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Sample records for benign focal seizures

  1. Benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS: clinical characteristics of seizures according to age at first seizure

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    Miziara Carmen Silvia M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BECTS is characterized by the presence of simple partial motor seizures in the face and/or oropharynx, with or without sensory symptoms and often with secondary generalization. These seizures tend to occur more often during sleep or drowsiness. According to some authors, generalized seizures prevail over other types particularly among children aged five or less. The purpose of this study is to determine the characteristics of the first epileptic episode among children with BECTS, grouped by age as of their first epileptic seizure, as well as to analyze how such seizures change over the course of clinical evolution. A total of 61 children were examined, 16 of whom below the age of 5 and 45 above. With regard to the first and recurrent epileptic episodes, our final assessment showed that partial seizures occurred more frequently than generalized tonic-clonic seizures in both groups. Although no conclusive relation could be established between the type of partial seizure (i.e. simple versus complex and the children's age as of their first epileptic episode, it was possible to correlate the type of epileptic seizure with their clinical evolution, in which case simple partial seizures proved to be more frequent than complex partial seizures. It should be noted that the number of children under the age of five was relatively small, which evinces the need for further studies. It should also be borne in mind that the reported frequency of generalized seizures in these children's first epileptic episode may be due to their parents' lack of attention and familiarity with this pathology and their attendant difficulty in characterizing its clinical symptoms.

  2. FOCAL MOTOR SEIZURES WITH TYPICAL AUTOMATISMS (FOCAL AUTOMOTOR SEIZURES

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    M. B. Mironov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the study of a group of patients with focal automotor seizures, by taking into consideration their nosological, anamnestic, clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroimaging features.

  3. Benign Familial Infantile Seizures

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The history, classification, clinical and EEG features, genetics, differential diagnosis, and outcome of “benign familial infantile seizures” (BFIS are reviewed from the Neurology Department, Bambino Gesu Children Hospital, Rome, Italy.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

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    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions BFNS benign familial neonatal seizures ...

  5. Seizure ending signs in patients with dyscognitive focal seizures.

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    Gavvala, Jay R; Gerard, Elizabeth E; Macken, Mícheál; Schuele, Stephan U

    2015-09-01

    Signs indicating the end of a focal seizure with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness but without progression to focal or generalized motor symptoms are poorly defined and can be difficult to determine. Not recognizing the transition from ictal to postictal behaviour can affect seizure reporting accuracy by family members and may lead to delayed or a lack of examination during EEG monitoring, erroneous seizure localization and inadequate medical intervention for prolonged seizure duration. Our epilepsy monitoring unit database was searched for focal seizures without secondary generalization for the period from 2007 to 2011. The first focal seizure in a patient with loss of awareness and/or responsiveness and/or behavioural arrest, with or without automatisms, was included. Seizures without objective symptoms or inadequate video-EEG quality were excluded. A total of 67 patients were included, with an average age of 41.7 years. Thirty-six of the patients had seizures from the left hemisphere and 29 from the right. All patients showed an abrupt change in motor activity and resumed contact with the environment as a sign of clinical seizure ending. Specific ending signs (nose wiping, coughing, sighing, throat clearing, or laughter) were seen in 23 of 47 of temporal lobe seizures and 7 of 20 extra-temporal seizures. Seizure ending signs are often subtle and the most common finding is a sudden change in motor activity and resumption of contact with the environment. More distinct signs, such as nose wiping, coughing or throat clearing, are not specific to temporal lobe onset. A higher proportion of seizures during sleep went unexamined, compared to those during wakefulness. This demonstrates that seizure semiology can be very subtle and arousals from sleep during monitoring should alert staff. Patient accounts of seizure frequency appear to be unreliable and witness reports need to be taken into account. [Published with video sequences].

  6. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

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    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient.

  7. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

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    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment.

  8. The semiology of benign focal epilepsy with affective symptoms.

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    Nascimento, Fábio A; Sotero de Menezes, Márcio A; Simão, Cristiane A; Takeshita, Bruno T; Blattes da Rocha, Samanta F; Kowacs, Pedro A

    2017-06-01

    Benign focal epilepsy with affective symptoms (BFEAS) is a rare childhood epilepsy syndrome essentially characterized by "epileptic attacks with affective symptoms of a terrifying type". Since the original description, approximately 50 cases have been reported. To our knowledge, however, none of the studies included video-EEG data. Herein, we detail the electroclinical features of a neurodevelopmentally normal 9-year-old boy with epilepsy since the age of 2 years. His seizure semiology essentially consisted of nocturnal focal seizures featuring abrupt fear and autonomic phenomena (such as excessive sweating, repeated swallowing, and coughing), associated with impaired consciousness. These seizures were often secondary generalized, and he had multiple episodes of convulsive status epilepticus. He has been seizure-free for the past year and a half on dual antiepileptic therapy with sulthiamine and valproate. His intellectual and social abilities are excellent (IQ of 116), although he does have difficulties particularly in language learning, and was recently diagnosed with phonological dyslexia with dysorthography. By presenting our patient's history and video-EEG, we intend to further detail the semiology of seizures with affective symptomatology. [Published with video sequence on www.epilepticdisorders.com].

  9. The semiology of febrile seizures: Focal features are frequent.

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    Takasu, Michihiko; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tsuji, Takeshi; Kurahashi, Hirokazu; Numoto, Shingo; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2017-08-01

    To clarify the semiology of febrile seizures (FS) and to determine the frequency of FS with symptoms suggestive of focal onset. FS symptoms in children were reported within 24h of seizure onset by the parents using a structured questionnaire consisting principally of closed-ended questions. We focused on events at seizure commencement, including changes in behavior and facial expression, and ocular and oral symptoms. We also investigated the autonomic and motor symptoms developing during seizures. The presence or absence of focal and limbic features was determined for each patient. The associations of certain focal and limbic features with patient characteristics were assessed. Information was obtained on FS in 106 children. Various events were recorded at seizure commencement. Behavioral changes were observed in 35 children, changes in facial expression in 53, ocular symptoms in 78, and oral symptoms in 90. In terms of events during seizures, autonomic symptoms were recognized in 78, and convulsive motor symptoms were recognized in 68 children. Focal features were evident in 81 children; 38 children had two or more such features. Limbic features were observed in 44 children, 9 of whom had two or more such features. There was no significant relationship between any patient characteristic and the numbers of focal or limbic features. The semiology of FS varied widely among children, and symptoms suggestive of focal onset were frequent. FS of focal onset may be more common than is generally thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Neurophysiological markers of generalized and focal epileptic seizures].

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    Kravtsova, E Yu; Shulakova, K V

    To identify neurophysiological markers of focal and generalized epileptic seizures in the inter-epileptic period. Sixty-four patients, including 36 with isolated generalized tonic-clonic seizures and 28 with focal seizures, were examined. The control group consisted of 27 healthy people. EEG-video monitoring and bioelectric activity analysis of the brain during wakefulness and day sleep, spectral EEG analysis, quantitative and quality indicators of sleep were used. In generalized epileptic seizures, alpha rhythm is predominantly recorded in the left hemisphere. In wakefulness, the focal epileptiform activity develops during the first two stages of day sleep. In focal epileptic seizures, delta and beta-2 rhythms were recorded in the left hemisphere, regional epileptiform changes are aggravated during the 1st and 2nd stages of slow sleep initiated in the frontal regions. A focal component of the epileptiform activity in the inter-epileptic period in patients with different types of seizures should be taken into account in examination and treatment planning of patients who had difficulties with the diagnosis of epilepsy type.

  11. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

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    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  12. Lacosamide: A Review in Focal Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy.

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    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a solution or tablets) and as an intravenous infusion for use as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. As adjunctive therapy to other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), lacosamide provided effective seizure control and was generally well tolerated in adults and adolescents (aged ≥16 years) in randomized clinical trials and in the real-world setting. In clinical trials, adjunctive lacosamide provided significantly greater reductions in 28-day seizure rates than adjunctive placebo, with these benefits maintained after up to 8 years of therapy in open-label extension studies. Moreover, patients were effectively switched from oral to short-term intravenous adjunctive therapy at the same dosage, which may be particularly beneficial in situations where oral therapy is not suitable. Conversion to lacosamide monotherapy was superior to a historical-control cohort in patients with focal seizures converting from previous AED therapy. In the absence of head-to-head comparisons with other AEDs, the exact position of lacosamide relative to other AEDs remains to be fully determined. In the meantime, oral and intravenous lacosamide provides a useful option as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy.

  13. [Focal epileptic seizures ipsilateral to the tumor: case report].

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    Gusmão, Sebastião Silva; Mendes, Mirian Fabíola Studart; Silveira, Roberto Leal

    2002-06-01

    Focal somatosensory epileptic seizures ipsilateral to a brain tumor is reported and the literature reviewed. It is an exceptional occurrence, having been described only six cases, with several mechanisms being proposed. The proximity of the lesions with the low cerebral convexity (perisylvian) suggests the compromising of the secondary somatosensorial area, seeming to prove the experimental observation of somatosensorial crises originating in this area.

  14. Microscale spatiotemporal dynamics during neocortical propagation of human focal seizures.

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    Wagner, Fabien B; Eskandar, Emad N; Cosgrove, G Rees; Madsen, Joseph R; Blum, Andrew S; Potter, N Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R; Cash, Sydney S; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-11-15

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4×4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) a newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multiunit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~2-3 Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25-60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the MUA

  15. Focal epileptic seizures mimicking sleep paralysis.

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    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Ossola, Maria; Colnaghi, Silvia; Arbasino, Carla

    2009-03-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common parasomnia. The diagnostic criteria for SP, as reported in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are essentially clinical, as electroencephalography (EEG)-polysomnography (PSG) is not mandatory. We describe a subject whose sleep-related events fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SP, even though her visual hallucinations were elementary, repetitive and stereotyped, thus differing from those usually reported by patients with SP. Video/EEG-PSG documented the focal epileptic nature of the SP-like episodes.

  16. Benign occipital lobe seizures: Natural progression and atypical evolution

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    Prithika Chary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign occipital seizure syndromes are benign childhood epilepsy syndromes and are mainly of two types, Panayiotopoulos syndrome, an autonomic epilepsy and idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut (ICOE-G including the idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy. Although both these types are categorized as occipital seizures, they are distinct in presentation and management. They can also be tricky to diagnose as visual symptoms may not always be the presenting feature and it is also not very easy to elicit visual hallucinations during history taking. These seizures have a good response to treatment; however, there could be atypical evolution and refractoriness to treatment especially with ICOE-G. We describe three children who presented with visual and non-visual symptoms and the electroencephalography (EEG in all the three cases showed occipital paroxysms. We have emphasized the clues in the clinical history and EEG leading to the diagnosis of these distinct epilepsy syndromes. We have also discussed the natural course of these epilepsy syndromes with some atypical evolution, which clinicians need to be aware of during treatment of these children.

  17. Detection of recurrent activation patterns across focal seizures: Application to seizure onset zone identification.

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    Vila-Vidal, Manel; Principe, Alessandro; Ley, Miguel; Deco, Gustavo; Tauste Campo, Adrià; Rocamora, Rodrigo

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a method that quantifies the consistent involvement of intracranially monitored regions in recurrent focal seizures. We evaluated the consistency of two ictal spectral activation patterns (mean power change and power change onset time) in intracranial recordings across focal seizures from seven patients with clinically marked seizure onset zone (SOZ). We examined SOZ discrimination using both patterns in different frequency bands and periods of interest. Activation patterns were proved to be consistent across more than 80% of recurrent ictal epochs. In all patients, whole-seizure mean activations were significantly higher for SOZ than non-SOZ regions (Pseizure period while gamma band (20-70Hz) achieved the highest discrimination values between SOZ and non-SOZ sites near seizure onset (0-5s). Consistent spectral activation patterns in focal epilepsies discriminate the SOZ with high effect sizes upon appropriate selection of frequency bands and activation periods. The present method may be used to improve epileptogenic identification as well as pinpoint additional regions that are functionally altered during ictal events. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. What is a seizure network? Long-range network consequences of focal seizures.

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    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    What defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of seizure activity in brain networks? To fully answer this question a precise and quantitative definition of seizures is needed, which unfortunately remains elusive. Nevertheless, it is possible to ask under conditions where clearly divergent patterns of activity occur in large-scale brain networks whether certain activity patterns are part of the seizure while others are not. Here we examine brain network activity during focal limbic seizures, including diverse regions such as the hippocampus, subcortical arousal systems and fronto-parietal association cortex. Based on work from patients and from animal models we describe a characteristic pattern of intense increases in neuronal firing, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI) signals and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in the hippocampus during focal limbic seizures. Similar increases are seen in certain closely linked subcortical structures such as the lateral septal nuclei and anterior hypothalamus, which contain inhibitory neurons. In marked contrast, decreases in all of these parameters are seen in the subcortical arousal systems of the upper brainstem and intralaminar thalamus, as well as in the fronto-parietal association cortex. We propose that the seizure proper can be defined as regions showing intense increases, while those areas showing opposite changes are inhibited by the seizure network and constitute long-range network consequences beyond the seizure itself. Importantly, the fronto-parietal cortex shows sleep-like slow wave activity and depressed metabolism under these conditions, associated with impaired consciousness. Understanding which brain networks are directly involved in seizures versus which sustain secondary consequences can provide new insights into the mechanisms of brain dysfunction in epilepsy, hopefully leading to innovative treatment

  19. Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes: Relationship between type of seizures and response to medication in a Greek population

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    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS is considered to be the most common childhood epileptic syndrome. We studied the relationship between the type of seizures and response to medication in a Greek population. Materials and Methods: We studied 60 neurodevelopmentally normal children diagnosed with BECTS. Children were subdivided into three groups, based on type of seizures: Group A comprised 32 children with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, Group B 19 children with focal seizures and Group C 9 children with focal seizures with secondary generalization. All patients in the present study were started on an antiepileptic medication after the third seizure (sodium valproate, carbamazepine, and oxcarbazepine, and we studied the response to medication. Results: 10 from 13 (76.92% of patients in Group A, 13 from 15 (86.66% patients in Group B, and all 6 patients (100% in Group C started carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine had a favorable respond. Similarly, 16 from 19 (84.2% of patients in Group A, 3 from 4 patients (75% in Group B, and 1 from 3 patients (33.3% in Group C, started sodium valproate responded well to medication. Conclusions: The majority of children responded well to the first antiepileptic treatment and had a favorable outcome, regardless of type of seizures. 88.3% of children became seizure free by 1 or 2 years after seizure onset. These findings are indicative that the type of seizures has no major effect neither in response to antiepileptic treatment or in the final outcome. Further research in a larger number of children is needed.

  20. Synchronous inhibitory potentials precede seizure-like events in acute models of focal limbic seizures.

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    Uva, Laura; Breschi, Gian Luca; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Taverna, Stefano; de Curtis, Marco

    2015-02-18

    Interictal spikes in models of focal seizures and epilepsies are sustained by the synchronous activation of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks. The nature of population spikes associated with seizure initiation (pre-ictal spikes; PSs) is still undetermined. We analyzed the networks involved in the generation of both interictal and PSs in acute models of limbic cortex ictogenesis induced by pharmacological manipulations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings from both principal cells and interneurons were performed in the medial entorhinal cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain during focal interictal and ictal discharges induced in the limbic network by intracortical and brief arterial infusions of either bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or 4-aminopyridine (4AP). Local application of BMI in the entorhinal cortex did not induce seizure-like events (SLEs), but did generate periodic interictal spikes sensitive to the glutamatergic non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX. Unlike local applications, arterial perfusion of either BMI or 4AP induced focal limbic SLEs. PSs just ahead of SLE were associated with hyperpolarizing potentials coupled with a complete blockade of firing in principal cells and burst discharges in putative interneurons. Interictal population spikes recorded from principal neurons between two SLEs correlated with a depolarizing potential. We demonstrate in two models of acute limbic SLE that PS events are different from interictal spikes and are sustained by synchronous activation of inhibitory networks. Our findings support a prominent role of synchronous network inhibition in the initiation of a focal seizure. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353048-08$15.00/0.

  1. Febrile seizures - semiology in humans and animal models: evidence of focality and heterogeneity.

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    Neville, Brian G R; Gindner, Diane

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between febrile seizures and hippocampal sclerosis has been the subject of longstanding discussion. Animal models for prolonged seizures have shown a clear causal relationship with focal limbic features at low dose and hippocampal damage at high dose. Careful history taking of febrile seizure semiology has shown focal early features often with clear temporal lobe elements. This would suggest that many febrile seizures are secondarily generalised hippocampal seizures. There is evidence of varying levels of epileptogenicity in specific infective causes of febrile seizures. Seizure semiology also suggests that a proportion of such seizures may be non-epileptic reflex asystolic attacks. Seizure semiology in febrile seizures deserves closer scrutiny. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Benign infantile seizures and paroxysmal dyskinesia caused by an SCN8A mutation

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    Gardella, Elena; Becker, Felicitas; Møller, Rikke S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), and their combination-known as infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA)-are related autosomal dominant diseases. PRRT2 (proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 gene) has been identified...

  3. Focal cortical dysplasia: long term seizure outcome after surgical treatment

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    Kral, T; von Lehe, M; Podlogar, M; Clusmann, H; Süßmann, P; Kurthen, M; Becker, A; Urbach, H; Schramm, J

    2007-01-01

    Background Studies of long term outcome after epilepsy surgery for cortical malformations are rare. In this study, we report our experience with surgical treatment and year to year long term outcome for a subgroup of patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Methods We retrospectively analysed the records of 49 patients (females n = 26; males n = 23; mean age 25 (11) years) with a mean duration of epilepsy of 18 years (range 1–45). Preoperative MRI, histological results based on the Palmini classification and clinical year to year follow‐up according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification were available in all patients. Results 98% of patients had a lesion on preoperative MRI. In addition to lobectomy (n = 9) or lesionectomy (n = 40), 14 patients had multiple subpial transections of the eloquent cortex. The resected tissue was classified as FCD type II b in 41 cases with an extratemporal (88%) and FCD type II a in 8 cases with a temporal localisation (100%). After a mean follow‐up of 8.1 (4.5) years, 37 patients (76%) were seizure free, a subgroup of 23 patients (47%) had been completely seizure free since surgery (ILAE class 1a) and 4 patients (8%) had only auras (ILAE class 2). Over a 10 year follow‐up, the proportion of satisfactory outcomes decreased, mainly within the first 3 years. During long term follow‐up, 48% stopped antiepileptic drug treatment, 34% received a driver's license and 57% found a job or training. Conclusion Surgical treatment of epilepsy with FCD is not only successful in the short term but also has a satisfying long term outcome which remains constant after 3 years of follow‐up but is not associated with better employment status or improvement in daily living. PMID:17287239

  4. Seizure Freedom in Children With Pathology-Confirmed Focal Cortical Dysplasia.

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    Mrelashvili, Anna; Witte, Robert J; Wirrell, Elaine C; Nickels, Katherine C; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the temporal course of seizure outcome in children with pathology-confirmed focal cortical dysplasia and explored predictors of sustained seizure freedom. We performed a single-center retrospective study of children ≤ 18 years who underwent resective surgery from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2012 and had pathology-proven focal cortical dysplasia. Surgical outcome was classified as seizure freedom (Engel class I) or seizure recurrence (Engel classes II-IV). Fisher exact and nonparametric Wilcoxon ranksum tests were used, as appropriate. Survival analysis was based on seizure-free outcome. Patients were censored at the time of seizure recurrence or seizure freedom at last follow-up. Thirty-eight patients were identified (median age at surgery, 6.5 years; median duration of epilepsy, 3.3 years). Median time to last follow-up was 13.5 months (interquartile range, 7-41 months). Twenty patients (53%) were seizure free and 26 patients (68%) attained seizure freedom for a minimum of 3 months. Median time to seizure recurrence was 38 months (95% confidence interval, 6-109 months), and the cumulative seizure-free rate was 60% at 12 months (95% confidence interval, 43%-77%). Clinical features associated with seizure freedom at last follow-up included older age at seizure onset (P = .02), older age at surgery (P = .04), absent to mild intellectual disability before surgery (P = .05), and seizure freedom for a minimum of 3 months (P seizure freedom included older age at seizure onset, older age at surgery, absent or mild intellectual disability at baseline, and seizure freedom for a minimum of 3 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures: three patients treated with the ketogenic diet.

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    Caraballo, Roberto; Noli, Daniel; Cachia, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    We present three patients with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures treated with the ketogenic diet. Between February 1, 2012 and January 31, 2014, three patients who met the diagnostic criteria for migrating focal seizures in infancy at our department were placed on the ketogenic diet and followed for a minimum of seven months. Two of the three children responded well to the ketogenic diet. One of these patients became seizure-free and his neuropsychological performance also significantly improved. The other child had a seizure reduction of 75% to 99% with only weekly seizures and moderate psychomotor improvement. For these two patients who responded well to the ketogenic diet, hospital admission was not required. The remaining patient had a seizure reduction of less than 50%. Tolerability of the diet was good in all three patients. Early treatment with the ketogenic diet should be considered for epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures to control seizures and status epilepticus, and avoid progressive cognitive impairment.

  6. Rufinamide for refractory focal seizures: an open-label, multicenter European study.

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    Coppola, Giangennaro; Zamponi, Nelia; Kluger, Gerhard; Mueller, Arndt; Anna Rita, Mazzotta; Parisi, Pasquale; Isone, Claudia; Santoro, Elena; Curatolo, Paolo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the efficacy and tolerability of rufinamide as adjunctive drug for the treatment of a large series of children, adolescents and adults with refractory cryptogenic or symptomatic focal epilepsy. Patients were recruited in a prospective, add-on, open-label treatment study from six Italian and one German centers for pediatric and adolescent epilepsy care. Inclusion criteria were: (1) age 3 years or more; (2) diagnosis of cryptogenic or symptomatic focal epilepsy refractory to at least three previous antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), alone or in combination; (3) more than one seizure per month in the last 6 months; (4) use of at least one other AED, but no more than three, at baseline; (5) informed consent from parents and/or caregivers. Sixty-eight patients (40 males, 28 females), aged between 3 and 63 years (mean 19.9 years, median 16.0)±SD 12.58, with cryptogenic (28 pts, 41.2%) or symptomatic focal epilepsy (40 pts, 58.8%), were recruited in the study. After a mean follow-up period of 10.4±10.29 months, twenty-two patients (32.3%) had a 50-99% seizure reduction, and none became seizure-free. Twelve patients (17.6%) had a 25-49% seizure decrease, while in 30 (44.1%) seizure frequency was unchanged. A seizure worsening was reported in 5 patients (7.3%). A better response to rufinamide occurred in frontal lobe seizures (51.6%) and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (50%). Rufinamide was effective against focal-onset seizures, particularly in the treatment of secondary generalized frontal lobe seizures. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Synchronization analysis of voltage-sensitive dye imaging during focal seizures in the rat neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Bahar, Sonya

    2011-12-01

    Seizures are often assumed to result from an excess of synchronized neural activity. However, various recent studies have suggested that this is not necessarily the case. We investigate synchronization during focal neocortical seizures induced by injection of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) in the rat neocortex in vivo. Neocortical activity is monitored by field potential recording and by the fluorescence of the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. After removal of artifacts, the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) signal is analyzed using the nonlinear dynamics-based technique of stochastic phase synchronization in order to determine the degree of synchronization within the neocortex during the development and spread of each seizure event. Results show a large, statistically significant increase in synchronization during seizure activity. Synchrony is typically greater between closer pixel pairs during a seizure event; the entire seizure region is synchronized almost exactly in phase. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first application of synchronization analysis methods to mammalian VSD imaging in vivo. Our observations indicate a clear increase in synchronization in this model of focal neocortical seizures across a large area of the neocortex; a sharp increase in synchronization during seizure events was observed in all 37 seizures imaged. The results are consistent with a recent computational study which simulates the effect of 4AP in a neocortical neuron model.

  8. Focal neuronal loss, reversible subcortical focal T2 hypointensity in seizures with a nonketotic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavendra, S.; Ashalatha, R.; Thomas, Sanjeev V. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Kesavadas, C. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-04-15

    Neuroimaging in seizures associated with nonketotic hyperglycemia (NKH) is considered normal. We report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in four patients with NKH and seizures. We prospectively evaluated clinical and radiological abnormalities in four patients with NKH during the period March 2004 to December 2005. All patients presented with seizures, either simple or complex partial seizures or epilepsia partialis continua. Two of them had transient hemianopia. MRI showed subcortical T2 hypointensity in the occipital white matter and in or around the central sulcus (two patients each), T2 hyperintensity of the overlying cortex (two patients), focal overlying cortical enhancement (three patients) and bilateral striatal hyperintensity (one patient). Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) performed in three patients showed restricted diffusion. The ictal semiology and electroencephalographic (EEG) findings correlated with the MRI abnormalities. On clinical recovery, the subcortical T2 hypointensity and striatal hyperintensity reversed in all patients. The initial cortical change evolved to FLAIR hyperintensity suggestive of focal cortical gliosis. The radiological differential diagnosis considered initially included encephalitis, malignancy and hemorrhagic infarct rendering a diagnostic dilemma. We identified subcortical T2 hypointensity rather than hyperintensity as a characteristic feature of seizures associated with NKH. Only very few similar reports exist in literature. Reversible bilateral striatal T2 hyperintensity in NKH has not been reported to the best of our knowledge. (orig.)

  9. Familial aggregation of focal seizure semiology in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobochnik, Steven; Fahlstrom, Robyn; Shain, Catherine; Winawer, Melodie R

    2017-07-04

    To improve phenotype definition in genetic studies of epilepsy, we assessed the familial aggregation of focal seizure types and of specific seizure symptoms within the focal epilepsies in families from the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project. We studied 302 individuals with nonacquired focal epilepsy from 149 families. Familial aggregation was assessed by logistic regression analysis of relatives' traits (dependent variable) by probands' traits (independent variable), estimating the odds ratio for each symptom in a relative given presence vs absence of the symptom in the proband. In families containing multiple individuals with nonacquired focal epilepsy, we found significant evidence for familial aggregation of ictal motor, autonomic, psychic, and aphasic symptoms. Within these categories, ictal whole body posturing, diaphoresis, dyspnea, fear/anxiety, and déjà vu/jamais vu showed significant familial aggregation. Focal seizure type aggregated as well, including complex partial, simple partial, and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Our results provide insight into genotype-phenotype correlation in the nonacquired focal epilepsies and a framework for identifying subgroups of patients likely to share susceptibility genes. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Benign focal liver lesions-from diagnosis to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Terkivatan (Türkan)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractFocal liver lesions in a noncirrhotic liver often present as incidental finding during routine abdominal imaging as part of a general check-up, or during work-up in case of a known malignancy. Only in some cases, liver tumors may be symptomatic. The most important diagnostic challenge

  11. Tract-specific atrophy in focal epilepsy: Disease, genetics, or seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, David N; Raffelt, David; Curwood, Evan; Tsai, Meng-Han; Tournier, Jacques-Donald; Connelly, Alan; Jackson, Graeme D

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether genetics, underlying pathology, or repeated seizures contribute to atrophy in specific white matter tracts. Medically refractory unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS-TLE, n = 26) was studied as an archetype of focal epilepsy, using fixel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging. A genetic effect was assessed in first-degree relatives of HS-TLE subjects who did not have epilepsy themselves (HS-1°Rel; n = 26). The role of disease process was uncovered by comparing HS-TLE to unilateral TLE with normal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-neg TLE; n = 26, matched for seizure severity). The effect of focal seizures was inferred from lateralized atrophy common to both HS-TLE and MRI-neg TLE, in comparison to healthy controls (n = 76). HS-1 °Rel had bilaterally small hippocampi, but no focal white matter atrophy was detected, indicating a limited effect of genetics. HS-TLE subjects had lateralized atrophy of most temporal lobe tracts, and hippocampal volumes in HS-TLE correlated with parahippocampal cingulum and anterior commissure atrophy, indicating an effect of the underlying pathology. Ipsilateral atrophy of the tapetum, uncinate, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus was found in both HS-TLE and MRI-neg TLE, suggesting a common lateralized effect of focal seizures. Both epilepsy groups had bilateral atrophy of the dorsal cingulum and corpus callosum fibers, which we interpret as a consequence of bilateral insults (potentially generalized seizures and/or medications). Underlying pathology, repeated focal seizures, and global insults each contribute to atrophy in specific tracts. Genetic factors make less of a contribution in this cohort. A multifactorial model of white matter atrophy in focal epilepsy is proposed. Ann Neurol 2017;81:240-250. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  12. Restoring Conscious Arousal During Focal Limbic Seizures with Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundishora, Adam J; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Ma, Chanthia; Liu, Mengran; McCafferty, Cian; Schiff, Nicholas D; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Gerrard, Jason; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2016-03-03

    Impaired consciousness occurs suddenly and unpredictably in people with epilepsy, markedly worsening quality of life and increasing risk of mortality. Focal seizures with impaired consciousness are the most common form of epilepsy and are refractory to all current medical and surgical therapies in about one-sixth of cases. Restoring consciousness during and following seizures would be potentially transformative for these individuals. Here, we investigate deep brain stimulation to improve level of conscious arousal in a rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that dual-site stimulation of the central lateral nucleus of the intralaminar thalamus (CL) and the pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) bilaterally during focal limbic seizures restored normal-appearing cortical electrophysiology and markedly improved behavioral arousal. In contrast, single-site bilateral stimulation of CL or PnO alone was insufficient to achieve the same result. These findings support the "network inhibition hypothesis" that focal limbic seizures impair consciousness through widespread inhibition of subcortical arousal. Driving subcortical arousal function would be a novel therapeutic approach to some forms of refractory epilepsy and may be compatible with devices already in use for responsive neurostimulation. Multisite deep brain stimulation of subcortical arousal structures may benefit not only patients with epilepsy but also those with other disorders of consciousness.

  13. Cerebral regional oxygen fluctuations and decline during clinically silent focal electroencephalographic seizures in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaiber, Hans; Bolton, Scott; Alfonso, Israel; Dunoyer, Catalina; Yaylali, Ilker

    2004-07-01

    We describe a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex and right frontal cortical dysplasia who underwent simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and electroencephalography (EEG) during repetitive clinically silent right frontal EEG seizures. The seizures produced a progressive decline in regional oxygen saturation index and wider regional oxygen saturation index fluctuations in the right hemisphere than in the left hemisphere. We conclude that recurrent clinically silent focal EEG seizures in this neonate were associated with lateralizing near-infrared spectroscopy changes suggestive of relative cerebral hypoxia.

  14. Clinical Value of Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound in Differentiating Benign and Malignant Focal Liver Lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jinfeng; WU Ying; DONG Fajin; XIONG Yi; PENG Qihui; XIE Mingxing

    2007-01-01

    To explore the clinical value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in differentiating benign and malignant focal liver lesions (FLLs) with SonoVue, CEUS was used to examine 113 pa- tients with focal liver lesions (FLLs) in our hospital during July 2005 to December 2006. All the pa- tients underwent contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) or contrast-enhanced MRI(CEMRI). Except for pa- tients with focal fatty sparings (n=18) and with hemangiomas (n=8), all the patients were confirmed by operation or ultrasonic-guided liver puncture biopsy. A sulfur hexafluoride gas-based contrast agent was used with a MI of 0.15 to 0.17. Forty-eight cases of malignant FLLs, including 30 hepato- cellular carcinomas (HCCs), 2 cholangiocarcinomas and 16 metastatic tumors, were detected. Sev- enty-eight cases of benign FLLs, including 33 hemangiomas, 9 focal nodular hyperplasias (FNHs), 19 focal fatty sparings, 5 abscesses, 7 regenerative nodules and 2 inflammatory pseudo-tumor, were in- volved. The contrast pattern of benign and malignant FLLs was quite different. CEUS has higher specificity and sensitivity than conventional ultrasound in differentiating benign and malignant FLLs.

  15. Noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes lessens behavioral seizure activity of recurrent pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Liu, Xiang; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We have been developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. In this study we demonstrate the effect of focal stimulation on behavioral seizure activity induced by two successive pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats. Seizure onset latency, time of the first behavioral change, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score were studied and compared for focal stimulation treated (n = 9) and control groups (n = 10). First, we demonstrate that no significant difference was found in behavioral activity for focal stimulation treated and control groups after the first pentylenetetrazole administration. Next, comparing first and second pentylenetetrazole administrations, we demonstrate there was a significant change in behavioral activity (time of the first behavioral change) in both groups that was not related to focal stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate focal stimulation provoking a significant change in seizure onset latency, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score. We believe that these results, combined with our previous reports, suggest that transcranial focal stimulation may have an anticonvulsant effect. PMID:22692938

  16. FOCAL GENERATION OF PAROXYSMAL FAST RUNS DURING ELECTROGRAPHIC SEIZURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Sofiane; Chauvette, Sylvain; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose A cortically generated Lennox-Gastaut type seizure is associated with spike-wave/polyspike-wave discharges at 1.0–2.5 Hz and fast runs at 7–16 Hz. Here we studied the patterns of synchronization during runs of paroxysmal fast spikes. Methods Electrographic activities were recorded using multisite intracellular and field potential recordings in vivo from cats anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine. In different experiments, the recording electrodes were located either at short distances (<1 mm) or at longer distances (up to 12 mm). The main experimental findings were tested in computational models. Results In the majority of cases, the onset and the offset of fast runs occurred almost simultaneously in different recording sites. The amplitude and duration of fast runs could vary by orders of magnitude. Within the fast runs, the patterns of synchronization recorded in different electrodes were as following: (i) synchronous, in phase, (ii) synchronous, with phase shift, (iii) patchy, repeated in phase/phase shift transitions and (iv) non-synchronous, slightly different frequencies in different recording sites or absence of oscillatory activity in one of the recording sites; the synchronous patterns (in phase or with phase shifts) were most common. All these patterns could be recorded in the same pair of electrodes during different seizures and they were reproduced in a computational network model. Intrinsically-bursting (IB) neurons fired more spikes per cycle than any other neurons suggesting their leading role in the fast run generation. Conclusions Once started, the fast runs are generated locally with variable correlations between neighboring cortical foci. PMID:18616553

  17. Review of therapeutic options for adjuvant treatment of focal seizures in epilepsy: focus on lacosamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Juan Luis; Ojeda, Joaquín; Corredera, Enrique; Ruiz Giménez, Jesús

    2011-12-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions worldwide, with an age-adjusted incidence of approximately 50 per 100,000 persons per year in developed countries. Antiepileptic therapy can result in long-term remission in 60-70% of patients, but many patients will require combination treatment to achieve optimal seizure control, as monotherapy is ineffective at controlling seizures in 30-53% of patients. Despite the increase in available treatment options, patient outcomes have not improved significantly and there is still a need for more effective therapies. Drugs used in the treatment of focal-onset seizures are a diverse range of compounds, and in most cases their mechanism of action is unknown or poorly defined. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of the newer adjuvant antiepileptic therapies that may improve outcomes in patients unresponsive to monotherapy, including clobazam, vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, zonisamide and eslicarbazepine, with focus on lacosamide. Lacosamide has been shown to exert its anticonvulsant effects predominantly by enhancement of the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Lacosamide is indicated for use as adjuvant treatment of focal-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy, and there is some evidence that it may also be of use in patients with status epilepticus and cancer patients with epilepsy. The efficacy of lacosamide has been assessed in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, all of which have shown lacosamide to be effective at reducing seizure frequency and increasing 50% responder rates in patients with focal-onset seizures. Long-term lacosamide treatment is generally well tolerated and is not associated with significant drug interactions; the availability of an intravenous form of the drug also makes it particularly useful for a broad range of patients.

  18. Long-term seizure outcome in 211 patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, Susanne; Essang, Charles; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias; Staack, Anke Maren; Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Strobl, Karl; Bast, Thomas; Schubert-Bast, Susanne; Stephani, Ulrich; Wiegand, Gert; Prinz, Marco; Brandt, Armin; Zentner, Josef; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is currently recognized as the most common cause of neocortical pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Epilepsy surgery has become an increasingly successful treatment option. Herein, the largest patient cohort reported to date is analyzed regarding long-term outcome and factors relevant for long-term seizure control. Two hundred eleven children and adults undergoing epilepsy surgery for histologically proven FCD and a follow-up period of 2-12 years were analyzed regarding the longitudinal course of seizure control, effects of FCD type, localization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), timing of surgery, and postoperative antiepileptic treatment. After 1 year, Engel class I outcome was achieved in 65% of patients and the percentage of seizure-free patients remained stable over the following (up to 12) years. Complete resection of the assumed epileptogenic area, lower age at surgery, and unilobar localization were positive prognostic indicators of long-term seizure freedom. Seizure recurrence was 12% after the first year, whereas 8% achieved late seizure freedom either following additional introduction of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) (4%), a reoperation (2%), or a running down phenomenon (2%). Thirty-nine percent of patients had a reduction of AED from polytherapy to monotherapy or a complete cessation of AED treatment. Late seizure relapse was seen in nine patients during reduction of AEDs (i.e., in 12% of all patients with AED tapering); in four of them seizures persisted after reestablishment of antiepileptic medication. Postoperative long-term seizure outcome was favorable in patients with FCD and remained stable in 80% of patients after the first postoperative year. Several preoperative factors revealed to be predictive for the postoperative outcome and may help in the preoperative counseling of patients with FCD and in the selection of ideal candidates for epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. The delta between postoperative seizure freedom and persistence: Automatically detected focal slow waves after epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Margit; Stefan, Hermann; Hamer, Hajo M; Rössler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Rampp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we use a novel automated method for localization and quantitative comparison of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) delta activity in patients with and without recurrent seizures after epilepsy surgery as well as healthy controls. We identified the generators of delta activity by source location in frequency domain between 1 and 4 Hz in spontaneous MEG data. Comparison with healthy control subjects by z-transform emphasized relative changes of activation in patients. The individual results were compared to spike localizations and statistical group analysis was performed. Additionally, MEG results were compared to 1-4 Hz activity in invasive EEG (iEEG) in two patients, in whom this data was available. Patients with recurrent seizures exhibited significantly increased focal MEG delta activity both in comparison to healthy controls and seizure free patients. This slow activity showed a correlation to interictal epileptic activity and was not explained by consequences of the resection alone. In two patients with iEEG, iEEG analysis was concordant with the MEG findings. The quantity of delta activity could be used as a diagnostic marker for recurrent seizures. The close relation to epileptic spike localizations and the resection volume of patients with successful second surgery imply involvement in seizure recurrence. This initial evidence suggests a potential application in the planning of second epilepsy surgery.

  20. Focal inhibitory seizure with prolonged deficit in adult Sturge-Weber syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupy, Jerome; Bonnet, Charlotte; Arnould, Jean-Simon; Fernandez, Philippe; Marchal, Cecile; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a sporadic congenital neurocutaneous disorder often related to varying degrees of motor impairment. The phenomenon of prolonged ictal paresis is a rare seizure sign that can be due to lesions affecting the centro-parietal lobe. Focal inhibitory motor seizures can be difficult to differentiate from other clinical entities such as stroke, migraine or postictal paresis. We describe the case of a 40-year-old patient suffering from Sturge-Weber syndrome, admitted due to prolonged right-sided hemiparesis following a usual seizure. Repeated EEGs during the prolonged deficit showed only intermittent left fronto-parietal sharp waves. (99m)Tc HMPAO-brain SPECT performed seven days after the last seizure showed a vast area of parieto-occipital hyperperfusion in the left hemisphere. Aggressive antiepileptic therapy dramatically improved the clinical symptoms and scintigraphic images, which corroborated the diagnosis of ictal paresis. This case highlights the role of SPECT in the evaluation of Sturge-Weber syndrome, not only to investigate progressive neurological deterioration, but also exacerbation of seizures or prolonged neurological deficits. In fact, it may be possible to document ongoing epileptic activity using SPECT, despite a non-contributory EEG, which may be of help in adapting a therapeutic strategy.

  1. Pediatric first time non-febrile seizure with focal manifestations: is emergent imaging indicated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprahamian, N; Harper, M B; Prabhu, S P; Monuteaux, M C; Sadiq, Z; Torres, A; Kimia, A A

    2014-10-01

    To assess the prevalence of clinically urgent intra-cranial pathology among children who had imaging for a first episode of non-febrile seizure with focal manifestations. We performed a cross sectional study of all children age 1 month to 18 years evaluated for first episode of non-febrile seizure with focal manifestations and having neuroimaging performed within 24h of presentation at a single pediatric ED between 1995 and 2012. We excluded intubated patients, those with known structural brain abnormality and trauma. A single neuro-radiologist reviewed all cranial computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging performed. We defined clinically urgent intracranial pathology as any finding resulting in a change of initial patient management. We performed univariate analysis using χ(2) analysis for categorical data and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous data. We identified 319 patients having a median age of 4.6 years [IQR 1.8-9.4] of which 45% were female. Two hundred sixty-two children had a CT scan, 15 had an MR and 42 had both. Clinically urgent intra-cranial pathology was identified on imaging of 13 patients (4.1%; 95% CI: 2.2, 7.0). Infarction, hemorrhage and thrombosis were most common (9/13). Twelve of 13 were evident on CT scan. Persistent Todd's paresis and age ≤ 18 months were predictors of clinically urgent intracranial pathology. Absence of secondary generalization and multiple seizures on presentation were not predictive. Four percent of children imaged with first time, afebrile focal seizures have findings important to initial management. Children younger than ≤ 18 months are at increased risk. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Seizure outcome after AED failure in pediatric focal epilepsy: impact of underlying etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Wong-Kisiel, Lily C; Nickels, Katherine C

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to identify long-term seizure outcome in pediatric nonsyndromic focal epilepsy after failure of serial antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) due to lack of efficacy. Children (1 month-17 years) with new-onset focal epilepsy not meeting the criteria for a defined electroclinical syndrome diagnosed between 1980 and 2009 while residing in Olmsted County, MN, were retrospectively identified. Medical records of those followed for ≥2 years were reviewed to assess etiology, the number of AEDs that failed due to lack of efficacy, and seizure outcome at final follow-up. Etiology was classified into structural/metabolic, genetic, or unknown. Favorable outcome was defined as seizure freedom ≥1 year, on or off AEDs, without prior epilepsy surgery. Poor outcome was defined as ongoing seizures in the preceding year or having undergone prior epilepsy surgery. Nonsyndromic focal epilepsy accounted for 275/468 (59%) of all patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy--of these, 256 (93%) were followed for a minimum of two years and were included in the study. Median duration of follow-up was 10.0 years. At least one AED had failed due to lack of efficacy in 100 (39.1%) children. Favorable outcomes occurred in 149/156 (95.5%) children with no AED failure, 16/30 (53.3%) with one AED failure, 8/25 (32%) with two AED failures, and only 2/45 (4.4%) with three AED failures. After two AED failures, the seizures of nearly one-quarter of children who had epilepsy with an unknown cause responded favorably to the third AED compared with only 7.8% of the cohort that had epilepsy with a structural/metabolic cause. Children with a remote brain insult had a significantly higher likelihood of favorable outcome with serial AEDs than those with other structural abnormalities. Etiology is an important determinant of pharmacoresistance in nonsyndromic focal epilepsy. Surgical evaluation should be considered after failure of 1-2 AEDs in those who have epilepsy with structural causes, excluding

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of high-dose phenobarbital in children with focal seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Akihisa; Nakahara, Eri; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Nakazawa, Mika; Takasu, Michihiko; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-04-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of children with focal epilepsy treated with oral high-dose phenobarbital. We reviewed data on children (agedphenobarbital (>5 mg/kg/day to maintain a target serum level >40 μg/mL) for at least 6 months. Seizure frequency was evaluated after phenobarbital titration, and 1 and 2 years after high-dose phenobarbital treatment commenced. Treatment was judged effective when seizure frequencies fell by ⩾75%. Seven boys and eight girls were treated. The median age at commencement of high-dose phenobarbital therapy was 30 months. The maximal serum phenobarbital level ranged from 36.5 to 62.9 μg/mL. High-dose PB was effective in seven. In two patients, treatment was transiently effective, but seizure frequency later returned to the baseline. High-dose PB was ineffective in six. No significant association between effectiveness and any clinical variable was evident. Drowsiness was recorded in nine patients, but no patient developed a behavioral problem or hypersensitivity. Oral high-dose phenobarbital was effective in 7 of 15 patients with focal epilepsy and well tolerated. High-dose PB may be useful when surgical treatment is difficult. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. VEGF receptor-2 (Flk-1 overexpression in mice counteracts focal epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litsa Nikitidou

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF was first described as an angiogenic agent, but has recently also been shown to exert various neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in the nervous system. These effects of VEGF are mainly mediated by its receptor, VEGFR-2, which is also referred to as the fetal liver kinase receptor 1 (Flk-1. VEGF is up-regulated in neurons and glial cells after epileptic seizures and counteracts seizure-induced neurodegeneration. In vitro, VEGF administration suppresses ictal and interictal epileptiform activity caused by AP4 and 0 Mg(2+ via Flk-1 receptor. We therefore explored whether increased VEGF signaling through Flk-1 overexpression may regulate epileptogenesis and ictogenesis in vivo. To this extent, we used transgenic mice overexpressing Flk-1 postnatally in neurons. Intriguingly, Flk-1 overexpressing mice were characterized by an elevated threshold for seizure induction and a decreased duration of focal afterdischarges, indicating anti-ictal action. On the other hand, the kindling progression in these mice was similar to wild-type controls. No significant effects on blood vessels or glia cells, as assessed by Glut1 and GFAP immunohistochemistry, were detected. These results suggest that increased VEGF signaling via overexpression of Flk-1 receptors may directly affect seizure activity even without altering angiogenesis. Thus, Flk-1 could be considered as a novel target for developing future gene therapy strategies against ictal epileptic activity.

  5. Topiramate reduces non-convulsive seizures after focal brain ischemia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anthony J; Tortella, Frank C; Gryder, Divina; Hartings, Jed A

    2008-01-03

    Acute "silent" seizures after brain injury are associated with a worsening of patient outcome and are often refractory to anti-epileptic drug (AED) therapy. In the present study we evaluated topiramate (TPM, 1-30 mg/kg, i.v.) in a rodent model of spontaneous non-convulsive seizure (NCS) activity induced by focal cerebral ischemia. For seizure detection, electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was continuously recorded for 24h in male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Infarct volume, neurological deficit, and NCS were evaluated by an experimenter blinded to the treatment group. All vehicle treated rats (7/7) exhibited NCS following MCAo. TPM treatment, delivered at 20 min post-occlusion and prior to onset of NCS activity, dose-dependently reduced the incidence of NCS (ED(50)=21.1mg/kg). The highest dose of TPM tested (30 mg/kg) exhibited maximal reductions of 76% in the number of NCS/rat (vehicle=22.1+/-5.3, TPM=4.4+/-3.2, Pseizure treatment, TPM was not effective when delivered immediately following onset of the first NCS event (36+/-5 min post-MCAo). In conclusion, TPM exhibited significant efficacy for the prophylactic treatment of brain-injury induced NCS and represents a novel class of AED for treatment of this type of silent brain seizure.

  6. Reduced inhibition within primary motor cortex in patients with poststroke focal motor seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Kirn R; Schnitzler, Alfons; Classen, Joseph; Benecke, Reiner

    2002-10-08

    Following an ischemic brain lesion, the affected cortex undergoes structural and functional changes that may lead to increased cortical excitability or decreased inhibitory neuronal activity, resulting in the occurrence of poststroke epileptic seizures in 6 to 10% of patients with stroke. To assess motor cortical excitability, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to determine the silent period (SP) duration in 84 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke. In a subpopulation of six patients (38 to 72 years old) a significant decrease of the SP duration (mean 116 +/- 14 msec) was detected in either the arm or the leg on the affected side as compared to the corresponding unaffected limb (mean 231 +/- 32 msec). This electrophysiologic abnormality was clinically associated with focal motor seizures in five of the six patients, whereas none of the other 76 patients with normal or prolonged SP durations developed seizures or epilepsy. Silent period shortening in this group reflects decreased inhibitory activity that may partly be related to functional or structural impairment of GABAergic interneurons. TMS may be of value for determining patients with stroke at risk for developing poststroke seizures.

  7. DWI/ADC in Differentiation of Benign from Malignant Focal Liver Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahic, Elma; Sofic, Amela; Selimovic, Azra Husic

    2016-01-01

    Material and methods: The study was of prospective-retrospective character. It was carried out at the AKH in Vienna (Austria), where 100 patients with focal liver lesions were included in the study. All patients underwent the routine MR sequences on appliances 1,5 and 3T (Siemens, Germany): T1, T2, HASTE, VIBE, and a DWI with three b values (b 50, b 300 b 600 s / mm2) and ADC map with ROI (regions of interest). The numerical value of ADC map was calculated, where n = 100 liver lesions, by two independent radiologists. Results: On the basis of matching the PH finding statistically we get DWI accuracy of 96.8% for the assessment of liver lesions. The average numerical value of ADC in benign hepatic lesions (FNH, Hemangiomas) in our study amounted to 1.88 (1.326 to 2.48) x103 mm2 /s, while the value of malignant liver lesions (HCC, CCC, CRCLM) were significantly lower and amounted to 1.15 (1.024 to 1.343) x10-3 mm2 /s (Figure 2). Differences between the mean ADC of benign and malignant lesions showed a statistically significant difference with p <0.0005. In our research, we get cut-off for the ADC value of 1,341x10-3 mm2 /s, which proved to be the optimal parameter for differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. Conclusion: Measuring ADC values with DWI as an additional MRI tool can help in oncological practice by distinguishing normal liver parenchyma from focal lesions, and in differentiating benign from malignant liver lesions, particularly in cases where administration of contrast is not possible. PMID:27708485

  8. The role of transvaginal power Doppler ultrasound in the differential diagnosis of benign intrauterine focal lesions.

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    Cogendez, Ebru; Eken, Meryem Kurek; Bakal, Nuray; Gun, Ismet; Kaygusuz, Ecmel Isik; Karateke, Ates

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the role of power Doppler imaging in the differential diagnosis of benign intrauterine focal lesions such as endometrial polyps and submucous myomas using the characteristics of power Doppler flow mapping. A total of 480 premenopausal patients with abnormal uterine bleeding were evaluated by transvaginal ultrasonography (TVS) searching for intrauterine pathology. Sixty-four patients with a suspicious focal endometrial lesion received saline infusion sonography (SIS) after TVS. Fifty-eight patients with focal endometrial lesions underwent power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS). Three different vascular flow patterns were defined: Single vessel pattern, multiple vessel pattern, and circular flow pattern. Finally, hysteroscopic resection was performed in all cases, and Doppler flow characteristics were then compared with the final histopathological findings. Histopathological results were as follows: endometrial polyp: 40 (69 %), submucous myoma: 18 (31 %). Of the cases with endometrial polyps, 80 % demonstrated a single vessel pattern, 7.5 % a multiple vessel pattern, and 0 % a circular pattern. Vascularization was not observed in 12.5 % of patients with polyps. Of the cases with submucousal myomas, 72.2 % demonstrated a circular flow pattern, 27.8 % a multiple vessel pattern, and none of them showed a single vessel pattern. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the single vessel pattern in diagnosing endometrial polyps were 80, 100, 100, and 69.2 %, respectively; and for the circular pattern in diagnosing submucous myoma, these were 72.2, 100, 100, and 88.9 %, respectively. Power Doppler blood flow mapping is a useful, practical, and noninvasive diagnostic method for the differential diagnosis of benign intrauterine focal lesions. Especially in cases of recurrent abnormal uterine bleeding, recurrent abortion, and infertility, PDUS can be preferred as a first-line diagnostic method.

  9. Stimulation strength and focality of electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy in a realistic head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the characteristics of the electric field (E-field) induced in the brain by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST). The electric field induced by five ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, focal electrically administered seizure therapy, and frontomedial) as well as an MST coil configuration (circular) was computed in an anatomically realistic finite element model of the human head. We computed the maps of the electric field strength relative to an estimated neural activation threshold, and used them to evaluate the stimulation strength and focality of the various ECT and MST paradigms. The results show that the median ECT stimulation strength in the brain is 3-11 times higher than that for MST, and that the stimulated brain volume is substantially higher with ECT (47-100%) than with MST (21%). Our study provides insight into the observed reduction of cognitive side effects in MST compared to ECT, and supports arguments for lowering ECT current amplitude as a means of curbing its side effects.

  10. Encapsulated galanin-producing cells attenuate focal epileptic seizures in the hippocampus.

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    Nikitidou, Litsa; Torp, Malene; Fjord-Larsen, Lone; Kusk, Philip; Wahlberg, Lars U; Kokaia, Mérab

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulated cell biodelivery (ECB) is a relatively safe approach, since the devices can be removed in the event of adverse effects. The main objectives of the present study were to evaluate whether ECB could be a viable alternative of cell therapy for epilepsy. We therefore developed a human cell line producing galanin, a neuropeptide that has been shown to exert inhibitory effects on seizures, most likely acting via decreasing glutamate release from excitatory synapses. To explore whether ECB of genetically modified galanin-producing human cell line could provide seizure-suppressant effects, and test possible translational prospect for clinical application, we implanted ECB devices bilaterally into the hippocampus of rats subjected to rapid kindling, a model for recurrent temporal lobe seizures. Two clones from a genetically modified human cell line secreting different levels of galanin were tested. Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings and stimulations were performed by electrodes implanted into the hippocampus at the same surgical session as ECB devices. One week after the surgery, rapid kindling stimulations were initiated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measurements prior to device implantation showed a release of galanin on average of 8.3 ng/mL/24 h per device for the low-releasing clone and 12.6 ng/mL/24 h per device for the high-releasing clone. High-releasing galanin-producing ECB devices moderately decreased stimulation-induced focal afterdischarge duration, whereas low-releasing ECB devices had no significant effect. Our study shows that galanin-releasing ECB devices moderately suppress focal stimulation-induced recurrent seizures. Despite this moderate effect, the study provides conceptual proof that ECB could be a viable alternative approach to cell therapy in humans, with the advantage that the treatment could be terminated by removing these devices from the brain. Thereby, this strategy provides a higher level of safety for future

  11. Transition issues for benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children, childhood absence epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

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    Camfield, Carol S; Berg, Anne; Stephani, Ulrich; Wirrell, Elaine C

    2014-08-01

    This chapter covers the syndromes of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children (NLFN), and the genetic generalized epilepsies. BECTS is an epilepsy syndrome that always enters terminal remission before the general age of a planned transition of adolescents. This is also the case for the majority (65%) of those with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). Approximately 15% of patients with CAE who initially remit during their childhood years later develop juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) as teenagers. They will have many issues for continuing medical care and transition, because their seizure disorder generally persists into adulthood. A significant minority of NLFN (~35%) and most patients with JME continue to have active epilepsy into adulthood. In addition, CAE, JME, and NLFN patients are at risk of a number of significant adverse social outcomes that require ongoing advice and counseling.

  12. The algorithmic complexity of neural spike trains increases during focal seizures.

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    Rapp, P E; Zimmerman, I D; Vining, E P; Cohen, N; Albano, A M; Jiménez-Montaño, M A

    1994-08-01

    The interspike interval spike trains of spontaneously active cortical neurons can display nonrandom internal structure. The degree of nonrandom structure can be quantified and was found to decrease during focal epileptic seizures. Greater statistical discrimination between the two physiological conditions (normal vs seizure) was obtained with measurements of context-free grammar complexity than by measures of the distribution of the interspike intervals such as the mean interval, its standard deviation, skewness, or kurtosis. An examination of fixed epoch data sets showed that two factors contribute to the complexity: the firing rate and the internal structure of the spike train. However, calculations with randomly shuffled surrogates of the original data sets showed that the complexity is not completely determined by the firing rate. The sequence-sensitive structure of the spike train is a significant contributor. By combining complexity measurements with statistically related surrogate data sets, it is possible to classify neurons according to the dynamical structure of their spike trains. This classification could not have been made on the basis of conventional distribution-determined measures. Computations with more sophisticated kinds of surrogate data show that the structure observed using complexity measures cannot be attributed to linearly correlated noise or to linearly correlated noise transformed by a static monotonic nonlinearity. The patterns in spike trains appear to reflect genuine nonlinear structure. The limitations of these results are also discussed. The results presented in this article do not, of themselves, establish the presence of a fine-structure encoding of neural information.

  13. Focal seizures and epileptic spasms in a child with Down syndrome from a family with a PRRT2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Ayuko; Okumura, Akihisa; Shimojima, Keiko; Abe, Shinpei; Ikeno, Mitsuru; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2016-06-01

    We describe a girl with Down syndrome who experienced focal seizures and epileptic spasms during infancy. The patient was diagnosed as having trisomy 21 during the neonatal period. She had focal seizures at five months of age, which were controlled with phenobarbital. However, epileptic spasms appeared at seven months of age in association with hypsarrhythmia. Upon treatment with adrenocorticotropic hormone, her epileptic spasms disappeared. Her younger brother also had focal seizures at five months of age. His development and interictal electroencephalogram were normal. The patient's father had had infantile epilepsy and paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. We performed a mutation analysis of the PRRT2 gene and found a c.841T>C mutation in the present patient, her father, and in her younger brother. We hypothesized that the focal seizures in our patient were caused by the PRRT2 mutation, whereas the epileptic spasms were attributable to trisomy 21. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early clinical experience with lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory focal epilepsy and nocturnal seizures.

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    García-Morales, Irene; Delgado, Rafael Toledano; Falip, Mercé; Campos, Dulce; García, María Eugenia; Gil-Nagel, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    This retrospective study reports the early experience with lacosamide (LCM) as adjunctive therapy in Spanish patients with refractory focal epilepsy. Sixty patients (mean age 38.3 years, 54% women, mean epilepsy duration 27.2 years, mean seizure rate 9.7/month, and 28% with mainly nocturnal seizures) taking ≥2 antiepileptic drugs (mean 2.2) were included. LCM maintenance doses were 200, 300, 400, and 500mg/day in 31, 16, 10, and 3 patients, respectively. Patients were followed up for 13-24 months. Twenty-eight patients (47%) reported a ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency. A ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency was reported by 65% and 40% of patients in the nocturnal seizure and diurnal seizure subgroups, respectively (p>0.05). Of the 28 responders, 2 achieved stable periods of seizure freedom of 6 and 11 months after starting LCM. Twenty patients (33%) reported drug-related adverse events (AEs); the most common was dizziness (16 patients). LCM was withdrawn in 8 patients (13%). There were no serious AEs. These results support the efficacy and safety of adjunctive LCM in patients with partial-onset seizures. 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. EFFICACY OF VIMPAT (LACOSAMIDE TN THE TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT CRYPTOGENIC FOCAL EPILEPSY WITH FOCAL AUTOMOTOR AND SECONDARILY GENERALIZED SEIZURES (A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable advances of epileptology drug-resistant epilepsies consist about 30% among all forms of epilepsy. A case of successful using of a new antiepileptic drug lacosamide (vimpat in the treatment of 31 years old patient with the resistant form of cryptogenic focal epilepsy with focal automotor and secondarily generalized seizures is presented. Authors represent the review of the literature devoted to efficacy and tolerability of lacosamide in the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy.

  16. Crise epiléptica focal ipsilateral a tumor cerebral: relato de caso Focal epileptic seizures ipsilateral to the tumor: case report

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    Sebastião Silva Gusmão

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se um caso de crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral a tumor cerebral e revê-se a literatura. Trata-se de ocorrência excepcional, tendo sido descritos apenas seis casos. Vários mecanismos fisiopatológicos foram propostos para explicar a crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral. A proximidade das lesões da convexidade cerebral baixa (perisilviana sugere o comprometimento da área somatosensorial secundária e parece comprovar os achados experimentais de crises somatosensoriais originadas desta área.Focal somatosensory epileptic seizures ipsilateral to a brain tumor is reported and the literature reviewed. It is an exceptional occurrence, having been described only six cases, with several mechanisms being proposed. The proximity of the lesions with the low cerebral convexity (perisylvian suggests the compromising of the secondary somatosensorial area, seeming to prove the experimental observation of somatosensorial crises originating in this area.

  17. A meta-analysis of predictors of seizure freedom in the surgical management of focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Nathan C; Englot, Dario J; Cage, Tene A; Sughrue, Michael E; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chang, Edward F

    2012-05-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of the most common causes of medically refractory epilepsy leading to surgery. However, seizure control outcomes reported in isolated surgical series are highly variable. As a result, it is not clear which variables are most crucial in predicting seizure freedom following surgery for FCD. The authors' aim was to determine the prognostic factors for seizure control in FCD by performing a meta-analysis of the published literature. A MEDLINE search of the published literature yielded 37 studies that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Seven potential prognostic variables were determined from these studies and were dichotomized for analysis. For each variable, individual studies were weighted by inverse variance and combined to generate an odds ratio favoring seizure freedom. The methods complied with a standardized meta-analysis reporting protocol. Two thousand fourteen patients were included in the analysis. The overall rate of seizure freedom (Engel Class I) among patients undergoing surgery for FCD in the cohort of studies was 55.8% ± 16.2%. Partial seizures, a temporal location, detection with MRI, and a Type II Palmini histological classification were associated with higher rates of postoperative seizure control. As a treatment-related factor, complete resection of the anatomical or electrographic abnormality was the most important predictor overall of seizure freedom. Neither age nor electroencephalographic localization of the ictal onset significantly affected seizure freedom after surgery. Using a large population cohort pooled from the published literature, an analysis identified important factors that are prognostic in patients with epilepsy due to FCD. The most important of these factors-diagnostic imaging and resection-provide modalities through which improvements in the impact of FCD can be effected.

  18. Benign Hepatocellular Tumors in Children: Focal Nodular Hyperplasia and Hepatocellular Adenoma

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    Stéphanie Franchi-Abella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign liver tumors are very rare in children. Most focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH remain sporadic, but predisposing factors exist, as follows: long-term cancer survivor (with an increasing incidence, portal deprivation in congenital or surgical portosystemic shunt. The aspect is atypical on imaging in two-thirds of cases. Biopsy of the tumor and the nontumoral liver is then required. Surgical resection will be discussed in the case of large tumors with or without symptoms. In the case of associated vascular disorder with portal deprivation, restoration of the portal flow will be discussed in the hope of seeing the involution of FNH. HepatoCellular Adenoma (HCA is frequently associated with predisposing factors such as GSD type I and III, Fanconi anemia especially if androgen therapy is administered, CPSS, and SPSS. Adenomatosis has been reported in germline mutation of HNF1-α. Management will depend on the presence of a predisposing factor and may include metabolic control, androgen therapy withdrawn, or closure of the shunt when appropriate. Surgery is usually performed on large lesions. In the case of adenomatosis or multiple lesions, surgery will be adapted. Close followup is required in all cases.

  19. Consecutive 15 min is necessary for focal low frequency stimulation to inhibit amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yi; Xu, Zhenghao; Xu, Cenglin; Ying, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Shihong; Xiao, Bo; Chen, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is emerging as a new option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. The stimulation duration may influence the anti-epileptic effect of LFS but is poorly studied. The present study was designed to evaluate the anti-epileptic effect of focal LFS with different stimulation duration on amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats. We found 15 and 30 min but not 1 or 5 min LFS delivered immediately after the kindling stimulation slowed the progression of behavioral seizure stages and reduced mean afterdischarge duration (ADD) during kindling acquisition. In fully kindled animals, 15 and 30min rather than 1 and 5 min LFS decreased the incidence of generalized seizures and the average seizure stage as well as shortened the cumulative generalized seizure duration (GSD). Meanwhile, EEG analysis showed 15 and 30 min LFS specifically lowered the power in delta band. However, if 15min LFS delivered intermittently by 5 min interval, it had no suppressing effect on kindling rat. Thus, it is likely that consecutive 15 min is necessary for LFS to inhibit amygdaloid-kindling seizures in rats, indicating the stimulation duration may be a key fact affecting the clinical effect of LFS on epilepsy.

  20. Electric field strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy and magnetic seizure therapy: a finite element simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2011-02-01

    We present the first computational study comparing the electric field induced by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) paradigms. Four ECT electrode configurations (bilateral, bifrontal, right unilateral, and focal electrically administered seizure therapy) and three MST coil configurations (circular, cap, and double cone) were modeled. The model incorporated a modality-specific neural activation threshold. ECT (0.3 ms pulse width) and MST induced the maximum electric field of 2.1-2.5 V cm-1 and 1.1-2.2 V cm-1 in the brain, corresponding to 6.2-7.2 times and 1.2-2.3 times the neural activation threshold, respectively. The MST electric field is more confined to the superficial cortex compared to ECT. The brain volume stimulated was much larger with ECT (up to 100%) than with MST (up to 8.2%). MST with the double-cone coil was the most focal, and bilateral ECT was the least focal. Our results suggest a possible biophysical explanation of the reduced side effects of MST compared to ECT. Our results also indicate that the conventional ECT pulse amplitude (800-900 mA) is much higher than necessary for seizure induction. Reducing the ECT pulse amplitude should be explored as a potential means of diminishing side effects.

  1. Hidden focal EEG seizures during prolonged suppressions and high-amplitude bursts in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Futaisi, Amna; Banwell, Brenda; Ochi, Ayako; Hew, Justine; Chu, Bill; Oishi, Makoto; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2005-05-01

    We report on a 27-month-old female with atypical early infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EIEE), who developed tonic spasms, partial seizures and myoclonic jerks along with episodic bradycardia at 5 days. We recorded digital electroencephalography (EEG) using either an 11-channel neonatal montage or 19 channel scalp electrodes, at 200 Hz sampling rate, and a single reference for a minimum of 30 min. At 18 days EEG showed suppression-burst (SB) patterns during wakefulness and sleep. Tonic spasms concomitant with bursts recorded as brief, low-amplitude fast waves. EEG at 8 months showed increased amplitude of bursts to 1 mV and extension of suppression periods to 65 s. By increasing recording sensitivity, we detected focal epileptiform discharges of slow rhythmic sharp and slow waves building to 30 microV during suppression periods. Status epilepticus occurred at 16 months. EEG at 27 months returned to the previous SB pattern with rare partial seizures. This report is the first to demonstrate clinically silent focal EEG seizures during prolonged suppression periods in atypical EIEE by off-line digital EEG. Digital EEG sensitivity can reveal covert electrical activity during suppression periods in epileptic neonates and infants.

  2. The delta between postoperative seizure freedom and persistence: Automatically detected focal slow waves after epilepsy surgery

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    Margit Schönherr

    2017-01-01

    Significance: The quantity of delta activity could be used as a diagnostic marker for recurrent seizures. The close relation to epileptic spike localizations and the resection volume of patients with successful second surgery imply involvement in seizure recurrence. This initial evidence suggests a potential application in the planning of second epilepsy surgery.

  3. [THE PROPAGATION AND SEMIOLOGY OF FOCAL EPILEPTIC SEIZURES. CASES CONNECTED TO THE INSULA. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Attila; Balogh, Attila

    2016-01-30

    The developing of diagnostical examinations in epileptology provides new challenges in seizure semiology. On the analysis of seizures it is important to examine the mechanisms of their propagation. The brain connectivity (based on the neuroimaging), the shadowing of the movement of excessive neuronal activity (based on computerized EEG and MEG methods), the cognition of the physiological and pathological brain networks are the footstone of the epileptic seizure propagation. The investigators prove, by means of case demonstrations of the role of the network nodes and the role of the epileptic hubs in the seizure symptomatology. The preoperative, intra and postoperative data are analised of three insular and one parietal epileptic patients in point of view of their seizure symptomes. Complex neuroimaging, noninvasive and invasive electrophysiology, intensive long-term video-EEG monitoring, computerized EEG analysis, fuctional mapping, intraoperative corticography were used. The etiology were confirmed with hystology. It is observed that on seizure semiology our patients plays the insula a double role. In some cases, it is the focus of insular seizures with their symptoms difficult to identify. However, in the majority of cases and as a consequence of its rich neural connections, the insula has a peculiar property in the evolution of the symptomatogenic features of seizures. This observations are developing new relationships between the mechanism of seizure propagation and its semiological consequences. On epileptological point of view there are brain structures which has peculiar role in the "designe" of propagation of the epileptic excitement. The numerous new methods in neuroimaging and neurophysiology allowed the connectomical examination of the epileptic networks. The role of the epileptic diathesis is approachable with the metholdology of the brain connectivity. Theoretically the node of the epileptic network consist of the potential pathes where the localised

  4. [Somatosensory focal seizures as an onset form in adult Moyamoya syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, C; Alvarez Sabín, J; Bosch, J; Codina Puiggrós, A

    1995-01-01

    Moya-Moya disease is a chronic infrequent vasculopathy. Occasionally such abnormalities are found in association with one of many conditions, in these cases the angiographic abnormality should be termed Moya-Moya syndrome rather than Moya-Moya disease. Although in children the usual manifestations are ischemic events and seizures. This clinical presentation is infrequent in adults. We present a 42-years-old man with a 1-month history of recurrent right sided partial somatosensorial seizures, later he presented a left parietal infarction, the angiographic findings were compatible with moyamoya syndrome.

  5. Multi-focal lobular carcinoma in situ arising in benign phylodes tumor: A case report

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    Lee, Taeg Ki; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kim, Youn Jeong; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu [Inha University Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Coexistent breast malignancy arising in phyllodes tumor is extremely rare, and most of them are incidental reports after surgical excision. Coexistent malignancy in phyllodes tumor can vary from in-situ to invasive carcinoma. Lobular neoplasia is separated into atypical lobular hyperplasia and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). LCIS is known to have a higher risk of developing invasive cancer. We reported imaging findings of multifocal LCIS arising in benign phyllodes tumor.

  6. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have warning symptoms before the attack, such as: Fear or anxiety Nausea Vertigo (feeling as if you are spinning or moving) Visual symptoms (such as flashing bright lights, spots, or wavy lines before the eyes) Causes Seizures of all types are caused by disorganized and sudden electrical activity ...

  7. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia masquerading as benign cementoblastoma: A diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gayathri S; Kamalapur, Muralidhar G; Acharya, Swetha

    2014-01-01

    Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) is a fibro-osseous lesion that is a nonneoplastic reactive lesion. A case of 47-year-old female patient presenting with a diagnostic dilemma to the clinician is reported. Methods to achieve definitive diagnosis are discussed. FCOD can present with features of periapical pathology or other osseous lesions. Hence, to arrive at a definitive diagnosis biopsy and histopathologic examination is imperative.

  8. Sequential motor task (Luria's Fist-Edge-Palm Test in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes

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    Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego Miziara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the sequential motor manual actions in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and compares the results with matched control group, through the application of Luria's fist-edge-palm test. The children with BECTS underwent interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and School Performance Test (SPT. Significant difference occurred between the study and control groups for manual motor action through three equal and three different movements. Children with lower school performance had higher error rate in the imitation of hand gestures. Another factor significantly associated with the failure was the abnormality in SPECT. Children with BECTS showed abnormalities in the test that evaluated manual motor programming/planning. This study may suggest that the functional changes related to epileptiform activity in rolandic region interfere with the executive function in children with BECTS.

  9. Cytochrome c oxidase deficit is associated with the seizure onset zone in young patients with focal cortical dysplasia Type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Lili; Greiner, Hansel M; Mangano, Francesco T; Horn, Paul S; Leach, James L; Miles, Michael V

    2015-10-01

    It has been postulated that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important factor in epileptogenesis of intractable epilepsy. The current study tests the hypothesis that mitochondrial Complex IV (CIV) or cytochrome c oxidase dysfunction is associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Subjects were selected based on: age <19y; epilepsy surgery between May, 2010 and October, 2011; pathological diagnosis of isolated focal cortical dysplasia Type I (FCDI) or Type II (FCDII); and sufficient residual cortical tissue to conduct analysis of electron transport chain complex (ETC) activity in SOZ and adjacent cortical regions. In this retrospective study, patients were identified who had sufficient unfixed, frozen brain tissue for biochemical analysis in tissue homogenates. Specimens were subtyped using ILAE classification for FCD, and excluded if diagnosed with FCD Type III or dual pathology. Analysis of ETC activity in resected tissues was conducted independently and without knowledge of the identity, diagnosis, or clinical status of individual subjects. Seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria, including 6 FCDI and 11 FCDII. Comparison of adjacent cortical resections showed decreased CIV activity in the SOZ of the FCDII group (P = 0.003), but no significant CIV difference in adjacent tissues of the FCDI group. Because of the importance of CIV as the terminal and rate-limiting complex in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, these authors conclude that 1) a deficit of CIV is associated with the SOZ of patients with FCDII; 2) CIV deficiency may contribute to the spectrum of FCD neuropathology; and 3) further investigation of CIV in FCD may lead to the discovery of new targets for neuroprotective therapies for patients with intractable epilepsy.

  10. Determining the relationship between sleep architecture, seizure variables and memory in patients with focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie A; Ricci, Monica; van Schalkwijk, Frank J; Mohamed, Armin; van der Werf, Ysbrand D

    2016-06-01

    Sleep has been shown to be important to memory. Both sleep and memory have been found to be abnormal in patients with epilepsy. In this study, we explored the effects that nocturnal epileptiform discharges and the presence of a hippocampal lesion have on sleep patterns and memory. Twenty-five patients with focal epilepsy who underwent a 24-hr ambulatory EEG also completed the Everyday Memory Questionnaire (EMQ). The EEG record was scored for length of time spent in the various sleep stages, time spent awake after sleep onset, and rapid eye movement (REM) latency. Of these sleep variables, only REM latency differed when the epilepsy patients were divided on the bases of either presence/absence of nocturnal discharges or presence/absence of a hippocampal lesion. In both cases, presence of the abnormality was associated with longer latency. Furthermore, longer REM latency was found to be a better predictor of EMQ score than either number of discharges or presence of a hippocampal lesion. Longer REM latency was associated with a smaller percentage of time spent in slow-wave sleep in the early part of the night and may serve as a particularly sensitive marker to disturbances in sleep architecture. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. The inflammatory molecules IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly enhance focal seizure generation in a brain slice model of temporal lobe epilepsy

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    Angela eChiavegato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by a hyperexcitable brain tissue and unpredictable seizures, i.e., aberrant firing discharges in large neuronal populations. It is well established that proinflammatory cytokines, in addition to their canonical involvement in the immune response, have a crucial role in the mechanism of seizure generation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and high mobility group B1 (HMGB1 in the generation of seizure-like discharges using two models of focal epilepsy in a rat entorhinal cortex slice preparation. Seizure like-discharges were evoked by either slice perfusion with low Mg2+ and picrotoxin or with a double NMDA local stimulation in the presence of the proconvulsant 4-amino-pyridine. The effects of IL-1β or HMGB1 were evaluated by monitoring seizure discharge generation through laser scanning microscope imaging of Ca2+ signals from neurons and astrocytes. In the picrotoxin model, we revealed that both cytokines increased the mean frequency of spontaneous ictal-like discharges, whereas only IL-1β reduced the latency and prolonged the duration of the first ictal-like event. In the second model, a single NMDA pulse, per se ineffective, became successful when it was performed after IL-β or HMGB1 local applications. These findings demonstrate that both IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly lower focal ictal event threshold and strengthen the possibility that targeting these inflammatory pathways may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent seizures.

  12. A quantitative evaluation of diffusion-weighted MR imaging of focal hepatic lesions by using an optimal b-value for differentiation of malignant and benign tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kim, Kwang

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine an optimized b-value for the characterization of focal hepatic lesions (malignant and benign tumors) and to perform a quantitative analysis of the results. To achieve this, we obtained diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) from 30 focal hepatic disease patients (liver metastasis: 20 patients, and liver hemangioma: 10 patients) by using a 1.5 T MR system and varying the b-value from 0 through 200. The experimental results revealed that at a b-value of 50, the DWIs of the lesions showed high signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs; SN R liver_meta . = 229.83 ± 19.08, SNR liver_hema . = 241.66 ± 29.02), high contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs; CN R liver_meta . = 39.66 ± 3.87, C N R liver_hema . = 142.55 ± 12.97) and low signal intensities of the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs; ADC liver_meta . = 1.40 × 10-3 ± 0.29, ADC liver_hema . = 2.55 × 10-3 ± 0.92). The focal hepatic lesions were clearly depicted, with DW images and ADC maps corresponding well. Thus, we could present an optimized b-value ( b = 50) for the characterization of focal hepatic lesions. Additionally, the ADC values of liver lesions were found to be useful in differentiating benign from malignant tumors.

  13. The adult seizure and social outcomes of children with partial complex seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    Most intellectually normal children with focal epilepsy have partial complex or focal with secondary generalization seizures without a precise epilepsy syndrome. Their long-term outcome is largely unknown. Cases were identified from the population-based Nova Scotia Childhood Epilepsy cohort. Those eligible had seizure onset at 1 month to 16 years between 1977 and 1985, normal intelligence, ≥10 years of follow-up, only focal seizures and no benign epilepsy syndromes. There were 108 patients with partial complex with or without secondary generalization as the only seizure type(s) throughout (partial complex group) and 80 with secondary generalization as the only seizure type (secondary generalization group). Average age ± standard deviation at onset was 7.3 ± 4.5 years and follow-up was 27.9 ± 5.4 years. At follow-up, 57% of the partial complex group were in remission versus 81% of the secondary generalization group (P = 0.001). The partial complex group was more likely to be intractable or have undergone epilepsy surgery (36% versus 5%, P = 0.000). In the partial complex group, 28% had seizure free versus 5% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.000). More patients in the partial complex group had undergone mental health assessments (59% versus 32%, P = 0.000), and 33% had a psychiatric diagnosis versus 15% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.004). More patients with partial complex seizures had specific learning disorders (63% versus 45%, P = 0.03). Seven markers of poor social outcome were more common in patients with partial complex seizures (>2 markers: 34% versus 10%, P = 0.000). During 25-30 years of follow-up, >50% of intellectually normal patients with childhood-onset partial complex seizures had difficult-to-control seizures and learning and psychiatric/social problems. Most with secondary generalized seizures only had remission and better academic and psychiatric/social outcomes.

  14. Crise epiléptica focal ipsilateral a tumor cerebral: relato de caso Focal epileptic seizures ipsilateral to the tumor: case report

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Descreve-se um caso de crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral a tumor cerebral e revê-se a literatura. Trata-se de ocorrência excepcional, tendo sido descritos apenas seis casos. Vários mecanismos fisiopatológicos foram propostos para explicar a crise focal somatosensorial ipsilateral. A proximidade das lesões da convexidade cerebral baixa (perisilviana) sugere o comprometimento da área somatosensorial secundária e parece comprovar os achados experimentais de crises somatosensoriais originad...

  15. Aplicación del nuevo esquema diagnóstico en niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticas Application of the new diagnostic scheme for children with idiopathic focal epilepsies

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    Albia J. Pozo Alonso

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Nos propusimos con este trabajo aplicar, en 101 niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticas, el nuevo esquema diagnóstico propuesto para personas con crisis epilépticas y epilepsia, correspondiente al año 2001. La edad promedio de inicio de la epilepsia focal fue de 6,4 años. Las crisis epilépticas focales más frecuentes fueron las secundariamente generalizadas (35,6 %, seguidas por las crisis motoras (30,7 % y las sensoriales (20,8 %. Entre las crisis focales motoras predominaron las de signos motores clónicos elementales (48,4 %, y a continuación las crisis motoras tónicas asimétricas (35,5 %. En las crisis focales sensoriales predominaron las crisis con síntomas elementales (95,2 %. El síndrome epiléptico que se identificó con más frecuencia fue la epilepsia benigna de la infancia con puntas centrotemporales (10,9 %, seguido por las crisis infantiles benignas de la infancia no familiares (5 %. El trazado electroencefalográfico inicial interictal anormal más frecuente fue el focal (36,4 %. La aplicación de este nuevo esquema diagnóstico resultó útil en niños con epilepsias focales idiopáticasThe aim of this paper was to apply in 101 children with focal idiopathic epilepsies, the new diagnostic scheme proposed for persons with epilepsy seizures and epilepsy in 2001. The average age at the onset of focal epilepsy was 6.4 years old. The most frequent focal epileptic seizures were the secondarily generalized (35.6 %, followed by the motor seizures (30.7 % and the sensory seizures (20.8 %. Among the focal motor seizures, it was observed a predominance of those of elementary clonic motor signs (48.4 % and of the asymmetric tonic motor seizures (35.5 %. As regards the focal sensory seizures, there was a prevalence of the seizures with elementary symptoms (95.2 %. The most commonly identified epileptic syndrome was the infantile benign epilepsy with centrotemporal points (10.9 %, followed by the non-family infantile benign

  16. Idiopathic focal epilepsies: the "lost tribe".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deb K; Ferrie, Colin; Addis, Laura; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Caraballo, Roberto; de Saint-Martin, Anne; Fejerman, Natalio; Guerrini, Renzo; Hamandi, Khalid; Helbig, Ingo; Ioannides, Andreas A; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Lal, Dennis; Lesca, Gaetan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Neubauer, Bernd A; Pisano, Tiziana; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Seegmuller, Caroline; Shibata, Takashi; Smith, Anna; Striano, Pasquale; Strug, Lisa J; Szepetowski, Pierre; Valeta, Thalia; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Koutroumanidis, Michalis

    2016-09-01

    The term idiopathic focal epilepsies of childhood (IFE) is not formally recognised by the ILAE in its 2010 revision (Berg et al., 2010), nor are its members and boundaries precisely delineated. The IFEs are amongst the most commonly encountered epilepsy syndromes affecting children. They are fascinating disorders that hold many "treats" for both clinicians and researchers. For example, the IFEs pose many of the most interesting questions central to epileptology: how are functional brain networks involved in the manifestation of epilepsy? What are the shared mechanisms of comorbidity between epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders? How do focal EEG discharges impact cognitive functioning? What explains the age-related expression of these syndromes? Why are EEG discharges and seizures so tightly locked to slow-wave sleep? In the last few decades, the clinical symptomatology and the respective courses of many IFEs have been described, although they are still not widely appreciated beyond the specialist community. Most neurologists would recognise the core syndromes of IFE to comprise: benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes or Rolandic epilepsy (BECTS/RE); Panayiotopoulos syndrome; and the idiopathic occipital epilepsies (Gastaut and photosensitive types). The Landau-Kleffner syndrome and the related (idiopathic) epilepsy with continuous spikes and waves in sleep (CSWS or ESES) are also often included, both as a consequence of the shared morphology of the interictal discharges and their potential evolution from core syndromes, for example, CSWS from BECTS. Atypical benign focal epilepsy of childhood also has shared electro-clinical features warranting inclusion. In addition, a number of less well-defined syndromes of IFE have been proposed, including benign childhood seizures with affective symptoms, benign childhood epilepsy with parietal spikes, benign childhood seizures with frontal or midline spikes, and benign focal seizures of adolescence. The

  17. Long-term seizure outcome and risk factors for recurrence after extratemporal epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne M; Averill, Clare A; Kalnins, Renate M; Mitchell, L Anne; Fabinyi, Gavin C A; Jackson, Graeme D; Berkovic, Samuel F

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to assess long-term seizure outcome and risk factors for seizure recurrence in a cohort of patients who have undergone extratemporal resection for management of refractory seizures. Eighty-one patients underwent extratemporal resection at Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia (1991-2004). Seizure recurrence was any postoperative disabling seizure (complex partial seizure [CPS] ± secondary generalization). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models examined potential preoperative and perioperative risk factors and the risk associated with early postoperative seizures (≤ 28 days postsurgery). The change between preoperative and postoperative seizure frequency was also measured. Median follow-up was 10.3 years (range 1-17.7). The probabilities of freedom from disabling seizures (on or off antiepileptic medication) were 40.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 30-51) at 1 month, 23.5% (95% CI 15-33) at 1 year, and 14.7% (95% CI 8-23) at 5 years postoperative. Reduction of disabling seizures to at least 20% of preoperative frequency was attained by 57% of patients at 5 postoperative years. Of the preoperative/perioperative factors, focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type 1 (hazard ratio [HR] 1.90, 95% CI 1.08-3.34, p = 0.025) and incomplete resection (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.06-2.76, p = 0.028) were independent recurrence risks. After surgery, an early postoperative seizure was the only factor associated with higher risk (HR 4.28 [2.42-7.57], p = 0.00). Distinction between subtypes of focal cortical dysplasia, which can be made using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria, may be useful for preoperative prognostication. Early seizures after surgery are not benign and may be markers of factors that contribute to seizure recurrence. Most patients achieve substantial reduction in seizure frequency. Further study of the significance of this reduction in terms of surgical "success" or otherwise is required. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League

  18. Febrile and other occasional seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, T; Carmant, L

    2013-01-01

    Seizures with fever that result from encephalitis or meningitis usually occur late in the course of febrile illness, and are focal and prolonged. Febrile seizures are by far the most common affecting 5% of the population, followed by posttraumatic seizures and those observed in the setting of a toxic, infectious, or metabolic encephalopathy. This chapter reviews the clinical presentation of the three most common forms, due to fever, trauma, and intoxication. Febrile seizures carry no cognitive or mortality risk. Recurrence risk is increased by young age, namely before 1 year of age. Febrile seizures that persist after the age of 6 years are usually part of the syndrome of Generalized epilepsy febrile seizures plus. These febrile seizures have a strong link with epilepsy since non-febrile seizures may occur later in the same patient and in other members of the same family with an autosomal dominant transmission. Complex febrile seizures, i.e., with focal or prolonged manifestations or followed by focal defect, are related to later mesial temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis; risk factors are seizure duration and brain malformation. Prophylactic treatment is usually not required in febrile seizures. Early onset of complex seizures is the main indication for AED prophylaxis. Early posttraumatic seizures, i.e., within the first week, are often focal and indicate brain trauma: contusion, hematoma, 24 hours amnesia, and depressed skull fracture are major factors of posttraumatic epilepsy. Prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is not effective. Various psychotropic drugs, including antiepileptics, may cause seizures.

  19. Is "Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes” Always Benign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SAEED

    2014-07-01

    centrotemporal spikes. Seizure. 2010; 19:12–16.Genizi J, Shamay-Tsoory SG, Shahar E, Yaniv S, Aharon- Perez J. Impaired social behavior in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. J Child Neurol. 2012; 27:156–161.Zenkov LR, Konstantinov PA, Shiriaeva IIu, Miasnikov VN, Sirazitdinova EB, Shevel’chisnkiĭ SI. Mental and behavioral disorders in idiopathic focal epileptiform spikes. Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S Korsakova. 2007; 107:39–49.Winckler MIB, Rotta NT. Prognostic factors for recurrence of a first seizure during childhood. Arq Neuropsiquiatr.1997; 55:749-756.Holmes GL. Rolandic epilepsy: clinical and electroencephalographic features. In: Degen R, Dreifuss FE, editors. Benign localized and generalized epilepsies of early childhood. Amsterdam: Elsevier ;1992: p.29-43.Gregory DL, Wong PKH. Clinical relevance of a dipole field in rolandic spikes. Epilepsia. 1992; 33:36-44.Bouma PAD, Bovenkerk AC, Westendorp RGJ, Brouwer OF. The course of benign partial epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes: a meta- analysis. Neurology. 1997; 48: 430-437.Fejerman N, Caraballo R, Tenembaum S. Atypical evolutions of benign -localization-related epilepsies in children: are they predictable? Epilepsia. 2000; 4: 380-390.Peters JM, Camfield CS, Camfield PR. Population study of benign rolandic epilepsy: is treatment needed? Neurology. 2001; 57: 537-539.Holmes GL. Rolandic epilepsy: clinical and electroencephalographic features. In Degen R, Dreifuss FE. editors. Benign localized and generalized epilepsies of early childhood. Amsterdam: Elsevier 1992:p. 29-43.Laub MC, Funke R, Kirsch CM, Oberst U. BECT: comparison of cerebral blood flow imaging, neuropsychological testing and long-term EEG findings. Epilepsy Res Suppl. 1992;6:95-98.Coppola G. Cognitive and linguistic abnormalities in benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. Acta Paediatr. 2011;100(5:768-772.Sarco DP, Boyer K, Lundy-Krigbaum SM, Takeoka M, Jensen F, Gregas M, Waber DP. Benign rolandic

  20. Comparison between febrile and afebrile seizures associated with mild rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ben; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Young Jin; Son, Byong Kwan; Kim, Dong Wook; Kwon, Young Se

    2013-09-01

    We aimed on identifying the differences of febrile and afebrile seizures associated with mild rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in the pediatric population. Medical charts of pediatric patients who had been admitted between July 1999 and June 2011 due to RVGE were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were ultimately divided into three groups; 'no seizure' (NS: patients without seizure), 'febrile seizure' (FS: patients with fever during seizure), 'afebrile seizure' (AFS: patients without fever during seizure). Comparisons between groups were carried out on demographic and clinical characteristics, laboratory test results, electroencephalogram findings, brain magnetic resonance imaging findings, antiepileptic treatment, and prognosis. Among the 755 subjects who had been admitted due to mild rotavirus enteritis, 696 (90.3%) did not have any seizures, 17 (2.2%) had febrile seizures, 42 (5.5%) had afebrile seizures. The duration of gastrointestinal symptoms before the onset of seizures were significantly shorter in the FS group compared to the AFS group (1.3±0.8 vs. 2.8±1.0 days; pseizure attack was significantly higher in the AFS group (3.0±1.6 vs. 1.7±1.0 episodes; p=0.0003), and the frequency of seizures that were of focal type with or without secondary generalization were significantly higher in the AFS group (33.3% vs. 6.0%; p=0.0139). All patients among the FS and AFS group had not received further antiepileptic treatment after discharge, and none developed epilepsy during follow up period. Despite some differences in seizure characteristics, both febrile and afebrile seizures associated with mild RVGE were mostly benign with a favorable prognosis. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Febrile seizures: A review for family physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karande Sunil

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most common cause of convulsions in children. Most are simple in nature, although those with focal onset, prolonged duration (³15 min or those that recur within 24 h or within the same febrile illness are considered complex. Diagnosis of this condition is essentially clinical and based on its description provided by parents. Its pathophysiology remains unclear, but genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Although most febrile seizures are benign and associated with minor viral illnesses, it is critical that the child be evaluated immediately to reduce parental anxiety and to identify the cause of the fever. It is essential to exclude underlying pyogenic meningitis, either clinically or, if any doubt remains, by lumbar puncture. The risk of pyogenic meningitis is as low (< 1.3% as the risk in a febrile child without seizures. After an initial febrile seizure (simple or complex, 3-12% of children develop epilepsy by adolescence. However, the risk of developing epilepsy after an initial simple febrile seizure is low (1.5-2.4%. Since the vast majority of children have a normal long-term outcome, antiepileptic medication is not recommended to prevent recurrence of febrile seizures. Oral diazepam or clobazam, given only when fever is present, is an effective means of reducing the risk of recurrence. The family physician can play an important role in counseling the parents that most febrile seizures are brief, do not require any specific treatment or extensive work-up, the probability of frequent or possibly threatening recurrences is low and the long-term prognosis is excellent.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ accompanying seizures with impaired consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Hanaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ is characterized by childhood-onset epilepsy syndrome. It involves febrile seizures and a variety of afebrile epileptic seizure types within the same pedigree with autosomal-dominant inheritance. Approximately 10% of individuals with GEFS+ harbor SCN1A, a gene mutation in one of the voltage-gated sodium channel subunits. Considerably less common are focal epilepsies including focal seizures with impaired consciousness. We report vagus nerve stimulation (VNS in a 6-year-old girl with GEFS+ who exhibited drug-resistant generalized tonic-clonic seizures and focal seizures with impaired consciousness.

  3. Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seizures are more common in girls. History of febrile seizures. Infants and children who have seizures brought on by fever are at greater risk of absence seizures. Family members who have seizures. Nearly half of ...

  4. Treatment of refractory seizures due to a benign mass present in the corpus callosum with an ion magnetic inductor: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic-Madzarevic, Vera; Pappas, Panos

    2005-01-01

    A 39-year-old female patient was having episodes of body stiffness that affected her motor abilities. A lipoma in the corpus callosum was identified by computed tomography. Her condition deteriorated rapidly, and seizures were refractory to any treatment. Seizure frequency and severity increased, incapacitating the patient completely. When seizure control was not achieved by any other treatment, the patient decided to undergo experimental therapy with the ion magnetic inductor. Treatment with the ion magnetic inductor notably reduced the seizure frequency and intensity. After treatment the patient was able to return to work and other normal activities. The long-term effects are not yet known, but there have been no adverse events to date. The patient is still undergoing ion magnetic inductor treatment daily in the same way other epileptic patients must continue with the use of antiepileptic drugs for life. There is evidence in the literature that other types of electromagnetic therapy, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), may be useful for treating refractory seizures. The potential advantage of the ion magnetic inductor over rTMS is that there is no need to locate precisely the epileptogenic focus, making the treatment procedure simpler and faster.

  5. Recent Research on Febrile Seizures: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syndi Seinfeld, DO; Pellock, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. They are the most common cause of seizures in children less than five years of age. There are two categories of febrile seizures, simple and complex. Both the International League against Epilepsy and the National Institute of Health has published definitions on the classification of febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures are mostly benign, but a prolonged (complex) febrile seizure can have long term consequences. Most children who have a febrile seizure have normal health and development after the event, but there is recent evidence that suggests a small subset of children that present with seizures and fever may have recurrent seizure or develop epilepsy. This review will give an overview of the definition of febrile seizures, epidemiology, evaluation, treatment, outcomes and recent research. PMID:25383238

  6. Seizure semiology and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Diosely C; Jehi, Lara; Chapin, Jessica; Krishnaiengar, Suparna; Novak, Eric; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy; Najm, Imad

    2011-02-01

    The incidence of epilepsy is high in older individuals. However, epilepsy in the elderly may be underdiagnosed and undertreated because of diagnostic difficulties. The main goal of this study was to determine whether seizure semiology differs between older and younger adults with epilepsy in the outpatient setting. Fifty patients with focal epilepsy aged 55 years and older and 50 patients aged between 18 and 45 years were included. Review of medical records contained detailed seizure description. There were no differences in seizure semiology between groups, except that subtle perceptions of transient confusion were seen in older patients but not in younger patients (P=0.0028). Older patients had less generalized motor seizures, but the differences between groups did not reach significance (P=0.01). Older patients may present with subtle symptoms of seizures characterized by brief periods of confusion, which may contribute to greater difficulty diagnosing seizures in the elderly. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical risk factors of febrile seizure in children in a university hospital in Bushehr port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Sanaei Dashty

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the majority of febrile seizures are benign, it is clinically important to understand the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated characteristics of febrile convulsion and factors related to its recurrence and its relapse during a hospital course. Methods: A total of 102 patients with febrile seizure who were admitted serially at Fatemeh Zahra (S University Hospital in Bushehr port were investigated. Demographic information and data of the history and physical examination were recorded. Children under the age of five with temperature of more than 37.8C or with history of fever accompanied by seizure entered the study those with meningitis or encephalitis according to the results of lumbar puncture or clinical diagnosis were ruled out. Results: Mean age of patients was 24±13.1 months, the most frequent type of convulsion was tonic-clonic (60.5%, and the least were atonic and myoclonic (each 7.9%. Focal convulsion was determined in 13.0% and complex type was observed in 32.5% of patients. Family history of febrile seizure was found in 59.0%. Female sex (RR=2.68, 95% CI: 1.20-5.99, history of previous febrile seizure (RR=2.56, 95% CI: 1.11-5.95, age at initial febrile seizure (RR=2.7, 95% CI: 1.16-6.29, and complex type of seizure (RR=3.86, 95% CI: 1-14.97 increased the risk of seizure relapses in a hospital course (P<0.05. Conclusion: Gender, history of previous febrile seizure, age at initial febrile seizure, and complex type of seizure increase the risk of recurrence of febrile seizure during hospital course. Further studies for assessing the long term effects of these factors on recurrence will determine children who need more medical attention in the future.

  8. Fluoxetine Overdose-Induced Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    Suchard, Jeffrey R

    2008-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman experienced a witnessed generalized seizure in the Emergency Department three hours after ingesting approximately 1400 mg of fluoxetine in a suicide attempt. Although the majority of fluoxetine ingestions are benign, seizures may occur after large intentional overdoses. [WestJEM. 2008;9:154-156

  9. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant focal liver lesions in 54 cases%超声造影对54例肝脏局灶性病变的良恶性鉴别

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤丽丽; 程文; 韩雪

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察肝脏局灶性病变在超声造影的各期相灌注特点,评价超声造影在肝脏局灶性病变中的诊断价值.方法 使用SonoVue造影剂和低机械指数实时造影成像技术,对54例患者肝脏局灶性病变进行超声造影检查,研究病灶的造影增强模式,判断病变的良恶性.结果 良恶性病变增强的动态时相变化结果表明,恶性病变患者增强开始时间、峰值时间、减退时间、持续时间均早于良性病变患者(P<0.05).良恶性病灶动脉期、门脉期及实质期增强方式也有所不同.恶性病变表现为快进、快出,其显影增强时间为(16.1 ±3.2)s,开始消退时间为(34.6±6.4)s.良性肿瘤表现为快进慢出,显影增强时间为(26.8±6.2)s,持续时间为(267.5±56.3)s.结论 超声造影能准确地反映血流灌注情况,揭示不同肿瘤的增强特征,尤其是鉴别良恶性病变.%Objective To observe characteristics of focal liver lesions in each period of perfu sion, and to investigate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Meth ods Fifty-four patients with focal liver lesions were examined by low-mechanical index real contrast-enhanced ultrasound with SonoVue. The enhancement patterns of lesions were analyzed and benign and malignant focal liver lesions were differentiated. Results In the early and late enhanced stages, the arrival time, peak time, wash-out time and enhancement time of the ma lignant lesions were significantly earlier than those of the benign lesion ( P < 0.05). Benign and malignant lesions showed different enhancement patterns at arterial, portal, parenchymal period. The malignant lesions appeared as fast-in and fast-out, the arrival time was(16. 1 ± 3.2)s, the wash-out time was( 34. 6 ±6.4)s. The benign lesions appeared as fast-in and slow out, the arrival time was (26. 8 ±6. 2) s, the enhancement time was( 267. 5 ±56. 3)s. Con clusion CEUS can reflect the blood flow perfusion of focal liver lesion

  11. Management of provoked seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure. This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED, that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  12. Varying seizure semiology according to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordli, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of seizures change in a predictable fashion with advancing age. For focal seizures these changes can be summarized into domains similar to those used in developmental models. These include fine motor, communication, and gross motor manifestations. Instead of socialization the fourth domain for seizure semiology concerns synchronization. Focal seizures in the very young tend to be simpler with fewer fine motor manifestations. Auras are uncommon, even in young children with some linguistic skill and it is often difficult to discern alteration of consciousness. Infantile focal seizures can present with spasms or even diffuse tonic seizures. In terms of synchronization, orderly secondary generalization is rarely seen so that primary generalized clonic seizures are rarely recorded in infants. Amongst so-called "generalized" seizures spasms are most often seen in the first year of life. Absence seizures, myoclonic-astatic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures are all usually not seen until after age 2 years. A full description of the clinical details of seizures is probably the most important part of the epilepsy history. A detailed knowledge of seizure semiology can make the history more effective and also in the identification of the correct seizure classification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Seizure characteristics of epilepsy in childhood after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuji; Natsume, Jun; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Ishihara, Naoko; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Tsuji, Takeshi; Okumura, Akihisa; Kubota, Tetsuo; Ando, Naoki; Saitoh, Shinji; Miura, Kiyokuni; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify characteristics of post-encephalopathic epilepsy (PEE) in children after acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), paying particular attention to precise diagnosis of seizure types. Among 262 children with acute encephalopathy/encephalitis registered in a database of the Tokai Pediatric Neurology Society between 2005 and 2012, 44 were diagnosed with AESD according to the clinical course and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and were included in this study. Medical records were reviewed to investigate clinical data, MRI findings, neurologic outcomes, and presence or absence of PEE. Seizure types of PEE were determined by both clinical observation by pediatric neurologists and ictal video-electroencephalography (EEG) recordings. Of the 44 patients after AESD, 10 (23%) had PEE. The period between the onset of encephalopathy and PEE ranged from 2 to 39 months (median 8.5 months). Cognitive impairment was more severe in patients with PEE than in those without. Biphasic seizures and status epilepticus during the acute phase of encephalopathy did not influence the risk of PEE. The most common seizure type of PEE on clinical observation was focal seizures (n = 5), followed by epileptic spasms (n = 4), myoclonic seizures (n = 3), and tonic seizures (n = 2). In six patients with PEE, seizures were induced by sudden unexpected sounds. Seizure types confirmed by ictal video-EEG recordings were epileptic spasms and focal seizures with frontal onset, and all focal seizures were startle seizures induced by sudden acoustic stimulation. Intractable daily seizures remain in six patients with PEE. We demonstrate seizure characteristics of PEE in children after AESD. Epileptic spasms and startle focal seizures are common seizure types. The specific seizure types may be determined by the pattern of diffuse subcortical white matter injury in AESD and age-dependent reorganization of the brain

  14. Two epileptic syndromes, one brain: childhood absence epilepsy and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminara, Caterina; Coniglio, Antonella; El-Malhany, Nadia; Casarelli, Livia; Curatolo, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS), or benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), are the most common forms of childhood epilepsy. CAE and BCECTS are well-known and clearly defined syndromes; although they are strongly dissimilar in terms of their pathophysiology, these functional epileptic disturbances share many features such as similar age at onset, overall good prognosis, and inheritance factors. Few reports are available on the concomitance of CAE and BCECTS in the same patients or the later occurrence of generalized epilepsy in patients with a history of partial epilepsy. In most cases described in the literature, absence seizures always started after the onset of benign focal epilepsy but the contrary has never occurred yet. We describe two patients affected by idiopathic generalized epileptic syndrome with typical absences, who experienced BCECTS after remission of seizures and normalization of EEG recordings. While the coexistence of different seizure types within an epileptic syndrome is not uncommon, the occurrence of childhood absence and BCECTS in the same child appears to be extremely rare, and this extraordinary event supports the hypothesis that CAE and BCECTS are two distinct epileptic conditions. However, recent interesting observations in animal models suggest that BCECTS and CAE could be pathophysiologically related and that genetic links could play a large role.

  15. 婴儿癫痫伴游走性局灶性发作的临床及基因突变特点%Clinical features and gene mutations in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚可为; 张月华; 杨小玲; 刘爱杰; 杨志仙; 刘晓燕; 姜玉武; 吴希如

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize the clinical features and geue mutations of epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS).Method Clinical features and electroencephalograms (EEG) of 9 patients with EIMFS of Peking University First Hospital from May 2015 to January 2016 were analyzed.Candidate gene mutations were screened by next generation sequencing.Result Among the 9 patients,3 were males and 6 were females.Two patients had family history.Seizure onset age was 2 days to 3 months after birth (median age 35 days).Migrating focal seizure was presented.Seizures manifested as eyes and (or) head deviation,involuntary blinking,swallowing,trembling or stiffness of limbs,hand clenching,flushing and cyanosis of lips,etc.Four patients had a history of status epilepticus.All 9 patients had psychomotor delay.EEG of all patients presented relatively slow background;during interictal phase,there were multi-focal epileptic discharges,which dominated one hemisphere or brain region;seizures were recorded in all 9 cases,which manifested eyes or(and) head deviation,stiffening or trembling of limbs,lip smacking,etc.Corresponding EEG showed low-medium-amplitude fast waves that originated from some brain regions and migrated to other regions.Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in 4 cases,which predominantly showed white matter dysplasia and enlargement of subarachnoid spaces.Two cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of SCN1A gene,while 3 cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of KCNTI gene,all of which were de novo.One case carried compound heterozygous mutation of TBC1D24 gene(p.Gln207 *,p.Ala289Va).Gene mutation was not found in 3 cases.All patients used multiple antiepileptic drugs (AED) and their seizures were not controlled.Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years and 8 months,during which 4 were found dead.Two were lost to follow-up.Conclusion EIMFS is clinically characterized by early onset,which is usually within 3 months after birth

  16. [Simple febrile seizure, complex seizure, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus, FIRES and new syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de Flagge, Noris

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common seizures in childhood. They have been observed in 2-5% of children before the age of 5, but in some populations this figure may increase to 15%. It is a common cause of pediatric hospital admissions and cause of anxiety for parents. Febrile seizures could be the first manifestation of epilepsy. About 13% of epileptic patients have a history of febrile seizure, and 30% have had recurrent febrile seizures. Their phenotypic characteristics allow, in the majority of cases, a classification of the seizure, an elaboration of a prognosis and to assume a specific therapeutic attitude. It is possible to describe a spectrum according to their severity, from the benign simple seizure to the more complex, febrile seizure plus, Dravet'syndrome, and FIRES. During the past decade, molecular genetic studies have contributed to the identification of genetic factors involved in febrile seizure and related disorders, making the necessity of a careful follow up of these patients in order to detect risk factors earlier. We have reviewed the medical literature to update current knowledge of febrile seizures, their prognosis and their relation to new epileptic syndromes.

  17. [Ecstatic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered.

  18. Febrile seizures and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2015-06-01

    To review the literature about febrile seizures and GEFS plus with special emphasis on management and outcome. Selected literature review. Febrile seizures are the most common convulsive event in humans, occurring in 2-6% of the population. The aetiology is complex with strong evidence for a heterogeneous genetic predisposition interacting with fever of any cause, with certain viral infections having a greater effect. A large amount of literature has established that febrile seizures have no long-term consequences on cognition or behaviour. Unfortunately, about 40% of children with a first febrile seizure will have a recurrence. The strongest predictor of recurrence is age febrile seizure. Epilepsy follows febrile seizures in ∼3% cases, with the concepts of simple and complex febrile seizures providing relatively weak prediction. Very prolonged febrile seizures may lead to mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy although the degree of risk remains uncertain. Investigations beyond establishing the cause of the provoking fever are nearly always unnecessary. Treatment is mainly reassurance and there is some evidence that parents eventually "come to grips" with the fear that their children are dying during a febrile seizure. Antipyretic medications are remarkably ineffective to prevent recurrences. Daily and intermittent prophylactic medications are ineffective or have unacceptable side effects or risks. "Rescue" benzodiazepines may prevent prolonged recurrences for selected patients with a first prolonged febrile seizure although this has not been proven. Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a complex autosomal dominant disorder usually caused by mutations in SCN1A (a voltage-gated sodium channel). One third of patients have febrile seizures only; two thirds have a variety of epilepsy syndromes, both focal and generalized. Febrile seizures may distress parents but rarely have any long-term consequences. Reassurance is the only

  19. Childhood epileptic seizures imitating migraine and encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravljanac Ružica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Paroxismal events can resemble epileptic seizures, however, some epileptic seizures, especially benign occipital childhood epilepsies can imitate migraine, cycling vomiting or encephalitis. Objective. The aim of this study was evaluation of clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG features and outcome in children with benign occipital childhood epilepsies. Methods. Investigation included 18 patients with benign occipital childhood epilepsies hospitalized in the period from 2007 to 2010. The diagnosis was based on clinical and EEG characteristics of seizures, while treatment included acute therapy for seizures and chronic antiepileptic drugs. Prognosis was analyzed in terms of neurological outcome and seizure recurrence rate. Results. Benign occipital childhood epilepsy with early onset was diagnosed in 15 children. Vegetative symptoms, mostly ictal vomiting (13, eye deviation and loss of consciousness (13 dominated in the clinical presentation. The most frequent EEG findings showed occipital epileptic discharges. Benign occipital childhood epilepsy with late onset was diagnosed in three cases. Seizures were manifested by visual hallucinations, headache and secondary generalized convulsions. All three patients were administered chronic antiepileptic drugs and had good outcome. Conclusion. In our patients, clinical manifestations of benign occipital epilepsies had some similarities with clinical features of migraine and encephalitis. It could explain misdiagnosis in some of them. Knowledge about main features and differences between each of these disorders is crucial for making appropriate diagnosis.

  20. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Iglesias, E; García-Arpa, M; Sánchez-Caminero, P; Romero-Aguilera, G; Cortina de la Calle, P

    2007-11-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare disease of the oral mucosa caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). It appears as a benign epithelial growth, usually in the mucosa of the lower lip. It is mainly associated with HPV serotypes 13 and 32 and there is a clear racial predilection for the disease in Native Americans and Eskimos. We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl from Ecuador with multiple papular lesions in both lips that were clinically and histologically consistent with focal epithelial hyperplasia. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction detected HPV serotype 13.

  1. Sequential motor task (Luria's Fist-Edge-Palm Test in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes Tarefa motora sequencial (Teste de Lúria punho-lado-palma em crianças com epilepsia focal benigna da infância com descarga centrotemporal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Silvia Molleis Galego Miziara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the sequential motor manual actions in children with benign focal epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS and compares the results with matched control group, through the application of Luria's fist-edge-palm test. The children with BECTS underwent interictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and School Performance Test (SPT. Significant difference occurred between the study and control groups for manual motor action through three equal and three different movements. Children with lower school performance had higher error rate in the imitation of hand gestures. Another factor significantly associated with the failure was the abnormality in SPECT. Children with BECTS showed abnormalities in the test that evaluated manual motor programming/planning. This study may suggest that the functional changes related to epileptiform activity in rolandic region interfere with the executive function in children with BECTS.Esse estudo avaliou ações motoras manuais sequenciais em crianças com epilepsia focal benigna da infância com descarga centrotemporal (EBICT e comparou os resultados com o grupo controle pareado, através do teste de Lúria (punho-lado-palma. As crianças com EBICT realizaram single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT interictal e Teste de Desempenho Escolar (TDE. Foram encontradas diferenças significativas entre os dois grupos nas atividades motoras de três movimentos iguais e três movimentos diferentes. As crianças com piores resultados no TDE e com SPECT alterado apresentaram mais erros no teste de imitação manual. Crianças com epilepsia fracassaram nos testes de avaliação motora que envolvem programação/planejamento. Esse estudo sugere que mudanças funcionais relacionadas à atividade epileptiforme na região rolândica interfere com as funções executivas de crianças com EBICT.

  2. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Jornet, Pía; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Berdugo, Lucero

    2010-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign, asymptomatic disease. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue and, less frequently, on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. FEH is caused by human papillomavirus subtype 13 or 32. The condition occurs in many populations and ethnic groups. We present the clinical case of a 31-year-old male with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to FEH.

  3. Risk factors of recurrent seizure, co-morbidities, and mortality in new onset seizure in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phabphal, Kanitpong; Geater, Alan; Limapichat, Kitti; Sathirapanya, Pornchai; Setthawatcharawanich, Suwanna

    2013-09-01

    To determine the risk factors of seizure recurrence and the most common comorbidities in elderly patients with epilepsy. We did a retrospective study of 278 patients older than 65 years with first seizure. We evaluated electrolytes, blood glucose, urea and creatinine levels, and performed electrocardiography (ECG), and routine electroencephalogram (EEG) on all patients. We evaluated seizure recurrence and comorbidities at 2 years. Univariate analysis found that significant (Pseizure recurrence were etiology of seizure, EEG, and status epilepticus at first presentation. In multivariate regression analysis, etiology of seizure and EEG were significant statistical factors in seizure recurrence at 2 years follow up. Age, sex, duration of time between first seizure and diagnosis of seizure, seizure type, misdiagnosis of non-epileptic seizure, and use of antiepileptic drugs were not significant factors for predicting seizure recurrence. Depression and anxiety were the most common comorbidities in our study, followed by sleep-related disorders and stroke. There were no statistically significantly differences in comorbidities between patients who remained seizure free and patients who had recurrent seizure. Most of the new onset seizures in our elderly patients were focal onset. Acute symptomatic etiology, remote symptomatic etiology, progressive symptomatic etiology and abnormal EEG features were powerful predictors of seizure recurrence, and mood disorder, sleep disorder and stroke were the common comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood with acquired neurocognitive, lexical semantic, and autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nicholas M; Conroy, Judith; Deonna, Thierry; McCreary, Dara; McGettigan, Paul; Madigan, Cathy; Carter, Imogen; Ennis, Sean; Lynch, Sally A; Shahwan, Amre; King, Mary D

    2016-01-01

    Atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE) of childhood or pseudo-Lennox syndrome is a form of idiopathic focal epilepsy characterized by multiple seizure types, focal and/or generalized epileptiform discharges, continuous spike-wave during sleep (CSWS), and sometimes reversible neurocognitive deficits. There are few reported cases of ABPE describing detailed correlative longitudinal follow-up of the various associated neurocognitive, language, social communicative, or motor deficits, in parallel with the epilepsy. Furthermore, the molecular inheritance pattern for ABPE and the wider spectrum of epilepsy aphasia disorders have yet to be fully elucidated. We describe the phenotype-genotype study of a boy with ABPE with follow-up from ages 5 to 13 years showing acquired oromotor and, later, a specific lexical semantic and pervasive developmental disorder. Exome sequencing identified variants in SCN9A, CPA6, and SCNM1. A direct role of the epilepsy in the pathogenesis of the oromotor and neurocognitive deficits is apparent.

  5. White matter integrity and cerebral network topology in focal epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Otte, W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide more than fifty million people suffer from recurrent spontaneous seizures. Seizures are considered to be harmful to the brain and may have adverse long-term behavioral and cognitive consequences in particular in people with focal epilepsies that do not respond to pharmacotherapy. Characterization of seizure related brain damage may provide knowledge to better comprehend the mechanisms underlying the poorly understood comorbidities often encountered in patients with focal epilepsy. I...

  6. Localization of pediatric seizure semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Martina; Zarowski, Marcin; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Wyllie, Elaine; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between semiology of seizures in children and adolescents to the corresponding EEG localization. Charts of 225 consecutive pediatric epilepsy patients undergoing Video-EEG monitoring (VEM) over 2 years were reviewed. Seizure semiology recorded during VEM was classified according to ILAE seizure semiology terminology and EEG localization, and analyzed based on onset as defined by the EEG data (generalized, frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital or multilobar). A total of 1008 seizures were analyzed in 225 children (mean age 8.5 years, range 0-20), with 50% boys. Auras and seizures with automatisms arose predominantly from the temporal lobes (psemiologies relate to specific brain regions, with overlap between focal and generalized semiological seizure types, as identified electrographically. Semiology of seizures can provide important information for epilepsy localization, and should not be overlooked, especially in patients undergoing pre-surgical evaluation. Separation of clinical seizure description and EEG findings may be useful, in particular when only incomplete information is available. i.e. during the first office visit. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. New onset seizures in HIV--seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Mala; Mochan, Andre; Modi, Girish

    2009-05-01

    Thirty-seven HIV-positive patients with new-onset seizures (NOS) were prospectively identified during a 1-year study period. The patients were categorized according to the different mechanisms causing NOS in HIV, namely focal brain lesion (FBL) in 21 patients (57%), meningitis in 6 patients (16%), metabolic derangement (no patient), and no identified cause (NIC) other than HIV itself (10 patients, 27%). Seizure semiology, CD4 counts, and blood and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) viral loads were studied to identify any special characteristics of the different categories. With respect to seizure semiology, all NIC patients had generalized seizures. Two-thirds of the meningitis patients had generalized seizures with one-third having focal seizures. Half of the patients with FBL had generalized seizures and one-third had focal seizures. Status epilepticus was strongly associated with FBL. No significant difference could be detected between the subgroups with respect to CD4 counts and serum and CSF viral loads. The median CD4 count in all patients was 108 cells/ml, indicating advanced immunosuppression. In the FBL group this was 104 cells/ml. In the meningitis group the median CD4 count was 298 cells/ml, and in the NIC group this was 213 cells/ml. Similarly, no differences were noted in the NOS categories with respect to serum and CSF viral loads. Seizures in HIV are a nonspecific manifestation of the seizure mechanism.

  8. Posterior cortex epilepsy surgery in childhood and adolescence: Predictors of long-term seizure outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramantani, Georgia; Stathi, Angeliki; Brandt, Armin; Strobl, Karl; Schubert-Bast, Susanne; Wiegand, Gert; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; van Velthoven, Vera; Zentner, Josef; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Bast, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the long-term seizure outcome of children and adolescents who were undergoing epilepsy surgery in the parietooccipital cortex and determine their predictive factors. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 50 consecutive patients aged 11.1 (mean) ± 5.1 (standard deviation) years at surgery. All patients but one had a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible lesion. Resections were parietal in 40%, occipital in 32%, and parietooccipital in 28% cases; 24% patients additionally underwent a resection of the posterior border of the temporal lobe. Etiology included focal cortical dysplasia in 44%, benign tumors (dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, ganglioglioma, angiocentric glioma, and pilocystic astrocytoma) in 32%, peri- or postnatal ischemic lesions in 16%, and tuberous sclerosis in 8% cases. At last follow-up (mean 8 years, range 1.5-18 years), 60% patients remained seizure-free (Engel class I): 30% had discontinued and 20% had reduced antiepileptic drugs. Most seizure recurrences (71%) occurred within the first 6 months, and only three patients presented with seizures ≥2 years after surgery. Independent predictors of seizure recurrence included left-sided as well as parietal epileptogenic zones and resections. Longer epilepsy duration to surgery was identified as the only modifiable independent predictor of seizure recurrence. Our study demonstrates that posterior cortex epilepsy surgery is highly effective in terms of lasting seizure control and antiepileptic drug cessation in selected pediatric candidates. Most importantly, our data supports the early consideration of surgical intervention in children and adolescents with refractory posterior cortex epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Epilepsy in children with a history of febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun Ha; Eun, Baik-Lin; Eun, So-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Febrile seizure, the most common type of pediatric convulsive disorder, is a benign seizure syndrome distinct from epilepsy. However, as epilepsy is also common during childhood, we aimed to identify the prognostic factors that can predict epilepsy in children with febrile seizures. The study comprised 249 children at the Korea University Ansan Hospital who presented with febrile seizures. The relationship between the subsequent occurrence of epilepsy and clinical factors including seizure and fever-related variables were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Twenty-five patients (10.0%) had additional afebrile seizures later and were diagnosed with epilepsy. The subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in patients with a history of febrile seizures was associated with a seizure frequency of more than 10 times during the first 2 years after seizure onset (Pseizures during a febrile seizure attack (P=0.005), and epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) (P=0.008). Other factors such as the age at onset of first seizure, seizure duration, and family history of epilepsy were not associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in this study. Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. However, careful observation is needed, particularly for prediction of subsequent epileptic episodes in patients with frequent febrile seizures with known risk factors, such as developmental delay, history of preterm birth, several attacks during a febrile episode, and epileptiform discharges on EEG.

  10. Systemic focal epileptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remler, M.P.; Marcussen, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Rats that receive radiation to 0.25 cc of one cerebral hemisphere are clinically and electroencephalographically normal until there is a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at 3 to 6 months postradiation. This BBB lesion can be detected by transient focal seizure activity produced by the BBB-excluded systemic convulsant bicuculline methiodide. In two rats the seizure activity induced by this one injection was self-sustaining. In seven of 15 other rats tested, the subsequent administration of repeated 2 mg/kg injections created a chronic focus that continued to spike with great frequency for 3 weeks or more without further administration of any convulsant. In three of eight other rats, implanted minipumps delivering 180 micrograms/h of bicuculline methiodide produced self-sustaining epileptic activity.

  11. Dopey's seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

  12. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  13. Classification of clinical semiology in epileptic seizures in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Palumbo, Linda; Ghosh, Soumya

    2012-03-01

    The clinical semiology of 61 neonatal seizures with EEG correlates, in 24 babies was analysed. Most seizures (89%) had multiple features during the EEG discharge. The seizures were classified using the prominent clinical feature at onset, and all features seen during the seizure, using an extended classification scheme. Orolingual features occurred most frequently at onset (30%), whereas ocular phenomena occurred most often during the seizure (70%). Orolingual, ocular and autonomic features were seen at onset in 55% of the seizures. Seizure onsets with clonic, tonic and hypomotor features were seen in 20%, 8% and 18% respectively. Clinico-electrical correlations were as follows. The EEG discharge involved both hemispheres in 54% of all seizures, in clonic seizures this was 93%. Focal clonic seizures were associated with EEG seizure onset from the contralateral hemisphere. Majority of the clonic and hypomotor seizures had a left hemisphere ictal EEG onset. Orolingual seizures frequently started from the right hemisphere, whereas ocular and autonomic seizures arose from either hemisphere. There was no significant difference in mortality, morbidity, abnormal neuroimaging and EEG background abnormalities in babies with or without clonic seizures. This study provides insights into neuronal networks that underpin electroclinical seizures, by analysing and classifying the obvious initial clinical features and those during the seizure. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Focal cortical dysplasia - review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults.Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed - from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized.Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe.Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes.New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life.Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias.THE MOST COMMON FINDINGS ON MRI IMAGING INCLUDE: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also in both types

  15. Developmental Venous Anomaly: Benign or Not Benign

    Science.gov (United States)

    AOKI, Rie; SRIVATANAKUL, Kittipong

    2016-01-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), previously called venous angiomas, are the most frequently encountered cerebral vascular malformations. However, DVA is considered to be rather an extreme developmental anatomical variation of medullary veins than true malformation. DVAs are composed of dilated medullary veins converging centripetally into a large collecting venous system that drains into the superficial or deep venous system. Their etiology and mechanism are generally accepted that DVAs result from the focal arrest of the normal parenchymal vein development or occlusion of the medullary veins as a compensatory venous system. DVAs per se are benign and asymptomatic except for under certain unusual conditions. The pathomechanisms of symptomatic DVAs are divided into mechanical, flow-related causes, and idiopathic. However, in cases of DVAs associated with hemorrhage, cavernous malformations (CMs) are most often the cause rather than DVAs themselves. The coexistence of CM and DVA is common. There are some possibilities that DVA affects the formation and clinical course of CM because CM related to DVA is generally located within the drainage territory of DVA and is more aggressive than isolated CM in the literature. Brain parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVA and cerebral varix have also been reported. These phenomena are considered to be the result of venous hypertension associated with DVAs. With the advance of diagnostic imagings, perfusion study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that some DVAs have venous congestion pattern. Although DVAs should be considered benign and clinically silent, they can have potential venous hypertension and can be vulnerable to hemodynamic changes. PMID:27250700

  16. Evaluation of first nonfebrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilden, Jessica A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-08-15

    Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, length, and type of movements. Laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, and neuroimaging may be indicated depending on the presentation, suspected etiology, and patient's age. Electroencephalography should be performed 24 to 48 hours after a first seizure because of its substantial yield and ability to predict recurrence. Neuroimaging is recommended for adults, infants, and children who have cognitive or motor developmental delay or a focal seizure. Neuroimaging may be scheduled on an outpatient basis for patients with stable vital signs who are awake and have returned to neurologic baseline. Emergent neuroimaging should be performed in patients with persistent decreased mental status or a new focal neurologic abnormality. Although magnetic resonance imaging is generally preferred to head computed tomography because of its greater sensitivity for intracranial pathology, computed tomography should be performed if intracranial bleeding is suspected because of recent head trauma, coagulopathy, or severe headache. Treatment with an antiepileptic drug after a first seizure does not prevent epilepsy in the long term, but it decreases the short-term likelihood of a second seizure. Adults with an unremarkable neurologic examination, no comorbidities, and no known structural brain disease who have returned to neurologic baseline do not need to be started on antiepileptic therapy. Treatment decisions should weigh the benefit of decreased short-term risk of recurrence against the potential adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs.

  17. Frontal lobe epilepsy with atypical seizure semiology resembling shuddering attacks or wet dog shake seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahodova, Alena; Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Kudr, Martin; Kyncl, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Tichy, Michal

    2012-03-01

    We report a girl with a drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia, who exhibited uncommon seizures. The seizures consisted of shoulder or whole body shuddering after a short psychic aura and face grimacing. Consciousness was fully preserved. The seizures resembled "wet dog shake" seizures described in rat models of epilepsy or shuddering attacks in infants. EEG findings were inconclusive, however, MRI showed a clear dysplastic lesion in the right frontal mesial and polar structures. The patient underwent an extended lesionectomy guided by neuronavigation and intraoperative electrocorticography. Focal cortical dysplasia type Ib was histologically confirmed and the patient has been seizure-free for the three years following resection. [Published with video sequences].

  18. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  19. Febrile seizures: A review for family physicians

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common cause of convulsions in children. Most are simple in nature, although those with focal onset, prolonged duration (³15 min) or those that recur within 24 h or within the same febrile illness are considered complex. Diagnosis of this condition is essentially clinical and based on its description provided by parents. Its pathophysiology remains unclear, but genetics plays a major role in conferring susceptibility. Although most febrile seizures are ben...

  20. Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as focal cortical dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. O'Rourke

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare syndrome characterized by intractable seizures, often associated with epilepsia partialis continua and symptoms of progressive hemispheric dysfunction. Seizures are usually the hallmark of presentation, but antiepileptic drug treatment fails in most patients and is ineffective against epilepsia partialis continua, which often requires surgical intervention. Co-occurrence of focal cortical dysplasia has only rarely been described and may have implications regarding pathophysiology and management. We describe a rare case of dual pathology of Rasmussen's encephalitis presenting as a focal cortical dysplasia (FCD and discuss the literature on this topic.

  1. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... born in Denmark between January 1977 and December 1986 was followed until December 2001 by using data from nationwide registries. RESULTS: We followed 558,958 persons including 16,429 with a history of febrile seizures for 2.8 million person-years and identified 952 persons who were diagnosed...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...

  2. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia......BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...

  3. Controlling Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  4. Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical facility for diagnosis and treatment. Call an ambulance if the seizure is less than 5 minutes but the child does not seem to be recovering quickly. Gradually place the child on a protected surface such as the floor or ground to prevent accidental injury. Do not restrain or ...

  5. Gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, René Andrade; Astencio, Adriana Goicoechea

    2012-01-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a patient with gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe. Our patient, an 8-year-old girl, underwent interictal video/EEG monitoring and MRI. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic spikes and waves in the left parietal lobe. MRI revealed the characteristic features of focal cortical dysplasia. Our findings suggest that the left parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke Steensbjerre; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated w...

  7. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H G; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; Van Kempen, Marjan J A; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associa

  8. Hemorrhagc focal nodular hyperplasia in young men: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Hyun; Kwon, Hee Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Yeong; Nam, Kyung Jin; Roh, Young Hoon; Jeong, Jin Sook [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In general, focal nodular hyperplasia is a hepatic lesion that most frequently affects the healthy women of reproductive age. Focal nodular hyperplasia lesions have a benign natural course; the majority of the cases remain asymptomatic and complications are rare. Spontaneous hemorrhage of focal nodular hyperplasia is a rare disease, and the hemorrhage in young men is even more uncommon. We report a rare case of spontaneous hemorrhage of focal nodular hyperplasia in a 19-year-old man.

  9. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less. We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  10. Cognitive deficits in children with benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood or rolandic discharges: a study of children between 4 and 7 years of age with and without seizures compared with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Julia; Petermann, Franz

    2009-12-01

    Recent developments in research on cognitive abilities in benign rolandic epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes have led to interest in the following domains: language, memory, executive, motor, and visual-constructive functions. As previous studies have investigated the cognitive development of mainly school-aged children, this study focuses on preschool and elementary school children. Twenty-five children affected by benign rolandic epilepsy/rolandic discharges and 25 healthy children matched for age and sex were enrolled in this retrospective study. The mean IQ scores were 94.76 for children with epilepsy and 99.3 for control children. For the children with benign rolandic epilepsy, cognitive testing revealed increased verbal and nonverbal deficits with respect to articulation (P=0.002), auditory memory (P=0.003), visual memory (P=0.016), language comprehension (P=0.009), and visual-constructive performance (P=0.033), as compared with the children in the control group. In our sample, the results showed an association between rolandic epilepsy and language and memory deficits. As cognitive development in preschool children is progressive and dynamic, larger prospective follow-up studies, with assessments at different time points, will facilitate understanding of the cognitive profiles of children with rolandic epilepsy.

  11. Benign occipital epilepsy of childhood: Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a 3 year old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Narayanankutty Sunilkumar , Vadakut Krishnan Parvathy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS is a relatively frequent and benign epileptic syndrome seen in children in the age group of 3-6 years and is characterised by predominantly autonomic symptoms and/or simple motor focal seizures followed or not by impairment of consciousness. Although multifocal spikes with high amplitude sharp-slow wave complexes at various locations can be present in the EEG, interictal electroencephalogram (EEG in children with this particular type of epilepsy characteristically shows occipital spikes. This syndrome has known to be a masquerader and can imitate gastroenteritis, encephalitis, syncope, migraine, sleep disorders or metabolic diseases. In the absence of thorough knowledge of types of benign epilepsy syndromes and their various clinical presentations, epilepsy such as PS can be easily missed. The peculiar aspects of this type of epilepsy in children should be known not only by paediatricians but also by general doctors because a correct diagnosis would avoid aggressive interventions and concerns on account of its benign outcome. In this case study, we report a case of PS in a 3 year old child.

  12. Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; D'Souza, Carol; French, Jacqueline A; Haut, Sheryl R; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Somerville, Ernest; Sperling, Michael; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    This companion paper to the introduction of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2017 classification of seizure types provides guidance on how to employ the classification. Illustration of the classification is enacted by tables, a glossary of relevant terms, mapping of old to new terms, suggested abbreviations, and examples. Basic and extended versions of the classification are available, depending on the desired degree of detail. Key signs and symptoms of seizures (semiology) are used as a basis for categories of seizures that are focal or generalized from onset or with unknown onset. Any focal seizure can further be optionally characterized by whether awareness is retained or impaired. Impaired awareness during any segment of the seizure renders it a focal impaired awareness seizure. Focal seizures are further optionally characterized by motor onset signs and symptoms: atonic, automatisms, clonic, epileptic spasms, or hyperkinetic, myoclonic, or tonic activity. Nonmotor-onset seizures can manifest as autonomic, behavior arrest, cognitive, emotional, or sensory dysfunction. The earliest prominent manifestation defines the seizure type, which might then progress to other signs and symptoms. Focal seizures can become bilateral tonic-clonic. Generalized seizures engage bilateral networks from onset. Generalized motor seizure characteristics comprise atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic, tonic, or tonic-clonic. Nonmotor (absence) seizures are typical or atypical, or seizures that present prominent myoclonic activity or eyelid myoclonia. Seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified as motor, nonmotor, tonic-clonic, epileptic spasms, or behavior arrest. This "users' manual" for the ILAE 2017 seizure classification will assist the adoption of the new system. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Differentiation between focal malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of the spine with T2{sup *}-corrected fat-signal fraction map using a three -echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo dixon sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Kim, Sung Jun; Chung, Tae Sub; Yoo, Yeon Hwa; Yoon, Choon Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kanneengiesser, Stephan [MR Applications Development, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Paek, Moon Young [Siemens Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Taek; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the feasibility of T2{sup *}-corrected fat-signal fraction (FF) map by using the three-echo volume interpolated breath-hold gradient echo (VIBE) Dixon sequence to differentiate between malignant marrow-replacing lesions and benign red marrow deposition of vertebrae. We assessed 32 lesions from 32 patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging after being referred for assessment of a known or possible vertebral marrow abnormality. The lesions were divided into 21 malignant marrow-replacing lesions and 11 benign red marrow depositions. Three sequences for the parameter measurements were obtained by using a 1.5-T MR imaging scanner as follows: three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence for FF; conventional T1-weighted imaging for the lesion-disc ratio (LDR); pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images for the contrast-enhancement ratio (CER). A region of interest was drawn for each lesion for parameter measurements. The areas under the curve (AUC) of the parameters and their sensitivities and specificities at the most ideal cutoff values from receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were obtained. AUC, sensitivity, and specificity were respectively compared between FF and CER. The AUCs of FF, LDR, and CER were 0.96, 0.80, and 0.72, respectively. In the comparison of diagnostic performance between the FF and CER, the FF showed a significantly larger AUC as compared to the CER (p = 0.030), although the difference of sensitivity (p = 0.157) and specificity (p = 0.157) were not significant. Fat-signal fraction measurement using T2{sup *}-corrected three-echo VIBE Dixon sequence is feasible and has a more accurate diagnostic performance, than the CER, in distinguishing benign red marrow deposition from malignant bone marrow-replacing lesions.

  14. Cognitive and other neuropsychological profiles in children with newly diagnosed benign rolandic epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonhak Kwon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; Although benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE is a benign condition, it may be associated with a spectrum of behavioral, psychiatric, and cognitive disorders. This study aimed to assess the cognitive and other neuropsychological profiles of children with BRE. &lt;B&gt;Methods:&lt;/B&gt; In total, 23 children with BRE were consecutively recruited. All children underwent sleep electroencephalography (EEG and were assessed on a battery of comprehensive neuropsychological tests including the Korean versions of the Wechsler intelligence scale for children III, frontal executive neuropsychological test, rey complex figure test, Wisconsin card sorting test, attention deficit diagnostic scale, and child behavior checklist scale. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/B&gt; The study subjects included 13 boys and 10 girls aged 9.0±1.6 years. Our subjects showed an average monthly seizure frequency of 0.9±0.7, and a majority of them had focal seizures (70%. The spike index (frequency/min was 4.1±5.3 (right and 13.1±15.9 (left. Of the 23 subjects, 9 showed frequent spikes (&gt;10/min on the EEG. The subjects had normal cognitive and frontal executive functions, memory, and other neuropsychological sub-domain scores, even though 8 children (35% showed some evidence of learning difficulties, attention deficits, and aggressive behavior. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; Our data have limited predictive value; however, these data demonstrate that although BRE appears to be benign at the onset, children with BRE might develop cognitive, behavioral, and other psychiatric disorders during the active phase of epilepsy, and these problems may even outlast the BRE. Therefore, we recommend scrupulous follow-up for children with BRE.

  15. Extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Shoryabi, Ali; Adhami, Shahrzad; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda

    2010-01-01

    Heck's disease or focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign contagious disease caused by human papillomavirus types 13 or 32. It occurs with low frequency in the Iranian population. This condition is characterized by the occurrence of multiple, small papules or nodules in the oral cavity, especially on the labial and buccal mucosa and tongue. In some populations, up to 39% of children are affected. Conservative surgical excision of lesions may be performed for diagnostic or aesthetic purposes. The risk of recurrence after this therapy is minimal, and there seems to be no malignant transformation potential. In the present work, we presented the clinical case of a 12-year-old Iranian girl with oral lesions that clinically and histologically correspond to Heck's disease.

  16. Hyperkinetic motor seizures: a common semiology generated by two different cortical seizure origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaugier, Lisa; McGonigal, Aileen; Lagarde, Stanislas; Trébuchon, Agnes; Szurhaj, William; Derambure, Philippe; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2017-08-22

    We report a 37-year-old, right-handed patient with drug-resistant focal epilepsy whose seizures were characterized by explosive hyperkinetic behaviour. Video-SEEG revealed bifocal organization of epilepsy with two distinct cortical origins of seizures: the right temporal pole and left temporal lateral and perisylvian cortex. Irrespective of the cortical pattern of seizure onset, the hyperkinetic semiology was extremely similar. This supports a major role for "final common pathway" subcortical circuits in the genesis of the hyperkinetic semiology in this patient.

  17. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  18. Benign positional vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; BPPV: dizziness- positional ... Benign positional vertigo is also called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). It is caused by a problem in the inner ear. ...

  19. "Focal thyroid inferno" on color Doppler ultrasonography: a specific feature of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xianshui; Guo, Limei; Zhang, Huabin; Ran, Weiqiang; Fu, Peng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Wen; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Jinrui; Jia, Jianwen

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate color-Doppler features predictive of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A total of 521 patients with 561 thyroid nodules that underwent surgeries or gun biopsies were included in this study. These nodules were divided into three groups: focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (104 nodules in 101 patients), benignity other than focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (73 nodules in 70 patients), and malignancy (358 nodules in 350 patients). On color Doppler sonography, four vascularity types were determined as: hypovascularity, marked internal flow, marked peripheral flow and focal thyroid inferno. The χ2 test was performed to seek the potential vascularity type with the predictive ability of certain thyroid pathology. Furthermore, the gray-scale features of each nodule were also studied. The vascularity type I (hypovascularity) was more often seen in focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis than other benignity and malignancy (46% vs. 20.5% and 19%). While the type II (marked internal flow) showed the opposite tendency (26.9% [focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis] vs. 45.2% [other benignity] and 52.8% [malignancy]). However, type III (marked peripheral flow) was unable to predict any thyroid pathology. Importantly, type IV (focal thyroid inferno) was exclusive to focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. All 8 type IV nodules appeared to be solid, hypoechoic, and well-defined. Using "focal thyroid inferno" as an indicator of FHT, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 7.7% and 100% respectively. The vascularity type of "focal thyroid inferno" is specific for focal Hashimoto thyroiditis. Recognition of this particular feature may avoid unnecessary interventional procedures for some solid hypoechoic thyroid nodules suspicious of malignancy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuro-inflammation, blood-brain barrier, seizures and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theoharides Theoharis C

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many children with Autism Spectrum Diseases (ASD present with seizure activity, but the pathogenesis is not understood. Recent evidence indicates that neuro-inflammation could contribute to seizures. We hypothesize that brain mast cell activation due to allergic, environmental and/or stress triggers could lead to focal disruption of the blood-brain barrier and neuro-inflammation, thus contributing to the development of seizures. Treating neuro-inflammation may be useful when anti-seizure medications are ineffective.

  1. Safety Profile of Eslicarbazepine Acetate as Add-On Therapy in Adults with Refractory Focal-Onset Seizures: From Clinical Studies to 6 Years of Post-Marketing Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Helena; Vieira, Mariana; Costa, Raquel; Graça, Joana; Magalhães, Luís M; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2017-07-27

    Eslicarbazepine acetate was first approved in the European Union in 2009 as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. The objective of this study was to review the safety profile of eslicarbazepine acetate analyzing the data from several clinical studies to 6 years of post-marketing surveillance. We used a post-hoc pooled safety analysis of four phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (BIA-2093-301, -302, -303, -304) of eslicarbazepine acetate as add-on therapy in adults. Safety data of eslicarbazepine acetate in special populations of patients aged ≥65 years with partial-onset seizures (BIA-2093-401) and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (BIA-2093-111) and renal impairment (BIA-2093-112) are also considered. The incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and serious adverse events were analyzed. The global safety database of eslicarbazepine acetate was analyzed for all cases from post-marketing surveillance from 1 October, 2009 to 21 October, 2015. From a pooled analysis of four phase III studies, it was concluded that the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and adverse drug reactions were dose dependent. Dizziness, somnolence, headache, and nausea were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥10% of patients) and the majority were of mild-to-moderate intensity. No dose-dependent trend was observed for serious adverse events and individual serious adverse events were reported in less than 1% of patients. Hyponatremia was classified as a possibly related treatment-emergent adverse event in phase III studies (1.2%); however, after 6 years of post-marketing surveillance it represents the most frequently (10.2%) reported adverse drug reaction, with more than half of these cases occurring with eslicarbazepine acetate at

  2. Outcomes of resective surgery in children and adolescents with focal lesional epilepsy: The experience of a tertiary epilepsy center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Kurt, Gokhan; Erdem, Atilla; Capraz, Irem; Bilir, Erhan; Vural, Ozge; Ucar, Murat; Oner, Ali Yusuf; Onal, Baran; Akdemir, Ozgur; Atay, Ozlem; Arhan, Ebru; Aydin, Kursad

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of resective surgery in children with focal lesional epilepsy by evaluating the predictive value of pre- and postsurgical factors in terms of seizure freedom. This study included 61 children aged between 2 and 18years who were admitted to the pediatric video-EEG unit for presurgical workup. Each patient was evaluated with a detailed history, video-EEG, neuroimaging, and postsurgical outcomes according to Engel classification to predict postsurgical seizure freedom. All the possible factors including history, etiology, presurgical evaluation, surgical procedures, and postsurgical results were analyzed for their predictive value for postoperative seizure freedom. Of the 61 patients, 75% were diagnosed as having temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), and 25% were diagnosed with extra-TLE. Two years after the surgery, 78.6% were seizure-free, of which 89% had TLE, and 50% had extra-TLE (pseizure freedom if they had rare seizure frequency, focal EEG findings, and focal seizures; had a temporal epileptogenic zone; or had TLE and hippocampal sclerosis. On the other hand, patients were more likely to have unfavorable results for seizure freedom if they had younger age of seizure onset, frequent seizures before the surgery, a frontal or multilobar epileptogenic zone, secondarily generalized seizures, extra-TLE with frontal lobe surgery, or focal cortical dysplasia. Resective surgery is one of the most effective treatment methods in children with intractable epilepsy. A history of young age of seizure onset, frequent seizures before surgery, secondarily generalized seizures, a multilobar epileptogenic zone, frontal lobe surgery, and focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) are the most important predictive factors indicating that a patient would continue having seizures after surgery. On the other hand, focal seizure semiologies, temporal lobe localization, and hippocampal sclerosis indicate that a patient would have better results in terms of

  3. Seizure characteristics in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Shaygannejad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate seizure characteristic among multiple sclerosis patients with coexistent seizure activity compared to control group. Materials and Methods : This study is a cross-sectional study which was conducted by reviewing the clinical records of patients with definite diagnosis of MS according to McDonald′s criteria from March 2007 to June 2011, who referred to the MS clinic of the university. Results : A total of 920 patients with a diagnosis of MS were identified, among whom 29 patients (3.15% with seizure activity (case due to MS with the mean age of 32.6 ± 6.23 years were analyzed. Also, fifty MS patients without any seizure occurrence with the mean age of 33.7 ± 7.4 years were used as our control group. In case group, seizure was general tonic clonic in 23 patients (79.3%, complex partial in four (13.8%, and simple partial in two (5.9%. The 26 available interictal EEGs in MS patients showed abnormal EEG pattern in 22 (84.6% of them, including focal epileptic form discharge or focal slowing in 10 (38.5%, generalized discharge (spike-wave, polyspike, or general paroxysmal fast activity in 10 (38.5%, and general slowing activity in 10 record (38.5%. MRI reviews of the 26 available brain MRIs showed subcortical white mater lesions in 22 (84.6% of patients with seizure. All MRIs were performed within one month after the first seizure episode. Amongst 48 available MRIs in our control group, 91.7% (44 cases showed periventricular lesions and in 8.3% (4 cases subcortical white matter lesions were reported. Conclusion : The result of this study demonstrated the higher rate of subcortical whit matter lesion in MS patients with seizure occurrence compared to control group.

  4. Seizures in horses: diagnosis and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacombe VA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Véronique A Lacombe Department of Physiological Sciences, Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Stillwater, OK, USA Abstract: Seizures are a diverse and very common set of chronic neurologic disorders in humans and dogs but are less common in horses. Seizures refer to a specific clinical event (described as sudden and severe regardless of the etiology, which includes both intracranial and extracranial causes. Therefore, after briefly reviewing some definitions, this article aims to describe the use of a standardized classification, which could facilitate a logical approach for the clinician to establish a diagnosis, as well as to use a consistent mode of communication. For instance, seizures can be classified by type (ie, focal vs generalized or etiology (ie, reactive, symptomatic, cryptogenic, idiopathic. In particular, epilepsy, a brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures can be classified as primary (ie, genetic origin or secondary (ie, acquired. This review further discusses the limitations associated with the clinical workup of horses with seizures. This is germane to the fact that the identification of the underlying cause remains challenging due to the technical limitations of imaging the equine adult brain. Indeed, as in man and dogs, epilepsies of unknown cause (ie, cryptogenic account for the majority of all epilepsies. Therefore, although electroencephalography and advanced brain imaging techniques (eg, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are becoming increasingly available, information obtained from the history, physical, and neurologic examinations and progression of clinical signs and response to treatment remain essential in the workup of horses with seizures. Keywords: focal seizure, generalized seizure, symptomatic, cryptogenic, electroencephalography, computed tomography

  5. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

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    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  6. Focal epithelial hyperplasia caused by human papillomavirus 13.

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    Saunders, Natasha R; Scolnik, Dennis; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Koelink, Eric; Craw, Lindsey; Roth, Sherryn; Aronson, Leya; Perusini, Stephen; Silverman, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign, papulo-nodular disease of the oral cavity. It is rare, affecting primarily Native American populations during childhood. It is closely associated with human papillomavirus 13 and 32. This report describes the diagnosis of 2 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in children from southern Guyana. The diagnosis was made using clinical criteria, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing.

  7. Focal cortical dysplasia – review

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    Kabat, Joanna; Król, Przemysław

    2012-01-01

    Summary Focal cortical dysplasia is a malformation of cortical development, which is the most common cause of medically refractory epilepsy in the pediatric population and the second/third most common etiology of medically intractable seizures in adults. Both genetic and acquired factors are involved in the pathogenesis of cortical dysplasia. Numerous classifications of the complex structural abnormalities of focal cortical dysplasia have been proposed – from Taylor et al. in 1971 to the last modification of Palmini classification made by Blumcke in 2011. In general, three types of cortical dysplasia are recognized. Type I focal cortical dysplasia with mild symptomatic expression and late onset, is more often seen in adults, with changes present in the temporal lobe. Clinical symptoms are more severe in type II of cortical dysplasia usually seen in children. In this type, more extensive changes occur outside the temporal lobe with predilection for the frontal lobes. New type III is one of the above dysplasias with associated another principal lesion as hippocampal sclerosis, tumor, vascular malformation or acquired pathology during early life. Brain MRI imaging shows abnormalities in the majority of type II dysplasias and in only some of type I cortical dysplasias. The most common findings on MRI imaging include: focal cortical thickening or thinning, areas of focal brain atrophy, blurring of the gray-white junction, increased signal on T2- and FLAIR-weighted images in the gray and subcortical white matter often tapering toward the ventricle. On the basis of the MRI findings, it is possible to differentiate between type I and type II cortical dysplasia. A complete resection of the epileptogenic zone is required for seizure-free life. MRI imaging is very helpful to identify those patients who are likely to benefit from surgical treatment in a group of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. However, in type I cortical dysplasia, MR imaging is often normal, and also

  8. Can Seizure-Alert Dogs predict seizures?

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    Brown, Stephen W; Goldstein, Laura H

    2011-12-01

    An index observation where a dog was trained to alert to, as well as respond to, human tonic-clonic seizures led to further research and refinement of training techniques. This was followed by anecdotal reports of pet dogs spontaneously anticipating human epileptic seizures. An industry has since developed training Seizure-Alert Dogs (SADs) to give humans warnings of their seizures. In some cases this has been accompanied by a reduction in seizure frequency. SADs may be trained along with the person with epilepsy, responding specifically to that person's seizures, or may be trained separately. Recent sceptical reports of non-epileptic seizures in some people with SADs have cast doubt on dogs' ability to anticipate true epileptic seizures. This may reflect selection criteria for training programmes as well as training methods used, but does not necessarily indicate that SADs might not be able to predict epileptic seizures. Whether the seizures are epileptic or non-epileptic, it is speculated that SADs probably alert to subtle pre-ictal human behaviour changes, but may also be sensitive to heart rate or olfactory cues. As yet, however, no rigorous data exist as to whether seizure prediction by SADS is better than chance, and what false positive and negative prediction rates might be.

  9. Does semiology tell us the origin of seizures consisting mainly of an alteration in consciousness?

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    Baykan, Betül; Altindag, Ebru; Feddersen, Berend; Ozel, Sevda; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2011-08-01

    Studies on seizures only with an alteration of consciousness were limited mainly to generalized epilepsy. This seizure type has been described rarely in focal epilepsy. We aimed to analyze the semiologic features of this seizure type in focal and generalized epilepsies in a blinded design. A total of 338 seizure videos in 100 patients were included exclusively by semiologic criteria. Two investigators evaluated the seizure semiology (aura, seizure duration, blinking, mild motor phenomena including automatisms, and so on) from the videos. Primarily the ictal electroencephalography (EEGs) studies and all laboratory findings were evaluated for the localization of the epileptogenic zone and delineating the syndromes, in the second step. Of the focal epilepsy patients (n = 57), the epileptogenic zone could be localized to the temporal (n = 20), frontal (n = 9), and parietooccipital (n = 3) regions. The most common etiology of the generalized epilepsy patients (n = 43) was presumably genetic (n = 33). The presence of aura (none in generalized epilepsy vs. 35% in focal epilepsy; p = 0.0008), lack of blinking (19.3% in focal vs 65.1% in generalized epilepsy; p = 0.01), and longer seizure duration (generalized 14.3 ± 17.7 s vs focal 54.9 ± 40.1 s; p semiologic and clinical features that help to differentiate between focal and generalized epilepsy should be considered in the syndrome diagnosis. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. 超声造影在肝脏局灶性病灶良恶性肿瘤鉴别诊断中的应用价值%Application Value of Ultrasonic Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Liver Focal Benign and Malignant Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付华伟; 刘发生; 冯晓曦; 江华

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨在肝脏局灶性良恶性肿瘤鉴别诊断中超声造影技术的应用价值。方法回顾性分析91例接受超声造影检查的肝脏肿瘤患者93个病灶的临床诊断资料,对肝脏不同病变的超声造影表现情况进行比较。结果在本次研究中,共有89个超声造影结果准确,诊断率为95.7%。在93个肝脏肿瘤病灶中,有78个恶性肿瘤病灶,有15个良性肿瘤病灶。超声造影回声增强程度、增强均匀度、消退快慢和增强快慢在肝脏良恶性肿瘤中存在统计学差异(P<0.05)。在本次研究中,有肝转移癌( metastatic liver carcinoma ,MLC)病灶26个,有肝细胞癌( hepato cellular carcinoma , HCC)病灶52个,HCC和MLC在超声造影增强程度和增强均匀度上差异明显(P<0.05),在增强快慢和消退快慢上无明显差异(P>0.05)。结论在肝脏良恶性肿瘤的鉴别中超声造影有很重要的应用价值。%Objective To study the value of contrast-enhanced ultreasonography in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignancy tumors of focal liver .Methods Retrospective analysis of clinical diagnosis materials of 93 focal lesions in 91 pa-tients of with liver cancer were conducted ,ultrasonic imaging of liver lesions in different situation were compared .Results After contrast-enhanced ultrasound diagnosis to all lesions ,89 lesions with contrast-enhanced ultrasound results satisfied ,diagnostic rate was 95.7%.In 93 liver cancer lesions,there were 78 malignant lesions and 15 benign lesions,there were significant differences in contrast-enhanced ultrasound echo enhancement degree ,enhance evenness ,subside speed and increase speed between benign and malignant tumors of the liver (P0.05).Conclusion Contrast-enhanced ultrasound has important value in the identification of benign and malignant liver tumors.

  11. EFFICACY OF RUFINAMIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT FOCAL EPILEPSIES IN PAEDIATRIC PRACTICE

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    I. O. Shchederkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among drug-resistant epilepsies, epileptic syndromes, characterized by combination of several types of seizures, are considered to be the most difficult in terms of treatment. Lennox–Gastaut syndrome is one of them. It manifests with polymorphic seizures (tonic axial, myatonic, atypical absence seizures, status epilepticus of minor motor seizures, myoclonic, generalized convulsive, and focal seizures. This is a heterogeneous disease, represented by a complex of clinical and electroencephalographic manifestations with various etiology. Current review is devoted to a novel antiepileptic drug rufinamide, which has a new mechanism of action. The drug has been registered in Russia in 2015. The authors also describe their own experience of rufinamide usage in the treatment of drug-resistant focal epilepsy as a part of multicomponent therapy for polymorphic seizures. One patient achieved clinical remission for 16 months; the second one had more than 50 % decrease in seizures frequency with a remission of drop-attacks.

  12. Focal status epilepticus as atypical presentation of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

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    Yoshii, Akira; Takeoka, Masanori; Kelly, Peter J; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpahty S

    2005-08-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy usually presents in the neonatal period or even in utero, is refractory to antiepileptic medications, and is treatable with lifelong administration of pyridoxine. The seizures are typically generalized tonic-clonic, although myoclonic seizures or infantile spasms have been described. We report an infant who presented at 5 months of age with a right-sided clonic seizure with fever. Subsequently, she had recurrent right focal or generalized seizures despite sequential treatment with various antiepileptic medications. At 7 months, she was hospitalized with status epilepticus, which was finally controlled with pyridoxine. After she became seizure free, she continued to have a strong left arm preference with mild weakness of the right arm and delayed language skill. Eventually, she outgrew these symptoms. This case illustrates that pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, although rare, must be included in the differential diagnosis of focal seizures, especially when the seizures are refractory to traditional antiepileptic drugs.

  13. Febrile Seizures: Four Steps Algorithmic Clinical Approach

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    Mahmoud Mohammadi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures (FS are the most common form of convulsive phenomena in human being and affect 2% to 14% of children. It is the most common type of seizures that every pediatrician is dealing with. It is the most benign type of all seizures occurring in childhood. There are many debates on how to approach to febrile seizures in pediatric neurology and there are many possible malpractices in this field. Some of the most common frequent queries are -How could we differentiate FS from seizures and fever associated with serious infections involving the central nervous system? - When should we refer the affected child for further investigations such as lumbar puncture, EEG, neuroimaging, and routine biochemical studies? - How should we treat FS in its acute phase? - How could we assess the risk for further recurrences as well as other risks threatening the childs health in future? - How could we select the patients for treatment or prophylaxis? - Which medication(s should be selected for treatment or prophylaxis? Trying to answer the above-mentioned questions, this review article will present a four steps algorithmic clinical approach model to a child with febrile seizures based on the current medical literature.

  14. Febrile Seizures: Four Steps Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common form of convulsive phenomena in human being and affect 2% to 14% of children. It is the most common type of seizures that every pediatrician is dealing with. It is the most benign type of all seizures occurring in childhood. There are many debates on how to approach to febrile seizures in pediatric neurology and there are many possible malpractices in this field. Some of the most common frequent queries areHow could we differentiate FS from seizures and fever associated with serious infections involving the central nervous system?When should we refer the affected child for further investigations such as lumbar puncture, EEG, neuroimaging, and routine biochemical studies?How should we treat FS in its acute phase?How could we assess the risk for further recurrences as well as other risks threatening the child's health in future?How could we select the patients for treatment or prophylaxis?Which medication(s) should be selected for treatment or prophylaxis? Trying to answer the above-mentioned questions, this review article will present a four steps algorithmic clinical approach model to a child with febrile seizures based on the current medical literature. PMID:23056677

  15. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease

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    Parichehr Gheliani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck is a rare lesion caused by human papilloma virus subtype 13 or 32 and presents as multiple small white or pink papules on the mucosal surface of lips, buccal mucosa and tongue usually seen in children and adolescent of American Indian and Eskimo background. This disease has a genetic basis. The site of new lesions and recurrence are unpredictable. Continued follow up of the patient is often necessary. In this report, a 50-year-old woman is described with benign papillomatous lesions on dorsal surface of tongue for 15 years

  16. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  17. Sex Differences in Seizure Types and Symptoms

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    Carlson, Chad; Dugan, Patricia; Kirsch, Heidi E; Friedman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing interest in sex differences in disease manifestations and responses to treatment, very few data are available on sex differences in seizure types and semiology. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative study that aims to create a comprehensive repository of detailed clinical information and DNA samples from a large cohort of people with epilepsy. We used this well-characterized cohort to explore differences in seizure types as well as focal seizure symptoms between males and females. Methods We reviewed the EPGP database and identified individuals with generalized epilepsy of unknown etiology (GE) (n=760; female 446, male 314), non-acquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) (n=476; female 245, male 231), or both (n=64; female 33, male 31). Demographic data along with characterization of seizure type and focal seizure semiologies were examined. Results In GE, males reported atonic seizures more frequently than females (6.5% vs. 1.7%; p<0.001). No differences were observed in other generalized seizure types. In NAFE, no sex differences were seen for seizure types with or without alteration of consciousness or progression to secondary generalization. Autonomic (16.4% vs. 26.6%; p=0.005), psychic (26.7% vs. 40.3%; p=0.001), and visual symptoms (10.3% vs. 19.9%; p=0.002) were more frequently reported in females than males. Specifically, of psychic symptoms, more females than males endorsed déjà vu (p=0.001), but not forced thoughts, derealization/depersonalization, jamais vu, or fear. With corrections for multiple comparisons, there were no significant differences in aphasic, motor, somatosensory, gustatory, olfactory, auditory, vertiginous, or ictal headache symptoms between sexes. Conclusions Significant differences between the sexes were observed in the reporting of atonic seizures, which was more common in males with GE, and for autonomic, visual, and psychic symptoms associated with NAFE

  18. Neurodiagnostic Evaluation of a Child with First Complex Febrile Seizure

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    Arpita S Thakker

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile seizure is the most common type of childhood seizure and complex febrile seizure has been associated with the risk of epilepsy. The neurodiagnostic evaluation of a child with first CFS is still unclear. Aim & Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and diagnostic evaluation of children aged 1 month to 5 years presenting with first Complex Febrile Seizure (CFS and to determine the utility of various investigations in a case of first CFS. Material and Methods: A prospective study was conducted in the pediatric department of a tertiary hospital. Fortynine children aged 1 month-5 years with first CFS fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study over duration of 8-months. All the cases were evaluated with complete blood count, serum calcium, serum electrolytes, Electroencephalography (EEG, CT/MRI and lumbar puncture. Results: The investigation results were analyzed with respect to different CFS parameter like type of seizure (focal or generalized and duration of seizure(less than or more than 15 minutes. Upper respiratory tract infection is the main cause of febrile seizure. The duration of CFS did not vary according to the underlying cause. Serum calcium levels are found to be lower in children with complex febrile seizure. All children with CFS, whether focal or multiple generalized, whether of long or short duration, had a normal EEG. Children who had prolonged focal and multiple generalized seizures had abnormal neuroimaging but it was not statistically significant. Conclusion: We conclude from our study that a child with first CFS may not need EEG and neuroimaging as a diagnostic evaluation test. Hypocalcemia can be identified in these children and can be corrected to stop the seizure. Further studies are needed on a large series of children with first CFS to form guidelines for their neurodiagnostic evaluation.

  19. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge.

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    Khair, Abdulhafeez M; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes.

  20. Mapping preictal networks preceding childhood absence seizures using magnetoencephalography.

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    Jacobs-Brichford, Eliza; Horn, Paul S; Tenney, Jeffrey R

    2014-10-01

    The electrographic hallmark of childhood absence seizures is 3 Hz generalized spike and wave discharges; however, there is likely a focal thalamic or cortical onset that cannot be detected using scalp electroencephalography (EEG). The purpose of this study was to study the earliest preictal changes in children with absence epilepsy. In this report, magnetoencephalography recordings of 44 absence seizures recorded from 12 children with drug-naïve childhood absence seizures were used to perform time frequency analysis and source localization prior to the onset of the seizures. Evidence of preictal magnetoencephalography frequency changes were detected a mean of 694 ms before the initial spike on the EEG. A consistent pattern of focal sources was present in the frontal cortex and thalamus during this preictal period, but source localization occurred synchronously so that independent activity between the 2 structures could not be distinguished.

  1. Early postnatal EEG features of perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke with seizures.

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    Evonne Low

    Full Text Available Stroke is the second most common cause of seizures in term neonates and is associated with abnormal long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in some cases.To aid diagnosis earlier in the postnatal period, our aim was to describe the characteristic EEG patterns in term neonates with perinatal arterial ischaemic stroke (PAIS seizures.Retrospective observational study.Neonates >37 weeks born between 2003 and 2011 in two hospitals.Continuous multichannel video-EEG was used to analyze the background patterns and characteristics of seizures. Each EEG was assessed for continuity, symmetry, characteristic features and sleep cycling; morphology of electrographic seizures was also examined. Each seizure was categorized as electrographic-only or electroclinical; the percentage of seizure events for each seizure type was also summarized.Nine neonates with PAIS seizures and EEG monitoring were identified. While EEG continuity was present in all cases, the background pattern showed suppression over the infarcted side; this was quite marked (>50% amplitude reduction when the lesion was large. Characteristic unilateral bursts of theta activity with sharp or spike waves intermixed were seen in all cases. Sleep cycling was generally present but was more disturbed over the infarcted side. Seizures demonstrated a characteristic pattern; focal sharp waves/spike-polyspikes were seen at frequency of 1-2 Hz and phase reversal over the central region was common. Electrographic-only seizure events were more frequent compared to electroclinical seizure events (78 vs 22%.Focal electrographic and electroclinical seizures with ipsilateral suppression of the background activity and focal sharp waves are strong indicators of PAIS. Approximately 80% of seizure events were the result of clinically unsuspected seizures in neonates with PAIS. Prolonged and continuous multichannel video-EEG monitoring is advocated for adequate seizure surveillance.

  2. Prevalence and risk factors of seizure clusters in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baibing; Choi, Hyunmi; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Katz, Austen; Legge, Alexander; Wong, Rebecca A; Jiang, Alfred; Kato, Kenneth; Buchsbaum, Richard; Detyniecki, Kamil

    2017-07-01

    In the current study, we explored the prevalence of physician-confirmed seizure clusters. We also investigated potential clinical factors associated with the occurrence of seizure clusters overall and by epilepsy type. We reviewed medical records of 4116 adult (≥16years old) outpatients with epilepsy at our centers for documentation of seizure clusters. Variables including patient demographics, epilepsy details, medical and psychiatric history, AED history, and epilepsy risk factors were then tested against history of seizure clusters. Patients were then divided into focal epilepsy, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), or symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), and the same analysis was run. Overall, seizure clusters were independently associated with earlier age of seizure onset, symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), central nervous system (CNS) infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, absence of 1-year seizure freedom, and having failed 2 or more AEDs (Pseizure clusters than patients with focal epilepsy (16.3%) and IGE (7.4%; all Pepilepsy type showed that absence of 1-year seizure freedom since starting treatment at one of our centers was associated with seizure clustering in patients across all 3 epilepsy types. In patients with SGE, clusters were associated with perinatal/congenital brain injury. In patients with focal epilepsy, clusters were associated with younger age of seizure onset, complex partial seizures, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus, CNS infection, and having failed 2 or more AEDs. In patients with IGE, clusters were associated with presence of an aura. Only 43.5% of patients with seizure clusters were prescribed rescue medications. Patients with intractable epilepsy are at a higher risk of developing seizure clusters. Factors such as having SGE, CNS infection, cortical dysplasia, status epilepticus or an early seizure onset, can also independently increase one's chance of having seizure clusters. Copyright © 2017. Published

  3. On the nature of seizure dynamics

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    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  4. On the nature of seizure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Viktor K; Stacey, William C; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between 'normal' and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical

  5. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: Position Paper of the ILAE Commission for Classification and Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; French, Jacqueline A; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) presents a revised operational classification of seizure types. The purpose of such a revision is to recognize that some seizure types can have either a focal or generalized onset, to allow classification when the onset is unobserved, to include some missing seizure types, and to adopt more transparent names. Because current knowledge is insufficient to form a scientifically based classification, the 2017 Classification is operational (practical) and based on the 1981 Classification, extended in 2010. Changes include the following: (1) "partial" becomes "focal"; (2) awareness is used as a classifier of focal seizures; (3) the terms dyscognitive, simple partial, complex partial, psychic, and secondarily generalized are eliminated; (4) new focal seizure types include automatisms, behavior arrest, hyperkinetic, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional; (5) atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, and tonic seizures can be of either focal or generalized onset; (6) focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizure replaces secondarily generalized seizure; (7) new generalized seizure types are absence with eyelid myoclonia, myoclonic absence, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic; and (8) seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified. The new classification does not represent a fundamental change, but allows greater flexibility and transparency in naming seizure types. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Seizure risk from cavernous or arteriovenous malformations

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    Josephson, C.B.; Leach, J.-P.; Duncan, R.; Roberts, R.C.; Counsell, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the risk of epileptic seizures due to a brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or cavernous malformation (CM). Methods: In a prospective population-based study of new diagnoses of AVMs (n = 229) or CMs (n = 139) in adults in Scotland in 1999–2003, we used annual medical records surveillance, general practitioner follow-up, and patient questionnaires to quantify the risk of seizures between clinical presentation and AVM/CM treatment, last follow-up, or death. Results: The 5-year risk of first-ever seizure after presentation was higher for AVMs presenting with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit (ICH/FND: n = 119; 23%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9%–37%) than for incidental AVMs (n = 40; 8%, 95% CI 0%–20%), CMs presenting with ICH/FND (n = 38; 6%, 95% CI 0%–14%), or incidental CMs (n = 57; 4%, 95% CI 0%–10%). For adults who had never experienced ICH/FND, the 5-year risk of epilepsy after first-ever seizure was higher for CMs (n = 23; 94%, 95% CI 84%–100%) than AVMs (n = 37; 58%, 95% CI 40%–76%; p = 0.02). Among adults who never experienced ICH/FND and presented with or developed epilepsy, there was no difference in the proportions achieving 2-year seizure freedom over 5 years between AVMs (n = 43; 45%, 95% CI 20%–70%) and CMs (n = 35; 47%, 95% CI 27%–67%). Conclusions: AVM-related ICH confers a significantly higher risk of a first-ever seizure compared to CMs or incidental AVMs. Adults with a CM have a high risk of epilepsy after a first-ever seizure but achieve seizure freedom as frequently as those with epilepsy due to an AVM. PMID:21536634

  7. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ESMAILI GOURABI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveBecause of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht.Materials & MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16.ResultsOf the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months, 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3% occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant (P=0.02. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls. Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%. All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever.ConclusionMost of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection.

  8. Temporal Lobe Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t respond to medication. More study is needed. Pregnancy and seizures The most important thing to remember ... have a seizure while doing them. Activities include: Swimming. If you go in water, don't go ...

  9. Occipital seizures and subcortical T2 hypointensity in the setting of hyperglycemia

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    Swapna L. Putta

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Hyperglycemia should be considered in the etiology of differential diagnosis of patients with visual abnormalities suspicious for seizures, especially when the MRI shows focal subcortical T2 hypointensity with or without leptomeningeal enhancement.

  10. Voltage synchronizations between multichannel electroencephalograms during epileptic seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2010-01-01

    The underlying dynamics for the electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from humans but especially epilepsy patients are usually not completely known. However, the ictal activity is claimed to be characterized by synchronous oscillations in the brain voltages in the literature. These time dependent interdependencies (synchronization, coupling) between the EEG voltages from epileptogenic and non epileptogenic brain sites of nineteen focal epileptic patients are investigated in this work. It is found that strong synchronizationdesynchronization events occur in alternation during most of the investigated seizures. Thus, these seizures are detected with considerable sensitivity (71 of the 79 seizures).

  11. Comparison of Intravenous Midazolam Drip with Intermittent Intravenous Diazepam in the Treatment of Refractory Serial Seizures in Children

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    Afshin FAYYAZI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Fayyazi A, Karimzadeh P, Torabian S, Damadi S, Khaje A. Comparison of Intravenous Midazolam Drip with Intermittent Intravenous Diazepam in The Treatment of Refractory Serial Seizures in Children. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3: 15-19. ObjectiveSerial seizures occur commonly in inpatient epileptic children. This type ofseizure due to its characteristics has a significant impact on the patient’s health.Untreated serial seizures lead to status epilepticus; therefore, finding a moreeffective treatment for such patients is essential. This study was performed tocompare the outcome of intermittent intravenous diazepam in the pediatricneurology clinic and intravenous midazolam in the pediatric intensive care unit(PICU, in order to introduce an alternative treatment for serail seizures.Materials & MethodsIn this study, 38 inpatient children aged 6 mo-15 years with refractory serialseizures were treated by first line antiepileptic drugs and then randomlytreated with either intermittent intravenous diazepam in the neurology ward orintravenous midazolam in PICU.ResultsFourteen (70% diazepam group patients and 13 (72.2% midazolam grouppatients had good response to treatment, there was no significant differencebetween the two groups. Four midazolam group patients and two diazepamgroup patients needed mechanical ventilation and were intubated duringtreatment, with no significant difference between the two groups. Durationsof mechanical ventilation and PICU and hospital stay were not significantlydifferent between the two groups.ConclusionIntermittent intravenous diazepam is an effective alternative therapy formidazolam drip in the treatment of serial seizures due to similar therapeuticeffects and fewer side effects.ReferencesHaut SR. Seizure clustering. Epilepsy Behav 2006Feb;8(1:50-5.Caraballo RH, Cersosimo RO, Fejerman N. Benign focal seizures of adolescence: a prospective study. Epilepsia 2004 Dec;45(12:1600-3.Haut SR, Swick C

  12. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation

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    Marta S Vismer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of the limbic and cortical regions of the mammalian brain provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with epilepsy and seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC, perirhinal (PRC, and entorhinal cortex (ERC in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis.

  13. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vismer, Marta S; Forcelli, Patrick A; Skopin, Mark D; Gale, Karen; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of mammalian limbic and neocortical brain regions provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC), perirhinal (PRC), and entorhinal cortex (ERC) in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis.

  14. Clinically silent seizures in a neonate with tuberous sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Mitsuru; Okumura, Akihisa; Abe, Shinpei; Igarashi, Ayuko; Hisata, Ken; Shoji, Hiromichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Although seizures during infancy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are common, seizures in neonates are infrequent. Here, we report the clinical course and electroencephalography (EEG) findings of a neonate with tuberous sclerosis complex associated with clinically silent seizures. The patient was a girl in whom cardiac tumors were detected on fetal ultrasonography. Brain magnetic resonance imaging during the neonatal period showed subependymal and cortical tubers. Routine EEG indicated unexpected ictal changes with no noticeable clinical symptoms. Ictal EEG was associated with a subtle increase in heart rate and a brief increase in chin electromyogram. These changes were difficult to identify clinically. The patient later developed focal seizures and epileptic spasms and had severe psychomotor delay. The present case suggests the occurrence of clinically silent seizures before the appearance of epileptic spasms in infants with tuberous sclerosis, and that EEG is an option for neonates with a prenatal diagnosis. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Autonomic seizures and autonomic status epilepticus in early onset benign childhood occipital epilepsy (Panayiotopoulos syndrome Crises autonômicas e status epilepticus autonômico na epilepsia occipital benigna da infância de início precoce (síndrome de Panayiotopoulos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Maria Almeida Souza Tedrus

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available To study clinical and EEG features of children with ictal vomiting and no underlying brain lesions (Panayiotopoulos syndrome. The subjects were 36 children aged 2-13 years. The onset of seizures occurred between 1 and 5 years of age. Fourteen children (38.8% had a single seizure. Fourteen children (38.8% had autonomic status epilepticus. Impairment of consciousness was reported in 30 (83.3% children, eye deviation in 10 (27.7% other autonomic symptoms and head deviation in 9, generalization in 8, visual symptoms in one child, and, speech arrest or hemifacial motor symptoms in 8 cases. The EEG showed occipital spikes or spike-wave complexes in 27 (75.0% children, blocked by opening of the eyes in 8 (22.2% cases. Nine patients (25% also had rolandic spikes and 3 had extraoccipital spikes. Six (16.6% patients had normal EEG. No clinical differences were observed between patients having occipital or extraoccipital spikes. In children only with autonomic seizures, the spikes are predominantly occipital but blockage by opening of the eyes is a less frequent feature. In some children there is an overlapping of different focal childhood idiopathic syndromes.Estudar aspectos clínico-eletrencefalográficos de crianças com vômito ictal e sem sinais de lesão cerebral (síndrome de Panayiotopoulos. Foram estudadas 36 crianças na faixa etária de 2-13 anos. O início das crises ocorreu entre 1 e 5 anos de idade. Quatorze crianças tiveram crise única. Status epilepticus foi observado em 14 (38,8% casos. Distúrbio da consciência foi relatado em 83,3% das crianças, desvio ocular em 27,7%, outros sintomas autonômicos e desvio da cabeça em 26,4%, generalização em 23,5%, bloqueio da fala ou sintomas motores da hemiface em 23,5% das crianças e sintomas visuais em um caso. O EEG mostrou pontas ou complexos de ponta-onda em 27 (75,0% casos, bloqueados pela abertura dos olhos em 8 (22,2% pacientes. Nove pacientes tiveram também pontas rolândicas e 3

  16. Failure of antiepileptic drugs in controlling seizures in epilepsy: What do we do next?

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    Brahyan Galindo-Mendez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medically intractable epilepsy is a clinical condition of concern that arises when a patient with epilepsy suffers seizures, despite a trial of two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs suitable for the type of epilepsy that are prescribed at maximum tolerated doses, does not achieve control of seizures. This diagnosis could be related to cortical dysplasias. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with a previous normal neurological development and no family history of epilepsy who presented with focal-type seizures at age 4. She started treatment by taking different AEDs for seizure control. She continued having frequent seizures that sometimes progressed to generalized seizures and status epilepticus. After a focal cortical resection performed in the area where interictal spikes were detected, the pathology confirmed a type IIb cortical dysplasia as the cause of the epilepsy. This article discusses cortical dysplasias as a cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy and its treatment.

  17. Molecular Correlates of Age-Dependent Seizures in an Inherited Neonatal-Infantile Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunxiang; Deprez, Liesbet; Maljevic, Snezana; Pitsch, Julika; Claes, Lieve; Hristova, Dimitrina; Jordanova, Albena; Ala-Mello, Sirpa; Bellan-Koch, Astrid; Blazevic, Dragica; Schubert, Simone; Thomas, Evan A.; Petrou, Steven; Becker, Albert J.; De Jonghe, Peter; Lerche, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Many idiopathic epilepsy syndromes have a characteristic age dependence, the underlying molecular mechanisms of which are largely unknown. Here we propose a mechanism that can explain that epileptic spells in benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures occur almost exclusively during the first days to months of life. Benign familial…

  18. "Simple febrile seizures plus (SFS+)": more than one febrile seizure within 24 hours is usually okay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, Marie F; Ng, Yu-Tze

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether children with recurrent febrile seizures within a 24-hour period need to be worked up differently from children with simple febrile seizures. Inclusion criteria included the following: (i) children with first seizure cluster between 4 months and 3 years of age, (ii) children who had more than one febrile seizure within 24 hours, and (iii) children who returned to baseline between and after each event. Thirty-two patients met the inclusion criteria over a 3-year period. All patients underwent brain CT and/or MRI and EEG. All head CTs were normal. Two children had abnormal MRI findings - both benign: one is thought to represent postictal changes, and the other one is an incidental arachnoid cyst. Of the 4 abnormal EEGs, one showed epileptiform discharges, while the others showed generalized ictal or postictal features. We propose the term "simple febrile seizures plus (SFS+)" to describe children who have more than one seizure within 24 hours but who are otherwise not different in presentation from children with SFS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Seizures following carotid endarterectomy in patients with severely compromised cerebral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina G; Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T V

    1995-01-01

    . The seizures were associated with headache in two, focal neurological deficits in four and hypertensive episodes in all cases. The symptoms remitted within 2 weeks and no patients suffered cerebral haemorrhage. CONCLUSIONS: Seizures following correction of high grade stenoses causing severe pressure reduction...

  20. Extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Braz Campos; Pinto, José Marcelo Vargas; Jorge, Jacks; de Almeida, Oslei Paes

    2005-11-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a rare benign lesion caused by human papillomavirus subtype 13 or 32. The condition occurs in numerous populations and ethnic groups. A higher incidence in close communities and among family members indicates infectious pathogenesis. A 21-year-old woman with FEH is described, in whom the lesions had persisted for 10 years. A literature review is also presented, with emphasis on manifestations in the oral mucosa and histopathological features.

  1. Focal epithelial hyperplasia in a Turkish family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökahmetoğlu, Selma; Ferahbaş, Ayten; Canöz, Özlem

    2014-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign proliferative condition that is more frequently found in children of certain ethnic groups. Human papillomavirus (HPV) 13 and 32 genotypes has been consistently detected in these lesions. In this study a daughter, mother and father had FEH, and HPV 13 was shown by sequence analysis in the lesions of these patients. Cryotherapy was applied to the lesions and the lesions improved, but did not recover properly. In conclusion, HPV genotyping should be performed in FEH cases.

  2. Forecasting seizures in dogs with naturally occurring epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howbert, J Jeffry; Patterson, Edward E; Stead, S Matt; Brinkmann, Ben; Vasoli, Vincent; Crepeau, Daniel; Vite, Charles H; Sturges, Beverly; Ruedebusch, Vanessa; Mavoori, Jaideep; Leyde, Kent; Sheffield, W Douglas; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Seizure forecasting has the potential to create new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy, such as providing patient warnings and delivering preemptive therapy. Progress on seizure forecasting, however, has been hindered by lack of sufficient data to rigorously evaluate the hypothesis that seizures are preceded by physiological changes, and are not simply random events. We investigated seizure forecasting in three dogs with naturally occurring focal epilepsy implanted with a device recording continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG). The iEEG spectral power in six frequency bands: delta (0.1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low-gamma (30-70 Hz), and high-gamma (70-180 Hz), were used as features. Logistic regression classifiers were trained to discriminate labeled pre-ictal and inter-ictal data segments using combinations of the band spectral power features. Performance was assessed on separate test data sets via 10-fold cross-validation. A total of 125 spontaneous seizures were detected in continuous iEEG recordings spanning 6.5 to 15 months from 3 dogs. When considering all seizures, the seizure forecasting algorithm performed significantly better than a Poisson-model chance predictor constrained to have the same time in warning for all 3 dogs over a range of total warning times. Seizure clusters were observed in all 3 dogs, and when the effect of seizure clusters was decreased by considering the subset of seizures separated by at least 4 hours, the forecasting performance remained better than chance for a subset of algorithm parameters. These results demonstrate that seizures in canine epilepsy are not randomly occurring events, and highlight the feasibility of long-term seizure forecasting using iEEG monitoring.

  3. Factors affecting seizure outcome after epilepsy surgery: an observational series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Gail S; de Tisi, Jane; Gonzalez-Fraile, Juan Carlos; Peacock, Janet L; McEvoy, Andrew W; Harkness, William F J; Foong, Jacqueline; Pope, Rebecca A; Diehl, Beate; Sander, Josemir W; Duncan, John S

    2017-11-01

    Surgical treatment can bring seizure remission in people with focal epilepsy but requires careful selection of candidates. To determine which preoperative factors are associated with postoperative seizure outcome. We audited seizure outcome of 693 adults who had resective epilepsy surgery between 1990 and 2010 and used survival analysis to detect preoperatively identifiable risk factors of poor seizure outcome. Seven factors were significantly associated with increased probability of recurrence of seizures with impaired awareness postsurgery: MRI findings (eg, HR adjusted for other variables in the model 2.5; 95% CI 1.6 to 3.8 for normal MRI compared with hippocampal sclerosis), a history of secondarily generalised convulsive seizures (2.3; 95% CI 1.7 to 3.0 for these seizures in the previous year vs never), psychiatric history (1.3; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.7), learning disability (1.8; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.6) and extratemporal (vs temporal) surgery (1.4; 95% CI 1.02, 2.04). People with an older onset of epilepsy had a higher probability of seizure recurrence (1.01; 95% CI 1.00, 1.02) as did those who had used more antiepileptic drugs (1.05; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09). Combinations of variables associated with seizure recurrence gave overall low probabilities of 5-year seizure freedom (eg, a normal MRI and convulsive seizures in the previous year has a probability of seizure freedom at 5 years of approximately 0.19). Readily identified clinical features and investigations are associated with reduced probability of good outcome and need consideration when planning presurgical evaluation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Clinical analysis on benign temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis

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    Xiang-shu HU

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the drug response of patients with benign temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (TLE-HS, and to summarize the clinical characteristics of patients with good drug response. Methods A total of 46 benign TLE-HS patients who were treated by anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs and followed-up for at least 2 years with seizure-free periods longer than 12 months were enrolled in benign TLE-HS group and 51 AEDs-resistant patients were enrolled in control group. Demographic data, early sudden damage factor, family history of epilepsy, clinical symptoms, interictal EEG abnormality, side of hippocamal sclerosis and drug strategy were noted and compared between 2 groups. Multivariate forward Logistic regression was used to analyze the influencing factors of good drug response to TLE-HS. Results Age of onset (P = 0.041, duration (P = 0.001, history of febrile seizure (P = 0.019, initial seizure frequency (P = 0.001 and drug strategy (P = 0.000 were statistically different between 2 groups. Age, sex, perinatal injury, encephalitis, traumatic brain injury (TBI, family history of epilepsy, status epilepticus (SE, cognitive impairment, mental disturbance, seizure type, aura, interictal EEG abnormality and side of hippocamal sclerosis were not statistically different between 2 groups (P > 0.05, for all. History of febrile seizure was risk factor for benign TLE-HS (OR = 3.405, 95%CI: 1.080-10.737; P = 0.037, while low initial seizure frequency (OR = 0.275, 95% CI: 0.100-0.758; P = 0.013 and monotherapy (OR = 0.135, 95% CI: 0.049-0.373; P = 0.000 were protective factors for good drug response. Conclusions Benign TLE - HS often occurs in late adolescence. In the early stage, seizure frequency is low and the occurrence of febrile seizure is rare. Monotherapy of carbamazepine or oxcarbazepine may achieve good therapeutic effect. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.10.012

  5. A Population-Based Study of Long-term Outcomes of Cryptogenic Focal Epilepsy in Childhood: Cryptogenic Epilepsy is NOT Probably Symptomatic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine C; Grossardt, Brandon R; So, Elson L; Nickels, Katherine C

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare long-term outcome in a population-based group of children with cryptogenic vs symptomatic focal epilepsy diagnosed from 1980–2004 and to define the course of epilepsy in the cryptogenic group. Methods We identified all children residing in Olmsted County, MN, 1 month through 17 years with newly diagnosed, non-idiopathic focal epilepsy from 1980–2004. Children with idiopathic partial epilepsy syndromes were excluded. Medical records were reviewed to determine etiology, results of imaging and EEG studies, treatments used, and long-term outcome. Children were defined as having symptomatic epilepsy if they had a known genetic or structural/metabolic etiology, and as cryptogenic if they did not. Key Findings Of 359 children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy, 215 (60%) had non-idiopathic focal epilepsy. Of these, 206 (96%) were followed for more than 12 months. Ninety five children (46%) were classified as symptomatic. Median follow-up from diagnosis was similar in both groups, being 157 months (25%ile, 75%ile 89, 233) in the cryptogenic group vs 134 months (25%ile, 75%ile 78, 220) in the symptomatic group (p=0.26). Of 111 cryptogenic cases, 66% had normal cognition. Long-term outcome was significantly better in those with cryptogenic vs symptomatic etiology (intractable epilepsy at last follow-up, 7% vs 40%, pseizure-freedom at last follow-up, 81% vs 55%, pseizure-freedom at final follow-up, 68% of the cryptogenic group versus only 46% of the symptomatic group were off antiepileptic medications (p=0.01). One third of the cryptogenic group had a remarkably benign disorder, with no seizures seen after initiation of medication, or in those who were untreated, after the second afebrile seizure. A further 5% had seizures within the first year but remained seizure-free thereafter. With the exception of perinatal complications, which predicted against seizure remission, no other factors were found to significantly predict outcome in the cryptogenic group

  6. FOCAL EPILEPTIC MYOCLONUS: DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Kvaskova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the clinical, electroencephalographic (EEG, and neuroimaging features of focal epileptic myoclonus (FEM and the results of therapy in patients with this type of seizure. The latter was identified in 2.5 % of the cases of epilepsy with onset beyond the age of 18 years (n = 1261. The age of onset of FЕМ was from 5 months to 23 years (mean 8.1 ± 1.6 years. The addition of secondary generalized seizures was stated in 90.3% of cases; that of focal motor seizures, epileptic aura, and negative FЕМ was seen in 64.5, 25.8, and 12.8 %, respectively. FЕМ was most commonly located in the flexor muscles of the upper extremities (22.6 % and facial and upper limb muscles (25.6 %. The regional epileptoformactivity maximally located in the frontocentroparietal leads is a typical EEG pattern of FЕМ in all the patients. Magnetic resonance imaging most frequently revealed diffuse cortical and subcortical atrophy (29 % and total cortical hemiatrophy (32 %. There was no case of complete remission of FЕМ. Monotherapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs resulted in reduction of FЕМ in only 6.4 % of cases. During duo therapy, there was more than a 50 % reduction in FЕМ in 67.7 %. Our investigation has indicated that active FЕМ is a seizure type resistant to AEDs. This fact necessitates the detection of FЕМ at its early stages in order to predict the course of the disease and search for new therapies for epileptic syndromes associated with this type of seizures.

  7. Widespread changes in network activity allow non-invasive detection of mesial temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Alice D; Zepeda, Rodrigo; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-10-01

    Decades of experience with intracranial recordings in patients with epilepsy have demonstrated that seizures can occur in deep cortical regions such as the mesial temporal lobes without showing any obvious signs of seizure activity on scalp electroencephalogram. Predicated on the idea that these seizures are purely focal, currently, the only way to detect these 'scalp-negative seizures' is with intracranial recordings. However, intracranial recordings are only rarely performed in patients with epilepsy, and are almost never performed outside of the context of epilepsy. As such, little is known about scalp-negative seizures and their role in the natural history of epilepsy, their effect on cognitive function, and their association with other neurological diseases. Here, we developed a novel approach to non-invasively identify scalp-negative seizures arising from the mesial temporal lobe based on scalp electroencephalogram network connectivity measures. We identified 25 scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures in 10 patients and obtained control records from an additional 13 patients, all of whom underwent recordings with foramen ovale electrodes and scalp electroencephalogram. Scalp data from these records were used to train a scalp-negative seizure detector, which consisted of a pair of logistic regression classifiers that used scalp electroencephalogram coherence properties as input features. On cross-validation performance, this detector correctly identified scalp-negative seizures in 40% of patients, and correctly identified the side of seizure onset for each seizure detected. In comparison, routine clinical interpretation of these scalp electroencephalograms failed to identify any of the scalp-negative seizures. Among the patients in whom the detector raised seizure alarms, 80% had scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures. The detector had a false alarm rate of only 0.31 per day and a positive predictive value of 75%. Of the 13 control patients, false

  8. Clinical characterization of gastroenteritis-related seizures in children: impact of fever and serum sodium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zifman, Eyal; Alehan, Füsun; Menascu, Shay; Har-Gil, Miki; Miller, Peter; Saygi, Semra; Ozdemir, Beril; Watemberg, Nathan

    2011-11-01

    Gastroenteritis-related seizures have increasingly gained attention in recent years. Most cases follow a brief, benign course with very few episodes of seizure recurrence and without development of epilepsy. Published reports usually do not make a distinction between febrile and afebrile patients, and most authors include only nonfebrile convulsions in their reported series. This study evaluated the impact of fever in children presenting with seizures during a mild gastroenteritis episode and found that the presence or absence of fever did not affect seizure characteristics or duration. However, mild hyponatremia affected some seizure features, particularly seizure duration, as hyponatremic children sustained more prolonged seizures than patients with normal serum sodium levels, irrespective of body temperature.

  9. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ESMAILI GOURABI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Esmaili Gourabi H, Bidabadi E, Cheraghalipour  F, Aarabi  Y, Salamat F. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4:33-37.Abstract Objective Because of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16. Results Of the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months, 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3% occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant (P=0.02. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls. Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%. All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever. Conclusion Most of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection.  References: Huang MC, Huang CC, Thomas K. Febrile convulsions: development and validation of a questionnaire to measure

  10. Atypical focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Rizwan Khan; Taimur Saleem; Tanveer Ul Haq; Kanwal Aftab

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Focal nodular hyperplasia, a benign hepatic tumor, is usually asymptomatic. However, rarely the entity can cause symptoms, mandating intervention. METHOD: We present a case of focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver, which caused a considerable diagnostic dilemma due to its atypical presentation. RESULTS: A 29-year-old woman presented with a 15-year history of a progressively increasing mass in the right upper quadrant which was associated with pain and emesis. Examination showed a firm, mobile mass palpable below the right subcostal margin. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed an exophytic mass arising from hepatic segments III and IVb. Trucut biopsy of the hepatic mass was equivocal. Angiography showed a vascular tumor that was supplied by a tortuous branch of the proper hepatic artery. Surgical intervention for removal of the mass was undertaken. Intra-operatively, two large discrete tumors were found and completely resected. Histopathological examination showed features consistent with focal nodular hyperplasia. CONCLUSION: This description of an unusual case of focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver highlights the point that the diagnosis of otherwise benign hepatic tumors may be difficult despite extensive work-up in some cases.

  11. Surgically intractable epilepsy associated with focal cortical dysplasia and congenital cutaneous hemangiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, Anna; Cruz, Vincent B; Prayson, Richard A

    2014-11-01

    We describe a 6-month-old girl with medically intractable seizures, multiple congenital hemangiomas, and developmental delay. The patient underwent two surgical resections. Pathological findings at both the first and second resections were consistent with focal cortical dysplasia. The literature was reviewed on focal cortical dysplasia associated with cutaneous hemangiomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HIPPOCAMPAL SCLEROSIS IN EPILEPSY AND CHILDHOOD FEBRILE SEIZURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; COOK, MJ; FISH, DR; STEVENS, JM; SHORVON, SD

    1993-01-01

    The connection between hippocampal sclerosis and childhood febrile seizures (CFS) is a contentious issue in the study of epilepsy. We investigated 107 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy by high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 20 had a history of CFS, 45 had focal (26) or

  13. [Clinical and EEG studies of symptomatic focal epilepsy in 7 patients with colpocephaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasushi; Oguni, Hirokazu; Funatsuka, Makoto; Osawa, Makiko

    2008-05-01

    The clinical observations of seven patients with epileptic seizures and colpocephaly were summarized. The ages at the time of onset of the seizures were usually under 1 year, and the frequency of seizures in the late-onset cases was lower than that in the early-onset cases. The seizures were characterized by vomiting, eye deviation, versive seizures, and focal motor seizures. Interictal electroencephalograms showed either unilateral or synchronous bilateral spikes (and wave) or slowing of the basic activity in the occipital area. The basic activity slowed down in all of the cases. Epileptic seizures accompanied with colpocephaly may derive from epileptic foci in the occipital and posterior temporal region, which is structurally abnormal. Ongoing convulsions ceased after the intravenous administration of diazepam. In addition, the oral antiepileptics clobazam and clorazepate proved to be effective for the treatment of refractory cases.

  14. Seizure semiology and EEG findings in mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevallier, Justyna A; Von Allmen, Gretchen K; Koenig, Mary Kay

    2014-05-01

    Seizures constitute a frequent yet under-described manifestation of mitochondrial disorders (MDs). The aim of this study was to describe electroencephalography (EEG) findings and clinical seizure types in a population of children and adults with mitochondrial disease. Retrospective chart review of 165 records of children and adults with mitochondrial disease seen in the University of Texas Houston Mitochondrial Center between 2007 and 2012 was performed; all subjects were diagnosed with confirmed mitochondrial disease. EEG findings and clinical data, including seizure semiology and response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), were analyzed and categorized. Sixty-six percent (109/165) of subjects had a routine EEG performed. Sixty-one percent (67/109) of EEG studies were abnormal and 85% (56/67) had epileptiform discharges. The most common EEG finding was generalized slowing (40/67, 60%). The most frequent category of epileptiform activity seen was multifocal discharges (41%), followed by focal (39%) and generalized (39%) discharges. Clinical seizures were seen in 55% of subjects and the most common types of seizures observed were complex partial (37%) and generalized tonic-clonic (GTC; 37%). The most common seizure type in patients with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) was GTC (33%), with generalized or focal discharges seen on EEG. In Leigh syndrome GTC (11%) and complex partial (11%) seizures were the most frequent types. Of 60 subjects with clinical seizures, 28% were intractable to medical treatment. Mitochondrial disorder should be included in the list of differential diagnosis in any child that presents with encephalopathy, seizures, and a fluctuating clinical course. Given the relatively high prevalence of EEG abnormalities in patients with MD, EEG should be performed during initial evaluation in all patients with MD, not only upon clinical suspicion of epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International

  15. Value and limitations of seizure semiology in localizing seizure onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Elson L

    2006-08-01

    Seizure semiology has been the foundation of clinical diagnosis of seizure disorders. This article discusses the value and the limitations of behavioral features of seizure episodes in localizing seizure onset. Studies have shown that some semiologic features of seizures are highly accurate in the hemispheric lateralization and lobar localization of seizures. There is good agreement between blinded reviewers in lateralizing video-recorded seizures in temporal lobe and extratemporal lobe epilepsies. However, seizure semiology alone should not be used to determine the site of seizure onset. Each semiologic feature may falsely localize seizure onset. Seizure semiology in some patients may signify the site of seizure propagation rather than origination. Moreover, seizure semiology may not be as reliable in multifocal epilepsies as it is in unifocal epilepsies. Many semiologic features of seizures of adults are often missing in seizures of children. Seizure semiology should be analyzed and integrated with EEG and neuroimaging data to localize the seizure focus. A sample of the recorded seizures should be shown to the patient's relatives or friends to verify that it is representative of habitual seizures.

  16. Recurrent focal myositis in a patient on maintenance hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Focal myositis is a benign inflammatory process involving a single group of muscles. It may resolve with conservative measures or may be a harbinger for polymyositis. Very few focal myosites are recurrent, and recurrence in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis is extremely rare. Clinical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging help in identifying this entity. Muscle biopsy and histopathological evaluation are mandatory in diagnosis. It often responds to ...

  17. Focal epithelial hyperplasia. A rare disease in our area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael; Toro-Rojas, Mariano; Ceballos-Salobreña, Alejandro; Aparicio-Soria, Jose Luis; Fuentes-Vaamonde, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign, asymptomatic disease, occurring with very low frequency within our population. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue, and less frequently on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. We present the clinical case of a 9-year-old Saharan girl with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to a focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  18. A Case of Lung Cancer with Brain Metastases Diagnosed After Epileptic Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Eroglu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available    Epileptic seizures can accompany benign diseases, also can be the first sign of malign tumors. In brain metastasis, epileptic seizures can be seen before the symptoms of the primary lesion. Brain metastasis is bad prognostic factor in all malignancies and it is determined that lung cancers are the most metastatic tumors to the brain. Especially in new onset epileptic seizures in elderly patients, metastatic brain tumors are frequent in etiology. We aimed to present a lung cancer patient with brain metastasis who admitted emergency department with first epileptic seizure.

  19. OUTCOME AND TRANSFORMATION OF FEBRILE SEIZURES IN CHILDREN (DATA OF SVT. LUKA'S INSTITUTE OF CHILD NEUROLOGY & EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available According to definition, febrile seizuresbenign, age-dependent, genetically predisposed condition in which the brain is susceptible to epileptic seizures, occurring in response to the fever. The article presents the outcome and trans­formation of febrile seizures in children by data of Svt. Luka's Institute of child neurology & epilepsy. The authors found, thatfebrile seizures can occur at onset of 21 epileptic syndromes with different etiologic factors and outcome. The clini­cal characteristics, EEG and neuroimaging data, as well as the effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs and prognosis of dif­ferentforms of epilepsy with febrile seizures in history are described in detail.  

  20. Optimization of imaging and treatment of patients with focal liver lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kessel, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of focal liver lesions (either benign or malignant) has increased drastically the last decades. Treatment possibilities have extended significantly due to improved chemotherapeutic agents, extended eligibility criteria for partial liver resection, the introduction of radiofrequency abl

  1. Focal epithelial hyperplasia - an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ahmed K; Leao, Jair C; Fedele, Stefano; Porter, Stephen R

    2013-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is an asymptomatic benign mucosal disease, which is mostly observed in specific groups in certain geographical regions. FEH is usually a disease of childhood and adolescence and is generally associated with people who live in poverty and of low socioeconomic status. Clinically, FEH is typically characterized by multiple, painless, soft, sessile papules, plaques or nodules, which may coalesce to give rise to larger lesions. Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially genotypes 13 and 32, have been associated and detected in the majority of FEH lesions. The clinical examination and social history often allow diagnosis, but histopathological examination of lesional tissue is usually required to confirm the exact diagnosis. FEH sometimes resolves spontaneously however, treatment is often indicated as a consequence of aesthetic effects or any interference with occlusion. There remains no specific therapy for FEH, although surgical removal, laser excision or possibly topical antiviral agents may be of benefit. There remains no evidence that FEH is potentially malignant.

  2. Rufinamide efficacy and safety as adjunctive treatment in children with focal drug resistant epilepsy: the first Italian prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moavero, Romina; Cusmai, Raffaella; Specchio, Nicola; Fusco, Lucia; Capuano, Alessandro; Curatolo, Paolo; Vigevano, Federico

    2012-11-01

    Rufinamide is a new antiepileptic drug approved as add-on treatment in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome from the age of 4 years, and for the treatment of focal seizures in adults and adolescents. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of add-on Rufinamide in the treatment of childhood focal drug resistant epilepsy. We recruited 70 patients for a prospective, add-on, open-label study. Inclusion criteria were: 3 years of age or more; focal drug resistant epilepsy despite the use of three previous AEDs; use of at least one other AED, but no more than three at baseline; more than one seizure per month in the previous 6 months. Rufinamide efficacy was observed up to 12 months of follow-up, with a total responder rate of 38.57%. We found the best results in focal epilepsies due to structural/metabolic etiology (42.6%). The responder rate was similar for focal seizures with secondary generalization, simple focal seizures other than myoclonic jerks, and complex partial seizures. Response to Rufinamide was not related to the age. Our experience suggests that Rufinamide can be effective in reducing focal seizure frequency in children with drug resistant epilepsy, and that it can be considered as a safe drug.

  3. Bilaterally symmetric focal cortical dysplasia in a golden retriever dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K M; Bollen, A W; Winger, K M; Vernau, K M; Dickinson, P J; Higgins, R J; Sisó, S

    2014-11-01

    A 10-year-old golden retriever dog was referred with a 24-h history of generalized seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain found no abnormalities on 3 mm transverse sections and the dog was subsequently humanely destroyed. Microscopically there was bilaterally symmetrical focal disorganization of cortical grey matter within the tips of the right and left suprasylvian gyri of the temporal cortex. The focal abnormal cortical lamination was characterized by loss of pyramidal neurons with abnormal, irregular, angular, remaining neurons occasionally forming clusters, surrounded by fibrillary astrogliosis and microgliosis and vascular proliferation. These histological findings are consistent with focal cortical dysplasia, a cerebral cortical malformation that causes seizures in people, but not reported previously in the dog.

  4. Changes on diffusion-weighted MRI with focal motor status epilepticus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevblad, K.O. [Neuroradiology, Radiodiagnostic, Hopital Cantonal de Geneve HUG, Geneve (Switzerland); Senn, P.; Zutter, D.; Bassetti, C.; Donati, F. [Dept. of Neurology, Inselspital, Univ. Hospital, Berne (Switzerland); Loevblad, K.O.; Zeller, O.; Schroth, G. [Div. of Neuroradiology, Inselspital, Univ. Hospital, Berne (Switzerland)

    2003-04-01

    Transient imaging abnormalities, including changes on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), may be seen in focal status epilepticus. The changes on DWI provide an insight into the pathophysiology. We report a 53-year-old man with focal motor status epilepticus involving the left hand, arm and face with focal slowing on EEG. The apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were higher in the affected hemisphere than on the other side. At 10 days and 6 weeks after the end of the seizures, we saw normal ADCs and atrophy of the affected hemisphere. We conclude that the MRI findings indicate both cytotoxic and vasogenic oedema during seizure activity and subsequent loss of brain parenchyma. (orig.)

  5. CT SCAN FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH SEIZURES IN NOTHERN CHHATTISGARH : A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A five years study of CT scan findings in seizure patients is carried out to know the different etiology. Seizure is a finite event of altered cerebral function because of excessive and abnormal electrical discharges of the brain cells. Epilepsy is a chronic condition predisposing a person to recurrent seizures. This study is designed to establish usefulness of CT in defining the etiology of seizures in various age groups in people of Northern Chhattisgarh. This is a retrospective hospital - based study conducted in Radio - diagnosis Department of Chhattisgarh Institute of Medical Sciences, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh. The study was carried out over a 5 year period. Hospital admissions with history of seizures are very common. Almost 3 - 9% p er 1000 population of total hospital emergencies is seizure cases. Epilepsy is an important health problem in developing countries, where its prevalence can be up to 57 per 1000 population. This study has high prevalence of seizures in First, second, third and fourth decades with decreasing pattern with increasing age. Prevalence in first decade is low as compare to second and third decades. Tuberculoma (9.39% and Neurocysticercosis (3.60% has highest prevalence in partial seizures followed by Focal Cereb ral Edema (6.22% whereas Diffuse Cerebral edema (4.91% seen with Generalised Seizures Cerebral infarct has equally seen in both types of seizures. Brain tumour presented mostly with Generalised seizure (2.07% than in partial seizures (0.98% . Other abno rmal findings like Cerebral calcifications, Diffuse cortical atrophy, Focal cortical atrophy, Sub Arachnoid hemorrhage, Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy, Hydrocephalus and few rare diseases like Fahr disease and Tuberous sclerosis have also seen in CT scan in seizure patients. CT scan is valuable in making a diagnosis particularly in Indian subcontinent, where infective causes in form of space occupying lesions and infections are most

  6. Focal nodular hyperplasia: typical and atypical MRI findings with emphasis on the use of contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin, D. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)], E-mail: danielemarin2@gmail.com; Brancatelli, G. [Sezione di Radiologia, Ospedale Specializzato in Gastroenterologia, ' Saverio de Bellis' - IRCCS, Castellana Grotte (Bari) (Italy); Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Universita di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Federle, M.P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lagalla, R. [Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Universita di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Catalano, C.; Passariello, R. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Midiri, M. [Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Universita di Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Vilgrain, V. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France)

    2008-05-15

    Focal nodular hyperplasia is a benign hypervascular hepatic tumour, frequently detected in asymptomatic patients undergoing imaging studies for unrelated reasons. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generally allows a confident differential diagnosis with other hypervascular liver lesions, either benign or malignant. In addition, due to the recent development of hepatospecific MRI contrast agents, MRI concomitantly enables functional and morphological information to be obtained, thus providing important clues for the detection and characterization of focal nodular hyperplasia lesions.

  7. Focal epilepsies in adult patients attending two epilepsy centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilioli, Isabella; Vignoli, Aglaia; Visani, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    consecutively after 1990 and followed regularly at two epilepsy centers. We systematically collected the clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data using a custom-written database. We classified the patients as seizure-free or AED resistant according to the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria.......8% of the 729 patients with symptomatic focal epilepsies and was positively associated with electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities, seizure type, and the presence of mesial temporal sclerosis. Among 426 patients without detectable causes, the percentage of AED resistance was significantly lower (39...... control (14.9% needed three or more AEDs). Furthermore, among seizure-free patients who could be previously classified as resistant to two or more AEDs, 52.2% reached seizure freedom while receiving treatment with "new generation" AEDs. SIGNIFICANCE: The ILAE classification of AED resistance, as well...

  8. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This revi...

  9. Focal epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Mette; Gulløv, Christina Hedal; Fredholm, Merete

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the mode of inheritance and describe the clinical features of epilepsy in the Belgian shepherd, taking the outset in an extended Danish dog family (199 individuals) of Groenendael and Tervueren with accumulated epilepsy. METHODS: Epilepsy positive individuals (living...... and deceased) were ascertained through a telephone interview using a standardised questionnaire regarding seizure history and phenomenology. Living dogs were invited to a detailed clinical evaluation. Litters more than five years of age, or where epilepsy was present in all offspring before the age of five......, were included in the calculations of inheritance. results: Out of 199 family members, 66 dogs suffered from epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy in the family was 33%. Fifty-five dogs experienced focal seizures with or without secondary generalisation, while four dogs experienced primary generalised...

  10. Viruses and febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijl, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    We conclude that viral infections are the main cause of febrile seizures, with an important role for influenza A, HHV-6 and HHV-7. We showed that several viral infections not only contribute to initial febrile seizures, but also to recurrences. Viruses could not be detected in the CSF of children

  11. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  12. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP.

  13. Dental injury during seizures associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R H; Higgins, S; Fuller, G N

    2009-01-01

    Patients can sustain injuries during seizures and the pattern and type of injury (eg, tongue biting) can be a useful silent witness in the diagnosis of seizures. In addition, the seizure type potentially influences the type of injury. Patients with dental injury were identified from the Gloucestershire Epilepsy Database (n = 1673). These patients' notes were reviewed and the following data collected: demographic data; seizure types and age of onset; injury; EEG; and MRI. 14 people had dental injuries: 10 incisors (seven had >1 incisor) and five other teeth. Eight had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), two other primary generalised epilepsy and four focal onset epilepsy. Compared with the rest of the database population (JME; n = 81) there was a highly significant association of dental injury with JME (pseizure onset. This pattern of injury should prompt consideration of this diagnosis. It is hoped that recognition of this can both facilitate earlier diagnosis and help educate patients to protect their teeth.

  14. Reliability of seizure semiology in patients with 2 seizure foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathke, Kevin M; Schäuble, Barbara; Fessler, A James; So, Elson L

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether seizure semiology is reliable in localizing and distinguishing seizures at 2 independent brain foci in the same patient. Two masked reviewers localized seizures from 2 foci by their clinical semiology and intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs). Epilepsy monitoring unit of referral comprehensive epilepsy program. Seventeen consecutive patients (51 seizures) with sufficient video and intracranial EEG data were identified by reviewing medical records of 366 patients older than 10 years. The primary outcome measures were interobserver agreement between the 2 masked reviewers; the proportion of seizures localized by semiology; the proportion of localized seizures concordant with intracranial EEG localization; and comparison between concordant and nonconcordant seizures in latency of intracranial EEG seizure spread. Interobserver agreement was 41% (κ score, 0.16). Only 30 of 51 seizures (59%) were localized by seizure semiology. The focus localized by semiology was concordant with the location of intracranial EEG seizure onset in 16 of 30 seizures (53%). No significant difference was observed between concordant and nonconcordant seizures in relation to the speed with which the EEG discharge spread from the location of seizure onset to another lobar region (P = .09, Wilcoxon rank sum test). Clinical seizure semiology is not as useful as intracranial EEG in localizing seizure onset in patients with dual seizure foci.

  15. Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinfeld, S. A.; Pellock, J M; Kjeldsen, Lone Marianne Juel

    2016-01-01

    Background A history of complex febrile seizures can increase the risk of epilepsy, but the role of genetic factors is unclear. This analysis evaluated the relationship between febrile seizures and epilepsy. Methods Information on the history of seizures was obtained by a questionnaire from twin...... epilepticus. There were 78 twins who developed epilepsy. The highest rate of epilepsy (22.2%) occurred in the febrile status epilepticus group. Concordance was highest in simple group. Conclusion A twin with febrile status epilepticus is at the highest risk of developing epilepsy, but simple febrile seizures...... and emotional burden. It is currently not possible to accurately identify which children will develop recurrent febrile seizures, epilepsy, or neuropsychological comorbidities. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  16. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) BPPV is the most common vestibular disorder. Benign ... al. Diagnosis and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). CMAJ. 2003 169(7):681-693. Nuti D, ...

  17. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia: review and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Y M Y; Osman, Y I; Norval, E J G

    2010-10-01

    Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia is a benign fibro-osseous condition that can be seen in dentate and edentulous patients. It is an asymptomatic lesion and needs no treatment; however follow-up is essential due to the possibility that focal cemento-osseous dysplasia can progress to a condition called florid osseous dysplasia that involves multiple sites. A case report is presented here, along with a review of the differential diagnoses considered in order to reach a final diagnosis of focal cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  18. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  19. Fever as a seizure precipitant factor in Panayiotopoulos syndrome: a clinical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Aldrovandi, Anna; Gentile, Valentina; Garone, Caterina; Conti, Sara; Aceti, Arianna; Gennaro, Elena; Zara, Federico; Franzoni, Emilio

    2012-03-01

    To examine fever as a precipitating factor for focal seizures in patients with Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS) and evaluate the role of SCN1A in PS patients with seizures triggered by fever. From January 2000 to June 2008, we identified patients referred for seizures who fulfilled the criteria of PS. Patients were divided into two groups, according to the presence (group A) or the absence (group B) of seizures triggered by fever. Electroclinical features of the two groups were compared. In addition, an analysis of SCN1A in patients of group A was performed. Thirty patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Eleven patients (36%) had at least one focal autonomic seizure triggered by fever (group A). In group A, 7/11 patients (63.5%) had the first focal autonomic seizure during a febrile illness. Two of these 7 patients were misdiagnosed at the onset of PS. The median age at the onset of PS was slightly lower in group A than in group B (p=.050). Moreover, patients in group A more frequently had a positive familial history of febrile seizures (FS) (p=.047). No mutations of SCN1A were found in any of the 10 patients screened. Fever is a common trigger for focal autonomic seizures in PS. Knowing that an autonomic manifestation during fever can be an epileptic seizure could facilitate diagnosis and prevent unnecessary investigations and erroneous treatments. Moreover, our data show that SCN1A gene does not contribute significantly to susceptibility to autonomic seizures during fever in patients with PS. Copyright © 2011 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutations in GRIN2A> cause idiopathic focal epilepsy with rolandic spikes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Johannes R; Lal, Dennis; Reinthaler, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic focal epilepsy (IFE) with rolandic spikes is the most common childhood epilepsy, comprising a phenotypic spectrum from rolandic epilepsy (also benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, BECTS) to atypical benign partial epilepsy (ABPE), Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) and epileptic enc...

  1. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... The following organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ... Urology Care Foundation -- www. ...

  2. Stuttering or reflex seizure? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Véronique; Burbaud, Pierre; Taillard, Jacques; Gaida, Tsouria; Joseph, Pierre Alain; Duché, Bernard; Bioulac, Bernard

    2004-09-01

    Stuttering is characterized by involuntary syllabic repetitions and interruption in the smooth flow of speech. The exact cause of primary stuttering remains a matter of debate but a frontal dysfunction has been evoked. On the other hand, acquired stuttering is uncommon. We report a case of reflex epilepsy in which seizures were triggered by reading aloud or stressful conversation. Each paroxysmal event in left frontal region was associated clinically with a language disorder mimicking stuttering. Our observation suggests that reflex frontal focal epilepsy could be a putative etiology for acquired stuttering.

  3. Individualized Low-Amplitude Seizure Therapy: Minimizing Current for Electroconvulsive Therapy and Magnetic Seizure Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V; Krystal, Andrew D; Rosa, Moacyr A; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at conventional current amplitudes (800–900 mA) is highly effective but carries the risk of cognitive side effects. Lowering and individualizing the current amplitude may reduce side effects by virtue of a less intense and more focal electric field exposure in the brain, but this aspect of ECT dosing is largely unexplored. Magnetic seizure therapy (MST) induces a weaker and more focal electric field than ECT; however, the pulse amplitude is not individualized and the minimum amplitude required to induce a seizure is unknown. We titrated the amplitude of long stimulus trains (500 pulses) as a means of determining the minimum current amplitude required to induce a seizure with ECT (bilateral, right unilateral, bifrontal, and frontomedial electrode placements) and MST (round coil on vertex) in nonhuman primates. Furthermore, we investigated a novel method of predicting this amplitude-titrated seizure threshold (ST) by a non-convulsive measurement of motor threshold (MT) using single pulses delivered through the ECT electrodes or MST coil. Average STs were substantially lower than conventional pulse amplitudes (112–174 mA for ECT and 37.4% of maximum device amplitude for MST). ST was more variable in ECT than in MST. MT explained 63% of the ST variance and is hence the strongest known predictor of ST. These results indicate that seizures can be induced with less intense electric fields than conventional ECT that may be safer; efficacy and side effects should be evaluated in clinical studies. MT measurement could be a faster and safer alternative to empirical ST titration for ECT and MST. PMID:25920013

  4. Pulmonary edema following generalized tonic clonic seizures is directly associated with seizure duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jeffrey D.; Hardin, Kimberly A.; Parikh, Palak; Li, Chin-Shang; Seyal, Masud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Postictal pulmonary edema (PPE) is almost invariably present in human and animal cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) coming to autopsy. PPE may be a contributing factor in SUDEP. The incidence of postictal PPE is unknown. We retrospectively investigated PPE following generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) in the epilepsy monitoring unit. Methods Chest X-Rays (CXR) following each GTCS were obtained in 24 consecutive patients. Relationship of CXR abnormality to seizure duration, ictal/postictal oxygen desaturation (SpO2), apnea and presence of postictal generalized EEG suppression (PGES) was investigated using logistic regression. Results Eleven of 24 patients had CXR abnormalities following a GTCS. In these 11 patients, 22 CXR were obtained and abnormalities were present in 15 CXR. Abnormalities included PPE in 7 patients, of which 2 also had focal infiltrates. In 4 patients focal infiltrates were present without PPE. There was no significant difference in mean time to CXR (225 min) following GTCS in the abnormal CXR group versus the normal group of patients (196 min). Mean preceding seizure duration was longer (p=0.002) in GTCS with abnormal CXR (259.7 sec) versus GTCS with normal CXR (101.2 sec). Odds-ratio for CXR abnormality was 20.46 (p=0.006) with seizure duration greater than 100 sec versus less than 100 sec. On multivariable analysis, only the seizure duration was a significant predictor of CXR abnormality (p=0.015). Conclusions Radiographic abnormalities are not uncommon following GTCS. The presence of CXR abnormality is significantly associated with the duration of the preceding GTCS. Severe, untreated PPE may be relevant to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:25844030

  5. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  6. A case of hepatocellular carcinoma arising within large focal nodular hyperplasia with review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodoros Petsas; Athanassios Tsamandas; Irene Tsota; Dionisios Karavias; Chrysoula Karatza; Vassilios Vassiliou; Dimitrios Kardamakis

    2006-01-01

    Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is a relatively rare benign hepatic tumor, usually presenting as a solitary lesion; however, multiple localizations have also been described. The association of FNH with other hepatic lesions, such as adenomas and haemangiomas has been reported by various authors. We herein report a case of a hepatocellular carcinoma arising within a large focal nodular hyperplasia, in a young female patient.

  7. Persistent benign pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, J M

    In this narrative review we describe the main aetiologies, clinical characteristics and treatment for patients with benign pleural effusion that characteristically persists over time: chylothorax and cholesterol effusions, nonexpansible lung, rheumatoid pleural effusion, tuberculous empyema, benign asbestos pleural effusion and yellow nail syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  8. A patient with atonic seizures mimicking transient ischemic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ju Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A focal atonic seizure is a partial seizure in which the ictal manifestation consists of paresis of the extremities or muscles on one side of the body, and this phenomenon can easily be misdiagnosed as a transient ischemic attack. An 86-year-old woman visited our hospital complaining of transient right upper extremity weakness lasting for 10 min following an unusual sensation in her chest accompanied by palpitations. On the third hospital day, she again complained of right arm weakness, which progressed to jerky movements of her right extremity accompanied by facial twitching and then generalized into a tonic–clonic seizure. The EEG displayed several interictal spikes in the contralateral temporal area, and the ictal SPECT, analyzed using the SISCOM system, showed an increased signal in both the contralateral superior parietal area and the mesial frontal area. In this case, the patient was diagnosed with focal atonic seizures as the cause of the monolimb weakness, which had been initially misdiagnosed aas transient ischemic attacks. In cases in which a patient presents with monolimb paresis, physicians should consider the possibility of an atonic seizure as the cause.

  9. [Acute benign cerebral angiopathy. 6 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseaux, P; Scherpereel, B; Bernard, M H; Guyot, J F

    1983-10-08

    The 6 cases reported here constitute, with 5 previously published cases, a special nosological entity tentatively called "acute benign cerebral angiopathy" by the authors. These 11 cases have in common certain radiological and clinical features. Arteriography shows segmental, multifocal and assymetrical stenoses involving the cerebral arteries between Willis' circle and the terminal arterioles and looking like "strings of sausages". The lesions disappear within one month and present the radiological characteristics of arteritis of medium caliber vessels. The clinical symptoms are suggestive of meningeal haemorrhage or acute cerebromeningeal oedema, with acute repetitive attacks of severe headache and agitation with obnubilation; epileptic seizures and transient neurological deficit may occur. True meningeal haemorrhage confirmed by lumbar puncture is seen in nearly one half of the cases; it seems to be due to alterations in the blood-brain barrier induced by the angiopathy. Intracerebral haematoma may develop, but the disease is usually benign and regresses spontaneously in a few days. None of the usual causes of cerebral arteritis (intra-cranial infection, collagen disease, allergic or toxic angitis) has been found. Pseudo-arteritis (notably spasm of ruptured arterial aneurysms) has been excluded. No aetiological factor common to the 11 cases reported has been elicited, although 6 of the patients had recently given birth and our 6 patients had benign virus infection before or during the clinical manifestations of the disease. In the authors' opinion, the most rewarding line of research would be the role of short acute attacks of arterial hypertension.

  10. Anti-epileptic effects of focal micro-injection of excitatory amino acid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, B; Millan, M; Patel, S; de Sarro, G

    1988-01-01

    The role of excitatory synaptic activity at various brain regions in the development and spread of seizure activity has been investigated by the focal microinjection of 2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoate (2-APH), a selective antagonist at the N-methyl-D-aspartate preferring receptor, or gamma-D-glutamyl-aminomethyl sulphonate (GAMS), a partially selective antagonist at the kainate receptor. In genetically epilepsy prone rats the seizure response to a loud sound in most effectively suppressed by focal injections of 2-APH, 0.1-1.0 nmol, in the inferior colliculus. Protection is also seen after injections of 2-APH, 25 nmoles, in the substantia nigra (pars reticulata) or the midbrain reticular formation. Motor limbic seizures induced by pilocarpine, 380 mg/kg intraperitoneally, are prevented by prior injection into the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, or the entopeduncular nucleus, of 2-APH, 10 nmol or 10 pmol, respectively. Similar protection follows the injection of 2-APH, 1-5 pmol in the piriform cortex. The convulsant effects of pilocarpine are also blocked by the focal injection of GAMS, 10 nmol in the entopeduncular nucleus. This experimental approach can indicate critical sites at which seizure activity is initiated in particular models (e.g., inferior colliculus in sound-induced seizures, and piriform cortex in limbic seizures) and the pathways controlling seizure expression, such as the basal ganglia outputs. It also identifies specific receptors at which anticonvulsant drugs may operate.

  11. An excitatory loop with astrocytes contributes to drive neurons to seizure threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gómez-Gonzalo

    Full Text Available Seizures in focal epilepsies are sustained by a highly synchronous neuronal discharge that arises at restricted brain sites and subsequently spreads to large portions of the brain. Despite intense experimental research in this field, the earlier cellular events that initiate and sustain a focal seizure are still not well defined. Their identification is central to understand the pathophysiology of focal epilepsies and to develop new pharmacological therapies for drug-resistant forms of epilepsy. The prominent involvement of astrocytes in ictogenesis was recently proposed. We test here whether a cooperation between astrocytes and neurons is a prerequisite to support ictal (seizure-like and interictal epileptiform events. Simultaneous patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ imaging techniques were performed in a new in vitro model of focal seizures induced by local applications of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA in rat entorhinal cortex slices. We found that a Ca2+ elevation in astrocytes correlates with both the initial development and the maintenance of a focal, seizure-like discharge. A delayed astrocyte activation during ictal discharges was also observed in other models (including the whole in vitro isolated guinea pig brain in which the site of generation of seizure activity cannot be precisely monitored. In contrast, interictal discharges were not associated with Ca2+ changes in astrocytes. Selective inhibition or stimulation of astrocyte Ca2+ signalling blocked or enhanced, respectively, ictal discharges, but did not affect interictal discharge generation. Our data reveal that neurons engage astrocytes in a recurrent excitatory loop (possibly involving gliotransmission that promotes seizure ignition and sustains the ictal discharge. This neuron-astrocyte interaction may represent a novel target to develop effective therapeutic strategies to control seizures.

  12. Diazepam for Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy and side effects of intermittent oral diazepam for the prevention of febrile seizure recurrence were investigated in the Departments of Clinical Pharmacology, Neurosurgery, and Biostatistics, University of Tours, France.

  13. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  14. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  15. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  16. Seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines in febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomoyuki; Sakaue, Yuko; Sokoda, Tatsuyuki; Sawai, Chihiro; Akabori, Shie; Maruo, Yoshihiro; Taga, Takashi; Ohno, Masaki; Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures. The study population comprised 14 patients with simple febrile seizures and 35 patients with complex febrile seizures. Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamine. The time from fever detection to the seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than that in nonantihistamine group. Interleukin-1beta is thought to be associated with causing febrile seizures via its dual role as a pyrogen and convulsant substance. Moreover, interleukin-1beta may activate the turnover of hypothalamic neural histamine. These considerations, along with the present results, suggest that the depletion of hypothalamic neuronal histamine induced by antihistamines may increase neuronal excitability, thereby increasing seizure susceptibility in patients with febrile seizures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prognostic parameters in benign astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, L; Gjerris, F; Klinken, L

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the prognosis of different types of benign astrocytomas and to ascertain whether patients with partially resected benign astrocytomas, or any subtype of these, would benefit from postoperative radiotherapy, we studied retrospectively material comprising 300 patients with benign...... time of patients with non-pilocytic supratentorial benign astrocytomas. The study emphasizes the necessity of a prospective combined multicenter analysis of the effect of radiation on benign astrocytomas....

  18. Topographic movie of intracranial ictal high-frequency oscillations with seizure semiology: epileptic network in Jacksonian seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Chan, Derrick W; Go, Cristina Y; Ochi, Ayako; Elliott, Irene M; Donner, Elizabeth J; Weiss, Shelly K; Snead, O Carter; Rutka, James T; Drake, James M; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We developed a technique to produce images of dynamic changes in ictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) >40 Hz recorded on subdural electroencephalography (EEG) that are time-locked to the ictal EEG and ictal semiology video. We applied this technique to Jacksonian seizures to demonstrate ictal HFO propagation along the homunculus in the primary sensory-motor cortex to visualize the underlying epileptic network. We analyzed intracranial ictal EEGs from two patients with intractable Jacksonian seizures who underwent epilepsy surgery. We calculated the degrees of increase in amplitude within 40-80, 80-200, and 200-300 Hz frequency bands compared to the interictal period and converted them into topographic movies projected onto the brain surface picture. We combined these data with the ictal EEGs and video of the patient demonstrating ictal semiology. The ictal HFOs began in the sensory cortex and appeared concomitantly with the sensory aura. They then propagated to the motor cortex at the same time that focal motor symptoms evolved. As the seizure progressed, the ictal HFOs spread or reverberated in the rolandic region. However, even when the seizure became secondarily generalized, the ictal HFOs were confined to the rolandic region. In both cases, there was increased amplitude of higher frequency bands during seizure initiation compared to seizure progression. This combined movie showed the ictal HFO propagation corresponding to the ictal semiology in Jacksonian seizures and revealed the epileptic network involved in seizure initiation and progression. This method may advance understanding of neural network activities relating to clinical seizure generation and propagation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2010 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Expansive focal cemento-osseous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Emel Uzun; Acikgoz, Aydan; Ozan, Bora; Zengin, Ayse Zeynep; Gunhan, Omer

    2012-01-01

    To present a case of expansive focal cemento-osseous dysplasia and emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis. Cemento-osseous dysplasia is categorized into three subtypes on the basis of the clinical and radiographic features: Periapical, focal and florid. The focal type exhibits a single site of involvement in any tooth-bearing or edentulous area of the jaws. These lesions are usually asymptomatic; therefore, they are frequently diagnosed incidentally during routine radiographic examinations. Lesions are usually benign, show limited growth, and do not require further surgical intervention, but periodic follow-up is recommended because occasionally, this type of dysplasia progresses into florid osseous dysplasia and simple bone cysts are formed. A 24-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic for swelling in the left edentulous mandibular premolarmolar region and felt discomfort when she wore her prosthetics. She had no pain, tenderness or paresthesia. Clinical examination showed that the swelling in the posterior mandible that was firm, nonfluctuant and covered by normal mucosa. On panoramic radiography and computed tomography, a well defined lesion of approximately 1.5 cm in diameter of mixed density was observed. The swelling increased slightly in size over 2 years making it difficult to use prosthetics and, therefore, the lesion was totally excised under local anesthesia, and surgical specimens were submitted for histopathological examination. The histopathological diagnosis was focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. In the present case, because of the increasing size of the swelling making it difficult to use prosthetics, young age of the patient and localization of the lesion, in the initial examination, cemento-ossifying fibroma was suspected, and the lesion was excised surgically; the histopathological diagnosis confirmed it as focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. We present a case of expansive focal cemento-osseous dysplasia. Differential diagnosis

  20. MMR Vaccination and Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Hviid, Anders; Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: The rate of febrile seizures increases following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination but it is unknown whether the rate varies according to personal or family history of seizures, perinatal factors, or socioeconomic status. Furthermore, little is known about the long-term outcome...... of febrile seizures following vaccination. OBJECTIVES: To estimate incidence rate ratios (RRs) and risk differences of febrile seizures following MMR vaccination within subgroups of children and to evaluate the clinical outcome of febrile seizures following vaccination. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS......: Incidence of first febrile seizure, recurrent febrile seizures, and subsequent epilepsy. RESULTS: A total of 439,251 children (82%) received MMR vaccination and 17,986 children developed febrile seizures at least once; 973 of these febrile seizures occurred within 2 weeks of MMR vaccination. The RR...

  1. Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z

    2007-10-01

    Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy.

  2. Imaging benign inflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, S; Asad-Syed, M; Boisserie-Lacroix, M; Palussière, J; Hurtevent, G

    2012-02-01

    Benign mastitis is a rare disease and its management is difficult. The diagnostic challenge is to distinguish it from carcinomatous mastitis. We make a distinction between acute mastitis secondary to an infection, to inflammation around a benign structure or to superficial thrombophlebitis, and chronic, principally plasma cell and idiopathic granulomatous mastitis. Imaging is often non-specific but we need to know and look for certain ultrasound, mammogram or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs to give a pointer as early as possible towards a benign aetiology. A biopsy should be undertaken systematically where there is the slightest diagnostic doubt, to avoid failing to recognise a carcinomatous mastitis. Copyright © 2011 Éditions française de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Tomographic imaging of the spleen: the role of morphological and metabolic features in differentiating benign from malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Iodice, Delfina; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Segreto, Sabrina; Capece, Sergio; Sica, Giacomo; Magliulo, Mario; Ciancia, Giuseppe; Pace, Leonardo; Salvatore, Marco

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the tomographic features in differentiating benign from malignant splenic diseases, 54 patients with a cytohistological examination and a contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (ce-MDCT) and/or positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were retrospectively selected. Significant associations were observed between ce-MDCT Pattern 3 (focal hyperdense lesion) and Pattern 4 (infarcts/cysts) as well as PET/CT Pattern 3 (focal photopenia/diffuse uptakebenign pathologies, and between ce-MDCT Pattern 1 (splenomegaly without focal lesions) and Pattern 2 (focal hypodense lesion) as well as PET/CT Pattern 1 (diffuse uptake ≥ liver) and Pattern 2 (focal increased uptake) and malignant diseases. No significant association between benign or malignant diseases and spleen volumes and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) as well as lesion characteristics was observed. The metabolic data do not improve the performance of morphological patterns.

  4. Bimaxillary Oral Focal Mucinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sunil; Malik, Sunita; Mittal, Hitesh Chander; Singh, Gurdarshan; Kamra, Hemlata

    2016-10-01

    Oral focal mucinosis is considered as oral counterpart of cutaneous focal mucinosis. The preoperative diagnosis of mucinosis is almost impossible because of its rarity and clinical similarity to other lesions of various etiologies. The histological diagnosis of oral mucinosis is important to better understand the etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities, and any recurrence of the lesion besides differentiating from the other soft tissue lesions.The purpose of this paper is to report the first case of bimaxillary involvement with dome-shaped elevated, rounded, asymptomatic, normally colored swelling in left posterior palatal mucosa and left mandibular posterior region in a 25-year old woman who was diagnosed as oral focal mucinosis histopathologically.

  5. Global and regional functional connectivity maps of neural oscillations in focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Hinkley, Leighton B; Kort, Naomi S; Imber, Brandon S; Mizuiri, Danielle; Honma, Susanne M; Findlay, Anne M; Garrett, Coleman; Cheung, Paige L; Mantle, Mary; Tarapore, Phiroz E; Knowlton, Robert C; Chang, Edward F; Kirsch, Heidi E; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-08-01

    Intractable focal epilepsy is a devastating disorder with profound effects on cognition and quality of life. Epilepsy surgery can lead to seizure freedom in patients with focal epilepsy; however, sometimes it fails due to an incomplete delineation of the epileptogenic zone. Brain networks in epilepsy can be studied with resting-state functional connectivity analysis, yet previous investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging or electrocorticography have produced inconsistent results. Magnetoencephalography allows non-invasive whole-brain recordings, and can be used to study both long-range network disturbances in focal epilepsy and regional connectivity at the epileptogenic zone. In magnetoencephalography recordings from presurgical epilepsy patients, we examined: (i) global functional connectivity maps in patients versus controls; and (ii) regional functional connectivity maps at the region of resection, compared to the homotopic non-epileptogenic region in the contralateral hemisphere. Sixty-one patients were studied, including 30 with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and 31 with focal neocortical epilepsy. Compared with a group of 31 controls, patients with epilepsy had decreased resting-state functional connectivity in widespread regions, including perisylvian, posterior temporo-parietal, and orbitofrontal cortices (P regional connectivity within the resection site (n = 24) were more likely to achieve seizure postoperative seizure freedom (87.5% with Engel I outcome) than those with neutral (n = 15, 64.3% seizure free) or decreased (n = 23, 47.8% seizure free) regional connectivity (P < 0.02, chi-square). Widespread global decreases in functional connectivity are observed in patients with focal epilepsy, and may reflect deleterious long-term effects of recurrent seizures. Furthermore, enhanced regional functional connectivity at the area of resection may help predict seizure outcome and aid surgical planning.

  6. Low-Power Implantable Device for Onset Detection and Subsequent Treatment of Epileptic Seizures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariqus Salam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, there has been growing interest in neuro-responsive intracerebral local treatments of seizures, such as focal drug delivery, focal cooling, or electrical stimulation. This mode of treatment requires an effective intracerebral electroencephalographic acquisition system, seizure detector, brain stimulator, and wireless system that consume ultra-low power. This review focuses on alternative brain stimulation treatments for medically intractable epilepsy patients. We mainly discuss clinical studies of long-term responsive stimulation and suggest safer optimized therapeutic options for epilepsy. Finally, we conclude our study with the proposed low-power, implantable fully integrated device that automatically detects low-voltage fast activity ictal onsets and triggers focal treatment to disrupt seizure progression. The detection performance was verified using intracerebral electroencephalographic recordings from two patients with epilepsy. Further experimental validation of this prototype is underway.

  7. 'Focal thyroid inferno' on color Doppler ultrasonography: A specific feature of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Xianshui, E-mail: fuxs1968@163.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Guo, Limei, E-mail: guolimei@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Huabin, E-mail: huabinzhang@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Ran, Weiqiang, E-mail: ranwq-sina@vip.sina.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Fu, Peng, E-mail: fupeng01@gmail.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Zhiqiang, E-mail: lizhq126@126.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen, Wen, E-mail: wendy7989@sina.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Jiang, Ling, E-mail: papayaling@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Jinrui, E-mail: jinrui_wang@sina.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Jia, Jianwen, E-mail: drjia88@sohu.com [Department of Ultrasound, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate color-Doppler features predictive of focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Materials and methods: A total of 521 patients with 561 thyroid nodules that underwent surgeries or gun biopsies were included in this study. These nodules were divided into three groups: focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (104 nodules in 101 patients), benignity other than focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis (73 nodules in 70 patients), and malignancy (358 nodules in 350 patients). On color Doppler sonography, four vascularity types were determined as: hypovascularity, marked internal flow, marked peripheral flow and focal thyroid inferno. The {chi}{sup 2} test was performed to seek the potential vascularity type with the predictive ability of certain thyroid pathology. Furthermore, the gray-scale features of each nodule were also studied. Results: The vascularity type I (hypovascularity) was more often seen in focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis than other benignity and malignancy (46% vs. 20.5% and 19%). While the type II (marked internal flow) showed the opposite tendency (26.9% [focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis] vs. 45.2% [other benignity] and 52.8% [malignancy]). However, type III (marked peripheral flow) was unable to predict any thyroid pathology. Importantly, type IV (focal thyroid inferno) was exclusive to focal Hashimoto's thyroiditis. All 8 type IV nodules appeared to be solid, hypoechoic, and well-defined. Using 'focal thyroid inferno' as an indicator of FHT, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 7.7% and 100% respectively. Conclusions: The vascularity type of 'focal thyroid inferno' is specific for focal Hashimoto thyroiditis. Recognition of this particular feature may avoid unnecessary interventional procedures for some solid hypoechoic thyroid nodules suspicious of malignancy.

  8. Global and regional functional connectivity maps of neural oscillations in focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Hinkley, Leighton B.; Kort, Naomi S.; Imber, Brandon S.; Mizuiri, Danielle; Honma, Susanne M.; Findlay, Anne M.; Garrett, Coleman; Cheung, Paige L.; Mantle, Mary; Tarapore, Phiroz E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Chang, Edward F.; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2015-01-01

    Intractable focal epilepsy is a devastating disorder with profound effects on cognition and quality of life. Epilepsy surgery can lead to seizure freedom in patients with focal epilepsy; however, sometimes it fails due to an incomplete delineation of the epileptogenic zone. Brain networks in epilepsy can be studied with resting-state functional connectivity analysis, yet previous investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging or electrocorticography have produced inconsistent results. Magnetoencephalography allows non-invasive whole-brain recordings, and can be used to study both long-range network disturbances in focal epilepsy and regional connectivity at the epileptogenic zone. In magnetoencephalography recordings from presurgical epilepsy patients, we examined: (i) global functional connectivity maps in patients versus controls; and (ii) regional functional connectivity maps at the region of resection, compared to the homotopic non-epileptogenic region in the contralateral hemisphere. Sixty-one patients were studied, including 30 with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and 31 with focal neocortical epilepsy. Compared with a group of 31 controls, patients with epilepsy had decreased resting-state functional connectivity in widespread regions, including perisylvian, posterior temporo-parietal, and orbitofrontal cortices (P epilepsy and higher frequency of consciousness-impairing seizures (P seizure postoperative seizure freedom (87.5% with Engel I outcome) than those with neutral (n = 15, 64.3% seizure free) or decreased (n = 23, 47.8% seizure free) regional connectivity (P epilepsy, and may reflect deleterious long-term effects of recurrent seizures. Furthermore, enhanced regional functional connectivity at the area of resection may help predict seizure outcome and aid surgical planning. PMID:25981965

  9. Focal cortical dysplasia of the temporal lobe with late-onset partial epilepsy: serial quantitative MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademacher, J.; Seitz, R.J. [Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Aulich, A. [Department of Radiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Reifenberger, G. [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kiwit, J.C.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Langen, K.J.; Schmidt, D. [Institute of Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    We describe serial studies of focal cortical dysplasia causing temporal lobe seizures and progressive aphasia in a 54-year-old woman. Initially, MRI volumetry of the temporal lobes showed significant left cortical thickening corresponding to an elevated aminoacid uptake in the left temporoparietal and inferior frontal cortex on SPECT using 3-[{sup 123}I]iodo-{alpha}-methyl-l-tyrosine (IMT). After 1 year there was severe shrinkage of the left temporal lobe, possibly the result of recurrent complex partial seizures. (orig.)

  10. Intergenerational Transmission of Enhanced Seizure Susceptibility after Febrile Seizures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Dengchang; Feng, Bo; Dai, Yunjian; Wu, Xiaohua; Chen, Bin; Xu, Cenglin; Tang, Yangshun; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shihong; Wang, Shuang; Luo, Benyan; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    .... Here, we demonstrate that prolonged febrile seizures induced by exposure of rat pups to a hyperthermic environment enhance seizure susceptibility not only in these hyperthermia-treated rats but also...

  11. Ictal headache: headache as first ictal symptom in focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainese, Filippo; Mai, Roberto; Francione, Stefano; Mainardi, Federico; Zanchin, Giorgio; Paladin, Francesco

    2011-12-01

    Headache may be associated with seizures as a preictal, ictal, or postictal phenomenon, but it is often neglected because of the dramatic neurological manifestations of the seizure. Headache can also be the sole or predominant clinical manifestation of epileptic seizures, although this is a relatively rare condition. We describe two cases of focal symptomatic drug-resistant epilepsy with headache as the first ictal symptom. In both cases, the headache, which lasted a few seconds, was contralateral to the ictal discharge and did not have the clinical features of migraine. Ictal headache is a rare epilepsy symptom that can help to localize ictal EEG discharges. Recently, the term ictal epileptic headache has been proposed in cases in which headache is the sole ictal epileptic manifestation Diagnosis requires the simultaneous onset of headache with EEG-demonstrated ictal discharges.

  12. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate gets bigger, it may press on the urethra and cause the flow of urine to be slower and less forceful. "Benign" means the enlargement isn't caused by cancer or infection. "Hyperplasia" means enlargement. SymptomsWhat are the ...

  13. Benign segmental bronchial obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loercher, U.

    1988-09-01

    The benigne segmental bronchial obstruction - mostly discovered on routine chest films - can well be diagnosed by CT. The specific findings in CT are the site of the bronchial obstruction, the mucocele and the localized empysema of the involved segment. Furthermore CT allows a better approach to the underlying process.

  14. Benign Fibrous Histiocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa Varma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous histiocytomas (FHs are mesenchymal tumors that may be benign or malignant. Ocular involvement by FHs is infrequent and primarily limited to the orbit. Rarely, FHs can also involve the conjunctiva and perilimbal area. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with lid, conjunctival, and neck FHs. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology.

  15. Focal neurological deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other examples of focal loss of function include: Horner syndrome : small pupil on one side, one-sided ... 403. Read More Alertness - decreased Fine motor control Horner syndrome Hypotonia Movement - uncoordinated Muscle function loss Neurologic ...

  16. Efficacy of lacosamide on seizures and myoclonus in a patient with epilepsia partialis continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalletti, Maddalena; Comanducci, Angela; Vagaggini, Alessandro; Bucciardini, Luca; Grippo, Antonello; Amantini, Aldo

    2013-06-01

    A 39-year-old male with epilepsia partialis continua, refractory to first- and second-line antiepileptic drugs, is described. Lacosamide produced a progressive antiepileptic effect on Jacksonian motor seizures and subsequently on positive myoclonus, which developed into negative myoclonus before complete resolution. Our report confirms the efficacy of lacosamide on focal motor refractory status epilepticus and documents a unique effect of lacosamide on seizure semiology.

  17. Characterization of febrile seizures and febrile seizure susceptibility in mouse inbred strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gassen, K L I; Hessel, E V S; Ramakers, G M J; Notenboom, R G E; Wolterink-Donselaar, I G; Brakkee, J H; Godschalk, T C; Qiao, X; Spruijt, B M; van Nieuwenhuizen, O; de Graan, P N E

    2008-07-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most prevalent seizures in children. Although FS are largely benign, complex FS increase the risk to develop temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Studies in rat models for FS have provided information about functional changes in the hippocampus after complex FS. However, our knowledge about the genes and pathways involved in the causes and consequences of FS is still limited. To enable molecular, genetic and knockout studies, we developed and characterized an FS model in mice and used it as a phenotypic screen to analyze FS susceptibility. Hyperthermia was induced by warm air in 10- to 14-day-old mice and induced FS in all animals. Under the conditions used, seizure-induced behavior in mice and rats was similar. In adulthood, treated mice showed increased hippocampal Ih current and seizure susceptibility, characteristics also seen after FS in rats. Of the seven genetically diverse mouse strains screened for FS susceptibility, C57BL/6J mice were among the most susceptible, whereas A/J mice were among the most resistant. Strains genetically similar to C57BL/6J also showed a susceptible phenotype. Our phenotypic data suggest that complex genetics underlie FS susceptibility and show that the C57BL/6J strain is highly susceptible to FS. As this strain has been described as resistant to convulsants, our data indicate that susceptibility genes for FS and convulsants are distinct. Insight into the mechanisms underlying seizure susceptibility and FS may help to identify markers for the early diagnosis of children at risk for complex FS and TLE and may provide new leads for treatment.

  18. Extended seizure detection algorithm for intracranial EEG recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, T. W.; Remvig, L. S.; Henriksen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We implemented and tested an existing seizure detection algorithm for scalp EEG (sEEG) with the purpose of improving it to intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings. Method: iEEG was obtained from 16 patients with focal epilepsy undergoing work up for resective epilepsy surgery. Each patient...... had 4 or 5 recorded seizures and 24 hours of non-ictal data were used for evaluation. Data from three electrodes placed at the ictal focus were used for the analysis. A wavelet based feature extraction algorithm delivered input to a support vector machine (SVM) classifier for distinction between ictal...... the original implementation a sensitivity of 92.8% and a false positive ratio (FPR) of 0.93/h were obtained. Our extension of the algorithm rendered a 95.9% sensitivity and only 0.65 false detections per hour. Conclusion: Better seizure detection can be performed when the higher frequencies in the iEEG were...

  19. Seizures in Children With Cerebral Palsy and White Matter Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Monica S; Mackay, Mark T; Fahey, Michael; Reddihough, Dinah; Reid, Susan M; Williams, Katrina; Harvey, A Simon

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the prevalence, syndromes, and evolution of seizure disorders in children with cerebral palsy (CP) due to white matter injury (WMI). For this population-based cohort study, brain MRI scans and medical records were reviewed in children in the Victorian Cerebral Palsy Register born between 1999 and 2006 recorded as having WMI. Children were excluded if they had features of an undiagnosed syndrome, associated cortical malformation or injury, or no medical contact in the preceding year. Included were 166 children with CP and isolated WMI due to presumed vascular insufficiency or hemorrhage; 87 were born preterm. Seizure and CP details were obtained from medical records and interviews, and EEG recordings were reviewed. Forty-one children (25%) had seizures beyond the neonatal period. Four children had West syndrome, which resolved with treatment. Thirteen children had febrile seizures that they outgrew. Thirty children had focal epilepsy with seizure manifestations and EEG discharges typical of early-onset childhood occipital epilepsy or childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes; 23 have outgrown these seizures. Two children had idiopathic generalized epilepsy; it was ongoing in 1 child. Fourteen children had evolution from 1 epileptic syndrome to another. At last follow-up (median age, 12.7 years; minimum age, 9.7 years), 80% had not had a seizure for >2 years. The electroclinical features of seizure disorders associated with CP and WMI are those of the age-limited, epileptic syndromes of childhood, with favorable outcome in the majority. The findings have important implications for counseling and drug treatment. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Entropy analyses of spatiotemporal synchronizations in brain signals from patients with focal epilepsies

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2010-01-01

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) data intracerebrally recorded from 20 epileptic humans with different brain origins of focal epilepsies or types of seizures, ages and sexes are investigated (nearly 700 million data). Multi channel univariate amplitude analyses are performed and it is shown that time dependent Shannon entropies can be used to predict focal epileptic seizure onsets in different epileptogenic brain zones of different patients. Formations or time evolutions of the synchronizations in the brain signals from epileptogenic or non epileptogenic areas of the patients in ictal interval or inter-ictal interval are further investigated employing spatial or temporal differences of the entropies.

  1. Severe depression as the sole symptom of affective focal status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2014-05-14

    Depression as well as fear, joy and anger have been described as the semiological features of focal epileptic seizures. When emotions present as the sole symptoms of epileptic seizures, they may easily be misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder. We describe a patient with affective focal status epilepticus, secondary to limbic encephalitis, in which depression was the only clinical manifestation. Through EEG correlates the epileptic nature of depression could be proven. Furthermore, we discuss the association between epilepsy and depression, as well as the link between ictal depression and suicidal rates.

  2. [Pyridoxine dependent seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K N; Ostergaard, J R; Møller, S M

    1994-10-17

    Pyridoxine dependent seizures is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. Its manifestations are intractable epilepsy leading to death in status epilepticus. Treatment with pyridoxine prevents the seizures and normalizes the EEG. Early diagnosis is important for the intellectual outcome. In Denmark, the disease has occurred in a child of healthy Tamil immigrants, who are first cousins. The child's case story is described and points to awareness of increased occurrence of rare autosomal recessive disorders in immigrants from cultures with traditional consanguinity. We suggest giving a pyridoxine test dosis to all cases of severe epilepsy and status epilepticus in infants younger than 18 months.

  3. SPECT in Focal Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick Duncan

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion changes during seizures were first observed in the 1930s. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT was developed in the 1970s, and tracers suitable for the imaging of regional cerebral perfusion (rCP became available in the 1980s. The method was first used to study rCP in the interictal phase, and this showed areas of low perfusion in a proportion of cases, mainly in patients with temporal lobe epilepsies. However, the trapping paradigm of tracers such as hexamethyl propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO provided a practicable method of studying changes in rCP during seizures, and a literature was established in the late 1980s and early 1990s showing a typical sequence of changes during and after seizures of mesial temporal lobe origin; the ictal phase was associated with large increases in perfusion throughout the temporal lobe, with first the lateral, then the mesial temporal lobe becoming hypoperfused in the postictal phase. Activation and inhibition of other structures, such as the basal ganglia and frontal cortex, were also seen. Studies of seizures originating elsewhere in the brain have shown a variety of patterns of change, according to the structures involved. These changes have been used practically to aid the process of localisation of the epileptogenic zone so that epilepsy surgery can be planned.

  4. Usefulness of ketogenic diet in a girl with migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tatsuo; Imai, Katsumi; Oboshi, Taikan; Fujiwara, Yuh; Takeshita, Saoko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi

    2016-06-01

    Migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI) are an age-specific epilepsy syndrome characterized by migrating focal seizures, which are intractable to various antiepileptic drugs and cause severe developmental delay. We report a case of MPSI with heterozygous missense mutation in KCNT1, which was successfully managed by ketogenic diet. At age 2months, the patient developed epilepsy initially manifesting focal seizures with eye deviation and apnea, then evolving to secondarily generalized clonic convulsion. Various antiepileptic drugs including phenytoin, valproic acid, zonisamide, clobazam, levetiracetam, vitamin B6, and carbamazepine were not effective, but high-dose phenobarbital allowed discontinuation of midazolam infusion. Ictal scalp electroencephalogram showed migrating focal seizures. MPSI was suspected and she was transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Potassium bromide (KBr) was partially effective, but the effect was transient. High-dose KBr caused severe adverse effects such as over-sedation and hypercapnia, with no further effects on the seizures. At age 9months, we started a ketogenic diet, which improved seizure frequency and severity without obvious adverse effects, allowing her to be discharged from hospital. Ketogenic diet should be tried in patients with MPSI unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs. In MPSI, the difference in treatment response in patients with and those without KCNT1 mutation remains unknown. Accumulation of case reports would contribute to establish effective treatment options for MPSI.

  5. Ictal EEG/fMRI study of vertiginous seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Alessandra; Carnì, Marco; Casciato, Sara; Vaudano, Anna Elisabetta; Fattouch, Jinane; Fanella, Martina; Albini, Mariarita; Basili, Luca Manfredi; Lucignani, Giulia; Scapeccia, Marco; Tomassi, Regina; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Colonnese, Claudio; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are extremely common complaints, related to either peripheral or central nervous system disorders. Among the latter, epilepsy has to be taken into consideration: indeed, vertigo may be part of the initial aura of a focal epileptic seizure in association with other signs/symptoms, or represent the only ictal manifestation, a rare phenomenon known as "vertiginous" or "vestibular" seizure. These ictal symptoms are usually related to a discharge arising from/involving temporal or parietal areas, which are supposed to be a crucial component of the so-called "vestibular cortex". In this paper, we describe three patients suffering from drug-resistant focal epilepsy, symptomatic of malformations of cortical development or perinatal hypoxic/ischemic lesions located in the posterior regions, who presented clusters of vertiginous seizures. The high recurrence rate of such events, recorded during video-EEG monitoring sessions, offered the opportunity to perform an ictal EEG/fMRI study to identify seizure-related hemodynamic changes. The ictal EEG/fMRI revealed the main activation clusters in the temporo-parieto-occipital regions, which are widely recognized to be involved in the processing of vestibular information. Interestingly, ictal deactivation was also detected in the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere, suggesting the ictal involvement of cortical-subcortical structures known to be part of the vestibular integration network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporal seizure focus and status epilepticus are associated with high-sensitive troponin I elevation after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-09-01

    Postictal elevation of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI), a highly specific biomarker for myocardial ischemia, has been reported. We aimed at evaluating its association of high-sensitive troponin I (TNI) with seizure type and focus, as well as vascular risk factors. TNI was measured in 247 patients admitted to our clinic via the emergency room with an acute epileptic seizure. TNI control measurements were performed in 61.5% of cases. All patients underwent electroencephalography and cerebral imaging. Seizure focus - when possible - was determined using results from these examinations as well as clinical data. Of 247 patients, 133 (53.8%) were men, the mean age was 59 ± 18 years. 70 (28.3%) patients had focal and 177 (71.7%) generalized seizures. Status epilepticus was present in 38 cases (15.4%). Mean TNI was 0.05 ± 0.17. TNI was elevated in 27 patients (10.9%). Higher age, status epilepticus and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with TNI elevation in multivariate analysis. In 21 (13.8%) of the patients with TNI control measurement, TNI was continuously elevated. Higher age and temporal seizure focus were significantly associated with continuously high TNI. Coronary heart disease and vascular risk factors were significantly associated with high TNI only in univariate analysis. No patient had a symptomatic myocardial ischemia. Postictal TNI elevation is relatively common in older patients with status epilepticus or temporal seizure focus. These data support the concept of relevant and possibly dangerous ictal effects on cardiac function especially in temporal lobe seizures. Although the risk of manifest postictal myocardial infarction seems to be very low, selected patients could profit from closer monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative analysis by renormalized entropy of invasive electroencephalograph recordings in focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopitzki, K.; Warnke, P. C.; Timmer, J.

    1998-10-01

    Invasive electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings of ten patients suffering from focal epilepsy were analyzed using the method of renormalized entropy. Introduced as a complexity measure for the different regimes of a dynamical system, the feature was tested here for its spatiotemporal behavior in epileptic seizures. In all patients a decrease of renormalized entropy within the ictal phase of seizure was found. Furthermore, the strength of this decrease is monotonically related to the distance of the recording location to the focus. The results suggest that the method of renormalized entropy is a useful procedure for clinical applications like seizure detection and localization of epileptic foci.

  8. Quantitative analysis by renormalized entropy of invasive electroencephalograph recordings in focal epilepsy

    CERN Document Server

    Kopitzki, K; Timmer, J

    1998-01-01

    Invasive electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings of ten patients suffering from focal epilepsy were analyzed using the method of renormalized entropy. Introduced as a complexity measure for the different regimes of a dynamical system, the feature was tested here for its spatio-temporal behavior in epileptic seizures. In all patients a decrease of renormalized entropy within the ictal phase of seizure was found. Furthermore, the strength of this decrease is monotonically related to the distance of the recording location to the focus. The results suggest that the method of renormalized entropy is a useful procedure for clinical applications like seizure detection and localization of epileptic foci.

  9. Management of seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib

    Seizures are common events in children and up to 10% of all children experience at least one seizure during their childhood. They can be triggered by many conditions such as fever, medications or injury. Febrile seizures are the most common types of seizures, affecting 3-4% of children. While epilepsy is typically recurrent and unprovoked, a single, isolated seizure is not epilepsy. Taking a detailed history of the seizure description helps establish the diagnosis. A video recording of the event can also support the diagnosis and rule out non-epileptic seizures that resemble seizures, such as pseudo-seizure. Seeing a child having a seizure, particularly if it is the first one, is usually frightening and distressing for the parents. First seizure should always be evaluated by health professionals because of a possible serious underlying cause. If the seizure occurs at home, the child should be placed in the recovery side position to prevent the swallowing of any vomit. The care of a child who does have epilepsy is best achieved by a community or hospital epilepsy specialist nurse. These nurses play a pivotal role in providing a close link between the epileptic children and their families. Such a nurse is also in an ideal position to establish a link between the doctor and affected families, offering valuable advice and support, and visiting the epileptic child at home.

  10. GELASTIC SEIZURES IN TUBEROUS SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the historical description, nosological entity, clinical and electroencephalographic manifestations of gelastic seizures, a rare type of epileptic seizures manifesting as sudden attacks of spasmodic laughter. They describe their case of gelastic seizures in a child with tuberous sclerosis.

  11. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients.

  12. Seizures Complicating Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical data of 116 patients, 1 month to <5 years of age, admitted for bacterial meningitis, and grouped according to those with and without seizures during hospitalization, were compared in a study at Buddhist Dalin Tzu Chi General Hospital, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and other centers in Taiwan.

  13. Exacerbation of benign familial neonatal epilepsy induced by massive doses of phenobarbital and midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tomoki; Shimizu, Miki; Sekiguchi, Kazuhito; Ishii, Atsushi; Ihara, Yukiko; Hirose, Shinichi; Izumi, Tatsuro

    2014-08-01

    Barbiturates and benzodiazepines are the first-line anticonvulsants for neonatal seizures. However, in immature brains, those drugs may lead to paradoxical neuronal excitation. A patient with benign familial neonatal epilepsy developed epileptic encephalopathy after massive doses of phenobarbital that were followed by a continuous infusion of midazolam on postnatal day 3. Electroencephalography revealed rhythmic delta activity in clusters with migrating epileptic foci. After discontinuation of both drugs, the patient's consciousness promptly improved and her electroencephalography normalized on postnatal day 5. This baby developed persistent electroencephalographic seizures due to massive doses of phenobarbital and midazolam. Clinicians should be aware of this anticonvulsant-induced paradoxical neuronal excitation and the uncoupling phenomenon, especially in individuals with benign familial neonatal epilepsy, who have low seizure thresholds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recurrent focal myositis in a patient on maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Yadla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Focal myositis is a benign inflammatory process involving a single group of muscles. It may resolve with conservative measures or may be a harbinger for polymyositis. Very few focal myosites are recurrent, and recurrence in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis is extremely rare. Clinical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging help in identifying this entity. Muscle biopsy and histopathological evaluation are mandatory in diagnosis. It often responds to conservative treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and physiotherapy, but occasionally it requires therapy with steroids.

  15. Pure cannabidiol in the treatment of malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, Dimah; Joshi, Charuta

    2015-05-01

    Malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy is a devastating pharmacoresistent epileptic encephalopathy of unknown etiology characterized by onset in the first 6 months of life, continuous migrating focal seizures with corresponding multifocal electroencephalographic discharges, developmental deterioration, and early mortality. Recent widespread interest in the nonpsychoactive component of the cannabis plant, cannabidiol, as a potential treatment for refractory devastating epilepsies has led to individual trials initiated by families or physicians in states that have legalized medical marijuana with anecdotal success. We describe a now 10-month-old boy with malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy who made developmental gains and demonstrated sustained seizure reduction with the addition of cannabidiol to his antiepileptic regimen. This report supports a role for cannabidiol in the treatment of malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Botulinum Toxin Injections for Simple Partial Motor Seizures Associated with Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intractable epilepsy with painful partial motor seizures is a relatively rare and difficult disorder to treat. We evaluated the usefulness of botulinum toxin to reduce ictal pain. Two patients received two or four botulinum toxin (BTX injections at one-to-two-month intervals. Patient 1 had painful seizures of the right arm and hand. Patient 2 had painful seizures involving the left foot and leg. Injections were discontinued after improved seizure control following resective surgery. Both patients received significant pain relief from the injections with analgesia lasting at least two months. Seizure severity was reduced, but seizure frequency and duration were unaffected. For these patients, BTX was effective in temporarily relieving pain associated with muscle contraction in simple partial motor seizures. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that modulation of motor end-organ feedback affects focal seizure generation. BTX is a safe and reversible treatment that should be considered as part of adjunctive therapy after failure to achieve control of painful partial motor seizures.

  17. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    2017-08-01

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Unusual benign breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.J.R. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gporter@ncht.trent.nhs.uk; Evans, A.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); Lee, A.H.S. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); Hamilton, L.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom); James, J.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Hucknall Rd, Nottingham NG5 1PB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this article is to show examples of the radiological (mammography and/or ultrasound) and pathological appearances of unusual benign breast lesions. The conditions covered are granular cell tumours, fibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, myofibroblastomas, haemangiomas, neurofibromas, and leiomyomas. The article includes the first published description of the ultrasound appearance of a myofibroblastoma. Knowledge of these appearances may help confirm or refute radiological-pathological concordance of percutaneous biopsy results during multidisciplinary assessment of these lesions and aid patient management.

  19. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Ortega, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease but its molecular mechanism remains unknown. Using human tissue samples from 16 patients diagnosed with BPH, we performed an ultrastructural study to clarify the mechanism and the role of glandular cells in this pathology. We have made a description of all the changes that suffers the prostatic epithelium. We have shown that the glandular architecture presents many non-physiological forms such as papillae and papillary fronds. Basal c...

  20. Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerminara, Caterina; El Malhany, Nadia; Roberto, Denis; Curatolo, Paolo

    2013-12-09

    Focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain is an unusual partial epilepsy characterized by paroxysmal episodes of abdominal or visceral pain, disturbance of awareness and electroencephalographic abnormalities. We describe a new case of ictal abdominal pain in which gastrointestinal complaints were the only manifestation of seizures and review the previously described pediatric patients. In our patient clinical findings, ictal EEG abnormalities, and a good response to antiepileptic drugs allowed us to make a diagnosis of focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain. This is a rare epileptic phenomenon that should be suspected in patients with unexplained paroxysmal abdominal pain and migraine-like symptoms. We suggest that, after the exclusion of more common etiologies, focal epilepsy with ictal abdominal pain should be considered in patients with paroxysmal abdominal pain and ictal EEG abnormalities.

  1. SNAP focal plane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  2. Treatment of focal epithelial hyperplasia with trichloroacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    J. Harris Ricardo; M. Carmona Lorduy; A. Díaz Caballero

    2012-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign disease which has a chronic course that manifests as characteristic multiple small papules or nodules. They are predominantly found in the oral mucosa, gingiva and tongue. The surface of the lesions is smooth and it varies in size. It is an asymptomatic disease caused by human papillomavirus, affecting mainly children and adolescents. In this report, we describe four cases referred to the Stomatology and Oral Surgery Department of the Faculty of Dentis...

  3. Treatment of focal epithelial hyperplasia with trichloroacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    J. Harris Ricardo; M. Carmona Lorduy; A. Díaz Caballero

    2012-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign disease which has a chronic course that manifests as characteristic multiple small papules or nodules. They are predominantly found in the oral mucosa, gingiva and tongue. The surface of the lesions is smooth and it varies in size. It is an asymptomatic disease caused by human papillomavirus, affecting mainly children and adolescents. In this report, we describe four cases referred to the Stomatology and Oral Surgery Department of the Faculty of Dentis...

  4. Unexpected marked seizure improvement in paediatric epilepsy surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Mathiasen, René; Uldall, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Epilepsy surgery is performed based on the assumption that medical refractory epilepsy will continue. Rarely seizure freedom occurs before surgery is performed, while the patient is being evaluated as an epilepsy surgery candidate. The aim of this study was to describe the number of children withdrawn from an epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected seizure improvement. We retrospectively studied 173 children under 18 years with medical refractory epilepsy referred for epilepsy surgery between 1996 and 2010. Medical records were reviewed in 2012 and 2015. At the first evaluation point in 2012, 13 patients were withdrawn from the epilepsy surgery programme due to unexpected marked improvement. In 2015, 6 of them were still seizure free. They had unexpected seizure freedom due to change in AED treatment (n=3) or after a febrile episode (n=3). The mean number of years they had had seizures was 3.4 years (range 0.6-6.2 years) and the number of seizures at inclusion was 209 per month (range 6-750 per month). The duration of follow-up was 6.6 years after inclusion into the epilepsy surgery programme (range 4.0-13.0 years). The aetiology of the epilepsy for these patients was heterotopia (n=1), focal cortical dysplasia (n=3), infarction (n=1) and unknown, with normal MRI (n=1). They all had an IQ in the normal range. Two of the remaining 7 children were operated later. Unexpected seizure control may occur during epilepsy surgery evaluation. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroimaging observations in a cohort of elderly manifesting with new onset seizures: Experience from a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Sinha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of epilepsy is higher among elderly patients. The clinical manifestations of seizures, causes of epilepsy, and choice of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs are different in elderly people with epilepsy compared to the young. Aim: To evaluate the imaging (CT/MRI observations in elderly patients manifesting with new-onset seizures. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and one elderly patients with new onset seizures, >60 years (age: 68.0 ± 7.5 years; M:F = 1.8:1 from Jan′ 07 to Jan′ 09, were prospectively recruited. Observations of cranial CT scan (n = 201 and MR imaging (n = 43 were analyzed. Results: The type of seizures included: Simple partial (42%, generalized tonic-clonic (30.3%, and complex partial (27.4%. The pattern of epilepsy syndromes were acute symptomatic (42.3%, remote symptomatic (18.4%, cryptogenic (37.8%, and idiopathic (1.5%. Seizures were controlled with monotherapy in 85%. The CT scan (n = 201 revealed cerebral atrophy (139, mild (79, moderate (43, and severe (18; focal lesions (98, infarcts (45, hemorrhages (18, granuloma (16, tumor (15 and gliosis (4, and hemispheric atrophy (1, white matter changes (75 and diffuse edema (21. An MRI (n = 43 showed variable degree of cerebral atrophy (31; white matter changes (20; focal cerebral lesions (24; - infarct (7; intracranial hemorrhage (6; granuloma (5; tumor (6; gliosis (1; hemispheric atrophy (1; and prominent Virchow-Robin spaces (7; and UBOs (12. Patients with focal lesions in neuroimaging more often had partial seizures, symptomatic epilepsy, past stroke, focal deficit, absence of diffuse atrophy, focal EEG slowing, abnormal CSF, seizure recurrence at follow-up (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Brain imaging observations in elderly patients with new-onset seizures revealed underlying symptomatic nature, hence the etiology and thereby assisted in deciding the specific therapy.

  6. Focal nodular hyperplasia of the liver: an unusual association with diabetes mellitus in a child and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trizzino Antonino

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatic hemangioma, adenoma and focal nodular hyperplasia are the most frequent benign lesions of the liver, but they are all infrequent among pediatric population. The reports of focal nodular hyperplasia in children have recently increased in number, with many cases associated to drug intake, particularly to chemotherapy. We here describe, to our knowledge, the first case of focal nodular hyperplasia in association with diabetes mellitus in childhood.

  7. [Epileptic seizures in childhood: from seizure type to diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milh, M; Ticus, I; Villeneuve, N; Hugonencq, C; Mancini, J; Chabrol, B

    2008-02-01

    Epileptic seizures can be difficult to recognize in infancy and childhood because the semeiology can be misleading. Already, in the acute phase, precise assessment of the seizure is required, with active questioning about circumstances of occurrence, clinical manifestations and postictal symptoms. Laboratory tests and toxicologic screening should only be performed according to the circumstances and clinical examination in order to distinguish between symptomatic seizure and epilepsy at the beginning. Epilepsy consists in repetition of several unprovoked epileptic seizure. Assessment of the age of onset, type of seizures, interictal EEG and the neuropsychological profile are instrumental for both the diagnosis of epileptic syndrome and the choice of the right treatment. Epileptic seizures cause distress to parents and the fear they experience of death must always be taken into account.

  8. Seizures and epilepsy in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore SA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarah A Moore Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Seizures are a common presenting complaint in cats, although causes and options for the treatment of seizures in this species have been historically poorly described in the veterinary literature. Seizure manifestation in cats may be different than what is typically seen in dogs, but the underlying causes of seizure activity are the same. These include primary epilepsies, structural epilepsies, and reactive seizures. Although primary epilepsy was once believed to be rare in cats, we now commonly appreciate this syndrome, albeit at a lower frequency than in dogs. Because of this, a complete diagnostic work-up is recommended for all cats presenting for initial evaluation of seizures. Symptomatic treatment of seizures in cats is similar to dogs, with only a few limitations related to species-specific antiepileptic drug toxicities. The goal of this review is to summarize the recent veterinary literature related to feline seizures, with a focus on seizure classification, clinical manifestation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options. Keywords: antiepileptic drug, seizure classification, levetiracetam, zonisamide, phenobarbital

  9. Benign cephalic histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, F; Caputo, R; Ermacora, E; Gianni, E

    1986-09-01

    Benign cephalic histiocytosis is a self-healing non-X, nonlipid cutaneous histiocytosis of children, characterized by a papular eruption on the head. Mucous membranes and viscera are always spared. In the 13 cases reported herein, the children were otherwise in good general health. The disease appeared during the first three years of life, and spontaneous regression was complete by the age of nine years in the four cases healed to date. The histiocytic infiltrate was localized in the upper and middle dermis and contained no lipids at any stage of evolution. All the histiocytes contained coated vesicles, and 5% to 30% also contained comma-shaped bodies in their cytoplasm.

  10. Radiotherapy of benign diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, W.

    1982-10-11

    Still today radiotherapy is of decisive relevance for several benign diseases. The following ones are briefly described in this introductory article: 1. Certain inflammatory and degenerative diseases as furuncles in the face, acute thrombophlebitis, recurrent pseudoriparous abscesses, degenerative skeletal diseases, cervical syndrome and others; 2. rheumatic joint diseases; 3. Bechterew's disease; 4. primary presenile osteoporosis; 5. syringomyelia; 6. endocrine ophthalmopathy; 7. hypertrophic processes of the connective tissue; 8. hemangiomas. A detailed discussion and a profit-risk analysis is provided in the individual chapters of the magazine.

  11. Unexpected Death of a Child with Complex Febrile Seizures-Pathophysiology Similar to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhy, Brian J; Ciliberto, Michael A; Cifra, Christina L; Kirby, Patricia A; Shrock, Devin L; Nashelsky, Marcus; Richerson, George B

    2017-01-01

    Febrile seizures are usually considered relatively benign. Although some cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood have a history of febrile seizures, no documented case of febrile seizure-induced death has been reported. Here, we describe a child with complex febrile seizures who died suddenly and unexpectedly after a suspected seizure while in bed at night during the beginning phases of sleep. She was resuscitated and pronounced brain dead 2 days later at our regional medical center. Autopsy revealed multiorgan effects of hypoperfusion and did not reveal an underlying (precipitating) disease, injury, or toxicological cause of death. Although a seizure was not witnessed, it was suspected as the underlying cause of death based on the medical examiner and forensic pathologist (author Marcus Nashelsky) investigation, the post-resuscitation clinical findings, and multiple aspects of the clinical history. The child had a history of complex febrile seizures that had previously caused apnea and oxygen desaturation. She had two febrile seizures earlier on the same day of the fatal event. Interestingly, her mother also experienced a febrile seizure as a child, which led to respiratory arrest requiring cardiorespiratory resuscitation. This case suggests that in a child with complex febrile seizures, a seizure can induce death in a manner that is consistent with the majority of cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Further work is needed to better understand how and why certain individuals, with a history of epilepsy or not, die suddenly and unexpectedly from seizures. This will only occur through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying epileptic and febrile seizures and death from seizures including SUDEP.

  12. Interictal and Postictal Performances on Dichotic Listening Test in Children with Focal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, G.; Wiegand, G.; Stephani, U.

    2011-01-01

    Dichotic listening test (DL) is an important tool to disclose speech dominance in healthy subjects and in clinical cases. The aim of this study was to probe if focal epilepsy in children reveals a corresponding suppression of the ear reports contralateral to seizure onset site. Thus, 15 children and adolescents with clinically and…

  13. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in CT-undetermined focal liver lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrose, Sebastian; Karstrup, S.; Gerke, Oke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in the diagnosis of focal liver lesions, which were undetermined at CT scan. Materials and Methods: From January 2010 to December 2010, patients with CT-undetermined focal liver lesions were included in this study......, surgical resection, PET/CT and clinical follow-up. Results: The 78 included patients had 163 undetermined focal liver lesions, mean size 1.1 cm, range 0.1–5.3 cm. There were 18 malignant and 145 benign liver lesions, as defined by the standard of reference. In differentiating between benign vs. malignant......, then sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy would be 95.8% (95% CI: 66.4–99.6%), 98.6% (95% CI: 94.4–99.7%), 92.0% (95CI: 65.1–98.6%), 99.3% (95% CI: 95.0–99.9%), 98.2% (95% CI: 94.4–99.5%). Conclusion: The results of this study showed a high diagnostic accuracy for CEUS in undetermined focal liver...

  14. Characterising seizures in anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis with dynamic causal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Gerald K; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela; Englund, Marita; Wickstrom, Ronny; Friston, Karl

    2015-09-01

    We characterised the pathophysiology of seizure onset in terms of slow fluctuations in synaptic efficacy using EEG in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis. EEG recordings were obtained from two female patients with anti-NMDA-R encephalitis with recurrent partial seizures (ages 19 and 31). Focal electrographic seizure activity was localised using an empirical Bayes beamformer. The spectral density of reconstructed source activity was then characterised with dynamic causal modelling (DCM). Eight models were compared for each patient, to evaluate the relative contribution of changes in intrinsic (excitatory and inhibitory) connectivity and endogenous afferent input. Bayesian model comparison established a role for changes in both excitatory and inhibitory connectivity during seizure activity (in addition to changes in the exogenous input). Seizures in both patients were associated with a sequence of changes in inhibitory and excitatory connectivity; a transient increase in inhibitory connectivity followed by a transient increase in excitatory connectivity and a final peak of excitatory-inhibitory balance at seizure offset. These systematic fluctuations in excitatory and inhibitory gain may be characteristic of (anti NMDA-R encephalitis) seizures. We present these results as a case study and replication to motivate analyses of larger patient cohorts, to see whether our findings generalise and further characterise the mechanisms of seizure activity in anti-NMDA-R encephalitis.

  15. Effectiveness of clobazam as add-on therapy in children with refractory focal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Mariana Ribeiro Marcondes; Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Franzon, Renata Cristina; Guerreiro, Carlos A M; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of clobazam in children with refractory focal epilepsy. We investigated 100 consecutive patients concerning etiology of epilepsy, previously used antiepileptic drugs, seizure frequency and adverse events. Clobazam was introduced as add-on therapy in patients with previous failure of at least two monotherapies. Mean age was eight years-old and 39 patients were girls. Clobazam mean dosage was 23.6 mg/day. Mean use of clobazam was 18.6 months. Twenty-two patients had adverse events. Twenty-six patients became seizure-free, 11 had an improvement of >75% and in 58 there was no modification in seizure frequency. Five patients had an increase in seizure frequency. Clobazam efficacy lasted for more than one year in 42% of the seizure-free patients. Clobazam seems to be safe and effective in the treatment of focal epilepsy in childhood and should be considered in patients with refractory seizures.

  16. Recurrence rate of seizure following discontinuation of anti-epileptic drugs in patients with normal long term electroencephalography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Abdul Gafoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The usefulness of electroencephalography (EEG in predicting seizure recurrence after antiepileptic drugs (AED tapering is a controversial subject. There have been no studies which tested the additional yield of long-term over routine EEG recordings in predicting seizure recurrence after AED withdrawal. Objective: The primary objective of our study is to determine the recurrence rate of seizure following AED withdrawal in patients with focal epilepsy, unknown cause who had normal long-term electroencephalography (LTEEG and secondary objective is to analyze the variables that would predict seizure recurrence. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study. A total of 91 patients were included. 62 patients who had normal routine and LTEEG entered the final phase of the study were followed-up regularly for 1 year or until seizure recurrence whichever was earlier. Results: A total number of 91 patients were enrolled for the first phase of the study. Of these, 13 (14.29% patients had an abnormal routine EEG. Of the remaining patients, another 16 (17.58% had abnormal LTEEG. The remaining 62 patients with normal routine and long-term EEG entered the final phase of the study. Of these, 17 patients (27.41% had seizure recurrence during the follow-up while 45 (72.58% remained seizure free until the end of the 1 year follow-up. The significant variables associated with a higher risk of seizure relapse were a positive past history of seizure recurrence on prior drug withdrawal (relative risk: 2.19, confidence interval: 1.01-4.74, P < 0.05 and the duration of epilepsy until seizure control was achieved (P < 0.009. Conclusions: The recurrence rate of seizure in patients with a normal LTEEG is 27.41%. A positive past history of seizure recurrence and a longer time to achieve seizure freedom with AED increased the risk of seizure recurrence.

  17. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. A unique manifestation of human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, E A M; Arani, S Fallah; Hegt, V Noordhoek; van Praag, M C G

    2009-03-01

    A 34-year old Creole woman appeared at the dermatology department with white-pink spots on the oral mucosa, which had been there for some time. Histology showed lesions characteristic of focal epithelial hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a CO2 laser. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare benign lesion and is caused by human papillomavirus subtypes 13 or 32; it only appears on the oral mucosa.

  18. Psychogenic seizures--why women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, M

    2000-01-01

    The only consistent finding in studies of psychogenic seizures is the approximately threefold higher incidence in women. Therefore, why women? Charcot and Freud emphasized the sexual aspects of the seizure as has the current interest in childhood sexual abuse. From case studies and review of the literature the author believes that psychogenic seizures in women express rage, fear, and helplessness against the dominant and abusive male rather than sexual conflicts. Emphasizing the aggressive component of seizures does not minimize the traumatic effects of sexual abuse but rather includes it as leading to rage and helplessness.

  19. Seizure activity post organophosphate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, John

    2009-01-01

    Electrographic seizures are a feature of organophosphate anticholinesterase intoxication. Clinical studies of pesticide poisonings suggest that seizures are more common in children than in adults. Since flaccid paralysis, a characteristic sign of organophosphate poisoning, can mask convulsions, the most reliable indicator of seizures is the electroencephalogram, but this has not been widely used in clinical studies. Seizures can rapidly progress to status epilepticus, contributing to mortality and, in survivors, to neuronal damage and neurological impairment. Anticonvulsant drugs can significantly reduce the lethal and toxic effects of these compounds. A benzodiazepine, usually diazepam, is the treatment currently indicated for control of seizures. Animal studies have indicated that the early phase of seizure activity (0-5 min after seizure onset) is purely cholinergic, predominantly involving muscarinic mechanisms. Seizure activity subsequently progresses through mixed cholinergic and noncholinergic modulation (5-40 min) into a final noncholinergic phase. Neuropathology caused by seizures is most likely associated with glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Future prospects for improved treatments include new benzodiazepines, glutamate receptor antagonists, antimuscarinics with additional antiglutamatergic activity and adenosine receptor antagonists.

  20. Characteristic phasic evolution of convulsive seizure in PCDH19-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Shigematsu, Hideo; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-03-01

    PCDH19-related epilepsy is a genetic disorder that was first described in 1971, then referred to as "epilepsy and mental retardation limited to females". PCDH19 has recently been identified as the responsible gene, but a detailed characterization of the seizure manifestation based on video-EEG recording is still limited. The purpose of this study was to elucidate features of the seizure semiology in children with PCDH19-related epilepsy. To do this, ictal video-EEG recordings of 26 convulsive seizures in three girls with PCDH19-related epilepsy were analysed. All seizures occurred in clusters, mainly during sleep accompanied by fever. The motor manifestations consisted of six sequential phases: "jerk", "reactive", "mild tonic", "fluttering", "mild clonic", and "postictal". Some phases were brief or lacking in some seizures, whereas others were long or pronounced. In the reactive phase, the patients looked fearful or startled with sudden jerks and turned over reactively. The tonic and clonic components were less intense compared with those of typical tonic-clonic seizures in other types of epilepsy. The fluttering phase was characterised initially by asymmetric, less rhythmic, and less synchronous tremulous movement and was then followed by the subtle clonic phase. Subtle oral automatism was observed in the postictal phase. The reactive, mild tonic, fluttering and mild clonic phases were most characteristic of seizures of PCDH19-related epilepsy. Ictal EEG started bilaterally and was symmetric in some patients but asymmetric in others. It showed asymmetric rhythmic discharges in some seizures at later phases. The electroclinical pattern of the phasic evolution of convulsive seizure suggests a focal onset seizure with secondary generalisation. Based on our findings, we propose that the six unique sequential phases in convulsive seizures suggest the diagnosis of PCDH19-related epilepsy when occurring in clusters with or without high fever in girls. [Published with

  1. Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures: role of cortical slow activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Yang, Li; Hamid, Hamada; Danielson, Nathan; Bai, Xiaoxiao; Marfeo, Anthony; Yu, Lissa; Gordon, Aliza; Purcaro, Michael J.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Agarwal, Ravi; Ellens, Damien J.; Golomb, Julie D.; Shamy, Michel C. F.; Zhang, Heping; Carlson, Chad; Doyle, Werner; Devinsky, Orrin; Vives, Kenneth; Spencer, Dennis D.; Spencer, Susan S.; Schevon, Catherine; Zaveri, Hitten P.

    2010-01-01

    Impaired consciousness requires altered cortical function. This can occur either directly from disorders that impair widespread bilateral regions of the cortex or indirectly through effects on subcortical arousal systems. It has therefore long been puzzling why focal temporal lobe seizures so often impair consciousness. Early work suggested that altered consciousness may occur with bilateral or dominant temporal lobe seizure involvement. However, other bilateral temporal lobe disorders do not impair consciousness. More recent work supports a ‘network inhibition hypothesis’ in which temporal lobe seizures disrupt brainstem–diencephalic arousal systems, leading indirectly to depressed cortical function and impaired consciousness. Indeed, prior studies show subcortical involvement in temporal lobe seizures and bilateral frontoparietal slow wave activity on intracranial electroencephalography. However, the relationships between frontoparietal slow waves and impaired consciousness and between cortical slowing and fast seizure activity have not been directly investigated. We analysed intracranial electroencephalography recordings during 63 partial seizures in 26 patients with surgically confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Behavioural responsiveness was determined based on blinded review of video during seizures and classified as impaired (complex-partial seizures) or unimpaired (simple-partial seizures). We observed significantly increased delta-range 1–2 Hz slow wave activity in the bilateral frontal and parietal neocortices during complex-partial compared with simple-partial seizures. In addition, we confirmed prior work suggesting that propagation of unilateral mesial temporal fast seizure activity to the bilateral temporal lobes was significantly greater in complex-partial than in simple-partial seizures. Interestingly, we found that the signal power of frontoparietal slow wave activity was significantly correlated with the temporal lobe fast seizure

  2. Focal and generalized alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dair, H A; Foster, A P

    1995-07-01

    Focal or generalized alopecia is defined as hair loss affecting the ventral, lateral, perineal, and dorsal aspects of the trunk of the cat, usually in a symmetric pattern. This may be attributable to failure of hair coat production, excess loss of hair due to self trauma, or excess shedding of whole hairs. Self trauma is the most common cause of hair loss and is associated particularly with flea allergy dermatitis. Other causes of hair loss are reviewed.

  3. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contra...

  4. [Characteristics of structural injuries in pediatric patients with focal epilepsy in a Honduran hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Izcoa, A; Varela-Gonzalez, D; Fonseca, M I

    2017-08-01

    Epilepsy is the most commonly occurring neurological disorder in the world. The study of structural brain lesions is important to understand the secondary complications. In Honduras there is little information on this topic. To determine the characteristics and proportion of structural brain lesions in paediatric patients with focal epilepsy at the Hospital Escuela Universitario. A descriptive, cross-sectional, retrospective-prospective study. The study population consisted of 162 paediatric patients with focal epilepsy who were treated in the paediatric neurology outpatient department between January 2015 and June 2016. On applying the eligibility and exclusion criteria, the universe of study comprised 102 patients with focal epilepsy. 41% of the patients with focal epilepsy presented a structural lesion. The main locations of the structural lesions were the parietal lobe (12.8%), the occipital lobe (10.8%) and the frontal lobe (10.8%). An association was found between the presence of structural brain lesions and the presence of uncontrolled seizures, with statistical significance. The attributable risk was calculated and it was found that among patients with uncontrolled seizures, 67% had a structural lesion in the imaging study. The presence of uncontrolled seizures is associated to the presence of structural lesions in imaging studies, with a high attributable risk. Leukomalacia and cerebral ischaemia were the main findings that were reported. The predominant structural lesions in paediatric patients with focal epilepsy in the population studied are those related to events that take place during the peripartum period.

  5. Electroconvulsive Therapy In Neuropsychiatry : Relevance Of Seizure Parameters

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    Gangadhar BN

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is used to induce therapeutic seizures in various clinical conditions. It is specifically useful in depression, catatonia, patients with high suicidal risk, and those intolerant to drugs. Its beneficial effects surpass its side effects. Memory impairment is benign and transient. Its mechanism of action is unknown, though numerous neurotransmitters and neuroreceptors have been implicated. The standards of ECT practice are well established but still evolving in some particularly in unilateral ECT. Assessment of threshold by formula method may deliver higher stimulus dose compared with titration method. Cerebral seizure during ECT procedure is necessary. Motor (cuff method and EEG seizure monitoring are mandatory. Recent studies have shown some EEG parameters (amplitude, fractal dimension, symmetry, and post ictal suppression to be associated with therapeutic outcome. Besides seizure monitoring, measuring other physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP may be useful indicators of therapeutic response. Use of ECT in neurological conditions as well as its application in psychiatric illnesses associated with neurological disorders has also been reviewed briefly.

  6. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

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    Guo Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a common clinical disorder characterized by brief recurrent spells of vertigo often brought about by certain head position changes as may occur with looking up, turning over in bed, or straightening up after bending over. It is important to understand BPPV not only because it may avert expensive and often unnecessary testing, but also because treatment is rapid, easy, and effective in >90% of cases. The diagnosis of BPPV can be made based on the history and examination. Patients usually report episodes of spinning evoked by certain movements, such as lying back or getting out of bed, turning in bed, looking up, or straightening after bending over. At present, the generally accepted recurrence rate of BPPV after successful treatment is 40%-50% at 5 years of average follow-up. There does appear to be a subset of individuals prone to multiple recurrences.

  7. Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on…

  8. Characteristics of the initial seizure in familial febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E. van Beijeren; N.H. Wils; G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractComplex seizure characteristics in patients with a positive family history were studied to define familial phenotype subgroups of febrile seizures. A total of 51 children with one or more affected first degree relatives and 177 without an affected first degree relative

  9. A novel mutation of KCNQ3 gene in a Chinese family with benign familial neonatal convulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Li, Nan; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Qian; Song, Yanmin; Guo, Jifeng; Xia, Kun; Pan, Qian; Tang, Beisha

    2008-03-01

    Benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC, also named benign familial neonatal seizures, BFNS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited epilepsy syndrome with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Two voltage-gated potassium channel subunit genes, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3, have been identified to cause BFNC1 and BFNC2, respectively. To date, only three mutations of KCNQ3, all located within exon 5, have been reported. By limited linkage analysis and mutation analysis of KCNQ3 in a Chinese family with BFNC, we identified a novel missense mutation of KCNQ3, c.988C>T located within exon 6. c.988C>T led to the substitution Cys for Arg in amino acid position 330 (p.R330C) in KCNQ3 potassium channel, which possibly impaired the neuronal M-current and altered neuronal excitability. Seizures of all BFNC patients started from day 2 to 3 after birth and remitted during 1 month, and no recurrence was found. One family member who displayed fever-associated seizures for two times at age 5 years and was diagnosed as febrile seizures, however, did not carry this mutation, which suggests that febrile seizures and BFNC have different pathogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of KCNQ3 mutation in Chinese family with BFNC.

  10. Hypocalcemia-Induced Seizure

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    Pengcheng Han

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is essential for both neurotransmitter release and muscle contraction. Given these important physiological processes, it seems reasonable to assume that hypocalcemia may lead to reduced neuromuscular excitability. Counterintuitively, however, clinical observation has frequently documented hypocalcemia’s role in induction of seizures and general excitability processes such as tetany, Chvostek’s sign, and bronchospasm. The mechanism of this calcium paradox remains elusive, and very few pathophysiological studies have addressed this conundrum. Nevertheless, several studies primarily addressing other biophysical issues have provided some clues. In this review, we analyze the data of these studies and propose an integrative model to explain this hypocalcemic paradox.

  11. Cerebral Abscess Presenting as a Complex Febrile Seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Anjoli; Salas, Alicia; Mahl, Evan; Levine, Marla C

    2015-07-01

    Currently, there is no standardized approach to the management of complex febrile seizures in children and there are no published practice guidelines for the procurement of neuroimaging. Presented is a 2-year-old female patient who experienced a 3- to 5-minute episode of staring and unilateral mouth twitching associated with high fever. On initial presentation, the patient appeared well and had a normal neurological examination. No focus of infection was identified, and she was diagnosed with complex febrile seizure. The patient was discharged home with close neurology and primary care follow-up but returned the following day with altered mental status, toxic appearance, and right lower extremity weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed left-sided cranial empyema and the patient was managed with antibiotics and surgical drainage. A literature review to answer the question "Do children with complex febrile seizures require emergent neuroimaging?" yielded a small number of retrospective reviews describing the utility of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture in the work-up of febrile seizures. Current evidence indicates that neuroimaging is not indicated in an otherwise healthy child who presents with complex febrile seizure if the patient is well appearing and has no evidence of focal neurological deficit on examination. As this case demonstrates, however, serious conditions such as meningitis and brain abscess (though rare) should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complex febrile seizure and physicians should remain aware that the need for neuroimaging and/or lumbar puncture may arise in the appropriate clinical setting.

  12. Clinical profile of patients with nascent alcohol related seizures

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    P Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to characterize the clinical profile of patients with alcohol related seizures (ARS and to identify the prevalence of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE in the same. Materials and Methods: 100 consecutive male patients presenting to a tertiary care center in South India with new onset ARS were analyzed with alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT score. All underwent 19 channel digital scalp electroencephalography (EEG and at least computed tomography (CT scan. Results: A total of 27 patients (27% who had cortical atrophy on CT had a mean duration of alcohol intake of 23.62 years compared with 14.55 years in patients with no cortical atrophy (P < 0.001. Twenty-two patients (22% had clustering in the current episode of whom 18 had cortical atrophy. Nearly, 88% patients had generalized tonic clonic seizures while 12% who had partial seizures underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which identified frontal focal cortical dysplasia in one. Mean lifetime duration of alcohol intake in patients presenting with seizures within 6 hours (6H-gp of intake of alcohol was significantly lower (P = 0.029. One patient in the 6H-gp with no withdrawal symptoms had EEG evidence for IGE and had a lower AUDIT score compared with the rest. Conclusion: CT evidence of cortical atrophy is related to the duration of alcohol intake and portends an increased risk for clustering. Partial seizures can be a presenting feature of ARS and those patients may benefit from MRI to identify underlying symptomatic localization related epilepsy (8.3% of partial seizures. IGE is more likely in patients presenting with ARS within first 6 hours especially if they do not have alcohol withdrawal symptoms and scalp EEG is helpful to identify this small subgroup (~1% who may require long-term anti-epileptic medication.

  13. [Benign myoepithelioma of the lung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mezni, F; Zeddini, A; Hamzaoui, A; Ismail, O; Ghrairi, H; Ben Miled, K; Smati, B; Kilani, T

    2004-11-01

    Benign myoepithelioma of the lung is a benign tumor caused by proliferating myoepithelial cells with no ductal component. These tumors are exceptional: only three cases have been reported in the literature. We report a fourth case in a 37-year-old woman at 8 months gestation. Pathological proof of diagnosis was obtained.

  14. Management Of Post Stroke Seizures

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    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of seizures in relation to stroke is 8.9%, with a frequency of 10.6 and 8.6% in haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, respectively. In subarachnoid haemorrhage the incidence is 8.5%. Due to the fact that infarcts are significantly more frequent than haemorrhages, seizures are mainly related to occlusive vascular disease of the brain. The general view is to consider stroke-related seizures as harmless complications in the course of a prolonged vascular disease involving the heart and brain. Seizures can be classified as those of early and those of late onset in a paradigm comparable to post-traumatic epilepsy, with an arbitrary dividing point of two weeks after the event. Most early-onset seizures occur during the first day after the stroke. Late-onset seizures occur three times more often than early-onset ones. A first late-onset epileptic event is most likely to take place between six months and two years after the stroke. However, up to 28% of patients develop their first seizure several years later. Simple partial seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, account for about 50% of total seizures, while complex partial spells, with or without secondary generalisation, and primary generalised tonic–clonic insults account for approximately 25% each. Status epilepticus occurs in 12% of stroke patients, but the recurrence rate after an initial status epilepticus is not higher than after a single seizure. Inhibitory seizures, mimicking transient ischaemic attacks, are observed in 7.1% of cases. The only clinical predictor of late-onset seizures is the initial presentation of partial anterior circulation syndrome due to a territorial infarct. Patients with total anterior circulation syndrome have less chance of developing epileptic spells, not only due to their shorter life expectancy but also due to the fact that the large infarcts are sharply demarcated in these patients. The optimal timing and type of antiepileptic drug

  15. Seizures and electroencephalography findings in 61 patients with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, S; Vicente, M; Lainez, E; Sánchez-Montañez, A; Vázquez, E; Mangado, L; Martínez-Ribot, L; Del Campo, M

    2017-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) cause neurodevelopmental abnormalities. However, publications about epilepsy and electroencephalographic features are scarce. In this study, we prospectively performed electroencephalography (EEG) and brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 61 patients with diagnosis of FASD. One patient had multiple febrile seizures with normal EEGs. Fourteen children showed EEG anomalies, including slow background activity and interictal epileptiform discharges, focal and/or generalized, and 3 of them had epilepsy. In one patient, seizures were first detected during the EEG recording and one case had an encephalopathy with electrical status epilepticus during slow sleep (ESES). Focal interictal discharges in our patients did not imply the presence of underlying visible focal brain lesions in the neuroimaging studies, such as cortical dysplasia or polymicrogyria. However, they had nonspecific brain MR abnormalities, including corpus callosum hypoplasia, vermis hypoplasia or cavum septum pellucidum. The latter was significantly more frequent in the group with EEG abnormal findings (p < 0.01).

  16. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  17. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aminiahidashti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  18. Benign hepatocellular nodules : What have we learned using the patho-molecular classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sempoux, Christine; Chang, Charissa; Gouw, Annette; Chiche, Laurence; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Balabaud, Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatocellular adenoma (HCA) are benign hepatocellular tumors that develop most frequently in females and in non-cirrhotic livers. HCA are prone to bleed and to transform into hepatocellutar carcinoma (HCC). Four major subgroups of HCA have been thus far identifie

  19. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures associated with hypophosphatasia in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Magda Lahorgue; Mugnol, Fabiana; Bica, Igor; Fiori, Renato Machado

    2002-03-01

    Pyridoxine dependency and congenital hypophosphatasia are unusual metabolic disorders. We report a female infant born from healthy consanguineous parents with shortening of limbs, detected during pregnancy by ultrasonography. Immediately after delivery, the baby was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit because of respiratory distress. A bone radiograph showed hypomineralization of all bones, and serum alkaline phosphatase was very low (10 U/L). Within the first day of life, seizures (focal clonic and tonic) started. The seizures were refractory to phenobarbital and other antiepileptic drugs. The first electroencephalogram (EEG) showed a burst-suppression pattern. Pyridoxine was administered (50 mg/kg) and completely controlled the seizures. Antiepileptic drugs were discontinued, and a maintenance dose of pyridoxine (10 mg/day) was established. A postpyridoxine EEG revealed the disappearance of the burst-suppression pattern. The patient died at age 26 days. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures, when recognized early and treated, have a more favorable prognosis. However, hypophosphatasia detected at birth almost always has a lethal outcome.

  20. PRRT2 Mutations Are Related to Febrile Seizures in Epileptic Patients

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    Zheng-Wen He

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported that the proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2 gene was identified to be related to paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD, infantile convulsions with PKD, PKD with migraine and benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE. The present study explores whether the PRRT2 mutation is a potential cause of febrile seizures, including febrile seizures plus (FS+, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ and Dravet syndrome (DS; thus, it may provide a new drug target for personalized medicine for febrile seizure patients. We screened PRRT2 exons in a cohort of 136 epileptic patients with febrile seizures, including FS+, GEFS+ and DS. PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 25 out of 136 (18.4% febrile seizures in epileptic patients. Five loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified: c.649delC (p.R217Efs*12, c.649_650insC (p.R217Pfs*8, c.412C>G (p.Pro138Ala, c.439G>C (p.Asp147His and c.623C>A (p.Ser208Tyr. PRRT2 variants were probably involved in the etiology of febrile seizures in epileptic patients.

  1. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  2. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  3. Optical triggered seizures using a caged 4-Aminopyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingrui; McGarry, Laura M.; Ma, Hongtao; Harris, Samuel; Berwick, Jason; Yuste, Rafael; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of epilepsy are critical not only for understanding the fundamental mechanism of epilepsy but also for testing the efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs and novel therapeutic interventions. Photorelease of caged molecules is widely used in biological research to control pharmacologic events with high spatio-temporal resolution. We developed a technique for in vivo optical triggering of neocortical seizures using a novel caged compound based on ruthenium photochemistry (RuBi-4AP). Epileptiform events in mouse cortex were induced with blue light in both whole brain and focal illumination. Multi-electrode array recording and optical techniques were used to characterize the propagation of these epileptic events, including interictal spikes, polyspikes, and ictal discharges. These results demonstrate a novel optically-triggered seizure model, with high spatio-temporal control, that could have widespread application in the investigation of ictal onset, propagation and to develop novel light-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25698919

  4. Neurogenesis in a young dog with epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borschensky, C M; Woolley, J S; Kipar, A; Herden, C

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic seizures can lead to various reactions in the brain, ranging from neuronal necrosis and glial cell activation to focal structural disorganization. Furthermore, increased hippocampal neurogenesis has been documented in rodent models of acute convulsions. This is a report of hippocampal neurogenesis in a dog with spontaneous epileptic seizures. A 16-week-old epileptic German Shepherd Dog had marked neuronal cell proliferation (up to 5 mitotic figures per high-power field and increased immunohistochemical expression of proliferative cell nuclear antigen) in the dentate gyrus accompanied by microglial and astroglial activation. Some granule cells expressed doublecortin, a marker of immature neurons; mitotically active cells expressed neuronal nuclear antigen. No mitotic figures were found in the brain of age-matched control dogs. Whether increased neurogenesis represents a general reaction pattern of young epileptic dogs should be investigated.

  5. The adolescent or adult with generalized tonic-clonic seizures

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    Roop Gursahani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCs together constitute up to 50% of adolescent and adult patients with epilepsy as diagnosed by history and EEG. Syncope and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are major differential diagnoses and must be carefully excluded in therapy-resistant cases. Individual episodes can have up to seven phases in secondarily generalized GTCs. The distinction between primary and secondary GTCs depends mainly on history and EEG, and yield can be improved with sleep deprivation or overnight recording. Epilepsies with primary or unclassified GTCs can respond to any one of the five broad-spectrum antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: valproate, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, topiramate and zonisamide. Unless a focal onset is clearly confirmed, a sodium-channel blocking AED should not be used in the initial treatment of these conditions.

  6. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  7. Seizure semiology and electroencephalography in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Rui-Juan; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Cui, Tao; Shao, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to discuss the clinical features of seizure semiology and electroencephalography (EEG) in young children with lesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Children with lesional TLE received presurgical evaluation for intractable epilepsy. They were followed up for more than one year after temporal lobectomy. We reviewed the medical history and video-EEG monitoring of children with TLE to analyze the semiology of seizures and EEG findings and compared the semiology of seizures and EEG findings of childhood TLE and adult TLE. A total of 84 seizures were analyzed in 11 children (aged 23-108 months). The age of seizure onset was from 1 month to 26 months (a mean of 17.6 months). All of the patients exhibited prominent motor manifestations including epileptic spasm, tonic seizure, and unilateral clonic seizure. Seven children manifested behavioral arrest similar to an automotor seizure in adult TLE but with a shorter duration and higher frequency. The automatisms were typically orofacial, whereas manual automatisms were rarely observed. The EEG recordings revealed that diffuse discharge patterns were more common in younger children, whereas focal or unilateral patterns were more typical in older children. All of the patients were seizure-free after temporal lobectomy with more than one-year follow-up. All of the children had a mental development delay or regression; however, there was improvement after surgery, especially in those with surgery performed early. In contrast to TLE in adults, young children with lesional TLE probably represent a distinct nosological and probably less homogeneous syndrome. Although they had generalized clinical and electrographic features, resective epilepsy surgery should be considered as early as possible to obtain seizure control and improvement in mental development. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Focal organizing pneumonia mimicking lung cancer: a surgeon's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi; Pan, Youmin; Song, Chaoguo; Wei, Hao; Wu, Shimin; Wei, Xiang; Pan, Tiecheng; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Focal organizing pneumonia is a unique form of organizing pneumonia. Little is known regarding its clinical and radiological feature, diagnosis, management, and outcome. Twenty patients with focal organizing pneumonia were investigated and compared with 40 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. There were 38 men (63.3%) and 22 women (36.7%). The mean age was 55 ± 9.9 years. No specific feature in clinical and radiological manifestation was found to distinguish between focal organizing pneumonia and bronchogenic carcinoma. In patients with focal organizing pneumonia, wedge resection was performed in 12 cases and lobectomy in eight cases. Follow-up was complete with a median period of 26 months (range, 6 to 104 months). All patients were free from recurrence of organizing pneumonia. Clinical and radiologic findings of focal organizing pneumonia are nonspecific, and this unique form of organizing pneumonia is difficult to differentiate from lung cancer. Surgical resection allows both diagnosis and cure. However, considering the benign nature of this disease, major pulmonary resections should be avoided.

  9. MR imaging features of focal liver lesions in Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohan, Anthony; Vargas, Ottavia; Dautry, Raphael; Guerrache, Youcef; Woimant, France; Hamzi, Lounis; Boudiaf, Mourad; Poujois, Aurelia; Faraoun, Sid Ahmed; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic involvement in Wilson disease (WD) manifests as a diffuse chronic disease in the majority of patients. However, in a subset of patients focal liver lesions may develop, presenting with a wide range of imaging features. The majority of focal liver lesions in patients with WD are benign nodules, but there are reports that have described malignant liver tumors or dysplastic nodules in these patients. Because of the possibility of malignant transformation of liver nodules, major concerns have been raised with respect to the management and follow-up of patients with WD in whom focal liver lesions have been identified. The assessment of liver involvement in patients with WD is generally performed with ultrasonography. However, ultrasonography conveys limited specificity so that magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is often performed to improve lesion characterization. This review was performed to illustrate the spectrum of MR imaging features of focal liver lesions that develop in patients with WD. It is assumed that familiarity with the MR imaging presentation of focal liver lesions in WD may help clarify the actual nature of hepatic nodules in patients with this condition.

  10. [Focal surgery in testis cancer: current state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Giuseppe; Antonucci, Michele; Recupero, Salvatore Marco; Fiorillo, Alessandro; Vittori, Matteo; Bassi, Pier Francesco; Gulino, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Radical orchiectomy is the standard treatment of testicular neoplasia causing androgen insufficiency, infertility and psychological stress. Focal surgery allows the preservation of fertility, endocrine function and integrity of the genital anatomy, with preservation of the image of the male body. The EAU guidelines suggest focal surgery in case of synchronous bilateral tumors, metachronous contralateral tumours, tumour in solitary testis with normal pre-operative testosterone levels, when the tumor volume less than 30% of the testicular volume. There are two focal surgical techniques: tumorectomy and polar resection, followed by biopsies and frozen section of the resection bed. In case of benign tumours, the treatment is often curative. In case of malignancy, carcinoma in situ is frequently found in the surrounding tissues. Adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy is performed with a fair success rate. These adjuvant treatments reduce or delete the functional benefits achieved by conservative surgery. The evidence of the literature suggests that focal surgery is a valid option for all patients with testicular tumours that are not palpable and small sized, with the advantage of avoiding unnecessary radical orchiectomy in most cases. Therefore, the selection criteria for focal surgery are the mass size (less than 25 mm) and a safety distance of the tumor from the rete testis, in order to preserve testicular vascularization. A close follow-up with ultrasound, testicular markers and radiological examinations is mandatory in case of germ cell neoplasia treated conservatively in patients with indications for conservative surgery.

  11. Nihilism: a benign denial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2003-06-01

    Nihilism is the belief that all possible knowledge on a given topic has been amassed and codified. Ranging from benign denial to deliberate attempts at excommunication, nihilism is often encountered in the history of medicine. Eustachius, Columbus, and Sylvius strongly criticized Vesalius and defended the authority of Galen. Riolan fervently rejected Harvey's monumental work on the circulation of blood. Gross stated that no honest and sensible surgeon would ever sanction thyroidectomy. Sandstrom's discovery of the parathyroids was met with silence. Transplantation of parathyroids by Mandl was not appreciated when announced. Aristotle's dictum that the heart cannot withstand serious injury led to Paget's statement that cardiac surgery had reached the limits set by nature, which no new techniques could overcome. The first Billroth I operation was welcomed as, "Hopefully, also the last." Pancreatic surgery was opposed because the organ was of no clinical interest and was impossible for surgeons to reach. Pancreatic transplantation was rejected for many years, despite good results. When Blundell used blood transfusion for postpartum hemorrhage, critics averred that his next exploit would be radical removal of the spleen. Bassini stated that it could be risky to publish more about radical treatment of inguinal hernias. Carcinomas of the lower sigmoid and upper rectum were deemed untreatable because of their inaccessibility. Colostomy during pediatric surgery was rejected many times. Although it is difficult for the human mind to move from a familiar point of view, this propensity should not infect science, thereby impeding advancement.

  12. Der benigne paroxysmale Lagerungsschwindel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiest G

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Der benigne paroxysmale Lagerungsschwindel (BPPV ist eine häufige Störung des peripheren Vestibularorgans, welche bei allen Patienten mit lageabhängigem Schwindel suspiziert werden sollte. Obwohl kurzzeitige Drehschwindelattacken als pathognomonisches Symptom gelten, weisen viele Patienten auch unsystematisierten Schwankschwindel auf, was die Diagnosestellung oft erschwert. Auslöser des BPPV sind Klziumkarbonatkristalle (Otokonien, welche sich aus der Otolithenmatrix des Utriculus lösen und in einen der drei Bogengänge gelangen. Die Diagnosestellung erfolgt mit spezifischen Provokations- bzw. Lagerungstests, um den entsprechenden Lagerungsschwindel und Nystagmus zu induzieren. Die von Semont und Epley entwickelten Befreiungsmanöver zielen darauf ab, die in den Bogengängen lokalisierten Partikel in den Utriculus zu repositionieren, wo sie keinen Drehschwindel mehr auslösen. Zur Unterscheidung des BPPV von einem zentralen Lageschwindel bzw. Nystagmus können neben der Latenz auch der Verlauf und die Dauer des Lagerungsnystagmus beitragen, von entscheidender Bedeutung in der Differentialdiagnose ist allerdings die Schlagrichtung des induzierten Nystagmus.

  13. Benign anatomical mistakes: incidentaloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirilas, Petros; Skandalakis, J E

    2002-11-01

    The concept of the "incidentaloma," a totally asymptomatic nonfunctional tumor that is clinically and biochemically silent and discovered "incidentally" in a totally asymptomatic patient, is a by-product of the evolving diagnostic techniques of the last three decades. Various authors have used the concept for "incidental" findings during diagnostic workup for symptoms unrelated to adrenal disease, or for "incidental" adrenal tumors unrelated to symptoms that could potentially be of adrenal origin. "Incidentaloma" has been used to encompass a wide and heterogeneous spectrum of pathologic entities including adrenocortical and medullary tumors, benign or malignant lesions, hormonally active or inactive lesions, metastases, infections, granulomas, infiltrations, cysts and pseudocysts, hemorrhages, and pseudoadrenal masses. The term "incidentaloma" does not indicate whether the mass is functional, or malignant, or adrenocortical in origin. "Incidentaloma" has also appeared in the literature in reference to other endocrine organs such as pituitary, thyroid, and parathyroids, as well as the liver or kidney. We question the scientific justification for this neologism and suggest that it should be abolished. Questionable lesions should be clearly and simply described as "incidentally found."

  14. CLINICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF NEW - ONSET EPILETIC SEIZURES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalapathi Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is one of the most familiar neurological disorders which can cause bodily injury and death from inadequately treated or untreated cases. The imaging and EEG of new onset seizures is done with different indications, to identify an acute illness as the underline course for the seizure and possible neurological deficit. To this purpose we have evaluated new onset seizures in adult patients in correlation with their clinical profile, Electroencephalography (EEG and Computerized tomography (CT imaging of brain. METHODS: This cro ss sectional study was studied in 100 adult patients, presenting with seizures attending the Emergency department, General Medicine and Neurology wards and OPD of Tertiary care teaching hospital during the period of March 2006 to March 2008. All the patien ts were examined clinically and subjected to CT imaging of brain and EEG. Other necessary blood investigations were also done. Correlation between various seizures and CT scan brain and EEG were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data . RESULTS: 63% of patients were in the age group of 20 - 39 years, 63% were males and 37% were females. 65% presented with GTCS, 35% with partial seizures. CT scan was found abnormal in 49.2% patients in GTCS, 71.4% in partial seizures. EEG showed abnormal p attern in 39% patients. 40% of the patients with partial seizures had epileptic form discharges. 33% patients had focal lesions on CT brain with normal EEG. CONCLUSION: Generalized Tonic clonic seizures were the commonest type of seizures was present, seen mostly in male patients. CT scan brain was abnormal in 57% of the patients. Neurocysticercosis and calcified granuloma were the commonest causes for seizures up to 3 rd decade of life. Majority of the patients with focal lesions on CT scan brain had epileptic form discharges on EEG which indicate a strong correlation of EEG with CT findings. Initiating the treatment with antiepileptic drugs was

  15. Photolysis of Caged-GABA Rapidly Terminates Seizures In Vivo: Concentration and Light Intensity Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Yu, Zhixin; Yan, Jiaqing; Xue, Fenqin; Ren, Guoping; Jiang, Chenxi; Wang, Weimin; Piao, Yueshan; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    The therapy of focal epilepsy remains unsatisfactory for as many as 25% of patients. The photolysis of caged-γ-aminobutyric acid (caged-GABA) represents a novel and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Our previous experimental results have demonstrated that the use of blue light produced by light-emitting diode to uncage ruthenium-bipyridine-triphenylphosphine-c-GABA (RuBi-GABA) can rapidly terminate paroxysmal seizure activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, the optimal concentration of RuBi-GABA, and the intensity of illumination to abort seizures, remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the optimal anti-seizure effects of RuBi-GABA by using implantable fibers to introduce blue light into the neocortex of a 4-aminopyridine-induced acute seizure model in rats. We then investigated the effects of different combinations of RuBi-GABA concentrations and light intensity upon seizure. Our results show that the anti-seizure effect of RuBi-GABA has obvious concentration and light intensity dependence. This is the first example of using an implantable device for the photolysis of RuBi-GABA in the therapy of neocortical seizure, and an optimal combination of RuBi-GABA concentration and light intensity was explored. These results provide important experimental data for future clinical translational studies.

  16. Clinical and ictal EEG features in benign infantile epilepsy%良性婴儿癫痫的临床及发作期脑电图特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马秀伟; 侯豫; 辜蕊洁; 何芳; 王三梅; 封志纯

    2013-01-01

    Objective To further clarify clinical features and ictal electroencephalographic findings of patients with benign infantile epilepsy(BIE) in order to early recognize and evaluate prognosis. Methods The clinical information, video electroencephalogram(VEEG) characteristics, treatment and prognosis of 21 patients fulfilled the definition of BIE were collected and analyzed. Results The onset age of seizures was from 3 months to 11 months in 21 cases. Clusters of seizures occurred in 19 patients. The seizures were characterized by motion arrest, decreased responsiveness, cyanosis, staring or mild convulsive movements, such as eye deviation, head rotation, clonic movements, or increased limb tone. Interictal EEGs were normal in all patients. Ictal discharges at the onset of a seizure were focal in all seizures. The site of the origin of seizures was in the temporal area in 12 of 19 seizures, whereas it was in the occipital area in 5 seizures and parietal region in 2 seizures. The duration of a seizure on EEG was 55 to 126 seconds. All patients were treated with antiepileptic drugs(11 with levetiracetam, nine with depakine syrup, and 1 with oxcarbazepine). Seizures disappeared within one month in 17 patients. Antiepileptic treatment was withdrawn after 1 year and none of them experienced recurrence of seizures. All patients showed normal psychomotor development at the end of follow up. Conclusions Clusters of seizures often occur in BIE patients. The most frequent site of the seizure origin is in the temporal lobe. The prognosis of BIE is excellent, and excessive treatment should be avoided in such patients.%目的:进一步阐述良性婴儿癫痫(BIE)的临床发作及发作期脑电图(EEG)特征,以便早期识别此病,合理治疗及评估预后。方法对21例符合BIE诊断标准的患儿临床发作及视频脑电图(VEEG)进行分析,并对治疗及预后进行随访。结果患儿发病年龄3~11个月。19例发作初期有丛集性特

  17. Semiology of hypermotor (hyperkinetic) seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadi, Khalid; Sankaraneni, Ram; Thome, Ursula; Kotagal, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Hypermotor seizures (HMSs) consist of complex movements involving proximal segments of the limbs and trunk that appear violent and inappropriate for the situation. We analyzed hypermotor seizure videos in seizure-free patients (Engel class I) following resective epilepsy surgery. After completion of video analysis, we reviewed EEG and neuroimaging data. Search of our epilepsy surgery database yielded 116 patients classified as having hypermotor seizures between 1996 and 2013. From this subset, 17/31 (55%) patients had been seizure-free for >6months (mean follow-up: 3.3years). Mean seizure duration was 35s (range: 6-91s), of which the HM phase lasted a mean of 22s (range: 3-53s). In 16 patients (95%), hypermotor activity was seen at or within 10s of clinical seizure onset. Type I semiology occurred in 6 patients, type II semiology in 10 patients, and 1 patient exhibited features of both. Type I and type II semiologies were noted in patients who had frontal lobe as well as extrafrontal resections. Nonversive head and body turning occurred in 10 patients (ranging from 90° to 270°) which was ipsilateral to the side of resection in all patients and seen both in frontal and extrafrontal resections. Six out of eleven patients with abnormal MRI and 4/6 patients with nonlesional MRI underwent invasive EEG evaluation. Eight patients (47%) had frontal lobe resection, 4/17 (23%) patients had temporal lobe resection, and one patient each had parietal lobe, insular, temporoparietooccipital, or motor sparing resection; 1 patient had functional hemispherectomy. Hypermotor semiology typically occurs at or within 10s after seizure onset. Ipsilateral head/body turning appears to be of lateralizing value whereas asymmetry of limb movement was not lateralizing. Hypermotor semiology is most often seen in frontal lobe epilepsy but may occur in seizures arising from other locations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic imaging of coherent sources reveals different network connectivity underlying the generation and perpetuation of epileptic seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Elshoff

    Full Text Available The concept of focal epilepsies includes a seizure origin in brain regions with hyper synchronous activity (epileptogenic zone and seizure onset zone and a complex epileptic network of different brain areas involved in the generation, propagation, and modulation of seizures. The purpose of this work was to study functional and effective connectivity between regions involved in networks of epileptic seizures. The beginning and middle part of focal seizures from ictal surface EEG data were analyzed using dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS, an inverse solution in the frequency domain which describes neuronal networks and coherences of oscillatory brain activities. The information flow (effective connectivity between coherent sources was investigated using the renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC method. In 8/11 patients, the first and second source of epileptic activity as found by DICS were concordant with the operative resection site; these patients became seizure free after epilepsy surgery. In the remaining 3 patients, the results of DICS / RPDC calculations and the resection site were discordant; these patients had a poorer post-operative outcome. The first sources as found by DICS were located predominantly in cortical structures; subsequent sources included some subcortical structures: thalamus, Nucl. Subthalamicus and cerebellum. DICS seems to be a powerful tool to define the seizure onset zone and the epileptic networks involved. Seizure generation seems to be related to the propagation of epileptic activity from the primary source in the seizure onset zone, and maintenance of seizures is attributed to the perpetuation of epileptic activity between nodes in the epileptic network. Despite of these promising results, this proof of principle study needs further confirmation prior to the use of the described methods in the clinical praxis.

  19. Benign Breast Problems and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a needle. Another example is a simple fibroadenoma . Simple fibroadenomas usually shrink or go away on their own. ... Cyst: A sac or pouch filled with fluid. Fibroadenoma: A type of solid, benign breast mass. Hormone: ...

  20. Benign breast lesions in Kano

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background; Non-malignant diseases of the breast have assumed increased importance ... This was followed by fibroadenoma accounting for 28.8% with a mean age of 21 ... relevance of this study. ... benign breast lesion in Kano accounting.

  1. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julien; Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-10-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  2. Focal femoral condyle resurfacing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, S A

    2013-03-01

    Focal femoral inlay resurfacing has been developed for the treatment of full-thickness chondral defects of the knee. This technique involves implanting a defect-sized metallic or ceramic cap that is anchored to the subchondral bone through a screw or pin. The use of these experimental caps has been advocated in middle-aged patients who have failed non-operative methods or biological repair techniques and are deemed unsuitable for conventional arthroplasty because of their age. This paper outlines the implant design, surgical technique and biomechanical principles underlying their use. Outcomes following implantation in both animal and human studies are also reviewed. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:301-4.

  3. Proximal Focal Femoral Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Kalia, Vibhuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD is a developmental disorder of the proximal segment of thefemur and of acetabulum resulting in shortening of the affected limb and impairment of the function. It isa spectrum of congenital osseous anomalies characterized by a deficiency in the structure of the proximalfemur. The diagnosis is often made by radiological evaluation which includes identification and descriptionof PFFD and evaluation of associated limb anomalies by plain radiographs. Contrast arthrography orMagnetic Resonance Imaging is indicated when radiological features are questionable and to disclose thepresence and location of the femoral head and any cartilagenous anlage. The disorder is more commonlyunilateral and is apparent at birth. However, bilateral involvement is rarely seen. Therapy of the disorder isdirected towards satisfactory ambulation and specific treatment depending on the severity of dysplasia.

  4. Rates and predictors of seizure freedom in resective epilepsy surgery: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Chang, Edward F

    2014-07-01

    Epilepsy is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting approximately 1 % of the world's population. Drug-resistant focal epilepsies are potentially surgically remediable. Although epilepsy surgery is dramatically underutilized among medically refractory patients, there is an expanding collection of evidence supporting its efficacy which may soon compel a paradigm shift. Of note is that a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that early resection leads to considerably better seizure outcomes than continued medical therapy in patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present review, we provide a timely update of seizure freedom rates and predictors in resective epilepsy surgery, organized by the distinct pathological entities most commonly observed. Class I evidence, meta-analyses, and individual observational case series are considered, including the experiences of both our institution and others. Overall, resective epilepsy surgery leads to seizure freedom in approximately two thirds of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and about one half of individuals with focal neocortical epilepsy, although only the former observation is supported by class I evidence. Two common modifiable predictors of postoperative seizure freedom are early operative intervention and, in the case of a discrete lesion, gross total resection. Evidence-based practice guidelines recommend that epilepsy patients who continue to have seizures after trialing two or more medication regimens should be referred to a comprehensive epilepsy center for multidisciplinary evaluation, including surgical consideration.

  5. Blood-brain barrier changes with kainic acid-induced limbic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucker, D.K.; Wooten, G.F.; Lothman, E.W.

    1983-02-01

    Rats were treated with kainic acid (KA) i.v. to produce increasingly severe limbic seizures that were monitored with a behavioral rating scale. At various times after the induction of seizures, the animals; blood-brain barriers (B-BB) were studied with alpha-(/sup 14/C)aminoisobutyric acid ((/sup 14/C)AIBA) autoradiography. Using optical density ratios, a coefficient was devised to assess the functional integrity of the B-BB in discrete anatomic regions and to quantitatively compare these measurements among different groups of experimental animals. In animals that exhibited only mild seizures, the B-BB was not different from controls. Animals with severe limbic seizures, however, showed alterations. For as long as 2 h after delivery of KA, the B-BB appeared normal; from 2 to 24 h, the permeability to (/sup 14/C)AIBA was markedly increased throughout the brain, especially in limbic regions; from 24 h to 7 days the B-BB returned to normal except for a small residual change in limbic structures. These findings were confirmed with Evans blue dye studies of the B-BB. A correlation between focal accentuation of B-BB alterations and neuropathologic changes was found. These experiments indicted that recurrent limbic seizures may lead to a breakdown in the B-BB independent of systemic metabolic derangements. Marked focal metabolic and electrical changes, however, occurred in several limbic structures several hours before the blood-brain barrier was altered.

  6. Rates and predictors of seizure freedom in resective epilepsy surgery: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J.; Chang, Edward F.

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a debilitating neurological disorder affecting approximately 1 % of the world’s population. Drug-resistant focal epilepsies are potentially surgically remediable. Although epilepsy surgery is dramatically underutilized among medically refractory patients, there is an expanding collection of evidence supporting its efficacy which may soon compel a paradigm shift. Of note is that a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that early resection leads to considerably better seizure outcomes than continued medical therapy in patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present review, we provide a timely update of seizure freedom rates and predictors in resective epilepsy surgery, organized by the distinct pathological entities most commonly observed. Class I evidence, meta-analyses, and individual observational case series are considered, including the experiences of both our institution and others. Overall, resective epilepsy surgery leads to seizure freedom in approximately two thirds of patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy and about one half of individuals with focal neocortical epilepsy, although only the former observation is supported by class I evidence. Two common modifiable predictors of postoperative seizure freedom are early operative intervention and, in the case of a discrete lesion, gross total resection. Evidence-based practice guidelines recommend that epilepsy patients who continue to have seizures after trialing two or more medication regimens should be referred to a comprehensive epilepsy center for multidisciplinary evaluation, including surgical consideration. PMID:24497269

  7. Laparoscopy for benign disease: robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamini, Mark A

    2003-12-01

    Currently available robotic surgical systems appear to be particularly suited for use in benign diseases of the gastrointestinal system. Minimally invasive operations for foregut conditions, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and achalasia, require excellent visibility and precise tissue dissection. Benign lower gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and diverticulitis, also can be approached using robotic assistance. Disadvantages include expense and the loss of tactile feedback. Early clinical results are promising.

  8. Intracranial EEG seizure onset-patterns correlate with high-frequency oscillations in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari-Marinho, Taissa; Perucca, Piero; Dubeau, Francois; Gotman, Jean

    2016-11-01

    High-frequency oscillations (80-500Hz; HFOs) have been shown to be a specific biomarker of the seizure-onset zone. The relationship of HFOs with seizures having different intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) morphological onsets, however, has shown significant relationships in experimental animals but has not been studied in humans. We investigated how interictal and ictal HFOs relate to different seizure-onset morphological patterns. We analyzed the most representative seizure type of 37 patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy who underwent iEEG for diagnostic evaluation. According to the morphology, 211 seizure-onset zone channels were classified in six patterns (low-voltage fast activity; sharp activity at ≤13Hz; low-frequency high-amplitude periodic spikes; burst of high-amplitude polyspikes; spike-and-wave activity; and delta brush). Interictal and ictal HFOs were compared between the six seizure-onset patterns. Interictal ripple and fast ripple rates differed significantly across seizure-onset patterns (ppatterns (ppattern is more likely to be generated in a region of seizure spread. Regarding the difference in HFO density between pre-ictal baseline and seizure-onset section across the six patterns, burst of high-amplitude polyspikes and delta brushes had the highest densities of both ripples and fast ripples (ppatterns correlate specific interictal and ictal HFO profiles confirming that seizures with different morphological patterns likely have different mechanisms of generation. This study emphazises that, in clinical practice, seizure-onset patterns should be distinguished and specified when analyzing HFOs, particularly if they are used in presurgical evaluation to better localize the seizure-onset zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Lorenz plot and Cardiac Sympathetic Index of heart rate variability for detecting seizures for patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sandor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Tachycardia is often seen during epileptic seizures, but it also occurs during physical exercise. In order to assess whether focal epileptic seizures can be detected by short term moving window Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis, we modified the geometric HRV method, Lorenz plot, to consist of only 30, 50 or 100 R-R intervals per analyzed window. From each window we calculated the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) variability of Lorenz plot to retrieve the Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) as (L/T) and "Modified CSI" (described in methods), and compared the maximum during the patient's epileptic seizures with that during the patient's own exercise and non-seizure sessions as control. All five analyzed patients had complex partial seizures (CPS) originating in the temporal lobe (11 seizures) during their 1-5 days long term video-EEG monitoring. All CPS with electroencephalographic correlation were selected for the HRV analysis. The CSI and Modified CSI were correspondently calculated after each heart beat depicting the prior 30, 50 and 100 R-R intervals at the time. CSI (30, 50 and 100) and Modified CSI (100) showed a higher maximum peak during seizures than exercise/non-seizure (121-296%) for 4 of the 5 patients within 4 seconds before till 60 seconds after seizure onset time even though exercise maximum HR exceeded that of the seizures. The results indicate a detectable, sudden and inordinate shift towards sympathetic overdrive in the sympathovagal balance of the autonomic nervous system just around seizure-onset for certain patients. This new modified moving window Lorenz plot method seems promising way of constructing a portable ECG-based epilepsy alarm for certain patients with epilepsy who needs aid during seizure.

  10. Correlation between magnetoencephalography-based "clusterectomy" and postoperative seizure freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadera, Sumeet; Jehi, Lara; Burgess, Richard C; Shea, Katherine; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Mosher, John; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Bingaman, William

    2013-06-01

    During the presurgical evaluation of patients with medically intractable focal epilepsy, a variety of noninvasive studies are performed to localize the hypothetical epileptogenic zone and guide the resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is becoming increasingly used in the clinical realm for this purpose. No investigators have previously reported on coregisteration of MEG clusters with postoperative resection cavities to evaluate whether complete "clusterectomy" (resection of the area associated with MEG clusters) was performed or to compare these findings with postoperative seizure-free outcomes. The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts and imaging studies of 65 patients undergoing MEG followed by resective epilepsy surgery from 2009 until 2012 at the Cleveland Clinic. Preoperative MEG studies were fused with postoperative MRI studies to evaluate whether clusters were within the resected area. These data were then correlated with postoperative seizure freedom. Sixty-five patients were included in this study. The average duration of follow-up was 13.9 months, the mean age at surgery was 23.1 years, and the mean duration of epilepsy was 13.7 years. In 30 patients, the main cluster was located completely within the resection cavity, in 28 it was completely outside the resection cavity, and in 7 it was partially within the resection cavity. Seventy-four percent of patients were seizure free at 12 months after surgery, and this rate decreased to 60% at 24 months. Improved likelihood of seizure freedom was seen with complete clusterectomy in patients with localization outside the temporal lobe (extra-temporal lobe epilepsy) (p = 0.04). In patients with preoperative MEG studies that show clusters in surgically accessible areas outside the temporal lobe, we suggest aggressive resection to improve the chances for seizure freedom. When the cluster is found within the temporal lobe, further diagnostic testing may be required to better localize the epileptogenic zone.

  11. Propofol Anesthesia-Induced Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1994-01-01

    A case of a healthy young man who developed seizures and generalized paroxysmal fast activity in the EEG following use of propofol for anesthesia in minor surgery is reported from the Department of Neurology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL.

  12. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  13. Reading-Induced Absence Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1995-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with a 2-year history of absence seizures induced by reading and diagnosed by video EEG is reported from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, and Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

  14. Treatment of febrile seizures with intermittent clobazam

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Fifty children, 24 female and 26 male, with ages varying from 6 to 72 months (mean=23.7 m.) that experienced at least one febrile seizure (FS) entered a prospective study of intermittent therapy with clobazam. Cases with severe neurological abnormalities, progressive neurological disease, afebrile seizures, symptomatic seizures of other nature, or seizures during a central nervous system infection were excluded. Seizures were of the simple type in 25 patients, complex in 20 and unclassified i...

  15. Dissociation of spontaneous seizures and brainstem seizure thresholds in mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B; Ferland, Russell J

    2017-03-01

    C57BL/6J mice exposed to eight flurothyl-induced generalized clonic seizures exhibit a change in seizure phenotype following a 28-day incubation period and subsequent flurothyl rechallenge. Mice now develop a complex seizure semiology originating in the forebrain and propagating into the brainstem seizure network (a forebrain→brainstem seizure). In contrast, this phenotype change does not occur in seizure-sensitive DBA/2J mice. The underlying mechanism(s) was the focus of these studies. DBA2/J mice were exposed to eight flurothyl-induced seizures (1/day) followed by 24-hour video-electroencephalographic recordings for 28-days. Forebrain and brainstem seizure thresholds were determined in C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice following one or eight flurothyl-induced seizures, or after eight flurothyl-induced seizures, a 28-day incubation period, and final flurothyl rechallenge. Similar to C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice expressed spontaneous seizures. However, unlike C57BL/6J mice, DBA2/J mice continued to have spontaneous seizures without remission. Because DBA2/J mice do not express forebrain→brainstem seizures following flurothyl rechallenge after a 28-day incubation period, this indicated that spontaneous seizures were not sufficient for the evolution of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Therefore, we determined whether brainstem seizure thresholds were changing during this repeated-flurothyl model and whether this could account for the expression of forebrain→brainstem seizures. Brainstem seizure thresholds were not different between C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice on day one or on the last induction seizure trial (day eight). However, brainstem seizure thresholds did differ significantly on flurothyl rechallenge (day 28) with DBA/2J mice showing no lowering of their brainstem seizure thresholds. These results demonstrated that DBA/2J mice exposed to the repeated-flurothyl model develop spontaneous seizures without evidence of seizure remission and provide a new model of

  16. FEBRILE SEIZURE IN THALASSEMIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveFebrile seizure is the most common seizure disorder in children. Its pathophysiology is not fully understood yet; however, some risk factors have been cited for it. Iron is one of these influential elements and is involved in the metabolism of some neurotransmitters which are reduced in irondeficiency anemia and also increases the sensitivity of neural cells during a febrile episode. The present study aimed to determine the rate of febrile seizure in thalassemic patients and to compare it with the corresponding rate in the normal population.Materials & MethodsThis descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 766 patients with thalassemia major. They were all older than 6 months and were referred to Dastghaib Cooly's Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, from Oct 2006 to May 2007, and 766 normal and healthy children as the control group. Questionnaires containing demographic data and past history of febrile seizure, age of febrile seizure, number of episodes, hospitalization, and related family history were prepared and filled through interviewing the parents.ResultsFebrile seizure was detected in 7 cases of the patient group (0.9% versus 18 cases (2.3% of the control group. The frequency of febrile seizure in the controls was 2.5 times more than that in the thalassemia group, which was statistically significant (P ConclusionThis study showed a lower rate of febrile convulsion in thalassemic patients compared to the control group. Accordingly, it could be suggested that high iron storage is a protective factor against febrile convulsion.Keywords:seizure, febrile, thalassemia, convulsion

  17. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Rezayi A, Togha M, Ahmadabadi F, Derakhshanfar H, Azargashb E, Khodaei F. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:20-25.ObjectiveSome studies suggest that detection of epileptic discharge is unusual during the first postictal week of febrile seizure and others believe that EEGs carried out on the day of the seizure are abnormal in as many as 88% of the patients. In thisstudy, we intend to compare early and late EEG abnormalities in febrile seizure.Materials & Methods EEG was recorded during daytime sleep, 24-48 hours (early EEG and 2 weeks (late EEG after the seizure in 36 children with febrile seizure (FS, aged between 3 months and 6 years. EEGs that showed generalized or focal spikes, sharp, spike wave complex, and slowing were considered as abnormal EEG.Abnormalities of the first EEG were compared with those of second EEG.ResultsThe most common abnormal epileptiform discharges recorded in the early EEG were slow waves (27.6% and sharp waves in late EEG (36%. Distribution of abnormalities in early and late EEG showed no significant statistical difference.ConclusionThe early and late EEG recording had the same results in patient with febrile seizure. Reference:Hauser WA, Kurland LT. The epidemiology of epilepsy in Rochester, Minnesota, 1935 through 1967. Epilepsia 1975;16(1:1-66.Freeman JM. Febrile seizures: a consensus of their significance, evaluation, and treatment. Pediatrics 1980;66(6:1009.Waruiru C, Appleton R. Febrile seizures: an update. Arch Dis Child 2004;89(8:751-6.ILAE. Guidelines for epidemiologic studies on epilepsy, International League against Epilepsy. Epilepsia 1993;34(4:592-6.Annegers JF, Hauser WA, Shirts SB, Kurland LT. Factors prognostic of unprovoked seizures after febrile convulsions. N Engl J Med 1987;316(9:493-8.Berg AT, Shinnar S, Darefsky AS, Holford TR, Shapiro ED, Salomon ME, et al. Predictors of recurrent febrile

  18. Benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Suk Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neoplasms of the lacrimal drainage system are uncommon, but potentially life-threatening and are often difficult to diagnose. Among primary lacrimal sac tumors, benign mixed tumors are extremely rare. Histologically, benign mixed tumors have been classified as a type of benign epithelial tumor. Here we report a case of benign mixed tumor of the lacrimal sac.

  19. A machine learning system for automated whole-brain seizure detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition that affects approximately 70 million people worldwide. Characterised by sudden bursts of excess electricity in the brain, manifesting as seizures, epilepsy is still not well understood when compared with other neurological disorders. Seizures often happen unexpectedly and attempting to predict them has been a research topic for the last 30 years. Electroencephalograms have been integral to these studies, as the recordings that they produce can capture the brain’s electrical signals. The diagnosis of epilepsy is usually made by a neurologist, but can be difficult to make in the early stages. Supporting para-clinical evidence obtained from magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography may enable clinicians to make a diagnosis of epilepsy and instigate treatment earlier. However, electroencephalogram capture and interpretation is time consuming and can be expensive due to the need for trained specialists to perform the interpretation. Automated detection of correlates of seizure activity generalised across different regions of the brain and across multiple subjects may be a solution. This paper explores this idea further and presents a supervised machine learning approach that classifies seizure and non-seizure records using an open dataset containing 342 records (171 seizures and 171 non-seizures. Our approach posits a new method for generalising seizure detection across different subjects without prior knowledge about the focal point of seizures. Our results show an improvement on existing studies with 88% for sensitivity, 88% for specificity and 93% for the area under the curve, with a 12% global error, using the k-NN classifier.

  20. Seizure-induced brain lesions: A wide spectrum of variably reversible MRI abnormalities

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    Cianfoni, A., E-mail: acianfoni@hotmail.com [Neuroradiology, Neurocenter of Italian Switzerland–Ospedale regionale Lugano, Via Tesserete 46, Lugano, 6900, CH (Switzerland); Caulo, M., E-mail: caulo@unich.it [Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, University of Chieti, Via dei Vestini 33, 6610 Chieti. Italy (Italy); Cerase, A., E-mail: alfonsocerase@gmail.com [Unit of Neuroimaging and Neurointervention NINT, Department of Neurological and Sensorineural Sciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Policlinico “Santa Maria alle Scotte”, V.le Bracci 16, Siena (Italy); Della Marca, G., E-mail: dellamarca@rm.unicatt.it [Neurology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Falcone, C., E-mail: carlo_falc@libero.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Di Lella, G.M., E-mail: gdilella@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Gaudino, S., E-mail: sgaudino@sirm.org [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy); Edwards, J., E-mail: edwardjc@musc.edu [Neuroscience Dept., Medical University of South Carolina, 96J Lucas st, 29425, Charleston, SC (United States); Colosimo, C., E-mail: colosimo@rm.unicatt.it [Radiology Dept., Catholic University of Rome, L.go F Vito 1, 00100, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Introduction MRI abnormalities in the postictal period might represent the effect of the seizure activity, rather than its structural cause. Material and Methods Retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging charts of 26 patients diagnosed with seizure-related MR-signal changes. All patients underwent brain-MRI (1.5-Tesla, standard pre- and post-contrast brain imaging, including DWI-ADC in 19/26) within 7 days from a seizure and at least one follow-up MRI, showing partial or complete reversibility of the MR-signal changes. Extensive clinical work-up and follow-up, ranging from 3 months to 5 years, ruled out infection or other possible causes of brain damage. Seizure-induced brain-MRI abnormalities remained a diagnosis of exclusion. Site, characteristics and reversibility of MRI changes, and association with characteristics of seizures were determined. Results MRI showed unilateral (13/26) and bilateral abnormalities, with high (24/26) and low (2/26) T2-signal, leptomeningeal contrast-enhancement (2/26), restricted diffusion (9/19). Location of abnormality was cortical/subcortical, basal ganglia, white matter, corpus callosum, cerebellum. Hippocampus was involved in 10/26 patients. Reversibility of MRI changes was complete in 15, and with residual gliosis or focal atrophy in 11 patients. Reversibility was noted between 15 and 150 days (average, 62 days). Partial simple and complex seizures were associated with hippocampal involvement (p = 0.015), status epilepticus with incomplete reversibility of MRI abnormalities (p = 0.041). Conclusions Seizure or epileptic status can induce transient, variably reversible MRI brain abnormalities. Partial seizures are frequently associated with hippocampal involvement and status epilepticus with incompletely reversible lesions. These seizure-induced MRI abnormalities pose a broad differential diagnosis; increased awareness may reduce the risk of misdiagnosis and unnecessary intervention.

  1. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome lowers seizure threshold in adult patients without epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wither, Robert G; Borlot, Felippe; MacDonald, Alex; Butcher, Nancy J; Chow, Eva W C; Bassett, Anne S; Andrade, Danielle M

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies examining seizures in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) have focused primarily on children and adolescents. In this study we investigated the prevalence and characteristics of seizures and epilepsy in an adult 22q11.2DS population. The medical records of 202 adult patients with 22q11.2DS were retrospectively reviewed for documentation of seizures, electroencephalography (EEG) reports, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. Epilepsy status was assigned in accordance with 2010 International League Against Epilepsy Classification. Of 202 patients, 32 (15.8%) had a documented history of seizure. Of these 32, 23 (71.8%) had acute symptomatic seizures, usually associated with hypocalcemia and/or antipsychotic or antidepressant use. Nine patients (9/32, 28%; 9/202, 4%) met diagnostic criteria for epilepsy. Two patients had genetic generalized epilepsy; two patients had focal seizures of unknown etiology; two had epilepsy due to malformations of cortical development; in two the epilepsy was due to acquired structural changes; and in one patient the epilepsy could not be further classified. Similarly to children, the prevalence of epilepsy and acute symptomatic seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is higher than in the general population. Hypocalcemia continues to be a risk factor for adults, but differently from kids, the main cause of seizures in adults with 22q11.2DS is exposure to antipsychotics and antidepressants. Further prospective studies are warranted to investigate how 22q11.2 microdeletion leads to an overall decreased seizure threshold. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  3. Radical pancreaticoduodenectomy for benign disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kavanagh, D O

    2008-01-01

    Whipple\\'s procedure is the treatment of choice for pancreatic and periampullary malignancies. Preoperative histological confirmation of malignancy is frequently unavailable and some patients will subsequently be found to have benign disease. Here, we review our experience with Whipple\\'s procedure for patients ultimately proven to have benign disease. The medical records of all patients who underwent Whipple\\'s procedure during a 15-year period (1987-2002) were reviewed; 112 patients underwent the procedure for suspected malignancy. In eight cases, the final histology was benign (7.1%). One additional patient was known to have benign disease at resection. The mean age was 50 years (range: 30-75). The major presenting features included jaundice (five), pain (two), gastric outlet obstruction (one), and recurrent gastrointestinal haemorrhage (one). Investigations included ultrasound (eight), computerised tomography (eight), endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (seven; of these, four patients had a stent inserted and three patients had sampling for cytology), and endoscopic ultrasound (two). The pathological diagnosis included benign biliary stricture (two), chronic pancreatitis (two), choledochal cyst (one), inflammatory pseudotumour (one), cystic duodenal wall dysplasia (one), duodenal angiodysplasia (one), and granular cell neoplasm (one). There was no operative mortality. Morbidity included intra-abdominal collection (one), anastomotic leak (one), liver abscess (one), and myocardial infarction (one). All patients remain alive and well at mean follow-up of 41 months. Despite recent advances in diagnostic imaging, 8% of the patients undergoing Whipple\\'s procedure had benign disease. A range of unusual pathological entities can mimic malignancy. Accurate preoperative histological diagnosis may have allowed a less radical operation to be performed. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspirate (EUS-FNA) may reduce the need for Whipple\\'s operation

  4. Cortical silent period in a patient with focal epilepsy and Parry-Romberg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktekin, Berrin; Oguz, Yurttaş; Aydin, Hülya; Senol, Utku

    2005-03-01

    Progressive facial hemiatrophy (PFH), Parry-Romberg syndrome, is a rare disorder frequently associated with epilepsy. We describe a 28-year-old man who had PFH and partial epilepsy that was easily controlled with antiepileptic drugs. In accordance with this patient's benign course of seizures, the cortical silent period was prolonged in the symptomatic hemisphere. This finding may represent compensatory interictal mechanisms in epilepsy.

  5. Statistical earthquake focal mechanism forecasts

    CERN Document Server

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2013-01-01

    Forecasts of the focal mechanisms of future earthquakes are important for seismic hazard estimates and Coulomb stress and other models of earthquake occurrence. Here we report on a high-resolution global forecast of earthquake rate density as a function of location, magnitude, and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5 degree spatial resolution, covering the latitude range magnitude, and focal mechanism. In previous publications we reported forecasts of 0.5 degree spatial resolution, covering the latitude range from -75 to +75 degrees, based on the Global Central Moment Tensor earthquake catalog. In the new forecasts we've improved the spatial resolution to 0.1 degree and the latitude range from pole to pole. Our focal mechanism estimates require distance-weighted combinations of observed focal mechanisms within 1000 km of each grid point. Simultaneously we calculate an average rotation angle between the forecasted mechanism and all the surrounding mechanisms, using the method ...

  6. Prophylactic drug management for febrile seizures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Offringa

    , intermittent phenobarbitone or ibuprofen versus placebo or no treatment was found; nor for diclofenac versus placebo followed by ibuprofen, acetominophen or placebo; nor for intermittent rectal diazepam versus intermittent valproate, nor phenobarbitone versus intermittent rectal diazepam. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS No clinically important benefits for children with febrile seizures were found for intermittent oral diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbitone, intermittent rectal diazepam, valproate, pyridoxine, intermittent phenobarbitone or intermittent ibuprofen, nor for diclofenac versus placebo followed by ibuprofen, acetominophen or placebo. Adverse effects were reported in up to 30% of children. Apparent benefit for clobazam treatment in one recent trial needs to be replicated to be judged reliable. Given the benign nature of recurrent febrile seizures, and the high prevalence of adverse effects of these drugs, parents and families should be supported with adequate contact details of medical services and information on recurrence, first aid management and, most importantly, the benign nature of the phenomenon.

  7. Thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a novel indicator of oxidative stress in children with simple febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmas, Bahri; Erel, Özcan; Ersavaş, Dilek; Yürümez, Yusuf

    2017-08-14

    Simple febrile seizures are generally benign, but during the seizure, elevated levels of glutamate and high levels of oxygen use due to the high metabolic brain activity result in oxidative stress. However, the relationship between febrile seizures and oxidative stress remains unclear. In this study, we investigated thiol/disulfide homeostasis as a new oxidative stress parameter in patients with simple febrile seizures. This study was performed between February 2016 and May 2016 at the Pediatric Emergency Unit. The study population consisted of 40 patients with a diagnosis of simple febrile seizure and 30 control participants aged 8-59 months. Total thiol, native thiol and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, disulfide/total thiol, and native thiol/total thiol ratios were used as thiol/disulfide homeostasis parameters and were quantified in patient and control groups. Furthermore, correlations with seizure duration were investigated. In the patient group, native and total thiol levels and native thiol/total thiol ratios were low, and disulfide levels, disulfide/native thiol, and disulfide/total thiol ratios were significantly higher than in the control group. Negative correlations were observed between seizure duration, total and native thiol levels, and native thiol/total thiol ratio, whereas positive correlations were observed between seizure duration and disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratio. The sensitivities of both disulfide/native thiol and disulfide/total thiol ratios were high for simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures may cause impairment in favor of disulfide bonds in thiol/disulfide homeostasis. Overall, these changes may contribute to neuronal cell damage after simple febrile seizures.

  8. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia masquerading as a residual cyst

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    Rajat Bhandari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD is a benign fibroosseous condition that can be seen in dentulous and edentulous patients. It is an asymptomatic lesion and needs no treatment; however, follow-up is essential due to the possibility that it can progress to a condition called florid cemento-osseous dysplasia. We report a case of FCOD of mandible in a 25-year-old female. Clinically, the lesion resembled periapical pathosis of odontogenic origin. An attempt has been made to discuss the clinical and histopathologic features along with differential diagnosis of cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  9. Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia masquerading as a residual cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Rajat; Sandhu, Simarpreet V; Bansal, Himanta; Behl, Rashi; Bhullar, Ramanpreet Kaur

    2012-04-01

    Focal cemento-osseous dysplasia (FCOD) is a benign fibroosseous condition that can be seen in dentulous and edentulous patients. It is an asymptomatic lesion and needs no treatment; however, follow-up is essential due to the possibility that it can progress to a condition called florid cemento-osseous dysplasia. We report a case of FCOD of mandible in a 25-year-old female. Clinically, the lesion resembled periapical pathosis of odontogenic origin. An attempt has been made to discuss the clinical and histopathologic features along with differential diagnosis of cemento-osseous dysplasia.

  10. Pictures of focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christine; Sempoux; Charles; Balabaud; Paulette; Bioulac-Sage

    2014-01-01

    This practical atlas aims to help liver and non liver pa-thologists to recognize benign hepatocellular nodules on resected specimen. Macroscopic and microscopic views together with immunohistochemical stains illustrate typical and atypical aspects of focal nodular hyperplasia and of hepatocellular adenoma, including hepatocel-lular adenomas subtypes with references to clinical and imaging data. Each step is important to make a correct diagnosis. The specimen including the nodule and the non-tumoral liver should be sliced, photographed and all different looking areas adequately sampled for par-affin inclusion. Routine histology includes HE, trichrome and cytokeratin 7. Immunohistochemistry includes glu-tamine synthase and according to the above results ad-ditional markers such as liver fatty acid binding protein, C reactive protein and beta catenin may be realized to differentiate focal nodular hyperplasia from hepatocel-lular adenoma subtypes. Clues for differential diagnosis and pitfalls are explained and illustrated.

  11. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease) in two Chinese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N; Li, Y; Zhou, Y; Zeng, X

    2012-08-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, or Heck's disease, is a relatively rare virus-induced benign disease. To the best of the authors' knowledge it has not been reported in an ethnic Chinese population. The authors report two cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) in Chinese patients, which were clinically and histologically in accord with FEH. In particular, the lesions in one case were located on the gingival mucosa, which is rarely affected by FEH. DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded specimens from the two patients was tested for the presence of human papilloma virus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 16, 18, 13, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis.

  12. Treatment of focal epithelial hyperplasia with trichloroacetic acid

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    J Harris Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign disease which has a chronic course that manifests as characteristic multiple small papules or nodules. They are predominantly found in the oral mucosa, gingiva and tongue. The surface of the lesions is smooth and it varies in size. It is an asymptomatic disease caused by human papillomavirus, affecting mainly children and adolescents. In this report, we describe four cases referred to the Stomatology and Oral Surgery Department of the Faculty of Dentistry, Cartagena University with a diagnosis of focal epithelial hyperplasia. Clinical features and histopathological characteristics of the patients were recorded. We also describe the properties and advantages of trichloroacetic acid as a therapeutic method.

  13. Behavioral Abnormalities in Lagotto Romagnolo Dogs with a History of Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy: A Long‐Term Follow‐Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jokinen, T S; Tiira, K.; Metsähonkala, L.; Seppälä, E.H.; Hielm‐Björkman, A.; Lohi, H.; Laitinen‐Vapaavuori, O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lagotto Romagnolo (LR) dogs with benign juvenile epilepsy syndrome often experience spontaneous remission of seizures. The long‐term outcome in these dogs currently is unknown. In humans, behavioral and psychiatric comorbidities have been reported in pediatric and adult‐onset epilepsies. Hypothesis/Objectives The objectives of this study were to investigate possible neurobehavioral comorbidities in LR with a history of benign familial juvenile epilepsy (BFJE) and to assess the occu...

  14. Optimized methods for epilepsy therapy development using an etiologically realistic model of focal epilepsy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Clifford L; Fender, Jason S; Temkin, Nancy R; D'Ambrosio, Raimondo

    2015-02-01

    Conventionally developed antiseizure drugs fail to control epileptic seizures in about 30% of patients, and no treatment prevents epilepsy. New etiologically realistic, syndrome-specific epilepsy models are expected to identify better treatments by capturing currently unknown ictogenic and epileptogenic mechanisms that operate in the corresponding patient populations. Additionally, the use of electrocorticography permits better monitoring of epileptogenesis and the full spectrum of acquired seizures, including focal nonconvulsive seizures that are typically difficult to treat in humans. Thus, the combined use of etiologically realistic models and electrocorticography may improve our understanding of the genesis and progression of epilepsy, and facilitate discovery and translation of novel treatments. However, this approach is labor intensive and must be optimized. To this end, we used an etiologically realistic rat model of posttraumatic epilepsy, in which the initiating fluid percussion injury closely replicates contusive closed-head injury in humans, and has been adapted to maximize epileptogenesis and focal non-convulsive seizures. We obtained week-long 5-electrode electrocorticography 1 month post-injury, and used a Monte-Carlo-based non-parametric bootstrap strategy to test the impact of electrode montage design, duration-based seizure definitions, group size and duration of recordings on the assessment of posttraumatic epilepsy, and on statistical power to detect antiseizure and antiepileptogenic treatment effects. We found that use of seizure definition based on clinical criteria rather than event duration, and of recording montages closely sampling the activity of epileptic foci, maximize the power to detect treatment effects. Detection of treatment effects was marginally improved by prolonged recording, and 24h recording epochs were sufficient to provide 80% power to detect clinically interesting seizure control or prevention of seizures with small groups

  15. Ictal pain in focal non-convulsive status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciato, Sara; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Fanella, Martina; Albini, Mariarita; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2017-06-09

    We report an adult with acute unilateral pain as isolated manifestation of acute symptomatic focal non-convulsive status epilepticus. Pain is rarely a manifestation of epileptic seizures. Traditionally, painful seizures have been thought to originate in either the parietal or temporal lobes, but their localising value is debatable. Recent functional neuroimaging studies and electrophysiological findings obtained by using intracerebral recordings have shown the involvement of the insular cortex along with several other brain structures in the processing of painful inputs, comprising a more widespread anatomo-functional network. Despite their rarity as a distinct clinical entity, especially in adults, painful somatosensory seizures can be disabling and misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis is common; it is therefore essential to consider epilepsy as a possible cause of paroxysmal pain to ensure proper assessment and appropriate treatment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. [Case report of muscle cramp versus focal epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, H; Muranaka, H; Osari, S; Kimura, Y; Goto, A; Koda, M; Shiotani, M; Ozaki, I

    1999-09-01

    We report here a boy suffering from muscle cramps in the right upper extremity. At 32 days of age, he developed purulent meningitis followed by paresis of the right upper extremity. From infancy he had intermittent episodes myoclonus-like involving the right hand. Since he also had true epileptic seizures with loss of consciousness, ocular deviation, and vomiting at 6 and 8 years of age, he was treated with anti-epileptic drugs as therapy for focal motor seizures. At 6 years of age, these episodes increased in frequency. The cramps spread from the right hand to involve the entire upper extremity with pain. At the age of 10, he was referred to Hirosaki University Hospital and was admitted. Using closed circuit television with continuous EEG and EMG monitoring we observed during his episodes repeated EMG abnormalities consisting of continuous discharges of polyphasic motor unit potentials, but no epileptic EEG discharges. We diagnosed these episodes as muscle cramp. His muscle cramps were controlled by medication with muscle relaxants and Chinese medicines. This case illustrates that the differential diagnosis between muscle cramps and epileptic seizures is important for proper treatment.

  17. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

  18. Seizures and Meperidine: Overstated and Underutilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Konrad H; Hemmen, Thomas M; Lyden, Patrick D

    2015-12-01

    Meperidine is used for pain control and treatment of shivering. Concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly seizures, have led to efforts limiting meperidine use. We reviewed the body of evidence linking meperidine to seizures. We searched PubMed for the terms meperidine, normeperidine, pethidine, and norpethidine; each was combined with the terms: seizure, epilepsy, epileptogenic, toxicity, overdose, seizure threshold, and convulsion. Articles were assessed for relevance. Semiologies were reviewed to ascertain seizure likelihood. Our search yielded 351 articles, of which 66 were relevant. Of these, 33 had primary clinical data on meperidine-associated seizures, comprising 50 patients. Twenty events were deemed likely to be seizures, 26 indeterminate, and 4 unlikely. Most studies were case reports. Confounding comorbidities were frequent. The evidence base for meperidine-associated seizures in man is scant. Seizure risk associated with meperidine appears to be overstated. The utility of meperidine should continue to be explored, especially for therapeutic hypothermia.

  19. Treating benign prostatic hyperplasia with botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisinda, G; Vanella, S; Marniga, G; Crocco, A; Maria, G

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been increasingly used in the interventional treatment of several disorders; the use of this agent has extended to a plethora of conditions including focal dystonia, spasticity, inappropriate contraction in most gastrointestinal sphincters, eye movement disorders, hyperhidrosis, genitourinary disorders and aesthetically undesirable hyperfunctional facial lines. In addition, BoNT is being investigated for the control of pain, and for the management of tension or migraine headaches and myofascial pain syndrome. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in ageing men; the goal of therapy is to reduce the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with BPH and to improve the quality of life. However, medical treatment, including drugs that relax smooth muscle within the prostate and drugs that shrink the gland are not totally effective or without complications. The standard surgical treatment for BPH is progressively changing to minimally invasive therapies, but none of them has provided clear results. The use of BoNT-A to inhibit the autonomic efferent effects on prostate growth and contraction, and inhibit the abnormal afferent effects on prostate sensation, might be an alternative treatment for BPH. BoNT injections have several advantages over drugs and surgical therapies in the management of intractable or chronic disease; systemic pharmacologic effects are rare, permanent destruction of tissue does not occur, and graded degrees of relaxation may be achieved by varying the dose injected. In this paper, clinical experience over the last years with BoNT in BPH impaired patients will be illustrated.

  20. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound in CT-undetermined Focal Liver Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrose, S W; Karstrup, S; Gerke, O; Rafaelsen, S

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in the diagnosis of focal liver lesions, which were undetermined at CT scan. Materials and Methods: From January 2010 to December 2010, patients with CT-undetermined focal liver lesions were included in this study. A total of 78 patients were evaluated: 41 men and 37 women, mean age 61.8 years; age range 30-91 years. All patients were examined with GE LOGIQ 9E ultrasound scanners with contrast-specific software, and SonoVue intravenous bolus. The standard of reference was composite consisting of: percutaneous biopsy, surgical resection, PET/CT and clinical follow-up. Results: The 78 included patients had 163 undetermined focal liver lesions, mean size 1.1 cm, range 0.1-5.3 cm. There were 18 malignant and 145 benign liver lesions, as defined by the standard of reference. In differentiating between benign vs. malignant CEUS demonstrated sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 94.4% (95% CI: 56.3-99.5%), 99.3% (95% CI: 94.9 -99.9%), 94.4% (95% CI: 56.3-99.5%), 99.3% (95% CI: 94.9-99.9%) and 98.7% (95% CI: 94.9-99.7%), respectively. If the CEUS-inconclusive results were assumed to indicate malignancy, then sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy would be 95.8% (95% CI: 66.4-99.6%), 98.6% (95% CI: 94.4-99.7%), 92.0% (95CI: 65.1-98.6%), 99.3% (95% CI: 95.0-99.9%), 98.2% (95% CI: 94.4-99.5%). Conclusion: The results of this study showed a high diagnostic accuracy for CEUS in undetermined focal liver lesions found by CT. Due to a high diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in this study, it was cautiously concluded that CEUS is useful in differentiating between malignant and benign focal liver lesions in clinical practice.

  1. FEBRILE SEIZURE IN THALASSEMIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizure is the most common seizure disorder in children. Its pathophysiology is not fully understood yet; however, some risk factors have been cited for it. Iron is one of these influential elements and is involved in the metabolism of some neurotransmitters which are reduced in irondeficiency anemia and also increases the sensitivity of neural cells during a febrile episode. The present study aimed to determine the rate of febrile seizure in thalassemic patients and to compare it with the corresponding rate in the normal population.Materials & MethodsThis descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 766 patients with thalassemia major. They were all older than 6 months and were referred to Dastghaib Cooly's Clinic, affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, from Oct 2006 to May 2007, and 766 normal and healthy children as the control group. Questionnaires containing demographic data and past history of febrile seizure, age of febrile seizure, number of episodes, hospitalization, and related family history were prepared and filled through interviewing the parents.ResultsFebrile seizure was detected in 7 cases of the patient group (0.9% versus 18 cases (2.3% of the control group. The frequency of febrile seizure in the controls was 2.5 times more than that in the thalassemia group, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05.ConclusionThis study showed a lower rate of febrile convulsion in thalassemic patients compared to the control group. Accordingly, it could be suggested that high iron storage is a protective factor against febrile convulsion.

  2. Pathogenetic mechanisms of focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Guerrini, Renzo; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2014-07-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) constitute a prevalent cause of intractable epilepsy in children, and is one of the leading conditions requiring epilepsy surgery. Despite recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of these conditions, the pathogenetic mechanisms of FCDs remain largely unknown. The purpose if this work is to review the molecular underpinnings of FCDs and to highlight potential therapeutic targets. A systematic review of the literature regarding the histologic, molecular, and electrophysiologic aspects of FCDs was conducted. Disruption of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling comprises a common pathway underlying the structural and electrical disturbances of some FCDs. Other mechanisms such as viral infections, prematurity, head trauma, and brain tumors are also posited. mTOR inhibitors (i.e., rapamycin) have shown positive results on seizure management in animal models and in a small cohort of patients with FCD. Encouraging progress has been achieved on the molecular and electrophysiologic basis of constitutive cells in the dysplastic tissue. Despite the promising results of mTOR inhibitors, large-scale randomized trials are in need to evaluate their efficacy and side effects, along with additional mechanistic studies for the development of novel, molecular-based diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. [Color Doppler sonography of focal abdominal lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licanin, Zoran; Lincender, Lidija; Djurović, V; Salihefendić, Nizama; Smajlović, Fahrudin

    2004-01-01

    Color Doppler sonography (CDS--spectral, color and power), harmonic imaging techniques (THI, PHI), possibility of 3D analysis of picture, usage of contrast agents, have raised the values of ultrasound as a diagnostic method to a very high level. THI--non-linear gray scale modality, is based on the processing of higher reflected frequencies, that has improved a picture resolution, which is presented with less artifacts and limiting effects of obesity and gases. Ultrasound contrast agents improve analysis of micro and macro circulation of the examined area, and with the assessment of velocity of supply in ROI (wash in), distribution and time of signal weakening (wash out), are significantly increasing diagnostic value of ultrasound. Besides the anatomical and topographic presentation of examined region (color, power), Color Doppler sonography gives us haemodynamic-functional information on vascularisation of that region, as well as on pathologic vascularisation if present. Avascular aspect of a focal pathologic lesion corresponds to a cyst or haematoma, while coloration and positive spectral curve discover that anechogenic lesions actually represents aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms or AVF. In local inflammatory lesion, abscess in an acute phase, CDS shows first increased, and then decreased central perfusion, while in a chronic phase, a pericapsular vascularisation is present. Contribution of CDS in differentiation of hepatic tumors (hemangioma, HCC and metastasis) is very significant. Central color dots along the peripheral blood vessels and the blush phenomenon are characteristics of capillary hemangioma, peritumoral vascular ring "basket" of HCC, and "detour" sign of metastasis. The central artery, RI from 0.45 to 0.60 and radial spreading characterize FNH. Hepatic adenoma is characterized by an intratumoral vein, and rarely by a vascular hallo. Further on, blood velocity in tumor defined by Color Doppler, distinguishes malignant from benign lesion, where 40 cm/s is a

  4. Long-lasting effects of feline amygdala kindling on monoamines, seizures and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, M N; Staba, R J; Saquib, S F; Farber, P R

    2001-02-16

    This report describes the relationship between monoamines, sleep and seizures before and 1-month after amygdala kindling in young cats (kindling (n=2); 5-min recording epochs were temporally adjusted to correspond to dialysate samples and differentiated according to dominant sleep or waking state (lasting > or =80% of 5-min epoch) and degree of spontaneous seizure activity (number and duration of focal versus generalized spikes and spike trains and behavioral seizure correlates). Post-kindling records in each cat were divided into two groups (n=1 record each) based on higher or lower spontaneous EEG and behavioral seizure activity and compared to pre-kindling records. We found: (1) before and after kindling, NE and 5-HT but not DA concentrations were significantly lower in sleep than waking at both sites; (2) after kindling, each cat showed cyclic patterns, as follows: (a) higher NE, 5-HT and DA concentrations accompanied increased seizure activity with delayed sleep onset latency and increased sleep fragmentation (reduced sleep state percentages, number of epochs and/or epoch duration) in one recording versus (b) lower monoaminergic concentrations accompanied reduced seizure activity, rapid sleep onset and reduced sleep disruption in the other recording. The alternating, post-kindling pattern suggested "rebound" effects which could explain some controversies in the literature about chronic effects of kindling on monoamines and sleep-waking state patterns.

  5. [Complex febrile seizures: study of the associated pathology and practical use of complementary tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzosa López, R; Ramos Fernández, J M; Martínez Antón, J; Espinosa Fernández, M G; Urda Cardona, A

    2014-06-01

    Although one third of febrile seizures are complex, a consensus has still not been reached on how to manage them, as is the case with simple febrile seizures. The objective of this study is to estimate the usefulness of complementary examinations and the risk of associated serious intracranial pathology. A retrospective review was conducted from 2003 until 2011 on patients from 6 months to 6 years presenting with a complex febrile seizure admitted to a tertiary care hospital, excluding the cases with previous neurological disease. Epidemiological and clinic variables were collected, as well as complementary tests and complications. We found 65 patients (31 females and 34 males), of whom 44 had repeated seizures in the first 24 hours, with 15 having focal seizures. The vast majority (90%) of the recurrences occurred before 15 hours. The mean age was 20.7 months and temperature was 39.1 ± 0.12°C. None of the patients had severe intracranial pathology. The electroencephalogram gave no helpful information for the diagnosis. Neuroimaging was normal in all studied cases. The incidence of complications in complex febrile seizure in our series did not justify the systematic admission or the systematic study with complementary tests when the neurological examination was normal. The routine electroencephalogram does not appear to be justified. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk of seizure recurrence after achieving initial seizure freedom on the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Katherine S; Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Bergqvist, A G Christina

    2014-04-01

    Few studies have examined the long-term sustainability of complete seizure freedom on the ketogenic diet (KD). The purpose of this study was to describe the risk of seizure recurrence in children who achieved at least 1 month of seizure freedom on the KD, and to assess clinical features associated with sustained seizure freedom. Records of patients initiated on the KD at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) from 1991 to 2009 were reviewed. Subjects who attained seizure freedom for at least 1 month within 2 years were included in the study. Seizure frequency was recorded based on caregiver-reported seizure diaries as unchanged, improved, or worse compared to baseline. Those patients with seizure freedom ≥1 year were compared to those with seizure freedom seizure onset, number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) prior to KD, and epilepsy classification. Of 276 patients initiated on the KD, 65 patients (24%) attained seizure freedom for a minimum of 1 month. The majority of these patients had daily seizures. The median time to seizure freedom after KD initiation was 1.5 months. Seizures recurred in 53 patients (82%), with a median time to seizure recurrence of 3 months. However, seizure frequency after initial recurrence remained far less than baseline. No clinical features were identified as risk factors for seizure recurrence. Seizure recurrence on the KD after 1 month of seizure freedom most often occurred as occasional breakthrough seizures and not a return to baseline seizure frequency. This study provides evidence to support the continued use of the KD in patients with initial seizure freedom even after breakthrough seizures. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Predictors of anti-convulsant treatment failure in children presenting with malaria and prolonged seizures in Kampala, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byarugaba Justus

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In endemic areas, falciparum malaria remains the leading cause of seizures in children presenting to emergency departments. In addition, seizures in malaria have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality in these patients. The management of seizures in malaria is sometimes complicated by the refractory nature of these seizures to readily available anti-convulsants. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of anti-convulsant treatment failure and seizure recurrence after initial control among children with malaria. Methods In a previous study, the efficacy and safety of buccal midazolam was compared to that of rectal diazepam in the treatment of prolonged seizures in children aged three months to 12 years in Kampala, Uganda. For this study, predictive models were used to determine risk factors for anti-convulsant treatment failure and seizure recurrence among the 221 of these children with malaria. Results Using predictive models, focal seizures (OR 3.21; 95% CI 1.42–7.25, p = 0.005, cerebral malaria (OR 2.43; 95% CI 1.20–4.91, p = 0.01 and a blood sugar ≥200 mg/dl at presentation (OR 2.84; 95% CI 1.11–7.20, p = 0.02 were independent predictors of treatment failure (seizure persistence beyond 10 minutes or recurrence within one hour of treatment. Predictors of seizure recurrence included: 1 cerebral malaria (HR 3.32; 95% CI 1.94–5.66, p Conclusion Specific predictors, including cerebral malaria, can identify patients with malaria at risk of anti-convulsant treatment failure and seizure recurrence.

  8. New onset seizures in the elderly: aetiology and prognosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Timmons, S

    2012-02-03

    Late onset epilepsy is increasing in incidence. These patients often have significant underlying morbidity. This retrospective study in a tertiary referral centre identified 68 patients aged 65 years or older, with new onset seizures over a four-year period. 81% of patients (n = 55) were followed up at an average of 2.7 years post diagnosis. 38% of patients had evidence of cerebrovascular disease (CT visualised focal infarction, haemorrhage or small vessel ischaemia in 32%, clinical diagnosis with normal CT brain in 6%). No patient was found to have a space-occupying lesion. Of the 55 patients followed up, 45% of these had died at a mean age of 82 years old and 1.9 years post diagnosis (range 12 hours to 5 years). Three patients died as a direct result of seizures (trauma and sepsis). 14 patients died of clearly unrelated causes. Eight patients died from underlying vascular disease or Alzheimer\\'s dementia. Patients who died during follow-up were on average 3.4 years older at the time of diagnosis than survivors (p< 0.05). Patients with atrial fibrillation at the time of diagnosis, had increased mortality (relative risk 2.53; 95% C.I. 1.19 - 5.36), but they were older than those without atrial fibrillation. At the time of follow up, 92% of those taking anti-convulsants were maintained seizure free on anticonvulsant monotherapy.

  9. USE OF STRUCTURAL MRI IN PATIENTS WITH MEDICALLY REFRACTORY SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ara G. Kaprelyan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Refractory epilepsy is common in patients with structural brain lesions including acquired disorders and genetic abnormalities. Recently, MRI is a precise diagnostic tool for recognition of different structural causes underlying medically intractable seizures.Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of MRI for detection of brain lesions associated with refractory epilepsy.Material and methods: 49 patients (20M and 29F; aged 48.6±24.7 years with refractory epilepsy were included in the study. They presented with partial (46.0%, secondary (31.0% or primary (23.0% generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Clinical diagnosis was based on the revised criteria of ILAE. Structural neuroimaging (MRI, EEG recording, and neurological examination were performed.Results: MRI detected different structural brain abnormalities totally in 36 (73.5% patients, including cerebral tumors (21p, cerebrovascular accidents (5p, hyppocampal sclerosis (3p, developmental malformations (2p, postencephalitic lesions (2p, arachnoid cysts (2p, and tuberous sclerosis (1p. Neuroimaging revealed normal findings in 13 (27.5% cases. EEG recordings showed focal epileptic activity in 38 (77.6% patients, including 33 cases with and 5 without structural brain abnormalities.Conclusion: This study revealed that structural brain lesions are commonly associated with refractory epilepsy. We suggested that MRI is a useful diagnostic method for assessment of patients with uncontrolled seizures or altered epileptic pattern.

  10. [Clinical and electrophysiological evolution of infants presenting with partial seizures before the age of two months (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isch-Treussard, C; Terrade, E; Bapst-Reiter, J

    1977-01-01

    The study was carried out on 28 children: 18 with partial seizures in the first five days of life, and among them 4 with status epilepticus; 7 had focal seizures between the first and eight week, 3 generalised tonic seizures with assymetrical EEGs. A clinical and electro-physiological study was carried out at the time of onset, 1 month later and again at 4 months. The results of the clinical and EEG examinations showed: -firstly during the seizures, the gravity of neonatal status epilepticus and of certain EEG patterns, the lack of localising value of seizures and of electroencephalographic critical discharges whereas permanent assymetry of background activity can precede by several months the appearance of clinical signs. -at the examination one month later the prognostic importance of definite neurological signs always associated with EEG abnormalities whereas some isolated EEG abnormalities do not have any prognostic value as far cerebral maturation is concerned. -at the final examination: the possibility after 4 months of age, of focal neurological signs not present at the earlier examinations. This study underlines the importance of precise electroclinical correlations at different developmental stages, specifically at one and four months of age in children with neonatal seizures.

  11. Intergenerational Transmission of Enhanced Seizure Susceptibility after Febrile Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dengchang; Feng, Bo; Dai, Yunjian; Wu, Xiaohua; Chen, Bin; Xu, Cenglin; Tang, Yangshun; Wang, Kang; Zhang, Shihong; Wang, Shuang; Luo, Benyan; Chen, Zhong

    2017-03-01

    Environmental exposure early in development plays a role in susceptibility to disease in later life. Here, we demonstrate that prolonged febrile seizures induced by exposure of rat pups to a hyperthermic environment enhance seizure susceptibility not only in these hyperthermia-treated rats but also in their future offspring, even if the offspring never experience febrile seizures. This transgenerational transmission was intensity-dependent and was mainly from mothers to their offspring. The transmission was associated with DNA methylation. Thus, our study supports a "Lamarckian"-like mechanism of pathogenesis and the crucial role of epigenetic factors in neurological conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gash, A E

    2006-07-07

    The coupling of energetic metallic multilayers (a.k.a. flash metal) with energetic sol-gel synthesis and processing is an entirely new approach to forming energetic devices for several DoD and DOE needs. They are also practical and commercially viable manufacturing techniques. Improved occupational safety and health, performance, reliability, reproducibility, and environmentally acceptable processing can be achieved using these methodologies and materials. The development and fielding of this technology will enhance mission readiness and reduce the costs, environmental risks and the necessity of resolving environmental concerns related to maintaining military readiness while simultaneously enhancing safety and health. Without sacrificing current performance, we will formulate new impact initiated device (IID) compositions to replace materials from the current composition that pose significant environmental, health, and safety problems associated with functions such as synthesis, material receipt, storage, handling, processing into the composition, reaction products from testing, and safe disposal. To do this, we will advance the use of nanocomposite preparation via the use of multilayer flash metal and sol-gel technologies and apply it to new small IIDs. This work will also serve to demonstrate that these technologies and resultant materials are relevant and practical to a variety of energetic needs of DoD and DOE. The goal will be to produce an IID whose composition is acceptable by OSHA, EPA, the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Resource Recovery Act, etc. standards, without sacrificing current performance. The development of environmentally benign stab detonators and igniters will result in the removal of hazardous and toxic components associated with their manufacturing, handling, and use. This will lead to improved worker safety during manufacturing as well as reduced exposure of Service personnel during their storage and or use in operations. The

  13. Seizures after liver transplantation: a clinicopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estol, C J; Lopez, O; Brenner, R P; Martinez, A J

    1989-10-01

    We reviewed the clinical and neuropathologic findings in 21 patients who had seizures after orthotopic liver transplants. Tonic-clonic seizures were the most common seizure type. Six patients developed status epilepticus. In 9 patients, seizures occurred within 1 week following transplantation. We found CNS lesions that were probably responsible for the occurrence of seizures in most patients; some had more than 1 finding. Neuropathologic examination revealed ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes in 18 patients, central pontine myelinolysis in 5, and CNS infections in 5. Multiple metabolic abnormalities were a contributing factor to the onset of seizures in some patients.

  14. Frontal lobe nonconvulsive status epilepticus: a case of epileptic stuttering, aphemia, and aphasia--not a sign of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Peter W; Stagg, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Stuttering is a repetitive, iterative disfluency of speech, and is usually seen as a developmental problem in childhood. Acquired causes in adults include strokes and medications. When stuttering occurs with seizure-like events, it is usually attributed to psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe an elderly man who experienced personality change and bouts of stuttering, followed by anarthria with preserved writing and then aphasia affecting written and uttered language, and ending with confusion. EEG recordings showed nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focality in the left frontal region followed by bifrontal NCSE. This case enlarges our understanding of the behavioral correlates of focal frontal seizures to include simple partial seizures with speech and then language output disturbances (aphemia, then aphasia), progressing to complex partial phenomenology in the setting of frontal NCSE.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: focal dermal hypoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions focal dermal hypoplasia focal dermal hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Focal dermal hypoplasia is a genetic disorder that primarily affects the ...

  16. Design of environmentally benign processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostrup, Martin; Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a hybrid method for design of environmentally benign processes. The hybrid method integrates mathematical modelling with heuristic approaches to solving the optimisation problems related to separation process synthesis and solvent design and selection. A structured method...... of solution, which employs thermodynamic insights to reduce the complexity and size of the mathematical problem by eliminating redundant alternatives, has been developed for the hybrid method. Separation process synthesis and design problems related to the removal of a chemical species from process streams...... mixture and the second example involves the determination of environmentally benign substitute solvents for removal of a chemical species from wastewater. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Multicystic Benign Mesothelioma Complicating Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamhankar, V A

    2015-01-01

    Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM) is a rare peritoneal pathology typically affecting women in reproductive age. Though MBM is considered benign, these lesions are prone to recurrence and their growth could be modulated by the presence of oestrogen receptors. Acute presentation of MBM is still very rare in pregnancy and management options are not established. We describe a case of MBM presenting in early pregnancy with acute pain. This was successfully treated with surgical resection. Pregnancy continued uneventfully to term and no evidence of recurrent MBM was found at Caesarean section.

  18. Multicystic Benign Mesothelioma Complicating Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tamhankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicystic benign mesothelioma (MBM is a rare peritoneal pathology typically affecting women in reproductive age. Though MBM is considered benign, these lesions are prone to recurrence and their growth could be modulated by the presence of oestrogen receptors. Acute presentation of MBM is still very rare in pregnancy and management options are not established. We describe a case of MBM presenting in early pregnancy with acute pain. This was successfully treated with surgical resection. Pregnancy continued uneventfully to term and no evidence of recurrent MBM was found at Caesarean section.

  19. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Seizures in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch'ang, J; Claassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with seizures are either admitted to the intensive care unit because of uncontrolled seizures requiring aggressive treatment or are admitted for other reasons and develop seizures secondarily. These patients may have multiorgan failure and severe metabolic and electrolyte disarrangements, and may require complex medication regimens and interventions. Seizures can be seen as a result of an acute systemic illness, a primary neurologic pathology, or a medication side-effect and can present in a wide array of symptoms from convulsive activity, subtle twitching, to lethargy. In this population, untreated isolated seizures can quickly escalate to generalized convulsive status epilepticus or, more frequently, nonconvulsive status epileptics, which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Status epilepticus (SE) arises from a failure of inhibitory mechanisms and an enhancement of excitatory pathways causing permanent neuronal injury and other systemic sequelae. Carrying a high 30-day mortality rate, SE can be very difficult to treat in this complex setting, and a portion of these patients will become refractory, requiring narcotics and anesthetic medications. The most significant factor in successfully treating status epilepticus is initiating antiepileptic drugs as soon as possible, thus attentiveness and recognition of this disease are critical.

  1. [Generalized or focal photosensitive epilepsies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D

    1998-11-01

    Photosensitivity is defined by a pattern of occipital or more diffuse spikes and waves. Several techniques are needed for exploration: intermittent light stimulation (ILS), patterns, TV-screen, video games. Photosensitivity is a genetic characteristic. Only diffuse spikes and waves induced by ILS are correlated with epilepsy. Pure photogenic epilepsy is characterized by seizures induced by visual stimuli alone, usually by TV-screen. Video games may also have a triggering effect due to the slow-moving patterns or intense brightness. Several epileptic syndromes are associated with photosensitivity with or without visually-induced seizures. These syndromes are most often generalized and idiopathic.

  2. Experience in using injectable valproic acid (convulex in patients with serial epileptic seizures and status epilepticus at the prehospital stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Lebedeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy of injectable valproate (convulex in patients with serial epileptic seizures and status epilepticus (SE at the prehospital stage.Patients and methods. Thirty-two adult patients, including 17 (53% men and 15 (47% women, were examined. Most patients were aged over 40 years (mean age 54.7±9.4 years. To define the required dose of the drug, the authors estimated the patient's weight that averaged 76.8±1.9 kg, i.e. there was a preponderance of patients who needed convulex, more than 500 mg, to achieve a therapeutic effect.Results. It was impossible to reliably and validly evaluate the type of a seizure as the medical emergency team (MET generally observed the patient with a just evolving seizure and the medical history data were not always valid therefore the type of convulsions and the type of a seizure were evaluated. In most cases, solitary convulsive attacks (tonic and/or clonic convulsions and/or serial seizures were observed in 12 (37.5% and 14 (43.7% patients, respectively; SE was recorded in 6 (8.8% patients. Generalized seizures (without a clear focal onset were prevalent in 24 (75% patients while 8 (25% patients were found to have partial seizures (seizure onset lateralization, a focal onset. According to the pattern of convulsions, seizures may be classified into three types: tonic-clonic, clonic, and tonic in 22 (68.8%, 7 (21.9%, and 3 (9.3% patients, respectively. Analysis of the efficacy of intravenously injectable valproate (convulex in the group of patients with SE and epileptic seizures indicated that complete cessation of seizures could be achieved in 68.8%, their rate decreased in other 9.4% of the patients. Seizures were preserved in 7 (21.8% cases, which required additional administration of drugs. Conclusion. Injectable valproic acid (convulex has a high efficacy and may be preclinically used as the drug of choice to arrest SE and serial seizures caused by both epilepsy and other

  3. Effectiveness of clobazam as add-on therapy in children with refractory focal epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of clobazam in children with refractory focal epilepsy. We investigated 100 consecutive patients concerning etiology of epilepsy, previously used antiepileptic drugs, seizure frequency and adverse events. Clobazam was introduced as add-on therapy in patients with previous failure of at least two monotherapies. Mean age was eight years-old and 39 patients were girls. Clobazam mean dosage was 23.6 mg/day. Mean use of clobazam w...

  4. Clinical characteristics of children with febrile seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, D; Dhakal, A K; Shakya, H; Shakya, A; Shah, S C; Mehata, S

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure is common in children below five years of age. This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical profile of children presenting with febrile seizure in a teaching hospital. This was a descriptive retrospective study among children presenting with febrile seizure in a teaching hospital from July 2009 to June 2013. Children between six months to six years were included in the study while patients with prior episodes of afebrile seizures, abnormal neurodevelopment and not meeting the age criteria were excluded. Patient's demographic and clinical data were collected from the in-patients records and analyzed. This study included 103 children with febrile seizure. Out of which 67% were male. Simple febrile seizure and complex febrile seizure were observed in 76.7% and 23.3% of patients respectively. Majority of children (71.8%)had generalized tonic clonic seizure followed by tonic seizures. Most of children (72.8%) who developed first episode of seizure were below 24 months of age with the mean age of 20.7 (±12.1) months. Overall 33% of patients developed recurrence of febrile seizure and first episode of febrile seizure at age one year or below was associated with the seizure recurrence. Upper respiratory tract infections were the commonest cause of fever in these children. Febrile seizure was observed predominantly in children below age of two years and simple febrile seizure was the ommonest variety. Recurrence of febrile seizure was common and significantly associated with the first episode of febrile seizure at the age of one year or below.

  5. Parietal lobe epilepsy: the great imitator among focal epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristić, Aleksandar J; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; So, Norman; Wong, Chong; Najm, Imad M

    2012-03-01

    Comprising large areas of association cortex, the parietal lobe is part of an extensive synaptic network elaborately intertwined with other brain regions. We hypothesize that such widespread projections are responsible for producing inaccurate localisation readings on scalp EEG and clinical semiology in patients with parietal lobe epilepsies, as opposed to frontal or temporal lobe epilepsies. Our study included 50 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy, who were subsequently rendered seizure-free for ≥12 months (median: 23 months) following resections limited to the frontal (n=17), temporal (n=17), or parietal (n=16) lobes. Interictal and ictal EEG data with accompanying seizure video recordings were extracted from archived files of scalp video-EEG monitoring. Two blinded raters independently reviewed the EEG according to predetermined criteria. Videos of seizures were then observed, as raters formulated their final electroclinical impression (ECI), identifying patients' abnormal neuronal activities with parietal, temporal, and frontal lobe epilepsy, or unspecified localisation. Groups did not differ significantly in demographics, age at epilepsy onset, or presence of MRI abnormalities. Interictal discharges in parietal lobe epilepsy showed the greatest magnitude of scatter outside the lobe of origin; the majority of patients with parietal lobe epilepsy had more than one spike population (pparietal lobe epilepsy cases (p=0.024). Whenever raters confidently limited their ECI to one lobar subtype, overall accuracy was excellent. Lobar classifications by ECI were highly accurate for temporal lobe epilepsy, vacillating in frontal lobe epilepsy, and least accurate in parietal lobe epilepsy subjects. Scalp EEG readings of parietal lobe epilepsy patients showed a more variable scatter of interictal discharges and a lower localisation value of ictal recordings compared to temporal and frontal lobe epilepsy subjects, suggesting an increased likelihood of

  6. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  7. The computed cranial focal point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.A. de; Maal, T.J.J.; Delye, H.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stereophotogrammetry is a radiation-free method for monitoring skull development after craniosynostosis repair. Lack of clear fixed reference points complicate longitudinal comparison of 3D photographs. Therefore we developed the 'computed cranial focal point' (CCFP). METHODS: The CCFP

  8. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of benign breast tumor tissue sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, H.; Lasch, P.; Boese, M.; Haensch, W.

    2003-12-01

    We have applied infrared microspectroscopic imaging for the examination of benign breast tumor tissue sections. The IR spectra of the sections were obtained by classical point microscopy with a movable stage and via a microscope equipped with a focal plane array detector. The infrared microscopic data were analysed using functional group mapping techniques and cluster analysis. The output values of the two procedures were reassembled into infrared images of the tissues, and were compared with standard staining images of the corresponding tissue region. The comparative examination of identical tissue sections by the two IR approaches enabled us to assess potential problems associated with tissue microheterogeneity. It was found that in case of fibroadenoma, a benign lesion located in breast ducts, point microscopy with a spot size of ˜30 μm is a useful practical approach which minimizes the possibility of 'contamination' of the spectra because of spectral averaging of all tissue components present in the corresponding microareas. A comparison of the spectra of the benign breast tumor with those of a malignant ductal carcinoma in situ revealed that IR microspectroscopy has the potential to differentiate between these two breast tumor types.

  9. An insulinoma with clinical and electroencephalographic features resembling complex partial seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang WANG; Hai-tao HU; Shu-qun WEN; Zhong-jin WANG; Bao-rong ZHANG; Mei-ping DING

    2008-01-01

    We described a female patient with insulinoma who experienced recurrent episodes of automatism, confusion and convulsion. Furthermore, her electroencephalography (EEG) findings resembled the pattern in complex partial seizures with secondary generalization. The interictal EEG showed spikes and sharp waves, as well as focal slowing over the left temporal lobe, and the ictal EEG revealed generalized spikes and sharp waves associated with diffused slowing. She was initially misdiagnosed as pharmacoresistant epilepsy. After the insulinoma was found and surgically removed, her EEG turned normal and she was seizure-free during the 4-year follow-up. This report highlights the need for careful reassessment of all seizures refractory to medication, even for the patients associated with epileptiform discharges on EEG.

  10. Automatic seizure detection: going from sEEG to iEEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas; Remvig, Line Sofie; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2010-01-01

    Several different algorithms have been proposed for automatic detection of epileptic seizures based on both scalp and intracranial electroencephalography (sEEG and iEEG). Which modality that renders the best result is hard to assess though. From 16 patients with focal epilepsy, at least 24 hours...... of ictal and non-ictal iEEG were obtained. Characteristics of the seizures are represented by use of wavelet transformation (WT) features and classified by a support vector machine. When implementing a method used for sEEG on iEEG data, a great improvement in performance was obtained when the high...... frequency containing lower levels in the WT were included in the analysis. We were able to obtain a sensitivity of 96.4% and a false detection rate (FDR) of 0.20/h. In general, when implementing an automatic seizure detection algorithm made for sEEG on iEEG, great improvement can be obtained if a frequency...

  11. Clinical factors associated with invasive testing and imaging in patients with complex febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Deborah A; Sturm, Jesse J

    2013-04-01

    Complex febrile seizures (CFSs) are a common diagnosis in the pediatric emergency department (PED). Although multiple studies have shown a low likelihood of intracranial infections and abnormal neuroimaging findings among those who present with CFS, the absence of a consensus recommendation and the diversity of CFS presentations (ie, multiple seizures, prolonged seizure, focal seizure) often drive physicians to do a more extensive workup than needed. Few studies examine the factors that influence providers to pursue invasive testing and emergent neuroimaging. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical factors associated with a more extensive workup in a cohort of patients who present to the PED with CFSs. Patient visits to a tertiary care PED with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis of CFS were reviewed from April 2009 to November 2011. Patients included were 6 months to 6 years of age. Complex febrile seizures were defined as febrile seizures lasting 15 minutes or longer, more than 1 seizure in 24 hours, and/or a focal seizure. Charts were reviewed for demographics, clinical parameters (duration of fever, history of febrile seizure, focality of seizure, antibiotic use before PED, and immunization status), PED management (antiepileptic drugs given in the PED or by Emergency Medical Services, empiric antibiotics given in the PED, laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, or computed tomography [CT] scan), and results (cultures, laboratories, or imaging). A logistic regression model was created to determine which clinical parameters were associated with diagnostic testing. One hundred ninety patients were diagnosed with CFS and met study criteria. Clinical management in the PED included a lumbar puncture in 37%, blood cultures in 88%, urine cultures in 47%, and a head CT scan in 28%. There were no positive cerebral spinal fluid or blood cultures in this cohort. Of the 90 patients, 4 (4.4%) with urine cultures had a urinary

  12. Neonatal seizures associated with cerebral lesions shown by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, H; Toft, P.B.; Herning, Gudrun Margrethe;

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in neonatal seizures; to elucidate the aetiology, timing, and prognosis of the cerebral lesions detected. METHODS: Thirty one term neonates with clinical seizures underwent ultrasonography between days 1-7 (mean 2.5 days......) and a high field spin-echo MRI scan on days 1-30 (mean 8.1 days), both of which were repeated at 3 months of age. Routine investigation excluded, as far as possible, infection, haematological, and metabolic-toxic causes as causes of the neonatal seizures. RESULTS: Brain abnormality was demonstrated by MRI...... in 68% of infants and ultrasonographically in 10%. Diffuse brain lesions (present in 29%) were associated with high mortality (58%) and morbidity (42%), whatever the aetiology. In contrast to a better short term prognosis for neonates with focal lesions where no infants died, 33% had a handicap...

  13. Non-invasive imaging of epileptic seizures in vivo using photoacoustic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Qizhi; Carney, Paul R; Yuan Zhen; Jiang Huabei [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Liu Zhao [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Chen Huanxin; Roper, Steven N [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0265 (United States)], E-mail: hjiang@bme.ufl.edu

    2008-04-07

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that has the potential to image the dynamic function of the brain due to its unique ability of imaging biological tissues with high optical contrast and ultrasound resolution. Here we report the first application of our finite-element-based PAT for imaging of epileptic seizures in an animal model. In vivo photoacoustic images were obtained in rats with focal seizures induced by microinjection of bicuculline, a GABA{sub A} antagonist, into the neocortex. The seizure focus was accurately localized by PAT as confirmed with gold-standard electroencephalogram (EEG). Compared to the existing neuroimaging modalities, PAT not only has the unprecedented advantage of high spatial and temporal resolution in a single imaging modality, but also is portable and low in cost, making it possible to bring brain imaging to the bedside.

  14. Diazepam prophylaxis for bicuculline-induced seizures: a rat dose-response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anschel, David J; Ortega, Erik; Fisher, Robert S

    2004-02-06

    We developed a screening methodology to test the ability of putative antiepileptic drugs delivered directly to a seizure focus to prevent epileptiform activity. The left hippocampi of 15 rats were implanted with an injection cannula and bipolar recording electrodes. Bone screws were used to record neocortical EEG activity. Diazepam (DZP) at one of four possible concentrations or control solution was injected into the hippocampus, followed 5 min later by bicuculline methiodide. DZP suppressed spikes and ictal events in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.0001). At 100 mM, DZP reduced spikes from 678+/-128 to 87+/-35 for a 15 min segment. Numbers of ictal events (seizure) and latency to the first event were reduced by prophylactic DZP. The study establishes a protocol for testing of intracranially-injected drugs to prevent focal seizures.

  15. Seizure onset zone localization from ictal high-density EEG in five patients

    OpenAIRE

    Staljanssens, Willeke; Strobbe, Gregor; Van Holen, Roel; Birot, Gwénaël; Michel, Christophe M; Seeck, Margitta; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vulliémoz, Serge; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Because epilepsy is a network disease, localization of the exact seizure onset zone (SOZ) is difficult because the epileptic activity can spread to other regions within milliseconds. Functional connectivity metrics quantify how the activity in different brain regions is interrelated. In the past, it has been shown that functional connectivity analysis of ictal intracranial EEG (icEEG) recordings can help with SOZ localization in patients with focal epilepsy (van Mierlo et al., 20...

  16. Parvalbumin-Positive Inhibitory Interneurons Oppose Propagation But Favor Generation of Focal Epileptiform Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessolo, Michele; Marcon, Iacopo; Bovetti, Serena; Losi, Gabriele; Cammarota, Mario; Ratto, Gian Michele; Fellin, Tommaso; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    Parvalbumin (Pv)-positive inhibitory interneurons effectively control network excitability, and their optogenetic activation has been reported to block epileptic seizures. An intense activity in GABAergic interneurons, including Pv interneurons, before seizures has been described in different experimental models of epilepsy, raising the hypothesis that an increased GABAergic inhibitory signal may, under certain conditions, initiate seizures. It is therefore unclear whether the activity of Pv interneurons enhances or opposes epileptiform activities. Here we use a mouse cortical slice model of focal epilepsy in which the epileptogenic focus can be identified and the role of Pv interneurons in the generation and propagation of seizure-like ictal events is accurately analyzed by a combination of optogenetic, electrophysiological, and imaging techniques. We found that a selective activation of Pv interneurons at the focus failed to block ictal generation and induced postinhibitory rebound spiking in pyramidal neurons, enhancing neuronal synchrony and promoting ictal generation. In contrast, a selective activation of Pv interneurons distant from the focus blocked ictal propagation and shortened ictal duration at the focus. We revealed that the reduced ictal duration was a direct consequence of the ictal propagation block, probably by preventing newly generated afterdischarges to travel backwards to the original focus of ictal initiation. Similar results were obtained upon individual Pv interneuron activation by intracellular depolarizing current pulses. The functional dichotomy of Pv interneurons here described opens new perspectives to our understanding of how local inhibitory circuits govern generation and spread of focal epileptiform activities.

  17. Benign concentric annular macular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Salles de Moura Mendonça

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the authors is to show clinical findings of a patient with benign concentric annular macular dystrophy, which is an unusual condition, and part of the "bull’s eye" maculopathy differential diagnosis. An ophthalmologic examination with color perception, fluorescein angiography, and ocular electrophysiology was performed.

  18. Benign Breast Problems and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are benign breast lumps or masses? • What is mastitis? • How is mastitis treated? • What are the signs and symptoms of ... recommended, along with close follow-up. What is mastitis? Mastitis is an infection of the breast tissue. ...

  19. Febrile Seizures: Controversy and Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Omer A.

    1983-01-01

    Although febrile convulsions are a relatively common complaint, the approach to their management is far from uniform and highly controversial. This article reviews the consensus statement on febrile convulsions arrived at by the Consensus Development Conference held in 1980 by the National Institutes of Health, together with other literature of interest to family physicians. Guidelines are given for the assessment, diagnosis and emergency treatment of febrile seizures. Epilepsy and atypical febrile convulsions are distinguished from simple febrile seizures. Prognosis, prevention, and the importance of counselling parents are discussed, as well as the controversial issue of prophylactic treatment. PMID:21286583

  20. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen s

  1. Temperature, age, and recurrence of febrile seizure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: Prediction of a recurrent febrile seizure during subsequent episodes of fever. DESIGN: Study of the data of the temperatures, seizure recurrences, and baseline patient characteristics that were collected at a randomized placebo controlled trial of ibuprofen

  2. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures and microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hüseyin; Kardaş, Fatih; Büyükavci, Mustafa; Karakelleoğlu, Cahit

    2004-09-01

    Pyridoxine dependency is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder causing intractable seizures in neonates and infants. This case report describes an infant with pyridoxine-dependent seizures with microcephaly and discusses a probable pathogenetic mechanism of microcephaly in this condition.

  3. Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block | Idehen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block. ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING AJOL · RESOURCES ... We describe a case of seizure occurring immediately after completion of ...

  4. Utility of different seizure induction protocols in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Gourav; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic non epileptic seizure (PNES) can be induced by several induction tests but their relative usefulness has not been evaluated. In this study, we report the sensitivity and specificity of various induction tests in the diagnosis of PNES and assess their discomfort level. The induction tests were: (a) compression of temple region (CTR), (b) verbal suggestion (VS), (c) tuning fork application (TFA), (d) moist swab application (MSA), (e) torch light stimulation (TLS) and (f) saline injection (SI). Up to 3 trials were done for each test except for normal saline injection which was given once. For comparison of these tests, patients with epileptic seizures were included as controls. The time to precipitate PNES was recorded and patients' discomfort levels were noted on a 0-10 scale. Video EEG was recorded in the PNES patients. 140 patients with PNES and 50 controls with epileptic seizures were included. The diagnostic yield of CTR was 65.7%, TFA 61.4%, MSA 60.7%, SI 55.6%, VS 54.3% and TLS 40.7%. These tests did not induce seizures in the controls. All these tests had 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value in the diagnosis of PNES. The maximum discomfort was reported with SI and minimum with MSA. The similarity of efficacy and discomfort with CTR and TFA appear to be the most optimal induction techniques when compared with VS, AMS, TLS, and SI.

  5. Epileptic Seizures from Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    are provoked (e.g. medications and alcohol) and less than half of these patients have recurrent seizures. The life- time cumulative risk of developing... microwire and clinical macroelectrode recordings. Brain 131 (Pt 4), 928—937. Worrell, G.A., Parish, L., Cranstoun, S.D., Jonas, R., Bal- tuch, G., Litt

  6. Perioperative seizures in patients with a history of a seizure disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesen, Adam D; Jacob, Adam K; Aho, Lucyna E; Botten, Emily J; Nase, Karen E; Nelson, Julia M; Kopp, Sandra L

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder is unclear. There are several factors unique to the perioperative period that may increase a patient's risk of perioperative seizures, including medications administered, timing of medication administration, missed doses of antiepileptic medications, and sleep deprivation. We designed this retrospective chart review to evaluate the frequency of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients with a documented history of a seizure disorder who received an anesthetic between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2007. Patients excluded from this study include those who had an outpatient procedure or intracranial procedure, ASA classification of V, pregnant women, and patients younger than 2 years of age. The first hospital admission of at least 24 hours during which an anesthetic was provided was identified for each patient. Patient demographics, character of the seizure disorder, details of the surgical procedure, and clinically apparent seizure activity in the perioperative period (within 3 days after the anesthetic) were recorded. During the 6-year study period, 641 patients with a documented seizure disorder were admitted for at least 24 hours after an anesthetic. Twenty-two patients experienced perioperative seizure activity for an overall frequency of 3.4%(95% confidence interval, 2.2%-5.2%). The frequency of preoperative seizures (P seizure (P seizure. As the number of antiepileptic medications increased, so did the frequency of perioperative seizures (P seizures in this patient population. We conclude that the majority of perioperative seizures in patients with a preexisting seizure disorder are likely related to the patient's underlying condition. The frequency of seizures is not influenced by the type of anesthesia or procedure. Because patients with frequent seizures at baseline are

  7. Seizure semiology: its value and limitations in localizing the epileptogenic zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufenkjian, Krikor; Lüders, Hans O

    2012-12-01

    Epilepsy surgery has become an important treatment option in patients with medically refractory epilepsy. The ability to precisely localize the epileptogenic zone is crucial for surgical success. The tools available for localization of the epileptogenic zone are limited. Seizure semiology is a simple and cost effective tool that allows localization of the symptomatogenic zone which either overlaps or is in close proximity of the epileptogenic zone. This becomes particularly important in cases of MRI negative focal epilepsy. The ability to video record seizures made it possible to discover new localizing signs and quantify the sensitivity and specificity of others. Ideally the signs used for localization should fulfill these criteria; 1) Easy to identify and have a high inter-rater reliability, 2) It has to be the first or one of the earlier components of the seizure in order to have localizing value. Later symptoms or signs are more likely to be due to ictal spread and may have only a lateralizing value. 3) The symptomatogenic zone corresponding to the recorded ictal symptom has to be clearly defined and well documented. Reproducibility of the initial ictal symptoms with cortical stimulation identifies the corresponding symptomatogenic zone. Unfortunately, however, not all ictal symptoms can be reproduced by focal cortical stimulation. Therefore, the problem the clinician faces is trying to deduce the epileptogenic zone from the seizure semiology. The semiological classification system is particularly useful in this regard. We present the known localizing and lateralizing signs based on this system.

  8. Neonatal Seizures. Advances in Mechanisms and Management.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Seizures occur in approximately 1–5 per 1,000 live births, and are among the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal neurocritical care service. There are several, age-specific factors that are particular to the developing brain, which influence excitability and seizure generation, response to medications, and impact of seizures on brain structure and function. Neonatal seizures are often associated with serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke or hemor...

  9. The Life Time Prevalence of Childhood Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    P AlizadehTaheri; Naseri, M; M Lahooti; Sadeghi, M

    2009-01-01

    "nBackground: Seizure is the most common pediatric neurologic disorder. Epidemiological studies of childhood epilepsy are of importance to compare incidence and prevalence rates, age distribution, inheritance, seizure types, epilepsy syn­dromes and treatment strategies. Since there is little information about prevalence of childhood seizure in Iran, this study was aimed to determine the life time prevalence of childhood seizure and some of its determining factors in Tehran, Iran....

  10. Treatment of seizures in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, Marcus W.; Polman, Susanne K. L.; Uyttenboogaart, Maarten; De Keyser, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Background Epileptic seizures occur in only a minority of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), but can have serious consequences. The available literature suggests an association of seizures in MS with cortical and subcortical demyelinating lesions, which suggest that seizures in MS are probably m

  11. Association between hypocapnia and febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicaslan, Buket; Erol, Ilknur; Ozkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra; Sariturk, Cagla

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether hyperthermia-induced hyperventilation with subsequent hypocapnia is relevant to febrile seizures in children. This is only the second study to measure pCO2 and pH values in children with febrile seizures. This prospective case-control study enrolled 18 children who presented with febrile seizures and 18 children who presented with a febrile illness without seizures. Venous blood gas analyses were measured both from the febrile seizure and control group. There was no significant difference in mean blood pH between the febrile seizure and control groups but blood pCO2 was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group. Patients with complex febrile seizures exhibited significantly lower pCO2 levels within 1 hour of seizure onset than patients with simplex febrile seizures. These data indicate that febrile seizures may be associated with hyperventilation and that the ensuing hypocapnia may contribute to the development of febrile seizures.

  12. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease; Radioiodbehandling af benign thyreoideasygdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogh Rasmussen, Aa.; Jarloev, A.E.; Faber, J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in the use of radioactive iodine in the treatment of benigh thyroid disease in Denmark. A questionnaire was distributed to all departments in Denmark which administer radioiodine in the treatment of benign thyroid disease (n=20). Radioiodine is used for patients with toxic nodular goitre and for patients with relapse of toxic diffuse goitre. Four departments did not use radioiodine for volume reduction in non-toxic goitre. Patient information's included very different recommendations regarding cautions in relation to radioiodine treatment. Radioiodine is widely used in the treatment of benign thyroid disease. We recommend a national standardization of the cautions in relation to radioiodine treatment. (au)

  13. Hippocampal Abnormalities and Seizure Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal volumetry and T2 relaxometry were performed on 84 consecutive patients (adolescents and adults with partial epilepsy submitted to antiepileptic drug (AED withdrawal after at least 2 years of seizure control, in a study at State University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Brazil.

  14. Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A national surveillance study in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Unit was undertaken to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of migrating partial seizures of infancy (MPSI, a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis.

  15. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Exposure to Characters With Numerical Value: A Case With Right Temporal Cortical Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdener, Şefik Evren; Tezer, F Irsel; Oğuz, Kader K; Kamışlı, Özden; Ergün, Eser Lay; Söylemezoğlu, Figen; Saygi, Serap

    2016-07-01

    Reflex seizures can be triggered by a variety of stimuli. We present a case with drug-resistant complex partial seizures originating in right temporal lobe triggered extensively by visual, auditory, and mental exposure to multidigit numbers. The patient was investigated in video-EEG monitoring unit and seizures were triggered by numerical stimuli. Scalp EEG findings suggested a right temporal focus but ictal semiological findings suspicious for an extratemporal area necessitated the invasive EEG study. A right anterior temporal seizure focus was established with invasive monitoring and cortical stimulation studies. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cortical dysplasia in right anterior temporal lobe and ictal single-photon emission computed tomography confirmed the epileptogenic focus, leading to a right temporal lobectomy and amygdalohippocampectomy and a pathological diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia type Ia. The patient is seizure-free at the end of the second postoperative year despite repeated exposures to numbers. To our knowledge, this is the first report of seizures triggered by numbers. It is also of particular importance as the reflex seizures are associated with a cortical lesion and it may suggest involvement of right anterior temporal lobe in numerical processing.

  16. Pretreatment seizure semiology in childhood absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Sudha Kilaru; Shinnar, Shlomo; Cnaan, Avital; Dlugos, Dennis; Conry, Joan; Hirtz, Deborah G; Hu, Fengming; Liu, Chunyan; Mizrahi, Eli M; Moshé, Solomon L; Clark, Peggy; Glauser, Tracy A

    2017-07-19

    To determine seizure semiology in children with newly diagnosed childhood absence epilepsy and to evaluate associations with short-term treatment outcomes. For participants enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, comparative-effectiveness trial, semiologic features of pretreatment seizures were analyzed as predictors of treatment outcome at the week 16 to 20 visit. Video of 1,932 electrographic absence seizures from 416 participants was evaluated. Median seizure duration was 10.2 seconds; median time between electrographic seizure onset and clinical manifestation onset was 1.5 seconds. For individual seizures and by participant, the most common semiology features were pause/stare (seizure 95.5%, participant 99.3%), motor automatisms (60.6%, 86.1%), and eye involvement (54.9%, 76.5%). The interrater agreement for motor automatisms and eye involvement was good (72%-84%). Variability of semiology features between seizures even within participants was high. Clustering analyses revealed 4 patterns (involving the presence/absence of eye involvement and motor automatisms superimposed on the nearly ubiquitous pause/stare). Most participants experienced more than one seizure cluster pattern. No individual semiologic feature was individually predictive of short-term outcome. Seizure freedom was half as likely in participants with one or more seizure having the pattern of eye involvement without motor automatisms than in participants without this pattern. Almost all absence seizures are characterized by a pause in activity or staring, but rarely is this the only feature. Semiologic features tend to cluster, resulting in identifiable absence seizure subtypes with significant intraparticipant seizure phenomenologic heterogeneity. One seizure subtype, pause/stare and eye involvement but no motor automatisms, is specifically associated with a worse treatment outcome. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Mild hypothermia for refractory focal status epilepticus in an infant with hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elting, Jan Willem; Naalt, Joukje van der; Fock, Johanna Maria

    2010-09-01

    Hypothermia can reduce seizure frequency in animal models of status epilepticus, and its effectiveness in human status epilepticus has been reported occasionally. We report an infant with hemimegalencephaly who presented with generalized status epilepticus. After high dose intravenous drug therapy, this converted to focal status epilepticus in the right occipital region. A sudden cessation of all seizure activity was found to coincide with accidental hypothermia. After application of mild continuous hypothermia, a marked reduction of seizure frequency occurred, which allowed reduction of intravenous drug doses and discharge from the IC unit. Ultimately, hemispherectomy was needed to achieve long term seizure control. The therapeutic effect of hypothermia should be further investigated in patients with refractory status epilepticus. When used in combination with anti-epileptic drugs, seizure control may be achieved at lower doses. Hypothermia may obviate the need for potentially dangerous barbiturate therapy. This case demonstrates that even a mild degree of hypothermia (+/-36 degrees C) can be remarkably effective. Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Benign chondroblastoma - malignant radiological appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, K.; Treugut, H.; Mueller, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    The very rare benign chondroblastoma occasionally invades soft tissues and may grow beyond the epiphysis into the metaphysis. In the present case such a tumour did not show the typical radiological appearances, but presented malignant features both on plain films and on the angiogram. The importance of biopsy of tumours which cannot be identified with certainty must be stressed before radical surgery is carried out.

  19. Rates and predictors of long-term seizure freedom after frontal lobe epilepsy surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Wang, Doris D; Rolston, John D; Shih, Tina T; Chang, Edward F

    2012-05-01

    Frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) is the second-most common focal epilepsy syndrome, and seizures are medically refractory in many patients. Although various studies have examined rates and predictors of seizure freedom after resection for FLE, there is significant variability in their results due to patient diversity, and inadequate follow-up may lead to an overestimation of long-term seizure freedom. In this paper the authors report a systematic review and meta-analysis of long-term seizure outcomes and predictors of response after resection for intractable FLE. Only studies of at least 10 patients examining seizure freedom after FLE surgery with postoperative follow-up duration of at least 48 months were included. Across 1199 patients in 21 studies, the overall rate of postoperative seizure freedom (Engel Class I outcome) was 45.1%. No trend in seizure outcomes across all studies was observed over time. Significant predictors of long-term seizure freedom included lesional epilepsy origin (relative risk [RR] 1.67, 95% CI 1.36-28.6), abnormal preoperative MRI (RR 1.64, 95% CI 1.32-2.08), and localized frontal resection versus more extensive lobectomy with or without an extrafrontal component (RR 1.71, 95% CI 1.26-2.43). Within lesional FLE cases, gross-total resection led to significantly improved outcome versus subtotal lesionectomy (RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.47-2.84). These findings suggest that FLE patients with a focal and identifiable lesion are more likely to achieve seizure freedom than those with a more poorly defined epileptic focus. While seizure freedom can be achieved in the surgical treatment of medically refractory FLE, these findings illustrate the compelling need for improved noninvasive and invasive localization techniques in FLE.

  20. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  1. Recurrence Risk of Febrile Seizures in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, J; Poudel, P; Shah, G S; Yadav, S; Chaudhary, S; Kafle, S

    2016-09-01

    Identifying children with febrile seizure who are at risk for recurrence is important so that special attention can be given to them. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for recurrence of febrile seizures in children. This prospective hospital based study was conducted from July 2013 to August 2014 'among children of 6 months to 6 years of age at Bishweshwar Prasad Koirala Institute of Health Sciences (BPKIHS), Nepal. Children meeting the selection criteria were enrolled in study. Clinical, investigation, treatment and outcome parameters were analyzed. A total of 92 children with febrile seizure were enrolled in study. Males accounted for 70% and females 30%. Simple febrile seizure was present in 48% and complex febrile seizures were seen in 52%. Recurrence of seizure was seen in one third of cases. Loss of consciousness was most common post-ictal phenomenon followed by confusion and lethargy. Upper respiratory infection was the most common precipitating factor. Generalized Tonic Clonic Seizure was the most common seizure type present in 79% of cases. Significant risk factors for recurrence occurred in males (p=0.088), age less than 1 year (p=0.003). Most of the recurrence occurred within one year of first seizure. Febrile Seizure is common in males. Almost one third of children with febrile seizure are at risk for recurrence. The significant risk factors for recurrences are male gender and age <1year.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-08-01

    Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2-2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1(GFP/+) mice. Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS.

  3. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  4. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Yang; Jiongxing Wu; Ren Guo; Yufen Peng; Wen Zheng; Ding Liu; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment.

  5. INHIBITORY MOTOR SEIZURES: SEMIOLOGY AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Мukhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to rare and unique type of epileptic seizures – inhibitory motor seizures, characterized by the inability to execute a voluntary movement with preserved consciousness. The exact prevalence of this type of seizures is not known, but many cases are unrecognized or non-correctly diagnosed as Todd's paralysis. Therefore practical doctors should know the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of this type of seizures andtake them into account in the differential diagnoses . The authors presented a detailed review of the literature, including the historical data, etiology, pathogenesis and proposed mechanisms of formation of inhibitory motor seizures, clinical and EEG characteristics, therapeutic approaches. Antiepileptic drugs of choice used in the treatment of inhibitory motor seizures are valproic acid (preferably depakine chronosphere – original prolonged form of valproate. The authors also presented their observations of patients with inhibitory motor seizures.

  6. Grupo Focal em Pesquisas Sociais

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lúcia Silva Servo; Pricila Oliveira Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir a técnica de grupo focal em pesquisas sociais. Apresenta-se as concepções sobre grupo focal. Traz-se os postulados de Pichon-Rivière sobre grupo operativo, os instrumentos de planificação, os vetores do campo grupal para nortear a dinâmica e a observação do campo grupal, bem como a organização, a operacionalização e a análise dos dados das sessões de grupo focal. Através desta técnica de coleta de dados em pesquisas sociais, é possível a construção do EC...

  7. Grupo Focal em Pesquisas Sociais

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Lúcia Silva Servo; Pricila Oliveira Araújo

    2012-01-01

    Este artigo tem como objetivo discutir a técnica de grupo focal em pesquisas sociais. Apresenta-se as concepções sobre grupo focal. Traz-se os postulados de Pichon-Rivière sobre grupo operativo, os instrumentos de planificação, os vetores do campo grupal para nortear a dinâmica e a observação do campo grupal, bem como a organização, a operacionalização e a análise dos dados das sessões de grupo focal. Através desta técnica de coleta de dados em pesquisas sociais, é possível a construção do EC...

  8. Myoepithelial carcinoma of the breast with focal rhabdoid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Hiroya; Iwaba, Akiko; Kato, Tomoya; Ohe, Rintaro; Maeda, Kunihiko; Matsuda, Mikio; Izuru, Kazuhiko; Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Katagiri, Shigeru; Yamakawa, Mitsunori

    2013-01-01

    Myoepithelial carcinoma of the breast is extremely rare and only 33 cases have been reported in the English literature. Herein, we report a case of myoepithelial carcinoma of the breast with focal rhabdoid features. The patient was a 67-year-old woman, who presented with a lump of the left breast that rapidly grew to 3 cm in diameter within 3 months. Lumpectomy revealed a solid and whitish colored tumor, which was composed mainly of elongated spindle-shaped cells with mild atypia, focal necrosis, and infiltrative margin. In a small area of the lesion, ovoid tumor cells exhibited eccentric nuclei with centrally located nucleoli and plump cytoplasm including round eosinophilic inclusions, resembling a rhabdoid tumor. Immunohistochemically, both types of tumor cells exhibited a myoepithelial phenotype. MIB-1 index was 30%. The cytoplasmic inclusion of the ovoid cells exhibited immunopositivity for both vimentin and cytokeratin. From these findings, this tumor was diagnosed as a myoepithelial carcinoma with focal rhabdoid features. Although rhabdoid features have been reported in some types of malignant and benign tumors, this is the first report of such features in myoepithelial carcinoma of the breast.

  9. Prevalence, Response to Cysticidal Therapy, and Risk Factors for Persistent Seizure in Indian Children with Neurocysticercosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Animesh; Mandal, Anirban; Sinha, Sheela; Singh, Amitabh

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the commonest cause of childhood acquired epilepsy in developing countries. The use of cysticidal therapy in NCC, except “single lesion NCC,” is still debated in view of its doubtful usefulness and potential adverse effects. Methods. Children presenting with first episode of seizure or acute focal neurological deficit without fever were screened for NCC and received appropriate therapy (followup done for 1 year to look for the response and side effects). Results. The prevalence of NCC was 4.5%. Most common presenting feature was generalized seizure and commonest imaging finding was single small enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe. Abnormal EEG and CSF abnormalities were found in almost half of the children. The response to therapy was very good with infrequent recurrence of seizure and adverse effects of therapy were encountered rarely. No risk factors for persistent seizure could be identified. Conclusion. Present study shows that the response to cysticidal therapy is very good in NCC as seizure recurrence was observed in only 5%, 4.2%, and 4.2% of cases at 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year followup. Adverse effects of therapy were observed in 20% of cases during therapy but they were mild and self-limiting. PMID:28167968

  10. Prevalence, Response to Cysticidal Therapy, and Risk Factors for Persistent Seizure in Indian Children with Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the commonest cause of childhood acquired epilepsy in developing countries. The use of cysticidal therapy in NCC, except “single lesion NCC,” is still debated in view of its doubtful usefulness and potential adverse effects. Methods. Children presenting with first episode of seizure or acute focal neurological deficit without fever were screened for NCC and received appropriate therapy (followup done for 1 year to look for the response and side effects. Results. The prevalence of NCC was 4.5%. Most common presenting feature was generalized seizure and commonest imaging finding was single small enhancing lesion in the parietal lobe. Abnormal EEG and CSF abnormalities were found in almost half of the children. The response to therapy was very good with infrequent recurrence of seizure and adverse effects of therapy were encountered rarely. No risk factors for persistent seizure could be identified. Conclusion. Present study shows that the response to cysticidal therapy is very good in NCC as seizure recurrence was observed in only 5%, 4.2%, and 4.2% of cases at 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year followup. Adverse effects of therapy were observed in 20% of cases during therapy but they were mild and self-limiting.

  11. Seizure-freedom with combination therapy in localization-related epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Jukka; Peltola, Maria; Raitanen, Jani; Keränen, Tapani; Kharazmi, Elham; Auvinen, Anssi

    2008-04-01

    We analyzed the effect of combination therapy on seizure frequency in all adult patients (N=193) with focal epilepsy followed at a single institution in a cross-sectional study. One hundred and thirty-five patients were on two AEDs, of them, 37 (27%) were seizure-free, 50 patients were on three AEDs including 5 (10%) seizure-free patients (pseizure-freedom with two AEDs versus three AEDs). Thirty-five different combinations were used in patients on two AEDs and 40 combinations on patients on three drugs emphasizing the difficulties involved in evaluation of the efficacy and tolerability of specific combinations. The significant proportion of seizure-free cases (27%) on duotherapy is suggesting the usefulness of combination therapy in achieving seizure-freedom in epilepsies refractory to single drug treatment. The material in the study was not from a randomized trial and therefore the comparability of patients on different AEDs is uncertain, but on the other hand the clinical practice followed provides a natural experiment suitable for comparative, non-randomized assessment of treatment outcomes.

  12. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounach, Jamal; Satte, Amal; Ouhabi, Hamid; El Hessni, Aboubaker

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS) after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD). Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p = 0.34), and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p = 0.08). The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15–20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p = 0.001). The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p = 0.001). EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15–20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity. PMID:27635393

  13. IPS Interest in the EEG of Patients after a Single Epileptic Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Zahra Taoufiqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pathological cerebral activity responses to intermittent rhythmic photic stimulation (IPS after a single epileptic seizure. Patients and Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven EEGs were performed at the Neurophysiology Department of Mohamed V Teaching Military Hospital in Rabat. Clinical and EEG data was collected. Results. 9.5% of our patients had photoparoxysmal discharges (PPD. Incidence was higher in males than in females, but p value was not significant (p=0.34, and it was higher in children compared to adults with significant p value (p=0.08. The most epileptogenic frequencies were within the range 15–20 Hz. 63 patients had an EEG after 72 hours; among them 11 were photosensitive (p=0.001. The frequency of the PPR was significantly higher in patients with generalized abnormalities than in focal abnormalities (p=0.001. EEG confirmed a genetic generalized epilepsy in 8 cases among 13 photosensitive patients. Conclusion. PPR is age related. The frequencies within the range 15–20 Hz should inevitably be included in EEG protocols. The presence of PPR after a first seizure is probably more in favor of generalized seizure rather than the other type of seizure. PPR seems independent from the delay Seizure-EEG. Our study did not show an association between sex and photosensitivity.

  14. Early presentation of de novo high grade glioma with epileptic seizures: electroclinical and neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Rosario; Figus, Andrea; Corraine, Simona

    2010-10-01

    We report the clinical, EEG and neuroradiologic findings from three adult patients who developed new-onset seizure disorders as early clinical manifestations of de novo high grade glioma. The malignancies could not be recognised at the time of the first epileptic seizure because of minimal non-specific brain abnormalities, which showed no signs of necrosis or significant contrast enhancement on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Focal EEG abnormalities were recorded in all cases and appeared consistent with the neuroradiologic findings. The patients regained normal neurological status after the first seizure but rapidly developed space-occupying necrotic lesions. Two patients underwent surgery and received histological diagnoses of the tumours. Another patient was finally diagnosed with a malignant glioma based on the neuroradiologic picture and rapid progression of the cerebral lesion. It should be noted that in adult patients, new-onset epileptic seizures might reveal the presence of malignant gliomas at a very early stage in the tumour formation process. This report indicates that typical anatomoradiologic features of de novo high grade glioma, such as necrosis and rim-contrast enhancement, could be absent at the time of the first epileptic seizure but become clear within a short period after clinical presentation.

  15. Epileptic fast intracerebral EEG activity: evidence for spatial decorrelation at seizure onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Fabrice; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Bourien, Jérôme; Chauvel, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Low-voltage rapid discharges (or fast EEG ictal activity) constitute a characteristic electrophysiological pattern in focal seizures of human epilepsy. They are characterized by a decrease of signal voltage with a marked increase of signal frequency (typically beyond 25 Hz). They have long been observed in stereoelectroencephalographic (SEEG) signals recorded with intra-cerebral electrodes, generally occurring at seizure onset and simultaneously involving distinct brain regions. Spectral properties of rapid ictal discharges as well as spatial correlations measured between SEEG signals generated from distant sites before, during and after these discharges were studied. Cross-correlation estimates within typical EEG sub-bands and statistical tests performed in ten patients suffering from partial epilepsy (frontal, temporal or fronto-temporal) reveal that SEEG signals are significantly de-correlated during the discharge period compared to periods that precede and follow this discharge. These results can be interpreted as a functional decoupling of distant brain sites at seizure onset followed by an abnormally high re-coupling when the seizure develops. They lead to the concept of “disruption” that is complementary of that of “activation” (revealed by significantly high correlations between signals recorded during seizures), both giving insights into our understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in human partial epilepsies as well as in the interpretation of clinical semiology. PMID:12764064

  16. High frequency oscillations mirror disease activity in patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Karolin; LeVan, Pierre; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Fauser, Susanne; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Jacobs, Julia

    2013-08-01

    The study analyzes the occurrence of high frequency oscillations in different types of focal cortical dysplasia in 22 patients with refractory epilepsy. High frequency oscillations are biomarkers for epileptic tissue, but it is unknown whether they can reflect increasingly dysplastic tissue changes as well as epileptic disease activity. High frequency oscillations (80-450 Hz) were visually marked by two independent reviewers in all channels of intracranial implanted grid, strips, and depth electrodes in patients with focal cortical dysplasia and refractory epilepsy. Rates of high frequency oscillations in patients with pathologically confirmed focal cortical dysplasia of Palmini type 1a and b were compared with those in type 2a and b. Patients with focal cortical dysplasia type 2 had significantly more seizures than those with type 1 (p high frequency oscillations were significantly higher in patients with focal cortical dysplasia type 2 versus type 1 (p high frequency oscillations were significantly higher in presumed epileptogenic areas than outside (p high frequency oscillations mirrors the higher epileptogenicity of focal cortical dysplasia type 2 lesions compared to type 1 lesions. Therefore, rates of high frequency oscillations can reflect disease activity of a lesion. This has implications for the use of high frequency oscillations as biomarkers for epileptogenic areas, because a detailed analysis of their rates may be necessary to use high frequency oscillations as a predictive tool in epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puriene, Alina; Rimkevicius, Arunas; Gaigalas, Mindaugas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to present a 15 year-old patient with focal epithelial hyperplasia and to review the references on the subject-related etiological, pathological, diagnostic and treatment aspects. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare human papilloma virus (HPV) related to oral lesion with very low frequency within our population. Surgical treatment with a biopsy was performed, acanthosis and parakeratosis are consistent histopathological features, since the patient had no history of sexual contact and HIV infection, the virus was probably acquired from environmental sources.

  18. Individualised prediction model of seizure recurrence and long-term outcomes after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs in seizure-free patients: a systematic review and individual participant data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberink, Herm J; Otte, Willem M; Geerts, Ada T; Pavlovic, Milen; Ramos-Lizana, Julio; Marson, Anthony G; Overweg, Jan; Sauma, Letícia; Specchio, Luigi M; Tennison, Michael; Cardoso, Tania M O; Shinnar, Shlomo; Schmidt, Dieter; Geleijns, Karin; Braun, Kees P J

    2017-07-01

    epilepsy duration before remission, seizure-free interval before antiepileptic drug withdrawal, age at onset of epilepsy, history of febrile seizures, number of seizures before remission, absence of a self-limiting epilepsy syndrome, developmental delay, and epileptiform abnormality on electroencephalogram (EEG) before withdrawal. Independent predictors of seizures in the last year of follow-up were epilepsy duration before remission, seizure-free interval before antiepileptic drug withdrawal, number of antiepileptic drugs before withdrawal, female sex, family history of epilepsy, number of seizures before remission, focal seizures, and epileptiform abnormality on EEG before withdrawal. Adjusted concordance statistics were 0·65 (95% CI 0·65-0·66) for predicting seizure recurrence and 0·71 (0·70-0·71) for predicting long-term seizure freedom. Validation was stable across the individual study populations. We present evidence-based nomograms with robust performance across populations of children and adults. The nomograms facilitate prediction of outcomes following drug withdrawal for the individual patient, including both the risk of relapse and the chance of long-term freedom from seizures. The main limitations were the absence of a control group continuing antiepileptic drug treatment and a consistent definition of long-term seizure freedom. Epilepsiefonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Patient reported outcomes in benign multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Line E; Healy, Brian C; Rintell, David J; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Glanz, Bonnie I

    2011-07-01

    Benign MS patients have a mild course of disease and show no or minimal accumulation of disability over time. Little is known about the patient reported outcomes (PROs) in benign MS. The objective of the study was to compare PROs in benign MS patients and patients with similar disease duration or disability status, and to investigate how the definition of benign MS affected this outcome. Two groups of Benign MS patients (disease duration ≥15 years, Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score ≤1.5 [Benign-1.5], or ≤3.0 [Benign-3]) were compared with four other MS groups: disease duration ≥15 years, EDSS score >3.0 (Late-MS); disease duration MS). PROs included measures of QOL, fatigue, depression, and social support. Cognitive function was also assessed. Both benign groups had better PROs than Late MS patients on all measures (p QOL, depression, and fatigue were significantly different between Benign-1.5 and Early-MS groups (p QOL than Low EDSS-1.5, but was otherwise similar. Benign-3 patients had worse depression than Early-MS (p QOL and lower fatigue (p MS had better PROs than other groups of MS patients, suggesting that both disease duration and disability influence PROs. The study also showed a difference in PROs based on the way benign MS was defined.

  20. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  1. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-03-01

    To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was -37.9% in the active and -17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. © 2014 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Possibilities of differentiation of solitary focal liver lesions by computed tomography perfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Irmina Sefić Pašić; Anes Pašić; Spomenka Kristić; Adnan Beganović; Aladin Čarovac; Amra Dzananovic; Lidija Lincender; Sandra Vegar Zubović

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate possibilities of computed tomography (CT) perfusion in differentiation of solitary focal liver lesions based on their characteristic vascularization through perfusion parameters analysis. Methods Prospective study was conducted on 50 patients in the period 2009-2012. Patients were divided in two groups: benign and malignant lesions. The following CT perfusion parameters were analyzed: blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), capillary permeability surfa...

  3. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease): report of two cases with PCR detection of human papillomavirus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasooriya, P R; Abeyratne, S; Ranasinghe, A W; Tilakaratne, W M

    2004-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) (Heck's disease) is essentially a benign oral infection produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, it is relatively rare in South-East Asia. The following report is based on two cases of adult FEH with histopathological features in favour of the disease. In addition, polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the presence of HPV DNA in the lesions in order to confirm the histopathological diagnosis.

  4. A surgical case of frontal lobe epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia accompanied by olfactory nerve enlargement: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Noriaki; Uda, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nagai, Taiki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Kamei, Takamasa; Morino, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old man came to our clinic due to refractory general tonic seizure and an attack of unintended yelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated mild cortical hyperintensity on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image in the left basal frontal area. Enlargement of the left olfactory nerve was also detected below the affected gyrus. Subtotal resection of the MRI-visible epileptogenic lesion was performed without any neurological deficit. The final pathological diagnosis was focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIa. Seizures and yelling attacks subsided after surgery. Extracerebral abnormalities, including cranial nerve enlargement, are common in patients with hemimegalencephaly. However, such abnormalities are rare with FCD.

  5. The prevalence and diagnostic significance of fluid-fluid levels in focal lesions of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, P.; Saifuddin, A. [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, London Bone and Soft Tissue Tumour Service, HA7 4LP, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and diagnostic significance of fluid-fluid levels (FFLs) in focal bone lesions. Clinical and radiological details of 738 consecutive patients referred with focal lesions of bone and who had undergone MRI were reviewed. FFLs were identified in 83 (11.2%). The proportion of the lesion occupied by FFLs was estimated, based on imaging in all available planes, as <1/3, 1/3-2/3, >2/3 but not the entire lesion, and complete. The degree of FFL change in each lesion was correlated with the final diagnosis, which was either histological (n=80) or clinicoradiological (n=3). There were 31 female and 52 male patients, mean age 25.5 years (range 5-83 years). Histology revealed 46 benign, 32 malignant and 2 non-neoplastic lesions. A clinicoradiological diagnosis was made in the 3 lesions without histology: 2 were benign (simple bone cyst and intraosseous lipoma) and 1 malignant (a metastasis). Malignant neoplasms commonly showed FFLs which occupied <1/3 of the entire lesion (n=22/32, 68.8%), and 50% of all the lesions in this group were conventional intramedullary osteosarcomas (n=16). With increasing FFL change, malignancy became less frequent: with >2/3 (but incomplete) FFL change, 81% (n=13/16) of tumours were benign. If the entire tumour showed FFL change, the histology was benign in 100% (n=11). The extent of FFLs within a focal bone lesion appears to be inversely related to the degree of malignancy. If at least 2/3 of the lesion shows FFL change, 89% of diagnoses are benign. (orig.)

  6. Focal fits during chlorambucil therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naysmith, A.; Robson, R. H.

    1979-01-01

    An elderly man receiving chlorambucil for chronic lymphatic leukaemia developed focal fits. The onset and frequency were dose related. There was no evidence of metabolic disturbance or of meningeal leukaemia. Although reported in children and well recognized in animals, chlorambucil-induced fits in an adult have not been previously recorded. PMID:118440

  7. Focal lesions of the patella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedayati, B. [Royal national Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore, Brockley Hill Stanmore, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Lewisham Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal national Orthopaedic Hospital Stanmore, Brockley Hill Stanmore, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Focal lesions of the patella may be identified during the investigation of anterior knee pain or as an incidental finding on radiological images. This pictorial review describes the radiographic appearances of a wide range of conditions that have been seen in this sesamoid bone. Where appropriate, computed tomography and magnetic resonance features have been included. (orig.)

  8. Clinical characteristics of patients with benign nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jiyeon Kim,1 Seong Hoon Kim,2 Sung Chul Lim,2 Woojun Kim,2 Young-Min Shon3 1Department of Neurology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, College of Medicine, Korea University, Ansan, 2Department of Neurology, Catholic Neuroscience Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seocho-gu, 3Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Purpose: To evaluate the evolution of nonlesional temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE-NL in patients treated exclusively with antiepileptic drugs and to elucidate clinical phenotypes related to the prognosis of these patients.Methods: Clinical, radiological, and electroencephalographic (EEG findings in 84 patients with TLE-NL were reviewed. A good response group (GRG and a poor response group (PRG were defined if the duration of their seizure-free period was >1 year, or <1 year, respectively.Results: There were 46 (54.8% patients in the GRG and 38 (45.2% patients in the PRG. The number of antiepileptic drugs administered was significantly lower in the GRG than that in the PRG (1.3±0.8 vs 2.8±1.0, respectively; P<0.05. The GRG had a significantly older age of onset than the PRG and a lower occurrence of initial precipitating events, such as febrile seizures, central nervous system infection, and head trauma (P<0.05. The prevalence of EEG abnormality, presence of aura, generalized seizures, and automatism was less frequently observed in the GRG (P<0.05. Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were significantly associated with a poor prognosis (P<0.05.Conclusion: In contrast to the commonly assumed intractability of TLE, we found that more than 54% of patients with TLE-NL achieved a long seizure-free period. Older age at onset of TLE-NL was associated with a better prognosis. However, the presence of automatism and initial precipitating events were related to a poor prognosis. Future prospective

  9. The genetic risk of acute seizures in African children with falciparum malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Symon M; Rockett, Kirk; Clark, Taane G; Reyburn, Hugh; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Taylor, Terrie E; Birbeck, Gretchen L; Williams, Thomas N; Newton, Charles R J C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It is unclear why some children with falciparum malaria develop acute seizures and what determines the phenotype of seizures. We sought to determine if polymorphisms of malaria candidate genes are associated with acute seizures. Methods Logistic regression was used to investigate genetic associations with malaria-associated seizures (MAS) and complex MAS (repetitive, prolonged, or focal seizures) in four MalariaGEN African sites, namely: Blantyre, Malawi; Kilifi, Kenya; Kumasi, Ghana; and Muheza, Tanzania. The analysis was repeated for five inheritance models (dominant, heterozygous, recessive, additive, and general) and adjusted for potential confounders and multiple testing. Key Findings Complex phenotypes of seizures constituted 71% of all admissions with MAS across the sites. MAS were strongly associated with cluster of differentiation-ligand-rs3092945 in females in Kilifi (p = 0.00068) and interleukin (IL)-17 receptor E-rs708567 in the pooled analysis across the sites (p = 0.00709). Complex MAS were strongly associated with epidermal growth factor module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor (EMR)1-rs373533 in Kumasi (p = 0.00033), but none in the pooled analysis. Focal MAS were strongly associated with IL-20 receptor A-rs1555498 in Muheza (p = 0.00016), but none in the pooled analysis. Prolonged MAS were strongly associated with complement receptor 1-rs17047660 in Kilifi (p = 0.00121) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-rs1050828 in females in the pooled analysis (p = 0.00155). Repetitive MAS were strongly associated with EMR1-rs373533 in Kumasi (p = 0.00003) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor-rs17140229 in the pooled analysis (p = 0.00543). MAS with coma/cerebral malaria were strongly associated with EMR1-rs373533 in Kumasi (p = 0.00019) and IL10-rs3024500 in the pooled analysis across the sites (p = 0.00064). Significance We have identified a number of genetic associations that may explain the risk of seizures in >2,000 cases

  10. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  11. Ultrastructure of focal cerebral cortex tissue from rats with focal cortical dysplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    for observing its ultrastructure under a transmission electron microscope. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①The ultrastructure of hippocampal tissue.②The conscious state and electrical activity of brain of rats. RESULTS:Eighteen rats were enrolled in the final analysis.① Observation of hippocampal ultrastructure: Electromicroscopic pathological findings showed that for each rat of the liquid nitrogen injured group, mitochondrium in the pyramidal neuron around the microgyrus was swelled,endoplasmic reticulum was expanded,glial cells were swelled,water gathered around the blood capillary,partial medullary sheath was degenerated,neuropilem was normal and no obviously abnormal synapse was found.② Changes in conscious state of rats:Rats in the normal control group and sham-operation group had no convulsive seizure, but those in the liquid nitrogen injured group had occasionally.Most of them showed increased activities, excitation and restlessness,scratching and frequent " watching face-like activities".③Electrical activity of brain of rats:Electroencephalogram recording of liquid nitrogen injured group showed that small wave amplitude of rhythm took the main part.No typical sharp wave,V wave,sharp and slow wave,V and slow waves were discharged. CONCLUSION:Liquid nitrogen can lead to cerebral cortical developmental disorder.Pathological changes of ultrastructure of focal tissue around the microgyrus can provide pathological basis for epilepsy associated with focal cortical developmental disorder.

  12. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in amygdala blocks the effect of audiogenic seizure kindling in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Faingold, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Genetically epilepsy-prone rats of the severe seizure strain (GEPR-9s) exhibit audiogenic seizures (AGS) beginning with wild running and ending with tonic hind limb extension (TE). AGS kindling in GEPR-9s involves periodic repetition of >/=14 seizures over 7-21 days and results in prolonged seizures and an additional phase of generalized post-tonic clonus (PTC) that follows TE. AGS kindling behavior changes are long-lasting and involve expansion of the requisite seizure neuronal network from the brainstem to include the amygdala, mediated by neuroplasticity in lateral amygdala. Recent evidence indicates that focal activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in lateral amygdala leads to precipitous acquisition of AGS-kindled seizure behaviors, suggesting that activation of AC activity is important in development and maintenance of AGS kindling. The present study further examined the role of AC in AGS-kindled seizures in GEPR-9s by focally inhibiting AC in the amygdala. Bilateral microinjection of an AC inhibitor, SQ22,536 (0.25 and 0.50 nmol/side), in AGS-kindled GEPR-9s selectively blocked PTC during AGS at 1 h after microinjection, but the pre-kindled AGS behaviors remained intact. The incidence of PTC during AGS returned to pre-drug levels 12 h after the lower dose of SQ22,536 (0.25 nmol/side). However, after the higher dose of SQ22,536 (0.5 nmol/side), complete return to AGS with PTC was seen in all GEPR-9s at 120 h. These results indicate that maintenance of AGS kindling-mediated PTC in GEPR-9s may involve activation of AC. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of AC in the epileptogenic mechanisms subserving AGS kindling.

  13. Focal electroencephalography rhythm asymmetry due to focal skull fibrous dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Meyer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An unusual pervasive and persistent asymmetry in background rhythm was found on surface electroencephalography (EEG recordings in a 22 year old with new onset of generalized seizure activity. Radiographic correlation with computed tomography, positron emission tomography and bone scan imaging uncovered that the higher amplitude left frontal-parietal background activity was related to a circumscribed area of left frontal-parietal fibrous dysplasia affecting the skull. This case report emphasizes that the presumed higher electrical conductance of fibrous dysplasia lead to a greater transparency of normal background rhythms, and must be taken into account as a form of breach rhythm for accurate EEG interpretation.

  14. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure detection...... sensitivity of 96% and a false detection rate of 0.14/h were obtained. This corresponds to the performance obtained when channels are selected through visual inspection by a clinical neurophysiologist, and constitutes a 4% improvement in sensitivity compared to seizure detection using channels recorded...

  15. Marked Seizure Reduction after MCT Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Azzam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 43-year-old man with history of nonsurgical partial epilepsy who previously failed multiple trials of antiepileptic drugs. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT were added to his regular diet in the form of pure oil. Subsequently, his seizure frequency was markedly reduced from multiple daily seizures to one seizure every four days. His seizures recurred after transient discontinuation of MCT over a period of ten days. His seizure improvement was achieved at a dose of four tablespoons of MCT twice daily with no reported side effects. He developed significant diarrhea and flatulence at higher doses. We conclude that MCT oil supplementation to regular diet may provide better seizure control in some patients. MCT oil supplementation may be a more tolerable alternative to the standard ketogenic diet.

  16. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was based...... on the amplitude of the signal. The other algorithm was based on information of the signal in the frequency domain, and it focused on synchronisation of the electrical activity in a single muscle during the seizure. Results: The amplitude-based algorithm reliably detected seizures in 2 of the patients, while...

  17. Utility of initial EEG in first complex febrile seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, Chellamani; Nagarajan, Elanagan; Kimia, Amir A; de Carvalho, Rachel Marin; An, Sookee; Bergin, Ann M; Takeoka, Masanori; Pearl, Phillip L; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    The risk of developing epilepsy following febrile seizures (FS) varies between 2% and 10%, with complex febrile seizures (CFS) having a higher risk. We examined the utility of detected epileptiform abnormalities on the initial EEG following a first CFS in predicting subsequent epilepsy. This was a retrospective study of consecutive patients (ages 6-60 months) who were neurologically healthy or mildly delayed, seen in the ED following a first CFS and had both an EEG and minimum of 2-year follow-up. Data regarding clinical characteristics, EEG report, development of subsequent epilepsy, and type of epilepsy were collected. Established clinical predictors for subsequent epilepsy in children with FS and EEG status were evaluated for potential correlation with the development of subsequent epilepsy. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of an abnormal EEG (epileptiform EEG) were calculated. A group of 154 children met our inclusion criteria. Overall, 20 (13%) children developed epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy was 13% (CI 8.3-19.6%). Epileptiform abnormalities were noted in 21 patients (13.6%), EEG slowing in 23 patients (14.9%), and focal asymmetry in six (3.8%). Epileptiform EEGs were noted in 20% (4/20) of patients with epilepsy and 13% (17/134) of patients without epilepsy (p=0.48). At an estimated risk of subsequent epilepsy of 10% (from population-based studies of children with FS), we determined that the PPV of an epileptiform EEG for subsequent epilepsy was 15%. None of the clinical variables (presence of more than 1 complex feature, family history of epilepsy, or status epilepticus) predicted epilepsy. An epileptiform EEG was not a sensitive measure and had a poor positive predictive value for the development of epilepsy among neurologically healthy or mildly delayed children with a first complex febrile seizure. The practice of obtaining routine EEG for predicting epilepsy after the first CFS needs clarification by well

  18. Dosimetry in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. Background and practice; Dosimetrie bei Radioiodtherapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen. Hintergrund und Durchfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockisch, A.; Sonnenschein, W.; Jentzen, W.; Hartung, V.; Goerges, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-09-15

    Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases (focal = [toxic adenoma], multifocal, disseminated autonomy, Grave's disease or clinical relevant goitre) needs to be and can be performed individually for each patient. Most frequently a radioiodine test is performed applying a small activity of iodine-131 ({sup 131}I). The paper discusses some protocols for pre- or posttherapeutic dosimetry and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. All are based on the volumetry of the target tissue as well as the radioiodine kinetics in the target volume what may be represented by maximum uptake and half life of iodine retention in the thyroid. Possible disturbances and measuring uncertainties of these parameters are presented and discussed. In spite of the discussed uncertainties in dosimetry, due to its high therapeutic width radioiodine therapy is a very successful procedure to cure hyperthyroidism or to reduce goitre volume with only little side effects. (orig.)

  19. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  20. Differentiation of benign from malignant liver masses with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hojun; Wilson, Stephanie R

    2011-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the performance of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging to differentiate benign from malignant liver masses, both of hepatocellular origin and metastases, by quantification of their stiffness. This study has institutional review board approval and informed consent. Eighty-nine patients (42 female and 47 male patients) with 105 liver masses had ARFI evaluation on ultrasound, S2000 (Siemens, Mountain View, Calif). Mean age of the patients was 53.67 years (range, 27-83 years). Mean diameter of the masses was 2.77 cm (range, 1.0-13.0 cm). Final diagnoses, confirmed by imaging on contrast-enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance, or ultrasound or biopsy, include hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 28), metastasis (n = 13), hemangioma (n = 35), focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 15), focal fat sparing (n = 8), focal fat deposit (n = 4), and adenoma (n = 2). Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the ARFI measurement and to extract the optimal cutoff values in the differentiation of benign from malignant disease. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse values showed a statistically significant difference between benign (1.73 [SD, 0.8] m/sec) and malignant masses (2.57 [SD, 1.01] m/sec) (P fair accuracy. For differentiation of malignant from benign masses, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 68% (28/41), 69% (44/64), 58% (28/48), and 77% (44/57), respectively, when 1.9 m/sec was chosen as a cutoff value, reflective of a wide variation of ARFI values in each diagnosis. For differentiation of metastasis from benign masses, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and NPV were 69% (9/13), 89% (57/64), 56% (9/16), and 93% (57/61), respectively, when 2.72 m/sec was chosen as a cutoff value. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse measurement may be helpful to differentiate benign masses from metastases, in particular

  1. Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted.

  2. Family history and recurrence of febrile seizures.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    To determine the value of a detailed family history for the assessment of the risk of recurrence of febrile seizures, 115 children who visited the emergency room of an academic children's hospital were studied prospectively. The recurrence risk of febrile seizures was analysed in relation to the child's family history and the proportion of relatives affected by febrile seizures using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard models. A first degree family history positive for febrile ...

  3. Ketamine Induced Seizures in an Autistic Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali S Verma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An autistic child of eight years age, with attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome presented for tooth extraction under general anaesthesia. Ketamine was used for induction and the child developed seizures following its administration. Seizures were controlled, extraction done and post-operative period was uneventful. Ketamine was suspected to have caused seizures though safe use of Ketamine has been reported in autistic patient.

  4. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Roger E; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated wi...

  5. Focal rigidity of flat tori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Kwakkel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Given a closed Riemannian manifold (M, g, i.e. compact and boundaryless, there is a partition of its tangent bundle TM = ∪iΣi called the focal decomposition of TM. The sets Σi are closely associated to focusing of geodesics of (M, g, i.e. to the situation where there are exactly i geodesic arcs of the same length joining points p and q in M. In this note, we study the topological structure of the focal decomposition of a closed Riemannian manifold and its relation with the metric structure of the manifold. Our main result is that flat n-tori, n > 2, are focally rigid in the sense that if two flat tori are focally equivalent then the tori are isometric up to rescaling. The case n = 2 was considered before by F. Kwakkel.Dada uma variedade Riemanniana (M, g fechada, isto é, compacta e sem bordo, existe uma partição de seu fibrado tangente TM = ∪iΣi chamada decomposição focal de TM. Os conjuntos Σi estão intimamente associados ao modo como focalizam as geodésicas de (M,g, isto é, à situação em que existem exatamente i arcos de geodésica de mesmo comprimento unindo pontos p e q em M. Nesta nota, estudamos a estrutura topológica da decomposição focal de uma variedade Riemanniana fechada e sua relação com a estrutura métrica de M. Nosso principal resultado é que n-toros planos, n > 2, são focalmente rigidos, isto é, se dois toros planos são focalmente equivalentes, então os dois toros são isométricos módulo mudança de escala. O caso n = 2 foi considerado anteriormente por F. Kwakkel.

  6. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of 3 cases with human papillomavirus DNA sequencing analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gültekin, S E; Tokman Yildirim, Benay; Sarisoy, S

    2011-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a benign proliferative viral infection of the oral mucosa that is related to Human Papil-lomavirus (HPV), mainly subtypes 13 and 32. Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, the reported cases among Caucasians are relatively rare. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Histopathologically, it is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, fusion, and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges and the cells named mitozoids. The purpose of this case report was to present 3 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in a pediatric age group. Histopathological and clinical features of cases are discussed and DNA sequencing analysis is reported in which HPV 13, HPV 32, and HPV 11 genomes are detected.

  7. A seizure response dog: video recording of reacting behaviour during repetitive prolonged seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vito, Lidia; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Seizure response and alerting behaviour may spontaneously develop in dogs living with children or adults with epilepsy. Some dogs can also be reliably trained to respond and anticipate seizures. We describe the case of a dog, not previously trained for assistance work, showing complex seizure response behaviour. This is the first release of a home video recording of a dog reacting to its owner's seizure.

  8. Seizure-Induced Neuronal Injury: Vulnerability to Febrile Seizures in an Immature Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Toth, Zsolt; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Haftoglou, Suzie; Ribak, Charles E.; Tallie Z. Baram

    1998-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common seizure type in young children. Whether they induce death of hippocampal and amygdala neurons and consequent limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy has remained controversial, with conflicting data from prospective and retrospective studies. Using an appropriate-age rat model of febrile seizures, we investigated the acute and chronic effects of hyperthermic seizures on neuronal integrity and survival in the hippocampus and amygdala via molecular and neuroanatomic...

  9. Predictors of seizure freedom after surgical management of tuberous sclerosis complex: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Hu, Wen-Han; Zhang, Chao; Meng, Fan-Gang; Chen, Ning; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the rate of seizure freedom in surgical management of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and to identify factors associated with postoperative seizure outcome. A comprehensive literature search identified articles published since 1990 that described seizure outcomes in patients with TSC who underwent resective surgery. Two reviewers assessed article eligibility and independently extracted the data. Eleven potential prognostic variables were identified and dichotomized for analyses. Random or fixed effects meta-analyses were used depending on the presence or absence of heterogeneity. Among 229 patients in 13 studies, the pooled rate of postoperative seizure freedom was 59%. Seizure onset later than 1 year of age, unilateral focality in interictal or ictal electroencephalography, and lobectomy were significantly associated with a higher rate of seizure freedom. Our findings indicate that surgery is an effective treatment modality for TSC patients. The meta-analyses provided useful evidence-based information for identifying TSC candidates for epilepsy surgery and planning surgical strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Treating seizures in Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus C. Ng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are known to occur in Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD. In the setting of a rapidly progressive condition with no effective therapy, determining appropriate treatment for seizures can be difficult if clinical morbidity is not obvious yet the electroencephalogram (EEG demonstrates a worrisome pattern such as status epilepticus. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old man with CJD and electrographic seizures, discuss how this case challenges conventional definitions of seizures, and discuss a rational approach toward treatment. Coincidentally, our case is the first report of CJD in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

  11. Diagnosing Functional Seizures in Children and Adolescent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichaidit, Bianca Taaning; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Ostergaard, John R

    2014-01-01

    Functional seizures (FS) is a condition where the child experiences seizure-like events, without abnormal electrical discharge as measured by EEG, and with high risk of misdiagnosis. Diagnosing FS contains: 1) video-EEG, 2) anamnestic evaluation, focusing on the presence of psychosocial stressors......, psychiatric co-morbidity and functional symptoms other than FS, and 3) evaluation of seizure characteristics such as long duration, seizure initiation during wakefulness and in the presence of witnesses asynchronous movements, and no incontinence, tongue bite and injury related to the event....

  12. Febrile seizures: risks, evaluation, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Reese C; Oehler, Karen; Tingle, Leslie E

    2012-01-15

    Febrile seizures are common in the first five years of life, and many factors that increase seizure risk have been identified. Initial evaluation should determine whether features of a complex seizure are present and identify the source of fever. Routine blood tests, neuroimaging, and electroencephalography are not recommended, and lumbar puncture is no longer recommended in patients with uncomplicated febrile seizures. In the unusual case of febrile status epilepticus, intravenous lorazepam and buccal midazolam are first-line agents. After an initial febrile seizure, physicians should reassure parents about the low risk of long-term effects, including neurologic sequelae, epilepsy, and death. However, there is a 15 to 70 percent risk of recurrence in the first two years after an initial febrile seizure. This risk is increased in patients younger than 18 months and those with a lower fever, short duration of fever before seizure onset, or a family history of febrile seizures. Continuous or intermittent antiepileptic or antipyretic medication is not recommended for the prevention of recurrent febrile seizures.

  13. Febrile seizures: Mechanisms and relationship to epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Céline M.; Brewster, Amy L.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of febrile seizures have been driven by two major enigmas: first, how these most common of human seizures are generated by fever has not been known. Second, epidemiological studies have linked prolonged febrile seizures with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy, yet whether long or recurrent febrile seizures cause temporal lobe epilepsy has remained unresolved. To investigate these questions, a model of prolonged (complex) febrile seizures was developed in immature rats and mice, permitting mechanistic examination of the potential causal relationships of fever and seizures, and of febrile seizures and limbic epilepsy. Although the model relied on hyperthermia, it was discovered that the hyperthermia-induced secretion of endogenous fever mediators including interleukin-1β, which contributed to the generation of these ‘febrile’ seizures. In addition, prolonged experimental febrile seizures provoked epilepsy in a third of the animals. Investigations of the mechanisms of this epileptogenesis demonstrated that expression of specific ion (HCN) channels and of endocannabinoid signaling, may be involved. These may provide novel drug targets for intervention in the epileptogenic process. PMID:19232478

  14. Cellular and network mechanisms of electrographic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor; Fröhlich, Flavio; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    Epileptic seizures constitute a complex multiscale phenomenon that is characterized by synchronized hyperexcitation of neurons in neuronal networks. Recent progress in understanding pathological seizure dynamics provides crucial insights into underlying mechanisms and possible new avenues for the development of novel treatment modalities. Here we review some recent work that combines in vivo experiments and computational modeling to unravel the pathophysiology of seizures of cortical origin. We particularly focus on how activity-dependent changes in extracellular potassium concentration affects the intrinsic dynamics of neurons involved in cortical seizures characterized by spike/wave complexes and fast runs. PMID:19190736

  15. Benign Papules and Nodules of Oral Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih Gürel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews some of the more common benign oral papules and nodules of oral mucosa with emphasis on their etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, histopathology, and treatment. These lesions include mucocele, traumatic fibroma, epulis, pyogenic granuloma, oral papilloma, oral warts, lymphangioma, hemangioma, lipoma, oral nevi and some soft tissue benign tumors. These benign lesions must be separated clinically and histologically from precancerous and malign neoplastic lesions. Accurate clinico-pathological diagnosis is mandatory to insure appropriate therapy.

  16. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  17. Deep Recurrent Neural Networks for seizure detection and early seizure detection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talathi, S. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-05

    Epilepsy is common neurological diseases, affecting about 0.6-0.8 % of world population. Epileptic patients suffer from chronic unprovoked seizures, which can result in broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Since seizures, in general, occur infrequently and are unpredictable, automated seizure detection systems are recommended to screen for seizures during long-term electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. In addition, systems for early seizure detection can lead to the development of new types of intervention systems that are designed to control or shorten the duration of seizure events. In this article, we investigate the utility of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in designing seizure detection and early seizure detection systems. We propose a deep learning framework via the use of Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) RNNs for seizure detection. We use publicly available data in order to evaluate our method and demonstrate very promising evaluation results with overall accuracy close to 100 %. We also systematically investigate the application of our method for early seizure warning systems. Our method can detect about 98% of seizure events within the first 5 seconds of the overall epileptic seizure duration.

  18. A hardware-algorithm co-design approach to optimize seizure detection algorithms for implantable applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Shriram; Gupta, Sumeet K; Markandeya, Himanshu S; Roy, Kaushik; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2010-10-30

    Implantable neural prostheses that deliver focal electrical stimulation upon demand are rapidly emerging as an alternate therapy for roughly a third of the epileptic patient population that is medically refractory. Seizure detection algorithms enable feedback mechanisms to provide focally and temporally specific intervention. Real-time feasibility and computational complexity often limit most reported detection algorithms to implementations using computers for bedside monitoring or external devices communicating with the implanted electrodes. A comparison of algorithms based on detection efficacy does not present a complete picture of the feasibility of the algorithm with limited computational power, as is the case with most battery-powered applications. We present a two-dimensional design optimization approach that takes into account both detection efficacy and hardware co