae. Insecticide residues in soil samples from breeding sites were investigated to determine major factors that can inhibit the normal growth of mosquito larvae by exposing susceptible and resistant laboratory strains. Results There is a common use by local farmers of mineral fertilizer NPK at 200 kg/ha and urea at 50 kg/hectare following insecticide treatments in both the Calendar Control Program (CCP and the Targeted Intermittent Control Program (TICP. By contrast, no chemicals are involved in Biological Program (BP where farmers use organic and natural fertilizers which include animal excreta. Susceptibility test results confirmed a high resistance to DDT. Mean mortality of An. gambiae collected from the farms practicing CCP, TICP and BP methods were 33%, 42% and 65% respectively. An. gambiae populations from areas using the CCP and TICP programs showed resistance to permethrin with mortality of 50% and 58% respectively. By contrast, bioassay test results of

  13. Chiese pentecostali, crisi e cambiamento. Il significato emico dell’idea di sviluppo presso le comunità pentecostali nel sud-ovest del Benin - Pentecostal churches, crisis and change. Emic signification of the notion of development among the Pentecostal communities in south-western Benin

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    Carla Bertin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of Pentecostal churches in many countries of the world South has taken new social dimensions since 2000, with the foundation of religious NGOs, schools, orphanages, health centers, etc. This article questions Pentecostal activism in the development sector from the ethnographic case of Southern Benin, a region characterized by great inter-confessionality where Christian, Islamic and “traditional” religious (new and old voduns movements share and compete in the same spaces. After having introduced the ethnographic case of Benin, the first part of the article demonstrates how this religious activism is not only characterized by proselytism aims but also by – as the “development”’s definition of Olivier de Sardan suggests – a project of social transformation. But in what terms do Pentecostalists propose themselves as the motor of the social-economic developing process after the neo-liberal crises started during the ’90s? The second part explores the extent to which, behind the adoption of some stereotypes representing western professionals (the cliché of the Village, of the peasant mentality, the Pentecostal notion of development is in continuity with local conceptions of power: the religious salvation is tightly connected to social and economic successes. From cure to economic gains and moral changing, the displacement of “money” from the temptations’ sphere to divine blessings depends on the moral behaviour of the individual.

  14. Political Dynamics in Benin,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    Kerekou regime, one must take into accont that Renin~gg perceive these years to be stable vis a vis the turbulent years of the past. In all walks of life...President Ahomadegbe passed a law concerning the appointment of the members of the supreme court . On his return Apithy refused to sign the law. The single...31, 1968. The Supreme Court ruled the ban unconstitutional and Apithy and Maga urged the citizens to boycott the elections. The military overruled the

  15. African Journals Online: Benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... technical notes, reviews of literature, scientific information, in all the fields of sciences and biological technology, ecology, biochemistry, biotechnology, geology, soil sciences, agro-feedings, human and animal nutrition. Articles are written in French or English with a detailed summary of a half-page in the second language ...

  16. Impact of three years of large scale Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS and Insecticide Treated Nets (ITNs interventions on insecticide resistance in Anopheles gambiae s.l. in Benin

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    Padonou Gil

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Benin, Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs are the cornerstones of malaria prevention. In the context of high resistance of Anopheles gambiae to pyrethroids, The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP has undertaken a full coverage of IRS in a no-flood zone in the Oueme region, coupled with the distribution of LLINs in a flood zone. We assessed the impact of this campaign on phenotypic resistance, kdr (knock-down resistance and ace-1R (insensitive acetylcholinesterase mutations. Methods Insecticides used for malaria vector control interventions were bendiocarb WP (0.4 g/m2 and deltamethrin (55 mg/m2, respectively for IRS and LLINs. Susceptibility status of An. gambiae was assessed using World Health Organization bioassay tests to DDT, permethrin, deltamethrin and bendiocarb in the Oueme region before intervention (2007 and after interventions in 2008 and 2010. An. gambiae specimens were screened for identification of species, molecular M and S forms and for the detection of the West African kdr (L1014F as well as ace-1R mutations using PCR techniques. Results The univariate logistic regression performed showed that kdr frequency has increased significantly during the three years in the intervention area and in the control area. Several factors (LLINs, IRS, mosquito coils, aerosols, use of pesticides for crop protection could explain the selection of individual resistant An. gambiae. The Kdr resistance gene could not be the only mechanism of resistance observed in the Oueme region. The high susceptibility to bendiocarb is in agreement with a previous study conducted in Benin. However, the occurrence of ace-1R heterozygous individuals even on sites far from IRS areas, suggests other factors may contribute to the selection of resistance other than those exerted by the vector control program. Conclusion The results of this study have confirmed that An.gambiae have maintained and developed

  17. Pilot assessment of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in the context of transmission assessment surveys for lymphatic filariasis in Benin and Tonga.

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    Brian K Chu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass drug administration (MDA for lymphatic filariasis (LF programs has delivered more than 2 billion treatments of albendazole, in combination with either ivermectin or diethylcarbamazine, to communities co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH, reducing the prevalence of both diseases. A transmission assessment survey (TAS is recommended to determine if MDA for LF can be stopped within an evaluation unit (EU after at least five rounds of annual treatment. The TAS also provides an opportunity to simultaneously assess the impact of these MDAs on STH and to determine the frequency of school-based MDA for STH after community-wide MDA is no longer needed for LF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pilot studies conducted in Benin and Tonga assessed the feasibility of a coordinated approach. Of the schools (clusters selected for a TAS in each EU, a subset of 5 schools per STH ecological zone was randomly selected, according to World Health Organization (WHO guidelines, for the coordinated survey. In Benin, 519 children were sampled in 5 schools and 22 (4.2% had STH infection (A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura, or hookworm detected using the Kato-Katz method. All infections were classified as light intensity under WHO criteria. In Tonga, 10 schools were chosen for the coordinated TAS and STH survey covering two ecological zones; 32 of 232 (13.8% children were infected in Tongatapu and 82 of 320 (25.6% in Vava'u and Ha'apai. All infections were light-intensity with the exception of one with moderate-intensity T. trichiura. CONCLUSIONS: Synchronous assessment of STH with TAS is feasible and provides a well-timed evaluation of infection prevalence to guide ongoing treatment decisions at a time when MDA for LF may be stopped. The coordinated field experiences in both countries also suggest potential time and cost savings. Refinement of a coordinated TAS and STH sampling methodology should be pursued, along with further validation of

  18. Pilot assessment of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in the context of transmission assessment surveys for lymphatic filariasis in Benin and Tonga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Brian K; Gass, Katherine; Batcho, Wilfrid; 'Ake, Malakai; Dorkenoo, Améyo M; Adjinacou, Elvire; Mafi, 'Eva; Addiss, David G

    2014-02-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) for lymphatic filariasis (LF) programs has delivered more than 2 billion treatments of albendazole, in combination with either ivermectin or diethylcarbamazine, to communities co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH), reducing the prevalence of both diseases. A transmission assessment survey (TAS) is recommended to determine if MDA for LF can be stopped within an evaluation unit (EU) after at least five rounds of annual treatment. The TAS also provides an opportunity to simultaneously assess the impact of these MDAs on STH and to determine the frequency of school-based MDA for STH after community-wide MDA is no longer needed for LF. Pilot studies conducted in Benin and Tonga assessed the feasibility of a coordinated approach. Of the schools (clusters) selected for a TAS in each EU, a subset of 5 schools per STH ecological zone was randomly selected, according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, for the coordinated survey. In Benin, 519 children were sampled in 5 schools and 22 (4.2%) had STH infection (A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura, or hookworm) detected using the Kato-Katz method. All infections were classified as light intensity under WHO criteria. In Tonga, 10 schools were chosen for the coordinated TAS and STH survey covering two ecological zones; 32 of 232 (13.8%) children were infected in Tongatapu and 82 of 320 (25.6%) in Vava'u and Ha'apai. All infections were light-intensity with the exception of one with moderate-intensity T. trichiura. Synchronous assessment of STH with TAS is feasible and provides a well-timed evaluation of infection prevalence to guide ongoing treatment decisions at a time when MDA for LF may be stopped. The coordinated field experiences in both countries also suggest potential time and cost savings. Refinement of a coordinated TAS and STH sampling methodology should be pursued, along with further validation of alternative quantitative diagnostic tests for STH that can be used with

  19. Obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors in urban adults of Benin: Relationship with socio-economic status, urbanisation, and lifestyle patterns

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    Delisle Hélène

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a dearth of information on diet-related chronic diseases in West Africa. This cross-sectional study assessed the rate of obesity and other cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors in a random sample of 200 urban adults in Benin and explored the associations between these factors and socio-economic status (SES, urbanisation as well as lifestyle patterns. Methods Anthropometric parameters (height, weight and waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and serum lipids (HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured. WHO cut-offs were used to define CVD risk factors. Food intake and physical activity were assessed with three non-consecutive 24-hour recalls. Information on tobacco use and alcohol consumption was collected using a questionnaire. An overall lifestyle score (OLS was created based on diet quality, alcohol consumption, smoking, and physical activity. A SES score was computed based on education, main occupation and household amenities (as proxy for income. Results The most prevalent CVD risk factors were overall obesity (18%, abdominal obesity (32%, hypertension (23%, and low HDL-cholesterol (13%. Diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia were uncommon. The prevalence of overall obesity was roughly four times higher in women than in men (28 vs. 8%. After controlling for age and sex, the odds of obesity increased significantly with SES, while a longer exposure to the urban environment was associated with higher odds of hypertension. Of the single lifestyle factors examined, physical activity was the most strongly associated with several CVD risk factors. Logistic regression analyses revealed that the likelihood of obesity and hypertension decreased significantly as the OLS improved, while controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion Our data show that obesity and cardio-metabolic risk factors are highly prevalent among urban adults in Benin, which calls for urgent measures to avert the

  20. Reducing Soil CO2 Emission and Improving Upland Rice Yield with no-Tillage, Straw Mulch and Nitrogen Fertilization in Northern Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossou-Yovo, E.; Brueggemann, N.; Naab, J.; Huat, J.; Ampofo, E.; Ago, E.; Agbossou, E.

    2015-12-01

    To explore effective ways to decrease soil CO2 emission and increase grain yield, field experiments were conducted on two upland rice soils (Lixisols and Gleyic Luvisols) in northern Benin in West Africa. The treatments were two tillage systems (no-tillage, and manual tillage), two rice straw managements (no rice straw, and rice straw mulch at 3 Mg ha-1) and three nitrogen fertilizers levels (no nitrogen, recommended level of nitrogen: 60 kg ha-1, and high level of nitrogen: 120 kg ha-1). Potassium and phosphorus fertilizers were applied to be non-limiting at 40 kg K2O ha-1 and 40 kg P2O5 ha-1. Four replications of the twelve treatment combinations were arranged in a randomized complete block design. Soil CO2 emission, soil moisture and soil temperature were measured at 5 cm depth in 6 to 10 days intervals during the rainy season and every two weeks during the dry season. Soil moisture was the main factor explaining the seasonal variability of soil CO2 emission. Much larger soil CO2 emissions were found in rainy than dry season. No-tillage planting significantly reduced soil CO2 emissions compared with manual tillage. Higher soil CO2 emissions were recorded in the mulched treatments. Soil CO2 emissions were higher in fertilized treatments compared with non fertilized treatments. Rice biomass and yield were not significantly different as a function of tillage systems. On the contrary, rice biomass and yield significantly increased with application of rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer. The highest response of rice yield to nitrogen fertilizer addition was obtained for 60 kg N ha-1 in combination with 3 Mg ha-1 of rice straw for the two tillage systems. Soil CO2 emission per unit grain yield was lower under no-tillage, rice straw mulch and nitrogen fertilizer treatments. No-tillage combined with rice straw mulch and 60 kg N ha-1 could be used by smallholder farmers to achieve higher grain yield and lower soil CO2 emission in upland rice fields in northern Benin.

  1. Diversity, Physicochemical and Technological Characterization of Elite Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz Cultivars of Bantè, a District of Central Benin

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    Abadjayé Faouziath Sanoussi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is one of the staple food crops contributing significantly to food and nutrition security in Benin. This study aimed to assess the diversity of the elite cassava cultivars of Bantè district, determine the physicochemical properties of the most preferred ones as well as the sensory attributes of their major derived products (gari and tapioca, and compare them with the farmers’ and processors’ perception on their technological qualities. The ethnobotanical investigation revealed existence of 40 cultivars including 9 elites that were further classified into three groups based on agronomics and technological and culinary properties. Clustered together, cultivars Idilèrou, Monlèkangan, and Odohoungbo characterized by low fiber content, high yield of gari and tapioca, and good in-ground postmaturity storage were the most preferred ones. Their physicochemical analysis revealed good rate of dry matters (39.8% to 41.13%, starch (24.47% to 25.5% and total sugars (39.46% to 41.13%, low fiber (0.80% to 1.02%, and cyanide (50 mg/kg contents. The sensory analysis of their gari and tapioca revealed very well appreciated (taste, color, and texture products by the consumers. The confirmation by scientific analysis of the farmers’ perception on qualities of the most preferred cultivars indicated that they have good knowledge of their materials.

  2. Integration of Optical and Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery for Improving Crop Mapping in Northwestern Benin, West Africa

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    Gerald Forkuor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Crop mapping in West Africa is challenging, due to the unavailability of adequate satellite images (as a result of excessive cloud cover, small agricultural fields and a heterogeneous landscape. To address this challenge, we integrated high spatial resolution multi-temporal optical (RapidEye and dual polarized (VV/VH SAR (TerraSAR-X data to map crops and crop groups in northwestern Benin using the random forest classification algorithm. The overall goal was to ascertain the contribution of the SAR data to crop mapping in the region. A per-pixel classification result was overlaid with vector field boundaries derived from image segmentation, and a crop type was determined for each field based on the modal class within the field. A per-field accuracy assessment was conducted by comparing the final classification result with reference data derived from a field campaign. Results indicate that the integration of RapidEye and TerraSAR-X data improved classification accuracy by 10%–15% over the use of RapidEye only. The VV polarization was found to better discriminate crop types than the VH polarization. The research has shown that if optical and SAR data are available for the whole cropping season, classification accuracies of up to 75% are achievable.

  3. Pierre Bourdieu and transformative agency: a study of how patients in Benin negotiate blame and accountability in the context of severe obstetric events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhague, Dominique P; Kanhonou, Lydie G; Filippi, Véronique; Lègonou, Solange; Ronsmans, Carine

    2008-05-01

    This paper explores the social and institutional processes that constrain and enable obstetric patients in Benin to critically evaluate quality of healthcare and to stimulate positive changes in the health system. Based on qualitative data collected as part of a hospital auditing system, the paper analyses semi-structured patient feedback interviews and their function as a primary mechanism through which critical patient evaluation can develop constructively. Using a Bourdieuan framework, we explore the dynamic social conditions that give rise to transformative agency and institutional change. Our results show that hospitals are often permeated with the habitus of employment, kinship and reproductive social fields, through which a number of social, economic and healthcare conflicts, power struggles and blame-inducing interactions emerge. These conflicts generally serve to keep patients quiescent and passive when it comes to developing critical statements of quality of care. In a subset of cases, however, these conflicts are transformed by patients and their family members into opportunities for modifying the values and practices of each habitus in new and creative ways. The active negotiation of social conflict and blame enabled a minority of patients actively to divert blame from themselves and to develop and maintain critical healthcare evaluations.

  4. Chloroquine prophylaxis associated with high prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum pfcrt K76T mutation in people with sickle-cell disease in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatfeng, Y M; Agbonlahor, D E; Tchounga, K S; Omolu, P I; Okodua, M; Yah, C S; Adeolu, A

    2008-03-01

    High mortality and morbidity in sickle-cell disease has been associated with malaria infection especially in countries where chloroquine is used. Chloroquine resistance has been associated with the emergence of Pfcrt mutant genes. This study aimed at comparing the prevalence rate of Pfcrt T76 mutation in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from infected individuals with sickle-cell disease and sickle-cell trait. This study was carried out in Benin City between the months of April and June 2006. This period is marked with high transmission rate of malaria. The genotype of the subjects was screened using haemoglobin electrophoresis system and the P. falciparum. Pfcrt genotyping was carried out using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Four hundred and twenty-four subjects comprising of 207 haemoglobin AA, 136 haemoglobin AS and 81 haemoglobin SS typed individuals were enrolled for this study. No significant difference existed in the prevalence rate of malaria in the three groups (p > 0.05). However, the prevalence rate of Pfcrt K76T mutant gene was higher in the haemoglobin SS genotyped individuals than the haemoglobin AA and AS subjects (p urgency to curb the up rise in the prevalence of the chloroquine resistant genes in our environment.

  5. Diversity, Physicochemical and Technological Characterization of Elite Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) Cultivars of Bantè, a District of Central Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanoussi, Abadjayé Faouziath; Loko, Laura Yéyinou; Ahissou, Hyacinthe; Adjahi, Adidjath Koubourath; Orobiyi, Azize; Agré, Angelot Paterne; Azokpota, Paulin; Dansi, Alexandre; Sanni, Ambaliou

    2015-01-01

    Cassava is one of the staple food crops contributing significantly to food and nutrition security in Benin. This study aimed to assess the diversity of the elite cassava cultivars of Bantè district, determine the physicochemical properties of the most preferred ones as well as the sensory attributes of their major derived products (gari and tapioca), and compare them with the farmers' and processors' perception on their technological qualities. The ethnobotanical investigation revealed existence of 40 cultivars including 9 elites that were further classified into three groups based on agronomics and technological and culinary properties. Clustered together, cultivars Idilèrou, Monlèkangan, and Odohoungbo characterized by low fiber content, high yield of gari and tapioca, and good in-ground postmaturity storage were the most preferred ones. Their physicochemical analysis revealed good rate of dry matters (39.8% to 41.13%), starch (24.47% to 25.5%) and total sugars (39.46% to 41.13%), low fiber (0.80% to 1.02%), and cyanide (50 mg/kg) contents. The sensory analysis of their gari and tapioca revealed very well appreciated (taste, color, and texture) products by the consumers. The confirmation by scientific analysis of the farmers' perception on qualities of the most preferred cultivars indicated that they have good knowledge of their materials.

  6. The "bringing into cultivation" phase of the plant domestication process and its contributions to in situ conservation of genetic resources in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodouhè, R; Dansi, A

    2012-01-01

    All over the world, plant domestication is continually being carried out by local communities to support their needs for food, fibre, medicine, building materials, etc. Using participatory rapid appraisal approach, 150 households were surveyed in 5 villages selected in five ethnic groups of Benin, to investigate the local communities' motivations for plant domestication and the contributions of this process to in situ conservation of genetic resources. The results indicated differences in plant domestication between agroecological zones and among ethnic groups. People in the humid zones give priority to herbs mainly for their leaves while those in dry area prefer trees mostly for their fruits. Local communities were motivated to undertake plant domestication for foods (80% of respondents), medicinal use (40% of respondents), income generation (20% of respondents) and cultural reasons (5% of respondents). 45% of the species recorded are still at early stage in domestication and only 2% are fully domesticated. Eleven factors related to the households surveyed and to the head of the household interviewed affect farmers' decision making in domesticating plant species. There is gender influence on the domestication: Women are keen in domesticating herbs while men give priority to trees.

  7. Cotton fertilization using PGPR Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and compost: Impact on insect density and cotton yield in North Benin, West Africa

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    Thiery B. Charles Alavo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work has compared the effects of the biofertilizer Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 with that of compost for cotton production. The population dynamics of pests and predators have been studied in order to check whether the use of both fertilization materials can contribute to pest management in cotton. Three treatments were considered: (i dressing of seeds in rhizobacteria suspension, (ii introduction of rhizobacterial suspension directly in the pocket, same time with the seeds, and (iii fertilization with compost. The study was carried out in northwest Benin (West Africa. Results showed that cotton aphids, Aphis gossypii, pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella, leaf roller, Sylepta derogata, and cotton bugs, Dysdercus sp. are the major insect pests encountered in the experimental plots. Cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, was present but under the economic threshold. The coccinellid predators, Cheilomenes spp., occurred in the experimental plots and almost suppressed aphid proliferation. Other natural enemies such as chrysopids and ant species also occurred and probably contributed to maintain the cotton bollworm under the economic threshold. The treatment with seeds dressed with the rhizobacteria suspension yielded 39% more cotton compared to the compost fertilization. The use of both fertilization materials without application of chemicals can contribute to pest management in cotton.

  8. EPIVAC International Conference on Financial Sustainability of Immunization Programs in sub-Saharan Africa, February 16-18, 2012, Ouidah, Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drach, Marcel; Le Gargasson, Jean-Bernard; Mathonnat, Jacky; Da Silva, Alfred; Kaddar, Miloud; Colombini, Anaïs

    2013-09-23

    The introduction of new vaccines with much higher prices than traditional vaccines results in increasing budgetary pressure on immunization programs in GAVI-eligible countries, increasing the need to ensure their financial sustainability. In this context, the third EPIVAC (Epidemiology and Vaccinology) technical conference was held from February 16 to 18, 2012 at the Regional Institute of Public Health in Ouidah, Benin. Managers of ministries of health and finance from 11 West African countries (GAVI eligible countries), as well as former EPIVAC students and European experts, shared their knowledge and best practices on immunization financing at district and country level. The conference concluded by stressing five major priorities for the financial sustainability of national immunization programs (NIPs) in GAVI-eligible countries. - Strengthen public financing by increasing resources and fiscal space, improving budget processes, increasing contribution of local governments and strengthen efficiency of budget spending. - Promote equitable community financing which was recognized as a significant and essential contribution to the continuity of EPI operations. - Widen private funding by exploring prospects offered by sponsorship through foundations dedicated to immunization and by corporate social responsibility programs. - Contain the potential crowding-out effect of GAVI co-financing and ensure that decisions on new vaccine introductions are evidence-based. - Seek out innovative financing mechanisms such as taxes on food products or a national solidarity fund. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The “Bringing into Cultivation” Phase of the Plant Domestication Process and Its Contributions to In Situ Conservation of Genetic Resources in Benin

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    R. Vodouhè

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All over the world, plant domestication is continually being carried out by local communities to support their needs for food, fibre, medicine, building materials, etc. Using participatory rapid appraisal approach, 150 households were surveyed in 5 villages selected in five ethnic groups of Benin, to investigate the local communities’ motivations for plant domestication and the contributions of this process to in situ conservation of genetic resources. The results indicated differences in plant domestication between agroecological zones and among ethnic groups. People in the humid zones give priority to herbs mainly for their leaves while those in dry area prefer trees mostly for their fruits. Local communities were motivated to undertake plant domestication for foods (80% of respondents, medicinal use (40% of respondents, income generation (20% of respondents and cultural reasons (5% of respondents. 45% of the species recorded are still at early stage in domestication and only 2% are fully domesticated. Eleven factors related to the households surveyed and to the head of the household interviewed affect farmers’ decision making in domesticating plant species. There is gender influence on the domestication: Women are keen in domesticating herbs while men give priority to trees.

  10. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcus Species in Raw Meat Samples Intended for Human Consumption in Benin City, Nigeria: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O; Beshiru, Abeni; Akporehe, Lucy U; Oviasogie, Faith E; Igbinosa, Owen O

    2016-09-24

    The present study was designed to characterize methicillin-resistant staphylococci from raw meat. A total of 126 meat samples were obtained from open markets between February and April, 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the disc diffusion method. Molecular profiling was conducted using 16S rRNA, mecA, nuc, and PVL gene signatures were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay. Fifty isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were detected in 26 (52%) pork, 14 (28%) beef and 10 (20%) chicken samples. The staphylococcal isolates were identified through partial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (16S rRNA) nucleotide sequencing, and BLAST analysis of the gene sequence revealed 98%-100% staphylococcal similarity. All isolates from beef and chicken samples amplified the mecA gene, while 100% of the MRSA isolates amplified the PVL gene. The multidrug resistance profile (resistant to ≥1 antimicrobial agent in ≥3 classes of antimicrobial agents) of the staphylococcal isolates showed that 7 isolates were resistant to methicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, kanamycin, amoxicillin, cloxacillin, erythromycin, vancomycin, and gentamycin. There was a significant regression effect from the multidrug-resistant profile on the number of isolates (p resistant strains within bacterial populations. The findings of the present study indicate that raw meats in the Benin metropolis were possibly contaminated with pathogenic and multi-drug resistant staphylococci strains and therefore could constitute a risk to public health communities.

  11. Why 1D electrical resistivity techniques can result in inaccurate siting of boreholes in hard rock aquifers and why electrical resistivity tomography must be preferred: the example of Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alle, Iboukoun Christian; Descloitres, Marc; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel; Yalo, Nicaise; Lawson, Fabrice Messan Amen; Adihou, Akonfa Consolas

    2018-03-01

    Hard rock aquifers are of particular importance for supplying people with drinking water in Africa and in the world. Although the common use of one-dimensional (1D) electrical resistivity techniques to locate drilling site, the failure rate of boreholes is usually high. For instance, about 40% of boreholes drilled in hard rock aquifers in Benin are unsuccessful. This study investigates why the current use of 1D techniques (e.g. electrical profiling and electrical sounding) can result in inaccurate siting of boreholes, and checks the interest and the limitations of the use of two-dimensional (2D) Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Geophysical numerical modeling and comprehensive 1D and 2D resistivity surveys were carried out in hard rock aquifers in Benin. The experiments carried out at 7 sites located in different hard rock groups confirmed the results of the numerical modeling: the current use of 1D techniques can frequently leads to inaccurate siting, and ERT better reveals hydrogeological targets such as thick weathered zone (e.g. stratiform fractured layer and preferential weathering associated with subvertical fractured zone). Moreover, a cost analysis demonstrates that the use of ERT can save money at the scale of a drilling programme if ERT improves the success rate by only 5% as compared to the success rate obtained with 1D techniques. Finally, this study demonstrates, using the example of Benin, that the use of electrical resistivity profiling and sounding for siting boreholes in weathered hard rocks of western Africa should be discarded and replaced by the use of ERT technique, more efficient.

  12. Clinical evaluation of the deadline of healing of the ulcer of Buruli hurts of diameter lower or equal to 10 centimeters in pobe (Benin

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    Christiane Koudoukpo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ulcer of Buruli is a skin disorder due to Mycobacterium ulcerans. The objective was to estimate the deadline of healing of the hurts of the ulcer of ulcer of Buruli of diameter ≤ 10 cm. Patients and Methods: It was about a retrospective, descriptive and analytical study, realized from 2010 to 2012 in Pobè (Benin. Were included the patient, having had a positive PCR in Mycobacterium ulcerans, hurts of diameter ≤ 10 cm and treated according to the recommendations of the WHO. Results: A total of 104 patients have been included. The hurt patches represented the most frequent clinical shape (57%. The average deadline of consultation was 16.6 ±19.6 weeks. The patients presenting a hurt lesion and having consulted less than 5 weeks after the beginning of the disease, had an average deadline of healing of 85.1 ± 33.7 days versus 146.1 ± 80.2 days for those having consulted 27 weeks after the beginning of the disease (p <0.05. The average deadline of healing of forms by diameter ≤ 5cm was 105.1 ± 59.5 days versus 111. ± 44.3 days for that of hurt forms of 5 cm ≤ diameter ≤ 10 cm (p = 0.04. Conclusion: Delay in the consultation lengthens the deadline of healing of the hurts. The not hurt lesions whatever are their sizes have a deadline of healing longer than that of the hurt lesions. The results of this work should arouse other studies for new therapeutic perspectives of that affection.

  13. Olyset Duo® (a pyriproxyfen and permethrin mixture net: an experimental hut trial against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in Southern Benin.

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    Corine Ngufor

    Full Text Available Alternative compounds which can complement pyrethroids on long-lasting insecticidal nets (LN in the control of pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors are urgently needed. Pyriproxyfen (PPF, an insect growth regulator, reduces the fecundity and fertility of adult female mosquitoes. LNs containing a mixture of pyriproxyfen and pyrethroid could provide personal protection through the pyrethroid component and reduce vector abundance in the next generation through the sterilizing effect of pyriproxyfen.The efficacy of Olyset Duo, a newly developed mixture LN containing pyriproxyfen and permethrin, was evaluated in experimental huts in southern Benin against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus. Comparison was made with Olyset Net® (permethrin alone and a LN with pyriproxyfen alone (PPF LN. Laboratory tunnel tests were performed to substantiate the findings in the experimental huts.Overall mortality of wild pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae s.s. was significantly higher with Olyset Duo than with Olyset Net (50% vs. 27%, P = 0.01. Olyset DUO was more protective than Olyset Net (71% vs. 3%, P<0.001. The oviposition rate of surviving blood-fed An. gambiae from the control hut was 37% whereas none of those from Olyset Duo and PPF LN huts laid eggs. The tunnel test results were consistent with the experimental hut results. Olyset Duo was more protective than Olyset Net in the huts against wild pyrethroid resistant Cx. quinquefasciatus although mortality rates of this species did not differ significantly between Olyset Net and Olyset Duo. There was no sterilizing effect on surviving blood-fed Cx. quinquefasciatus with the PPF-treated nets.Olyset Duo was superior to Olyset Net in terms of personal protection and killing of pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae, and sterilized surviving blood-fed mosquitoes. Mixing pyrethroid and pyriproxyfen on a LN shows potential for malaria control and management of pyrethroid resistant vectors by

  14. Determination of the silvo-melliferous regions of Benin: a nationwide categorisation of the land based on melliferous plants suitable for timber production

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    Felicien Amakpe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Perennial plants are the main pollen and nectar sources for bees in the tropical areas where most of the annual flora are burned in dry seasons. Therefore perennial plants constitute the most reliable bio materials for determining and evaluating the beekeeping regions of the Republic of Benin. A silvo-melliferous region (S-MR is a geographical area characterised by a particular set of homogenous melliferous plants that can produce timber. Using both the prevailing climatic and the agro-ecological conditions six S-MRs could be identified, i.e. the South region, the Common Central region, the Central West region, the Central North region, the Middle North region and the Extreme North region. At the country level, the melliferous plants were dominated by Vitellaria paradoxa which is common to all regions. The most diversified family was the Caesalpiniaceae (12 species followed by the Combretaceae (10 species and Combretum being the richest genus. The effect of dominance is particularly high in the South region where Elaeis guineensis alone represented 72.6% of the tree density and 140% of the total plant importance. The total melliferous plant density varied from 99.3 plants ha^(−1 in the Common Central region to 178.0 plants ha^(−1 in the Central West region. On the basis of nectar and pollen source, the best region for beekeeping is the CentralWest region with 46.7% of nectar producing trees, 9.4% of pollen producing trees and 40.6% of plants that issue both, this in opposition to the South region which was characterised by an unbalanced distribution of melliferous trees.

  15. On-Farm Diversity and Market Participation Are Positively Associated with Dietary Diversity of Rural Mothers in Southern Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Mauricio R; Ntandou-Bouzitou, Gervais D; Caracciolo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to test the extent to which, under different opportunities for market participation, the diversity of plant species rural households grow or collect (on-farm diversity), and the variety of foods mothers purchase (market diversity) are associated with their dietary diversity. Rural households from three districts in southern Benin were interviewed during dry (n = 472) and wet (n = 482) seasons between 2011 and 2012. Villages within districts and their households were selected randomly according to market accessibility, with a mother selected from each household. Information on on-farm diversity was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Market diversity was obtained through a 7-day food frequency questionnaire that elicited if foods were purchased. Dietary diversity was derived from a quantitative 24-hour food recall. A system of three simultaneous equations via a Generalized Methods of Moments was estimated to address potential endogeneity between dietary diversity and on-farm diversity and market diversity. Results show rich on-farm diversity with more than 65 different edible plant species grown or collected by households. More than 70% of foods consumed by mothers were purchased in 55 market places. More than 50% of mothers met minimum dietary diversity with at least 5 food groups consumed. Diagnostic tests indicated the existence of endogeneity. Econometric results showed that on-farm and market diversities were positively associated with mothers' dietary diversity (p market opportunities, seasonality and other socioeconomic factors were controlled for. Results provide evidence of a positive relationship between on-farm diversity and dietary diversity among participant mothers. They demonstrate the important contribution of market diversity to their dietary diversity. Links among these three facets of diversity suggest that production for self-consumption and food purchases complement rather than replace each other in

  16. Can treatment of malaria be restricted to parasitologically confirmed malaria? A school-based study in Benin in children with and without fever

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    Ouendo Edgard

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Applying the switch from presumptive treatment of malaria to new policies of anti-malarial prescriptions restricted to parasitologically-confirmed cases is a still unsolved challenge. Pragmatic studies can provide data on consequences of such a switch. In order to assess whether restricting anti-malarials to rapid diagnostic test (RDT-confirmed cases in children of between five and 15 years of age is consistent with an adequate management of fevers, a school-based study was performed in Allada, Benin. Methods Children in the index group (with fever and a negative RDT and the matched control group (without fever and a negative RDT were not prescribed anti-malarials and actively followed-up during 14 days. Blood smears were collected at each assessment. Self-medication with chloroquine and quinine was assessed with blood spots. Malaria attacks during the follow-up were defined by persistent or recurrent fever concomitant to a positive malaria test. Results 484 children were followed-up (242 in each group. At day 3, fever had disappeared in 94% of children from the index group. The incidence of malaria was similar (five cases in the index group and seven cases in the control group between groups. Self-medication with chloroquine and quinine in this cohort was uncommon. Conclusions Applying a policy of restricting anti-malarials to RDT-confirmed cases is consistent with an adequate management of fevers in this population. Further studies on the management of fever in younger children are of upmost importance.

  17. What would PCR assessment change in the management of fevers in a malaria endemic area? A school-based study in Benin in children with and without fever

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    Faucher Jean-François

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent school-based study in Benin showed that applying a policy of anti-malarial prescriptions restricted to parasitologically-confirmed cases on the management of fever is safe and feasible. Additional PCR data were analysed in order to touch patho-physiological issues, such as the usefulness of PCR in the management of malaria in an endemic area or the triggering of a malaria attack in children with submicroscopic malaria. Methods PCR data were prospectively collected in the setting of an exposed (with fever/non exposed (without fever study design. All children had a negative malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT at baseline, were followed up to day 14 and did not receive drugs with anti-malarial activity. The index group was defined by children with fever at baseline and the control group by children without fever at baseline. Children with submicroscopic malaria in these two groups were defined by a positive PCR at baseline. Results PCR was positive in 66 (27% children of the index group and in 104 (44% children of the control group respectively. The only significant factor positively related to PCR positivity at baseline was the clinical status (control group. When definition of malaria attacks included PCR results, no difference of malaria incidence was observed between the index and control groups, neither in the whole cohort, nor in children with submicroscopic malaria. The rate of undiagnosed malaria at baseline was estimated to 3.7% at baseline in the index group. Conclusions Treating all children with fever and a positive PCR would have led to a significant increase of anti-malarial consumption, with few benefits in terms of clinical events. Non malarial fevers do not or do not frequently trigger malaria attacks in children with submicroscopic malaria.

  18. Morphometric parameters and level of Salmonella and Escherichia coli contamination of Tilapia guineensis and Sarotherodon melanotheron in the waterway of Southern Benin

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    Tossou Jacques Dougnon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aims to evaluate the morphometric parameters and level of Salmonella and Escherichia coli contamination of Tilapia guineensis and Sarotherodon melanotheron in the waterway of Southern Benin. Materials and Methods: 183 T. guineensis and 195 S. melanotheron were collected from June to July 2014 in four waterways: Lake Ahémé, Nokoué Lake, coastal lagoon, and lagoon of Porto-Novo. Weight, total length, and standard length of these fish were evaluated. E. coli and Salmonella sp. were sought in fresh fish. Results: The results obtained in this study indicate that S. melanotheron presented high-performance of length and weight more than T. guineensis in Ahémé Lake and lagoon of Porto-Novo. However, in Nokoué Lake and coastal lagoon, no difference was observed between the two species of fish. As for bacteriological analysis, the population of T. guineensis was more contaminated with E. coli with respective values of 60% and 59.52% in the Nokoué Lake and coastal lagoon than in the two other streams. Regarding the population of S. melanotheron, she was most contaminated in the coastal lagoon with a percentage of 66.66% in Ahémé Lake, Nokoué Lake, and the lagoon of Porto-Novo. However, no Salmonella germ was detected in fish analyzed in this study. Conclusion: It appears that the morphometric parameters and weight of T. guineensis are lower than those of S. melanotheron. The evaluation of the microbiological quality revealed that T. guineensis is more contaminated with E. coli that S. melanotheron.

  19. Impact of dental caries and its treatment on the quality of life of 12- to 15-year-old adolescents in Benin, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwumah, Nneka M; Folayan, Morenike O; Oziegbe, Elizabeth O; Umweni, Alice A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of caries and its treatment on quality of life (QoL) in 12- to 15-year-old children in Benin, Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study involving 1790 children. Clinical examinations were conducted using the WHO criteria for diagnosis and coding of caries. The Decayed Missing Filled Teeth score of each child was calculated. The child Oral Impact on Daily Performance questionnaire was used to assess the QoL of children with caries pre- and post-treatment. Associations between age, sex, and socio-economic status and caries were analysed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of caries in the study population was 21.9%. Approximately 57% of children with caries reported negative impact on their QoL pre-treatment. Eating (47.6%) was the most affected domain. The mean pre-treatment QoL score was 8.40 ± 10.34. Four weeks post-treatment, only 1.12% of participants reported negative impact of caries treatment on their QoL. The mean post-treatment QoL score was 0.22 ± 0.91 There was a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment QoL scores (P = 0.0001) with significant changes in all the eight domains studied. Age, sex, and socio-economic status had no significant impact on QoL pre- and post-treatment. Caries had a significant impact on the QoL of adolescents. Its treatment resulted in marked improvement in QoL. © 2015 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Benefits of using vaccines out of the cold chain: delivering meningitis A vaccine in a controlled temperature chain during the mass immunization campaign in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, Simona; Djingarey, Mamoudou Harouna; Lodjo, Jean-Claude; Olodo, Laifoya; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre; Ronveaux, Olivier

    2014-03-14

    In October 2012, the Meningococcal A conjugate vaccine MenAfriVac was granted a label variation to allow for its use in a controlled temperature chain (CTC), at temperatures of up to 40°C for not more than four days. This paper describes the first field use of MenAfriVac in a CTC during a campaign in Benin, December 2012, and assesses the feasibility and acceptability of the practice. We implemented CTC in one selected district, Banikoara (target population of 147,207; 1-29 years of age), across 14 health facilities and 150 villages. We monitored the CTC practice using temperature indicators and daily monitoring sheets. At the end of the campaign we conducted a face-to-face survey to assess vaccinators' and supervisors' experience with CTC. A mix of strategies were implemented in the field to maximize the benefits from CTC practice, depending on the distance from health centre to populations and the availability of a functioning refrigerator in the health centre. Coverage across Banikoara was 105.7%. Over the course of the campaign only nine out of approx. 15,000 vials were discarded due to surpassing the 4 day CTC limit and no vial was discarded because of exposure to a temperature higher than 40°C or due to the Vaccine Vial Monitor (VVM) reaching its endpoint. Overall confidence and perceived usefulness of the CTC approach were very high among vaccinators and supervisors. Vaccinators and supervisors see clear benefits from the CTC approach in low income settings, especially in hard-to-reach areas or where cold chain is weak. Taking advantage of the flexibility offered by CTC opens the door for the implementation of new immunization strategies to ensure all those at risk are protected. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Rare earth and precious elements in the urban sewage sludge and lake surface sediments under anthropogenic influence in the Republic of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessoufou, Arouna; Ifon, Binessi Edouard; Suanon, Fidèle; Dimon, Biaou; Sun, Qian; Dedjiho, Comlan Achille; Mama, Daouda; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2017-11-09

    Nowadays, sewage sludge and water bodies are subjected to heavy pollution due to rapid population growth and urbanization. Heavy metal pollution represents one of the main challenges threatening our environment and the ecosystem. The present work aims to evaluate the contamination state of the sewage sludge and lake sediments in the Republic of Benin. Twenty metallic elements including 15 rare earth elements (Eu, Sb, Cs, Nd, Pr, Gd, La, Ce, Tb, Sm, Dy, Ho, Eu, Yb, and Lu) and five precious elements (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt, and Ru) were investigated using inductive plasma-mass spectrometry. Results showed broad range concentrations of the elements. Ce, La, and Nd were present in both sediments and sewage sludge at concentrations ranging 5.80-41.30 mg/kg dry matter (DM), 3.23-15.60 mg/kg DM, and 2.74-19.26 mg/kg DM, respectively. Pr, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Eu, Er, Yb, Cs, Ho, and Tm concentrations were lower (0.02-5.94 mg/kg DM). Among precious elements, Ag was detected at the highest concentration in all sites (0.43-4.72 mg/kg DM), followed by Pd (0.20-0.57 mg/kg DM) and Au (0.01-0.57 mg/kg DM). Ru and Pt concentrations were sewage sludge. This revealed a growing anthropogenic input which was also implied by principal component analysis. The evaluation of pollution loading index (PLI) indicated a moderate to strong contamination (0.12 ≤ PLI ≤ 0.58; 37 ≤ PLI ≤ 114, respectively, for rare earth elements and precious elements), while the degree of contamination indicated a moderate polymetallic contamination for rare earth elements and significant contamination for precious elements.

  2. On-Farm Diversity and Market Participation Are Positively Associated with Dietary Diversity of Rural Mothers in Southern Benin, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Mauricio R.; Ntandou-Bouzitou, Gervais D.; Caracciolo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to test the extent to which, under different opportunities for market participation, the diversity of plant species rural households grow or collect (on-farm diversity), and the variety of foods mothers purchase (market diversity) are associated with their dietary diversity. Methods Rural households from three districts in southern Benin were interviewed during dry (n = 472) and wet (n = 482) seasons between 2011 and 2012. Villages within districts and their households were selected randomly according to market accessibility, with a mother selected from each household. Information on on-farm diversity was collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Market diversity was obtained through a 7-day food frequency questionnaire that elicited if foods were purchased. Dietary diversity was derived from a quantitative 24-hour food recall. A system of three simultaneous equations via a Generalized Methods of Moments was estimated to address potential endogeneity between dietary diversity and on-farm diversity and market diversity. Results Results show rich on-farm diversity with more than 65 different edible plant species grown or collected by households. More than 70% of foods consumed by mothers were purchased in 55 market places. More than 50% of mothers met minimum dietary diversity with at least 5 food groups consumed. Diagnostic tests indicated the existence of endogeneity. Econometric results showed that on-farm and market diversities were positively associated with mothers’ dietary diversity (p < 0.05) once market opportunities, seasonality and other socioeconomic factors were controlled for. Conclusion Results provide evidence of a positive relationship between on-farm diversity and dietary diversity among participant mothers. They demonstrate the important contribution of market diversity to their dietary diversity. Links among these three facets of diversity suggest that production for self-consumption and food

  3. Ulcera del Buruli: la "nuova lebbra" Africana. Isolamento e identificazione di M. ulcerans in prelievi bioptici provenienti da pazienti del Benin

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    Danila Costa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, a slow growing mycobacterium which classically infects the skin and the subcutaneous tissues generating indolent ulcers, is, after tuberculosis and leprosy, the third most common mycobacterial infection and has emerged as an important cause of human disease in at least 32 tropical and subtropical countries.The disease initially manifests a painless swelling in the skin and progresses to skin ulceration. Because of the lack of a specific vaccine and the inefficacy of antibiotic therapies, the current treatment is surgical excision. Early diagnosis and treatment prevent complications and therefore, a prompt and accurate diagnosis is crucial, but difficult to perform in countries with limited resources. In this paper we describe the mycobacteriological diagnosis on samples obtained from patients who underwent plastic-reconstructive surgery in a hospital in Zinviè, Benin (West Africa. M. ulcerans was isolated from 19/32 subjects at the mycobacteriology laboratory of the Institute of Hygiene, University of Bari, Italy, 10-15 days after sampling. The identification of M. ulcerans was performed with a panel of tests for conventional identification, including biochemical analyses (niacin, nitrate reduction, catalase at 68°C, Tween hydrolysis, and urease, cultures (growth at 32, 37, and 45°C, and inhibition studies (tolerance of 5% NaCl and thiophenecarboxylic acid as well as with INNO-LiPA MYCOBACTERIA v2 and confirmed with Chromatographic Analysis of Cell Wall Mycolic Acid (high-performance liquid chromatography. Our results demonstrate that, even on samples collected in distant sites and analyzed after 10-15 days, the conventional phenoptype identification confirmed by molecular testing and HPLC resulted in an accurate identification of such a devastating and relatively rare mycobacterium as M. ulcerans which had never been previously isolated in Italy.

  4. Field efficacy of Vectobac GR as a mosquito larvicide for the control of anopheline and culicine mosquitoes in natural habitats in Benin, West Africa.

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    Armel Djènontin

    Full Text Available The efficacy of Vectobac GR (potency 200 ITU/mg, a new formulation of bacterial larvicide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis Strain AM65-52, was evaluated against Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus in simulated field and natural habitats in Benin.In simulated field conditions, Vectobac GR formulation was tested at 3 dosages (0.6, 0.9, 1.2 g granules/m² against An. gambiae and 1, 1.5, 2 g granules/m² against Cx. quinquefasciatus according to manufacturer's product label recommendations. The dosage giving optimum efficacy under simulated field conditions were evaluated in the field. The efficacy of Vectobac GR in terms of emergence inhibition in simulated field conditions and of reduction of larval and pupal densities in rice fields and urban cesspits was measured following WHO guidelines for testing and evaluation of mosquito larvicides.Vectobac GR caused emergence inhibition of ≥80% until 21 [20]-[22] days for An. gambiae at 1.2 g/m² dose and 28 [27-29] days for Cx. quinquefasciatus at 2 g/m² in simulated field habitats. The efficacy of Vectobac GR in natural habitats was for 2 to 3 days against larvae and up to 10 days against pupae.Treatment with Vectobac GR caused complete control of immature mosquito within 2-3 days but did not show prolonged residual action. Larviciding can be an option for malaria and filariasis vector control particularly in managing pyrethroid-resistance in African malaria vectors. Since use of larvicides among several African countries is being emphasized through Economic Community of West Africa States, their epidemiological impact should be carefully investigated.

  5. A Model for Good Governance of Healthcare Technology Management in the Public Sector: Learning from Evidence-Informed Policy Development and Implementation in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngbo, P Th; Coleman, H L S; Zweekhorst, M; De Cock Buning, Tj; Medenou, D; Bunders, J F G

    2017-01-01

    Good governance (GG) is an important concept that has evolved as a set of normative principles for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to strengthen the functional capacity of their public bodies, and as a conditional prerequisite to receive donor funding. Although much is written on good governance, very little is known on how to implement it. This paper documents the process of developing a strategy to implement a GG model for Health Technology Management (HTM) in the public health sector, based on lessons learned from twenty years of experience in policy development and implementation in Benin. The model comprises six phases: (i) preparatory analysis, assessing the effects of previous policies and characterizing the HTM system; (ii) stakeholder identification and problem analysis, making explicit the perceptions of problems by a diverse range of actors, and assessing their ability to solve these problems; (iii) shared analysis and visioning, delineating the root causes of problems and hypothesizing solutions; (iv) development of policy instruments for pilot testing, based on quick-win solutions to understand the system's responses to change; (v) policy development and validation, translating the consensus solutions identified by stakeholders into a policy; and (vi) policy implementation and evaluation, implementing the policy through a cycle of planning, action, observation and reflection. The policy development process can be characterized as bottom-up, with a central focus on the participation of diverse stakeholders groups. Interactive and analytical tools of action research were used to integrate knowledge amongst actor groups, identify consensus solutions and develop the policy in a way that satisfies criteria of GG. This model could be useful for other LMICs where resources are constrained and the majority of healthcare technologies are imported.

  6. A Model for Good Governance of Healthcare Technology Management in the Public Sector: Learning from Evidence-Informed Policy Development and Implementation in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Th Houngbo

    Full Text Available Good governance (GG is an important concept that has evolved as a set of normative principles for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs to strengthen the functional capacity of their public bodies, and as a conditional prerequisite to receive donor funding. Although much is written on good governance, very little is known on how to implement it. This paper documents the process of developing a strategy to implement a GG model for Health Technology Management (HTM in the public health sector, based on lessons learned from twenty years of experience in policy development and implementation in Benin. The model comprises six phases: (i preparatory analysis, assessing the effects of previous policies and characterizing the HTM system; (ii stakeholder identification and problem analysis, making explicit the perceptions of problems by a diverse range of actors, and assessing their ability to solve these problems; (iii shared analysis and visioning, delineating the root causes of problems and hypothesizing solutions; (iv development of policy instruments for pilot testing, based on quick-win solutions to understand the system's responses to change; (v policy development and validation, translating the consensus solutions identified by stakeholders into a policy; and (vi policy implementation and evaluation, implementing the policy through a cycle of planning, action, observation and reflection. The policy development process can be characterized as bottom-up, with a central focus on the participation of diverse stakeholders groups. Interactive and analytical tools of action research were used to integrate knowledge amongst actor groups, identify consensus solutions and develop the policy in a way that satisfies criteria of GG. This model could be useful for other LMICs where resources are constrained and the majority of healthcare technologies are imported.

  7. PHYTOCHEMISTRY, ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTIRADICAL ACTIVITIES EVALUATION OF ESSENTIAL OILS, ETHANOLIC AND HYDROETHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF THE LEAVES OF EUCALYPTUS CITRIODORA HOOK FROM BENIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaya A. Koudoro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The precipitation and coloration reactions implemented in this study revealed in the leaves of E. citriodora (Myrtaceae of Benin the presence of polyphenols, anthocyanins, flavonoids, saponins, tannins, mucilages, anthraquinones, leucoanthocyanins, cardiac glycosides, coumarins, proteins, sterols and triterpenes. The essential oil from the leaves of this plant was extracted with a yield of 3% and then analyzed by GC/MS. Nine compounds, representing 94.46% of the chemical composition of the oil, were identified, three among them being majority: citronellal (65.45%, citronellol (13.5% and isopulegol (10.33%. The contents of polyphenolic compounds of ethanolic and hydroethanolic extracts were respectively 4.52 mg EAG.g-1 and 4.38 mg EAGg-1 for total polyphenols, 78.76 mg ECg-1 and 81.56 mg ECg-1 for total flavonoids and 62.62 mg ECg-1 and 67.09 mg ECg-1 for condensed tannins. The radical scavenging activity of hydroethanolic extract (IC50=0.23 mgmL-1 was more pronounced than that of ethanolic extract (IC50=0.42 mgmL-1 and essential oil (IC50=0.9 mgmL-1. Regarding antimicrobial activity, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans were sensitive to hydroethanolic extract of E. citriodora leaves while Escherichia coli developed resistance against this extract. As for the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Eucalyptus citriodora it showed fungicidal activity against Candida albicans and bacteriostatic with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  8. Caractéristiques structurales et écologiques des populations d'espèces commerciales de bois: une base pour la sylviculture dans les peuplements forestiers de Niaouli (Sud-Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agbangla, MM.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural and Ecological Characteristics of Commercial Timber species' population: a Basis for Silviculture in Niaouli Forest Stands (Southern Benin. This study was carried out to provide silvicultural guidance in the Niaouli forest (6°43'- 6°44'N and 2°07'- 2°08'E, Southern Benin, based on commercial species. Twenty-three 0.25 ha plots (50 m x 50 m were set to characterize the structure and the ecology of these species' populations. Within each plot of 0.25 ha, three 100 m² sub-plots (10 m × 10 m were set for the assessment of regeneration. A multidimensional scaling was performed with SPSS 16.0 on presence-absence data of species, and led to the identification of four forest stands. Overall, the number of species and their abundance in the stands were linked to the presence of water. Diameter structure and regeneration revealed that the populations of the studied species were not at equilibrium. The silvicultural interventions suggested to equilibrate them were as follows: enrichment of the forest stands with the studied species; removal of liana and clearing of the undergrowth to enable the germination of seeds and the growth of the seedlings of commercial species, and the protection of the forest from illegal logging by improving security.

  9. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013: Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Capela

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions, lesions' size (>15 cm diameter or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions. There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0-67.5, while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0-120.0 (p = 0.009, and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0-548.0. On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56-217.5; p = 0.09, larger lesions (diameter >15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-120; p = 0.92 or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30-150; p = 0.20, when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, small lesions (diameter ≤15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and focal

  10. The indigenous Somba cattle of the hilly Atacora region in North-West Benin: threats and opportunities for its sustainable use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Luc Hippolyte; Vanvanhossou, Fridaïus Ulrich Sèyi

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the declining Somba cattle population in its production system context. Two-hundred-twenty-four (224) cattle farm-households were surveyed in the Boukombe district, the natural habitat of the breed in North-West Benin. Information on their socioeconomic characteristics and on their herd management practices were recorded using a semi-structured questionnaire. In addition, 15 body measurements were recorded from 102 adult cattle. Three types of breeders were distinguished: the owners-herders (54.0 %); the absentee owners (40.2 %) and the professional herders (5.8 %). The average cattle herd sizes were 4.7 ± 3.70 and 58.6 ± 22.83 heads for owner-managed and entrusted herds, respectively. Offtakes were more associated with sociocultural purposes (75.5 %) than market. While crop farming was the main occupation and income source of their owners, the Somba cattle were used for ploughing during the rainy season. In contrast to the widely accepted belief that this indigenous genetic resource is mainly threatened by crossbreeding and/or replacement, our findings suggest high mortalities due to diseases, feed and water shortages and poor reproduction management as the main causes of the decline of this cattle population. Somba cattle generally have short horns and a small body size. However, bulls have significantly (P ≤ 0.05) longer horns (21.2 ± 16.44 cm against 13.9 ± 7.21 cm), higher height at withers (99.7 ± 6.97 cm against 95.9 ± 5.76 cm) and body length (149.7 ± 12.87 cm against 146.8 ± 11.01 cm) than cows. All surveyed farmers expressed their willingness and readiness to participate in and contribute materially or financially to any program towards a sustainable use and preservation of this breed which they perceived as hardy and embedded in their culture. We therefore argue that strategies for its sustainable use and conservation should consist of simultaneously

  11. Measurements of NO and NH3 soil fluxes at the Savé super site in Benin, West Africa, during the DACCIWA field campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifico, Federica; Delon, Claire; Jambert, Corinne; Durand, Pierre; Lohou, Fabienne; Reinares Martinez, Irene; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Brosse, Fabien; Pedruzo Bagazgoitia, Xabier; Dione, Cheikh; Gabella, Omar

    2017-04-01

    In the next decades South West Africa will be subject to a strong increase in anthropogenic emissions due to a massive growth in population and urbanization. The impact of global climate change, local or regional land use changes, and the strong sensitivity to the West African monsoon lead to complex interactions between surface emissions and atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Anthropogenic pollutants are transported northward from the mega cities located on the coast, and react with biogenic emissions, leading to enhanced ozone (O3) production outside urban areas, as well as secondary organic aerosols formation, with detrimental effects on humans, animals, natural vegetation and crops. Nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions from soils, among other sources, directly influence NOx concentrations. Changes in NO sources will consequently modify the rate of O3 production. The largest source of ammonia (NH3) emissions is agriculture, via the application of synthetic fertilizer. When released into the atmosphere, NH3 increases the level of air pollution. Once deposited in water and soils, it can potentially cause two major types of environmental damage, acidification and eutrophication, both of which can harm sensitive vegetation systems, biodiversity and water quality. We investigate the role of soil fluxes of NO and NH3 on atmospheric chemistry in West Africa, making use of the observations taken in June and July 2016 at the Savé super-site, Benin (8°02'03" N, 2°29'11″ E), during the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) field campaign, which took place in June-July 2016. These observations also include meteorological and soil parameters such as air temperature and humidity (at 2 m height), radiation, soil temperature and moisture at different depths (5 cm and 10 cm). The climate in Savé is typical of a wet Guinea savanna, and the wet season takes place from June to October. Soil fluxes of NO and NH3 were measured on: bare soil, grassland

  12. Observations of biogenic isoprene emissions and atmospheric chemistry components at the Savé super site in Benin, West Africa, during the DACCIWA field campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambert, Corinne; Pacifico, Federica; Delon, Claire; Lohou, Fabienne; Reinares Martinez, Irene; Brilouet, Pierre-Etienne; Derrien, Solene; Dione, Cheikh; Brosse, Fabien; Gabella, Omar; Pedruzzo Bagazgoitia, Xavier; Durand, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Tropospheric oxidation of VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), including isoprene, in the presence of NOx and sunlight leads to the formation of O3 and Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). Changes in NO or VOCs sources will consequently modify their atmospheric concentrations and thus, the rate of O3 production and SOA formation. NOx have also an impact on the abundance of the hydroxyl radical (OH) which determines the lifetime of some pollutants and greenhouse gases. Anthropogenic emissions of pollutants from mega cities located on the Guinean coast in South West Africa are likely to increase in the next decades due to a strong anthropogenic pressure and to land use changes at the regional or continental scale. The consequences on regional air quality and on pollutant deposition onto surfaces may have some harmful effects on human and ecosystem health. Furthermore, the regional climate and water cycle are affected by changes in atmospheric chemistry. When transported northward on the African continent, polluted air masses meet biogenic emissions from rural areas which contributes to increase ozone and SOA production, in high temperature and solar radiation conditions, highly favourable to enhanced photochemistry. During the Dynamics-aerosol-chemistry-cloud interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) field campaign, we measured the atmospheric chemical composition and the exchanges of trace components in a hinterland area of Benin, at the Savé super-site (8°02'03" N, 2°29'11″ E). The observations, monitored in June and July 2016, in a rural mixed agricultural area, include near surface concentrations of ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and isoprene, isoprene fluxes and meteorological parameters. We observed hourly average concentrations of O3 up to 50 ppb, low NOx concentrations (ca. 1 ppb and CO concentrations between 75 and 300 ppb. An 8 m tower was equipped with a Fast Isoprene Sensor and sonic anemometer to measure isoprene concentrations and

  13. Profile of metabolic abnormalities seen in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their first degree relatives with metabolic syndrome seen in Benin City, Edo state Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogedengbe, Stephen O; Ezeani, Ignatius U

    2014-01-01

    To determine the profile of metabolic abnormalities in T2DM persons with metabolic syndrome and their non-diabetic first-degree relatives who also had metabolic syndrome in Benin City. This was a cross sectional case controlled study in which convenience sampling technique was used to recruit 106 persons with T2DM, 96 people who are first degree relatives of type 2 diabetic persons and 96 controls using a interviewer administered questionnaire technique. The following were assessed: anthropometric indices, blood pressure, serum lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, proteinuria, and microalbuminuria. The data obtained were analyzed using the statistical software-Statistical package for social sciences [SPSS] version 16. A p-value of less than 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. THE MEAN AGE (SD) OF THE STUDY GROUPS WERE: persons living with T2DM: 58.6 ± 11.2 years, control: 57.69 ± 60.8 years and FDR: 57.4 ± 10.6 years. No significant age and sex differences were observed in these groups. There were more females (59.7%) than males (40.3%) with T2DM. The prevalence of MS was 13.5%, 16.7%, and 87.1% in the control, FDR and T2DM patients respectively. For the T2DM group of subjects, impaired fasting glycaemia was the commonest metabolic abnormality followed by microalbuminuria, low HDL cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, hypercholesterolaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia in decreasing frequency. For the FDR group, low HDL cholesterol was the commonest metabolic abnormality followed by hypertriglyceridaemia, impaired fasting glucose, high LDL cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia and microalbuminuria in decreasing frequency. Hypercholesterolemia and low HDL cholesterol were the commonest metabolic abnormalities in the control group. The prevalence of the MS in persons with T2DM in Nigeria appears to be high. Secondly, there is a high prevalence of lipid abnormalities in all the study groups.

  14. Extended high efficacy of the combination sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine with artesunate in children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria on the Benin coast, West Africa

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    Coosemans Marc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A study carried out in 2003–2005 in Southern Benin showed a day-28 sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP monotherapy failure rate greater than 40%, while for SP combined with artesunate (SP-AS the failure rate was 5.3%. Such a large difference could be explained by the relatively short 28-day follow-up period, with a substantial number of recurrent infections possibly occurring after day 28. This paper reports the treatment outcome observed in the same study cohort beyond the initial 28-day follow-up. Methods After the 28-day follow-up, children treated with either chloroquine alone (CQ, SP or SP-AS, were visited at home twice a week until day 90 after treatment. A blood sample was collected if the child had fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C. Total clinical failure for each treatment group was estimated by combining all the early treatment failures and late clinical failures that occurred over the whole follow-up period, i.e. from day 0 up to day 90. Pre-treatment randomly selected blood samples were genotyped for the dhfr gene (59 and the dhps gene (437 and 540 point mutations related to SP resistance. Results The PCR-corrected clinical failure at day 90 was significantly lower in the SP-AS group (SP-AS: 2.7%, SP alone: 38.2%; CQ: 41.1% (Log-Rank p dhfr Arg-59 with the dhps Gly-437 mutant and the dhps 540 wild type (85.5%. The dhps 540 mutation could be found in only three (8.3% samples. Conclusion Combining artesunate to SP dramatically increased the treatment efficacy, even when extending the follow-up to day 90 post-treatment, and despite the high percentage of failures following treatment with SP alone. Such a good performance may be explained by the low prevalence of the dhps 540 mutation, by the rapid parasite clearance with artesunate and by the level of acquired immunity.

  15. Origins of streamflow in a crystalline basement catchment in a sub-humid Sudanian zone: The Donga basin (Benin, West Africa): Inter-annual variability of water budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguis, L.; Kamagaté, B.; Favreau, G.; Descloitres, M.; Seidel, J.-L.; Galle, S.; Peugeot, C.; Gosset, M.; Le Barbé, L.; Malinur, F.; Van Exter, S.; Arjounin, M.; Boubkraoui, S.; Wubda, M.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryDuring the last quarter of the 20th century, West Africa underwent a particularly intense and generalized drought. During this period, the biggest drops in streamflow were observed in the Sudanian zone rather than in the Sahelian zone, but the reasons are still poorly understood. In 2000, a meso-scale hydrological observatory was set up in the sub-humid Sudanian zone of the Upper Ouémé Valley (Benin). Three embedded catchments of 12-586 km 2 located on a crystalline bedrock were intensively instrumented to document the different terms of the water budget and to identify the main streamflow generating processes and base-flow mechanisms at different scales. Geophysical, hydrological and geochemical data were collected throughout the catchments from 2002 to 2006. Crossing these data helped define their hydrological functioning. The region has seasonal streamflow, and the permanent groundwater in the weathered mantle does not drain to rivers, instead, seasonal perched groundwaters are the major contributor to annual streamflow. The perched groundwaters are mainly located in seasonally waterlogged sandy layers in the headwater bottom-lands called bas-fonds in French-speaking West Africa of 1st order streams. During the period 2003-2006, regolith groundwater recharge ranged between 10% and 15% of the annual rainfall depth. Depletion of permanent groundwater during the dry season is probably explained by local evapotranspiration which was seen not to be limited to gallery forests. During the 4-year study period, a reduction of 20% in annual rainfall led to a 50% reduction in streamflow. This reduction was observed in the two components of the flow: direct runoff and drainage of perched groundwater. Thanks to the comprehensive dataset obtained, the results obtained for the Donga experimental catchment are now being extrapolated to the whole upper Ouémé valley, which can be considered as representative of sub-humid Sudanian rivers flowing on a crystalline

  16. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013): Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela, Carlos; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Houezo, Jean G.; Fiodessihoué, René; Dossou, Ange D.; Costa, Patrício; Fraga, Alexandra G.; Menino, João F.; Silva-Gomes, Rita; Ouendo, Edgard M.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions), lesions’ size (>15cm diameter) or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions). There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque) the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0–67.5), while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0–120.0) (p = 0.009), and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0–548.0). On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56–217.5; p = 0.09), larger lesions (diameter >15cm) (median 60 days; IQR 30–120; p = 0.92) or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30–150; p = 0.20), when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30–90), small lesions (diameter ≤15cm) (median 60 days; IQR 30–90), or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30–90), respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and

  17. Diversity of high risk human papilloma viruses in women treated with antiretroviral and in healthy controls and discordance with cervical dysplasia in the South of Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capo-Chichi, Callinice D; Aguida, Blanche; Chabi, Nicodème W; Acapko-Ezin, Jocelyn; Sossah-Hiffo, Jonas; Agossou, Vidéhouénou K; Anagbla, Toussain; Zannou, Marcel; Houngbé, Fabien; Sanni, Ambaliou

    2016-01-01

    High risk oncologic Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is one of the leading causes of cervical cancer worldwide. We investigated HPV genotypes among women living or not with Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) in two major hospitals in the south of the republic of BENIN in the city of Cotonou. Our objective is to investigate the association of high risk-HPV to cervical dysplasia among women under stringent anti-retroviral (ARV) treatment and in controls without HIV. The investigation was carried out within 1 year period in two groups of adult women: one group with HIV1 infection and under ARV therapy in the National University Hospital (CNHU-HKM) designated as CH group (n = 86); and one control group without HIV infection and attending the hospital Mènontin for routine gynecologic checkup and designated as ME group (n = 86). Cells derived from cervical uterine smears (CUS) were used for this investigation. The samples in ME group were selected to have similar lamin A/C profile with CH group. HPV genotypes were assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while lamin A/C expression profile was assessed by western blotting to corroborate the risk of cervical dysplasia. HPV56 is dominant in CH group while HPV66 is dominant in ME group. 31 % of women in CH group are infected with HPV compared to 23 % in ME group. Quadruple and quintuple HPV infections are more observed among CH group but not in ME group making HPV counts of 43 in CH group and 27 in ME group. Cervical dysplasia are present in 5 % (4/86) of women in CH group and in 1 % (1/86) of women in ME group at the time of CUS collection. The adjustment of the risk to develop cervical cancer in the future related to HPV infection and the total loss of lamin A/C is not significantly different in both groups. Women living with HIV are more sensitive to multiple HPV infection but not all HPV infections generated cervical dysplasia. The effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in CH group may reduce significantly

  18. Expression of the cytochrome P450s, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2 are significantly elevated in multiple pyrethroid resistant populations of Anopheles gambiae s.s. from Southern Benin and Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranson Hilary

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes is threatening the success of malaria control programmes. This is particularly true in Benin where pyrethroid resistance has been linked to the failure of insecticide treated bed nets. The role of mutations in the insecticide target sites in conferring resistance has been clearly established. In this study, the contribution of other potential resistance mechanisms was investigated in Anopheles gambiae s.s. from a number of localities in Southern Benin and Nigeria. The mosquitoes were sampled from a variety of breeding sites in a preliminary attempt to investigate the role of contamination of mosquito breeding sites in selecting for resistance in adult mosquitoes. Results All mosquitoes sampled belonged to the M form of An. gambiae s.s. There were high levels of permethrin resistance in an agricultural area (Akron and an urban area (Gbedjromede, low levels of resistance in mosquito samples from an oil contaminated site (Ojoo and complete susceptibility in the rural Orogun location. The target site mutation kdrW was detected at high levels in two of the populations (Akron f = 0.86 and Gbedjromede f = 0.84 but was not detected in Ojoo or Orogun. Microarray analysis using the Anopheles gambiae detox chip identified two P450s, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2 up regulated in all three populations, the former was expressed at particularly high levels in the Akron (12.4-fold and Ojoo (7.4-fold populations compared to the susceptible population. Additional detoxification and redox genes were also over expressed in one or more populations including two cuticular pre-cursor genes which were elevated in two of the three resistant populations. Conclusion Multiple resistance mechanisms incurred in the different breeding sites contribute to resistance to permethrin in Benin. The cytochrome P450 genes, CYP6P3 and CYP6M2 are upregulated in all three resistant populations analysed. Several additional potential

  19. Department of Economics and Statistics, University of Benin, Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siphambe H (Prof)

    the effectiveness of the export promotion strategies adopted by the country. This raises a red flag and constitutes serious threat to the growth prospects of the economy, especially in the face of dwindling oil prices, resulting in declining oil revenues. Bridging the gap is needful, and this entails taking conscious and deliberate ...

  20. Emerging quinolones resistant transfer genes among gram-negative bacteria, isolated from faeces of HIV/AIDS patients attending some Clinics and Hospitals in the City of Benin, Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enabulele IO

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of 1431 gram-negative bacilli from June 2001 to September 2005 were obtained from the faeces of 920 HIV/AIDS patients attending some Clinics and Hospitals in Benin City, Nigeria, were screened for quinolones resistance gene. The HIV/AIDS patients CD4 cells range was ≤14/mm3 ≥800/mm3 of blood. Out of the 1431 isolates, 343 (23.9% were resistance to quinolones with a MIC ≥4μg/ml for norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin while a MIC of ≥32 µg/ml for nalidixic acid. The screened isolates include Pseudomonas aeruginosa 64(18.7%, E coli 92(26.8%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 53(15.4%, Salmonella typhi 39(11.4%, Shigella dysenteriae 36(10.5%, Proteus mirabilis 34(9.9% and Serratia marcescens 25(7.3%. The average resistance of the isolates to the various quinolones ranged from 42.7% to 66.7%. Klebsiella were the most resistant isolates with a mean resistance of 66.7% while Proteus were the less resistant isolates with a mean resistance of 42.7%. Most isolates were resistant to Nalidixic acid followed by norfloxacin while the less resistant were to the pefloxacin. The frequency of qnr genes transfer to EJRifr as recipient ranged from 2 x 10-2 to 6 x 10-6 with an average of 2 plasmids per cell. The molecular weight of the plasmids ranged from <2.9kbp to <5.5 kbp. This indicated that plasmids allowed the movement of genetic materials including qnr resistant genes between bacteria species and genera in Benin City, Nigeria.

  1. Congenital Anophthalmos in Benin City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    such as trisomy 13 and Klinefelter's syndrome.[3,11]. Most cases appear to occur sporadically, but certain modes of inheritance have been documented including autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and. X-linked transmission.[3,11] Other factors implicated in the etiology of anophthalmos include physical agents,.

  2. Cas de Cotonou au Benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    En effet, de ces différents résultats, il résulte que la concentration des services administratifs dans la ville de Cotonou, ...... j'achète et j'utilise les médicaments et que je repasse encore par ce carrefour, les mêmes maux reprennent ». ..... l'Etat d'en prendre conscience et de trouver des mesures subséquentes notamment le.

  3. in Benin City, Southern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    komla

    2017-04-19

    Apr 19, 2017 ... Investigations were carried out on the food and feeding habits of Epiplatys senegalensis (Steindachner) 1870 .... group. Standard body size (length in cm). There was a significant. Fig. 3. Relatiopnship between the body size and the gape of E. positive correlation between ...... in Tropical Freshwater; Their.

  4. Benin - Access to Land - Rural

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This evaluation presents evidence from the first large-scale randomized controlled trial of a land formalization program. This study examines the links between land...

  5. Specific cut-off points for waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio as predictors of cardiometabolic risk in Black subjects: a cross-sectional study in Benin and Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EL Mabchour A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Asma EL Mabchour,1 Hélène Delisle,1 Colette Vilgrain,2 Philippe Larco,2 Roger Sodjinou,3 Malek Batal1 1Transition Nutritionnelle (TRANSNUT, WHO Collaborating Centre on Nutrition Changes and Development, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Haitian Foundation for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases (FHADIMAC, Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 3West Africa Health Organization (WAHO, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso Purpose: Waist circumference (WC and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR are widely used as indicators of abdominal adiposity and the cut-off values have been validated primarily in Caucasians. In this study we identified the WC and WHtR cut-off points that best predicted cardiometabolic risk (CMR in groups of African (Benin and African ancestry (Haiti Black subjects. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 452 apparently healthy subjects from Cotonou (Benin and Port-au-Prince (Haiti, 217 women and 235 men from 25 to 60 years. CMR biomarkers were the metabolic syndrome components. Additional CMR biomarkers were a high atherogenicity index (total serum cholesterol/high density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥4 in women and ≥5 in men; insulin resistance set at the 75th percentile of the calculated Homeostasis Model Assessment index (HOMA-IR; and inflammation defined as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP concentrations between 3 and 10 mg/L. WC and WHtR were tested as predictors of two out of the three most prevalent CMR biomarkers. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, Youden's index, and likelihood ratios were used to assess the performance of specific WC and WHtR cut-offs. Results: High atherogenicity index (59.5%, high blood pressure (23.2%, and insulin resistance (25% by definition were the most prevalent CMR biomarkers in the study groups. WC and WHtR were equally valid as predictors of CMR. Optimal WC cut-offs were 80 cm and 94 cm in men and women, respectively, which is exactly

  6. A Case of Cyperus spp. and Imperata cylindrica Occurrences on Acrisol of the Dahomey Gap in South Benin as Affected by Soil Characteristics: A Strategy for Soil and Weed Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahima Kone

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the limiting efficacy of common weed control methods on Cyperus spp. and Imperata cylindrica their occurrences in tropical agroecologies and the effect of soil properties in suppressing these species were investigated in south Benin (Cotonou, a typical ecology of the Dahomey gap. Weeds and soil samples were collected twice early and later in the rainy season in 2009 at four topographic positions (summit, upper slope, middle slope, and foot slope. Sampling was done according to Braun-Blanquet abundance indices (3 and 5 and the absence (0 of Cyperus and Imperata in a quadrat, respectively. The relationship between their respective abundances and soil parameters (texture, C, N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, and Fe was explored. Weed occurrence was less related to soil texture, and Imperata growth was more influenced by soil nutrients (K, Ca, and Fe than Cyperus spp. Soil cation ratios of K : Mg and Ca : Mg were the main factors that could be changed by applying K and/or Mg fertilizers to reduce Cyperus and/or Imperata occurrence. Maintaining high Fe concentration in soil at hillside positions can also reduce Imperata abundance, especially in the Dahomey gap.

  7. Can hospital audit teams identify case management problems, analyse their causes, identify and implement improvements? A cross-sectional process evaluation of obstetric near-miss case reviews in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Obstetric near-miss case reviews are being promoted as a quality assurance intervention suitable for hospitals in low income countries. We introduced such reviews in five district, regional and national hospitals in Benin, West Africa. In a cross-sectional study we analysed the extent to which the hospital audit teams were able to identify case management problems (CMPs), analyse their causes, agree on solutions and put these solutions into practice. Methods We analysed case summaries, women’s interview transcripts and audit minutes produced by the audit teams for 67 meetings concerning one woman with near-miss complications each. We compared the proportion of CMPs identified by an external assessment team to the number found by the audit teams. For the latter, we described the CMP causes identified, solutions proposed and implemented by the audit teams. Results Audit meetings were conducted regularly and were well attended. Audit teams identified half of the 714 CMPs; they were more likely to find managerial ones (71%) than the ones relating to treatment (30%). Most identified CMPs were valid. Almost all causes of CMPs were plausible, but often too superficial to be of great value for directing remedial action. Audit teams suggested solutions, most of them promising ones, for 38% of the CMPs they had identified, but recorded their implementation only for a minority (8.5%). Conclusions The importance of following-up and documenting the implementation of solutions should be stressed in future audit interventions. Tools facilitating the follow-up should be made available. Near-miss case reviews hold promise, but their effectiveness to improve the quality of care sustainably and on a large scale still needs to be established. PMID:23057707

  8. Disease, religion and medicine: smallpox in nineteenth-century Benin Doenças, religião e medicina: a varíola no Benim, século XIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisée Soumonni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The essay examines, with special reference to smallpox, the perception and interpretation of disease in pre-colonial Dahomey, present-day Republic of Benin. Because disease is seen primarily as a punishment from the gods and not just as a medical problem or a bodily disorder, traditional cult priests play a leading role in making diagnoses and prescribing remedies, mostly based on medicinal plants. The prominence of Sakpata, god of smallpox, coupled with the influence of its priests is evaluated within the context of Dahomey's political history and the spread of the disease. This pivotal position was to constitute a challenge to the French colonial campaign to vaccinate against smallpox.O ensaio examina - com especial atenção à varíola - as percepções e interpretações das doenças no Daomé pré-colonial, atual República do Benim. Uma vez que as doenças eram vistas antes de tudo como punição divina, e não como problema ou distúrbio do corpo, os sacerdotes tradicionais exerciam papel central no seu diagnóstico e na prescrição de remédios, com base principalmente em plantas medicinais. A importância do culto a Sakpata, deus da varíola, juntamente com a influência dos sacerdotes é avaliada dentro do contexto da história política do Daomé e da disseminação das doenças. A posição crucial desse culto constituiu-se como um desafio para a campanha colonial francesa de vacinação contra a varíola.

  9. Indoor residual spraying with a mixture of clothianidin (a neonicotinoid insecticide) and deltamethrin provides improved control and long residual activity against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae sl in Southern Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngufor, Corine; Fongnikin, Augustin; Rowland, Mark; N'Guessan, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS) which can provide improved and prolonged control of malaria vectors that have developed resistance to existing insecticides. The neonicotinoid, clothianidin represents a class of chemistry new to public health. Clothianidin acts as an agonist on nicotinic acetyl choline receptors. IRS with a mixture of Clothianidin and another WHO approved insecticide such as deltamethrin could provide improved control of insecticide resistant malaria vector populations and serve as a tool for insecticide resistance management. The efficacy and residual activity of a novel IRS mixture of deltamethrin and clothianidin was evaluated against wild pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae sl in experimental huts in Cove, Benin. Two application rates of the mixture were tested and comparison was made with clothianidin and deltamethrin applied alone. To assess the residual efficacy of the treatments on different local wall substrates, the inner walls of the experimental huts were covered with either cement, mud or plywood. Clothianidin demonstrated a clear delayed expression in mortality of wild pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae sl in the experimental huts which reached its full effect 120 hours after exposure. Overall mortality over the 12-month hut trial was 15% in the control hut and 24-29% in the deltamethrin-treated huts. The mixture of clothianidin 200mg/m2 and deltamethrin 25mg/m2 induced high overall hut mortality rates (87% on mud walls, 82% on cement walls and 61% on wooden walls) largely due to the clothianidin component and high hut exiting rates (67-76%) mostly due to the deltamethrin component. Mortality rates remained >80% for 8-9 months on mud and cement walls. The residual activity trend was confirmed by results from monthly in situ cone bioassays with laboratory susceptible An. gambiae Kisumu strain. IRS campaigns with the mixture of clothianidin plus deltamethrin have the potential to provide

  10. Indoor residual spraying with a mixture of clothianidin (a neonicotinoid insecticide and deltamethrin provides improved control and long residual activity against pyrethroid resistant Anopheles gambiae sl in Southern Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corine Ngufor

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for new insecticides for indoor residual spraying (IRS which can provide improved and prolonged control of malaria vectors that have developed resistance to existing insecticides. The neonicotinoid, clothianidin represents a class of chemistry new to public health. Clothianidin acts as an agonist on nicotinic acetyl choline receptors. IRS with a mixture of Clothianidin and another WHO approved insecticide such as deltamethrin could provide improved control of insecticide resistant malaria vector populations and serve as a tool for insecticide resistance management.The efficacy and residual activity of a novel IRS mixture of deltamethrin and clothianidin was evaluated against wild pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae sl in experimental huts in Cove, Benin. Two application rates of the mixture were tested and comparison was made with clothianidin and deltamethrin applied alone. To assess the residual efficacy of the treatments on different local wall substrates, the inner walls of the experimental huts were covered with either cement, mud or plywood.Clothianidin demonstrated a clear delayed expression in mortality of wild pyrethroid resistant An. gambiae sl in the experimental huts which reached its full effect 120 hours after exposure. Overall mortality over the 12-month hut trial was 15% in the control hut and 24-29% in the deltamethrin-treated huts. The mixture of clothianidin 200mg/m2 and deltamethrin 25mg/m2 induced high overall hut mortality rates (87% on mud walls, 82% on cement walls and 61% on wooden walls largely due to the clothianidin component and high hut exiting rates (67-76% mostly due to the deltamethrin component. Mortality rates remained >80% for 8-9 months on mud and cement walls. The residual activity trend was confirmed by results from monthly in situ cone bioassays with laboratory susceptible An. gambiae Kisumu strain.IRS campaigns with the mixture of clothianidin plus deltamethrin have the potential to

  11. EFFECT OF ESSENTIAL OIL OF MENTHA SPICATA L. FROM BENIN ON THE QUALITY OF MANGO PUREE IN STORAGE MODEL FOOD SYSTEMS AT 4° AND 25°C

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    René G. DEGNON

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the effect of essential oil from fresh leaves of Mentha spicata L. on the quality of mango puree in storage model food systems at 4°C and 25°C. The results of physico-chemical characterization of mango puree underlined its high nutritional potential, with carbohydrates, carotenoids and vitamin C contents of 9.5±0.4%, 20.05±0.03 mg/100g and 21.03±0.05 mg/100g respectively. The microbiological analyses using taxonomic schemes primarily based on morphological characters of mycelium and conidia revealed that Aspergillus parasiticus, Fusarium versicolor and Mucor spp. were the most common fungi identified in mango puree in the southern Benin. Antifungal assay, performed by the agar diffusion assay, indicated that essential oil exhibited high antifungal activity against the growth of fungi. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the essential oil was found to be 2.0 μL.mL-1for Aspergillus parasiticus and Fusarium versicolor; and 1.0 μL.mL-1 for Mucor spp. The chemical analysis of the oil made by GC/MS led to the identification of 35 components, characterized by carvone (67.5%, and limonene (12.0% as major components. The results obtained during the evaluation of the microbiological, physico-chemical and sensorial characteristics of the mango puree stored by adding essential oil, revealed the high potential of the essential oil of Mentha spicata L. in food quality preservation. This essential oil offers a novel approach to the management of fruit derivate products during storage.

  12. Can hospital audit teams identify case management problems, analyse their causes, identify and implement improvements? A cross-sectional process evaluation of obstetric near-miss case reviews in Benin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borchert Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstetric near-miss case reviews are being promoted as a quality assurance intervention suitable for hospitals in low income countries. We introduced such reviews in five district, regional and national hospitals in Benin, West Africa. In a cross-sectional study we analysed the extent to which the hospital audit teams were able to identify case management problems (CMPs, analyse their causes, agree on solutions and put these solutions into practice. Methods We analysed case summaries, women’s interview transcripts and audit minutes produced by the audit teams for 67 meetings concerning one woman with near-miss complications each. We compared the proportion of CMPs identified by an external assessment team to the number found by the audit teams. For the latter, we described the CMP causes identified, solutions proposed and implemented by the audit teams. Results Audit meetings were conducted regularly and were well attended. Audit teams identified half of the 714 CMPs; they were more likely to find managerial ones (71% than the ones relating to treatment (30%. Most identified CMPs were valid. Almost all causes of CMPs were plausible, but often too superficial to be of great value for directing remedial action. Audit teams suggested solutions, most of them promising ones, for 38% of the CMPs they had identified, but recorded their implementation only for a minority (8.5%. Conclusions The importance of following-up and documenting the implementation of solutions should be stressed in future audit interventions. Tools facilitating the follow-up should be made available. Near-miss case reviews hold promise, but their effectiveness to improve the quality of care sustainably and on a large scale still needs to be established.

  13. Physico-chemical characterization of African urban aerosols (Abidjan in Cote d'Ivoire and Cotonou in Benin) and their toxic effects in human bronchial epithelial cells during the dry season 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adon, Jacques; Liousse, Cathy; Yoboue, Veronique; Baeza, Armelle; Akpo, Aristide; Bahino, Julien; Chiron, Christelle; Galy-Lacaux, Corinne; Keita, Sékou

    2017-04-01

    This study is a contribution to the WP2-DACCIWA program with the aim to characterize particulate pollution on domestic fire site, traffic sites and waste burning site of two West-African capitals (Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire and Cotonou, Benin) and to study aerosol biological impacts on lung inflammation. Such an impact is still largely unknown, especially for the particles emitted by intense African traffic sources and domestic fires. In this context, fundamental research of this study is centered on the following key scientific question: what is the link between aerosol size differentiated composition and inflammation markers for the main combustion sources prevailing in South West Africa during dry and wet seasons? To tackle this question, intensive campaigns in Abidjan and Cotonou have been conducted in July 2015, January and July 2016, and January 2017. In this paper, we will present our first results for the campaign of January 2016. In terms of aerosol size differentiated composition, main aerosol components (mass, black carbon, organic carbon, water soluble particles ...) were measured. We may notice that PM measured for all the sites is generally higher than WHO norms. Organic carbon and dust particles are the two more important contributors for the ultra-fine and fine particle sizes with more organic carbon in Abidjan and dust particles in Cotonou respectively. In terms of in vitro biological studies on sampled aerosols on these sites, size-fractionated PM from the different sampling sites were compared for their ability to induce a proinflammatory response characterized by the release of the cytokine IL-6 by human bronchial epithelial cells. PM from waste burning site did not induce significant IL-6 release whatever the size fraction whereas PM from domestic fire were the most reactive especially the ultra-fine fraction. Ultra-fine particles from traffic (Abidjan and Cotonou) always induced a dose-dependent IL-6 release. A tentative cross-analysis between

  14. Traditional ecological knowledge-based assessment of threatened woody species and their potential substitutes in the Atakora mountain chain, a threatened hotspot of biodiversity in Northwestern Benin, West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbani, Pierre Onodje; Kafoutchoni, Konoutan Médard; Salako, Kolawolé Valère; Gbedomon, Rodrigue Castro; Kégbé, Ahuéfa Mauricel; Karen, Hahn; Sinsin, Brice

    2018-03-20

    Atakora mountains in Benin are a unique but fragile ecosystem, harboring many endemic plant species. The ecosystem is undergoing degradation, and the woody vegetation is dramatically declining due to high anthropogenic actions and recurrent drought. This study aimed to (i) assess the diversity of threatened woody species and (ii) identify their potential substitutes in the three regions of the Atakora mountains namely East Atakora, Central Atakora, and West Atakora. The data were collected during expeditions on surveyed localities through semi-structured individual interviews. Free-listing was used to record threatened woody species and which were important and why. Alpha-diversity indices were used to assess diversity of threatened and important threatened woody species. A correspondence analysis was used to determine the reason supporting their importance. Differences in species composition were assessed using analysis of similarities. A number of potential substitutes were compared among species using generalized linear models. A total of 117 woody species (37 families and 92 genera) were identified. The most prominent families were Fabaceae (19.66%), Combretaceae (12.82%), and Moraceae (10.26%), and the richest genera were Ficus (10 species), Combretum (6), and Terminalia (5). Most threatened species differed across regions (East Atakora, Central Atakora, and West Atakora) and included Afzelia africana, Anogeissus leiocarpa, Borassus aethiopum, Diospyros mespiliformis, Khaya senegalensis, Milicia excelsa, and Pterocarpus erinaceus. Most socio-economically important species (K. senegalensis, Parkia biglobosa, Vitellaria paradoxa, and V. doniana) were used mainly for food, timber, and fuelwood purposes. Old and adult people, and Dendi and Fulfulde sociolinguistic groups had greater knowledge of threatened woody plant species. High intercultural differentiations in species composition were detected between Bariba-Berba and Bariba-Natimba. Knowledge of substitutes

  15. Decreased proportions of indoor feeding and endophily in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations following the indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated net interventions in Benin (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padonou, Gil Germain; Gbedjissi, Ghelus; Yadouleton, Anges; Azondekon, Roseric; Razack, Ossé; Oussou, Olivier; Gnanguenon, Virgile; Rock, Aikpon; Sezonlin, Michel; Akogbeto, Martin

    2012-11-14

    In many parts of Africa as in Benin, the main strategies of vector control are based on the scaling-up of Long Lasting Insecticide Treated Nets (LLITNs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS). The need to understand the biological implications of IRS in large scale and full coverage of LLITNs is paramount. It is in this context that the present study was conducted. It aims to evaluate the effect of a large scale IRS using a non-pyrethroid insecticide and full coverage of deltamethrin treated nets on the behavior of An. gambiae s.l. in the intervention areas compared to untreated areas used as controls. Mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches, pyrethrum spray catches and window exit traps to assess reduction of entry rate, endophily rate, endophagy rate and overall mortality rate in natural populations of An. gambiae s.l. before IRS and LLITNs intervention (2007) and after in 2008 and 2010. In the IRS arm, endophily rate was 67.13% before intervention and 4.5% after intervention, whereas in the control arm it was stable at 51.67% (P > 0 .05). In the LLITN arm endophily rates also decreased after intervention. After the IRS, no gravid mosquitoes were collected from all treated localities, but LLITN performance was not that spectacular. The proportion of mosquitoes biting indoors in the IRS arm decreased from 67.09% before intervention to 42.85% after intervention, compared to a low but significant decrease (71.31% to 57. 46%) in the LLITN arm.The use of vector control tools and behavior of the host would be the main factors that modify the behavior of taking a human blood meal observed on An. gambiae s.l. inside human dwellings. The impact on the behavior of An. gambiae s.l. observed with the bendiocarb used in IRS was highly effective compared with the free distribution of LLITNs in terms of mortality and the decrease of proportions of indoor feeding. Despite this efficacy, there is a need for complementary tools and research of alternative strategy

  16. Decreased proportions of indoor feeding and endophily in Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations following the indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated net interventions in Benin (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padonou Gil

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many parts of Africa as in Benin, the main strategies of vector control are based on the scaling-up of Long Lasting Insecticide Treated Nets (LLITNs and indoor residual spraying (IRS. The need to understand the biological implications of IRS in large scale and full coverage of LLITNs is paramount. It is in this context that the present study was conducted. It aims to evaluate the effect of a large scale IRS using a non-pyrethroid insecticide and full coverage of deltamethrin treated nets on the behavior of An. gambiae s.l. in the intervention areas compared to untreated areas used as controls. Methods Mosquitoes were collected using human landing catches, pyrethrum spray catches and window exit traps to assess reduction of entry rate, endophily rate, endophagy rate and overall mortality rate in natural populations of An. gambiae s.l. before IRS and LLITNs intervention (2007 and after in 2008 and 2010. Results In the IRS arm, endophily rate was 67.13% before intervention and 4.5% after intervention, whereas in the control arm it was stable at 51.67% (P > 0 .05. In the LLITN arm endophily rates also decreased after intervention. After the IRS, no gravid mosquitoes were collected from all treated localities, but LLITN performance was not that spectacular. The proportion of mosquitoes biting indoors in the IRS arm decreased from 67.09% before intervention to 42.85% after intervention, compared to a low but significant decrease (71.31% to 57. 46% in the LLITN arm. The use of vector control tools and behavior of the host would be the main factors that modify the behavior of taking a human blood meal observed on An. gambiae s.l. inside human dwellings. Conclusion The impact on the behavior of An. gambiae s.l. observed with the bendiocarb used in IRS was highly effective compared with the free distribution of LLITNs in terms of mortality and the decrease of proportions of indoor feeding. Despite this efficacy, there is a need

  17. Non-consensual sex in Benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-02-02

    32:165-75. 6. Ouattara M, Sen P, Thomson M. Forced marriage, forced sex: The perils of childhood for girls. Gend Dev 1998;6:27-33. 7. Martin SL, Tsui AO, Maitra K, Marinshaw R. Domestic violence in northern. India.

  18. Cotton in Benin: governance and pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togbe, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    Key words: cotton, synthetic pesticides, neem oil (Azadirachta indica), Beauveria bassiana,

    Bacillus thuringiensis, field experiment, farmers’ participation

    Pests are one of the main factors limiting cotton production worldwide. Most of the pest

    control

  19. Retinal Vein Occlusion in Benin City, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [8‑10] Ocular and systemic factors which predispose to RVO have been described. The systemic risk factors include cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypercoagulable states. Ocular risk factors implicated include glaucoma with elevated intraocular pressure and hypermetropia.

  20. Childhood Acute Glomerulonepbritis in Benin City

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2000-12-31

    Dec 31, 2000 ... Haematuria and proteinuria of varying degrees occurred in all the patients, while antecedent infections were noted in 49.2 percent. Complications included congestive cardiac failure (39.7 percent), urinary tract infection (20.6 percent), acute renal failure (12.7 percent), and hypertensive encephalopathy.

  1. Ecological assessment of riparian forests in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natta, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    The present research deals with the flora, phytosociology and ecology of riparian forests. The overall objective of this research is to contribute to a better knowledge of the flora, diversity and ecology of riparian forests in

  2. Benin | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers also trained large numbers of farmers in sustainable agricultural practices, and gave the country's decision-makers tools to design policies to combat ... Urban market gardeners adopted simple measures, such as building latrines, to successfully prevent transmission of the malaria parasite and improve the ...

  3. Cotton in Benin: governance and pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Togbe, C.E.

    2013-01-01

    Key words: cotton, synthetic pesticides, neem oil (Azadirachta indica), Beauveria bassiana, Bacillus thuringiensis, field experiment, farmers’ participation   Pests are one of the main factors limiting cotton production worldwide. Most of the pest control strategies in cotton

  4. Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assistant Secretary General — Dr. Asemota Osato Financial Secretary — Dr. Osaigbovo Emmanuel Club House Secretary — Dr. Ejike Ezeja Assistant Club House Secretary — Dr. Oviawe Uyi Public Relation Officer — Dr. Aloha Kennedy Social Secretary — Dr. Enabulele Joan Sport Secretary8— Dr. Obehighe Emmanuel

  5. A Tributary of Benin River, Sou

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    water by the presence and levels of concentration of sodium and magnesium ions and to some extent calcium ions. These ions help buffer the effect of bicarbonate and carbonate ions, thus maintaining the. pH (Raymont, 1983). Values of conductivity recorded are an indication of negligible impact of human activities in the ...

  6. Benin Journal of Postgraduate Medicine: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  7. Congenital anophthalmos in Benin City | Okeigbemen | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Ophthalmology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Associations between an IgG3 polymorphism in the binding domain for FcRn, transplacental transfer of malaria-specific IgG3, and protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria during infancy: A birth cohort study in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Dechavanne

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transplacental transfer of maternal immunoglobulin G (IgG to the fetus helps to protect against malaria and other infections in infancy. Recent studies have emphasized the important role of malaria-specific IgG3 in malaria immunity, and its transfer may reduce the risk of malaria in infancy. Human IgGs are actively transferred across the placenta by binding the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn expressed within the endosomes of the syncytiotrophoblastic membrane. Histidine at position 435 (H435 provides for optimal Fc-IgG binding. In contrast to other IgG subclasses, IgG3 is highly polymorphic and usually contains an arginine at position 435, which reduces its binding affinity to FcRn in vitro. The reduced binding to FcRn is associated with reduced transplacental transfer and reduced half-life of IgG3 in vivo. Some haplotypes of IgG3 have histidine at position 435. This study examines the hypotheses that the IgG3-H435 variant promotes increased transplacental transfer of malaria-specific antibodies and a prolonged IgG3 half-life in infants and that its presence correlates with protection against clinical malaria during infancy.In Benin, 497 mother-infant pairs were included in a longitudinal birth cohort. Both maternal and cord serum samples were assayed for levels of IgG1 and IgG3 specific for MSP119, MSP2 (both allelic families, 3D7 and FC27, MSP3, GLURP (both regions, R0 and R2, and AMA1 antigens of Plasmodium falciparum. Cord:maternal ratios were calculated. The maternal IgG3 gene was sequenced to identify the IgG3-H435 polymorphism. A multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between maternal IgG3-H435 polymorphism and transplacental transfer of IgG3, adjusting for hypergammaglobulinemia, maternal malaria, and infant malaria exposure. Twenty-four percent of Beninese women living in an area highly endemic for malaria had the IgG3-H435 allele (377 women homozygous for the IgG3-R435 allele, 117 women heterozygous for the Ig

  9. Enseñanza y aprendizaje del ELE en Benín: ¿qué puede aportar la adaptación del MCER? / Teaching and learning of SFL in Benin: What can provide the adaptation of the CEFR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent-Fidèle Sossouvi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen El Marco Común Europeo de Referencia para las Lenguas (MCER funciona en Europa como una herramienta para resolver y mejorar las dificultades de los estados miembros en materia de enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras. Pese a su universalidad, su obligada referencia y gran importancia en el mundo, sigue siendo desconocido por los profesionales de la enseñanza de lenguas extranjeras, especialmente del castellano en Benín. En este trabajo se hace hincapié en las posibilidades que tiene este documento en este país. Por ello, se comienza presentando algunas realidades del contexto de aprendizaje para luego explicar en qué consiste este marco supranacional. Después, se explora su importancia para la mejora de la docencia, del aprendizaje y de la evaluación, para centrarse en sus posibles aportaciones en el aula de castellano. Abstract The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR works in Europe as a tool to solve and improve the plight of the state members relating to the foreign languages teaching. Despite the universality, obligatory reference and the great importance of this tool in the world, it remains unknown to foreign language teaching experts, especially those of Spanish as Foreign Language (SFL in Benin. This paper emphasizes the possibilities of this document in this country. Therefore, we start by presenting some realities of learning context and then we explain what this frame supranational is. Then, we explore its importance for improving teaching, learning and assessment, and focus on their possible contributions to the Spanish language classroom.

  10. Adult Abdominal Tuberculosis in Benin City Nigeria | Ohanaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7), and ascites (6). Diagnosis was ... Abdominal tuberculosis is a great mimic and the foremost diagnostic tool is the most ideal investigation and patients usually respond to a closely supervised anti-tuberculous therapy. There is a place for ...

  11. Adult malignant lymphomas in University of Benin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: We conclude that NHL was the most common of the lymphoma seen in young adulthood in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria. A positive correlation between survival and duration of illness at presentation and haematological counts was found. The 1year survival is still very poor and this may not be unconnected ...

  12. Maternal Deaths Audit in Four Benin Referral Hospitals: Quality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Direct obstetric causes were prevailing in 74% of cases and the leading specific causes were haemorrhage (32.2%), infection (31.6%). Deficiencies in health system, medicals errors in treatment and monitoring, patients\\' financial unavailability and inadequate management of septic abortions were the main contributing ...

  13. Aquaculture marine au Benin : Perspectives de l'elevage de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal de la Recherche Scientifique de l'Université de Lomé. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 3 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  14. Utilisation de la telephonie mobile en republique du Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduite au Bénin en 1996, la téléphonie mobile de par ses multiples fonctions et l'accroissement de ses usagers, est devenue de nos jours un outil important dans le développement socioéconomique des populations. En effet, qu'il s'agisse de jeunes comme de vieux, de femmes comme d'hommes, des instruits comme ...

  15. Consumers’ preferences for “bicycle poultry” in Benin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodjinou, Epiphane; Henningsen, Arne; Koudande, Delphin O.

    2015-01-01

    are willing to pay a premium for these types of birds. The factors which significantly influence the price of chicken are the breed of the bird, the plumage color, the meatiness and the age of the bird. Consumers are willing to pay a price premium for meatier birds of traditional breeds with white plumage......Village poultry, also termed "bicycle poultry," is produced in scavenging farming systems and is a chewy meat with a low fat content, and constitutes an important source of meat in many African countries. This study investigates consumers’ preferences regarding the physical traits of these birds...... color and aged between six and twelve months. Thus, efforts to improve local breeds should stress these preferred traits....

  16. Knowledge, perception and attitude of infertile women in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With increasing utilization of Assisted Reproduction Technology (ART) in Nigeria, it is important to document views and feelings of the infertile couple to ART service in a public funded hospital. ... RESULT: More of the respondents(62.5%) knew of the female causes of infertility than those (39.7%) who knew male causes.

  17. Candida Species Amongst Pregnant Women In Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genital samples from pregnant women were examined to determine the Candida species present and how some predisposing factors would affect the frequency of isolation of species. A total of 147 women (87 volunteer asymptomatic pregnant women and 60 asymptomatic nonpregnant women) were examined.

  18. Renal disease in HIV infected patients at University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV related renal disease is a common occurrence in patients with HIV infection. It is the third leading cause of end stage renal disease among African-American males between the ages of 20 and 64 years in USA. Renal function impairment has been reported at all stages of HIV infection. The aim of this study ...

  19. Emergency traumatic Diaphragmatic injuries in Benin city | Iribhogbe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diaphragmatic injuries (DI) frequently accompany thoracoabdominal trauma. The diagnosis remains a challenge to surgeons and radiologists worldwide but missed injuries to the diaphragm is associated with great morbidity and mortality. We aimed to determine the prevalence of this injury in acute trauma and in general ...

  20. Childhood sexual assaults presenting at the central hospital, Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a common and serious societal ill that has not been given adequate attention in our society. It is highly underreported yet has serious adverse physical, psychological and medical effect on its victims. Objective: The study seeks to evaluate the frequency of CSA in our ...

  1. Wound care in Buruli ulcer disease in Ghana and Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velding, Kristien; Klis, Sandor-Adrian; Abass, Kabiru M.; Tuah, Wilson; Stienstra, Ymkje; van der Werf, Tjip

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a disease affecting the skin, subcutaneous fat, and bone tissues. Wound care is important in the prevention of disabilities. Awareness of current wound care practices in BU-endemic regions is necessary for future wound care interventions. Thirty-one health care workers in Ghana

  2. Prevalence of ototoxicity in University of Benin Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-23

    Jan 23, 2012 ... medicine (CM) services, not only homeopathy. Until around 1980, it was a small general hospital with a specialist homeopathic department. The surgical and other facilities were replaced by a range of CM services including the. NHS's first complementary cancer (1960), acupuncture. (1977), autogenic ...

  3. The Pattern and Frequency of Drowning Autopsies in Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Drowning is a form of violent asphyxia death, where in the entry of air into the lungs, is prevented by water or other fluids due to the submersion of mouth and nostril (complex submersion of whole body is not necessary). Aim and objective: To determine profile/patterns of all drowning autopsies in our ...

  4. Ophthalmic surgical procedures in children at the University of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The second commonest indication for surgery was cataract (23.0%), while eyeball removal (9% of cases) due to tumours or infection was the third commonest surgical procedure. Strabismus and pterygium surgery were infrequently performed (0.9%). Late presentation for eye surgery was the pattern in most of the cases.

  5. Market Sanitation: A Case Study of Oregbeni Market Benin - City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poor market sanitation is an intractable problem in Nigeria and has contributed to the spread of infectious diseases and environmental degradation. This study was undertaken to determine the awareness and practice of solid waste management in market places among market users. It involved 180 store owners and ...

  6. Occupational Health Problems of Welders in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... eye goggles (35.9%) and hand gloves (20.8%). None of them used any form of ear or respiratory protection. The levels of awareness of occupational hazards and the work-related health problems among the welders though high was not commensurate with the use of safety and protective devices against the hazards.

  7. Hydranencephalie a Cotonou (Benin) a propos de 3 cas cliniques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'hydranencéphalie est une malformation rare du système cérébral. Elle est caractérisée par une disparition des hémisphères cérébraux bilatéraux qui sont remplacés par le liquide céphalorachidien. Nous rapportons 3 cas cliniques. Le diagnostic repose sur le scanner cérébral et l'IRM et pose un problème thérapeutique ...

  8. Pattern of presentation of diseases at the university of Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ages of majority of the patients ranged from 21 to 70 years. The most common condition encountered in the clinic was peptic ulcer disease (33.9%), followed by chronic liver disease (15.4%), then acute hepatitis (9.6%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (6.7%), hepatocellular carcinoma (5.9%), and then chronic hepatitis ...

  9. Early onset pregnancy induced hypertension/eclampsia in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced hypertension /eclampsia in a Nigerian tertiary hospital, and compare maternofetal outcome in early and late onset disease. : A retrospective study of all cases of early onset pregnancy induced hypertension/eclampsia seen over a five-year period in a tertiary hospital. : Severity of disease, rates of induction of labour, ...

  10. Menstrual hygiene among students of a tertiary institution in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menstrual hygiene refers to a constellation of personal sanitation during menstruation and it involves use of appropriate sanitary pads, regular bathing and changing of clothes. The sustenance of menstruation related monthly sanitation, places an extra burden on the socioeconomic status and academic activity of females.

  11. from Ikpoba Reservoir, Benin City, Nigeria. *1WANGBOJE, O.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    ABSTRACT: This study determined the concentrations of Cd, Mn, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cr in. Synodontis clarias (Linnaeus, 1766) and ... concentrations of Cu and Zn in water, were significantly different (P<0.05) between stations. Manganese was ..... can be found in batteries, rust inhibitors, ammunition, solder, alloys and plastic.

  12. Diseases of the thyroid gland in Benin City | Okobia | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Quarterly Journal of Hospital Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 2 (2000) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access ...

  13. Charcoal Enterprise in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria KALU, C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    economic benefits and energy needs of the people. The study was conducted to determine peoples' involvement, uses and reasons for using charcoal, distribution channel as well as weekly sales and profit of the enterprise. The results revealed that ...

  14. Microbiota of Tayohounta , a fermented baobab flavour food of Benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tayohounta was also investigated using culture independent techniques, direct DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and cloning. Isolated microorganisms were tested for their functionality in baobab seed kernels fermentation. Total viable counts were around 9 ...

  15. Riparian forests, a unique but endangered ecosystem in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natta, A.K.; Sinsin, B.; Maesen, van der L.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Riparian forests are often small in area, but are of extreme ecological and economic value for local people. The interest of riparian forests lies in their resources: basically fertile and moist soils, water, wood and non-timber forest products that are utilised by neighbouring populations to

  16. original article candida species amongst pregnant women in benin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    occupation, use of contraceptive pill, were also collected from the women alongside the specimens. For the controls (non pregnant women) absence of pregnancy was confirmed with the. HCG Pregnancy Kit (Quimica Clinica. Aplicada,S.A. Amposta,, Spain). Microscopic examination of specimens. One swab from each pair ...

  17. Iodine deficiency and functional performance of schoolchildren in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briel-van Ingen, van den T.

    2001-01-01

    The notion that iodine deficiency may lead not only to goiter and cretinism, but to a much wider range of disorders, from stillbirth and abortions, to hearing problems and mental and physical underdevelopment began to be accepted beyond the research community since the early 1980's. In 1990 it was

  18. Marche du foncier urbain et promotion du logement au Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le marché du foncier urbain au Bénin est un secteur qui met en jeu l'intervention de plusieurs acteurs publics et privés mais également de l'informel. La notion de « foncier urbain » utilisée dans cet article englobe les acceptions et les utilisations faites en architecture, en urbanisme, en aménagement et en gestion urbaine.

  19. Market Sanitation: A Case Study of Oregbeni Market Benin - City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Basic, Applied and Innovative Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 2, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. epartment of hilosophy and Religions niversity of Benin, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tracie1

    wondering whether gambling is wrong and, in thinking about this, he takes account of the misery caused to the ... to the suffering caused by gambling rather than horror struck at the amount of greenness in the world created by ..... principles help him ell, surely he only had a problem because he already acknowledged duties ...