WorldWideScience

Sample records for benefit school systems

  1. Aromatherapy Benefits Autonomic Nervous System Regulation for Elementary School Faculty in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-Ming Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace stress-related illness is a serious issue, and consequently many stress reduction methods have been investigated. Aromatherapy is especially for populations that work under high stress. Elementary school teachers are a high-stress working population in Taiwan. In this study, fifty-four elementary school teachers were recruited to evaluate aromatherapy performance on stress reduction. Bergamot essential oil was used for aromatherapy spray for 10 minutes. Blood pressure and autonomic nervous system parameters were recorded 5 minutes before and after the application of the aroma spray. Results showed that there were significant decreases in blood pressure, heart rate, LF power percentage, and LF/HF while there were increases in heart rate variability and HF power percentage (P<.001∗∗∗ after application of the aromatherapy spray. Further analysis was investigated by dividing subjects into three background variables (position variables, age variables, gender variables and anxiety degree groups. All parameters were significantly different for most subgroups, except for the substitute teachers and the light-anxiety group. Parasympathetic nervous system activation was measured after aromatherapy in this study. It encouraged further study for other stress working population by aromatherapy.

  2. Aromatherapy Benefits Autonomic Nervous System Regulation for Elementary School Faculty in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Kang-Ming Chang; Chuh-Wei Shen

    2011-01-01

    Workplace stress-related illness is a serious issue, and consequently many stress reduction methods have been investigated. Aromatherapy is especially for populations that work under high stress. Elementary school teachers are a high-stress working population in Taiwan. In this study, fifty-four elementary school teachers were recruited to evaluate aromatherapy performance on stress reduction. Bergamot essential oil was used for aromatherapy spray for 10 minutes. Blood pressure and autonomic ...

  3. The Benefits of School-Based Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlin Norhaini Mansor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available School-based assessment (SBA approach in evaluating students’ academic progress was officially introduced by the Ministry of Education Malaysia and implemented in-line with the Standards-based Primary School Curriculum, in stages starting in 2011 as part of Malaysia educational reform. Under this approach, teachers are given greater responsibility to design quality assessments that align with their students’ learning outcomes Hence, the objectives of this qualitative case study is focused on how the newly introduced assessment approach has benefits the teaching and learning process in evaluating Year 1 academic progress in three urban Chinese primary schools. Data collected from interviews involving three Year 1 Chinese language teachers found that teachers have very positive perspectives towards SBA and that overall both teachers and students have benefited from this system. However, there are also weaknesses that need to be acknowledged and improvements to be made. The findings implicate that for SBA to be successful, teachers need to be creative, using varying strategies in their teaching and exploiting repertoire of methods in assessing their students. Further study on the matter is inevitable in ensuring the success of SBA’s implementation.

  4. Compulsory Education and the Benefits of Schooling

    OpenAIRE

    Melvin Stephens, Jr.; Dou-Yan Yang

    2013-01-01

    Causal estimates of the benefits of increased schooling using U.S. state schooling laws as instruments typically rely on specifications which assume common trends across states in the factors affecting different birth cohorts. Differential changes across states during this period, such as relative school quality improvements, suggest that this assumption may fail to hold. Across a number of outcomes including wages, unemployment, and divorce, we find that statistically significant causal esti...

  5. School uniforms: tradition, benefit or predicament?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Aardt, Annette Marie; Wilken, Ilani

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the controversies surrounding school uniforms. Roleplayers in this debate in South Africa are parents, learners and educators, and arguments centre on aspects such as identity, economy and the equalising effect of school uniforms, which are considered in the literature to be benefits. Opposing viewpoints highlight the fact that compulsory uniforms infringe on learners’ constitutional rights to self-expression. The aim of this research was to determine the perspectives ...

  6. 34 CFR 76.654 - Benefits for private school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... enrolled in public schools. (b) Same benefits. If a subgrantee uses funds under a program for public school... needs of students enrolled in public schools, a subgrantee shall provide program benefits for...

  7. Do recommender systems benefit users?

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, Chi Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are present in many web applications to guide our choices. They increase sales and benefit sellers, but whether they benefit customers by providing relevant products is questionable. Here we introduce a model to examine the benefit of recommender systems for users, and found that recommendations from the system can be equivalent to random draws if one relies too strongly on the system. Nevertheless, with sufficient information about user preferences, recommendations become accurate and an abrupt transition to this accurate regime is observed for some algorithms. On the other hand, we found that a high accuracy evaluated by common accuracy metrics does not necessarily correspond to a high real accuracy nor a benefit for users, which serves as an alarm for operators and researchers of recommender systems. We tested our model with a real dataset and observed similar behaviors. Finally, a recommendation approach with improved accuracy is suggested. These results imply that recommender systems ...

  8. Who Benefits from Failing Urban Schools? An Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This author speculates about who benefits from school failure. The article is grounded in the author's personal reflections over 50 years of involvement with urban schools, teachers, students, and administrators. He provides an in-depth critique of identifying the causes of school failure in the personal shortcomings of children and their families…

  9. The Societal Benefits and Costs of School Dropout Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Catterall, James S.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports an analysis of the societal benefits and costs of recovering school dropouts. Successful recovery is defined by subsequent graduation from high school. The analysis is based on established estimates of the societal costs of dropping out including reduced government tax collections and higher social costs of welfare, healthcare, and crime. These potential costs are cast as benefits when a dropout is recovered. A large dropout recovery program provides the setting for the a...

  10. Priceless: The Nonpecuniary Benefits of Schooling

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Oreopoulos; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasing wealth provides key motivation for students to forgo earnings and struggle through exams. But, as we argue in this paper, schooling generates many experiences and affects many dimensions of skill that, in turn, affect central aspects of individuals' lives. Schooling not only affects income, but also the degree to which one enjoys work, as well as one's likelihood of being unemployed. It leads individuals to make better decisions about health, marriage, and parenting. It also improv...

  11. Early Admission to Elementary School: Barriers versus Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Theron B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This article analyzes why schools fail to provide for early admission of intellectually advanced children. Reasons cited include misinterpretation of research findings, bias of school personnel, expense of screening, convenience of administering a uniform entrance age procedure, etc. Benefits accruing from early admission are discussed. (JDD)

  12. Implementation of the Performance Management System (PMS) in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana: An Investigation of Senior Management Team's Expected Benefits of the PMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulawa, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Different forms of the performance management system have been implemented in many countries for some years. As in other countries, in 1999 the government of Botswana took a decision to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. The government explained the purpose for which this reform was…

  13. Boarding Schools and Capital Benefits: Implications for Urban School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Lisa R.

    2014-01-01

    The author discusses the boarding school model as a schooling alternative to improve life chances for disadvantaged youth, particularly African American youth, by positively meeting their social and educational needs. Bourdieu, Coleman, and other social scientists purported that these needs can be better met by exposing students to social and…

  14. 34 CFR 300.141 - Requirement that funds not benefit a private school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirement that funds not benefit a private school... Their Parents in Private Schools § 300.141 Requirement that funds not benefit a private school. (a) An... instruction in a private school or to otherwise benefit the private school. (b) The LEA must use...

  15. The Societal Benefits and Costs of School Dropout Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Catterall

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an analysis of the societal benefits and costs of recovering school dropouts. Successful recovery is defined by subsequent graduation from high school. The analysis is based on established estimates of the societal costs of dropping out including reduced government tax collections and higher social costs of welfare, healthcare, and crime. These potential costs are cast as benefits when a dropout is recovered. A large dropout recovery program provides the setting for the analysis. Rigorous attention is given to accurate estimation of the number of students who would not have graduated without the program in the year assessed and to the induced public costs of their continued education. Estimated benefits are weighed against the total annual public costs of the program, which operates in 65 school centers and commands an annual budget of about $70 million. The estimated benefit-cost ratio for this program is 3 to 1, a figure comparable to benefit-cost ratio estimates reported in studies of dropout prevention. The sensitivity of this conclusion to specific assumptions within the analysis is discussed.

  16. 34 CFR 76.658 - Funds not to benefit a private school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Funds not to benefit a private school. 76.658 Section... Schools § 76.658 Funds not to benefit a private school. (a) A subgrantee may not use program funds to finance the existing level of instruction in a private school or to otherwise benefit the private...

  17. ENTERPRISE SYSTEMS BENEFITS FOR DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Florentin DUMITRU

    2014-01-01

    Many companies’ motivation to implement an enterprise system (ES) is the improvement of the core process. For the distribution companies, the adoption of information technologies can open new selling channels. In this article we aim to synthesize the possible benefits of the ESs. In order to do this, we will analyse the benefits reported by a set of distribution companies after adopting ESs. We will address the benefits from the point of view of the ES’s vendors. We will use as a research met...

  18. Observed benefits from product configuration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars; Haug, Anders; Mortensen, Niels Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a study of the benefits obtained from applying product configuration systems based on a case study in four industry companies. The impacts are described according to main objectives in literature for imple-menting product configuration systems: lead time in the specification...

  19. Observed benefits from product configuration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Lars; Haug, Anders; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Thuesen, Christian

    This article presents a study of the benefits obtained from applying product configuration systems based on a case study in four industry companies. The impacts are described according to main objectives in literature for imple-menting product configuration systems: lead time in the specification...... systems in industry companies and partly to assess if the objectives suggested are appropriate for describing the impact of product configuration systems and identifying other possible objectives. The empirical study of the com-panies also gives an indication of more overall performance indicators being...

  20. MAXIMIZING THE BENEFITS OF ERP SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo André da Conceição Menezes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning systems have been consolidated in companies with different sizes and sectors, allowing their real benefits to be definitively evaluated. In this study, several interactions have been studied in different phases, such as the strategic priorities and strategic planning defined as ERP Strategy; business processes review and the ERP selection in the pre-implementation phase, the project management and ERP adaptation in the implementation phase, as well as the ERP revision and integration efforts in the post-implementation phase. Through rigorous use of case study methodology, this research led to developing and to testing a framework for maximizing the benefits of the ERP systems, and seeks to contribute for the generation of ERP initiatives to optimize their performance.

  1. Moving toward a Coherent School Finance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Heather

    2013-01-01

    California's current school finance system is a tangled web of funding programs, restrictions, inequities and confusion. Building a stronger finance system to benefit from resources is an important step in strengthening California's K-12 education system and better meeting the needs of its students. Gov. Brown has recently proposed the Local…

  2. MAXIMIZING THE BENEFITS OF ERP SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo André Da Conceiçao Menezes; Fernando González Ladrón de Guevara

    2010-01-01

    The ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) systems have been consolidated in companies with different sizes and sectors, allowing their real benefits to be definitively evaluated. In this study, several interactions have been studied in different phases, such as the strategic priorities and strategic planning defined as ERP Strategy; business processes review and the ERP selection in the pre-implementation phase, the project management and ERP adaptation in the implementation phase, as well as th...

  3. Investment in Safe Routes to School Projects: Public Health Benefits for the Larger Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Watson, MPH

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe Safe Routes to School (SRTS program is designed to encourage active and safe transportation for children to school. This report examines the potential broader impact of these programs on communities within 0.5 mile (0.8 km of schools.MethodsWe used a geographic information system to generate estimates of the land area within 0.5 mile of public schools in 4 U.S. Census-defined categories: 37 large urban areas, 428 small urban areas, 1088 metropolitan counties (counties in metropolitan statistical areas excluding the urban areas, and 2048 nonmetropolitan counties. We estimated population at the county level or at the U.S. Census-defined urban-area level using data from the 2000 U.S. Census.ResultsIn large urban areas, 39.0% of the land area was within 0.5 mile of a public school, and in small urban areas, 26.5% of the land area was within 0.5 mile of a public school. An estimated 65.5 million people in urban areas could benefit from SRTS projects. In nonurban areas, 1% or less of land is within 0.5 mile of a public school.ConclusionResults suggest that SRTS projects in urban areas can improve the walking and bicycling environment for adults as well as for children, the target users. Investment in SRTS can contribute to increased physical activity among children and adults.

  4. Optimization of catalyst system reaps economic benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champlin Refining and Chemicals Inc. is learning to optimize its catalyst systems for hydrotreating Venezuelan gas oils through a program of research, pilot plant testing, and commercial unit operation. The economic results of this project have been evaluated, and the benefits are most evident in improvements in product yields and qualities. The project has involved six commercial test runs, to date (Runs 10-15), with a seventh run planned. A summary of the different types of catalyst systems used in the test runs, and the catalyst philosophy that developed is given. Runs 10 and 11 used standard CoMo and NiMo catalysts for heavy gas oils hydrotreating. These catalysts had small pore sizes and suffered high deactivation rates because of metals contamination. When it was discovered that metals contamination was a problem, catalyst options were reviewed

  5. State approaches to the system benefits charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, J M

    1997-07-01

    This report documents the consideration and implementation of a non-bypassable system benefits charge (SBC) in six states through mid-May 1997. The SBC is being established to sustain important public-policy programs during the electric industry restructuring process. The states covered include Arizona, California, Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin. This report was prepared for the Office of Energy and Resource Planning, Utah Department of Natural Resources, under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s Sustainable Technology Energy Partnerships Initiative, Second Round (STEP-2). The purpose of the report is to provide decision makers in Utah, including the Utah Public Service Commission and the state legislature, with relevant information on the SBC for use in their deliberation on the matter. The issues faced by the six states are the SBC in general; surcharge rate or funding levels; administrative structure and procedures; and actions, guidelines, and principles by program area.

  6. CRM system benefits : A case study of banking sector

    OpenAIRE

    Murrawat, Adnan; Nasershariati, Foroozan

    2011-01-01

    Seminar Date: 05-11-2011 Level: Master Thesis in Information Technology Management,   15ECTS Institution: School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Malardalen University Authors: Adnan Murrawat Khan [amt1001]         Foroozan Nasershariati [fni10002]                                              Title: CRM system benefits, a case study of banking sector Supervisor: Dr Ole Liljefors Problem statement: Customer relationship management (CRM) systems have been adopted to have b...

  7. Information System Selection: Methods for Comparing Service Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Evelyn; Campbell, James G.

    1981-01-01

    Automated hospital information systems are purchased both for their potential impact on costs (economic benefits) and for their potential impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of hospital performance (Service Benefits). This paper defines and describes Service Benefits and describes their importance in information system selection.

  8. The Compensation and Benefits System: Private Companies vs. Budgetary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldea Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic evolution of the last decades has entailed major changes concerning the Human Resource Management practices, in both private and budgetary sector of Romania. In order to maintain efficiency and market competitivity, a company must adapt to these changes by altering its human resource strategy since managers are encountering increasingly complex challenges as to attracting, motivating and retaining employees. Such an objective might be accomplished by elaborating a competitive system of employee compensation. This article focuses on the stage reached by the Human Resource Management in the compensation and benefits system of the private and budgetary sector. For the latter, we are focusing on the romanian system of higher education. This study demonstrates that the compensation and benefits system which is implemented in romanian universities is limited and can offer few opportunities as compared to the one implemented by private companies. It is worth saying that the legal system has a negative impact in this matter.

  9. Investigating benefits realisation process for enterprise resource planning systems

    OpenAIRE

    Badewi, Amgad

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to investigate the benefit realisation process for ERP systems so as to develop a benefit realization road map whereby organisations can realize the maximum potential of their ERP systems. This research covers two areas: mechanism of implementation and the destination to change (i.e. road map). It has been found that project management and benefits management approaches are necessary for recouping benefits from investing in Information Technologies (IT) pr...

  10. Benefits of management systems integration: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Merce BERNARDO; Simon, Alexandra; Tarí Guilló, Juan José; Molina-Azorín, José F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the benefits of integrated management systems by comparing them with the benefits obtained through the individual implementation of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 standards. The methodology used is a literature review based on an electronic search in the Web of Science, ScienceDirect, Scopus and Emerald databases. Findings show that although some benefits are common regardless the system management type, the benefits obtained with integration are greater than ...

  11. Top Benefits Challenges Facing School Business Decision Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohling, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    What's the main factor coloring employee satisfaction? Many organizations' leaders think the answer is salary, yet in reality, employee benefits packages are one of the biggest incentives an employer can offer. Educational institutions have done well in providing benefits to employees. However, with an unpredictable economic climate and a complex…

  12. Introducing E-portfolio Use to Primary School Pupils: Response, Benefits and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitra Theodosiadou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electronic portfolios (e-portfolios have a positive impact on the learning process in a broad range of educational sectors and on learners of all ages. Yet because most e-portfolio-related studies are about their implementation in higher education, this type of research is less usual in the early childhood context, and there is no available research for Greek schools. This study aims to investigate the impact of e-portfolios on learning in a Greek primary school and to provide a resource regarding the educational benefits of e-portfolio in primary education. To do that, it employs the qualitative naturalistic method to collect data, along with mixed methods which were used to achieve triangulation and strengthen confidence in the outcomes. Participants in the research were fourteen 8-year-old pupils, and one of the researchers was their regular teacher. Data evaluation revealed that the e-portfolio added value in pupils’ learning, acted as a medium to involve parents, promoted pupils’ self-esteem, and was acknowledged as a valuable assessment tool and a challenge for the school community. Based on the experience of the e-portfolio implementation, the authors provide some suggestions that would possibly help researchers and primary school teachers adopt and develop e-portfolio systems in their particular settings.

  13. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  14. Perceived Benefits of Yoga among Urban School Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Donna Wang; Marshall Hagins

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the findings of a qualitative evaluation of a yoga intervention program for urban middle and high school youth in New York City public and charter schools. Six focus groups were conducted with students who participated in a year-long yoga program to determine their perceptions of mental and physical benefits as well as barriers and challenges. Results show that students perceived the benefits of yoga as increased self-regulation, mindfulness, self-esteem, physical condit...

  15. Designing a Cheaper and More Effective Unemployment Benefit System

    OpenAIRE

    Melvyn G. Coles

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an equilibrium labour market in which an unemployment benefit system cannot raise the average value of being unemployed in the long run. It proposes an alternative benefit system which pays generous benefit rates when unemployment is high, but pays much lower rates in booms. By targeting unemployment compensation to recessions, when being unemployed is particularly costly, this policy provides insurance equivalent to that provided by the current system. By reducing the va...

  16. Students "Hacking" School Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Del

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with students hacking school computer systems. School districts are getting tough with students "hacking" into school computers to change grades, poke through files, or just pit their high-tech skills against district security. Dozens of students have been prosecuted recently under state laws on identity theft and unauthorized…

  17. Farmers’ perception of stable schools as a tool to improve management for the benefit of mink welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Britt I. F.; Anneberg, Inger; Sørensen, Jan Tind;

    2015-01-01

    schools, and that motivation for working towards a common goal is very important for the process of common learning among the farmers. The uniform production system at mink farms gives special challenges in how to work with the different subjects to ensure farmer ownership of the process. The farmers did......The aim of the study was to explore farmers' perception of stable schools as a tool to improve management for the benefit of mink welfare. Stable schools are knowledge exchange between farmers working towards a common goal, being able to give practical advice to each other. The concept is based on...... farmer field schools, developed and used in developing countries. Several Danish mink farmers are familiar with erfa-groups which also are farmers meeting, often with an advisor taking part, but the stable schools with only farmers and a facilitator have never been tested on mink farms. In 2013, we...

  18. Long-Run Benefits from Universal High-Quality Pre-Schooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauchmüller, Robert; Gørtz, Mette; Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz

    of staff with a pedagogic education, and a higher share of teachers with non-Danish ethnic background lead to significant improvements in children’s test results in Danish at the end of the 9th grade. Boys benefit more from pre-school quality than girls. We address possible selectivity by using......This paper investigates the role of pre-school quality for children’s cognitive development at the end of elementary schooling (age 16). We use a unique dataset based on Danish admini-strative registers where pre-school children are linked to their pre-school and its pre-school teachers. Based...... on this, we generate five main quality indicators of pre-schools. Child out-comes are language test scores from final (9th grade) elementary school exams. Controlling for child background factors, we find that a higher number of staff members per child, a higher share of male staff, a higher share...

  19. Estimating the Benefit of High School for College-Bound Students

    OpenAIRE

    Louis-Philippe Morin

    2010-01-01

    Studies based on instrumental variable techniques suggest that the value of a high school education is large for potential dropouts, yet we know much less about the size of the benefit for students who will go on to post-secondary education. To help fill this gap, I measure the value-added of a year of high-school mathematics for university-bound students using a recent Ontario secondary school reform. The subject specificity of this reform makes it possible to identify the benefit of an extr...

  20. Design and diffusion of systems for human benefit

    CERN Document Server

    Venable, John R; Bunker, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Information systems have the potential to provide human benefit in a number of areas including: improvement of education, provision of social and other services to the public, health and well-being, work-life balance, environmental sustainability, democracy and self-determination, freedom, emancipation, poverty reduction, and social equity. However, most studies within Information Systems relate to a business context rather than directly to human benefit. When dealing with human benefit, system stakeholders may have different objectives regarding a system's use, its distribution, and the way r

  1. Environmental benefits of domestic solar energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All nations of the world depend on fossil fuels for their energy needs. However the obligation to reduce CO2 and other gaseous emissions in order to be in conformity with the Kyoto agreement is the reason behind which countries turn to non-polluting renewable energy sources. In this paper the pollution caused by the burning of fossil fuels is initially presented followed by a study on the environmental protection offered by the two most widely used renewable energy systems, i.e. solar water heating and solar space heating. The results presented in this paper show that by using solar energy, considerable amounts of greenhouse polluting gasses are avoided. For the case of a domestic water heating system, the saving, compared to a conventional system, is about 80% with electricity or Diesel backup and is about 75% with both electricity and Diesel backup. In the case of space heating and hot water system the saving is about 40%. It should be noted, however, that in the latter, much greater quantities of pollutant gasses are avoided. Additionally, all systems investigated give positive and very promising financial characteristics. With respect to life cycle assessment of the systems, the energy spent for manufacture and installation of the solar systems is recouped in about 1.2 years, whereas the payback time with respect to emissions produced from the embodied energy required for the manufacture and installation of the systems varies from a few months to 9.5 years according to the fuel and the particular pollutant considered. Moreover, due to the higher solar contribution, solar water heating systems have much shorter payback times than solar space heating systems. It can, therefore, be concluded that solar energy systems offer significant protection to the environment and should be employed whenever possible in order to achieve a sustainable future

  2. Perceived Benefits of Yoga among Urban School Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donna; Hagins, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the findings of a qualitative evaluation of a yoga intervention program for urban middle and high school youth in New York City public and charter schools. Six focus groups were conducted with students who participated in a year-long yoga program to determine their perceptions of mental and physical benefits as well as barriers and challenges. Results show that students perceived the benefits of yoga as increased self-regulation, mindfulness, self-esteem, physical conditioning, academic performance, and stress reduction. Barriers and challenges for a yoga practice include lack of time and space. The extent to which the benefits experienced are interrelated to one another is discussed. Suggestions for future research and school-based programming are also offered. PMID:26884797

  3. Perceived Benefits of Yoga among Urban School Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the findings of a qualitative evaluation of a yoga intervention program for urban middle and high school youth in New York City public and charter schools. Six focus groups were conducted with students who participated in a year-long yoga program to determine their perceptions of mental and physical benefits as well as barriers and challenges. Results show that students perceived the benefits of yoga as increased self-regulation, mindfulness, self-esteem, physical conditioning, academic performance, and stress reduction. Barriers and challenges for a yoga practice include lack of time and space. The extent to which the benefits experienced are interrelated to one another is discussed. Suggestions for future research and school-based programming are also offered.

  4. Perceived Benefits of Yoga among Urban School Students: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Donna; Hagins, Marshall

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the findings of a qualitative evaluation of a yoga intervention program for urban middle and high school youth in New York City public and charter schools. Six focus groups were conducted with students who participated in a year-long yoga program to determine their perceptions of mental and physical benefits as well as barriers and challenges. Results show that students perceived the benefits of yoga as increased self-regulation, mindfulness, self-esteem, physical conditioning, academic performance, and stress reduction. Barriers and challenges for a yoga practice include lack of time and space. The extent to which the benefits experienced are interrelated to one another is discussed. Suggestions for future research and school-based programming are also offered. PMID:26884797

  5. Estimating the benefit of high school for universitybound students: evidence of subjectspecific human capital accumulation

    OpenAIRE

    Louis-Philippe Morin

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that the value of high school education is large for potential dropouts, yet we know much less about the benefits for students who will go on to postsecondary education. To help fill this gap I measure, using a recent Ontario high school reform, the valueadded (in terms of university grades) of an extra year of highschool mathematics for universitybound students. The estimated benefit is small for these students: 2.3 points on a 100point scale. This evidence helps to ...

  6. Psychosocial and Physical Benefits of Exercise Among Rural Secondary School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ntwanano Alliance Kubayi; Pule Eric

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits of physical exercise among secondary school students. Participants in the study were 251 students (120 boys and 131 girls) attending three public secondary schools in the Hlanganani rural area of South Africa. A validated questionnaire was used to collect data. Results of this study indicated that students exercised to be with their friends, to be physically attractive and compete with others. The findings of this study have practical impl...

  7. Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools Program: Benefits of Improving Air Quality in the School Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation and Indoor Air.

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools (IAQ TfS) Program to help schools prevent, identify, and resolve their IAQ problems. This publication describes the program and its advantages, explaining that through simple, low-cost measures, schools can: reduce IAQ-related health risks and…

  8. 1998 Complex Systems Summer School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-15

    For the past eleven years a group of institutes, centers, and universities throughout the country have sponsored a summer school in Santa Fe, New Mexico as part of an interdisciplinary effort to promote the understanding of complex systems. The goal of these summer schools is to provide graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and active research scientists with an introduction to the study of complex behavior in mathematical, physical, and living systems. The Center for Nonlinear Studies supported the eleventh in this series of highly successful schools in Santa Fe in June, 1998.

  9. Elementary School Classroom Teacher Delivered Physical Education: Costs, Benefits and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Clay P.; Tran, Cynthia; Alves, Yara

    2010-01-01

    Given academic priorities and budgetary constraints in the current elementary school milieu, the classroom teacher will likely remain a primary physical education provider. Understanding classroom teachers' perspectives related to costs, benefits, and barriers to teaching physical education is essential to understanding physical education…

  10. The Educational Benefits Claimed for Physical Education and School Sport: An Academic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Richard; Armour, Kathleen; Kirk, David; Jess, Mike; Pickup, Ian; Sandford, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This academic review critically examines the theoretical and empirical bases of claims made for the educational benefits of physical education and school sport (PESS). An historical overview of the development of PESS points to the origins of claims made in four broad domains: physical, social, affective and cognitive. Analysis of the evidence…

  11. Educational Audiologists: Their Access, Benefit, and Collaborative Assistance to Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richburg, Cynthia McCormick; Knickelbein, Becky A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The main goals of this study were to determine if school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have access to the services of an audiologist and if those SLPs felt they obtained benefit from the audiologist's services. Additional goals included gathering information about SLPs' (a) understanding of basic audiological concepts typical…

  12. A Framework for Identifying and Understanding Enterprise Systems Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Petra; Williams, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    business change, which addresses the identified limitations of previous research and provides a more detailed analysis of benefits and their contextual variation. Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on data gathered from 31 real-world organizations (case studies) of differing size, maturity, and industry...... codes and the method for deriving the codes allows companies to identify and define benefits as well as to assess the outcome of enterprise systems implementation projects. Originality/value – The paper empirically develops an applicable benefits framework, which addresses the lack of detail of previous...

  13. [Employment-related benefit system in the UK].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Keiji; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Statutory Sick Pay, Jobseeker's Allowance, and Employment and Support Allowance are employment-related benefits in the United Kingdom (UK). They correspond to the Injury and Disease Allowance and Unemployment Insurance in Japan. The Government of the UK is determined to reform the benefit system to make it fairer and to improve financial work incentives, using the slogan "Welfare to Work". Against this background, the government of the UK united some non-contributory benefits into a new "Universal Credit" scheme, which started in April 2013. The labor policy was also reformed to improve work incentives, for example by abolishing the Flexible New Deal program and uniting all the "Welfare to Work" policies into the "Work Programme". These reforms are useful for reconsidering the labor and employment-related policy and benefit system of Japan. PMID:24334698

  14. The intelligent transport systems – Risks and Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Krstev, Dejan; Pop-Andonov, Goran; Krstev, Aleksandar; Dzidrov, Misko; Krstev, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Effective deployment of ITS technologies depends in part on the knowledge of which technologies will most effectively address the issues of congestion and safety. Thus, it is important to understand the benefits or risks of both existing and emerging technologies. Based on documented experience locally and throughout the country, ITS deployments in urban areas have the potential to offer the following benefits: • Arterial management systems can potentially reduce delays with the impl...

  15. Extrinsic Versus Intrinsic Benefits: Challenging Categories Used to Define the Value of Music in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Hew Dale Crooke

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing pressures to justify the value of music in schools over recent decades has led to the construction of three distinct areas of benefits: intrinsic (or musical benefits, extrinsic benefits related to academic and/or cognitive development, and extrinsic benefits related to psychosocial wellbeing. While some argue these categories have been useful for identifying specific areas of value and enabling targeted advocacy approaches, others have challenged this segmented approach to justification. While the most strident point of contention stems from the perception that categories which champion non-musical (extrinsic benefits have led to the devaluing of musical (intrinsic benefits, others dispute the categories themselves. Such arguments question the ability to separate what have been categorised as musical and non-musical elements, particularly in relation to social and political elements. This paper aims to tease out the practicality of these existing categories, and in doing so, challenge their robustness in both form and definition. The argument is made that current attempts to separate the value of school-based music into distinct categories is not only unclear, but also unhelpful in areas of advocacy. This argument rests on the premise that musical participation affords opportunities to enrich human experience in holistic and integrated ways, and that categorisation serves to preclude this unique value.

  16. Cost/benefit analyses of reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study presents a methodology for quantitative assessment of the benefit yielded by the various engineered safety systems of a nuclear reactor containment from the standpoint of their capacity to protect the environment compared to their construction costs. The benefit is derived from an estimate of the possible damage from which the environment is protected, taking account of the probabilities of occurrence of malfunctions and accidents. For demonstration purposes, the methodology was applied to a 1 300-MWe PWR nuclear power station. The accident sequence considered was that of a major loss-of-coolant accident as investigated in detail in the German risk study. After determination of the benefits and cost/benefit ratio for the power plant and the containment systems as designed, the performance characteristics of three subsystems, the leakoff system, annulus exhaust air handling system and spray system, were varied. For this purpose, the parameters which describe these systems in the activity release programme were altered. The costs were simultaneously altered in order to take account of the performance divergences. By varying the performance of the individual sub-systems an optimization in design of these systems can be arrived at

  17. Accounting Systems for School Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, E. Barrett, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Advises careful analysis and improvement of existing school district accounting systems prior to investment in new ones. Emphasizes the importance of attracting and maintaining quality financial staffs, developing an accounting policies and procedures manual, and designing a good core accounting system before purchasing computer hardware and…

  18. NASA Electronic Publishing System: Cost/benefit Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuey, Richard C.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Scientific and Technical Information Office was assigned the responsibility to examine the benefits of the utilization of electronic printing and duplicating systems throughout NASA Installations and Headquarters. The subject of this report is the documentation of the methodology used in justifying the acquisition of the most cost beneficial solution for the printing and duplicating requirements of a duplicating facility that is contemplating the acquisition of an electronic printing and duplicating system. Four alternatives are presented with each alternative costed out with its associated benefits. The methodology goes a step further than just a cost benefit analysis through its comparison of risks associated with each alternative, sensitivity to number of impressions and productivity gains on the selected alternative and finally the return on investment for the selected alternative. The report can be used in conjunction with the two earlier reports, NASA-TM-106242 and TM-106510 in guiding others in determining the cost effective duplicating alternative.

  19. Do recommender systems benefit users? a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Chi Ho

    2016-04-01

    Recommender systems are present in many web applications to guide purchase choices. They increase sales and benefit sellers, but whether they benefit customers by providing relevant products remains less explored. While in many cases the recommended products are relevant to users, in other cases customers may be tempted to purchase the products only because they are recommended. Here we introduce a model to examine the benefit of recommender systems for users, and find that recommendations from the system can be equivalent to random draws if one always follows the recommendations and seldom purchases according to his or her own preference. Nevertheless, with sufficient information about user preferences, recommendations become accurate and an abrupt transition to this accurate regime is observed for some of the studied algorithms. On the other hand, we find that high estimated accuracy indicated by common accuracy metrics is not necessarily equivalent to high real accuracy in matching users with products. This disagreement between estimated and real accuracy serves as an alarm for operators and researchers who evaluate recommender systems merely with accuracy metrics. We tested our model with a real dataset and observed similar behaviors. Finally, a recommendation approach with improved accuracy is suggested. These results imply that recommender systems can benefit users, but the more frequently a user purchases the recommended products, the less relevant the recommended products are in matching user taste.

  20. Qualitative evaluation of a high school yoga program: feasibility and perceived benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conboy, Lisa A; Noggle, Jessica J; Frey, Jessica L; Kudesia, Ravi S; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2013-01-01

    This is the first published qualitative assessment of a yoga program applied in a high school setting. This qualitative interview study was nested in a randomized, controlled trial studying the effects of a yoga program offered in place of a semester of physical education classes at a rural public high school. Student interviews were conducted after taking part in a semester of the yoga program. A formal passive consent with information about the qualitative study was sent home to parents/guardians of all students in the parent study before the interviews. Most students enjoyed the yoga classes and felt benefits. Negative reports of yoga practice were associated with gender as most males sensed peer pressure against practicing yoga. Despite this finding, most students wanted to continue yoga and would continue if it were offered in school. Positive reports include a greater kinesthetic awareness, which some students associated with a greater respect for the body and improved self-image. Among students reporting psychological benefits, many cited stress reduction; many used yoga to manage negative emotions; and some propagated more optimism. Most thought yoga could reduce interest in the use of drugs and alcohol and increase social cohesion with family and peers. We found that a yoga program is feasible in this sample of 9th and 10th graders, especially after benefits are perceived. We also found evidence that yoga may lead to emergent positive benefits in health behaviors not directly prescribed by the program. These results suggest that school-based yoga programs may be appropriate for promoting healthy behaviors at a societal level by focusing on the prevention of negative patterns during the adolescent transition. PMID:23643372

  1. NON-TRADITIONAL SPORTS AT SCHOOL. BENEFITS FOR PHYSICAL AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Lara-Sánchez, Amador J.; MARÍA L. ZAGALAZ-SÁNCHEZ; Emilio J. Martínez-López; DANIEL BERDEJO-DEL-FRESNO

    2010-01-01

    Physical Education teachers have been using some very classic team sports, like football, basketball, handball, volleyball, etc. for many years in order to develop their education work at school. As a consequence of this, the benefits of this kind of activities on Physical Education lessons have not been as notable as we mighthave expected, since, even if they are increasing, their development and application are still low. There are many and very varied new non-traditional sports that have e...

  2. Integrating Suburban Schools: How to Benefit from Growing Diversity and Avoid Segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Adai; Frankenberg, Erica; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve; Chirichigno, Gina

    2011-01-01

    This manual was written to help guide education stakeholders--including parents, students, school board members, community activists, administrators, policymakers and attorneys--in their efforts to promote racial diversity and avoid racial isolation in suburban school systems. Critical information on the current legal, political and policy issues…

  3. Making an Impact Statewide to Benefit 21st-Century School Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Mullen, Carol A.; Davis, Ann W.; Lashley, Carl

    2012-01-01

    How can institutions of higher education, local education agencies, and departments of education partner to build capacity for 21st-Century school leadership? The model (IMPACT V) we describe utilizes a systems-wide partnership approach to cultivate shared leadership within influenced middle and high schools statewide to leverage technology as a…

  4. Benefits of advanced software techniques for mission planning systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasquet, A.; Parrod, Y.; Desaintvincent, A.

    1994-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern spacecraft, and the stringent requirement for maximizing their mission return, call for a new generation of Mission Planning Systems (MPS). In this paper, we discuss the requirements for the Space Mission Planning and the benefits which can be expected from Artificial Intelligence techniques through examples of applications developed by Matra Marconi Space.

  5. Electronic Payment System in Nigeria: Its Economic Benefits and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okifo, Joseph; Igbunu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The crux of this study is on the adoption of E-payment system in Nigeria: Its economic benefits and challenges. The arrival of the internet has taken electronic payments and transactions to an exponential growth level. Consumers could purchase goods and services from the internet and send unencrypted credit card numbers across the network, which…

  6. Benefits and Challenges of Over-Actuated Excitation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Norman Fitz-Coy; Vivek Nagabhushan; Michael T. Hale

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive discussion on the benefits and technical challenges of controlling over-determined and over-actuated excitation systems ranging from 1-DOF to 6-DOF. The primary challenges of over-actuated systems result from the physical constraints imposed when the number of exciters exceeds the number of mechanical degree-of-freedom. This issue is less critical for electro-dynamic exciters which tend to be more compliant than servo-hydraulic exciters. To facilitate the t...

  7. ISO9001 Quality Management Systems; Benefits and Requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Viro, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Oulu University of Applied Sciences Industrial Management Author(s): Antti Viro Title of thesis: ISO9001 Quality Management Systems; Benefits and Requirements Supervisor(s): Hannu Päätalo Spring 2015: Pages: 61 + 1 appendices The purpose of this thesis was to find reasons and justifications for the ISO9001 certified quality management system. The major part of the case work was establishing QMS for Dedicated Networks Partners Oy. The other parts were literature and t...

  8. School Indoor Environmental Quality Assessments and Interventions: Benefits of Effective Partnerships in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.; Kim, Janice; Smorodinsky, Svetlana

    2002-07-01

    Public, private, government, and university stakeholders have focused increasing attention on children's environmental health. Priority areas have been healthy school environments including indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ); susceptibilities of children to environmental factors and associated illness; and, understanding exposure to biological, chemical, and physical agents. As multidisciplinary teams, studies and intervention demonstrations in California public schools were conducted. A common theme among them was a ''partnership,'' the collaboration between stakeholders from the aforementioned sectors. Federal funding and local bond measures for planning, maintenance, and modernization of school facilities have recently been authorized. Therefore, beneficial ''partnerships'' should be established to conduct needed IEQ, environmental health, and productivity research, development and demonstration. This commentary describes benefits for stakeholders and five strategies for future effective collaborations.

  9. Benefits and drawbacks of electronic health record systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menachemi N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nir Menachemi¹, Taleah H Collum²¹Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA; ²Department of Health Services Administration, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH Act of 2009 that was signed into law as part of the "stimulus package" represents the largest US initiative to date that is designed to encourage widespread use of electronic health records (EHRs. In light of the changes anticipated from this policy initiative, the purpose of this paper is to review and summarize the literature on the benefits and drawbacks of EHR systems. Much of the literature has focused on key EHR functionalities, including clinical decision support systems, computerized order entry systems, and health information exchange. Our paper describes the potential benefits of EHRs that include clinical outcomes (eg, improved quality, reduced medical errors, organizational outcomes (eg, financial and operational benefits, and societal outcomes (eg, improved ability to conduct research, improved population health, reduced costs. Despite these benefits, studies in the literature highlight drawbacks associated with EHRs, which include the high upfront acquisition costs, ongoing maintenance costs, and disruptions to workflows that contribute to temporary losses in productivity that are the result of learning a new system. Moreover, EHRs are associated with potential perceived privacy concerns among patients, which are further addressed legislatively in the HITECH Act. Overall, experts and policymakers believe that significant benefits to patients and society can be realized when EHRs are widely adopted and used in a “meaningful” way.Keywords: EHR, health information technology, HITECH, computerized order entry, health information exchange 

  10. Climate benefits and environmental challenges related to urban food systems

    OpenAIRE

    Verzandvoort, S.J.E.; Mol, G.; Meulen, van der, A.; Oostrom, van, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    In a short literature review, we have collected available knowledge on the potential benefits of urban agriculture, as part of local food systems, on climate change mitigation and adaptation. The effects of urban agriculture on climate change mitigation and adaptation depend on the type of agricultural practice (e.g. in greenhouses, in soil, in artificial substrates used resources) and the difference with previous land use (e.g. leading to an increase or decrease of sealed soil surface and gr...

  11. Learning for Self-regulation: Improving Instructional Benefits for Pupils, Teachers, Parents, Schools, and Society At Large

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Mooij, T. (2007). Learning for Self-regulation: Improving Instructional Benefits for Pupils, Teachers, Parents, Schools, and Society At Large. Inaugural address, Open University of the Netherlands, The Netherlands.

  12. e-Leadership of School Principals: Increasing School Effectiveness by a School Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Ina; Presser, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, school management systems have become an important tool for effective e-leadership and data-based decision making. School management systems emphasize information flow and e-communication between teachers, students and parents. This study examines e-leadership by secondary-school principals through the Mashov school management…

  13. Mixed grazing systems benefit both upland biodiversity and livestock production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariecia D Fraser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With world food demand expected to double by 2050, identifying farming systems that benefit both agricultural production and biodiversity is a fundamentally important challenge for the 21(st century, but this has to be achieved in a sustainable way. Livestock grazing management directly influences both economic outputs and biodiversity on upland farms while contributing to potentially damaging greenhouse gas emissions, yet no study has attempted to address these impacts simultaneously. METHODS: Using a replicated, landscape-scale field experiment consisting of five management 'systems' we tested the effects of progressively altering elements within an upland farming system, viz i incorporating cattle grazing into an upland sheep system, ii integrating grazing of semi-natural rough grazing into a mixed grazing system based on improved pasture, iii altering the stocking ratio within a mixed grazing system, and iv replacing modern crossbred cattle with a traditional breed. We quantified the impacts on livestock productivity and numbers of birds and butterflies over four years. RESULTS CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We found that management systems incorporating mixed grazing with cattle improve livestock productivity and reduce methane emissions relative to sheep only systems. Systems that also included semi-natural rough grazing consistently supported more species of birds and butterflies, and it was possible to incorporate bouts of summer grazing of these pastures by cattle to meet habitat management prescriptions without compromising cattle performance overall. We found no evidence that the system incorporating a cattle breed popular as a conservation grazer was any better for bird and butterfly species richness than those based on a mainstream breed, yet methane emissions from such a system were predicted to be higher. We have demonstrated that mixed upland grazing systems not only improve livestock production, but also benefit

  14. Dual-use benefits of the CTBT verification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since it has been completed in September 1996, the CTBT has been signed by 151 countries. Awaiting the 44 ratifications and entry into force, all of the nuclear powers have imposed unilateral moratoriums on nuclear test explosions. The end of these weapons development activities is often cited as the principal benefit of the CTBT. As the world begins to implement the Treaty, it has become clear that the development and operation of the CTBT verification system will provide a wide range of additional benefits if the data analysis products are available for dual-purpose applications. As this paper describes these could have economic and social implications, especially for countries with limited technical infrastructures. These involve, seismic monitoring, mineral exploration, scientific and technical training

  15. Perceived Sexual Benefits of Alcohol Use among Recent High School Graduates: Longitudinal Associations with Drinking Behavior and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Sonya S.; Wilkerson, J. Michael; Jones-Webb, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    In this research study of 153 college-bound students, perceived sexual benefits of alcohol use were associated with greater drinking and related consequences during the senior year of high school and freshman year of college. Perceived benefits predicted drinking outcomes during fall after adjustment for gender, sensation seeking, parental…

  16. Benefits and Challenges of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Integration in Québec English Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Jihan

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated teachers' and educational consultants' perceptions of ICT integration in Québec English Schools, specifically with regards to the benefits and challenges of ICT integration therein. 23 teachers and educational consultants from seven different school boards participated in the focus group sessions. Results revealed higher…

  17. The Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School: Career and Research Benefits to Students and Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowee, M.

    2015-12-01

    This last summer we held the 5th Los Alamos Space Weather Summer School. This 8-week long program is designed for mid-career graduate students in related fields to come to LANL, receive lectures on space physics and space environment topics, and carry out a research project under the mentorship of LANL staff members. We accept typically 6-8 students to the program, with a strong applicant pool to choose from. This type of summer school program is relatively unique in the space physics community—there are several other summer schools but they are of shorter duration and do not include the mentor-research project aspect which builds a strong one-on-one connection between the summer student and his/her LANL mentor(s). From the LANL perspective, this program was intended to have several benefits including building collaborations between LANL staff and universities and recruitment of potential postdocs. From the student perspective, this program is not only an educational opportunity but a strong networking opportunity and a chance to enhance their professional skills and publication record. Students are permitted to work on projects directly related to their thesis or on projects in areas that are completely new to them. At the end of the summer school, the students also develop their presentation skills by preparing and giving AGU-style presentations on their research projects to the research group. Over the past five years the summer school has increased in popularity, and the feedback from the student participants has been very positive. Alumni of the program have continued collaborations with their mentors, resulting in publications and conference presentations, and one postdoc hire to date.

  18. Beacon-Colss core monitoring system application and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse and KNFC are creating an upgraded core monitoring system by merging the BEACON system (best estimate analyzer for core operation-nuclear) and COLSS (core operating limit supervisory system) into an integrated product. Although both BEACON and COLSS are core monitoring systems that have been in operation at many plants for a number of years, they each have some features and capabilities that are not in the other. Therefore it has been decided to incorporate portions of COLSS into the beacon system to create an optional level to support core monitoring applications on selected combustion engineering (C-E) designed plants. This optional level in the beacon system will be called BEACON-COLSS and will allow the beacon system to monitor the LCO's and Tech Spec limits at CE plants that currently use COLSS. This paper will present the structure of the new core monitoring system and the benefits it achieves for current COLSS plants, i.e., CE plants in the US and KSNP (Korean standard nuclear power plant). (authors)

  19. Benefit or Burden? How English Schools Responded to the Duty to Promote Community Cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Rowe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses results from a small scale qualitative study of howprimary and secondary schools in three English local authorities respondedto the introduction and subsequent inspection of a legal duty to promotecommunity cohesion, following a series of ‘race’ riots in 2001 and theLondon bombings of 2005. The policy itself is seen as reflecting widerdiscourse and is shown as shifting in focus during the period it wasofficially inspected between 2008 and 2011. Schools respondeddifferentially to the duty and its inspection, with those in more multiculturalareas responding with higher degrees of confidence than those inmono-ethnic areas. Some policy ‘slippage’ is seen to occur in the wayschools re-framed the duty. Over time, most schools came to identify thecurriculum and the school’s ethos as the most important weapons in theirarmoury. Teachers embraced the new duty with different degrees ofenthusiasm – for some it confirmed the importance of holistic approachesto education which they felt had been sidelined in recent years, whilst othershowed various forms of resistance. Teachers encountered some subtle andchallenging professional dilemmas in the course of discharging the duty.Overall, the respondents in this study felt that the imposition of the dutyand its inspection had been more of a benefit than a burden.

  20. Foreign Exchange: School Leaders Find Tangible Benefits in Their Overseas Educational Study Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Collier's lesson in universal educational experiences versus culture, illustrates the eye-opening experience of a few dozen U.S. school leaders who each year travel abroad on organized educational study missions. They are doing so in an effort to build bridges, share the perspective of the United States' educational system, learn about global…

  1. Costs and benefits with public and investor-owned electric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses the analysis of the costs and benefits associated with public ownership of major utility projects and systems as opposed to private ownership. The topics discussed include the alleged benefits of public power systems, principles of cost benefit analysis, tax-exempt debt, state and local taxes and federal income taxes, benefit of 100 percent debt financing

  2. Environmental-benefit analysis of two urban waste collection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda Usón, Alfonso; Ferreira, Germán; Zambrana Vásquez, David; Zabalza Bribián, Ignacio; Llera Sastresa, Eva

    2013-10-01

    Sustainable transportation infrastructure and travel policies aim to optimise the use of transportation systems to achieve economic and related social and environmental goals. To this end, a novel methodology based on life cycle assessment (LCA) has been developed in this study, with the aim of quantifying, in terms of CO2 emissions equivalent, the impact associated with different alternatives of waste collection systems in different urban typologies. This new approach is focussed on saving energy and raw materials and reducing the environmental impact associated with the waste collection system in urban areas, as well as allowing the design and planning of the best available technologies and most environment-friendly management. The methodology considers a large variety of variables from the point of view of sustainable urban transport such as the location and size of the urban area, the amount of solid waste generated, the level of social awareness on waste separation procedures, the distance between houses and waste collection points and the distance from the latter to the possible recovery plants and/or landfills, taking into account the material and energy recovery ratio within an integrated waste management system. As a case study, two different waste collection systems have been evaluated with this methodology in the ecocity Valdespartera located in Zaragoza, Spain, consisting of approximately 10,000 homes: (i) a system based on traditional truck transportation and manual collection, and (ii) a stationary vacuum waste collection system. Results show that, when operating at loads close to 100%, the stationary collection system has the best environmental performance in comparison with the conventional system. In contrast, when operating at load factors around 13% the environmental benefits in terms of net CO2-eq. emissions for the stationary collection system are around 60% lower in comparison with the conventional one. PMID:23792249

  3. Who Benefits From Four-Year Higher Education in Turkey? A Case Study of Law School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz GÖLPEK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In many countries, a higher education system which is based on welfare state practices prevails. In this system, the services are substantially provided by the state free of charge or at quite low prices. Since the services are financed by taxes, additional sources cannot be provided; and because of the fact that it doesn't entail a real cost benefit comparison by the users, it leads to inefficiency. From the early 80s on, there has been a tendency towards the marketing mechanisms in the provision of many public services such as education due to both strong theoretical and empirical reason, and the restrictions in public financing. Together with this tendency, the question of who benefits from education services is tried to be answered in order to discuss the stimulation of activities and additional resources on a reasonable base. The aim of this study is to determine whether it is the individual or the society who benefits from this public service at the higher education level by calculating private and social return rates through internal return rate technique which is one of the cost benefit analysis method. Findings from calculations have shown that the individual gains more than the society after a four-year university education.

  4. Environmental-benefit analysis of two urban waste collection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sustainable transportation infrastructure and travel policies aim to optimise the use of transportation systems to achieve economic and related social and environmental goals. To this end, a novel methodology based on life cycle assessment (LCA) has been developed in this study, with the aim of quantifying, in terms of CO2 emissions equivalent, the impact associated with different alternatives of waste collection systems in different urban typologies. This new approach is focussed on saving energy and raw materials and reducing the environmental impact associated with the waste collection system in urban areas, as well as allowing the design and planning of the best available technologies and most environment-friendly management. The methodology considers a large variety of variables from the point of view of sustainable urban transport such as the location and size of the urban area, the amount of solid waste generated, the level of social awareness on waste separation procedures, the distance between houses and waste collection points and the distance from the latter to the possible recovery plants and/or landfills, taking into account the material and energy recovery ratio within an integrated waste management system. As a case study, two different waste collection systems have been evaluated with this methodology in the ecocity Valdespartera located in Zaragoza, Spain, consisting of approximately 10,000 homes: (i) a system based on traditional truck transportation and manual collection, and (ii) a stationary vacuum waste collection system. Results show that, when operating at loads close to 100%, the stationary collection system has the best environmental performance in comparison with the conventional system. In contrast, when operating at load factors around 13% the environmental benefits in terms of net CO2-eq. emissions for the stationary collection system are around 60% lower in comparison with the conventional one. - Highlights: • A comprehensive

  5. A systems approach to achieving the benefits of open and modular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Gavin; Smith, Richard; Tripp, Howard; Worthington, Olwen

    2015-05-01

    The ability to evolve Military Communication and Information Systems (CIS) effectively and affordably is enhanced by the adoption of open and modular system architectures. However, there are a number of issues with actually achieving these benefits in practice. This paper presents the results of an initial system study into blockers to the achievement of the benefits of open and modular systems. In particular, the study and this paper, focuses on the issues associated with: the rapidly evolving Information and Communications Technology landscape; the commercial approach to the procurement of CIS systems; the evolution of such systems in a safe and secure manner.

  6. Mobile Learning in a Rural Medical School: Feasibility and Educational Benefits in Campus and Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Nestel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Students in a new medical school were provided with laptops. This study explored the feasibility and educational benefits of mobile learning for two cohorts of students learning in two settings—university campus (first-year students and rural clinical placements (second-year students. Evaluation involved questionnaires, focus groups (faculty and students, and document analysis. Descriptive statistics were computed. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Response rates for questionnaires exceeded 84%. Compared with second-year students, significantly more first-year students (60% took their laptops to campus daily (P=0.14 and used their laptops for more hours each day (P=0.031. All students used laptops most frequently to access the internet (85% and 97% and applications (Microsoft Word (80% and 61% and Microsoft PowerPoint (80% and 63%. Focus groups with students revealed appreciation for the laptops but frustration with the initial software image. Focus groups with faculty identified enthusiasm for mobile learning but acknowledged its limitations. Physical infrastructure and information technology support influenced mobile learning. Document analysis revealed significant costs and issues with maintenance. If adequately resourced, mobile learning through university-issued laptops would be feasible and have educational benefits, including equitable access to learning resources, when and where they are needed. However, barriers remain for full implementation.

  7. Benefits and problems in implementation for integrated medical information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Once the decision has been made to adopt an integrated medical information system (IMIS), there are a number of tissues to overcome. Users need to be aware of the impact the change will make on end users and be prepared to address issues that arise before they become problems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits and unexpected problems encountered in the implementation of IMIS and to determine a useful framework for IMIS. The Yonsei University Dental Hospital is steadily constructing an IMIS. The vendor's PACS software, Piview STAR, supports transactions between workstations that are approved to integrating the health care enterprise (IHE) with security function. It is necessary to develop an excellent framework that is good for the patient, health care provider and information system vendors, in an expert, efficient, and cost-effective manner. The problems encountered with IMIS implementation were high initial investments, delay of EMR enforcement, underdevelopment of digital radiographic appliances and software and insufficient educational training for users. The clinical environments of dental IMIS is some different from the medical situation. The best way to overcome these differences is to establish a gold standard of dental IMIS integration, which estimates the cost payback. The IHE and its technical framework are good for the patient, the health care provider and all information systems vendors.

  8. Benefits of glass fibers in solar fiber optic lighting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotinen, Tarja T; Lingfors, David H S

    2013-09-20

    The transmission properties and coupling of solar light have been studied for glass core multimode fibers in order to verify their benefits for a solar fiber optic lighting system. The light transportation distance can be extended from 20 m with plastic fibers to over 100 m with the kind of glass fibers studied here. A high luminous flux, full visible spectrum, as well as an outstanding color rendering index (98) and correlated color temperature similar to the direct sun light outside have been obtained. Thus the outstanding quality of solar light transmitted through these fibers would improve the visibility of all kinds of objects compared to fluorescent and other artificial lighting. Annual relative lighting energy savings of 36% in Uppsala, Sweden, and 76% in Dubai were estimated in an office environment. The absolute savings can be doubled by using glass optical fibers, and are estimated to be in the order of 550 kWh/year in Sweden and 1160 kWh/year in Dubai for one system of only 0.159 m(2) total light collecting area. The savings are dependent on the fiber length, the daily usage time of the interior, the type of artificial lighting substituted, the system light output flux, and the available time of sunny weather at the geographic location. PMID:24085167

  9. Teacher collaboration in a public school to set up language resource centers: portraying advantages, benefits, and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas Serrano, Javier Augusto

    2009-01-01

    In the present article, the author attempts to describe the benefits, challenges, advantages and disadvantages experienced by teachers in a public school when working collaboratively to implement a language resource center in their institution. Taking as a point of departure the development of a proposal to implement the resource center in their school, some teachers engaged in group work in order to attain the different objectives that were stated at the beginning of the process, thus encoun...

  10. SCHOOL INFORMATION SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR MOBILE PHONES

    OpenAIRE

    Kelvinnicky Gunawan; Bens Pardamean

    2013-01-01

    School Information System (SIS) is an academic information system developed and implemented for a private school with a purpose to improve the efficiency of information retrieval for students, parents and school authority. One of the initial problems with SIS implementation was that it depended on the availability of computers and internet access. With slow internet connections, authentication process could be time consuming, especially if a website implements various external scripts to impr...

  11. Benefits from a renewable energy village electrification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Alex [Kathmandu University, School of Mechanical Engineering, and RIDS-Nepal - ISIS Humla Project Director (Nepal); Kimber, Haddix McKay [University of Montana and The ISIS Foundation, Missoula, Montana (United States)

    2009-02-15

    More than 100 years after Edison's life changing discovery, 1.6-2 billion people around the globe still live without light, in dark and smoke filled homes. The remote and impoverished Himalayan villages of upper Humla, in north-west Nepal, belong to some of the 2.4 billion people who still depend on the use of traditional biomass for their daily energy services such as cooking, heating and light. These activities on open fireplaces have a direct chronic impact on the health and extremely low life expectancy of the women and children along with devastating deforestation. There is a strong relationship between prosperity and access to electricity. The more remote and isolated communities in Nepal generally live in great poverty. Eighty percent of Nepal's 28.5 million people live in rural areas, with around half of these so remote, that neither a road, nor the national grid is ever likely to reach them. While Nepal has no fossil fuel resources, it is a country that is rich in renewable energy resources such as hydropower and solar energy. These abundant and locally available renewable energy resources can be tapped into with appropriate locally developed technologies. Generating and storing electrical energy derived from these rich local energy resources can provide for appropriate and sustainable lighting, which brings potential health, education, social and economic benefits to the people who have previously lived in homes with excessive indoor air pollution. This paper describes the living conditions of some villages in upper Humla, and the possible benefits of a simple village electrification system that provides basic lighting for the homes and the consequent improvements in the living conditions of the villagers. (author)

  12. Are There Benefits from Teaching Yoga at Schools? A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials of Yoga-Based Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ferreira-Vorkapic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Yoga is a holistic system of varied mind-body practices that can be used to improve mental and physical health and it has been utilized in a variety of contexts and situations. Educators and schools are looking to include yoga as a cost-effective, evidence-based component of urgently needed wellness programs for their students. Objectives. The primary goal of this study was to systematically examine the available literature for yoga interventions exclusively in school settings, exploring the evidence of yoga-based interventions on academic, cognitive, and psychosocial benefits. Methods. An extensive search was conducted for studies published between 1980 and October 31, 2014 (PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, ISI, and the Cochrane Library. Effect size analysis, through standardized mean difference and Hedges’g, allowed for the comparison between experimental conditions. Results and Conclusions. Nine randomized control trials met criteria for inclusion in this review. Effect size was found for mood indicators, tension and anxiety in the POMS scale, self-esteem, and memory when the yoga groups were compared to control. Future research requires greater standardization and suitability of yoga interventions for children.

  13. Diversity in School Performance Feedback Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaeghe, Goedele; Schildkamp, Kim; Luyten, Hans; Valcke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    As data-based decision making is receiving increased attention in education, more and more school performance feedback systems (SPFSs) are being developed and used worldwide. These systems provide schools with data on their functioning. However, little research is available on the characteristics of the different SPFSs. Therefore, this study…

  14. Benefits of a Classroom Based Instrumental Music Program on Verbal Memory of Primary School Children: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Nikki S.; Vasquez, Jorge T.; Murphy, Fintan; Gill, Anneliese; Toukhsati, Samia R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated a benefit of music training on a number of cognitive functions including verbal memory performance. The impact of school-based music programs on memory processes is however relatively unknown. The current study explored the effect of increasing frequency and intensity of classroom-based instrumental training…

  15. Who Pays for Standardised Testing? A Cost-Benefit Study of Mandated Testing in Three Queensland Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Merilyn Gladys; Klenowski, Valentina; Chalmers, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on an Australian study that explored the costs and benefits of the National Assessment Programme, Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) testing, both tangible and intangible, of Year 9 students in three Queensland schools. The study commenced with a review of pertinent studies and other related material about standardised testing in…

  16. Urbanized Information Systems Nets Benefits: An Empirical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Trabelsi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available New methods thinking about the enterprise architectures are developing, The Urbanization of the IS in particularis proposed as French framework of EA being appropriate to evolve the IS and proposed outcomes of firms.Where IS became one of the main assets of modern corporations. And it faces many problems Among the mostimportant are low productivity and a large number of failures like obsolescence, heavier, slower and complexityof applications integration. The problem of low productivity of IS was the product of the software crisis, asindicated by the delayed development and implementation of ISs and accumulation which leads to maintenanceproblems. To do this, urbanization is a framework that aims to simplify the IS, to improve communicationbetween its components and to ensure its evolution. In an exploratory approach, this research examines theimpacts of urbanization in private sector studying it to ascertain agility and its nets benefits. This was done inorder to ascertain the evolution of IS and guarantee the agility facing the environment turbulence. The generalassertion is that the Urbanized Information Systems (UIS changes a firm vision because its procure agility toface environment turbulence. The originality of this paper is to explore IS urbanization considered as a Frenchframework of Enterprise Architecture (EA. This research therefore contributes to the body of knowledge by anempirical study and validation of the urbanization success assessments.

  17. NON-TRADITIONAL SPORTS AT SCHOOL. BENEFITS FOR PHYSICAL AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMADOR J. LARA-SÁNCHEZ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical Education teachers have been using some very classic team sports, like football, basketball, handball, volleyball, etc. for many years in order to develop their education work at school. As a consequence of this, the benefits of this kind of activities on Physical Education lessons have not been as notable as we mighthave expected, since, even if they are increasing, their development and application are still low. There are many and very varied new non-traditional sports that have emerged and extended across Spain in recent years. To mention an example, we could refer to a newly created non-traditional sport such as kin-ball. This sport wascreated for the purpose of achieving a way to combine several factors such as health, team-work and competitiveness. Three teams of four players each participate. This way, every player can participate to a great extent in all the moves of the match, for each of them must defend one area of their half in order to achieve a common objective. Besides, kin-ball helps to develop motor skills at school in an easy way; that is, coordination, balance and perception. There is a large variety of non-traditional games and sports that are similar to kin-ball, such as floorball, intercrosse, mazaball, tchoukball, ultimate, indiaca, shuttleball... All of them show many physical, psychic and social advantages, and can help us to make the Physical Education teaching-learning process more motivating, acquiring the recreational component that it showed some years ago and which hasnow disappeared

  18. Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) benefits assessment study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) versus integral spacecraft propulsion, spacecraft maintenance, cost benefits, launch prices, integral propulsion length penalties, remote maintenance versus EVA, potential weight reduction benefits, basing mode, mission models and payload requirements, and program profitability are discussed.

  19. Multiple benefits of personal FM system use by children with auditory processing disorder (APD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kristin N; John, Andrew B; Kreisman, Nicole V; Hall, James W; Crandell, Carl C

    2009-01-01

    Children with auditory processing disorders (APD) were fitted with Phonak EduLink FM devices for home and classroom use. Baseline measures of the children with APD, prior to FM use, documented significantly lower speech-perception scores, evidence of decreased academic performance, and psychosocial problems in comparison to an age- and gender-matched control group. Repeated measures during the school year demonstrated speech-perception improvement in noisy classroom environments as well as significant academic and psychosocial benefits. Compared with the control group, the children with APD showed greater speech-perception advantage with FM technology. Notably, after prolonged FM use, even unaided (no FM device) speech-perception performance was improved in the children with APD, suggesting the possibility of fundamentally enhanced auditory system function. PMID:19925345

  20. The Benefits of Fine Art Integration into Mathematics in Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Brezovnik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the article is to research the effects of the integration of fine art content into mathematics on students at the primary school level. The theoretical part consists of the definition of arts integration into education, a discussion of the developmental process of creative mathematical thinking, an explanation of the position of art and mathematics in education today, and a summary of the benefits of arts integration and its positive effects on students. The empirical part reports on the findings of a pedagogical experiment involving two different ways of teaching fifth-grade students: the control group was taught mathematics in a traditional way, while the experimental group was taught with the integration of fine art content into the mathematics lessons. At the end of the teaching periods, four mathematics tests were administered in order to determine the difference in knowledge between the control group and the experimental group. The results of our study confirmed the hypotheses, as we found positive effects of fine art integration into mathematics, with the experimental group achieving higher marks in the mathematics tests than the control group. Our results are consistent with the findings of previous research and studies, which have demonstrated and confirmed that long-term participation in fine art activities offers advantages related to mathematical reasoning, such as intrinsic motivation, visual imagination and reflection on how to generate creative ideas.

  1. Funding California Schools: The Revenue Limit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Tax revenue flows to California's nearly 1,000 school districts through many different channels. According to the Governor's Committee on Education Excellence (2007), this system is so complex that the state cannot determine how revenues are distributed among school districts, and after reviewing a large number of academic studies in the Getting…

  2. Uniform Effects?: Schools Cite Benefits of Student Uniforms, but Researchers See Little Evidence of Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the effectiveness of school uniform policies. At Stephen Decatur Middle School, it is the school's policy that all students wear the standard school attire consisting of khaki pants with polo shirts in white, burgundy, or navy blue. Some of the shirts also sport an embroidered Decatur eagle, an optional embellishment.…

  3. Who Benefits from SAT Prep?: An Examination of High School Context and Race/Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie J.; Becks, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Research on inequality and high schools often focuses on inequality "within" and "between" high schools. Different high schools may have markedly different access to resources such as college counselors and Advanced Placement offerings, or inequality may exist within a high school due to tracking or other forms of…

  4. Urban School Board Survey: Characteristics, Structure, and Benefits. Second Survey and Report. Urban Indicator, Fall 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Council of the Great City Schools surveyed its member districts in the fall of 2008 to determine the characteristics of school boards and school board members in the nation's major urban school districts. This is the second such survey that the organization has conducted in the last several years. The first was in 2005. Survey forms were…

  5. Energy affordability and the benefits system in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss a number of ways to define and measure the affordability of energy consumption, and we examine the emergence of energy poverty in Italy in the period from 1998 to 2011. The paper examines the eligibility criteria for claiming the benefits available to support energy consumption for vulnerable families and it identifies the potential beneficiaries. The study assesses the appropriateness of the eligibility criteria by comparing the population targeted by the policy with the population actually facing affordability problems. A simulation exercise, using the hypothetical scenario most likely to result in energy benefits being made available, shows that, regardless of the affordability index adopted, the provision of state energy benefits has little impact on fuel poverty. - Highlights: • The paper provides a discussion of alternative measure of energy affordability. • We examine the emergence of fuel poverty in Italy from 1998 to 2011. • We assess the appropriateness of the Italian energy benefits eligibility criteria. • A simulation shows that the energy benefits have little impact on fuel poverty

  6. Student and Parent Perceptions of Barriers to and Benefits of the School Breakfast Program in Elementary Schools in Southeast Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Alexis; Struempler, Barbara J.; Zizza, Claire A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the factors impacting participation in the School Breakfast Program (SBP) for elementary school students in southeast Alabama. Methods: Focus groups were used to gather qualitative data from southeastern Alabama public school fourth and fifth grade students and their parents. Six student…

  7. Homeschooling within the public school system

    OpenAIRE

    Horsburgh, Fergus Bruce Norman

    2005-01-01

    Homeschooling through the public school system is a relatively new trend in education. This qualitative study focuses on the experiences of six families participating in public school homeschooling programs in British Columbia, Canada. (Parents were interviewed and the interviews were recorded with transcripts becoming the primary data for this research.) Parents' motivations for homeschooling through the public system, rather than homeschooling on their own, are centered on financial advanta...

  8. More Male Primary-School Teachers? Social Benefits for Boys "and Girls"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Kevin; Sinclair, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The call for more male primary-school teachers has long been associated with the educational needs of boys, the importance of positive male role models in schools and the disproportionate number of male and female primary-school teachers internationally. However, little is known about whether or not parents and students actually want more male…

  9. Using State-Wide Multiple Measures for School Leadership and Management: Costs Incurred vs. Benefits Gained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Guilbert; Wohlstetter, Priscilla; Hirman, Jennifer; Zeehandelaar, Dara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine the utility and value of multiple measures of school performance for school leaders and managers. The research was conducted within the context of the state of California through an investigation of how operators, managers and authorisers of autonomous "charter" (publicly financed but privately operated) schools use…

  10. The Child in the Garden: An Evaluative Review of the Benefits of School Gardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    Although educators widely use school gardens for experiential education, researchers have not systematically examined the evaluative literature on school-gardening outcomes. The author reviewed the U.S. literature on children's gardening, taking into account potential effects, school-gardening outcomes, teacher evaluations of gardens as learning…

  11. Organic farming systems benefit biodiversity and natural pest regulation in white cabbage

    OpenAIRE

    Meyling, N.V.; Navntoft, S.; Eilenberg, J.

    2010-01-01

    Natural regulation of cabbage root flies works well in experimental organic cropping systems of white cabbage. Low input and complex organic systems benefit functional biodiversity by providing good living conditions to several groups of natural enemies. Intercropped green manure benefits large predators while small predatory beetles favour low input organic systems with bare soil between crop rows.

  12. Benefits planning for advanced clinical information systems implementation at Allina hospitals and clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Douglas Ivan; Henry, Sharon; Lockwood, Linda; Anderson, Brian; Atkinson, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Allina Hospitals and Clinics is implementing an enterprise-wide information system with inpatient and ambulatory clinical documentation and orders, clinical decision support, and revenue cycle applications. Allina has adopted a rigorous approach to planning for and realizing the expected clinical and financial benefits from this investment. Allina's strategies include: Forming a benefits realization team with formal responsibility for analysis, education, facilitation, and measurement; Studying system design to consider requirements for benefits realization; Integrating cultural, organizational and process change plans with system implementation plans; Measuring benefits using a measurement framework that matches organizational reporting, enables multi-level sequential analysis and adjusts for bias in quantifying benefits; Assigning accountability for achieving benefits by matching every benefit with an individual and an operational group; system executives, hospital executives, and department managers are held accountable for benefits within their scope of responsibility, and expected financial benefits are part of their yearly budgets. This article describes Allina's approach for benefits planning, contrasting it with the typical provider's approach to benefits realization. It argues that this approach may greatly increase the likelihood of realizing the value of investments in integrated clinical and business IT PMID:15682677

  13. A Conceptual Framework for Assessment of the Benefits of a Global Earth Observation System of Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, S.; Scholes, R. J.; Obersteiner, M.; Bouma, J.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is to contribute to human wellbeing though improving the information available to decision-makers at all levels relating to human health and safety, protection of the global environment, the reduction of losses from natural disasters, and achieving sustainable development. Specifically, GEOSS proposes that better international co-operation in the collection, interpretation and sharing of Earth Observation information is an important and cost-effective mechanism for achieving this aim. While there is a widespread intuition that this proposition is correct, at some point the following question needs to be answered: how much additional investment in Earth Observation (and specifically, in its international integration) is enough? This leads directly to some challenging subsidiary questions, such as how can the benefits of Earth Observation be assessed? What are the incremental costs of GEOSS? Are there societal benefit areas where the return on investment is higher than in others? The Geo-Bene project has developed a `benefit chain' concept as a framework for addressing these questions. The basic idea is that an incremental improvement in the observing system (including its data collection, interpretation and information-sharing aspects) will result in an improvement in the quality of decisions based on that information. This will in turn lead to better societal outcomes, which have a value. This incremental value must be judged against the incremental cost of the improved observation system. Since in many cases there will be large uncertainties in the estimation of both the costs and the benefits, and it may not be possible to express one or both of them in monetary terms, we show how order-of-magnitude approaches and a qualitative understanding of the shape of the cost-benefit curves can help guide rational investment decision in Earth Observation systems.

  14. Costs and Benefits of the Austrian Education System

    OpenAIRE

    Gudrun Biffl

    2002-01-01

    Since 1990, expenditure on education has increased in Austria for every educational level. This has been the result of an extension of education beyond compulsory level as well as a shift from apprenticeships to vocational colleges. The other side of the coin of increasing costs are greater benefits to individuals, employers and society in general arising from a more skilled work force. A longer period devoted to education, and later entry into the workforce, does not only increase the earnin...

  15. Meanings and robustness: Propositions for enhancing benefit sharing in social-ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernita van Wyk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Given increased pressure on natural resources to deliver benefits, complex trade-offs and the regulation of behaviours in relation to benefits is of key concern. Behaviours that signify resistance to the rules according to which benefits are allocated prompt us to consider causal links and feedbacks between benefits, perceptions of benefits, meanings attached to the benefits, and the regulatory instruments that mediate the distribution of benefits. An understanding of how meanings influence the perception of benefits exposes the complexity inherent in how people perceive and allocate value to natural resource benefits. Meanings are personal, sometimes overlapping, context dependent and variable across space and time. A challenge in directing resource user behaviour in common pool resources is that the relationship between the resource and resource use is typically not interpreted to include the manner in which users associate resource benefits with meanings. We propose that collective ordering of meanings and associated rules help to direct behaviours and in doing so they contribute to the purposeful maintenance of desirable elements of a social-ecological system (i.e. robustness. Using an example, we illustrate how tensions around benefit sharing are rooted in the emergence and changing prioritisation of contexts and meanings over time. The importance of eliciting, ordering and sanctioning of meanings is emphasised. We conclude by discussing the implications for robustness and benefit sharing in social-ecological systems and we comment on the usefulness and limitations of the framework.

  16. Analysing B2B electronic procurement benefits – Information systems perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Piotrowicz, Wojciech; Irani, Zahir

    2009-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to present electronic procurement benefits identified in four case companies from the information technology (IT), hi-tech sector. Design/methodology/approach – Multi-case study design was applied. The benefits reported in the companies were analysed and classified according to taxonomies from the information systems discipline. Finally, a new benefits classification was proposed. The framework was developed based on information systems literature. Findings –...

  17. Class Size: Can School Districts Capitalize on the Benefits of Smaller Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertling, Elizabeth; Leonard, Courtney; Lumsden, Linda; Smith, Stuart C.

    2000-01-01

    This report is intended to help policymakers understand the benefits of class-size reduction (CSR). It assesses the costs of CSR, considers some research-based alternatives, and explores strategies that will help educators realize the benefits of CSR when it is implemented. It examines how CSR enhances student achievement, such as when the…

  18. 34 CFR 200.66 - Requirements to ensure that funds do not benefit a private school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... private school. 200.66 Section 200.66 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... private school. (a) An LEA must use funds under subpart A of this part to provide services that supplement, and in no case supplant, the services that would, in the absence of Title I services, be available...

  19. A Shift in School Culture: Collective Commitments Focus on Change that Benefits Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaker, Robert; Keating, Janel

    2008-01-01

    Never before has there been such widespread agreement among researchers and practitioners regarding the most promising approach to significantly improve schools. Researchers, writers, and educational organizations have all endorsed the concept of schools functioning as professional learning communities. At the same time, the concept will have…

  20. University/Elementary School Partnerships in Physical Education: Strategies and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petray, Clayre; Hill, Grant M.

    2009-01-01

    University physical education teacher education (PETE) programs in many states face unique challenges in the preparation of pre-service elementary school physical education teachers. In some states such as Arizona, the majority of elementary schools employ full-time physical education specialists, while, in other states such as California, the…

  1. Integrating Voice into the School Network: Benefits of Wireless VoIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatland, Jeanne

    2005-01-01

    Voice Communications are critical for the proper functioning of primary, secondary and higher education environments. At the K-12 level, teachers and staff must be able to communicate with each other between classrooms and the school office. Also, teachers often need to communicate between schools within a district as well as with the district…

  2. Coteaching in Tanzania Benefits Both the School of St. Jude and Collegiate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Independent School, 2016

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, Louisville Collegiate School (Kentucky) formed a partnership with The School of St. Jude in Arusha, Tanzania. As part of their professional development, six Collegiate faculty members travel each summer to spend two weeks coteaching and interacting with Tanzanian faculty and students. This professional development experience forces…

  3. Reframing Class Scheduling: Seven School Counselor Benefits, Challenges, Considerations, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wines, Lisa; Nelson, Judith A.; Eckstein, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The American School Counseling Association (ASCA) identifies scheduling students for classes as a non-counseling activity. Ideally, school counselors should limit non-counseling activities, but the reality is that counselors do in fact spend much time and energy scheduling classes, according to a recent survey of secondary counselors. We introduce…

  4. On the Benefits of Pooling in Production-Inventory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Saif Benjaafar; William L. Cooper; Joon-Seok Kim

    2005-01-01

    We study inventory pooling in systems with symmetric costs where supply lead times are endogenously generated by a finite-capacity production system. We investigate the sensitivity of the cost advantage of inventory pooling to various system parameters, including loading, service levels, demand and production time variability, and structure of the production system. The analysis reveals differences in how various parameters affect the cost reduction from pooling and suggests that these differ...

  5. LTE as the future railway communication system: benefits and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Montes, José I.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the main challenges associated with the migration process towards LTE, will be assessed. These challenges comprise, among others, the next key topics: Reliability, Availability Maintainability and Safety (RAMS) requirements, end to end Quality of Service (QoS) requirements, system performance in high speed scenarios, communication system deployment strategy, and system backward compatibility as well as the future system features for delivering railway services. The practical eva...

  6. School-Based Management: Arab Education System in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arar, Khalid; Abu-Romi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the issue of school-based management (SBM) in elementary schools in the Arab education system in Israel, comparing schools experienced in SBM, schools beginning to use SBM and schools that do not use SBM. Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative research used a structured questionnaire to…

  7. Cost – Benefit Analysis of Different Rice Cropping systems in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    ARAYAPHONG, SUPISRA

    2012-01-01

    System of Rice Intensification (SRI) has been introduced and practiced throughout Thailand. However, the conventional transplanting system is well-accepted among Thai farmers over the country. This paper quantifies and compares costs and benefits of SRI and the conventional system of rice cultivation in Thailand to find the best system for a farmer, the environment and a society. The scope of this paper includes a farmer’s profit, the environmental damages and a society’s net benefits categor...

  8. School Holiday Food Provision in the UK: A Qualitative Investigation of Needs, Benefits, and Potential for Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Pamela Louise; Crilley, Eilish; Stretesky, Paul B; Long, Michael A; Palmer, Katie Jane; Steinbock, Eileen; Defeyter, Margaret Anne

    2016-01-01

    Access to an adequate supply of nutritious food has been recognized as a basic human right. However, many families across the UK face food insecurity, which is thought to be exacerbated during school holidays. To address this issue, some schools and community groups have chosen to roll out holiday clubs, though research into the effectiveness of such interventions is limited and no studies to date have evaluated holiday clubs being organized through schools. In an effort to address some of the limitations in the research literature, the current qualitative investigation utilized semi-structured interviews with staff involved in holiday clubs in school and community venues with the aim of gaging their views on the need for and benefits of holiday food provision in addition to potential areas for development. The investigation revealed that staff perceived many families to be facing food insecurity and isolation during the school holidays, which may be alleviated through holiday club provision. Holiday clubs were viewed as a valuable source of support for children and adults, providing food, activities, and learning experiences. Staff were keen to see them implemented on a wider scale in future but suggested some areas that require attention in any future development of such provision. Findings are discussed in relation to current research, policy, and practice surrounding the health and wellbeing of children and families. PMID:27597938

  9. Alternative Methods of Price Indexing Social Security: Implications for Benefits and System Financing

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew G. Biggs; Brown, Jeffrey R.; Glenn Springstead

    2005-01-01

    This paper explains four methods of "price indexing" initial Social Security retirement benefits, and discusses the effect of each method on the fiscal sustainability of Social Security, benefit levels and replacement rates, redistribution, and sensitivity of system finances to demographic and economic shocks. Of these methods, Primary Insurance Amount (PIA) Factor Indexing would generate the largest cost savings while reducing benefit growth at approximately an equal rate for all income leve...

  10. Benefits and swot analysis of iknow estudent services system

    OpenAIRE

    Petrevska Nechkoska, Renata; Manceski, Gjorgji

    2012-01-01

    The implementation of new robust and complex overall systems in any area is in the very least demanding, complicated, extensive, particularized and delicate. Especially if they are planned to be designed for almost entire higher education system in a country. Inevitably at the beginning, the stakeholders in the existing processes and resources will be reluctant to radical change such as the one in the case of iKnow system implementation, setbacks can be experienced in ...

  11. PENSION SYSTEMS REFORMS IN MACEDONIA: CAUSES, CONDITIONS AND BENEFITS

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Patoska; Branko Dimeski

    2015-01-01

    Pension systems in most countries in the world are in crisis. In Macedonia, the reasons for the crisis in the pension system are generally of socio-economic nature. The pension system reforms in the country are aimed in establishing a new model of pension and disability insurance. Preparations for the reform of the pension system in the country began in 1993 and radical reform was implemented in 2006 with the introduction of the second pillar and another in 2009 with the introduction of the t...

  12. Restructuring the system will benefit all. Interview by Mary Grayson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C C

    1992-08-20

    Carolyn Roberts, president and CEO of Copley Health Systems Inc., Morrisville, VT, is the new chairman-elect designate of the American Hospital Association. In an exclusive interview with Hospitals Editor Mary Grayson, she shares her perspectives on health care reform, restructuring the delivery system, and the role of trustees. PMID:1644407

  13. Security information and event management systems: benefits and inefficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Κάτσαρης, Δημήτριος Σ.

    2014-01-01

    In this Master’s thesis, the new trend in computer and information security industry called Security Information and Event Management systems will be covered. The evolution, advantages and weaknesses of these systems will be described, as well as a home-based implementation with open source tools will be proposed and implemented.

  14. Benefit assessment of solar-augmented natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. S.; French, R. L.; Sohn, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Report details how solar-energy-augmented system can reduce natural gas consumption by 40% to 70%. Applications discussed include: domestic hot water system, solar-assisted gas heat pumps, direct heating from storage tank. Industrial uses, solar-assisted appliances, and economic factors are discussed.

  15. BENEFITS OF SEWERAGE SYSTEM REAL-TIME CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time control (RTC) is a custom-designed computer-assisted management system for a specific urban sewerage network that is activated during a wet-weather flow event. Though uses of RTC systems had started in the mid 60s, recent developments in computers, telecommunication, in...

  16. Technological and Social Costs and Benefits of Patent Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Yildizoglu; Thomas Vallée

    2004-01-01

    "If we did not have a patent system, it would be irresponsible, on the basis of our present knowledge of its economic consequences, to recommend instituting one. But since we have had a patent system for a long time, it would be irresponsible, on the basis of our present knowledge, to recommend abolishing it." Machlup (1958) - cited by Hall (2002) The demand for a stronger patenting system has become in the recent period a major source of tension between the U.S. government and the E.U. The U...

  17. School sex education: an experimental programme with educational and medical benefit.

    OpenAIRE

    Mellanby, A. R.; Phelps, F. A.; Crichton, N J; Tripp, J H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To develop and teach a school sex education programme that will lead to a decrease in sexual activity. DESIGN--A matched internal and external control experiment, comparing control populations which received their own sex education programmes with populations which received a novel sex education intervention that included medical and peer led teaching. SETTING--Comprehensive secondary schools; control and intervention populations within Devon, and distant controls from rural, semi...

  18. Risk analysis for power systems : overview and potential benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Hilber, Patrik; Wallnerström, Carl Johan; Rosenlind, Johanna; Setréus, Johan; Schönborg, Niclas

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a mapping and sample of recently developed risk assessment techniques that are available for the distribution system operator. Three estimates on the value of more detailed risk analysis are desccribed. I.e. component reliability importance indices can be used to divversify the maintenance efforts, gaining better expected system performance at no cost. Furthermore, components that are assumed to be relatively harmless (based on average values) are identified as critical fo...

  19. The impact of immigration under the defined-benefit pension system: An analysis incorporating assimilation costs

    OpenAIRE

    Masatoshi Jinno

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recently, theoretical studies have started a discussion on how the influx of immigrants affects the finances of the host country. OBJECTIVE This paper investigates whether admission of unskilled immigrants, whose children incur assimilation costs in order to become skilled workers, positively influences the net benefits for native residents and immigrants under a defined-benefit pension system (DB system).This paper also compared the results under a DB system with those under a def...

  20. Significant Movements in City School Systems. Bulletin, 1929, No. 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbaugh, W. S.

    1929-01-01

    So extensive and so complex has the modern city school system become that it is impossible in a short chapter to discuss more than a few of the educational movements in the cities of the country, and these only briefly. In addition to day elementary and secondary schools, the activities of city school systems include night schools, continuation…

  1. The Development and Validation of the Student Response System Benefit Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, J. F.; Denker, K. J.; Summers, M. E.; Parker, M.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research into the benefits student response systems (SRS) that have been brought into the classroom revealed that SRS can contribute positively to student experiences. However, while the benefits of SRS have been conceptualized and operationalized into a widely cited scale, the validity of this scale had not been tested. Furthermore,…

  2. Purpose and benefit of control system training for operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexity of accelerators is ever increasing and today it is typical that a large number of feedback loops are implemented, based on sophisticated models which describe the underlying physics. Despite this increased complexity the machine operators must still effectively monitor and supervise the desired behavior of the accelerator. This is not alone sufficient; additionally, the correct operation of the control system must also be verified. This is not always easy since the structure, design, and performance of the control system is usually not visualized and is often hidden to the operator. To better deal with this situation operators need some knowledge of the control system in order to react properly in the case of problems. In fact operators need mental models of the control system to recognize fault states and react appropriate to errors and misbehavior of both, the accelerator and the control system itself. Mental models gained only on infrequent experience can be imprecise or plain wrong in worst case. Control system training can provide a foundation to build better mental models and therefore help to enhance operator responses and machine availability. For a refinement of the mental model repeated experience is needed. This can be provided by training sessions at the real accelerator

  3. Targeting bacterial secretion systems: benefits of disarmament in the microcosm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Christian; Coombes, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Secretion systems are used by many bacterial pathogens for the delivery of virulence factors to the extracellular space or directly into host cells. They are attractive targets for the development of novel anti-virulence drugs as their inactivation would lead to pathogen attenuation or avirulence, followed by clearance of the bacteria by the immune system. This review will present the state of knowledge on the assembly and function of type II, type III and type IV secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria focusing on insights provided by structural analyses of several key components. The suitability of transcription factors regulating the expression of secretion system components and of ATPases, lytic transglycosylases and protein assembly factors as drug targets will be discussed. Recent progress using innovative in vivo as well as in vitro screening strategies led to a first set of secretion system inhibitors with potential for further development as anti-infectives. The discovery of such inhibitors offers exciting and innovative opportunities to further develop these anti-virulence drugs into monotherapy or in combination with classical antibiotics. Bacterial growth per se would not be inhibited by such drugs so that the selection for mutations causing resistance could be reduced. Secretion system inhibitors may therefore avoid many of the problems associated with classical antibiotics and may constitute a valuable addition to our arsenal for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:17346208

  4. Expected and Realized Costs and Benefits from Implementing Product Configuration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    .g. supporting the quotation process or validating the structure of a product. This paper reports findings from a study of 12 Danish firms, which at the time of the study have implemented or are in the process of implementing product configuration systems. 12 costs and 12 benefits are identified in literature......) Using less resources, and 3) Lower turnaround time. Interestingly, the realized benefits are all higher than the expected benefits. The expected benefits highlight the motivation, and this has implications for human factors as they point in the direction of significant changes to come in the adopting...

  5. Are There Benefits from Teaching Yoga at Schools? A Systematic Review of Randomized Control Trials of Yoga-Based Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira-Vorkapic, C.; Feitoza, J. M.; Marchioro, M.; J Simões; Kozasa, E.; Telles, S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Yoga is a holistic system of varied mind-body practices that can be used to improve mental and physical health and it has been utilized in a variety of contexts and situations. Educators and schools are looking to include yoga as a cost-effective, evidence-based component of urgently needed wellness programs for their students. Objectives. The primary goal of this study was to systematically examine the available literature for yoga interventions exclusively in school settings, ...

  6. Business School's Performance Management System Standards Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azis, Anton Mulyono; Simatupang, Togar M.; Wibisono, Dermawan; Basri, Mursyid Hasan

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims to compare various Performance Management Systems (PMS) for business school in order to find the strengths of each standard as inputs to design new model of PMS. There are many critical aspects and gaps notified for new model to improve performance and even recognized that self evaluation performance management is not well…

  7. Evaluation of the mental health benefits of yoga in a secondary school: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Hickey-Schultz, Lynn; Cohen, Deborah; Steiner, Naomi; Cope, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate potential mental health benefits of yoga for adolescents in secondary school. Students were randomly assigned to either regular physical education classes or to 11 weeks of yoga sessions based upon the Yoga Ed program over a single semester. Students completed baseline and end-program self-report measures of mood, anxiety, perceived stress, resilience, and other mental health variables. Independent evaluation of individual outcome measures revealed that yoga participants showed statistically significant differences over time relative to controls on measures of anger control and fatigue/inertia. Most outcome measures exhibited a pattern of worsening in the control group over time, whereas changes in the yoga group over time were either minimal or showed slight improvements. These preliminary results suggest that implementation of yoga is acceptable and feasible in a secondary school setting and has the potential of playing a protective or preventive role in maintaining mental health. PMID:21647811

  8. Evaluation of BEACON-COLSS Core Monitoring System Benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant COLSS (Core Operating Limit Supervisory System) is used to monitor the DNBR Power Operating Limit (DNBRPOL) and Linear Heat Rate POL (KWPFPOL). Westinghouse and KNFC have developed an upgraded core monitoring system by combining the BEACONTM core monitoring system1 (Best Estimate Analyzer for Core Operation . Nuclear) and COLSS into an integrated product that is called BEACON-COLSS. BEACON-COLSS generates the 3-D power distribution corrected by the in-core detectors measurements. The 3-D core power distribution methodology in BEACON-COLSS is significantly better than the synthesis methodology in COLSS. BEACONCOLSS uses the CETOP-D2 thermal hydraulic code instead of CETOP-1. CETOP-D is a multi-channel thermal hydraulics code that will provide more accurate DNBR calculations than the DNBR calculators currently used in COLSS

  9. Benefits of social intelligence in home dialogue systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saini, P.; Ruyter, B.E.R. de; Markopoulos, P.; Breemen, A. van

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports an exploration of the concept of social intelligence in the context of home dialogue systems for an Ambient Intelligence home. It reports a Wizard of Oz experiment involving a robotic interface capable of displaying several human social behaviors. Our results show that endowing a

  10. Cost/benefit assessment in electric power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic function of a modern power system is to satisfy the system load requirements as economically as possible and with a reasonable assurance of continuity and quality. The question of what is reasonable can be examined in terms of the costs and the worth to the consumer associated with providing an adequate supply. The process of preparing reliability worth estimates based on customer cost-of-interruption data is presented. These data can be derived for a particular utility service area and are used to determine appropriate customer damage functions. These indicators can be used with the basic loss of energy expectation (LOEE) index to obtain a factor that can be utilized to relate the customer losses to the worth of electric service reliability. This factor is designated as the interrupted energy assessment rate (IEAR). The developed IEAR values can be utilized in both generating capacity and composite generation and transmission system assessment. Methods for using these estimates in power system optimization at the planning stages are described and examples are used to illustrate the procedures. 106 refs., 77 figs., 64 tabs

  11. The Nature of Unintended Benefits in Health Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuziemsky, Craig E.; Borycki, Elizabeth; Nøhr, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    Health information systems (HISs) have been shown to introduce unintended consequences post implementation. Much of the current research on these consequences has focused on the negative aspects of them. However unintended consequences of HIS usage can also be beneficial to various aspects of...

  12. Development of cost-benefit analysis system for FBR research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, we performed investigation and evaluation on cost-benefit, and made system construction of basic concept and conceptual design, prior to the system construction which performs (1) evaluation of cost-benefit of FBR development within the country, and (2) evaluation of cost-benefit for every item for R and D relating to the FBR development. As for the methods for cost-benefit, it shall be suitable to assume that success rate differs depending on the future scenario such as fuel prices and to employ discount rates, considering the point of long-term R and D investment. We also pointed out that establishment of discount rates is the biggest issue which influences the results of evaluation of cost-benefit then. When we grasp the effects, it is required to include the effects such as contribution to environmental benefits and energy security, or improvement of safety, other than real generation merits, as it is a public investment. Therefore we made investigations and developments on the way to understand the effects qualitatively. Based on the results, we made a proposal on application to the system, and then showed evaluation flows on the cost-benefit system. We also pointed out that it is a future task to be considered to establish fuel cost scenario or input data or parameters such as value of statistical life or CO2 reduction, as they are primary factors which influence evaluation results or system reliabilities. (author)

  13. Urban governance and the systems approaches to health-environment co-benefits in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Jose A Puppim de; Doll, Christopher N H; Siri, José; Dreyfus, Magali; Farzaneh, Hooman; Capon, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    The term "co-benefits" refers to positive outcomes accruing from a policy beyond the intended outcome, often or usually in other sectors. In the urban context, policies implemented in particular sectors (such as transport, energy or waste) often generate multiple co-benefits in other areas. Such benefits may be related to the reduction of local or global environmental impacts and also extend into the area of public health. A key to identifying and realising co-benefits is the adoption of systems approaches to understand inter-sectoral linkages and, in particular, the translation of this understanding to improved sector-specific and city governance. This paper reviews a range of policies which can yield health and climate co-benefits across different urban sectors and illustrates, through a series of cases, how taking a systems approach can lead to innovations in urban governance which aid the development of healthy and sustainable cities. PMID:26648361

  14. Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS) mission applications and benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramblit, D. C.; Turner, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Studies conducted by NASA have shown that the operating range of the Shuttle can be substantially increased and cost of payload operation be decreased by making use of the Teleoperator Maneuvering System (TMS). The TMS is remotely controlled, free-flying, orbital mini-tug vehicle capable of performing a wide range of remote satellite services missions. It can operate out of the Shuttle cargo bay, from a space station, or on top of an upper stage like Centaur. For high energy missions up to and including geostationary orbit, the TMS propulsion stage will augment the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS) recently proposed for commercial development in providing an effective low-cost second-stage system for delivering intermediate sized payloads to geosynchronous orbit (GEO). Attention is given to TMS capabilities for both long duration and short term orbital missions, taking into account also Space Station support operations.

  15. Accounting systems and environmental decision making: what costs, what benefits?

    OpenAIRE

    Schilizzi, Steven; Lesourd, Jean-Baptiste

    2001-01-01

    The environmental accounting literature covers both public and private, or corporate, fields. The needs of private firms differ from public organisations in that environmental accounting systems must pay for themselves. Stakeholder analysis and the so-called triple bottom line forget that shareholders (and regulators) must be satisfied. However, unsatisfied stakeholders can impact on the firm’s financial prospects and on shareholder value. This leads to strategic accounting, which endogenises...

  16. Innovative grassland management systems for environmental and livelihood benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, David R.; Guodong, Han; Xiangyang, Hou; Michalk, David L.; Fujiang, Hou; Jianping, Wu; Yingjun, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Grasslands occupy 40% of the world’s land surface (excluding Antarctica and Greenland) and support diverse groups, from traditional extensive nomadic to intense livestock-production systems. Population pressures mean that many of these grasslands are in a degraded state, particularly in less-productive areas of developing countries, affecting not only productivity but also vital environmental services such as hydrology, biodiversity, and carbon cycles; livestock condition is often poor and ho...

  17. NeuroControl: system identification approach for clinical benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carel G.M. Meskers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Progress in diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders after neurological diseases like stroke, cerebral palsy, dystonia and at old age requires understanding of the altered capacity to adequately respond to physical obstacles in the environment. With posture and movement disorders, the control of muscles is hampered, resulting in aberrant force generation and improper impedance regulation. Understanding of this improper regulation not only requires the understanding of the role of the neural controller, but also attention for the 1 the interaction between the neural controller and the “plant”, comprising the biomechanical properties of the skeleton including the viscoelastic properties of the contractile (muscle and non-contractile (connective tissues: neuromechanics and 2 the closed loop nature of neural controller and biomechanical system in which cause and effect interact and are hence difficult to separate. Properties of the neural controller and the biomechanical system need to be addressed synchronously by the combination of haptic robotics, (closed loop system identification, and neuro-mechanical modelling. In this paper, we argue that assessment of neuromechanics in response to well defined environmental conditions and tasks may provide for key parameters to understand posture and movement disorders in neurological diseases and as biomarkers to increase accuracy of prediction models for functional outcome and effects of intervention.

  18. Quality Management for School System

    OpenAIRE

    Florina BRAN; Ildiko IOAN

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the two most important factors that influence the development of quality management in education: the globalization and the sustainable development. The four well known quality management principles (Deming) can be adapted and implemented in the education system case, too.

  19. College-Going Benefits of High School Sports Participation: Race and Gender Differences over Three Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifrer, Dara; Pearson, Jennifer; Muller, Chandra; Wilkinson, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    The long touted athlete advantage in college enrollment has been tempered by assertions that this advantage is actually due to characteristics that precede participation. Moreover, it remains unclear whether the benefits of sports extend into contemporary times and apply equally to female and racial minority athletes. This study uses three…

  20. How Does Exercise Benefit Performance on Cognitive Tests in Primary-School Pupils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Liam J. B.; Williams, Justin H. G.; Aucott, Lorna; Thomson, Jenny; Mon-Williams, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We have previously demonstrated improved cognitive performance after a classroom-based exercise regime. In this study, we examined the reproducibility of this effect in a more socio-economically diverse sample and also investigated whether cognitive benefits of exercise were moderated by body mass index (BMI) or symptoms of…

  1. Benefit-Cost Analysis of Security Systems for Multiple Protected Assets Based on Information Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Qing Cai; Jingjing Dai; Ruimin Hu; Jun Chen

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a quantitative risk assessment for security systems which have multiple protected assets and a risk-based benefit-cost analysis for decision makers. The proposed methodology consists of five phases: identification of assets, security unit and intrusion path, security unit effectiveness estimation, intrusion path effectiveness estimation, security system risk assessment and benefit-cost estimation. Key innovations in this methodology include its use of effectiveness entro...

  2. Benefits of a Light Rail System in the Copenhagen Area as a Pooled Network

    OpenAIRE

    Roca Bisbe, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Many studies assessing the planning and implementation of light rail systems have been carried out for the Greater Copenhagen Area. However, the majority of these papers analyze and evaluate the benefits of introducing one unique line into the public transportation system obtaining in the majority of cases negative annual benefits and economically nonprofitable projects. This thesis assesses the positive impacts of treating groups of light rail lines as pooled networks in the l...

  3. Local therapy, systemic benefit: challenging the paradigm of biological predeterminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, J M

    2006-04-01

    This paper briefly reviews the historical evolution of paradigms that have been purported to characterise the clinical behaviour of breast cancer, with the intention of guiding treatment approaches. Results from randomised clinical trials and the explosion of knowledge in the area of cancer biology have discredited the monolithic paradigms that had dominated thinking about breast cancer in the past. Contemporary notions of breast cancer biology recognise that, although some cancers disseminate well before becoming clinically detectable, acquisition of a metastatic phenotype can occur at any point (or not at all) in the local evolution of the tumour. As a consequence, both systemic and timely local--regional therapies can be expected to influence disease dissemination and patient survival. This is consistent with results observed in clinical trials, overviews of which indicate that prevention of four local recurrences will, on the average, prevent one death from breast cancer. Optimisation of local-regional treatment is an important goal in breast cancer management. PMID:16605046

  4. Comparison of Economic Benefits of University and Vocational High School Education among Different Majors in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydede, Yigit; Orbay, Benan Zeki

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to develop a better understanding about the labour market dynamics behind the unparalleled demand in higher education and dragging growth rates in vocational high school (VHS) education in Turkey. While estimating labour market outcomes of fields of study has been the subject of many studies in the West, such studies are lacking in…

  5. Hidden Benefits: The Impact of High School Graduation on Household Wealth. Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Several recent reports have highlighted the earnings gap between high school graduates and dropouts; however, earnings tell only part of the story. Families rely on income from salary for regular expenses, but real economic security requires accumulated wealth. Education can be the key to higher earnings, but it is even more importantly linked to…

  6. Putting the "T" in "Resource": The Benefits of LGBT-Related School Resources for Transgender Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greytak, Emily A.; Kosciw, Joseph G.; Boesen, Madelyn J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the availability and effectiveness of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-related school resources for a national sample of transgender youth (N = 409), as compared to a national sample of LGB cisgender (non-transgender) youth (N = 6,444). All four examined resources--gay-straight alliances (GSAs), supportive…

  7. Kinematics and energetic benefits of schooling in the labriform fish, striped surfperch Embiotoca lateralis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J. L.; Vaknin, R.; Steffensen, John Fleng;

    2010-01-01

    Schooling can provide fish with a number of behavioural and ecological advantages, including increased food supply and reduced predator risk. Previous work suggests that fish swimming using body and caudal fin locomotion may also experience energetic advantages when trailing behind neighbours. Ho...

  8. Benefits of Multi-Sports Physical Education in the Elementary School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Caterina; Faigenbaum, Avery; Crova, Claudia; Marchetti, Rosalba; Bellucci, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In many countries, physical education (PE) is taught by classroom teachers (generalists) during the formative years of elementary school. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical and psychological outcomes of multi-sports PE taught by qualified PE teachers (specialists) and how they contribute to children's physical and…

  9. What the Research Shows, Volume 2. The Benefits of Attending a Girls' School

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Coalition of Girls' Schools (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication has been fully revamped and updated with new academic and scientific research. It contains: (1) twelve pages of reports and commentary from education researchers; (2) an expanded section on gender and the brain, citing the most recent studies; (3) new National Coalition of Girls' Schools alumnae survey findings integrated…

  10. Tomorrow's Child: Benefiting from Today's Family-School-Community-Business Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Sandra H.; Gottfried, Susan C.

    Recognizing that communities can accomplish more for their children if all parts of the community work together in a collaborative effort, family-school-community-business partnerships have developed to provide comprehensive services to children and their families more effectively. This report contains information on the history, purposes, and…

  11. Lecture recording system in anatomy: possible benefit to auditory learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacro, Thierry R H; Gebregziabher, Mulugeta; Ariail, Jennie

    2013-01-01

    The literature reports that using Learning Recording Systems (LRS) is usually well received by students but that the pedagogical value of LRS in academic settings remains somewhat unclear. The primary aim of the current study is to document students' perceptions, actual pattern of usage, and impact of use of LRS on students' grade in a dental gross and neuroanatomy course. Other aims are to determine if students' learning preference correlated with final grades and to see if other factors like gender, age, overall academic score on the Dental Aptitude Test (DAT), lecture levels of difficulty, type of lecture, category of lecture, or teaching faculty could explain the impact, if any, of the use of LRS on the course final grade. No significant correlation was detected between the final grades and the variables studied except for a significant but modest correlation between final grades and the number of times the students accessed the lecture recordings (r=0.33 with P=0.01). Also, after adjusting for gender, age, learning style, and academic DAT, a significant interaction between auditory and average usage time was found for final grade (P=0.03). Students who classified themselves as auditory and who used the LRS on average for fewer than 10 minutes per access, scored an average final grade of 16.43 % higher than the nonauditory students using the LRS for the same amount of time per access. Based on these findings, implications for teaching are discussed and recommendations for use of LRS are proposed. PMID:23508921

  12. Potential benefits of magnetic suspension and balance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, Pierce L.; Dress, David A.; Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) to improve conventional wind tunnel testing techniques is discussed. Topics include: elimination of model geometry distortion and support interference to improve the measurement accuracy of aerodynamic coefficients; removal of testing restrictions due to supports; improved dynamic stability data; and stores separation testing. Substantial increases in wind tunnel productivity are anticipated due to the coalescence of these improvements. Specific improvements in testing methods for missiles, helicopters, fighter aircraft, twin fuselage transports and bombers, state separation, water tunnels, and automobiles are also forecast. In a more speculative vein, new wind tunnel test techniques are envisioned as a result of applying MSBS, including free-flight computer trajectories in the test section, pilot-in-the-loop and designer-in-the-loop testing, shipboard missile launch simulation, and optimization of hybrid hypersonic configurations. Also addressed are potential applications of MSBS to such diverse technologies as medical research and practice, industrial robotics, space weaponry, and ore processing in space.

  13. Influenceof IT on School\\\\\\'s Educational Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Biranvand

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays by emergence of novel educational technologies especially access to internet among the population in schools as well as their being influenced by global and non-native cultures, a sithuattion has appeared that makese educational system choose novel functions for itself corresponding to current needs. Selection and reaching novel functions in turn requires a new approach towards educational system. What introduces us novel educational systems as a modern educational technology rather than a challenge in an educational system is the effects of these technologies in employing teaching aids in classrooms with the aim of reinforcement of the students’ learning, which has been confirmed by numerous studies. Through elucidation of student-oriented approach as a modern approach in educational system, the present paper studies the shift from traditional education to modern education and explains the existing barriers as well as the studies carried out so far. We mention that the only way to reach student-oriented status and use potential talents of students in research is to utilize modern communication and information technologies in educational processes.

  14. Benefits from "getting closer" ' regular high school education anlongside doctoral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Since 2002 the AWI has been running the cooperation programme HIGHSEA with local schools. Each year 22-24 high school students are admitted. During their last three years of school they spend two days a week at the AWI and not at school. With this programme the AWI aims at providing solid science education not only for undergraduate or graduate students but also for high school students. For HIGHSEA-students four subjects (biology as a major, chemistry, math and English as accessory subjects) are combined and taught fully integrated. All of the curricular necessities of the four subjects have been rearranged in their temporal sequencing thus enabling a conceptual formulation of 3-4 major questions to be dealt with in the course of the three-year program. Students are taught by teachers of the cooperating schools as well as by scientists of the AWI. Close links and intense cooperation between teachers and scientists are the basis of fundamental changes in teaching and learning climate. We can clearly show that significantly more HIGHSEA alumni enter university, that HIGHSEA doubles the rate of students entering a science career and that with HIGHSEA alumni drop out rates are drastically reduced. Closely linking HIGHSEA with the AWI's graduate school POLMAR offers the opportunity for new approaches for both sides: high school students emerge in authentic scientific projects while PhD students gain teaching and supervising experience. For a period of six month during their second year HIGHSEA-students form smaller working groups (3-4 students). Each of these groups are in contact with one specific researcher, e. g. a PhD-student, at the AWI. The first task of the working group is to formulate a scientific question, albeit a small one in the field of "their" researcher. Within the given time HIGHSEA-students then work on their question and develop a final product to be delivered at the end of the six month. During their working period they are supervised by "their" Ph

  15. Teacher Research Experiences: Impacting and Benefiting Teacher Professional Development and School-wide Practices (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Providing authentic research opportunities is a potent form of professional development that significantly impacts teaching practices. The University of Rhode Island's ARMADA Project (2003-2010) was funded by the National Science Foundation to create opportunities for teachers to work with marine science researchers and implement best-practices in their classrooms. In early 2009, I participated in a 6-week research experience that has changed how I teach and how I learn. On board the R/V Knorr, I worked as a sedimentologist with an international crew who used geophysics, geochemistry, microbiology and geology to understand the controls on and distribution of subseafloor microbial life in the equatorial Pacific. This experience has affected my educational practices in two ways: (1) motivating me to fill gaps in my own understanding of natural chemical processes, and (2) prioritizing authentic research opportunities for all students at my school. My participation in the ARMADA project underscored the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to research. The team of scientists exposed me to a variety of topics. Biochemistry and the role of redox reactions in biological systems were relatively new to me. Scientists encouraged me to dig deeper into the chemical systems that we were researching. Through self-study and coursework focusing on biogeochemical cycles, deriving energy through chemical processes, and atmospheric chemistry, I have learned much of the chemistry that I am now expected to teach in my courses. I continue to seek out opportunities to learn more and am currently volunteering at geochemistry laboratories at the USGS. My ARMADA research experience depended on teamwork. I learned that while the dynamics of research teams can be simplified if the teams are carefully designed, it is important that students need to learn to work with a variety of people in different situations. Therefore, in my courses, students work in different teams to design and

  16. When School Restructuring Meets Systemic Curriculum Reform. Brief to Policymakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmann, Fred M.; Clune, William H.

    The relationship between two educational improvement initiatives--school restructuring and systemic curriculum reform--is examined in this bulletin. School restructuring tends to focus on process in schools and curriculum reform concentrates more directly on content and curriculum across a range of schools. The main features, their promises and…

  17. The impact of immigration under the defined-benefit pension system: An analysis incorporating assimilation costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Jinno

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recently, theoretical studies have started a discussion on how the influx of immigrants affects the finances of the host country. OBJECTIVE This paper investigates whether admission of unskilled immigrants, whose children incur assimilation costs in order to become skilled workers, positively influences the net benefits for native residents and immigrants under a defined-benefit pension system (DB system.This paper also compared the results under a DB system with those under a defined-contribution pension system (DC system. METHODS This paper theoretically calculates the net benefits for native residents and immigrants under a DB system and compares the values between under a DB system and under a DC system. RESULTS The study has three main findings. (1 Under a DB system, native residents do not alwaysbecome net beneficiaries, even if the government admits an unlimited number of immigrants.This is unlike the analysis under the DC system. (2 The net benefits for native residents caused by permitting a small (large number of immigrants under the DB system becomes higher (lower than that under the DC system in certain practical situations. (3 Even if all residents who have the right to vote prefer to admit immigrants, there is a possibility that the net benefits for the native residents may be negative. CONCLUSIONS When admitting immigrants, the government must pay attention to the assimilation costs which offspring of immigrants have to pay and the future generation's right to vote becausethey are the main victims of the loss of benefits caused by the assimilation costs under DB system.

  18. Mini-med school for Aboriginal youth: experiential science outreach to tackle systemic barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita I. Henderson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Addressing systemic barriers experienced by low-income and minority students to accessing medical school, the University of Calgary's Cumming School of Medicine has spearheaded a year-round, mini-med school outreach initiative for Aboriginal students. Method: Junior and senior high school youth generally attend the half-day program in classes or camps of 15–25, breaking into small groups for multisession activities. Undergraduate medical education students mentor the youth in stations offering experiential lessons in physical examination, reading x-rays, and anatomy. All resources from the medical school are offered in-kind, including a pizza lunch at midday, whereas community partners organize transportation for the attendees. Results: Opening the medical school and its resources to the community offers great benefits to resource-constrained schools often limited in terms of science education resources. The model is also an effort to address challenges among the medical professions around attracting and retaining students from underserved populations. Conclusion: The prospect of increasing admission rates and successful completion of medical education among students from marginalized communities poses a real, though difficult-to-measure, possibility of increasing the workforce most likely to return to and work in such challenging contexts. A mini-medical school for Aboriginal youth highlights mutual, long-term benefit for diverse partners, encouraging medical educators and community-based science educators to explore the possibilities for deepening partnerships in their own regions.

  19. Systematic review of the health benefits of physical activity and fitness in school-aged children and youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janssen Ian

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose was to: 1 perform a systematic review of studies examining the relation between physical activity, fitness, and health in school-aged children and youth, and 2 make recommendations based on the findings. Methods The systematic review was limited to 7 health indicators: high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, the metabolic syndrome, obesity, low bone density, depression, and injuries. Literature searches were conducted using predefined keywords in 6 key databases. A total of 11,088 potential papers were identified. The abstracts and full-text articles of potentially relevant papers were screened to determine eligibility. Data was abstracted for 113 outcomes from the 86 eligible papers. The evidence was graded for each health outcome using established criteria based on the quantity and quality of studies and strength of effect. The volume, intensity, and type of physical activity were considered. Results Physical activity was associated with numerous health benefits. The dose-response relations observed in observational studies indicate that the more physical activity, the greater the health benefit. Results from experimental studies indicate that even modest amounts of physical activity can have health benefits in high-risk youngsters (e.g., obese. To achieve substantive health benefits, the physical activity should be of at least a moderate intensity. Vigorous intensity activities may provide even greater benefit. Aerobic-based activities had the greatest health benefit, other than for bone health, in which case high-impact weight bearing activities were required. Conclusion The following recommendations were made: 1 Children and youth 5-17 years of age should accumulate an average of at least 60 minutes per day and up to several hours of at least moderate intensity physical activity. Some of the health benefits can be achieved through an average of 30 minutes per day. [Level 2, Grade A]. 2 More vigorous

  20. CHALLENGES AND BENEFITS OF CONDUCTING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE RESEARCH IN A SCHOOL SETTING

    OpenAIRE

    GUIDRY, VIRGINIA T.; Lowman, Amy; Hall, Devon; BARON, DOTHULA; Wing, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) research requires attention to consequences for research participants beyond those typically considered by institutional review boards. The imbalance of power between impacted communities and those who create and regulate pollution creates challenges for participation, yet research can also benefit those involved. Our community-academic partnership designed the Rural Air Pollutants and Children's Health (RAPCH) study to provide positive impacts while measuring healt...

  1. Motivations and Benefits for College Students Serving as Mentors in a High School Robotics Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Salzman, Noah; Strobel, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Many universities provide space for student organizations in which undergraduate students are learning leadership skills, mentor other students and bring their engineering skills to practice.Purdue FIRST Programs (PFP) is a service-learning program where university students mentor predominantly high school student teams participating in the FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC). Whereas most FRC teams are mentored by professional engineers, PFP is unique in both the extent which it relies on stude...

  2. Intelligent transport systems deployment in Thessaloniki: Assessment of costs and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsakis Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation projects often require large initial investments and are expected to generate benefits extending far into the future. Thus, there is a need to compare benefits and costs that occur at different periods over time. Since money has a time value, the same amount of money at different time periods does not have the same value. Therefore, it is important to convert costs and benefits into equivalent values when conducting a Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA. A special category of transportation projects is that of Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS. ITS comprise innovative solutions for travel demand and traffic management, and it is expected to play a key role in future sustainable urban development plans. Compared to other transportation projects, ITS have a lower initial investment. In this paper a framework based on a CBA is presented, assessing costs and benefits of three ITS projects implemented in Thessaloniki, Greece. The paper refers to future developments of ITS in the city of Thessaloniki. The examined systems have already been developed as demonstration systems in various regions throughout Europe. The benefits of the systems have been transferred and scaled up, so as to be in line with the specific characteristics of the Greek environment.

  3. Who Benefits from Failing Urban School Districts? An Essay on Equity and Justice for Diverse Children in Urban Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberman, Martin

    This paper asserts that the growth and maintenance of failed urban school districts that have miseducated minority children in poverty for over 50 years is a predictable, explainable phenomenon. The essay suggests that the extensive resources funneled into these systems are used for increasing district bureaucracies rather than improving…

  4. Cost-benefit evaluation of a decentralized water system for wastewater reuse and environmental protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R; Wang, X C

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposed a net benefit value (NBV) model for cost-benefit evaluation of wastewater treatment and reuse projects, and attention was mainly paid to decentralized systems which are drawing wide interests all over the world especially in the water-deficient countries and regions. In the NBV model, all the factors related to project costs are monetary ones which can be calculated by using traditional methods, while many of the factors related to project benefits are non-monetary ones which need sophisticated methods for monetization. In this regard, the authors elaborated several methods for monetization of the benefits from wastewater discharge reduction, local environment improvement, and human health protection. The proposed model and methods were applied for the cost-benefit evaluation of a decentralized water reclamation and reuse project in a newly developed residential area in Xi'an, China. The system with dual-pipe collection and grey water treatment and reuse was found to be economically ineligible (NBV > 0) when all the treated water is reused for artificial pond replenishment, gardening and other non-potable purposes by taking into account the benefit of water saving. As environmental benefits are further considered, the economic advantage of the project is more significant. PMID:19403964

  5. SCHOOL INFORMATION SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR MOBILE PHONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvinnicky Gunawan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available School Information System (SIS is an academic information system developed and implemented for a private school with a purpose to improve the efficiency of information retrieval for students, parents and school authority. One of the initial problems with SIS implementation was that it depended on the availability of computers and internet access. With slow internet connections, authentication process could be time consuming, especially if a website implements various external scripts to improve visual quality. Due to these reasons, as well as the fact that BlackBerry is one of the most popular smartphones in Indonesia, the developers decided to design a simpler but more powerful system that would resolve Blackberry Mobile SIS problems. The mobile SIS was designed, implemented and evaluated to provide a perfect solution for problems related to ease-of-access. The Mobile SIS facilitates students and parents in obtaining academic information anytime, anywhere and without the need for repeated authentication, via BlackBerry mobile connection. Mobile SIS also offers faster loading time relative to traditional website access. Using the push technology service, SIS could now provide students and parents in getting the latest information every time new information gets disseminated.

  6. Comparative analysis of cost benefit division methodologies in a hydrothermal generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and operation planning of the Brazilian generation system has been realized in a coordinate way by several years, due to some organizations, where the main generating companies from the country take part. The benefit share of the system to each participant of the planning and integrated operation has aroused interest. This paper describes the alternate forms of cost benefit allocation, between the participant companies of a coordinate operation, in order to reach an adequateness of remuneration and incentives. It was analysed two proposal of benefit allocation for energy export/import contracts: share by generation value and share by marginal benefit, concluding that the second one represents the best way of contribution for the several factors that comprising a hydroelectric power plant (storage capacity, effective storage and turbine capacity). (C.G.C.). 1 tab

  7. xpected and Realized Costs and Benefits when Implementing Product Configuration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Riis, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary findings from a study of a number of Danish firms, which have or are in the process of implementing product configuration systems. 20 firms were selected and 15 responded positively and as of writing 10 interviews have been completed. Data are presented which illust...... illustrate the relative costs and benefits in each firm. It is observed that expected and realised benefits are consistent: 1) Improved quality in specifications, 2) Using less resources, and 3) Lower turnaround time....

  8. Methods for the Correlation and Valuation of Benefits in the Social Security System

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia CUCU; Florin Paul Costel LILEA; Oleg CARA; Valentin BICHIR

    2012-01-01

    The universal pensions schema has mandatory character and is guaranteed by the state. State is an administrator of the socialsecurity systems and sometimes as finance provider. In case of financial dis-equilibrium situations of the social insurance balance, the state grants loans to finance the deficit. As social security is a fundamental right of man, state has the responsibility to correlate benefits and ensure an adequate level of pensions. The correlation of benefits is in the first row l...

  9. Fuzzy - Expert System for Cost Benefit Analysis of Enterprise Information Systems: A Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith –Michael E. Uzoka

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise Information Systems (EIS are collections of hardware, software, data, people and procedures that work together to manage organizational information resources, ultimately enhancing decision making, and strategic advantage. One of the key issues in the acquisition and utilization of EIS is the determination of the value of investment in such systems. Traditional capital budgeting models such as NPV, IRR, payback period, and profitability index focus mainly on quantifiable variables. However, there are many intangible variables that make the use of entirely quantitative measures incomplete and less inclusive. The high level of impact of information systems (IS on the entire organizational strategy and the information intensity of IS makes the use of such traditional methods less practicable. Attempts have been made to overcome these shortcomings by utilizing other techniques such as the real options model, goal programming model, knowledge value model and intelligent techniques. This paper proposes the adoption of a hybrid intelligent technique (fuzzy-expert system in carrying out a cost benefit analysis of EIS investment. The study takes high cognizance of intangible variables and vagueness / imprecision in human group decision making that requires a good level of consensus.

  10. Estimating Criminal Justice System Costs and Cost-Savings Benefits of Day Reporting Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Amy

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the net cost-savings benefits (loss) to the criminal justice system of one rural and one urban day reporting center, both of which serve high risk/high need probationers. It also discusses issues of conducting criminal justice system cost studies of community corrections programs. The average DRC participant in the rural…

  11. Combining a building simulation with energy systems analysis to assess the benefits of natural ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oropeza-Perez, Ivan; Østergaard, Poul Alberg; Remmen, Arne

    thermal air flow simulation program - Into the energy systems analysis model. Descriptions of the energy systems in two geographical locations, i.e. Mexico and Denmark, are set up as inputs. Then, the assessment is done by calculating the energy impacts as well as environmental benefits in the energy...

  12. Cost benefit risk - a concept for management of integrated urban wastewater systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauger, Mikkel B.; Rauch, W.; Linde, Jens Jørgen; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    the evaluation and design of urban wastewater systems. In this paper we present and discuss a probabilistic approach for evaluation of the performance of urban wastewater systems. Risk analysis together with the traditional cost-benefit analysis is a special variant of multi-criteria analysis that...

  13. Impact on Social Change: Benefits and Barriers to School Culture and the Integration of M-Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines benefits and barriers of mtechnologyin its growing use in education through a surveyconducted at a Canadian teacher education institution(n=350. Topics included are the types of mobile technologydevices and how their uses have been rejected and acceptedas a socially-situated construct for learning in schools. Issuesfor new teachers range from the dollar cost of using thedevices to the cost of time in learning about these devices.The paper concludes with a central issue of why somedevices do not remain in the social construct but areadopted for short periods of time and do not last becausebarriers prevent their sustainability. The research for thispaper was supported in part by a grant from the ImperialOil Academy for the Learning of Mathematics, Science andTechnology.

  14. What kind of modern school system do we need?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Hongqi

    2007-01-01

    The marketization of education cannot serve as the guiding principle in constructing the modem school system,nor can it be directly transplanted from modem enterprise system.Because the modem school system is a kind of"educational institution"rather than an"economical institution",what it should focus on is not the ownership of property or the distinction of property,but on the core educational issue,that is,the students'development.Such a kind of modern school system requires that the government delegates power to schools to realize academic autonomy in schools (selfgovernance).

  15. Smart SUDS: recognising the multiple-benefit potential of sustainable surface water management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Roshni; Wade, Rebecca; Jefferies, Chris

    2015-01-01

    How can we make sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS) smart? SUDS help us to manage surface water runoff from urban environments but they are capable of delivering much more. This paper looks beyond the water quantity and quality improvement functions of SUDS and investigates the multiple benefits that can be gained by implementing smart SUDS solutions. This work provides a new perspective, using methodologies not normally associated with SUDS research, to determine multiple benefits. The outputs of the work can potentially assist decision-makers, designer and planners in recognising the potential for multiple benefits that can be delivered by SUDS. The ecosystem services (ES) associated with a large redevelopment in Dundee, Scotland, UK, are identified and a public perception study together with public participatory geographical information system (PPGIS) methods was used to confirm the goods and benefits of the SUDS. The paper presents findings on the public perception of SUDS as they provide cultural benefits such as recreation, aesthetics and biodiversity. The results show that greenspace is important when choosing a location, and willingness to pay for greenspace is high in this area. This paper concludes that SUDS provide multi-functional benefits in relation to the ES, thereby justifying the cachet of being termed Smart SUDS. PMID:25633948

  16. A Benefit Measurement Framework for an Online Contract Change Management System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Sun; Tejas Oza

    2008-01-01

    The contract change management (CCM) system is an online collaboration tool, which supports the contract change management process of new engineering contract (NEC) contract. It is currently used in practice on a wide range of civil, power, and building projects in the UK. The aim of this study is first to iden-tify the tangible and intangible benefits of the system through a user survey; then to develop a framework to measure these benefits. A questionnaire survey is conducted, which reveals that CCM can help project teams improve process effectiveness, reduce risk of process failures, and increase the compliance with NEC requirements. Subsequently, a spreadsheet tool is developed to allow CCM users to calculate the tan-gible cost savings as a result of using the system. For intangible benefits, a change management maturity model (CM3) is developed, which provides a measurement framework for assessing the improvement of a project team's capability in dealing with contract changes.

  17. The School Meal System and School-Based Nutrition Education in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Taejung

    2015-01-01

    Since the school meal was first served in Korea in 1953, there have been many changes, particularly during the last decade. Recently, the representative features of the school meal system became free school meals for all pupils in elementary school and a nutrition teacher system in schools. These policies were suggested to implement more and more the educational role of the school meal. The rate of schools serving school meals reached 100% as of 2013, and 99.6% students eat a school meal each school day. Nutrition teachers were assigned to schools from 2007, and 4,704 (47.9%) nutrition teachers of all nutrition employees were employed in schools as of 2013. At present, various nutrition education materials are being development by local education offices and government agencies, and various education activities are being implemented spiritedly. The ultimate goal of school meals and school-based nutrition education are as follows: 1) improvement of the health of students; 2) promotion of the traditional Korean diet; and 3) extension of opportunities for a healthier dietary life. PMID:26598874

  18. Benefits of Using a Mars Forward Strategy for Lunar Surface Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, Jack; Griffin, Brand; Smitherman, David; Maples, Dauphne

    2009-01-01

    This paper identifies potential risk reduction, cost savings and programmatic procurement benefits of a Mars Forward Lunar Surface System architecture that provides commonality or evolutionary development paths for lunar surface system elements applicable to Mars surface systems. The objective of this paper is to identify the potential benefits for incorporating a Mars Forward development strategy into the planned Project Constellation Lunar Surface System Architecture. The benefits include cost savings, technology readiness, and design validation of systems that would be applicable to lunar and Mars surface systems. The paper presents a survey of previous lunar and Mars surface systems design concepts and provides an assessment of previous conclusions concerning those systems in light of the current Project Constellation Exploration Architectures. The operational requirements for current Project Constellation lunar and Mars surface system elements are compared and evaluated to identify the potential risk reduction strategies that build on lunar surface systems to reduce the technical and programmatic risks for Mars exploration. Risk reduction for rapidly evolving technologies is achieved through systematic evolution of technologies and components based on Moore's Law superimposed on the typical NASA systems engineering project development "V-cycle" described in NASA NPR 7120.5. Risk reduction for established or slowly evolving technologies is achieved through a process called the Mars-Ready Platform strategy in which incremental improvements lead from the initial lunar surface system components to Mars-Ready technologies. The potential programmatic benefits of the Mars Forward strategy are provided in terms of the transition from the lunar exploration campaign to the Mars exploration campaign. By utilizing a sequential combined procurement strategy for lunar and Mars exploration surface systems, the overall budget wedges for exploration systems are reduced and the

  19. Mission Benefits of Gridded Ion and Hall Thruster Hybrid Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Polsgrove, Tara

    2006-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Project Office has been developing the NEXT gridded ion thruster system and is planning to procure a low power Hall system. The new ion propulsion systems will join NSTAR as NASA's primary electric propulsion system options. Studies have been performed to show mission benefits of each of the stand alone systems. A hybrid ion propulsion system (IPS) can have the advantage of reduced cost, decreased flight time and greater science payload delivery over comparable homogeneous systems. This paper explores possible advantages of combining various thruster options for a single mission.

  20. Social Media in the Dental School Environment, Part A: Benefits, Challenges, and Recommendations for Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Turner, Sharon P; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Chambers, David; McAndrew, Maureen; Zarkowski, Pamela; Karimbux, Nadeem

    2015-10-01

    Social media consist of powerful tools that impact not only communication but relationships among people, thus posing an inherent challenge to the traditional standards of who we are as dental educators and what we can expect of each other. This article examines how the world of social media has changed dental education. Its goal is to outline the complex issues that social media use presents for academic dental institutions and to examine these issues from personal, professional, and legal perspectives. After providing an update on social media, the article considers the advantages and risks associated with the use of social media at the interpersonal, professional, and institutional levels. Policies and legal issues of which academic dental institutions need to be aware from a compliance perspective are examined, along with considerations and resources needed to develop effective social media policies. The challenge facing dental educators is how to capitalize on the benefits that social media offer, while minimizing risks and complying with the various forms of legal constraint. PMID:26427774

  1. Cost benefit risk - a concept for management of integrated urban wastewater systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauger, Mikkel B.; Rauch, W.; Linde, Jens Jørgen; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    Urban wastewater systems should be evaluated and analysed from an integrated point of view, taking all parts of the system, that is sewer system, wastewater treatment plant and receiving waters into consideration. Risk and parameter uncertainties are aspects that hardly ever have been addressed in...... the evaluation and design of urban wastewater systems. In this paper we present and discuss a probabilistic approach for evaluation of the performance of urban wastewater systems. Risk analysis together with the traditional cost-benefit analysis is a special variant of multi-criteria analysis that...... seeks to find the most feasible improvement alternative for an urban wastewater system. The most feasible alternative in this context is the alternative that has the best performance, meaning that the alternative has the lowest sum of costs, benefits and risks. The sum is expressed as the Net Present...

  2. Computers and School Nurses in a Financially Stressed School System: The Case of St. Louis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the incorporation of computer technology into the professional lives of school nurses. St. Louis, Missouri, a major urban school system, is the site of the study. The research describes several major impacts computer technology has on the professional responsibilities of school nurses. Computer technology not only affects…

  3. CIME School on Quantum Many Body Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rivasseau, Vincent; Solovej, Jan Philip; Spencer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The book is based on the lectures given at the CIME school "Quantum many body systems" held in the summer of 2010. It provides a tutorial introduction to recent advances in the mathematics of interacting systems, written by four leading experts in the field: V. Rivasseau illustrates the applications of constructive Quantum Field Theory to 2D interacting electrons and their relation to quantum gravity; R. Seiringer describes a proof of Bose-Einstein condensation in the Gross-Pitaevski limit and explains the effects of rotating traps and the emergence of lattices of quantized vortices; J.-P. Solovej gives an introduction to the theory of quantum Coulomb systems and to the functional analytic methods used to prove their thermodynamic stability; finally, T. Spencer explains the supersymmetric approach to Anderson localization and its relation to the theory of random matrices. All the lectures are characterized by their mathematical rigor combined with physical insights.

  4. The Use of Replacement Rates in International Comparisons of Benefit Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Whiteford

    1995-01-01

    Comparative studies of social security systems have increasingly turned towards the use of replacement rates as measures of the level of benefits in different countries and therefore of the degree of social protection afforded by different welfare systems. The rationale for this is that replacement rates provide consistent measures of the relative generosity of payments and therefore indicate the ‘quality’ of social security systems. This paper reviews the use of replacement rates in comparis...

  5. Technical benefits of energy storage and electricity interconnections in future British power systems

    OpenAIRE

    Edmunds, RK; Cockerill, TT; Foxon, TJ; Ingham, DB; Pourkashanian, M.

    2014-01-01

    There are concerns that the GB (Great Britain) electricity system may not be able to fully absorb increasing levels of variable renewables with consequent implications for emission reduction targets. This study considers the technical benefits of additional energy storage and interconnections in future GB electricity systems. Initially a reference model of the GB electricity system was developed using the EnergyPLAN tool. The model was validated against actual data and was confirmed to accura...

  6. A practical technique for benefit-cost analysis of computer-aided design and drafting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of benefits and costs associated with the operation of Computer-Aided Design and Drafting Systems (CADDS) are needed to derive economic justification for acquiring new systems, as well as to evaluate the performance of existing installations. In practice, however, such analyses are difficult to perform since most technical and economic advantages of CADDS are ΣirreduciblesΣ, i.e. cannot be readily translated into monetary terms. In this paper, a practical technique for economic analysis of CADDS in a drawing office environment is presented. A Σworst caseΣ approach is taken since increase in productivity of existing manpower is the only benefit considered, while all foreseen costs are taken into account. Methods of estimating benefits and costs are described. The procedure for performing the analysis is illustrated by a case study based on the drawing office activities at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. (auth)

  7. Costs and Benefits of ISO9000-based Quality Management Systems to Construction Contractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ISO9000-based Quality Management Systems(QMSs have been widely applied by manycontractors with a hope to improve the productquality and hence achieve the desiredobjective of client satisfaction. However,setting up and implementing an ISO9000-based QMS is not without cost. Unless thecontractors can benefit from such system, it isunlikely that the senior management ofcontracting firms will commit to implement anISO9000-based QMS. In this paper, the costsof setting up and implementing an ISO9000-based QMS are assessed through aquestionnaire survey. The results arecompared with the benefits attained by thecontractors. It is found that contractors couldbe benefited from the use of ISO9000-basedQMS both tangibly and intangibly. Based on amore conservative estimation of some tangiblebenefits, a basic operational cost-benefit ratioof one to three was derived from the results ofthe survey. Since the latest version ofISO9000 has been fully implemented for anumber of years, the perception of contractorson the benefits gained after theimplementation of ISO9001:2000 is alsoexamined in this paper.

  8. Global Systems Science High School Curriculum Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Global Systems Science (GSS), a high school integrated interdisciplinary science project based at Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley, has collaborated with many organizations and institutions since its inception in the early 1990s. To start with, there were the federal agencies that made GSS possible: WESTGEC, NIGEC, NSF, and NASA. An NSF grant enabled the project to have teachers field test GSS in their classes and meet in summer institutes that resulted in GSS module dealing with climate change and related topics including energy use, ozone, loss of biodiversity, and ecosystem change. Interacting small and large systems naturally became an overarching theme. NASA grants and relationships with other NASA grantees in the NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) program resulted in formation of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) in the GSS Lifelines for High School Climate Change Education project. Teachers involved in that project participated in webinars with representatives of various climate change education resources, including SatCam, Detroit Climate Action Collaborative, Picture Post (UNH), Eyes on Earth, Earth Exploration Toolbook, My NASA Data, Digital Earth Watch (DEW), Alliance for Climate Education (ACE), the JPL Global Climate Change website, EOS-Webster (UNH), and Museum of the Earth at the Paleontological Research Institution. These webinars were recorded and are available at http://www.globalsystemsscience.org/lifelines/presentations. GSS course materials are available to teachers for free online at http://www.globalsystemsscience.org/

  9. An Approach to Establishing System Benefits for Technologies In NASA's Spaceliner Investment Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Pannell, Bill; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    real-world problem is that resources are limited and technologies need to be prioritized to assure the resources are spent on technologies that provide the highest system level benefits. Toward that end, a systems approach is being taken to determine the benefits of technologies for the Spaceliner Investment Area. Technologies identified to be enabling will be funded. However, the other technologies will be funded based on their system's benefits. Since the final launch system concept will not be decided for many years, several vehicle concepts are being evaluated to determine technology benefits. Not only performance, but also cost and operability are being assessed. This will become an annual process to assess these technologies against their goals and the benefits to various launch systems concepts. The paper describes the system process, tools and concepts used to determine the technology benefits. Preliminary results will be presented along with the current technology investments that are being made by ASTP's Spaceliner Investment Area.

  10. A Design proposal for a Benefits Management Method for Enterprise System Implementations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckartz, Silja; Katsma, Christiaan; Oude Maatman, Ruud

    2012-01-01

    Enterprise Systems (ES) involve relative high investments and long-lasting implementations for its adopters. A business case (BC) is often developed in the beginning to evaluate and justify this investment. This BC explains the expected costs, benefits and risks of the ES implementation. In this pap

  11. The School Health Portfolio System: a new tool for planning and evaluating coordinated school health programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Robert M; Pigg, R Morgan

    2004-11-01

    The School Health Portfolio System (SHPS), developed originally to evaluate the Florida Coordinated School Health Program Pilot Schools Project, offers a new and innovative system for planning and evaluating a coordinated school health program at the individual school level. The SHPS provides practitioners a detailed but easy-to-use system that enables schools to create new programs or modify existing programs across all eight components of the CSHP model, as well as administrative support critical to sustainability. The System comes packaged as a self-contained, notebook-style manual divided into 15 sections. It includes electronic templates of key documents to guide school teams in creating a customized portfolio, and a list of sample goals and artifacts that confirm achievement of a goal related to the school's coordinated school health program. An evaluation rubric provides a structured method to assess a program portfolio's contents, and the extent to which the contents document achievement of program goals. The rubric produces both a qualitative assessment, such as a narrative summary of program strengths and areas for improvement, and a quantitative assessment, such as a numerical score (0-100), letter grade (A-F), or 5-star system (*-*****). The physical structure, function, and scoring of the rubric depend on the method of assessment. The SHPS enables schools to set goals based on individual school needs, and incorporate CSHP goals into school improvement plans--a critical factor in sustainability and accountability. The System also offers teams the option of coordinating their efforts with CDC's School Health Index as a companion assessment measure. This article outlines the process a team would follow in developing a portfolio, and includes a sample assessment for the area of School Health Education. PMID:15656262

  12. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespans. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depend on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system.

  13. Prognostic Health Monitoring System: Component Selection Based on Risk Criteria and Economic Benefit Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prognostic health monitoring (PHM) is a proactive approach to monitor the ability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) to withstand structural, thermal, and chemical loadings over the SSCs planned service lifespan. The current efforts to extend the operational license lifetime of the aging fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants from 40 to 60 years and beyond can benefit from a systematic application of PHM technology. Implementing a PHM system would strengthen the safety of nuclear power plants, reduce plant outage time, and reduce operation and maintenance costs. However, a nuclear power plant has thousands of SSCs, so implementing a PHM system that covers all SSCs requires careful planning and prioritization. This paper therefore focuses on a component selection that is based on the analysis of a component's failure probability, risk, and cost. Ultimately, the decision on component selection depends on the overall economical benefits arising from safety and operational considerations associated with implementing the PHM system. (author)

  14. Biomass pyrolysis processes: performance parameters and their influence on biochar system benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Brownsort, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on performance of biomass pyrolysis processes for use in biochar systems. Objectives are to understand the range of control of such processes and how this affects potential benefits of pyrolysis biochar systems, in particular for climate change mitigation. Slow, intermediate and fast pyrolysis processes are reviewed. Product yield distributions change depending on feedstock composition and preparation, control of temperature and material flows. These allow s...

  15. Stochastic Placement and Sizing of Combined Heat and Power Systems Considering Cost/Benefit Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mehrdad Hosseini; Gholamreza Koohsari; M. Mahdi Zarif; D.B. Hossein Javidi

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a cost/worth analysis approach for optimal Placement and sizing of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) as a powerful optimization technique is employed for optimization. Different benefits brought up by CHP systems are taken into account as a multi-objective decision making. Economical factors such as power and heat selling, reliability improvement, loss reduction, deferred upgrading investment and CHP costs are considered in this study...

  16. Financing Disability Benefits In A System Of Individual Accounts: Lessons From International Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Wiese

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many countries with mandatory defined benefit pay-as-you-go (“PAYG”) systems have modified their systems to include individual accounts for financing retirement pensions. In most of these countries, a portion of the mandatory pension system’s contribution rate has been “carved-out”, and contributions earmarked by the carve-out are channeled into retirement accounts. Upon reaching retirement age, the contributions and accumulated interest in an individual’s account are used to...

  17. A Cost-Benefit Analysis of a Family Systems Intervention for Managing Pediatric Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distelberg, Brian J; Emerson, Natacha D; Gavaza, Paul; Tapanes, Daniel; Brown, Whitney N; Shah, Huma; Williams-Reade, Jacqueline; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent increases of psychosocial programs for pediatric chronic illness, few studies have explored their economic benefits. This study investigated the costs-benefits of a family systems-based, psychosocial intervention for pediatric chronic illness (MEND: Mastering Each New Direction). A quasi-prospective study compared the 12-month pre-post direct and indirect costs of 20 families. The total cost for program was estimated to $5,320. Families incurred $15,249 less in direct and $15,627 less in indirect costs after MEND. On average, medical expenses reduced by 86% in direct and indirect costs, for a cost-benefit ratio of 0.17. Therefore, for every dollar spent on the program, families and their third payers saved approximately $5.74. Implications for healthcare policy and reimbursements are discussed. PMID:27282311

  18. Teachers' Performance Motivation System in Thai Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasathang, Sarojn; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sataphonwong, Pattananusron

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to: 1) study the present conditions and desirable condition of the motivation systems as well as how to find methods for motivating the performance of teachers in primary schools, 2) develop a motivation system for the performance of teachers in primary schools, 3) study the effects of using the motivation system for compliance…

  19. Towards School Management System (SMS) Success in Teacher's Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Haslina binti; Rahmatullah, Bahbibi binti; Nordin, Norhisham bin Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    School Management System-SMS (Sistem Pengurusan Sekolah) is a system developed by Ministry of Education Malaysia in order to reduce teachers' burden and for Educational Data Integration. SMS is a type of Management Information System (MIS) and is pivotal for efficient and effective running of schools in Malaysia. As SMS is newly introduced, no…

  20. Stochastic Placement and Sizing of Combined Heat and Power Systems Considering Cost/Benefit Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mehrdad Hosseini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a cost/worth analysis approach for optimal Placement and sizing of Combined Heat and Power (CHP systems. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO as a powerful optimization technique is employed for optimization. Different benefits brought up by CHP systems are taken into account as a multi-objective decision making. Economical factors such as power and heat selling, reliability improvement, loss reduction, deferred upgrading investment and CHP costs are considered in this study. In order to incorporate stochastic nature of power system in this study, Monte-Carlo method is used to simulate the effect of uncertainty of loads and system on the optimal location and size of the CHPs in the network. This study conducts two separate case studies, 6-bus meshed test system and 14-bus radial test system to demonstrate economical feasibility for investment planning when cost and CHP benefits are taken into account. The impacts of considering different parameters such as the rate of load growth and interest are studied. Results indicate that the proposed methodology is capable of finding the best location and the optimal size of CHP that can cause improvement in network operation along with financial benefits

  1. Investigating preferences for dynamic electricity tariffs: The effect of environmental and system benefit disclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic electricity pricing can produce efficiency gains in the electricity sector and help achieve energy policy goals such as increasing electric system reliability and supporting renewable energy deployment. Retail electric companies can offer dynamic pricing to residential electricity customers via smart meter-enabled tariffs that proxy the cost to procure electricity on the wholesale market. Current investments in the smart metering necessary to implement dynamic tariffs show policy makers’ resolve for enabling responsive demand and realizing its benefits. However, despite these benefits and the potential bill savings these tariffs can offer, adoption among residential customers remains at low levels. Using a choice experiment approach, this paper seeks to determine whether disclosing the environmental and system benefits of dynamic tariffs to residential customers can increase adoption. Although sampling and design issues preclude wide generalization, we found that our environmentally conscious respondents reduced their required discount to switch to dynamic tariffs around 10% in response to higher awareness of environmental and system benefits. The perception that shifting usage is easy to do also had a significant impact, indicating the potential importance of enabling technology. Perhaps the targeted communication strategy employed by this study is one way to increase adoption and achieve policy goals. - Highlights: • We evaluate preferences for domestic dynamic electricity tariffs in the US and EU. • We use an online choice experiment approach with two dynamic tariff options. • People are more likely to switch if shown environmental and system benefits. • People are more likely to switch if they find shifting demand easy to do. • Our results imply the importance of targeted communication and enabling technology

  2. Benefit-Cost Analysis of Security Systems for Multiple Protected Assets Based on Information Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Cai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a quantitative risk assessment for security systems which have multiple protected assets and a risk-based benefit-cost analysis for decision makers. The proposed methodology consists of five phases: identification of assets, security unit and intrusion path, security unit effectiveness estimation, intrusion path effectiveness estimation, security system risk assessment and benefit-cost estimation. Key innovations in this methodology include its use of effectiveness entropy to measure the degree of uncertainty of a security system to complete a protection task, and the fact it measures risk like information theory measures the amount of information. A notional example is provided to demonstrate an application of the proposed methodology.

  3. Costs and Benefits of a Shared Digital Long-Term Preservation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esa-Pekka Keskitalo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the cost-benefit analysis of digital long-term preservation (LTP that was carried out in the context of the Finnish National Digital Library Project (NDL in 2010. The analysis was based on the assumption that as many as 200 archives, libraries, and museums will share an LTP system. The term ‘system’ shall be understood as encompassing not only information technology, but also human resources, organizational structures, policies and funding mechanisms. The cost analysis shows that an LTP system will incur, over the first 12 years, cumulative costs of €42 million, i.e. an average of €3.5 million per annum. Human resources and investments in information technology are the major cost factors. After the initial stages, the analysis predicts annual costs of circa €4 million. The analysis compared scenarios with and without a shared LTP system. The results indicate that a shared system will have remarkable benefits. At the development and implementation stages, a shared system shows an advantage of €30 million against the alternative scenario consisting of five independent LTP solutions. During the later stages, the advantage is estimated at €10 million per annum. The cumulative cost benefit over the first 12 years would amount to circa €100 million.

  4. Cost-benefit analysis of sustainable energy development using life-cycle co-benefits assessment and the system dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The energy policy was assessed using the system dynamics approach. • A life table approach was presented to estimate averted loss of life expectancy. • The mortality benefits estimated by VSL and VSLY are found to be similar. • Economic feasibility of the energy policy for climate change mitigation was presented. - Abstract: A novel Air Resource Co-benefits model was developed to estimate the social benefits of a Sustainable Energy Policy, involving both renewable energy (RE) and energy efficiency improvements (EEI). The costs and benefits of the policy during 2010–2030 were quantified. A system dynamics model was constructed to simulate the amount of energy saving under the scenario of promoting both RE and EEI. The life-cycle co-reductions of five criteria pollutants (PM10, SO2, NOx, CO, and ozone) and greenhouse gas are estimated by assuming coal fired as marginal electricity suppliers. Moreover, a concise life table approach was developed to estimate averted years of life lost (YOLL). The results showed that YOLL totaling 0.11–0.21 years (41–78 days) per capita, or premature deaths totaling 126,507–251,169, is expected to be averted during 2010–2030 under the RE plus EEI scenario. Specifically, because of the higher investment cost, the benefit-cost ratio of 1.9–2.1 under the EEI scenario is lower than the 7.2–7.9 under the RE scenario. This difference reveals that RE is more socially beneficial than EEI. The net benefit of the RE and EEI scenarios during 2010–2030 totaled approximately US$ 5,972–6,893 per person or US$ 170–190 per MW h. To summarize, this study presents a new approach to estimate averted YOLL, and finds that the health benefits can justify the compliance costs associated with the Sustainable Energy Policy

  5. Organizational culture focused on quality management and benefits derived from an ERP system implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar F. Bustinza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Organizational culture focused on quality management aims to meet customer needs and enhance teamwork, being oriented toward a dynamic process of continuous improvement. The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether, indeed, the quality-oriented culture has an effect on the management of business processes. In doing so, we analyze their relationship with the benefits of a resource management system or ERP.Design/methodology/approach: A survey is used to collect data, with valid questionnaires obtained for 200 Spain based respondents. Empirical analysis utilises Structural Equation Modelling (SEM.Findings: The results confirm that firm's commitment with quality management, customer focus, and confidence of workers has a positive effect on the results of operational, strategic and managerial benefits derived from an ERP system implementation. However, there is not relationship between customer focus and organizational benefits, neither to increase system capacity.Originality/value: The present study analyzes the relationship between quality-oriented culture and the resource management systems of the firm clarifying their strengths and limitations. In this sense, the customer orientation may limit the flexibility of business as require a lot of resources, and generate dissatisfaction among workers resulting from the attention to customer complaints.

  6. Voice of the Classified Employee: A Descriptive Study to Determine Degree of Job Satisfaction of Classified Employees and to Design Systems of Support by School District Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakos-Cartwright, Rebekah B.

    2012-01-01

    Classified employees comprise thirty two percent of the educational workforce in school districts in the state of California. Acknowledging these employees as a viable and untapped resource within the educational system will enrich job satisfaction for these employees and benefit the operations in school sites. As acknowledged and valued…

  7. WHO BENEFITS FROM THE VAT CASH ACCOUNTING SYSTEM IN ROMANIA AS OF JANUARY 1, 2013?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecobici Nicolae

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the legislative changes at the end of 2012 regarding the value added tax, changes that cameinto force on January 1, 2013, we will critically analyze the extent in which the new imposed system follows the VATtaxation principles and who will benefit from this system. In this case, it is the VAT cash accounting system which,under certain legally well-defined conditions, relate the VAT chargeability to the collection of value of the invoicedgoods and services no later than 90 calendar days and VAT deduction is subject to the payment of the goods andservices invoiced without specifying any deadline.

  8. Working with School Systems: Educational Outreach and Action Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Marvin; Salam, Shereen

    This guide explains how individuals and American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) chapters can work with school systems to reduce discrimination against students of Arab background and to educate teachers and other students about the cultures of the Middle East. Arab Americans can make a difference in the school systems by personal…

  9. Improving the Utilisation of Management Information Systems in Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosker, R. J.; Branderhorst, E. M.; Visscher, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    Although most secondary schools do use management information systems (MISs), these systems tend not to be used to support higher order managerial activities but are currently primarily used for clerical purposes. This situation is unsatisfactory as MISs fully utilised could offer invaluable support to schools, which are increasingly being granted…

  10. Integrating the value of salespeople and systems: adapting the benefits dependency network

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Beth; Stone, Merlin; B Foss

    2008-01-01

    Business-to-business (B2B) companies invest in customer relationship management (CRM), integrated with sales force automation (SFA) to achieve a return on investment, through improved sales force productivity, sales revenue, costs, customer satisfaction, process accuracy and customer knowledge. However, the devil is in the detail. CRM and SFA are multi-faceted. There are two main obstacles to successful implementation. One is the need for the customer to get some benefit out of the system; th...

  11. Labour Force Participation and Tax-Benefit Systems: A Cross-Country Comparative Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Galuščák, Kamil; Kátay, Gábor

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which cross-country differences in aggregate participation rates can be explained by divergence in tax-benefit systems. We take the example of two countries, the Czech Republic and Hungary, which – despite a lot of similarities – differ markedly in labour force participation rates. We first replicate for Czech household-level data the labour supply estimation for Hungary presented in Benczúr et al. (2014) and use the two perfectly comparable estimates to ...

  12. The development of a public optometry system in Mozambique: a Cost Benefit Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Loughman, James; Thompson, Stephen; Harris, Geoff; Bilotto, Luigi; Ferrao, Jorge; Naidoo, Kovin

    2014-01-01

    Background: The economic burden of uncorrected refractive error (URE) is thought to be high in Mozambique, largely as a consequence of the lack of resources and systems to tackle this largely avoidable problem. The Mozambique Eyecare Project (MEP) has established the first optometry training and human resource deployment initiative to address the burden of URE in Lusophone Africa. The nature of the MEP programme provides the opportunity to determine, using Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA), whether...

  13. The Development of a Public Optometry System in Mozambique: a Cost Benefit Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Stephen; Loughman, James

    2013-01-01

    The economic burden of uncorrected refractive error (URE) is thought to be high in Mozambique, largely as a consequence of the lack of resources and systems to tackle this largely avoidable problem. The Mozambique Eyecare Project (MEP) has established the first optometry training and human resource deployment initiative to address the burden of URE in Lusophone Africa. The nature of the MEP programme provides the opportunity to determine, using Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA), whether investing i...

  14. Implementation and Benefits of LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System) to Laboratories – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ayush Karol; Payal Garg

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory automation is termed as a utilization of technology to streamline process workflow and substitute manual error and interventions of equipment and process. Laboratory information management system is a basic tool to manage sample and test for analytical QC, R & D laboratories and quality assurance providing integrated solution to workflow. Main aim of this paper is to introduce the implementational benefits of LIMS to quality control laboratories by sorting and organizing test infor...

  15. School-enterprise Cooperation Research Based on Cost-benefit Analysis%基于成本-收益分析的校企合作研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭少柱

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current major mode of school-enterprise cooperation, and evaluates cost-benefit of the different cooperation modes. Cost-benefit balance is the prerequisite and basis for rational decision-making, is the key to en-sure school-enterprise cooperation initiative. This article analyzes factors what affect the cost-benefit balance both schools and enterprises, and put forward some suggestions to promote school-enterprise cooperation.%本文归纳总结了目前校企合作的主要模式,并对不同合作模式中校企双方的成本-收益情况进行了评价。成本-收益平衡是理性决策的前提和基础,是确保校企双方合作积极性的关键。文章对影响校企双方成本-收益平衡的因素进行了分析,提出了促进校企合作的几点建议。

  16. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A SINGLE UNIT SYSTEM WITH SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE AND VARIATION IN DEMAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Taneja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyses the reliability and cost-benefit for a single unit system with scheduled maintenance and variation in demand. As Change in demand affects the production of system also, hence sometimes, the system needs to be shut down when the number of produces are in excess as compared to those demanded. Revenue in case of both types of up states i.e., when demand is greater than or equal to production and when demand is less than production have also been taken under consideration while carrying out the cost-benefit analysis. The loss incurred to the system when it is kept shut down due to less demand has also been taken into account. Optimized reliability indices of the system effectiveness are estimated numerically using semi-Markov processes and regenerative point technique. Expression for the expected profit is obtained after obtaining various measures of system effectiveness. We can conclude that cut off points for various rates/probabilities/revenue per unit up time/costs can be obtained which help in deciding the upper/lower acceptable values of rates/costs so that the system is profitable.

  17. Exploring the Use of Audience Response Systems in Secondary School Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robin; Knaack, Liesel

    2009-10-01

    An audience response systems (ARS) allows students to respond to multiple choice questions using remote control devices. Once the feedback is collected and displayed, the teacher and students discuss misconceptions and difficulties experienced. ARSs have been extremely popular and effective in higher education science classrooms, although almost no research has been done at the secondary school level. The purpose of this study was to conduct a detailed formative analysis of the benefits, challenges, and use of ARSs from the perspective of 213 secondary school science students. Perceived benefits were increased student involvement (engagement, participation, and attention) and effective formative assessment of student understanding. Perceived challenges included decreased student involvement and learning when ARSs were used for summative assessment, occasional technological malfunctions, resistance to using a new method of learning, and increased stress due to time constraints when responding to questions. Finally, students rated the use of ARSs significantly higher when it was used for formative as opposed to summative assessment.

  18. A Case Study of the Evolution of High School Academies in a Large Suburban School System

    OpenAIRE

    Wittmann, John

    2005-01-01

    In 1993 a Career and Technical Preparation Task Force, was formed in a nothern Virginia suburban school system, to study and recommend changes to the vocational education curriculum and two high school vocational centers. The task force met for thirteen months and concluded its study in a report entitled "Securing Our Students' Future in a High Tech Global Economy." The Division Superintendent presented this report and its recommendations to the county school board on January 12, 1995. The Bo...

  19. The Global Systems Science High School Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, A. D.; Sneider, C.; Farmer, E.; Erickson, J.

    2015-12-01

    Global Systems Science (GSS), a high school integrated interdisciplinary science project based at Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley, began in the early 1990s as a single book "Planet at Risk" which was only about climate change. Federal grants enabled the project to enlist about 150 teachers to field test materials in their classes and then meeting in summer institutes to share results and effect changes. The result was a series of smaller modules dealing not only with climate change, but other related topics including energy flow, energy use, ozone, loss of biodiversity, and ecosystem change. Other relevant societal issues have also been incorporated including economics, psychology and sociology. The course has many investigations/activities for student to pursue, interviews with scientists working in specific areas of research, and historical contexts. The interconnectedness of a myriad of small and large systems became an overarching theme of the resulting course materials which are now available to teachers for free online at http://www.globalsystemsscience.org/

  20. Service Quality, User Satisfaction and Net-Benefits' Effect on e-School Success: The Case of NEPAD's e-School Pilot in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyagowa, Hesbon O.; Ocholla, Dennis N.; Mutula, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of a set of dimensions on e-School success in a cross-sectional study of NEPAD's e-School pilot in Kenya. All of the six e-Schools participating in the NEPAD's e-School pilot in Kenya were selected. The study used survey methodology. Students and teachers in those schools formed the study…

  1. The Aviation System Analysis Capability Air Carrier Cost-Benefit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Eric M.; Edlich, Alexander; Santmire, Tara S.; Wingrove, Earl R.., III

    1999-01-01

    To meet its objective of assisting the U.S. aviation industry with the technological challenges of the future, NASA must identify research areas that have the greatest potential for improving the operation of the air transportation system. Therefore, NASA is developing the ability to evaluate the potential impact of various advanced technologies. By thoroughly understanding the economic impact of advanced aviation technologies and by evaluating how the new technologies will be used in the integrated aviation system, NASA aims to balance its aeronautical research program and help speed the introduction of high-leverage technologies. To meet these objectives, NASA is building the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC). NASA envisions ASAC primarily as a process for understanding and evaluating the impact of advanced aviation technologies on the U.S. economy. ASAC consists of a diverse collection of models and databases used by analysts and other individuals from the public and private sectors brought together to work on issues of common interest to organizations in the aviation community. ASAC also will be a resource available to the aviation community to analyze; inform; and assist scientists, engineers, analysts, and program managers in their daily work. The ASAC differs from previous NASA modeling efforts in that the economic behavior of buyers and sellers in the air transportation and aviation industries is central to its conception. Commercial air carriers, in particular, are an important stakeholder in this community. Therefore, to fully evaluate the implications of advanced aviation technologies, ASAC requires a flexible financial analysis tool that credibly links the technology of flight with the financial performance of commercial air carriers. By linking technical and financial information, NASA ensures that its technology programs will continue to benefit the user community. In addition, the analysis tool must be capable of being incorporated into the

  2. A cost-benefit analysis of the requirement that students complete a thesis at the Naval Postgraduate School

    OpenAIRE

    Strobl, Michael R.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis identifies and compares the benefits and costs of the policy requiring master's degree candidates at NPS to complete a thesis. It uses fiscal year 2000 data. The goal is to evaluate the existing policy to determine if the economic benefit of requiring a thesis is greater than the economic cost. The direct benefit of the thesis requirement is the increased productivity of officers due to having completed a thesis. Indirect benefits are found in the valuable research provided by man...

  3. The life cycle benefits of an integrated system approach to control and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data acquisition, control and monitoring system for the Sizewell B PWR is based on an integrated system product known as P20, which has been jointly developed by CGE ALSTHOM and Electricite de France. The product uses an hierarchy of Local Area Networks supporting distributed plant interfaces, processing and man-machine interfaces. High integrity and availability are obtained through multiple redundancy and self-checking techniques. Object Oriented Design techniques are used to analyse and implement the Control and Instrumentaion requirements. The paper describes the product, the application and the benefits which result from this product and design approach. (author)

  4. Pilot production system cost/benefit analysis: Digital document storage project

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The Digital Document Storage (DDS)/Pilot Production System (PPS) will provide cost effective electronic document storage, retrieval, hard copy reproduction, and remote access for users of NASA Technical Reports. The DDS/PPS will result in major benefits, such as improved document reproduction quality within a shorter time frame than is currently possible. In addition, the DDS/PPS will provide an important strategic value through the construction of a digital document archive. It is highly recommended that NASA proceed with the DDS Prototype System and a rapid prototyping development methodology in order to validate recent working assumptions upon which the success of the DDS/PPS is dependent.

  5. Agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers: sharing water and benefits in hydropower-irrigation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tilmant

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to assess agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers in water resources systems where irrigation crop production and hydropower generation are the main economic activities. In many countries, water for crop irrigation is often considered as a static asset: irrigation water is usually allocated by a system of limited annual rights to use a prescribed volume of water. The opportunity cost (forgone benefits of this static management approach may be important in river basins where large irrigation areas are present in the upstream reaches. Temporary reallocation of some (or all of the irrigation water downstream to consumptive and/or non-consumptive users can increase the social benefits if the sum of the downstream productivities exceeds those of the upstream farmers whose entitlements are curtailed. However, such a dynamic allocation process will be socially acceptable if upstream farmers are compensated for increasing the availability of water downstream. This paper also presents a methodology to derive the individual contribution of downstream non-consumptive users, i.e. hydropower plants, to the financial compensation of upstream farmers. This dynamic management approach is illustrated with a cascade of multipurpose reservoirs in the Euphrates river basin. The analysis of simulation results reveals that, on average, the annual benefits obtained with the dynamic allocation process are 6% higher that those derived from a static allocation.

  6. Phases of health promotion implementation into the Scottish school system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugglberger, Lisa; Inchley, Jo

    2014-06-01

    Schools have been identified as ideal settings for health promotion (HP) among children, adolescents and school staff. Most European countries have established strategies to implement HP into their school system, however, little is known about these national strategies and how effective they have been. School HP implementation concerns processes of adoption, adaptation and operation of a complex intervention into a complex setting. This study analyses the processes that have led to school HP implementation in Scotland from the 1980s until now to identify key factors which facilitated and supported effective implementation. In the tradition of case-study research, 14 interviews with representatives of national and local organizations involved in school health, as well as with school staff were conducted. Furthermore, policy documents, reports and guidelines were collected. The data were analysed following a Grounded Theory approach. Four phases of school HP implementation into the Scottish school system were identified: (i) getting started (1980s-1998), (ii) political will and strategic vision (1999-2001), (iii) national leadership (2002-2008), and (iv) integration and embedding into education system (2008-ongoing). Throughout the phases political will and committed actors, the strategy/tradition to give power to the local authorities and individual schools, and the establishment of partnerships and ownership have supported implementation. Scotland is an interesting case giving important insights into the ways and possibilities of negotiating an interdisciplinary and cross-sectoral theme such as HP in schools. Further research concerning different political systems and national implementation processes is important to widen the understanding of national implementation strategies of school HP. PMID:23135795

  7. Economic benefits of an economizer system: Energy savings and reduced sick leave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, William J.; Seppanen, Olli; Faulkner, David; Huang, Joe

    2004-02-01

    This study estimated the health, energy, and economic benefits of an economizer ventilation control system that increases outside air supply during mild weather to save energy. A model of the influence of ventilation rate on airborne transmission of respiratory illnesses was used to extend the limited data relating ventilation rate with illness and sick leave. An energy simulation model calculated ventilation rates and energy use versus time for an office building in Washington, D.C. with fixed minimum outdoor air supply rates, with and without an economizer. Sick leave rates were estimated with the disease transmission model. In the modeled 72-person office building, our analyses indicate that the economizer reduces energy costs by approximately $2000 and, in addition, reduces sick leave. The annual financial benefit of the decrease in sick leave is estimated to be between $6,000 and $16,000. This modeling suggests that economizers are much more cost effective than currently recognized.

  8. An Empirical Study on the Benefit Analysis of Enterprises across the Strait Using ERP Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Sheng Weng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available As the world economy evolves with the process of globalization and internationalization, it has been a hugechallenge for the enterprises of Taiwan confronting the mobility and toughness throughout the global market. Inorder to respond to the flourishing development of enterprises across the strait and the expansion on new sector,“inquiry processed in Taiwan, manufactured in Mainland China, and marketed toward the entire world.” is avery critical strategy for Taiwan’s enterprises to respond to the rise of China and globalization. The productionand marketing strategy must be conducted and reacted closely to the market; furthermore, the manager ofenterprises must be well informed of the movement of the industry worldwide, and be capable of integrate allthe resources available. In addition to the HR, finance, material, technology, information, and production withinan enterprise, enterprises should be vertically synergize the upstream and downstream supplier to present acomplete supply-chain model and operation procedure, so to possess sufficient information during the process ofdecision making.For the enterprises across the strait, establishing a factory in China does enjoy the low cost advantage, yet theproblems of enterprise operation management cannot be ignored relatively. Previous studies rarely focused onthe beneficial analysis of enterprises across the strait by installing ERP systems. This dissertation is dedicated toelaborate the motivation of the enterprises across the strait use ERP system by sorting and demonstratingrelative studies of the previous studies, and shared the successful case of how ERP system installed havecontribute to individual companies. It can serve as a solid reference for companies across the strait who isplanning to install ERP systems and furthermore benefits in their planning to establish a effect-improvementstrategies while doing so.In this study sets to analyze the benefits by conducting questionnaire

  9. A Cost to Benefit Analysis of a Next Generation Electric Power Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Apurva

    This thesis provides a cost to benefit analysis of the proposed next generation of distribution systems- the Future Renewable Electric Energy Distribution Management (FREEDM) system. With the increasing penetration of renewable energy sources onto the grid, it becomes necessary to have an infrastructure that allows for easy integration of these resources coupled with features like enhanced reliability of the system and fast protection from faults. The Solid State Transformer (SST) and the Fault Isolation Device (FID) make for the core of the FREEDM system and have huge investment costs. Some key features of the FREEDM system include improved power flow control, compact design and unity power factor operation. Customers may observe a reduction in the electricity bill by a certain fraction for using renewable sources of generation. There is also a possibility of huge subsidies given to encourage use of renewable energy. This thesis is an attempt to quantify the benefits offered by the FREEDM system in monetary terms and to calculate the time in years required to gain a return on investments made. The elevated cost of FIDs needs to be justified by the advantages they offer. The result of different rates of interest and how they influence the payback period is also studied. The payback periods calculated are observed for viability. A comparison is made between the active power losses on a certain distribution feeder that makes use of distribution level magnetic transformers versus one that makes use of SSTs. The reduction in the annual active power losses in the case of the feeder using SSTs is translated onto annual savings in terms of cost when compared to the conventional case with magnetic transformers. Since the FREEDM system encourages operation at unity power factor, the need for installing capacitor banks for improving the power factor is eliminated and this reflects in savings in terms of cost. The FREEDM system offers enhanced reliability when compared to a

  10. Evaluating the benefits of an electrical energy storage system in a future smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in electrical energy storage systems is increasing as the opportunities for their application become more compelling in an industry with a back-drop of ageing assets, increasing distributed generation and a desire to transform networks into Smart Grids. A field trial of an energy storage system designed and built by ABB is taking place on a section of 11 kV distribution network operated by EDF Energy Networks in Great Britain. This paper reports on the findings from simulation software developed at Durham University that evaluates the benefits brought by operating an energy storage system in response to multiple events on multiple networks. The tool manages the allocation of a finite energy resource to achieve the most beneficial shared operation across two adjacent areas of distribution network. Simulations account for the key energy storage system parameters of capacity and power rating. Results for events requiring voltage control and power flow management show how the choice of operating strategy influences the benefits achieved. The wider implications of these results are discussed to provide an assessment of the role of electrical energy storage systems in future Smart Grids.

  11. Evaluating the benefits of an electrical energy storage system in a future smart grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in electrical energy storage systems is increasing as the opportunities for their application become more compelling in an industry with a back-drop of ageing assets, increasing distributed generation and a desire to transform networks into Smart Grids. A field trial of an energy storage system designed and built by ABB is taking place on a section of 11 kV distribution network operated by EDF Energy Networks in Great Britain. This paper reports on the findings from simulation software developed at Durham University that evaluates the benefits brought by operating an energy storage system in response to multiple events on multiple networks. The tool manages the allocation of a finite energy resource to achieve the most beneficial shared operation across two adjacent areas of distribution network. Simulations account for the key energy storage system parameters of capacity and power rating. Results for events requiring voltage control and power flow management show how the choice of operating strategy influences the benefits achieved. The wider implications of these results are discussed to provide an assessment of the role of electrical energy storage systems in future Smart Grids. (author)

  12. Bus 54 -- Where are you? A school bus intelligent information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, L.F.; Moore, S.; Tonn, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Conley, T. [GTE Wireless, Nashville, TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Although major accidents involving school buses are rare (only about 0.3% of all fatal crashes since 1986 are classified as school-bus-related), even minor accidents and breakdowns cause a great deal of parental anxiety. The objective of this research is to design an efficient, cost-effective, accurate, and secure system that will track individual school buses and communicate appropriate information to the school system`s central administration unit, to the school transportation administrator, and to parents of children on the bus. The greatest benefit of the proposed information system is that parents and officials can always know the location and condition (these conditions would vary depending on the needs of a particular school system) of the school buses. In case of an accident or mechanical problem, when emergency crews are needed, they can be dispatched almost immediately with a good understanding of the problem and the exact location of the bus. In addition to being able to track the bus while the child is on board, parents will be able to determine the location of their child`s bus prior to its arrival in the morning in order to prevent the child from needing to wait outside in inclement weather. The information available to parents can also be expanded to include maps of limited routes (e.g., snow routes). Basically, the Bus 54 concept consists of a bus component and a central data processing unit. Each bus will be outfitted with a global positioning satellite (GPS) device, a wireless communication device, and wireless data communication service. The central data processing unit will receive and process information from the buses and provide information access to parents and officials via an Internet link.

  13. Development of user guidelines for ECAS display design. Volume 2: Tasks 9 and 10. [educating the public to the benefits of spacelab and the space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathurst, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Lay-oriented speakers aids, articles, a booklet, and a press kit were developed to inform the press and the general public with background information on the space transportation system, Spacelab, and Spacelab 1 experiments. Educational materials relating to solar-terrestrial physics and its potential benefits to mankind were also written. A basic network for distributing audiovisual and printed materials to regional secondary schools and universities was developed. Suggested scripts to be used with visual aids describing materials science and technology and astronomy and solar physics are presented.

  14. Industrial Cost-Benefit Assessment for Fault-tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Blanke, M.

    1998-01-01

    Economic aspects are decisive for industrial acceptance of research concepts including the promising ideas in fault tolerant control. Fault tolerance is the ability of a system to detect, isolate and accommodate a fault, such that simple faults in a sub-system do not develop into failures at a...... system level. In a design phase for an industrial system, possibilities span from fail safe design where any single point failure is accommodated by hardware, over fault-tolerant design where selected faults are handled without extra hardware, to fault-ignorant design where no extra precaution is taken...... against failure. The paper describes the assessments needed to find the right path for new industrial designs. The economic decisions in the design phase are discussed: cost of different failures, profits associated with available benefits, investments needed for development and life-time support. The...

  15. Ideas for Changing Educational Systems, Educational Policy and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Pat; Lingard, Bob; Wrigley, Terry

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues the need for new ideas to assist in the creation of a new social imaginary post-neo-liberalism to frame rethought educational systems, policy and schooling. This is an attempt to reclaim progressive, democratic and social justice purposes for schooling well beyond dominant human capital renditions. While acknowledging the…

  16. School Libraries in Sierra Leone's Educational System: Quo Vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargbo, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of school libraries in Sierra Leone's (Africa) educational system and the problems affecting their development. Discusses the need for materials to support teaching activities; sociological factors; teachers' and students' information needs; current trends and changes; rural areas with no school libraries; and lack of standards,…

  17. Equity Index in the School Systems of Selected OECD Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmusul, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analysis the equity in the school systems of selected OECD countries. For this purpose, the international data for selected OECD countries was analyzed in terms of four dimensions of equity as learning equity, school resource equity, participating in education, and digital equity. When analyzing data, the equity…

  18. Application of Total Quality Management System in Thai Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueangphitchayathon, Setthiya; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn

    2015-01-01

    The present study seeks to develop a total quality management (TQM) system that can be applied to primary schools. The approach focuses on customer orientation, total involvement of all constituencies and continuous improvement. TQM principles were studied and synthesized according to case studies of the best practices in 3 primary schools (small,…

  19. Can Schools Offer Solutions to Small-Scale Farmers in Africa? Analysis of the Socioeconomic Benefits of Primary School Agriculture in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiror, John James; Oonyu, Joseph; Matsiko, Frank; Kibwika, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Agriculture;This paper discusses the factors influencing application of school gardening knowledge and skills by pupils at school and household level; and whether pupils are effective sources of information to their parents. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare cohorts of 30 pupils randomly selected from eight schools in Kumi and Tororo…

  20. Virtual Training System Design And Development Of Secondary Vocational School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯成舜; 石连栓; 梁甜

    2015-01-01

    This study is carried out on the teaching problems existing in the current secondary vocational school, which summarizes the shortage and blank of the secondary vocational school teaching.And the secondary vocational school virtual training system is exploited based on Virtools platform. At the same time, this paper states the framework and key technologies of the virtual training system.This system let trainees profound experience the process about the learning of knowledge, the principle of demonstration, examination evaluation of operation, that will become an important auxiliary teaching means to vocational colleges.

  1. The United States Department of Energy Office of Industrial Technology`s Technology Benefits Recording System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, K.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technology`s (OIT`s) Technology Benefits Recording System (TBRS) was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The TBRS is used to organize and maintain records of the benefits accrued from the use of technologies developed with the assistance of OIT. OIT has had a sustained emphasis on technology deployment. While individual program managers have specific technology deployment goals for each of their ongoing programs, the Office has also established a separate Technology Deployment Division whose mission is to assist program managers and research and development partners commercialize technologies. As part of this effort, the Technology Deployment Division developed an energy-tracking task which has been performed by PNL since 1977. The goal of the energy-tracking task is to accurately assess the energy savings impact of OIT-developed technologies. In previous years, information on OIT-sponsored technologies existed in a variety of forms--first as a hardcopy, then electronically in several spreadsheet formats that existed in multiple software programs. The TBRS was created in 1993 for OIT and was based on information collected in all previous years from numerous industrial contacts, vendors, and plants that have installed OIT-sponsored technologies. The TBRS contains information on technologies commercialized between 1977 and the present, as well as information on emerging technologies in the late development/early commercialization stage of the technology life cycle. For each technology, details on the number of units sold and the energy saved are available on a year-by-year basis. Information regarding environmental benefits, productivity and competitiveness benefits, or impact that the technology may have had on employment is also available.

  2. Agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers: sharing water and benefits in hydropower-irrigation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pinte

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology to assess agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers in water resources systems where irrigation crop production and hydropower generation are the main economic activities. In many countries, water for crop irrigation is often considered as a static asset: irrigation water is usually allocated by a system of limited annual rights to use a prescribed volume of water, which remains to a large extent independent of the availability of water in the basin. The opportunity cost (forgone benefits of this static management approach may be important in river basins where large irrigation areas are present in the upstream reaches. Continuously adjusting allocation decisions based on the hydrologic status of the system will lead to the temporary reallocation of some (or all of the irrigation water downstream to consumptive and/or non-consumptive users. Such a dynamic allocation process will increase the social benefits if the sum of the downstream productivities exceeds those of the upstream farmers whose entitlements are curtailed. However, this process will be socially acceptable if upstream farmers are compensated for increasing the availability of water downstream. This paper also presents a methodology to derive the individual contribution of downstream non-consumptive users, i.e. hydropower plants, to the financial compensation of upstream farmers. This dynamic management approach is illustrated with a cascade of multipurpose reservoirs in the Euphrates river basin. The analysis of simulation results reveals that, on average, the annual benefits obtained with the dynamic allocation process are 6% higher that those derived from a static allocation.

  3. Agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers: sharing water and benefits in hydropower-irrigation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmant, A.; Goor, Q.; Pinte, D.

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology to assess agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers in water resources systems where irrigation crop production and hydropower generation are the main economic activities. In many countries, water for crop irrigation is often considered as a static asset: irrigation water is usually allocated by a system of limited annual rights to use a prescribed volume of water, which remains to a large extent independent of the availability of water in the basin. The opportunity cost (forgone benefits) of this static management approach may be important in river basins where large irrigation areas are present in the upstream reaches. Continuously adjusting allocation decisions based on the hydrologic status of the system will lead to the temporary reallocation of some (or all) of the irrigation water downstream to consumptive and/or non-consumptive users. Such a dynamic allocation process will increase the social benefits if the sum of the downstream productivities exceeds those of the upstream farmers whose entitlements are curtailed. However, this process will be socially acceptable if upstream farmers are compensated for increasing the availability of water downstream. This paper also presents a methodology to derive the individual contribution of downstream non-consumptive users, i.e. hydropower plants, to the financial compensation of upstream farmers. This dynamic management approach is illustrated with a cascade of multipurpose reservoirs in the Euphrates river basin. The analysis of simulation results reveals that, on average, the annual benefits obtained with the dynamic allocation process are 6% higher that those derived from a static allocation.

  4. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Confidentiality Policies for Advanced Knowledge Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, D

    2003-03-01

    Knowledge Discovery (KD) processes can create new information within a Knowledge Management (KM) system. In many domains, including government, this new information must be secured against unauthorized disclosure. Applying an appropriate confidentiality policy achieves this. However, it is not evident which confidentiality policy to apply, especially when the goals of sharing and disseminating knowledge have to be balanced with the requirements to secure knowledge. This work proposes to solve this problem by developing a cost-benefit analysis technique for examining the tradeoffs between securing and sharing discovered knowledge.

  5. Reaping the benefits of an open systems approach: getting the commercial approach right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Gavin; Dawe, Tony; Stubbs, Peter; Worthington, Olwen

    2016-05-01

    Critical to reaping the benefits of an Open System Approach within Defence, or any other sector, is the ability to design the appropriate commercial model (or framework). This paper reports on the development and testing of a commercial strategy decision support tool. The tool set comprises a number of elements, including a process model, and provides business intelligence insights into likely supplier behaviour. The tool has been developed by subject matter experts and has been tested with a number of UK Defence procurement teams. The paper will present the commercial model framework, the elements of the toolset and the results of testing.

  6. A Cost Benefit Analysis of Two Alternative Traffic Lights Systems for the Colourful City of Zamzam

    OpenAIRE

    Machimbirike, Alexious

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Zamzam Infrastructure Bank has been approached by the country’s third largest city to finance the upgrading and expansion of its traffic lights system. Since the project is social in nature, the Bank intends to justify the borrowing on the basis of Colourful City’s ability to service the loan from its consolidated cash flows. A pre-requisite however, is the need to confirm the project’s socio-economic viability through economic cost benefit analysis. The Bank assessed and is satis...

  7. Benefits of Demand Side Response in Providing Frequency Response Service in the Future GB Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei eTeng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The demand for ancillary service is expected to increase significantly in the future GB electricity system due to high penetration of wind. In particular, the need for frequency response, required to deal with sudden frequency drops following a loss of generator, will increase because of the limited inertia capability of wind plants. This paper quantifies the requirements for primary frequency response and analyses the benefits of frequency response provision from DSR. The results show dramatic changes in frequency response requirements driven by high penetration of wind. Case studies carried out by using an advanced stochastic generation scheduling model suggest that the provision of frequency response from DSR could greatly reduce the system operation cost, wind curtailment and carbon emissions in the future GB system characterised by high penetration of wind. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the benefit of DSR shows significant diurnal and seasonal variation, whereas an even more rapid (instant delivery of frequency response from DSR could provide significant additional value. Our studies also indicate that the competing technologies to DSR, namely battery storage and more flexible generation could potentially reduce its value by up to 35%, still leaving significant room to deploy DSR as frequency response provider.

  8. Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granderson, Jessica; Lin, Guanjing; Piette, Mary Ann

    2013-11-26

    Energy information systems are the web-based software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems used to store, analyze, and display building energy data. They often include analysis methods such as baselining, benchmarking, load profiling, and energy anomaly detection. This report documents a large-scale assessment of energy information system (EIS) uses, costs, and energy benefits, based on a series of focused case study investigations that are synthesized into generalizable findings. The overall objective is to provide organizational decision makers with the information they need to make informed choices as to whether or not to invest in an EIS--a promising technology that can enable up to 20 percent site energy savings, quick payback, and persistent low-energy performance when implemented as part of best-practice energy management programs.

  9. DASH - Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS): High School

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2015. High School Dataset. The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health behaviors among youth and young...

  10. DASH - Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS): Middle School

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2015. Middle School Dataset. The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) monitors six categories of priority health behaviors among youth and young...

  11. Performance benefits of telerobotics and teleoperation - enhancements for an arm-based tank waste retrieval system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report evaluates telerobotic and teleoperational arm-based retrieval systems that require advanced robotic controls. These systems will be deployed in waste retrieval activities in Hanford's Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). The report assumes that arm-based, retrieval systems will combine a teleoperational arm and control system enhanced by a number of advanced and telerobotic controls. The report describes many possible enhancements, spanning the full range of the control spectrum with the potential for technical maturation. The enhancements considered present a variety of choices and factors including: the enhancements to be included in the actual control system, safety, detailed task analyses, human factors, cost-benefit ratios, and availability and maturity of technology. Because the actual system will be designed by an offsite vendor, the procurement specifications must have the flexibility to allow bidders to propose a broad range of ideas, yet build in enough restrictions to filter out infeasible and undesirable approaches. At the same time they must allow selection of a technically promising proposal. Based on a preliminary analysis of the waste retrieval task, and considering factors such as operator limitations and the current state of robotics technology, the authors recommend a set of enhancements that will (1) allow the system to complete its waste retrieval mission, and (2) enable future upgrades in response to changing mission needs and technological advances

  12. Performance benefits of telerobotics and teleoperation - enhancements for an arm-based tank waste retrieval system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gibbons, P.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Draper, J.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    This report evaluates telerobotic and teleoperational arm-based retrieval systems that require advanced robotic controls. These systems will be deployed in waste retrieval activities in Hanford`s Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). The report assumes that arm-based, retrieval systems will combine a teleoperational arm and control system enhanced by a number of advanced and telerobotic controls. The report describes many possible enhancements, spanning the full range of the control spectrum with the potential for technical maturation. The enhancements considered present a variety of choices and factors including: the enhancements to be included in the actual control system, safety, detailed task analyses, human factors, cost-benefit ratios, and availability and maturity of technology. Because the actual system will be designed by an offsite vendor, the procurement specifications must have the flexibility to allow bidders to propose a broad range of ideas, yet build in enough restrictions to filter out infeasible and undesirable approaches. At the same time they must allow selection of a technically promising proposal. Based on a preliminary analysis of the waste retrieval task, and considering factors such as operator limitations and the current state of robotics technology, the authors recommend a set of enhancements that will (1) allow the system to complete its waste retrieval mission, and (2) enable future upgrades in response to changing mission needs and technological advances.

  13. Forty days of free school meals as a tool for introducing market-based healthy school meal systems in 35 Danish schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinck, Nenna Maria; Hansen, Mette Weinreich; Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2011-01-01

    for data collection was semi-structured, qualitative interviews. Results: The main results from a systematic examination of the 35 participating schools show that the systems were mainly organized with external suppliers, and only a few of the 35 schools succeeded in establishing a user-paid school...... meal system afterwards. Conclusions: The established meal systems contained a lack of embedding factors, which is pointed to as one of the main challenges to a user-financed school meal system. The experiences of these 35 participating schools show that a period of free school meals is not a...

  14. Airborne Asbestos Exposures from Warm Air Heating Systems in Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Burdett, Garry J.; Dewberry, Kirsty; Staff, James

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of airborne asbestos that can be released into classrooms of schools that have amosite-containing asbestos insulation board (AIB) in the ceiling plenum or other spaces, particularly where there is forced recirculation of air as part of a warm air heating system. Air samples were collected in three or more classrooms at each of three schools, two of which were of CLASP (Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme) system-built d...

  15. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to the Use of High-Speed Broadband in Ireland's Second-Level Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Bryan; Devitt, Niamh; Lyons, Seán; McCoy, Selina

    2015-01-01

    As part of Ireland's National Digital Strategy, high-speed broadband is being rolled out to all second-level schools to support greater use of information and communication technology (ICT) in education. This programme signals a move from slow and unreliable broadband connections for many schools to a guaranteed high-speed connection with…

  16. Including natural systems into the system engineering process: benefits to spaceflight and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studor, George

    2014-03-01

    How did we get to the point where we don't have time to be inspired by the wonders of Nature? Our office walls, homes and city streets are so plain that even when we do escape to a retreat with nature all around us, we may be blind to its magnificence. Yet there are many who have applied what can be known of natural systems (NS) to create practical solutions, but often definite applications for them are lacking. Mimicry of natural systems is not only more possible than ever before, but the education and research programs in many major universities are churning out graduates with a real appreciation for Nature's complex integrated systems. What if these skills and perspectives were employed in the teams of systems engineers and the technology developers that support them to help the teams think "outside-the-box" of manmade inventions? If systems engineers (SE) and technology developers regularly asked the question, "what can we learn from Nature that will help us?" as a part of their processes, they would discover another set of potential solutions. Biomimicry and knowledge of natural systems is exploding. What does this mean for systems engineering and technology? Some disciplines such as robotics and medical devices must consider nature constantly. Perhaps it's time for all technology developers and systems engineers to perceive natural systems experts as potential providers of the technologies they need.

  17. Benefits to the Europa Clipper Mission Provided by the Space Launch System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Patel, Keyur

    2013-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) proposed Europa Clipper mission would provide an unprecedented look at the icy Jovian moon, and investigate its environment to determine the possibility that it hosts life. Focused on exploring the water, chemistry, and energy conditions on the moon, the spacecraft would examine Europa's ocean, ice shell, composition and geology by performing 32 low-altitude flybys of Europa from Jupiter orbit over 2.3 years, allowing detailed investigations of globally distributed regions of Europa. In hopes of expediting the scientific program, mission planners at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are working with the Space Launch System (SLS) program, managed at Marshall Space Flight Center. Designed to be the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown, SLS is making progress toward delivering a new capability for exploration beyond Earth orbit. The SLS rocket will offer an initial low-Earth-orbit lift capability of 70 metric tons (t) beginning with a first launch in 2017 and will then evolve into a 130 t Block 2 version. While the primary focus of the development of the initial version of SLS is on enabling human exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit using the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, the rocket offers unique benefits to robotic planetary exploration missions, thanks to the high characteristic energy it provides. This paper will provide an overview of both the proposed Europa Clipper mission and the Space Launch System vehicle, and explore options provided to the Europa Clipper mission for a launch within a decade by a 70 t version of SLS with a commercially available 5-meter payload fairing, through comparison with a baseline of current Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) capabilities. Compared to that baseline, a mission to the Jovian system could reduce transit times to less than half, or increase mass to more than double, among other benefits. In addition to these primary benefits, the paper will

  18. Systems: An Approach to School Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, C. W., Jr.

    This report describes some programs that attempt to raise the quality of school buildings without raising the cost of building them. Educational changes have required new sets of spaces in schoolhouses, whose specifications could only be met by changes in building technology and in construction management. This triumvirate of change emerged in the…

  19. Waldorf Schools: A Child-Centered System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    This paper presents an overview of the philosophy, psychology of learning, teaching methods, and curriculum of the Waldorf Schools. Most Waldorf teachers are influenced by the esoteric form of critical idealism propounded by Rudolf Steiner. The child is considered by Steiner to be a spiritual being who has reincarnated on to earth in a physical…

  20. Teaching Database Management System Use in a Library School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael D.

    1985-01-01

    Description of database management systems course being taught to students at School of Library and Information Studies, University of California, Berkeley, notes course structure, assignments, and course evaluation. Approaches to teaching concepts of three types of database systems are discussed and systems used by students in the course are…

  1. CATTLE AS ASSETS: ASSESSMENT OF NON-MARKET BENEFITS FROM CATTLE IN SMALLHOLDER KENYAN CROP-LIVESTOCK SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Ouma, Emily Awuor; Obare, Gideon A.; Staal, Steven J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper uses data from a survey of two hundred and fifty cattle households in three cattle keeping systems; intensive, semi-intensive and extensive systems to estimate the value of non-market, socio-economic benefits of cattle in Kenya. These benefits of cattle keeping are of special importance in developing countries, where financial markets function poorly and opportunities for risk management through formal insurance generally absent. However, when estimating the total contribution of l...

  2. Efficiency Benefits Using the Terminal Area Precision Scheduling and Spacing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thipphavong, Jane; Swenson, Harry N.; Lin, Paul; Seo, Anthony Y.; Bagasol, Leonard N.

    2011-01-01

    NASA has developed a capability for terminal area precision scheduling and spacing (TAPSS) to increase the use of fuel-efficient arrival procedures during periods of traffic congestion at a high-density airport. Sustained use of fuel-efficient procedures throughout the entire arrival phase of flight reduces overall fuel burn, greenhouse gas emissions and noise pollution. The TAPSS system is a 4D trajectory-based strategic planning and control tool that computes schedules and sequences for arrivals to facilitate optimal profile descents. This paper focuses on quantifying the efficiency benefits associated with using the TAPSS system, measured by reduction of level segments during aircraft descent and flight distance and time savings. The TAPSS system was tested in a series of human-in-the-loop simulations and compared to current procedures. Compared to the current use of the TMA system, simulation results indicate a reduction of total level segment distance by 50% and flight distance and time savings by 7% in the arrival portion of flight (200 nm from the airport). The TAPSS system resulted in aircraft maintaining continuous descent operations longer and with more precision, both achieved under heavy traffic demand levels.

  3. Improvement of safety by analysis of costs and benefits of the system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karkoszka

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of the paper has been the assessment of the dependence between improvement of the implemented occupational health and safety management system and both minimization of costs connected with occupational health and safety assurance and optimization of real work conditions.Design/methodology/approach: used for the analysis has included definition of the occupational health and safety system with regard to the rules and tool allowing for occupational safety assurance in the organisational and technical way, analyses of costs and benefits of the system maintenance as well as study on the tools for potential improvement of processes.Findings: of analysis are as follows: continuously improving occupational safety management system guarantees the advancement of work conditions, the decrease of the rate of occupational illnesses as well as the lowering of the amount of occupational accidents.Research limitations/implications: can apply in case of any organisation, which uses both organizational and technical rules, methods and tools to assure the optimal level of occupational health and safety conditions.Originality/value: of the presented paper has been constituted by the specification of the continuous improvement tools and methods in the system implemented on the basis on quality criterion.

  4. Regulatory Compliance and Environmental Benefit Analysis of Combined Heat and Power (CHP Systems in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy conservation achieved by utilizing waste heat in the energy and industrial sectors has became more and more important after the energy crisis in the 1970s because it plays a vital role in the potential energy-efficiency improvement. In this regard, cogeneration (combined heat and power, CHP systems are thus becoming attractive due to the energy, economic, and environmental policies for pursuing stable electricity supply, sustainable development and environmental pollution mitigation in Taiwan. The objective of this paper is to present an updated analysis of CHP systems in Taiwan during the period from 1990 to 2010. The description in the paper is thus based on an analysis of electricity supply/consumption and its sources from CHP systems during the past two decades, and centered on two important regulations in compliance with CHP systems (i.e., Energy Management Law and Environmental Impact Assessment Act. Based on the total net power generation from CHP systems (i.e., 35,626 GWh in 2011, it was found that the carbon dioxide reduction benefits were estimated to be around 20,000 Gg.

  5. Fuzzy - Expert System for Cost Benefit Analysis of Enterprise Information Systems: A Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Faith –Michael E. Uzoka

    2009-01-01

    Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) are collections of hardware, software, data, people and procedures that work together to manage organizational information resources, ultimately enhancing decision making, and strategic advantage. One of the key issues in the acquisition and utilization of EIS is the determination of the value of investment in such systems. Traditional capital budgeting models such as NPV, IRR, payback period, and profitability index focus mainly on quantifiable variables...

  6. Benefits Of Computerized Accounting Information Systems On The JIT Production Systems

    OpenAIRE

    DALCI, İlhan; TANIŞ, Veyis Naci

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in information technology IT have enabled companies to use computers to carry out their activities that were previously performed manually Accounting systems that were previously performed manually can now be performed with the help of computers Therefore improvements in the information technology have facilitated the use of cost and management accounting procedures On the other hand most of the companies have started to apply just in time JIT production system as a tool...

  7. Evaluation of the air quality benefits of the subway system in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cacilda Bastos Pereira da; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Amato-Lourenço, Luis Fernando; Rodrigues-Silva, Fernando; Miraglia, Simone Georges El Khouri

    2012-06-30

    Air pollution is a severe problem in major urban areas due to increasing numbers of vehicles, reduced road capacity and few investments in public transportation, especially in developing countries. Public transportation has a special role in avoiding congestion and consequent environmental and health impacts but is considered expensive. The objective of this paper was to analyze the benefits of the São Paulo subway in terms of the air pollution in the city through strikes events, analyzing both the health outcomes and the related economic burden. For the strike events, increases in air pollutant concentrations during the strike day was observed when compared to a similar day in terms of day of the week and meteorological conditions. Increases in mortality were also observed and the associated economic burden calculated. Despite the elevated construction and operation costs of the subway, when environment and social values are considered, cost-benefit analysis results would indicate a worthwhile investment. The consideration of these aspects is essential to sustainable transportation analyses, and in the case of the São Paulo subway, our analysis clearly demonstrated the important role of this system in the city's environmental, social and economic attributes. PMID:22446073

  8. Net environmental benefit: introducing a new LCA approach on wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, D; Bouchard, C; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2012-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) allows evaluating the potential environmental impacts of a product or a service in relation to its function and over its life cycle. In past LCAs applied to wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the system function definition has received little attention despite its great importance. This has led to some limitations in LCA results interpretation. A new methodology to perform LCA on WWTPs is proposed to avoid those limitations. It is based on net environmental benefit (NEB) evaluation and requires assessing the potential impact of releasing wastewater without and with treatment besides assessing the impact of the WWTP's life cycle. The NEB allows showing the environmental trade-offs between avoided impact due to wastewater treatment and induced impact by the WWTP's life cycle. NEB is compared with a standard LCA through the case study of a small municipal WWTP consisting of facultative aerated lagoons. The NEB and standard LCA show similar results for impact categories solely related to the WWTP's life cycle but differ in categories where wastewater treatment environmental benefit is accounted for as NEB considers influent wastewater quality whereas standard LCA does not. PMID:22508125

  9. Business Benefits from Enterprise Systems Implementation in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mathrani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The market for enterprise systems (ESs continues to grow as business becomes increasingly global and competitive. Increasingly, the market focus for ES vendors is on small businesses. The purpose of this study is to provide a unique ES vendor/consultant perspective on (a the business benefits small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs expect from their ES investment and (b to examine current practices of ES implementation in SMEs through a conceptual framework that considers the organisational, process and strategic context of the implementation. This study does so with interview data collected from ES vendors, ES consultants and IT research firms, who are the key players in the New Zealand ES industry. A distinctive contribution of this research is the vendor/consultant perspective as the unit of analysis, rather than the SME perspective commonly used in similar research. The vendor/consultant perspective offers a comprehensive viewpoint that extends across numerous SMEs in a variety of industries. Findings from interviews with these professionals indicate that although many ES implementations are several years old now, SMEs have only recently started tracking benefits through analytical processes in expectation to realise business value from their ES investment. The results also identify how ES implementation practices are adapting to be more suitable to the SME sector, an important market for ES vendors given the saturation of the large enterprise market for ES implementation.

  10. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolosz, Ben, E-mail: kolosz27@gmail.com; Grant-Muller, Susan, E-mail: S.M.Grant-Muller@its.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-01-15

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 25 years

  11. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO2 equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO2 equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO2 equivalency over 25 years. • ISA and AHS

  12. Rural transit systems benefits in Tennessee: methodology and an empirical study

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Southworth; Vogt, David P; T Randall Curlee

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a detailed benefits assessment framework and sensitivity analysis of the operation of rural public transit services in the state of Tennessee. The paper describes the major components of this benefits framework and its application to the demand-responsive services operated within the state during the 1998/99 fiscal year. An empirical analysis yields a benefit/cost ratio greater than 1.0, with benefits dominated by accessibility gains to current transit ...

  13. Effective Consultants: A Conceptual Framework for Helping School Systems Achieve Systemic Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazle Bussey, Leslie; Welch, Jennie C.; Mohammed, Meca B.

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of organisations--universities, non-profits, independent consultants--are emerging as partners to school systems pursuing systemic improvement. This proliferation invites questions probing the interaction between school systems and their consulting partners. Drawing on a cross-disciplinary review of literature, this theoretical…

  14. Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) implementation, integration & benefits in an integrated health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoori, Bahar; Erhard, Karen K; Sunshine, Jeffrey L

    2012-02-01

    The availability of the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) has revolutionized the practice of radiology in the past two decades and has shown to eventually increase productivity in radiology and medicine. PACS implementation and integration may bring along numerous unexpected issues, particularly in a large-scale enterprise. To achieve a successful PACS implementation, identifying the critical success and failure factors is essential. This article provides an overview of the process of implementing and integrating PACS in a comprehensive health system comprising an academic core hospital and numerous community hospitals. Important issues are addressed, touching all stages from planning to operation and training. The impact of an enterprise-wide radiology information system and PACS at the academic medical center (four specialty hospitals), in six additional community hospitals, and in all associated outpatient clinics as well as the implications on the productivity and efficiency of the entire enterprise are presented. PMID:22212425

  15. RADON MITIGATION IN SCHOOLS: CASE STUDIES OF RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS INSTALLED BY EPA IN FOUR MARYLAND SCHOOLS ARE PRESENTED

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first part of this two-part paper discusses radon entry into schools, radon mitigation approaches for schools, and school characteristics (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning -- HVAC-- system design and operation) that influence radon entry and mitigation system ...

  16. Benefits of School-To-Work Program Participation: Perceptions of Students and Comparison of Pre and Post Grades and Attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Esther R.

    1997-01-01

    There has been limited evaluation to show the perceptions of student participants in school-to-work programs about the impact of school-to-work program participation as being beneficial to their postsecondary educational and career plans, and no research to determine whether perceptions differ significantly across race and gender. In addition, the minimal research conducted to date did not study student participants' perceptions about the impact of the program on their understanding of the r...

  17. University-level practical activities in bioinformatics benefit voluntary groups of pupils in the last 2 years of school

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Daniel; Alderson, Rosanna Grace; McDonagh, James L.; Plaisier, Heleen; Comrie, Muriel Margaret; Duncan, Leigh; Muirhead, Gavin T.P.; Sweeney, Stuart D.

    2015-01-01

    This work was supported in part by the Science and Technology Facilities Council under grant ST/M000435/1 to Daniel Barker. Background Bioinformatics—the use of computers in biology—is of major and increasing importance to biological sciences and medicine. We conducted a preliminary investigation of the value of bringing practical, university-level bioinformatics education to the school level. We conducted voluntary activities for pupils at two schools in Scotland (years S5 and S6; pupils ...

  18. A Typology of Benefit Sharing Arrangements for the Governance of Social-Ecological Systems in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Breen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study explores and interprets relevant literature to construct a typology of benefit sharing arrangements for the governance of social-ecological systems in developing countries. The typology comprises three generic categories of benefit sharing arrangements: collaborative, market-oriented, and egalitarian. We contend that the three categories provide a useful basis for exploring and classifying the different societal arrangements required for governance of social-ecological systems. The typology we present is founded on a related set of explicit assumptions that can be used to explore and better understand the linkages among ecosystem services, benefit sharing, and governance. Issues that are strongly related to sustainability in developing countries form the core basis of our assumptions. Our aim is not to write a definitive exposition, but to spark debate and engage ongoing dialogue on governance and benefit sharing in the field of social-ecological systems.

  19. Adaption to Extreme Rainfall with Open Urban Drainage System: An Integrated Hydrological Cost-Benefit Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, Toke Emil; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark;

    2013-01-01

    with extreme rainfalls is evaluated using a quantitative flood risk approach based on urban inundation modeling and socio-economic analysis of corresponding costs and benefits. A hedonic valuation model is applied to capture the local economic gains or losses from more water bodies in green areas. The...... framework was applied to the northern part of the city of Aarhus, Denmark. We investigated four adaptation strategies that encompassed laissez-faire, larger sewer pipes, local infiltration units, and open drainage system in the urban green structure. We found that when taking into account environmental...... amenity effects, an integration of open drainage basins in urban recreational areas is likely the best adaptation strategy, followed by pipe enlargement and local infiltration strategies. All three were improvements compared to the fourth strategy of no measures taken....

  20. School System (Re)design: Developing Educational Infrastructures to Support School Leadership and Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Megan; Woulfin, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for local education agencies (i.e., school districts in the United States) undergoing reform is to design systems that facilitate instructional improvement. At the core of these systems are educational infrastructures that bolster capacity building efforts and support teaching and leadership practices. Our goal for this special…

  1. Budgeting for School Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drott, M. Carl

    1978-01-01

    Describes various forms of budgets and discusses concepts in budgeting useful to supervisors of school media centers: line item budgets, capital budgets, creating budgets, the budget calendar, innovations, PPBS (Planning, Programing, Budgeting System), zero-based budgeting, cost-benefit analysis, benefits, benefit guidelines, and budgeting for the…

  2. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  3. 20 CFR 404.463 - Nonpayment of benefits of aliens outside the United States; “foreign social insurance system...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... United States; âforeign social insurance system,â and âtreaty obligationâ exceptions defined. 404.463... benefits of aliens outside the United States; “foreign social insurance system,” and “treaty obligation” exceptions defined. (a) Foreign social insurance system exception. The following criteria are used...

  4. Deprivation and dental health. The benefits of a child dental health campaign in relation to deprivation as estimated by the uptake of free meals at school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, L; Wight, C; Wohlgemuth, B

    1991-01-01

    knowledge and behaviour were evaluated by interviews immediately before and after the campaign. The results showed a significant increase in knowledge about diet and dental health and a significantly higher proportion of children claimed to choose non-cariogenic foods and drinks as a result of the campaign......The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the overall effect of the 1989 Lothian dental health education campaign on 8-year-old school children's dental health knowledge and behaviour and to examine the relationship between free meals and the children's benefit from the campaign....... Altogether 874 children were randomly selected and included in the study. Sugar-free meals and drinks were provided in all primary schools throughout the campaign week. Dental officers held 30-minute information sessions with each class and encouraged teachers to continue dental health activities. Dental...

  5. Electric Power Saving Awareness System at School Using ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzume Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, education on energy saving at schools attracts attention to reduce energy consumption. In this paper we proposed a novel system to promote energy conservation activity at schools using a sensor network. The system consisted of a wall-type clock embedded with several kinds of sensors for temperature and light in the classroom, and wireless devices to connect to a cloud computer network. The system had the following superiorities: offered various services for energy conservation activity, needless of CT (Current Transformer sensor, low price, ease of installation and extension, and visualization of power consumption in conjunction with school timetable in real time. We presented the system and a user study conducted to evaluate its usefulness.

  6. Cost/benefit systems analysis and comparison of shallow land burial and greater confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) has, over the past few years, become an increasingly sophisticated and expensive problem for LLW generators, particularly utilities. The main area in the LLW management system, which includes volume reduction, solidification, packaging, handling, transportation, and disposal, that has really seen a dramatic increase in costs over the last few years is the disposal of LLW. In response, utilities are increasingly looking into various volume reduction alternatives to reduce these disposal costs. The time is ripe and the need evident for an analysis that considers the entire LLW management system, not just selected parts. To help meet this need, a cost/benefit and sensitivity analysis was performed of the entire LLW management system to see if greater confinement disposal is a potential cost effective alternative to shallow land burial. The results of this analysis are presented in this paper which concludes that greater confinement disposal can be a cost effective alternative to shallow land burial for a few LLW management configurations

  7. The Impact of Systemic Risk on the Diversification Benefits of a Risk Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Busse

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Risk diversification is the basis of insurance and investment. It is thus crucial to study the effects that could limit it. One of them is the existence of systemic risk that affects all of the policies at the same time. We introduce here a probabilistic approach to examine the consequences of its presence on the risk loading of the premium of a portfolio of insurance policies. This approach could be easily generalized for investment risk. We see that, even with a small probability of occurrence, systemic risk can reduce dramatically the diversification benefits. It is clearly revealed via a non-diversifiable term that appears in the analytical expression of the variance of our models. We propose two ways of introducing it and discuss their advantages and limitations. By using both VaR and TVaR to compute the loading, we see that only the latter captures the full effect of systemic risk when its probability to occur is low.

  8. Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

    2006-10-01

    The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

  9. Radon mitigation in schools utilising heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a continuing radon in schools technology development effort, EPA's School Evaluation Team has performed radon mitigation in schools by the method of ventilation/pressurisation control technology. Ventilation rates were increased, at a minimum, to meet the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) standard, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality (ASHRAE 62-1989). This paper presents the results and the preliminary evaluations which led to the team's decision to implement this technology. Factors considered include energy penalties, comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ), building shell tightness, and equipment costs. Cost benefit of heat recovery ventilation was also considered. Earlier results of the SEP team's efforts have indicated a severe ventilation problem within the schools of the United States. Two case studies are presented where HVAC technology was implemented for controlling radon concentrations. One involved the installation of a heat recovery ventilator to depressurise a crawl space and provide ventilation to the classrooms which previously had no mechanical ventilation. The other involved the restoration of a variable air volume system in a two-storey building. The HVAC system's controls were restored and modified to provide a constant building pressure differential to control the entry of radon. Pre-mitigation and post-mitigation indoor air pollutant measurements were taken, including radon, carbon dioxide (CO2), particulates, and bio-aerosols. Long-term monitoring of radon, CO2, building pressure differentials, and indoor/outdoor temperature and relative humidity is presented. (author)

  10. Pedagogical discourses in Bhutanese school system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer; Utha, Karma

    2013-01-01

    students. On a value basis the teachers agree with the pedagogical ideal of student centered learning which is in line with an experiential learning discourse. In addition students tell about how they go to the better students, rather than to the teacher, for help. This behavior, where peers are used as...... cognitive approach to learning. The consequences of that in terms of student’s personal development of professional, personal and social competences and the consequences in terms of development of society are examined. We conclude the article by discussing whether there could be some positive benefits of...

  11. Investigating Educational Systems, Leadership, and School Culture: A Holistic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Jill Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Most populous school districts operate using a bureaucratic hierarchical organizational structure developed primarily for industry, a system structure that has remained intact for a century despite evolving from a manufacturing to a knowledge-based economy. Although strong for efficiency, this system structure is resistant to change and promotes…

  12. Cost-Effective School Alarm Systems. Security Topics Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufer, Steve

    This document outlines considerations in the selection of a cost-effective school-alarm system. Steps in the planning process include: conducting a district needs assessment; gathering input from all staff levels; consulting technical expertise; and selecting a security system that can be integrated with other site needs. It further describes the…

  13. High School Students' Understanding of the Human Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi; Dodick, Jeff; Tripto, Jaklin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 120 tenth-grade students from 8 schools were examined to determine the extent of their ability to perceive the human body as a system after completing the first stage in their biology curriculum--"The human body, emphasizing homeostasis". The students' systems thinking was analyzed according to the STH thinking model, which roughly…

  14. Energy, winter, and schools: crisis and decision theory. [Cincinnati and Columbus, OH, school systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, D.K.

    1979-01-01

    Attempts to understand variations in crisis response proliferate in the areas of foreign policy and studies of communities caught in natural disasters. The premise that when a threat is unique or sufficiently severe the system often adapts is applied to what happened in two Ohio city school systems (Columbus and Cincinnati) that adapted to a winter crisis. The processes of educational planning and decision making that occurred in a perceived crisis are found to have led to a total reorganization in one school and not in the other. Several practical and theoretical implications for handling future crises are derived from these findings. 187 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  15. Mortality Benefits of Antibiotic Computerised Decision Support System: Modifying Effects of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Angela L. P.; Lye, David C.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic computerised decision support systems (CDSSs) are shown to improve antibiotic prescribing, but evidence of beneficial patient outcomes is limited. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a 1500-bed tertiary-care hospital in Singapore, to evaluate the effectiveness of the hospital’s antibiotic CDSS on patients’ clinical outcomes, and the modification of these effects by patient factors. To account for clustering, we used multilevel logistic regression models. One-quarter of 1886 eligible inpatients received CDSS-recommended antibiotics. Receipt of antibiotics according to CDSS’s recommendations seemed to halve mortality risk of patients (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.26-1.10, P = 0.09). Patients aged ≤65 years had greater mortality benefit (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.20-1.00, P = 0.05) than patients that were older than 65 (OR 1.28, 95% CI 0.91-1.82, P = 0.16). No effect was observed on incidence of Clostridium difficile (OR 1.02, 95% CI 0.34-3.01), and multidrug-resistant organism (OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.42-2.71) infections. No increase in infection-related readmission (OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.48-2.79) was found in survivors. Receipt of CDSS-recommended antibiotics reduced mortality risk in patients aged 65 years or younger and did not increase the risk in older patients. Physicians should be informed of the benefits to increase their acceptance of CDSS recommendations.

  16. Lightweight Data Systems in the Cloud: Costs, Benefits and Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatland, R.; Arendt, A. A.; Howe, B.; Hess, N. J.; Futrelle, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present here a simple analysis of both the cost and the benefit of using the cloud in environmental science circa 2016. We present this set of ideas to enable the potential 'cloud adopter' research scientist to explore and understand the tradeoffs in moving some aspect of their compute work to the cloud. We present examples, design patterns and best practices as an evolving body of knowledge that help optimize benefit to the research team. Thematically this generally means not starting from a blank page but rather learning how to find 90% of the solution to a problem pre-built. We will touch on four topics of interest. (1) Existing cloud data resources (NASA, WHOI BCO DMO, etc) and how they can be discovered, used and improved. (2) How to explore, compare and evaluate cost and compute power from many cloud options, particularly in relation to data scale (size/complexity). (3) What are simple / fast 'Lightweight Data System' procedures that take from 20 minutes to one day to implement and that have a clear immediate payoff in environmental data-driven research. Examples include publishing a SQL Share URL at (EarthCube's) CINERGI as a registered data resource and creating executable papers on a cloud-hosted Jupyter instance, particularly iPython notebooks. (4) Translating the computational terminology landscape ('cloud', 'HPC cluster', 'hadoop', 'spark', 'machine learning') into examples from the community of practice to help the geoscientist build or expand their mental map. In the course of this discussion -- which is about resource discovery, adoption and mastery -- we provide direction to online resources in support of these themes.

  17. Formation of concept of decimal system in Mexican school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Quintanar Rojas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with initial formation of concept of decimal system in second year of education at primary school in Mexico (City of Puebla. Our research is based on Activity Theory conception of teaching-learning process and of gradual introduction of scientific concepts in school age. The method has been designed and worked out with the help of actions in which logic, symbolic, spatial and mathematical aspects were implemented. All actions were introduced within divided activity of children in group guided by adult. A pretest-posttest design was used with an experimental group of Mexican school children. The results showed that children have developed the significant skills necessary for understanding the concept of decimal number system. They were also able to apply this concept for new kind if activity al the end of school year. Such new activity was solving of mathematic problems, which was not included in official school program. We consider that proposed method can be an approximation for solution of common difficulties which arise at primary school concerning teaching of mathematics.

  18. Probiotics in the Space Food System: Delivery, Microgravity Effects, and the Potential Benefit to Crew Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, S. L.; Ott, C. M.; Douglas, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    As mission distance and duration increase, the need grows for non-invasive disease prevention and immunomodulation, especially given the limited medical response capability expected for these missions and the immune dysregulation documented in crew. Additionally, changes in diet, lifestyle, antibiotic usage, and the environmental stresses during spaceflight may alter crewmembers' intestinal microbiome. The addition of probiotic bacteria to the space food system is expected to confer immunostimulatory benefits on crewmembers, with the potential to counteract the immune dysregulation that has been documented in spaceflight. Based on previous studies that demonstrated unique microbiological responses to the low shear environment of spaceflight, probiotic organisms hold the potential to induce enhanced beneficial responses through mechanisms, such as beneficial interactions with human immune cells and repression of colonization of pathogens on the mucosa. The work presented here will begin to address two research gaps related to providing probiotics in spaceflight: 1) delivery, and 2) the effect of the low shear microgravity environment on probiotic attributes. The probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus was selected for investigation due to its wide commercial use and documented benefits that include inhibition of virulence related gene expression in pathogens and mucosal stimulation of immune cells. The delivery system for probiotics has not been determined for spaceflight, where the food system is shelf stable and the lack of refrigeration prevents the use of traditional dairy delivery methods. In order to demonstrate the potential of the space food system to deliver viable probiotic bacteria to crewmembers, the probiotic L. acidophilus was packaged in high barrier flight packaging in nonfat dry milk (NFDM) or retained in commercial capsule form. Viable cells were enumerated over 8 months of storage at 22, 4, and -80ºC. The survival of L. acidophilus rehydrated in NFDM

  19. The Influence of Socioeconomic Factors on Kentucky's Public School Accountability System:Does Poverty Impact School Effectiveness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lyons

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Under the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System (CATS, Kentucky's public schools have been assigned individualized baseline and improvement goal indices based upon past school performance in relation to the 2014 statewide index goal of 100. Each school's CATS Accountability Index, a measure of school performance based upon both cognitive and non-cognitive measures, has then been compared to these individualized improvement goals for the purpose of designating schools as Meet Goal, Progressing, and Assistance Level (Kentucky Department of Education (KDE, 2000. Considered an interim target model, the design of CATS has been intended to negate the biasing effects of socioeconomic factors on school performance on accountability tests through the individualization of school goals (Ladd. 2001. Results of this study showed that 39.9% to 55.5% of the variance of the CATS indices was shared by school socioeconomic factors. Analysis of this interim target model for the 2000-2002 biennium showed that for elementary and middle schools this model negated the biasing effects of socioeconomic factors, but not for high schools. Moreover, analysis of the progress of schools toward their Improvement Goals in 2001 showed that both elementary and high schools from higher poverty backgrounds lagged significantly behind their more affluent peers, indicating inequitable capacity to meet improvement goals between the poorest and most wealthy schools. Adaptations to the present accountability systems were suggested for the purpose of providing more accurate information to the public regarding the effectiveness of public schools in Kentucky.

  20. Energy storage benefits and market analysis handbook : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyer, James M. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA); Corey, Garth P.; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr. (Distributed Utility Associates, Livermore, CA)

    2004-12-01

    This Guide describes a high level, technology-neutral framework for assessing potential benefits from and economic market potential for energy storage used for electric utility-related applications. In the United States use of electricity storage to support and optimize transmission and distribution (T&D) services has been limited due to high storage system cost and by limited experience with storage system design and operation. Recent improvement of energy storage and power electronics technologies, coupled with changes in the electricity marketplace, indicate an era of expanding opportunity for electricity storage as a cost-effective electric resource. Some recent developments (in no particular order) that drive the opportunity include: (1) states adoption of the renewables portfolio standard (RPS), which may increased use of renewable generation with intermittent output, (2) financial risk leading to limited investment in new transmission capacity, coupled with increasing congestion on some transmission lines, (3) regional peaking generation capacity constraints, and (4) increasing emphasis on locational marginal pricing (LMP).

  1. The Contribution of Operational and Research Applications from the Joint Polar Satellite System to Societal Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, M.

    2015-12-01

    Applications of satellite data are paramount to transform science and technology to product and services which are used in critical decision making. For the satellite community, good representations of technology are the satellite sensors, while science provides the instrument calibration and derived geophysical parameters. Weather forecasting is an application of the science and technology provided by remote sensing satellites. The Joint Polar Satellite System, which includes the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) provides formidable science and technology to support many applications and includes support to 1) weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are used to forecast weather events out to 7 days - nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites; 2) environmental monitoring -data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color; and 3) climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS and CERES will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. To bridge the gap between products and applications, the JPSS Program has established a proving ground program to optimize the use of JPSS data with other data sources to improve key products and services. A number of operational and research applications will be presented along with how the data and applications support a large number of societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation Systems of Systems (GEOSS).

  2. Clinical benefit of power-injectable port systems: A prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the clinical benefit of a central venous port system, which is approved for contrast media injection during contrast enhanced computed tomography. Materials and methods: At a university teaching hospital, 98 patients (59 female, 39 male; median age 61.7 years; range 23–83) had a power-injectable central venous port catheter system implanted. All implantations were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance by interventional radiologists. Procedure related immediate (up to 24 h after implantation), early (<30 days after implantation) and late complications were documented. The frequency of port system use for contrast enhanced computed tomography scans was also considered. Any port capsule migration was assessed indirectly by determining the catheter tip position. The intended follow-up period was 180 days. Results: An overall complication rate of 0.69 for 1,000 catheter days in 78 evaluated ports was recorded (12 ports affected, 15.4%). During the observational period, 40 of 104 contrast enhanced computed tomography scans were performed utilizing the port for contrast media administration (38.5%). 30 catheter tip retractions of more than 3 cm were observed in 82 patients (36.6%). Overall, tip dislocations were statistically more frequent in the female subgroup. Conclusion: The complication rate found in this study is comparable to those, which have been published for standard port systems. The utilization of the device for contrast media injection during contrast enhanced computed tomography scans should be increased. Finally, the port capsule has to be carefully positioned and fixed to prevent migration.

  3. Social Networking in Schools: Benefits and Risks; Review of the Research; Policy Considerations; and Current Practices. Information Capsule. Volume 1109

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Christie

    2012-01-01

    The role that social media should play in education is being hotly debated in school districts across the country. The adoption of social networking for educational purposes lags behind the public's general usage because educators fear that students will be exposed to inappropriate online content, unwanted adult interactions, and bullying from…

  4. Fostering Political Understanding Using "The West Wing": Analyzing the Pedagogical Benefits of Film in High School Civics Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journell, Wayne; Buchanan, Lisa Brown

    2013-01-01

    This study describes one high school civics teacher's use of film as a way to improve his students' understanding of politics. Using episodes of "The West Wing," an award-winning political drama, over the course of a semester, the teacher was able to create an authentic context for political instruction that allowed his students to practice…

  5. The Benefits of Partnership Schemes to Schools and Research Students: A Case Study of the Researchers in Residence Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley, Helen; Karim, Muhammed; Gilchrist, Myra; Gillies, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To meet the needs of a modern Scottish society, a "Curriculum for Excellence" enables teachers to deliver a more coherent and skills-based curriculum, involving partnerships with external agencies. This article analyses the work of one host school/researcher team through the Researchers in Residence scheme in an Edinburgh secondary…

  6. Using Multimedia Graphic Organizer Software in the Prewriting Activities of Primary School Students: What Are the Benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Barbara; Green, Tim; Brown, Abbie

    2009-01-01

    The use of multimedia graphic organizer software and how it influenced the prewriting process for primary school children were evaluated. An analysis of writing samples generated by second-grade students with diverse writing abilities was carried out. Students were given two opportunities to participate in prewriting activities--one without and…

  7. Students’ Attitudes Toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Alana D.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Moreno, Nancy P.; Zientek, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students’ science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Due to the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students’ content knowledge acquisition and attitudes toward science may aid in the development of effective science-related interventions. We investigated the impact of a semester-long after-school intervention utilizing an inquiry-based infectious diseases curriculum (designed for use after-school) on 63 urban students’ content knowledge and aspects of their attitudes towards science. Content knowledge increased 24.6% from pre- to posttest. Multiple regression analyses indicated suggested that the “self-directed effort” subscale of the Simpson-Troost Attitude Questionnaire - Revised best predicted increases in students’ science content knowledge. The construct “science is fun for me” served as a suppressor effect. These findings suggest that future after-school programs focusing on aspects of attitudes toward science most closely associated with gains in content knowledge might improve students’ enthusiasm and academic preparedness for additional science coursework by improving student attitudes towards their perceptions of their self-directed effort. PMID:26778859

  8. Impact of a Universal School-Based Violence Prevention Program on Violent Delinquency: Distinctive Benefits for Youth with Maltreatment Histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Claire V.; Scott, Katreena; Ellis, Wendy; Wolfe, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Child maltreatment constitutes a strong risk factor for violent delinquency in adolescence, with cumulative experiences of maltreatment creating increasingly greater risk. Our previous work demonstrated that a universal school-based violence prevention program could provide a protective impact for youth at risk for violent delinquency…

  9. Using a Computer-based Messaging System at a High School To Increase School/Home Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Mitzi K.

    Minimal communication between school and home was found to contribute to low performance by students at McDuffie High School (South Carolina). This report describes the experience of establishing a computer-based telephone messaging system in the high school and involving parents, teachers, and students in its use. Additional strategies employed…

  10. Estimation of energy conservation benefits in excess air controlled gas-fired systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadori, Alireza; Vuthaluru, Hari B. [School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box 1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2010-10-15

    The most significant energy consumers in energy related industries are boilers and other gas-fired systems. Combustion efficiency term commonly used for boilers and other fired systems and the information on either carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) or oxygen (O{sub 2}) in the exhaust gas can be used. The aim of this study is to develop a simple-to-use predictive tool which is easier than the existing approaches less complicated with fewer computations and suitable for combustion engineers for predicting the natural gas combustion efficiency as a function of excess air fraction and stack temperature rise (the difference between the flue gas temperature and the combustion air inlet temperature). The results of the proposed predictive tool can be used in follow-up calculations to determine relative operating efficiency and to establish energy conservation benefits for an excess air control program. Results show that the proposed predictive tool has a very good agreement with the reported data where the average absolute deviation percent is 0.1%. It should be noted that these calculations are based on assuming complete natural gas combustion at atmospheric pressure and the level of unburned combustibles is considered negligible. The proposed method is superior owing to its accuracy and clear numerical background, wherein the relevant coefficients can be retuned quickly for various cases. This proposed simple-to-use approach can be of immense practical value for the engineers and scientists to have a quick check on natural gas combustion efficiencies for wide range of operating conditions without the necessity of any pilot plant set up and experimental trials. In particular, process and combustion engineers would find the proposed approach to be user friendly involving transparent calculations with no complex expressions for their applications to the design and operation of natural gas-fired systems such as furnaces and boilers. (author)

  11. Perspectives of Teachers and Administrators on the Use of E-School System at Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Sarıtaş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Parallel to rapid developments in Information and Communication Technologies, nowadays information now be reached only by itself does not constitute an essential element; besides this, it has become great importance of information processing, information production and especially via Internet, information marketing that all have entered in our lives. After 1990s, many countries started to take necessary arrangements and actions for the transformation of e-government. One of the e-transformation projects in Turkey, E-School Project, is school administration information software that was initiated in 2007 by Turkish Ministry of National Education (TMNE. It is crucial in terms of the effective use of this e-School system to determine the needs and demands of teachers and administrators who are active users of the system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the e-School system and put forward the potential improvements and changes on the design of this system by examining perspectives and perceptions of teachers and administrators. In this study, qualitative research methods and Atlas.ti text-based data analysis software were employed.

  12. To What Extent Does Hong Kong Primary School Students' Chinese Reading Comprehension Benefit from After-School Private Tuition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Shek Kam

    2014-01-01

    The reading attainment of the 3,875 primary 4 Hong Kong primary school students participating in the 2011 Progress in International Reading Literacy Study ranked first among 49 countries and regions surveyed worldwide. Analysis of the association between (a) participating students' reading attainment and (b) responses to questionnaires…

  13. Differences in High School and College Students' Basic Knowledge and Perceived Education of Internet Safety: Do High School Students Really Benefit from the Children's Internet Protection Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The Children's Internet Protection Act (CIPA; 2000) requires an Internet filtering and public awareness strategy to protect children under 17 from harmful visual Internet depictions. This study compared high school students who went online with the CIPA restriction and college students who went online without the restriction in order to…

  14. Photovoltaic generating systems in rural schools in Neuquen Province, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawand, T.A.; Campbell, J. [Brace Research Institute, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-12-01

    During the period 1994-95, solar photovoltaic systems were installed at a number of schools in Neuquen Province, Argentina, by the Provincial electric utility, Ente Provincial de Energia del Neuquen. This was undertaken with funds provided by the Inter-American Development Bank. In all, there are 12 schools that have had photovoltaic generating systems installed. These generating systems are designed to provide electricity for the basic needs at the schools: primarily for lighting, and to operate small electrical appliances such as communication radios, televisions, VCR`s, AM/FM and short-wave radios. They do not provide enough energy to operate large consumption appliances such as washing machines, microwaves, refrigerators, power tools, etc. The program of provision of PV systems was supplemented with training on simple systems for cooking food or drying fruit, etc. These techniques are primarily intended for demonstration at the schools thus serving an educational role with the hope that they will be transmitted in time to the families of the students where the need is manifested the most.

  15. Systemic hypertension and associated factors in school adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma B. Galal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systemic hypertension is an endemic disease, which causes serious morbidities and mortality in all age groups. Hypertension of adults in Egypt is 26%. It can start in childhood and needs to be assessed in Egyptian children and adolescents.Aim and objectives: This study aims to investigate the prevalence of systemic hypertension in 12-14 year old school children and associated factors. Methods and study design: A cross sectional study was done in some preparatory public and private schools selected from a district of Cairo. The 234 children (167 females, 67males in this study were 12 - 14 year of age. Their weight ranged from 30 – 100 kg Subjects with high blood pressure (BP were identified according to the percentiles of Rosner, et al. Beside characteristics of the sample and blood pressure (BP, associated factors investigated were: - weight and body mass index (BMI, tea / coffee consumption, "added salt before tasting food", sleeping less than 8 hours per day and physical activity. Each student filled out stress and tension level tests. The school health team obtained informed parental consent to include their children in this study. Statistical analysis was done with EPI using chi-square, t-test, odd ratio (OR with 95% confidence limits (Cl and logistic regression with the 5% level for tests. The ethical committee of the faculty approved the study.Results / Finding: The prevalence of systemic hypertension was 10%. Children with high BP (23 were compared to 211 subjects with normotensive BP. High stress and tension score, less sleeping hours / day, adding salt to food and higher BMI were found significantly associated (p<0.05 with high BP. Study limitation: Researchers could assess preparatory schools children. However, primary and secondary school levels are separated in other schools and administrations. We used US standards for hypertension and BMI for children as local standards are not published.Conclusions: One tenth of 12

  16. Students’ Attitudes Toward Science as Predictors of Gains on Student Content Knowledge: Benefits of an After-School Program

    OpenAIRE

    Newell, Alana D.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Moreno, Nancy P.; Zientek, Linda R.

    2015-01-01

    High-quality after-school programs devoted to science have the potential to enhance students’ science knowledge and attitudes, which may impact their decisions about pursuing science-related careers. Due to the unique nature of these informal learning environments, an understanding of the relationships among aspects of students’ content knowledge acquisition and attitudes toward science may aid in the development of effective science-related interventions. We investigated the impact of a seme...

  17. Cost-benefit of the bubble tower concept as a containment passive safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Containment system integrity for both PWRs and BWRs can be assured by passive measures highlighted the use of an accessory Bubble Tower. The utilization of the Bubble Tower precludes the possibility of containment overpressurization. From the thermodynamic standpoint, the Bubble Tower is simply water column of about 120 ft. height attached to the containment and connected to the air space above the suppression pool of a BWR, or a PWR In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank. From the radiological protection standpoint, the Bubble Tower is a water column sufficient to effect decontamination factors of at least 100 for nuclide species other than the noble gases, and with the addition of organic solubilizers sufficient to effect decontamination factors of at least 10 iodides and at least 100 for other nuclide species. When containment steam or noncondensable gas passes through the Bubble Tower, a significant fraction of the radionuclides is absorbed by the water column. When a cost-benefit dose evaluation is performed relative to the utilization of a Bubble Tower, even under conditions where the dollars per man-rem is taken as $1000, the results are favorable. They are substantially more favorable when the dollars per man-rem is taken as $5000 or $10,000 as are the current trends. (author)

  18. Students and Teachers Benefit from Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in a School-Embedded Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Sarah; Luong, Minh T.; Schmidt, Stefan; Bauer, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is a research gap in studies that evaluate the effectiveness of a school-embedded mindfulness-based intervention for both students and teachers. To address this gap, the present pilot study reviews relevant literature and investigates whether students and teachers who participate in separate Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) courses show improvements across a variety of psychological variables including areas of mental health and creativity. Methods: The study applied a controlled waitlist design with three measurement points. A total of 29 students (n = 15 in the intervention and n = 14 in the waitlist group) and 29 teachers (n = 14 in the intervention and n = 15 in the waitlist group) completed questionnaires before and after the MBSR course. The intervention group was also assessed after a 4-month follow-up period. Results: Relative to the control group, significant improvements in self-reported stress, self-regulation, school-specific self-efficacy and interpersonal problems were found among the students who participated in the MBSR course (p mindfulness, anxiety and creativity indicate a realistic potential in those areas. By contrast, teachers in the intervention group showed significantly higher self-reported mindfulness levels and reduced interpersonal problems compared to the control group(p mindfulness in schools by discussing the similarities and differences in the effects of MBSR on students and teachers as well as stressing the importance of investigating interpersonal effects. PMID:27199825

  19. Digital dissection system for medical school anatomy training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Carmichael, Stephen W.; Korinek, Mark J.; Schroeder, Kathryn K.; Segovis, Colin M.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    As technology advances, new and innovative ways of viewing and visualizing the human body are developed. Medicine has benefited greatly from imaging modalities that provide ways for us to visualize anatomy that cannot be seen without invasive procedures. As long as medical procedures include invasive operations, students of anatomy will benefit from the cadaveric dissection experience. Teaching proper technique for dissection of human cadavers is a challenging task for anatomy educators. Traditional methods, which have not changed significantly for centuries, include the use of textbooks and pictures to show students what a particular dissection specimen should look like. The ability to properly carry out such highly visual and interactive procedures is significantly constrained by these methods. The student receives a single view and has no idea how the procedure was carried out. The Department of Anatomy at Mayo Medical School recently built a new, state-of-the-art teaching laboratory, including data ports and power sources above each dissection table. This feature allows students to access the Mayo intranet from a computer mounted on each table. The vision of the Department of Anatomy is to replace all paper-based resources in the laboratory (dissection manuals, anatomic atlases, etc.) with a more dynamic medium that will direct students in dissection and in learning human anatomy. Part of that vision includes the use of interactive 3-D visualization technology. The Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic has developed, in collaboration with the Department of Anatomy, a system for the control and capture of high resolution digital photographic sequences which can be used to create 3-D interactive visualizations of specimen dissections. The primary components of the system include a Kodak DC290 digital camera, a motorized controller rig from Kaidan, a PC, and custom software to synchronize and control the components. For each dissection procedure, the

  20. Implementation of the ISO 9001 quality management system - process, impact and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Ž. Drenovac

    2013-10-01

    , it is necessary to identify necessary procedures, in order to ensure fulfillment of all requirements. The aim is to establish an optimal system using as few procedures as posible. Therefore, it is necessary to choose first few procedures very carefully and implement them so that emloyees gain confidence. Procedures must be defined in such a way that they determine activities and responsibilities for particular jobs. Drawing up instructions and records Work instructions are documents that describe a way of accomplishing activities defined by procedures. Based on them, every competent executor would be able to complete a determined job. Records are documents that give objective evidence that a quality management system entirely conforms with standard requirements. As opposed to procedures, they are unchangeable and they record what was done, who did what, how something was done, and what was achieved. Implementation and control of a quality management system Implementing a quality management system opens a new process of system monitoring, reevalutation and improvement, thus entering first into a process of internal auditing. Internal audits have a purpose of marking positions at which the process in unsuccessful, of detecting deviations and improving the system. Certification Positive experience shows that a certification institution should be chosen at least three months before a formal evaluation is planned. Also, it is very important to choose a certification institution which is accepted, recognized and entirely accredited (BSI, LRQA, TÜV SUD, SGS, Bureau Veritas, etc.. Ther is no certification body that has total accreditation, but only accredited fields in which they can demonstrate relevant experience. Impact and benefits of the establishment of ISO 9001 system Entering the process of certification indicates commitment to quality, which reflects in lower costs due to fewer nonconformed products, lfewer refused products as well as in fewer faults in general

  1. "System Leader" Consultancy Development in English Schools: A Long-Term Agenda for a Democratic Future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Within the policy rationale of a "self-improving" school system, there are now several thousand National College designated "system leaders" working as consultants in English schools on aspects of school to school support. So far, there has been no systematic consideration of the long-term development of these consultants in…

  2. Educational Audiology: A Comparison of Service Delivery Systems Utilized by Missouri Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, J. Brad; Golden, Diane Cordry

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of three audiology service delivery systems--(1) school-based audiology within the district, (2) non-school-based audiology in the community, and (3) school-based audiology in a remote community--found the local school-based delivery system superior on various quality indicators. (Author/DB)

  3. How gamma radiation processing systems are benefiting from the latest advances in information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Wayne H.; Levesque, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    This paper discusses how gamma irradiation plants are putting the latest advances in computer and information technology to use for better process control, cost savings, and strategic advantages. Some irradiator operations are gaining significant benefits by integrating computer technology and robotics with real-time information processing, multi-user databases, and communication networks. The paper reports on several irradiation facilities that are making good use of client/server LANs, user-friendly graphics interfaces, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, distributed I/O with real-time sensor devices, trending analysis, real-time product tracking, dynamic product scheduling, and automated dosimetry reading. These plants are lowering costs by fast and reliable reconciliation of dosimetry data, easier validation to GMP requirements, optimizing production flow, and faster release of sterilized products to market. There is a trend in the manufacturing sector towards total automation using "predictive process control". Real-time verification of process parameters "on-the-run" allows control parameters to be adjusted appropriately, before the process strays out of limits. Applying this technology to the gamma radiation process, control will be based on monitoring the key parameters such as time, and making adjustments during the process to optimize quality and throughput. Dosimetry results will be used as a quality control measurement rather than as a final monitor for the release of the product. Results are correlated with the irradiation process data to quickly and confidently reconcile variations. Ultimately, a parametric process control system utilizing responsive control, feedback and verification will not only increase productivity and process efficiency, but can also result in operating within tighter dose control set points.

  4. How gamma radiation processing systems are benefiting from the latest advances in information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses how gamma irradiation plants are putting the latest advances in computer and information technology to use for better process control, cost savings, and strategic advantages. Some irradiator operations are gaining significant benefits by integrating computer technology and robotics with real-time information processing, multi-user databases, and communication networks. The paper reports on several irradiation facilities that are making good use of client/server LANs, user-friendly graphics interfaces, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems, distributed I/O with real-time sensor devices, trending analysis, real-time product tracking, dynamic product scheduling, and automated dosimetry reading. These plants are lowering costs by fast and reliable reconciliation of dosimetry data, easier validation to GMP requirements, optimizing production flow, and faster release of sterilized products to market. There is a trend in the manufacturing sector towards total automation using 'predictive process control'. Real-time verification of process parameters 'on-the-run' allows control parameters to be adjusted appropriately, before the process strays out of limits. Applying this technology to the gamma radiation process, control will be based on monitoring the key parameters such as time, and making adjustments during the process to optimize quality and throughput. Dosimetry results will be used as a quality control measurement rather than as a final monitor for the release of the product. Results are correlated with the irradiation process data to quickly and confidently reconcile variations. Ultimately, a parametric process control system utilizing responsive control, feedback and verification will not only increase productivity and process efficiency, but can also result in operating within tighter dose control set points

  5. 78 FR 12298 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records-School Participation Division Complaints Tracking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Intranet Web site called PCNet and is maintained by a School Participation Division (SPD) staff member in..., counsel, representative, or witness. (6) Employment, Benefit, and Contracting Disclosure. (a) For... issuance of a license, grant, or other benefit. (b) For Decisions by Other Public Agencies and...

  6. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  7. Home-School Token Economies: Bridging the Communication Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Thomas N.

    1976-01-01

    School token economy systems are being employed with a variety of children in a variety of settings. Additional benefits accrue when home-school token systems are used. These benefits are discussed, as well as the steps necessary towards implementation of these systems. Two case studies are shared as practical examples. (Author)

  8. School Reentry for Children with Acquired Central Nervous Systems Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Joan; Porter, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Onset of acquired central nervous system (CNS) injury during the normal developmental process of childhood can have impact on cognitive, behavioral, and motor function. This alteration of function often necessitates special education programming, modifications, and accommodations in the education setting for successful school reentry. Special…

  9. Funding California Schools: The Revenue Limit System. Technical Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the technical appendices accompanying the report, "Funding California Schools: The Revenue Limit System." Included are: (1) Revenue Limit Calculation and Decomposition; (2) Data and Methods; and (3) Base Funding Alternative Simulation Results. (Contains 5 tables and 26 footnotes.) [For the main report, "Funding California…

  10. School Technology Leadership: Artifacts in Systems of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Sara

    2011-01-01

    A cross-case analysis of five case studies of team-based technology leadership in middle schools with laptop programs identifies systems of practice that organize teams' distributed leadership. These cases suggest that successfully implementing a complex improvement effort warrants a team-based leadership approach, especially for an improvement…

  11. Co-benefits of climate mitigation and health protection in energy systems: scoping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirk R; Haigler, Evan

    2008-01-01

    Interventions in the energy sector offer significant opportunities for reducing both greenhouse and other health-damaging pollution, resulting in what are called "co-benefits." The health community plays a critical role in evaluating such interventions to optimize progress of both sorts because both affect health. In detail, analyses require sophisticated modeling and specific local information. As a starting point, however, we offer here a set of scoping methods for obtaining a quick assessment of these co-benefits for interventions in the energy sector, the arena with the highest potential for significant co-benefits. Thus we combine relevant methods developed separately in recent years for cost-effectiveness assessments in the climate change, health, and development communities. We offer sample calculations, which illustrate the apparent high degree of co-benefit effectiveness for targeted interventions in the household energy sector in developing countries. PMID:18173381

  12. Students and teachers benefit from Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction in a school-embedded pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eGouda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is a research gap in studies that evaluate the effectiveness of a school-embedded mindfulness-based intervention for both students and teachers. To address this gap, the present pilot study reviews relevant literature and investigates whether students and teachers who participate in separate Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR courses show improvements across a variety of psychological variables including areas of mental health and creativity. Methods: The study applied a controlled waitlist design with three measurement points. A total of 29 students (n = 15 in the intervention and n = 14 in the waitlist group and 29 teachers (n = 14 in the intervention and n = 15 in the waitlist group completed questionnaires before and after the MBSR course. The intervention group was also assessed after a four-month follow-up period. Results: Relative to the control group, significant improvements in self-reported stress, self-regulation, school-specific self-efficacy and interpersonal problems were found among the students who participated in the MBSR course (p < .05, Cohens` d ranges from 0.62-0.68. Medium effect sizes on mindfulness, anxiety and creativity indicate a realistic potential in those areas. By contrast, teachers in the intervention group showed significantly higher self-reported mindfulness levels and reduced interpersonal problems compared to the control group(p < .05, Cohens` d = 0.66 and 0.42, respectively, with medium effect sizes on anxiety and emotion regulation. Conclusion: The present findings contribute to a growing body of studies investigating mindfulness in schools by discussing the similarities and differences in the effects of MBSR on students and teachers as well as stressing the importance of investigating interpersonal effects.

  13. When does Inter-School Competition Matter? Evidence from the Chilean 'Voucher' System

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Gallego

    2012-01-01

    I investigate the effects of voucher-school competition on educational outcomes. I test whether voucher-school competition 1) improves student outcomes and 2) has stronger effects when public schools face a hard budget constraint. Since both voucher school competition and the degree of hardness of the budget constraint for public schools are endogenous to public school quality, I exploit (i) the interaction of the number of Catholic priests in 1950 and the institution of the voucher system in...

  14. USGEO National Earth Observation Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Relative Contributions of Earth Observing Systems to Societal Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, J.; Stryker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The second National Civil Earth Observation Assessment identifies the inputs and relative contributions of the portfolio of observing systems currently relied upon by Federal agencies to meet key Earth observing objectives. The Assessment employs a hierarchical value-tree framework that traces the pathways through which Earth observing systems contribute value across 13 societal benefit areas, utilizing multiple levels to provide logical traceability. This presentation describes the methods used to construct societal benefit area value-trees that include key objectives and the information products, services, and research derived from Earth observations that help satisfy them. It describes the methods for weighting nodes at multiple levels of each value-tree and the expert elicitation process for assessing the relative contributions of Earth observing systems to the development of information products, services, and research. The methodology employed in the Assessment is especially useful at assessing the interdependence and relative contributions of multiple Earth observing systems on the development of blended information products and tracing information pathways from direct observations through intermediate products, such as models, to end-products used to improve decision-making. This presentation will highlight case study examples from the 13 societal benefit areas (agriculture and forestry, biodiversity, climate, disasters, ecosystems, energy and mineral resources, human health, ocean and costal resources, space weather, transportation, water resources weather, and reference measurements) to demonstrate tractability from Earth observing systems, through information products and research that satisfy key objectives, to societal benefit.

  15. Math and Science School (MASS): A Department of Energy enhancement program to benefit students from Native American Tribes affected by the Hanford Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, M.

    1993-03-20

    Math and Science School is a program designed to enrich and encourage elementary students and teachers of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in the areas of mathematics and science activities. By providing access to special hands-on workshop sessions held in the mobile science laboratory at the school sites during the school year for students and teachers and with a separate summer inservice program for students, elementary children and teachers are encouraged to explore the fascination of science and the utility of mathematics through use of integrated curricula. The Department of Energy grant underwrites the instructional costs of this system while the grantee provides the mobile laboratory and the majority of the materials.

  16. Math and Science School (MASS): A Department of Energy enhancement program to benefit students from Native American Tribes affected by the Hanford Reservation. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, M.

    1993-03-20

    Math and Science School is a program designed to enrich and encourage elementary students and teachers of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation in the areas of mathematics and science activities. By providing access to special hands-on workshop sessions held in the mobile science laboratory at the school sites during the school year for students and teachers and with a separate summer inservice program for students, elementary children and teachers are encouraged to explore the fascination of science and the utility of mathematics through use of integrated curricula. The Department of Energy grant underwrites the instructional costs of this system while the grantee provides the mobile laboratory and the majority of the materials.

  17. Systemic hypertension and associated factors in school adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Salma B. Galal; Soheir A. Fahmy; Somia Lashine; Nahed Abdel-Fattah; Mohammed Omar Galal

    2011-01-01

    Background: Systemic hypertension is an endemic disease, which causes serious morbidities and mortality in all age groups. Hypertension of adults in Egypt is 26%. It can start in childhood and needs to be assessed in Egyptian children and adolescents.Aim and objectives: This study aims to investigate the prevalence of systemic hypertension in 12-14 year old school children and associated factors. Methods and study design: A cross sectional study was done in some preparatory public and private...

  18. The Soviet School System under Perestroika.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, Anna

    1990-01-01

    Describes changes at the three levels of the Soviet educational system (primary, basic, and secondary) brought about by Perestroika. The basic level offers a compulsive general studies program while a differentiated secondary curriculum offers more electives. Discusses the teacher's role and the establishment of public governing councils. (SLM)

  19. Benefits from a geographers' perspective on human-water systems - the waterscape concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Mariele; Höllermann, Britta; Almoradie, Adrian; Taft, Linda

    2016-04-01

    the knowledge of natural and social sciences by acknowledging their different epistemologies, concepts and methods at the same time, hereby, fostering a true integration of the disciplines. Space and time and feedback loops are the three key factors to understand human-water interactions. Especially, by recognizing the degree of feedback sensitive system parameters can be detected and allow for emerging a set of multiple framings and possible development paths. Therefore, the geographical perspective on the waterscape concept proposes a search apart from one solution or best practice as, in our assumption, there are no single best answers because the human dimension and their action and reaction are guided also beyond perceptions, preferences, benefits and costs. Our waterscape concept allows a multi-spatial and multi-disciplinary perspective on water and its projection into space by acknowledging multiple meanings, alternative framings and possible development paths, hence fostering an integrative perspective on human-water systems. It further provides a fruitful framework for transdisciplinary research approaches since it is open and supports societal co-production and reframing of knowledge and policies. Troy, T. J., Pavao-Zuckerman, M., and Evans, T. P.: Debates Perspectives on socio-hydrology: Socio-hydrologic modeling: Tradeoffs, hypothesis testing, and validation, Water Resour Res, 51, 4806-4814, 10.1002/2015WR017046, 2015

  20. MEDIA EDUCATION IN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Walat, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of the problem of the contemporary world in the area of global media communication is a basic challenge for existing and modernised educational systems. Without a complete vision of the world, people cannot exist in a fully aware way. Hence, the most important questions related to such social development in which no one would be excluded from the world-wide circulation of information. The general assumptions of common media education have been presented in the article.

  1. Do Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems benefit local populations? Maternal care utilisation in Butajira HDSS, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesganaw Fantahun Afework

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The benefits of Health and Demographic Surveillance sites for local populations have been the topic of discussion as countries such as Ethiopia take efforts to achieve their Millennium Development Goal targets, on which they lag behind. Ethiopia's maternal mortality ratio is very high, and in the 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey (2011 EDHS it was estimated to be 676/100,000 live births. Recent Global Burden of Disease (GBD and estimates based on the United Nations model reported better, but still unacceptably high, figures of 497/100,000 and 420/100,000 live births for 2013. In the 2011 EDHS, antenatal care (ANC utilization was estimated at 34%, and delivery in health facilities was only 10%. Objectives: To compare maternal health service utilization among populations in a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS to non-HDSS populations in Butajira district, south central Ethiopia. Design: A community-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in January and February 2012 among women who had delivered in the 2 years before the survey. Results: A total of 2,296 women were included in the study. One thousand eight hundred and sixty two (81.1% had attended ANC at least once, and 37% of the women had attended ANC at least four times. A quarter of the women delivered their last child in a health facility. Of the women living outside the HDSS areas, 715 (75.3% attended ANC at least once compared to 85.1% of women living in the HDSS areas [adjusted odds ratio (AOR 0.59; 95% CI 0.46, 0.74]. Of the women living outside the HDSS areas, only 170 (17.9% delivered in health facilities and were assisted by skilled attendants during delivery, whereas 30.0% of those living in HDSS areas delivered in health facilities (AOR 0.66; 95% CI 0.48, 0.91. Conclusion: This paper provides possible evidence that living in an HDSS site has a positive influence on maternal health. In addition, there may be a positive influence on

  2. Potential benefits of thermal energy storage in the proposed Twin Cities district heating-cogeneration system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.F.

    1979-10-01

    A new, large, cogeneration-district heating system has been proposed for the Twin Cities area, using hot water in a closed-loop system. The proposed system, as described by Studsvik Energiteknik AB of Sweden, does not employ thermal energy storage (TES). Four cases have been developed, describing system configurations which would employ TES, to evaluate the potential benefits of incorporating annual-cycle TES into the Twin Cities system. The potential benefits are found to be substantial, confirming results of earlier, generic studies of aquifer TES. The reference (Studsvik) system employs oil-fired boilers to supplement cogenerated heat, for handling peak loads and providing standby reserve. TES can serve the same function, with net energy savings in spite of heat losses during storage, by making it possible to operate the cogeneration equipment at higher capacity factors. Coal replaces oil as the fuel consumed. Energy savings of the reference system are impressive; energy savings with TES are 2 to 22% better. Capital cost requirements for boilers, cogeneration equipment, and pipelines are reduced by $66 to $258 million. The breakeven capital cost of TES is estimated to range from $43 to $76 per kilowatt peak thermal input to or withdrawal from aquifer TES. A factor in evaluating the breakeven operating cost of TES is the $14 to $31 million per year saving in cost of fuel. Abatement of air pollution and thermal pollution are concomitant benefits.

  3. Activation of cannabinoid system in anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex modulates cost-benefit decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Khani, Abbas; Kermani, Mojtaba; Hesam, 6Soghra; Haghparast, Abbas; Enrike G Argandoña; Rainer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Despite the evidence for altered decision making in cannabis abusers, the role of the cannabinoid system in decision-making circuits has not been studied. Here, we examined the effects of cannabinoid modulation during cost-benefit decision making in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), key brain areas involved in decision making. We trained different groups of rats in a delay-based and an effort-based form of cost-benefit T-maze decision-making task. During test...

  4. Prior-to-Secondary School Course Classification System: School Codes for the Exchange of Data (SCED). NFES 2011-801

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Forum on Education Statistics, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In this handbook, "Prior-to-Secondary School Course Classification System: School Codes for the Exchange of Data" (SCED), the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) and the National Forum on Education Statistics have extended the existing secondary course classification system with codes and descriptions for courses offered at lower grade…

  5. Effect of cattle breed on finishing performance, carcass characteristics and economic benefits under typical beef production system in China

    OpenAIRE

    Liping Ren; Bo Zhou; Fengshua Shi; Xiangxue Xie; Qingxaing Meng

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the finishing performance carcass characteristics and economic benefits of two imported (Limousin and Simmental) and three local (Luxi, Jinnan and Qinchuan) cattle breeds slaughtered at 18.5 months of age under thetypical Chinese beef production system. All cattle (n=71) were reared under the same production system and fed the same finishing diet for 105 days. Eight bulls from each breed were randomly selected for slaughtering. Compared with the three local breeds, the two...

  6. A Survey Of The Business Benefits Of Adopting Inter-Organisational Systems (lOSs) In Industrial Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Naudé, P; Holland, C.; Sudbury, M

    1997-01-01

    Business relationships are being revolutionised by the use of inter-organisational information systems which connect together separate companies' business processes. The physical value chain is now paralleled by the virtual, information chain. Detailed case studies from earlier research suggest that there are huge benefits to be gained from concepts such as EDI, shared product design databases, and shared production scheduling systems. However there is little statistical evidence of the overa...

  7. An Effect of the Learning Environment Management System toward Student Quality of Thai Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirussawa, Seatuch; Tesaputa, Kowat; Duangpaeng, Amporn

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at 1) investigating the element of the learning environment management system in the secondary schools, 2) exploring the current states and problems of the system on the learning environment management in the secondary schools, 3) designing the learning environment management system for the secondary schools, and 4) identifying…

  8. Developing an Indicator System for Schools of Choice: A Balanced Scorecard Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard S.; Wohlstetter, Priscilla; Liu, Sunny

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing an indicator system that goes beyond a single indicator of school progress or performance. The system relies on a set of school indicators that uses data that public schools routinely report to state agencies for compliance purposes. The framework for the indicator system is based on the idea of…

  9. High Performing Alabama School Systems: What Do the Best Have in Common?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Whitehead, Marie

    The Alabama State Department of Education School System Report Card provides annual data for each of Alabama's city and county public school systems, including student achievement indicators on the Stanford Achievement Test, High School Exit exam, writing tests, ACT test, dropouts, ADA expenditures, free and reduced lunch, system revenues, and…

  10. ASSESSING THE BENEFITS OF ON-FARM RESERVOIRS AND TAIL-WATER RECOVERY SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Popp, Jennie S. Hughes; Wailes, Eric J.; Young, Kenneth B.; Smartt, Jim

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply the MARORA model to evaluate the use of on-farm reservoirs and other management practices with respect to economic costs and returns and water use for rice and soybean production. Potential environmental benefits are also discussed.

  11. 7 CFR 274.12 - Electronic Benefit Transfer issuance system approval standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... retailers and financial institutions for redeemed benefits. (i) Verifying electronic transactions flowing to.... If special lanes are designated for the purpose of accepting other electronic debit or credit cards... terminals that are capable of relaying electronic transactions to a central database computer...

  12. Measuring the Benefits of an Electronic Medical Record System in Orthopedics

    OpenAIRE

    Richard; Buchanan, Bill; Steele, Brad; Schilz, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study to measure the benefits of an electronic medical record (EMR) that has been used in a busy Managed Care Orthopedic practice for the past 5 years. The EMR has evolved into a Intranet-based application that is currently available at 12 of our medical centers with over 2.5 million members.

  13. Industrial Cost-Benefit Assessment for Fault-tolerant Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, C.; Blanke, M.

    1998-01-01

    against failure. The paper describes the assessments needed to find the right path for new industrial designs. The economic decisions in the design phase are discussed: cost of different failures, profits associated with available benefits, investments needed for development and life-time support. The...

  14. National School Debate: Banning Cell Phones in Public Schools: Analyzing a National School and Community Relations Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clarence; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    School systems in America face many critical challenges pertaining to regulating cell phone use by students in today's schools. School executives and classroom teachers face challenges daily relative to how to effectively deal with student's using cell phones. There are many drawbacks and benefits for cell phone use by students. The authors…

  15. International Summer School on Mathematical Systems Theory and Economics

    CERN Document Server

    Szegö, G

    1969-01-01

    The International Summer School on Mathematical Systems Theory and Economics was held at the Villa Monastero in Varenna, Italy, from June 1 through June 12, 1967. The objective of this Summer School was to review the state of the art and the prospects for the application of the mathematical theory of systems to the study and the solution of economic problems. Particular emphasis was given to the use of the mathematical theory of control for the solution of problems in economics. It was felt that the publication of a volume collecting most of the lectures given at the school would show the current status of the application of these methods. The papers are organized into four sections arranged into two volumes: basic theories and optimal control of economic systems which appear in the first volume, and special mathematical problems and special applications which are contained in the second volume. Within each section the papers follow in alphabetical order by author. The seven papers on basic theories are a rat...

  16. School absence and treatment in school children with respiratory symptoms in the Netherlands: Data from the Child Health Monitoring System

    OpenAIRE

    Spee-van der Wekke, J.; Meulmeester, J.F.; Radder, J.J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S P

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of respiratory problems, and the relation of these problems with school attendance, medicine use, and medical treatment. DESIGN: The Child Health Monitoring System. SETTING: Nineteen public health services across the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: 5186 school children aged 4-15 years, who were eligible for a routine health assessment in the 1991/1992 school year. MAIN RESULTS: Respiratory symptoms were present in 12% of the children. Recent symptoms...

  17. Health Information Technology Systems profoundly impact users: a case study in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Heather K; Stewart, Denice C L; Ash, Joan S

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase our understanding of the impact of Health Information Technology Systems (HITS) on dental school users when the systems are integrated into chair-side patient care. We used qualitative research methods, including interviews, focus groups, and observations, to capture the experiences of HITS users at a single institution. Users included administrators, clinical faculty members, predoctoral students, support staff, and residents. The data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach, and nine themes emerged: 1) HITS benefits were disproportionate among users; 2) communicating about the HITS was challenging; 3) users experienced a range of strong emotions; 4) the instructor persona diminished; 5) there were shifts in the school's power structure; 6) allocation of end-users' time shifted; 7) the training and support needs of end-users were significant; 8) perceived lack of HITS usability made documentation cumbersome for clinicians; and 9) clinicians' workflow was disrupted. HITS integration into patient care impacts the work of all system users, especially end-users. The themes highlight areas of potential concern for implementers and users in integrating a HITS into patient care. PMID:20388817

  18. A cost-benefit analysis of preventative management for zebra and quagga mussels in the Colorado-Big Thompson System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    Zebra and quagga mussels are fresh water invaders that have the potential to cause severe ecological and economic damage. It is estimated that mussels cause $1 billion dollars per year in damages to water infrastructure and industries in the United States (Pimentel et al., 2004). Following their introduction to the Great Lakes in the late 1980s, mussels spread rapidly throughout the Mississippi River Basin and the Eastern U.S. The mussel invasion in the West is young. Mussels were first identified in Nevada in 2007, and have since been identified in California, Arizona, Colorado, Utah, and Texas. Western water systems are very different from those found in the East. The rapid spread of mussels through the eastern system was facilitated by connected and navigable waterways. Western water systems are less connected and are characterized by man-made reservoirs and canals. The main vector of spread for mussels in the West is overland on recreational boats (Bossenbroek et al., 2001). In response to the invasion, many western water managers have implemented preventative management programs to slow the overland spread of mussels on recreational boats. In Colorado, the Colorado Department of Wildlife (CDOW) has implemented a mandatory boat inspection program that requires all trailered boats to be inspected before launching in any Colorado water body. The objective of this study is to analyze the costs and benefits of the CDOW boat inspection program in Colorado, and to identify variables that affect the net benefits of preventative management. Predicting the potential economic benefits of slowing the spread of mussels requires integrating information about mussel dispersal potential with estimates of control costs (Keller et al., 2009). Uncertainty surrounding the probabilities of establishment, the timing of invasions, and the damage costs associated with an invasion make a simulation model an excellent tool for addressing "what if" scenarios and shedding light on the

  19. Investigation into the Possible Benefits of a Refrigeration Based Intercooling System

    OpenAIRE

    Kierans, Ronan; McGovern, Jim

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes findings from analysis and simulation in relation to the possible benefits of applying refrigeration based intercooling to the engine of a modern passenger car or haulage vehicle. Initial theoretical analysis showed that, depending on the engine specifications and the boost pressure level of the turbo/supercharger, the power improvement could range from 15–30% and there would be a similar improvement in torque. This meant a smaller engine could be used to do the work of a...

  20. Maximising multiple benefits from sustainable drainage systems: identification and decision support

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Rebecca; Lundy, Lian; Berwick, Neil; Fordyce, Fiona; Jeffries, Chris; Garcia, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes efforts in Scotland UK to assess urban diffuse pollution sources, pathways and sinks; to establish mitigation measures, which can address waterborne urban pollution and also provide multiple benefits. The paper will describe the results from an extensive review exercise, which culminated in the development of a new decision support tool. The tool is intended to help urban planners and water managers tackle urban diffuse pollution with mitigation measures, which could prov...

  1. Benefits of groups in managing systemic arterial hypertension: perceptions of patients and physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pereira do Amaral

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the nature of the benefits of using groups within primary care services to manage hypertension, from the point of view of both patients and physicians. Methods: A qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews with patients and doctors attending distinct consolidated groups, which have been purposely selected and carried out in physician-patient pairs until reaching data saturation. The interviews were subjected to thematic analysis. Results and discussion: The analysis of the interviews showed benefits in four fields: health education, compliance, psychosocial support, and quality of life improvement. Health promoting effects were perceived by participants, although restricted to individual and community levels. Participation in groups attenuates the “behavioral inadequacy” of high-risk preventive strategy, according to Geoffrey Rose, based on current management of hypertension. It also improves and facilitates health professionals’ educational role, improving compliance and significantly increasing social support for patients. Conclusions: The use of groups for hypertensive patients can improve hypertension management and promote the health of those involved. These benefits can be amplified if management is conducted in a dialogical and participatory way.

  2. Analysis of Employee Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Fuková, Kateřina

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to present system of employee benefits in specific company and according to the provided research judge the employee satisfaction with this system. The theoretical part of this bachelor's thesis defines the term employee benefits, their meaning, objectives, structure and the ways of providing. This part also deals with current trends in benefits and outsourcing. The practical part describes company Toyota Peugeot Citroën Automobile, s.r.o. and its system o...

  3. Parental decisions in a choice based school system: Analyzing the transition between primary and secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Mattia Makovec; Alejandra Mizala; Andrés Barrera

    2010-01-01

    We study parental choice focusing on the transition between primary and secondary school, taking advantage of the fact that most Chilean students have to switch school at the end of the 8th grade, the last year of primary school. Using a recursive probit model we estimate jointly the probability of attending private voucher versus public school, taking explicitly into account the endogeneity of the school choice at primary level. We find that parents caring more about school academic performa...

  4. Medicaid Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medicaid Outreach Tools Medicaid State Plan Amendments Benefits States establish and administer their own Medicaid programs ... Medicare certified hospital, and critical access hospital (CAH). Benefits Content Autism Services Early Periodic Screening Diagnosis & Treatment ...

  5. Reinventing the Dutch tax-benefit system; exploring the frontier of the equity-efficiency trade-off

    OpenAIRE

    Ruud de Mooij

    2007-01-01

    European governments aim to raise labour supply, cut unemployment and, at the same time, maintain social cohesion. Yet, economists have stressed the trade-off between these objectives. This paper reviews the key policy insights from optimal tax theory to identify options for reform in the tax-benefit system that can potentially improve the equity-efficiency trade-off. Using a comprehensive applied general equilibrium model, we then explore whether reforms along these lines in the actual Dutch...

  6. Organizational Factors’ Effects on the Success of E-Learning Systems and Organizational Benefits: An Empirical Study in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Chieh Liu; Yu-An Huang; Chad Lin

    2012-01-01

    E-learning development for enterprises is still in its infancy in that scholars are still working on identifying the critical success factors for e-learning in organizational contexts. This study presents a framework considering how organizational factors affect the quality and service of e-learning systems and how these factors influence organizational benefits in the view of IS success model and resource-based theory. A questionnaire survey of 120 Taiwanese companies was performed to valida...

  7. Environmental and economic benefit of new fungus-tolerant grape varieties and their usability for different training systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, A. L; Knott, R.; Schottdorf, W.

    2001-01-01

    Five selected new fungus-tolerant vitis vinifera L. grape varieties from different German grape breeders were tested over a periode of five years under cool climatic conditions with a special taxation of environmental and economical benefits for different training systems. REGENT, RONDO, JOHANNITER and Gf 48-12 obtained a better wine quality ranking than PINOT NOIR and SILVANER, respectively, and can be recommended for sustainable viticulture to reduce fungicide applications. The new fungu...

  8. Can Schools Be Autonomous in a Centralised Educational System?: On Formal and Actual School Autonomy in the Italian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Catalano, Giuseppe; Sibiano, Piergiacomo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the difference between formal and real school autonomy in the Italian educational system. The Italian case is characterised by low levels of school autonomy. It is interesting to consider whether heterogeneity of patterns is possible in this context. A description of this heterogeneity is provided…

  9. A Bullying Intervention System in High School: A Two-Year School-Wide Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kathleen P.

    2010-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of a systemic, two-year, whole-school bullying intervention initiative that was implemented in a US public high school. Students and staff members were anonymously surveyed before and after the intervention. The goals of the initiative were to reduce bullying and victimization, increase disclosure, increase intervention…

  10. Organizing for Instruction in Education Systems and School Organizations: "How" the Subject Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, James P.; Hopkins, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Teaching, the core technology of schooling, is an essential consideration in investigations of education systems and school organizations. Taking teaching seriously as an explanatory variable in research on education systems and organizations necessitates moving beyond treating it as a unitary practice, so as to take account of the school subjects…

  11. The Developmental Directions and Tasks of the School Based Curriculum Management System in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon Nam

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to inquire into the developmental directions and tasks of the School Based Curriculum Management (SBCM) system. The concept of the School Based Curriculum Management can be considered as a subsystem to School Based Management. The logics behind the SBCM system are autonomy, accountability, effectiveness, creativity,…

  12. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri, John; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Liber, Pawel; Lopez-Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-03-30

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate the ability of advanced low rank coal gasification technology to cause a significant reduction in the COE for IGCC power plants with 90% carbon capture and sequestration compared with the COE for similarly configured IGCC plants using conventional low rank coal gasification technology. GE’s advanced low rank coal gasification technology uses the Posimetric Feed System, a new dry coal feed system based on GE’s proprietary Posimetric Feeder. In order to demonstrate the performance and economic benefits of the Posimetric Feeder in lowering the cost of low rank coal-fired IGCC power with carbon capture, two case studies were completed. In the Base Case, the gasifier was fed a dilute slurry of Montana Rosebud PRB coal using GE’s conventional slurry feed system. In the Advanced Technology Case, the slurry feed system was replaced with the Posimetric Feed system. The process configurations of both cases were kept the same, to the extent possible, in order to highlight the benefit of substituting the Posimetric Feed System for the slurry feed system.

  13. From school to fitting work: How education-to-job matching of European school leavers is related to educational system characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Levels; R. van der Velden; V. Di Stasio

    2014-01-01

    Although optimal labour market allocation of school leavers benefits individuals, employers and societies, a substantial part of European school leavers do not find a job that matches their field or level of education. This paper explores the extent to which horizontal and vertical education-to-job

  14. Health Benefits of Anthocyanins and Their Encapsulation for Potential Use in Food Systems: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Basharat; Gul, Khalid; Wani, Ali Abas; Singh, Preeti

    2016-10-01

    Anthocyanins are one of the six subgroups of large and widespread group of plant constituents known as flavonoids. These are responsible for the bright and attractive orange, red, purple, and blue colors of most fruits, vegetables, flowers and some cereal grains. More than 600 structurally distinct anthocyanins have been identified in nature. Earlier, anthocyanins were only known for their coloring properties but now interest in anthocyanin pigments has intensified because of their possible health benefits as dietary antioxidants, which help to prevent neuronal diseases, cardiovascular illnesses, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, and many such others diseases. Ability of anthocyanins to counter oxidants makes them atherosclerosis fighters. Therefore, anthocyanin-rich foods may help to boost overall health by offering an array of nutrients. However, the incorporation of anthocyanins into food and medical products is a challenging task due to their low stability toward environmental conditions during processing and storage. Encapsulation seems to be an efficient way to introduce such compounds into these products. Encapsulating agents act as a protector coat against ambient adverse conditions such as light, humidity, and oxygen. Encapsulated bioactive compounds are easier to handle and offer improved stability. The main objective of this review is to explore health benefits of anthocyanins and their extraction, characterization, encapsulation, and delivery. PMID:25745811

  15. Trouble at School: Understanding School Discipline Systems as Nets of Social Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Decoteau J.

    2014-01-01

    Getting in trouble at school is often a student's first point of entry into the school-to-prison pipeline. What trouble entails is shaped by underlying and complex notions of justice that operate in a given school setting. These notions of justice shape the range of responses social actors use to address students who break school rules. These…

  16. DENINT power plant cost benefit analysis code: Analysis of methane fuelled power plant/district heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DENINT power plant cost benefit analysis code takes into consideration, not only power production costs at the generator terminals, but also, in the case of cogeneration, the costs of the fuel supply and heat and power distribution systems which depend greatly on the location of the plant. The code is able to allow comparisons of alternatives with varying annual operation hours, fuel cost increases, and different types of fossil fuels and production systems. For illustrative purposes, this paper examines two methane fired cogeneration plant/district heating alternatives

  17. Effect of cattle breed on finishing performance, carcass characteristics and economic benefits under typical beef production system in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Ren

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the finishing performance carcass characteristics and economic benefits of two imported (Limousin and Simmental and three local (Luxi, Jinnan and Qinchuan cattle breeds slaughtered at 18.5 months of age under thetypical Chinese beef production system. All cattle (n=71 were reared under the same production system and fed the same finishing diet for 105 days. Eight bulls from each breed were randomly selected for slaughtering. Compared with the three local breeds, the two imported breeds had higher average daily gain, dry matter intake and gain efficiency. Regarding carcass characteristics, the two imported breeds had higher carcass weight, bone weight, net meat weight, and ribeye area (P<0.001. However, the local breeds had higher (P<0.01 marbling scores than the imported breeds. The imported breeds showed higher economic benefits (P<0.001 than the local breeds. In conclusion, the imported cattle breeds had better growth performance, carcass traits and economic benefits compared with the local cattle breeds at 18.5 months old under the typical Chinese feeding conditions whereas, in this study, the local breeds may have some advantage in terms of meat quality.

  18. Toward a model of school inspections in a polycentric system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Frans J G; Ehren, Melanie C M

    2016-06-01

    Many education systems are developing towards more lateral structures where schools collaborate in networks to improve and provide (inclusive) education. These structures call for bottom-up models of network evaluation and accountability instead of the current hierarchical arrangements where single schools are evaluated by a central agency. This paper builds on available research about network effectiveness to present evolving models of network evaluation. Network effectiveness can be defined as the achievement of positive network level outcomes that cannot be attained by individual organizational participants acting alone. Models of network evaluation need to take into account the relations between network members, the structure of the network, its processes and its internal mechanism to enforce norms in order to understand the achievement and outcomes of the network and how these may evolve over time. A range of suitable evaluation models are presented in this paper, as well as a tentative school inspection framework which is inspired by these models. The final section will present examples from Inspectorates of Education in Northern Ireland and Scotland who have developed newer inspection models to evaluate the effectiveness of a range of different networks. PMID:27065046

  19. School absence and treatment in school children with respiratory symptoms in the Netherlands: Data from the Child Health Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee-van Der Wekke, J.; Meulmeester, J.F.; Radder, J.J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    Study objective - To assess the prevalence of respiratory problems, and the relation of these problems with school attendance, medicine use, and medical treatment. Design - The Child Health Monitoring System. Setting - Nineteen public health services across the Netherlands. Participants - 5186 schoo

  20. Evaluation of sound field systems in elementary school classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeant, Michelle C.; Kruger, Kelly

    2003-10-01

    Our primary purpose in this study was to determine the relevant ergonomic issues associated with daily use of sound field systems in elementary school classrooms, in order to develop a purchasing guideline and technical specification. The secondary purpose was to evaluate these systems to identify if one or more acoustical parameters could be used to determine the quality and effectiveness of a system. Six sound field systems, with varying numbers and types of speakers, were chosen as a cross-section of available systems on the market. Six representative classrooms, currently in use, were selected based on a range of reverberation times and background noise levels. All systems were installed for two weeks in each classroom. Student speech intelligibility (SI) tests using phonetically balanced word lists were conducted, as well as teacher interviews. The acoustical parameters measured were clarity ratios C50 and C80, speech transmission indices STI and R(rapid)STI, sound pressure level (SPL) uniformity and frequency response. An improvement in SI was found for all systems. Only SPL uniformity and frequency response were found to be useful distinguishing performance parameters between systems. Ergonomic design aspects of sound field systems had a significant influence on the acceptance and usage in the classroom.

  1. Activation of cannabinoid system in anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex modulates cost-benefit decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Abbas; Kermani, Mojtaba; Hesam, Soghra; Haghparast, Abbas; Argandoña, Enrike G; Rainer, Gregor

    2015-06-01

    Despite the evidence for altered decision making in cannabis abusers, the role of the cannabinoid system in decision-making circuits has not been studied. Here, we examined the effects of cannabinoid modulation during cost-benefit decision making in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), key brain areas involved in decision making. We trained different groups of rats in a delay-based and an effort-based form of cost-benefit T-maze decision-making task. During test days, the rats received local injections of either vehicle or ACEA, a cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist in the ACC or OFC. We measured spontaneous locomotor activity following the same treatments and characterized CB1Rs localization on different neuronal populations within these regions using immunohistochemistry. We showed that CB1R activation in the ACC impaired decision making such that rats were less willing to invest physical effort to gain high reward. Similarly, CB1R activation in the OFC induced impulsive pattern of choice such that rats preferred small immediate rewards to large delayed rewards. Control tasks ensured that the effects were specific for differential cost-benefit tasks. Furthermore, we characterized widespread colocalizations of CB1Rs on GABAergic axonal ends but few colocalizations on glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic neuronal ends. These results provide first direct evidence that the cannabinoid system plays a critical role in regulating cost-benefit decision making in the ACC and OFC and implicate cannabinoid modulation of synaptic ends of predominantly interneurons and to a lesser degree other neuronal populations in these two frontal regions. PMID:25529106

  2. Benefits and opportunities for applying Integrated Management Systems (IMS) strategies in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The safe, reliable, and cost-effective operation of Nuclear Power Facilities require a vast accumulation of information - volumes of scientific research, engineering analysis, operational data, regulatory reviews and many other types of technical information - combined with a complex assortment of people with the requisite educational background, expertise and acquired insight to apply that body of knowledge safely and effectively. This paper is intended to address the changing strategies and deployment techniques of IMS by identifying and examining initiatives that have been instigated in other regulated (and non-regulated industries), analyzing the opportunities, challenges and success criteria. 'Virtually everything in business today is an undifferentiated commodity except how a company manages its information. How you manage information determines whether you win or lose.' - Bill Gates, Microsoft A number of independent studies have drawn similar conclusions as to the benefits of managing plant information: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) estimates that $15.8 billion in profits is lost in U.S. capital facilities every year. Most of these losses ($9.1 billion or 2.8% of total installed cost), are realized in the operations and maintenance phase of the asset life cycle, while $2.7 billion and $4.1 billion are realized in engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) phases respectively. It is clear from the report that again the O/Os bear the brunt of the costs ($10.6 billion or 3.3% total installed cost) associated with poor information management (in this case interoperability) due to supply chain dynamics and duration, and that with proper incentives for their information supply chains, O/Os have the most to gain. - 45% of costs are associated with operations and maintenance information verification; - 15% of costs are associated with unnecessary operations and maintenance idle employee time; - 40%, the balance, is an

  3. Problemática y beneficios de las actividades acuáticas en la escuela. (Problematic and benefits of aquatic activities by school.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolonia Albarracín Pérez

    2009-07-01

    Activities in Physical Education Questionnaire (CAAFE. It also tells the main effects and which interactions produced gender, educational background, working status, teaching experience, type of courses completed, who taught the aquatic/water activity classes and the opinion of the general aspects of physical education about the inclusion of water activities in the school. The participants in the survey were one hundred and seventy-six ESO teachers from the Murcia Region. An exploratory factorial analysis used “benefits of inclusion” and “problems of the teachers” as the two dominant factors along with acceptable coefficients. An explained total variance of 35.98% was used to check the validity of the questionnaire. After the respective variance analysis, it was verified that women considered the benefits from activities in the curriculum more important than their own problems. Whereas, the problems presented were taken in account by the teachers who had to teach classes with a water expert present to be included in the school curriculum. Having a Bachelor of Science degree in Physical Education and Sport does not imply a better knowledge of the benefits nor that fewer problems with the activities will occur. The results were argued among other research and a wide range of bibliography.

  4. Invisible Architecture The Benefits of aligning people, process and technology case studies for system designers & managers

    CERN Document Server

    Ure, Jenny

    2005-01-01

    The biggest problems faced in designing, managing and integrating computer systems are often not technical, but 'socio-technical'. Using examples of portals, supply chains, ebusiness and elearning systems, the potential for harnessing 'soft' factors to competitive advantage in distributed networked systems are discussed.

  5. High School Students' Understanding of the Human Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi; Dodick, Jeff; Tripto, Jaklin

    2013-02-01

    In this study, 120 tenth-grade students from 8 schools were examined to determine the extent of their ability to perceive the human body as a system after completing the first stage in their biology curriculum - "The human body, emphasizing homeostasis". The students' systems thinking was analyzed according to the STH thinking model, which roughly divides it into three main levels that are arranged "pyramid" style, in an ascending order of difficulty: 1. Analysis of system components—the ability to identify the components and processes existing in the human body system; 2. Synthesis of system components—ability to identify dynamic relations within the system; 3. Implementation—ability to generalize and identify patterns in the system, and to identify its hidden dimensions. The students in this study proved largely incapable of achieving systems thinking beyond the primary STH level of identifying components. An overwhelming majority if their responses corresponded to this level of the STH model, further indicating a pronounced favoring of structure over process, and of larger, macro elements over microscopic ones.

  6. Benefits of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy during curative surgery in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-bin; YU Jian-chun; MA Zhi-qiang; KANG Wei-ming; ZHOU Li; YE Xin

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little information on the impact of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy on gastric cancer.The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer and undergoing curative resection,with a focus on evaluating survival benefits and tolerance of intra-operative systemic chemotherapy.Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathological data for 264 consecutive patients who underwent curative resection for gastric cancer at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2002 to January 2007.Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests.Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with the Cox proportional hazard model.Results Patients who received intra-operative systemic chemotherapy had higher 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P=0.019 and 0.010,respectively) than patients who did not receive intra-operative systemic chemotherapy.In the subgroup analysis,systemic intra-operative chemotherapy benefited the 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates for patients with cancer of stage pTNM ⅠB-ⅢB,but not stage pTNM ⅢC.Patients who received intra-operative systemic chemotherapy in combination with post-operative chemotherapy had higher 5-year overall survival and 5-year disease-free survival rates (P=0.046 and 0.021,respectively) than patients who only received postoperative chemotherapy.However,the difference in these rates between patients who received only intra-operative systemic chemotherapy and patients who only received curative surgery was not statistically significant (P=0.150 and 0.170,respectively).Multivariate analyses showed that intra-operative systemic chemotherapy was a favorable prognostic factor for the overall survival and disease-free survival rates (P =0.048 and 0.023,respectively).No grade 4 toxicities related to intra-operative systemic chemotherapy were recorded within the

  7. Benefits of using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to present, especially for high school students, the benefits of the use of nuclear energy, promoting a deeper knowledge of this technology, encouraging critical thinking of students and society around them

  8. Airborne Asbestos Exposures from Warm Air Heating Systems in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Garry J; Dewberry, Kirsty; Staff, James

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations of airborne asbestos that can be released into classrooms of schools that have amosite-containing asbestos insulation board (AIB) in the ceiling plenum or other spaces, particularly where there is forced recirculation of air as part of a warm air heating system. Air samples were collected in three or more classrooms at each of three schools, two of which were of CLASP (Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme) system-built design, during periods when the schools were unoccupied. Two conditions were sampled: (i) the start-up and running of the heating systems with no disturbance (the background) and (ii) running of the heating systems during simulated disturbance. The simulated disturbance was designed to exceed the level of disturbance to the AIB that would routinely take place in an occupied classroom. A total of 60 or more direct impacts that vibrated and/or flexed the encapsulated or enclosed AIB materials were applied over the sampling period. The impacts were carried out at the start of the sampling and repeated at hourly intervals but did not break or damage the AIB. The target air volume for background samples was ~3000 l of air using a static sampler sited either below or ~1 m from the heater outlet. This would allow an analytical sensitivity (AS) of 0.0001 fibres per millilitre (f ml(-1)) to be achieved, which is 1000 times lower than the EU and UK workplace control limit of 0.1 f ml(-1). Samples with lower volumes of air were also collected in case of overloading and for the shorter disturbance sampling times used at one site. The sampler filters were analysed by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) to give a rapid determination of the overall concentration of visible fibres (all types) released and/or by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the concentration of asbestos fibres. Due to the low number of fibres, results were reported in terms of both the calculated

  9. Making Mass Schooling Affordable: In-Kind Taxation and the Establishment of an Elementary School System in Sweden, 1840-1870

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberg, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the significance of in-kind taxation and payments in kind for the establishment of an elementary school system in Sweden, in the 1840-1870 period. By analysing the funding of teachers' wages, the heating of the school facilities, and school building construction in the 12 rural school districts of the Sundsvall region, this…

  10. AN UNDERSTANDING TOWARDS BENEFITS AND CONCERNS ASSOCIATED WITH PERFORMANCE APPRAISALS- A STUDY HIGHLIGHTING THE ESSENTIALS OF GOOD APPRAISAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mohammed Nazeer Ahmed,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Performance appraisal is a formal and structured system followed by the organizations for reviewing and assessing the performance of employees. Organizations‘ initiate the performance appraisals process for administrative purposes and for employee development purposes. For administrative purposes, it assists management in selection; retention; and training of personnel‘s, in estimating the number of personnel required, for rewarding and honoring employees, for legal requirements, and for granting hike in employees‘ salary. For employee development purposes, the appraisal process is used to communicate employees‘ strengths & weaknesses, to identify individuals‘ training needs & identify gaps in workers‘ performance, to judge the efficiency of human resource personnel‘s involved with recruitment, selection etc. and also to reduce the grievances of employees. An effective appraisal would always assist organizations in achieving the organizational goals. Nevertheless, an appraisal would also be the cause of negative experience when the managers judge the employees‘ performance in a biased manner. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the purposes of using appraisals in an organization also to emphasize both the benefits and concerns associated with the appraisals. The main purpose of the study is to emphasis comprehensively the various essential requirements of good appraisal system. The good appraisal system is required to overcome the concerns associated with appraisals and to garner the true benefits of appraisals. The present study recommends that, for the successful achievement of organizational objectives, the appraisal system should be appropriate and effective.

  11. The Benefits of Applying CRM Systems in Manufacturing Enterprises - Lessons from Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Oreský Milan

    2010-01-01

    Article contribution is to present in compound form results of survey about CRM systems performance, with orientation to exploitation of CRM software solutions, their assets towards development of relationships with customers and impact on company economic results. We state, how perceive CRM concept personnel within several companies also reasons of CRM system implementation and what are expectations. Major part of article is valuation of CRM system and its performance in production companies.

  12. Ecosystem Services in Biologically Diversified versus Conventional Farming Systems: Benefits, Externalities, and Trade-Offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albie Miles

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that biological diversification across ecological, spatial, and temporal scales maintains and regenerates the ecosystem services that provide critical inputs--such as maintenance of soil quality, nitrogen fixation, pollination, and pest control--to agriculture. Agrobiodiversity is sustained by diversified farming practices and it also supplies multiple ecosystem services to agriculture, thus reducing environmental externalities and the need for off-farm inputs. We reviewed the literature that compares biologically diversified farming systems with conventional farming systems, and we examined 12 ecosystem services: biodiversity; soil quality; nutrient management; water-holding capacity; control of weeds, diseases, and pests; pollination services; carbon sequestration; energy efficiency and reduction of warming potential; resistance and resilience to climate change; and crop productivity. We found that compared with conventional farming systems, diversified farming systems support substantially greater biodiversity, soil quality, carbon sequestration, and water-holding capacity in surface soils, energy-use efficiency, and resistance and resilience to climate change. Relative to conventional monocultures, diversified farming systems also enhance control of weeds, diseases, and arthropod pests and they increase pollination services; however, available evidence suggests that these practices may often be insufficient to control pests and diseases or provide sufficient pollination. Significantly less public funding has been applied to agroecological research and the improvement of diversified farming systems than to conventional systems. Despite this lack of support, diversified farming systems have only somewhat reduced mean crop productivity relative to conventional farming systems, but they produce far fewer environmental and social harms. We recommend that more research and crop breeding be conducted to improve diversified farming

  13. School Food Service Financial Management Handbook for Uniform Accounting. Complete System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This handbook is intended to assist the School Food Authority and those responsible for recording and reporting on the various financial activities of a school food service fund. It describes in a completely detailed form uniform accounting systems suitable for use by all school food authorities. The material, oriented toward the average-to-larger…

  14. School Food Service Financial Management Handbook for Uniform Accounting. Simplified System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This handbook is intended to assist the School Food Authority and those responsible for recording and reporting on the various financial activities of a school food service fund. It describes in a simplified form uniform accounting systems suitable for use by all school food authorities. The material, oriented toward the average-to-larger school…

  15. Update: New Federal Financial Accounting for State and Local School Systems Due Out Soon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielke, Catherine C.

    2002-01-01

    Reports on several changes in the 2002 edition (forthcoming) of the federal government accounting handbook "Federal Financial Accounting for State and Local School Systems." Includes brief summary of "Emerging Issues" section of the handbook that addresses issues such as alternative revenues, charter schools, school safety and security,…

  16. National High School Center Early Warning System Tool v2.0: Technical Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High School Center, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Early Warning System (EWS) Tool v2.0 is a Microsoft Excel-based tool developed by the National High School Center at the American Institutes for Research in collaboration with Matrix Knowledge Group. The tool enables schools, districts, and states to identify students who may be at risk of dropping out of high school and to monitor these…

  17. Benefits and Drawbacks of Computer-Based Assessment and Feedback Systems: Student and Educator Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debuse, Justin C. W.; Lawley, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    Providing students with high quality feedback is important and can be achieved using computer-based systems. While student and educator perspectives of such systems have been investigated, a comprehensive multidisciplinary study has not yet been undertaken. This study examines student and educator perspectives of a computer-based assessment and…

  18. Water Quality Benefits of Constructed Wetlands Integrated Within Agricultural Water Recycling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constructed wetlands have been integrated within innovative agricultural water recycling systems, and these systems are now being evaluated at three demonstration sites located in the northwest Ohio portion of the Maumee River Basin (Defiance, Fulton, and Van Wert Counties). The water recycling syst...

  19. Feasibility study of cloud-based administrative system in schools of Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Amardip; Lama, Nima

    2015-01-01

    This paper is about the feasibility study about implementation of cloud-based version of school administrative system in the schools of Nepal. Research was done through Internet surveys and emails. MUST method’s tools were used to gather information and analyzed. Study was done only with few of the private schools inside Kathmandu city. Semi-structured questionnaire survey was done as interview through Internet with the schools of Nepal as well as focus group interview were organized among N...

  20. Are the ICD-10 or DSM-5 diagnostic systems able to define those who will benefit from treatment for depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Two widely used diagnostic systems, the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), are reviewed for their ability to define those who will benefit from active treatment rather than placebo. Both systems suffer from a weakness in defining symptoms sufficiently clearly to separate depression from normal mood variations in the general population. Consequently, normal individuals may be medicalized and defined as suffering from and treated for depression. Also, in mild depression, unlike moderate depression, a lack of significant separation of active treatment from placebo has been shown in individual double-blind, placebo-controlled studies and in meta-analyses of these treatment studies. Both systems would be more useful for treatment purposes if they provided a clearer symptomatic definition of moderate depression, as is widely used in pivotal regulatory standard efficacy studies. PMID:27418397

  1. The cost benefits of the Spacelab system to scientific investigations and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, O. C.; Lee, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    Cost advantages of the Spacelab system to scientific experiments in space and space operations are presented. The payload integration concepts developed for Spacelab are examined, and it is shown that Spacelab and Shuttle integration, communications and data processing, launch support requirements and flight operations will provide a considerable savings in the costs of space research relative to previous space systems. Spacelab modular design, incorporating features such as standard payload interfaces, optional mission dependent equipment and standard services, such as the Experiment Computer Operating System, is shown to offer the user a wider range of services than previous programs, also at significantly lower costs. It is concluded that the Spacelab system will greatly reduce the costs and broaden the opportunities for scientific investigation in space.

  2. A rationale plan for conversion of Malaysia for solar hydrogen energy system and its benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It expected that early in the next century, Malaysia production of petroleum and natural gas will peak, and thereafter production will decline. In parallel with this production decline, Malaysia income from fossil fuels will start to decline, which would hurt the economy. One possible solution for Malaysia is the of Malaysia is the conversion to a hydrogen energy system. In order to move towards a sustainable hydrogen energy system, a future strategy must be outlined, followed, and continually revised. This paper will underline the available hydrogen technologies for production, storage, delivery, conversion, transportation and end use energy applications for the implementation of hydrogen energy system. Therefore, this paper will also emphasis the key success factors to drive the rationale plan for conversion to hydrogen energy system for Malaysia

  3. Networks of Innovation: Towards New Models for Managing Schools and Systems. Schooling for Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istance, David, Comp.; Kobayashi, Mariko, Comp.

    This book contains a collection of papers from the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's Schooling for Tomorrow project. The first part contains papers on networks and governance in schooling as follows: "Networking in Society, Organisations and Education" (Hans F. van Aalst); "Schooling for Tomorrow: Networks of Learning"…

  4. Small Schools in Rural India: "Exclusion" and "Inequity" in Hierarchical School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Small schools have enjoyed rich traditions in the history of education. The Vedic-age gurukula small schools, an abode for children of the privileged few, followed a structured curriculum in the teaching of religion, scriptures, philosophy, literature, warfare, medicine, astrology and history. The rigvedic small schools, which were more…

  5. Agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers: sharing water and benefits in hydropower-irrigation systems

    OpenAIRE

    A. Tilmant; Q. Goor; Pinte, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology to assess agricultural-to-hydropower water transfers in water resources systems where irrigation crop production and hydropower generation are the main economic activities. In many countries, water for crop irrigation is often considered as a static asset: irrigation water is usually allocated by a system of limited annual rights to use a prescribed volume of water, which remains to a large extent independent of the availability of water in the basin. The opp...

  6. Quantify Benefits of Home Energy Management System Under Dynamic Electricity Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jingjie; Liu, Andrew; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Retail electricity rates have been kept flat for the past century due to the lack of advanced metering technology and infrastructure. The flat-rate structure prevents consumers from responding to the fluctuation of actual costs of electricity generation, which varies hourly (or even minute-by-minute). The absence of demand response leads to an electricity system that is overly built with costly assets, solely to maintain system reliability. One of the core visions of the future electricity sy...

  7. Improvement of safety by analysis of costs and benefits of the system

    OpenAIRE

    Karkoszka, T.; M. Andraczke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: of the paper has been the assessment of the dependence between improvement of the implemented occupational health and safety management system and both minimization of costs connected with occupational health and safety assurance and optimization of real work conditions.Design/methodology/approach: used for the analysis has included definition of the occupational health and safety system with regard to the rules and tool allowing for occupational safety assurance in the organisationa...

  8. Cost-benefit analysis of an emergency alarm and response system: a case study of a long-term care program.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchlin, H S; Morris, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    Cost-benefit analyses are routinely included in evaluations of acute care programs. In the case of long-term care, it is frequently alleged that cost-benefit analysis cannot be fruitfully applied. This article demonstrates the utility of applying cost-benefit analysis to evaluations of long-term care programs. A case study is presented in which cost-benefit analysis is used to evaluate an emergency alarm and response system developed to monitor the safety of vulnerable and disabled persons in...

  9. Systemic Data-Based Decision Making: A Systems Approach for Using Data in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tamara M.

    2009-01-01

    No Child Left Behind has increased data collection and reporting, the development of data systems, and interest in using data for decision-making in schools and classrooms. Ends-driven decision making has become common educational practice, where the ends justify the means at all costs, and short-term results trump longer-term outcomes and the…

  10. Gauging Technology Costs and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestner, Rich

    2007-01-01

    Regardless of the role technology plays in a school district, district personnel should know the costs associated with technology, understand the consequences of technology purchases, and be able to measure the benefits of technology, so they can make more informed decisions. However, determining costs and benefits of current technology or…

  11. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  12. The Comparison of Selected Alternative Schools' Pedagogical Systems with the Don Bosco Preventive System

    OpenAIRE

    LAŇKA, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    The Paper discusses the education and upbringing as a system, and is especially aimed at the Preventive system of Saint John Bosco. The Bosco{\\crq}s system is then compared to the selected alternative schools{\\crq} pedagogical systems, which take humanism as the core of approach to the child{\\crq}s soul. The aim of this baccalaureate paper is to compare the selected issues, which the author sees as being important. It is the specification of target group, to which the pedagogical system is ai...

  13. Development of Effective Academic Affairs Administration System in Thai Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongnoi, Niratchakorn; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to: 1) study current situations and problems of academic affairs administration system in Primary Schools. 2) develop an effective academic affairs administration system, and 3) evaluate the implementation of the developed system in the primary school, Thailand. Research and Development (R&D) was employed which consisted of…

  14. A descriptive study of the nature of shared decision making in terms of context and outcomes in selected elementary schools in a large suburban Virginia public school system

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Sheila Ellen

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to produce a "snapshot" description of shared decision making in elementary schools in a large suburban public school system in Virginia; to identify schools for participation in indepth studies; and to provide examples and information to others who may wish to engage in shared decision making. The research questions guiding the study were: How do elementary school principals perceive shared decision making in their schools? How do principals, teachers on the d...

  15. Benefits of partial-state-of-charge operation in remote-area power-supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, R. H.; Baldsing, W. G. A.

    Many people throughout the world are remote from electricity networks and do not have access to reliable power. Remote-area power-supply (RAPS) systems offer a reliable and cost-effective alternative to grid connection. Achieving adequate performance from such systems requires appropriate componentry and well-designed control systems/strategies. A relatively new operating methodology—known as partial-state-of-charge (PSoC) operation—is now finding application in the field. The strategy, which can give a three-fold increase in the lifetime energy-delivery of gelled-electrolyte batteries compared with that obtained using traditional charging procedures, is to be employed in RAPS systems in Peru. The PSoC algorithms will be formulated and trailed in the laboratory, and then installed in the Peru facilities where they will be monitored and controlled remotely via a satellite link-up. This approach allows the algorithms to be fine-tuned in situ, and will ensure that system efficiency and battery lifetime are maximised. Use of the PSoC concept is expected to provide a battery lifetime of 8 years.

  16. An examination of bimodal nuclear power and propulsion benefits for outer solar system missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zubrin, R. [Lockheed Martin Atronautics, PO Box 179, Denver, Colorado 80201 (United States); Mondt, J. [Jet Propulsion Lab, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of the NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. The radiological hazard associated with using Earth gravity assists on such missions was examined and shown to be small compared to that currently accepted on Earth fly-by missions involving RTGs. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive options for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Sensing the danger. Can tsunami early warning systems benefit from test ban monitoring?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An editorial in the February 2005 edition of the Magazine for European Research pointed to the very issue of responsibility: Improvements are always possible, of course, but the very nature of a 'natural disaster' is that while not entirely absolving humans of responsibility it surpasses our means to deal with and even understand the forces at work. But science can help enhance our knowledge. For if there is one subject that the Asian tragedy has highlighted, it is the importance of putting in place coordinated early warning systems for earthquakes and, in particular, the absence of effective monitoring of tsunamis in the Indian Ocean. A concerted effort is now being made to develop a coordinated system of systems - bringing together organizations and initiatives that together can put in place an early warning system. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), set-up to monitor adherence to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, is one organization seen to contribute to a coordinated early warning system

  18. A Capital-Financing Plan for School Systems and Local Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Penny

    2012-01-01

    School business officials are best equipped to lead in funding operating and capital needs because they understand the need for a methodical means of funding ongoing costs over time and the benefits of planning for future financial needs rather than letting emergencies dictate spending priorities. A capital-financing plan makes it possible to…

  19. Predicted performance benefits of an adaptive digital engine control system of an F-15 airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, F. W., Jr.; Myers, L. P.; Ray, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The highly integrated digital electronic control (HIDEC) program will demonstrate and evaluate the improvements in performance and mission effectiveness that result from integrating engine-airframe control systems. Currently this is accomplished on the NASA Ames Research Center's F-15 airplane. The two control modes used to implement the systems are an integrated flightpath management mode and in integrated adaptive engine control system (ADECS) mode. The ADECS mode is a highly integrated mode in which the airplane flight conditions, the resulting inlet distortion, and the available engine stall margin are continually computed. The excess stall margin is traded for thrust. The predicted increase in engine performance due to the ADECS mode is presented in this report.

  20. COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF A SYSTEM UNDER HEADOF- LINE REPAIR APPROACH USING GUMBELHOUGAARD FAMILY COPULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangey Ram

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a new mathematical model of a system with a novel approach,which consists of two independent repairable subsystems. The model is analyzed under “Headof-Line” repair policy considering two types of repair between two successive transitions at astage contrast to the normal practice of assuming single type of transition in all states.Supplementary variable technique, Laplace transformation and Gumbel-Hougaard family copulatechniques are applied to obtain the availability and cost analysis of the system. At last somenumerical examples have been taken to illustrate the model.

  1. Evaluation of the Benefits of High Temperature Electronics for Lunar Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Edgar H.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative evaluation is conducted of several approaches to the cooling of a lunar power system's power electronics, in view of the 400 K temperature of the 354-hour lunar day and lunar dust accumulation, which can contaminate power components and radiator surfaces. It is noted that, by raising the power electronics' baseplate temperature to 480 K, no thermal control system is required; the surface of the baseplate acts as its own, waste-heat-rejecting radiator, but the baseplate must be kept clean of lunar dust contamination.

  2. Evolutionary design and construction: The system 80+TM solution to the cost-benefit dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power provides advanced nuclear power plant designs using an evolutionary design and implementation process. Since the emergence of severe accident concerns following the Three-Mile-Island accident, the industry has faced the problem of providing improved designs that are more economical to construct and operate relative to the current generation of operating nuclear power plants. It is easy to improve plant safety in the design process, but it is not so easy to develop features that are economical while at the same time improving safety. Moreover, it is critical to add only those design features that can be implemented in actual construction programs with high confidence that they will perform as expected. The key to ABB's development and implementation of advanced reactor designs is an evolutionary process that relies on use of proven design concepts and proven components. Furthermore, design improvements are implemented gradually in actual construction programs in order to maintain very high confidence that construction schedules will not be adversely affected and that plant startup and commercial operation will proceed as expected. ABB has demonstrated the success of the above approach through the System 80 design implemented at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, the gradually improved Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNPP) designs (based on System 80) being constructed in the Republic of Korea, and the System 80+ Standard Plant Design certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1997. This paper describes the improved redundancy, diversity, and simplicity of the more significant advanced design features that were included in the System 80+ design and that are now being implemented in the KSNPP and Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) programs. Examples described herein include plant safety systems, control and electrical systems, and severe accident mitigation systems. Probabilistic Safety Analyses

  3. An analysis of the performance benefits of short-term energy storage in wind-diesel hybrid power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of prototype high penetration wind-diesel hybrid power systems have been implemented with different amounts of energy storage. They range from systems with no energy storage to those with many hours worth of energy storage. There has been little consensus among wind-diesel system developers as to the appropriate role and amount of energy storage in such systems. Some researchers advocate providing only enough storage capacity to supply power during the time it takes the diesel genset to start. Others install large battery banks to allow the diesel(s) to operate at full load and/or to time-shift the availability of wind-generated electricity to match the demand. Prior studies indicate that for high penetration wind-diesel systems, short-term energy storage provides the largest operational and economic benefit. This study uses data collected in Deering, Alaska, a small diesel-powered village, and the hybrid systems modeling software Hybrid2 to determine the optimum amount of short-term storage for a particular high penetration wind-diesel system. These findings were then generalized by determining how wind penetration, turbulence intensity, and load variability affect the value of short term energy storage as measured in terms of fuel savings, total diesel run time, and the number of diesel starts

  4. Optimal water resources management and system benefit for the Marcellus shale-gas reservoir in Pennsylvania and West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; He, Li; Lu, Hongwei; Chen, Yizhong; Ren, Lixia

    2016-09-01

    A major concern associated with current shale-gas extraction is high consumption of water resources. However, decision-making problems regarding water consumption and shale-gas extraction have not yet been solved through systematic approaches. This study develops a new bilevel optimization problem based on goals at two different levels: minimization of water demands at the lower level and maximization of system benefit at the upper level. The model is used to solve a real-world case across Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Results show that surface water would be the largest contributor to gas production (with over 80.00% from 2015 to 2030) and groundwater occupies for the least proportion (with less than 2.00% from 2015 to 2030) in both districts over the planning span. Comparative analysis between the proposed model and conventional single-level models indicates that the bilevel model could provide coordinated schemes to comprehensively attain the goals from both water resources authorities and energy sectors. Sensitivity analysis shows that the change of water use of per unit gas production (WU) has significant effects upon system benefit, gas production and pollutants (i.e., barium, chloride and bromide) discharge, but not significantly changes water demands.

  5. Matching economical, energetic and environmental benefits: An analysis for hybrid CHCP-heat pump systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of design and operation of combined heat, cooling and power systems usually leads to select different plant lay-outs and size of components, depending on the adopted optimization criterion (maximum profit or energy saving or minimum environmental impact). This occurs when the current energy prices and the normative provisions supporting cogeneration are not able to coincide with the specific customer's interest and the overall 'social interest' for a reduction in energy consumption and in pollutants' emissions. At EU level, polygeneration is considered to have a large potential for residential and commercial buildings district network, for the tertiary sector and for industrial applications. In such applications, it is often convenient to integrate the trigeneration system with a reversible heat pump, because of a low ratio between electric demand and that for heating and cooling. In this paper, the design and operation of such hybrid systems is discussed. The results achievable through different operation modes are compared and, with reference to a 600-rooms hotel and a 300-beds hospital in Italy, the effects on plant design from an hour-by-hour optimization of plant operation are assessed. Finally, the need for a flexible support system for cogeneration plants is put into evidence and some criteria are listed for an effective regulation

  6. Long-term benefits of exercise training in patients with a systemic right ventricle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bom, T. van der; Winter, M.M.; Knaake, J.L.; Cervi, E.; Vries, L.S. de; Balducci, A.; Meregalli, P.G.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Bonvicini, M.; Mulder, B.J.; Bouma, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study is to determine the long-term effects of a ten-week exercise training program in adult patients with a systemic right ventricle. METHODS: All patients who participated in a 2009 randomized controlled trial were approached. At approximately three years of foll

  7. Cost and benefits design optimization model for fault tolerant flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, J.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements and specifications for a method of optimizing the design of fault-tolerant flight control systems are provided. Algorithms that could be used for developing new and modifying existing computer programs are also provided, with recommendations for follow-on work.

  8. Economic Benefits of Advanced Control Strategies in Biological Nutrient Removal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.; Nielsen, M.K.; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    Advances in on-line monitoring of nutrient salt concentrations and computer technology has created a large potential for the implementation of advanced and complex control strategies in biological nutrient removal systems. The majority of wastewater treatment plants today are operated with very...

  9. Incapacity Benefits versus Benefit Transfers

    OpenAIRE

    Orszag, Jonathan Michael; Snower, Dennis J.

    1996-01-01

    The paper explores the employment implications of allowing people the opportunity of using a portion of their incapacity benefits to provide employment vouchers for employers that hire them. The analysis indicates that introducing this policy could increase employment, raise the incomes of incapacity benefit recipients, and reduce employers’ labour costs.

  10. RADON MITIGATION IN SCHOOLS: HVAC SYTEMS IN SCHOOLS TEND TO HAVE A GREATER IMPACT ON RADON LEVELS THAN HVAC SYSTEMS IN HOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first part of this two-part paper discusses radon entry into schools, radon mitigation approaches for schools, and school characteristics (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air conditioing -- HVAC-- system design and operationg) that influence radon entry and mitigation system ...

  11. Science school and culture school: improving the efficiency of high school science teaching in a system of mass science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2006-01-01

    Educational expansion in western countries has been achieved mainly by adding years to full-time education; however, this process has probably reduced efficiency. Sooner or later, efficiency must improve, with a greater educational attainment per year. Future societies will probably wish more people to study science throughout high school (aged c. 11-19 years) and the first college degree. 'Science' may be defined as any abstract, systematic and research-based discipline: including mathematics, statistics and the natural sciences, economics, music theory, linguistics, and the conceptual or quantitative social sciences. Since formal teaching is usually necessary to learn science, science education should be regarded as the core function of high schools. One standard way to improve efficiency is the 'division of labour', with increased specialization of function. Modern schools are already specialized: teachers are specialized according to age-group taught, subject matter expertise, and administrative responsibilities. School students are stratified by age and academic aptitude. I propose a further institutional division of school function between science education, and cultural education (including education in arts, sports, ethics, social interaction and good citizenship). Existing schools might split into 'science school' and 'culture school', reflected in distinct buildings and zones, separate administrative structures, and the recruitment of differently-specialized teaching personnel. Science school would be distinguished by its focus on education in disciplines which promote abstract systematic cognition. All students would spend some part of each day (how much would depend on their aptitude and motivation) in the 'science school'; experiencing a traditional-style, didactic, disciplined and rigorous academic education. The remainder of the students' time at school would be spent in the cultural division, which would focus on broader aspects, and aim to generate

  12. Cost benefit indicators associated with the integration of alternative energy sources: A systems approach for Carinthia, Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlgemuth, N.

    Studies on how to promote the use of alternative energy sources (AES) typically focus on the relative efficiency and effectiveness of alternative subsidising mechanisms. Positive externalities of an increased AES utilisation are in general not explicitly taken into account. This paper analyses......, over the horizon to 2020, the technical and market penetration potentials of AES in the context of the Carinthian energy system. Apart from market penetration rates, cost benefit indicators are also computed to support the decision making process in the local energy and environmental policy. These...... indicators comprise import dependency, employment effects, capital expenditure, carbon dioxide emissions and government revenues. The systems approach adopted, the simultaneous consideration of not only market penetration rates but also of the associated economic indicators, gives a more complete picture of...

  13. Cost benefit indicators associated with the integration of alternative energy sources: A systems approach for Carinthia, Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlgemuth, N.

    1999-01-01

    , over the horizon to 2020, the technical and market penetration potentials of AES in the context of the Carinthian energy system. Apart from market penetration rates, cost benefit indicators are also computed to support the decision making process in the local energy and environmental policy. These...... indicators comprise import dependency, employment effects, capital expenditure, carbon dioxide emissions and government revenues. The systems approach adopted, the simultaneous consideration of not only market penetration rates but also of the associated economic indicators, gives a more complete picture of...... AES use. Analysis of two strategies, "Subsidy" and "High Tax", shows that none of these strategies is dominant with respect to all indicators, i.e., there are conflicting objectives. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. Operational benefits obtained by implementing a remote monitoring and control system at CEGAS (Gas Company of Ceara, Brazil)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Rui C.O. [Companhia de Gas do Ceara (CEGAS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Zamponha, Rogerio S. [SOFTBRASIL, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    CEGAS (Gas Company of Ceara) recently implemented an automated remote monitoring and control system at the Natural Gas Stations located within the city of Fortaleza. The main purposes to implement the project were to install a better operational platform, allowing CEGAS to analyze its operational conditions and to measure customer's consumption in real time. The data communication infra-structure chosen was GPRS/GSM, due to it's low deployment cost and coverage availability. The first phase of the project comprised 50 vehicular natural gas stations. The project was successfully installed, and became the 1{sup st} project at this type to run efficiently over a GPRS infra-structure in Brazil for gas monitoring, with reliable control and data communication. This document intends to present the reasons that lead CEGAS to invest in such a system, the technology deployed and the benefits achieved. (author)

  15. Demand Response Benefits for Major Assets of High Voltage Distribution Systems - Capacity Gain and Life Management

    OpenAIRE

    HUMAYUN, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Power systems require an adequate capacity and higher utilization efficiency for an economic and reliable supply of electricity. However, their utilization efficiency is ordinary owing to low load factor and reserve capacity needs. Moreover, the growth of electricity demand and aging infrastructure call for massive investments in form of expansions and replacements. Therefore, the power industry is searching for novel solutions to deal with the future needs. Demand response (DR), a load shapi...

  16. Regulatory Compliance and Environmental Benefit Analysis of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2013-01-01

    The energy conservation achieved by utilizing waste heat in the energy and industrial sectors has became more and more important after the energy crisis in the 1970s because it plays a vital role in the potential energy-efficiency improvement. In this regard, cogeneration (combined heat and power, CHP) systems are thus becoming attractive due to the energy, economic, and environmental policies for pursuing stable electricity supply, sustainable development and environmental pollution mitigati...

  17. The Potential Use and Benefits of Reduced till in Organic Agriculture Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mäder, Paul; Fliessbach, Andreas; David, Christophe; Cooper, Julia

    2014-01-01

    No Till and Reduced Till are conservation tillage practices with a high potential to restore or improve essential soil functions and mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration and reduced fuel use. While No Till systems are widely used in conventional farming, these techniques are challenging to adapt to organic farming due to weed pressure and frequent nitrogen deficiency in early spring. A potential answer may be Reduced Till, such as shallow inversion ploughing, or non-inversion ...

  18. The benefits of cost system accuracy in a competitive price setting duopoly.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinaels, Eddy; Roodhooft, Filip; Warlop, Luk; Van Herck, Gustaaf

    2002-01-01

    This study reports the results of an experiment to investigate the value of increased cost report accuracy in competitive pricing decisions. Prior work has shown that in more competitive environments, cost system choice matters less since there is opportunity to learn from informative market signals. Our study argues that in a dynamic duopoly, learning from such informative market signals is distorted when decision makers act as market leaders deciding first on prices. Compared to second move...

  19. Financial benefit of implementing Environmental Management System ISO 14001 in Icelandic companies

    OpenAIRE

    Erla Björk Sigurgeirsdóttir 1965

    2014-01-01

    General public, companies and public organizations in Iceland, as elsewhere in the world, meet increased demand for more emphasis on environmental issues and protection of nature. The requirements for minimizing the impact on the environment (by reducing energy usage, increasing environmental awareness, and reducing general waste, for example) have become a serious issue worldwide. The environmental management system ISO 14001 is a procedure that some companies have adopted in order to red...

  20. Comprehensive Benefit Platforms to Simplify Complex HR Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrsam, Hank

    2012-01-01

    Paying for employee turnover costs, data storage, and multiple layers of benefits can be difficult for fiscally constrained institutions, especially as budget cuts and finance-limiting legislation abound in school districts across the country. Many traditional paper-based systems have been replaced with automated, software-based services, helping…

  1. BENEFITS AND COSTS IN SELECTING FUEL FOR MUNICIPALITY HEATING SYSTEMS WITH THE ANALYTIC HIERARCHY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miros(l)aw DYTCZAK; Grzegorz GINDA

    2006-01-01

    Municipal economy problems are of a complex nature. Existing requirements for sustainable development make us apply various criteria while solving these problems. These can, for example,include economic, financial, social and environmental criteria. To handle them effectively,multi-criteria analysis should be applied. Decisions about heat production and delivery systems belong to such multidisciplinary problems. They were usually resolved in the past using classical numerical methodology that took into account only the technical and economic merits of the various alternatives.By applying multi-criteria tools instead it is possible to obtain more realistic results and make more effective decisions. The Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) seems to be a good alternative to fill the existing gap between decision-making as it is actually practiced and the traditional methods when applied to selecting district heating (DH) systems. This paper presents such an application. Our application is to select the best heat energy source for a DH system for a medium sized city located in Poland. Our results led to an interesting conclusion with regard to the best heat energy source. Our results suggest that intensifying the effort to make widespread the use of more efficient, but financially more costly, energy sources is the best.

  2. Short-lasting systemic and regional benefits of early crystalloid infusion after intravenous inoculation of dogs with live Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrido A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the systemic and regional hemodynamic effects of early crystalloid infusion in an experimental model of septic shock induced by intravenous inoculation with live Escherichia coli. Anesthetized dogs received an intravenous infusion of 1.2 x 10(10 cfu/kg live E. coli in 30 min. After 30 min of observation, they were randomized to controls (no fluids; N = 7, or fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution, 16 ml/kg (N = 7 or 32 ml/kg (N = 7 over 30 min and followed for 120 min. Cardiac index, portal blood flow, mean arterial pressure, systemic and regional oxygen-derived variables, blood lactate, and gastric PCO2 were assessed. Rapid and progressive cardiovascular deterioration with reduction in cardiac output, mean arterial pressure and portal blood flow (~50, ~25 and ~70%, respectively was induced by the live bacteria challenge. Systemic and regional territories showed significant increases in oxygen extraction and in lactate levels. Significant increases in venous-arterial (~9.6 mmHg, portal-arterial (~12.1 mmHg and gastric mucosal-arterial (~18.4 mmHg PCO2 gradients were also observed. Early fluid replacement, especially with 32 ml/kg volumes of crystalloids, promoted only partial and transient benefits such as increases of ~76% in cardiac index, of ~50% in portal vein blood flow and decreases in venous-arterial, portal-arterial, gastric mucosal-arterial PCO2 gradients (7.2 ± 1.0, 7.2 ± 1.3 and 9.7 ± 2.5 mmHg, respectively. The fluid infusion promoted only modest and transient benefits, unable to restore the systemic and regional perfusional and metabolic changes in this hypodynamic septic shock model.

  3. Photographs and Classroom Response Systems in Middle School Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Feldman, Allan

    2015-08-01

    In spite of being readily available, photographs have played a minor and passive role in science classes. In our study, we present an active way of using photographs in classroom discussions with the use of a classroom response system (CRS) in middle school astronomy classes to teach the concepts of day-night and seasonal change. In this new pedagogical method, students observe objects or phenomena in photographs and use the information to develop understanding of the scientific concepts. They share their ideas in classroom discussion with the assistance of the CRS. Pre- and posttest results showed that the new pedagogy helped students overcome primitive conceptions and enhanced their understanding of the concepts. The observation of the rich details of photographs played three pedagogical roles in classroom discussion: easing students' anxiety about learning a new scientific concept; continuous stimulus of learning; and as evidence or data.

  4. Boarding School Students Monitoring Systems (E-ID Using Radio Frequency Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herdawatie B.A. Kadir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Monitoring Boarding school student movement using the old-fashioned study system is inefficient and brings difficulty to the hostel management to check attendance manually. By using RFID technology, student movement is quick and easy. Approach: The application of RFID Matrix Card system as a boarding school students monitoring system (E-ID were purposed to improve school management system and to monitor interest group movement. The RFID tags enable school management to track the students movements in and out of the hostel. An individual without RFID card will trigger the alarm and this will inform school management about availability of students using an online monitoring system. Results: This system used main component of passive RFID system, database management system and wireless networking. When RFID tag pass through the RFID reader in read range zone, system recorded data from the RFID tag to the database system. Data sent online to the management for the supervision of students. This ease management to monitor availability of boarding school students and access the students personal records. Conclusion: This research study offer important implication for monitoring the boarding school students. Although this project cannot control the punctuation of student but it can ease the workload of school management and save time.

  5. Airborne fibre and asbestos concentrations in system built schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the airborne fibre concentration data measured in system built schools that contained asbestos insulation board (AIB) enclosed in the support columns by a protective steel casing. The particular focus of this work was the CLASP (Consortium of Local Authorities Special Programme) system buildings. A variety of air monitoring tests were carried out to assess the potential for fibres to be released into the classroom. A peak release testing protocol was adopted that involved static sampling, while simulating direct impact disturbances to selected columns. This was carried out before remediation, after sealing gaps and holes in and around the casing visible in the room (i.e. below ceiling level) and additionally round the tops of the columns, which extended into the suspended ceiling void. Simulated and actual measurements of worker exposures were also undertaken, while sealing columns, carrying out cleaning and maintenance work in the ceiling voids. Routine analysis of these air samples was carried out by phase contrast microscopy (PCM) with a limited amount of analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis to confirm whether the fibres visible by PCM were asbestos or non-asbestos. The PCM fibre concentrations data from the peak release tests showed that while direct releases of fibres to the room air can occur from gaps and holes in and around the column casings, sealing is an effective way of minimising releases to below the limit of quantification (0.01 f/ml) of the PCM method for some 95% of the tests carried out. Sealing with silicone filler and taping any gaps and seams visible on the column casing in the room, also gave concentrations below the limit of quantification (LOQ) of the PCM method for 95% of the tests carried out. The data available did not show any significant difference between the PCM fibre concentrations in the room air for columns that had or had not been sealed in the ceiling void, as well as in the room

  6. Do comprehensive schools reduce social mobility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boliver, Vikki; Swift, Adam

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the claim that the shift from a selective to a comprehensive school system had a deleterious effect on social mobility in Great Britain. Using data from the National Child Development Study, we compare the chances, for both class and income mobility, of those who attended different kinds of school. Where media attention focuses exclusively on the chances for upward mobility of those children from lowly origins who were (or would have been) judged worthy of selection into a grammar school, we offer more rounded analyses. We match respondents in a way that helps us to distinguish those inequalities in mobility chances that are due to differences between children from those due to differences between the schools they attended; we look at the effects of the school system on the mobility chances of all children, not merely those from less advantaged origins; and we compare comprehensive- and selective-system schools, not merely comprehensive and grammar schools. After matching, we find, first, that going to a grammar school rather than a comprehensive does not make low-origin children more likely to be upwardly mobile but it helps them move further if they are; second, that grammar schools do not benefit working-class children, in terms of class mobility, more than they benefit service-class children, but, in terms of income mobility, such schools benefit low-income children somewhat more than they benefit higher-income children - that benefit relating only to rather modest and limited movements within the income distribution. Finally, however, the selective system as a whole yields no mobility advantage of any kind to children from any particular origins: any assistance to low-origin children provided by grammar schools is cancelled out by the hindrance suffered by those who attended secondary moderns. Overall, our findings suggest that comprehensive schools were as good for mobility as the selective schools they replaced. PMID:21361903

  7. Applications and cost benefits of sexed semen in pasture-based dairy production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S T; Hutchinson, I A; Cromie, A R; Shalloo, L

    2014-05-01

    Sexed semen technology is now commercially available in many countries around the world, and is primarily used in dairy cattle breeding. Sperm are sorted by flow cytometry on the basis of a 4% difference in DNA content between sperm containing X and Y chromosomes. Despite reliably producing a 90% gender bias, the fertility of the sexed semen product is compromised compared with conventional semen. The negative implications of the reduced fertility of sexed semen are amplified in seasonal systems of dairy production, as the importance of fertility is greater in these systems compared with year-round calving systems. A review of the literature indicates that conception rates (CR) to 1st service with frozen-thawed sexed semen are ~75% to 80% of those achieved with conventional frozen-thawed semen. Preliminary results from a large-scale field trial carried out in Ireland in 2013 suggest that significant improvements in the performance of sexed semen have been made, with CR of 87% of those achieved with conventional semen. The improved fertility of a sexed semen product that delivers a 90% gender bias has considerable implications for the future of breeding management in pasture-based dairy production systems. Sexed semen may facilitate faster, more profitable dairy herd expansion by increasing the number of dairy heifer replacements born. Biosecurity can be improved by maintaining a closed herd during the period of herd expansion. In a non-expansion scenario, sexed semen may be used to increase the value of beef output from the dairy herd. The replacement heifer requirements for a herd could be met by using sexed semen in the 1st 3 weeks of the breeding season, with the remaining animals bred to beef sires, increasing the sale value over that of a dairy bull calf. Alternatively, very short gestation sires could be used to shorten the calving interval. Market prices have a considerable effect on the economics of sexed semen use, and widespread use of sexed semen should

  8. Ecological benefits of passive wetland treatment systems designed for acid mine drainage: With emphasis on watershed restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western Pennsylvania has been a large source of coal for much of the US since the late 1800's. During the extraction of the coal resources, acid mine drainage (AMD) often resulted. AMD from abandoned discharges has effectively rendered thousands of kilometers of streams lifeless in the Appalachian coal region. Restoration of these streams has been limited in previous years primarily because of the lack of cost-effective treatment for AMD. Conventional treatment can treat AMD effectively but is costly to operate and maintain and is effective only when receiving human attention. Passive wetland treatment systems have proven to be the only realistic AMD treatment strategy, in terms of watershed restoration activities. If ecosystem health is the reason for implementing effluent standards then it can be reasonably argued that passive wetland treatment systems supply the most effective overall treatment, even if they do not meet one or more of the current effluent standards. Recent advancements in passive wetland treatment system technology have provided a management tool that could be used to treat the majority of AMD discharges cost-effectively, and when used strategically could reasonably be employed to restore the thousands of kilometers of AMD-affected streams in the coal regions of Appalachia. Secondary benefits that have been observed with passive wetland treatment systems suggest that these systems may be providing for accelerated ecological recovery independent of regulated effluent standards

  9. Interconnection Assessment Methodology and Cost Benefit Analysis for High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggu, Murali; Giraldez, Julieta; Harris, Tom; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Lisell, Lars; Narang, David

    2015-06-14

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners completed a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale PV. Building upon the APS Community Power Project-Flagstaff Pilot, this project investigates the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes and large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters were designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models are being developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2014 IEEE PVSC conference that described feeder model evaluation and high penetration advanced scenario analysis, specifically feeder reconfiguration. This paper presents results from Phase 5 of the project. Specifically, the paper discusses tool automation; interconnection assessment methodology and cost benefit analysis.

  10. The diversity-generating benefits of a prokaryotic adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houte, Stineke; Ekroth, Alice K E; Broniewski, Jenny M; Chabas, Hélène; Ashby, Ben; Bondy-Denomy, Joseph; Gandon, Sylvain; Boots, Mike; Paterson, Steve; Buckling, Angus; Westra, Edze R

    2016-04-21

    Prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas adaptive immune systems insert spacers derived from viruses and other parasitic DNA elements into CRISPR loci to provide sequence-specific immunity. This frequently results in high within-population spacer diversity, but it is unclear if and why this is important. Here we show that, as a result of this spacer diversity, viruses can no longer evolve to overcome CRISPR-Cas by point mutation, which results in rapid virus extinction. This effect arises from synergy between spacer diversity and the high specificity of infection, which greatly increases overall population resistance. We propose that the resulting short-lived nature of CRISPR-dependent bacteria-virus coevolution has provided strong selection for the evolution of sophisticated virus-encoded anti-CRISPR mechanisms. PMID:27074511

  11. Cost/benefit tradeoffs for reducing the energy consumption of the commercial air transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, E. F.; Vanabkoude, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The fuel saving potential and cost effectiveness of numerous operational and technical options proposed for reducing the fuel consumption of the U.S. commercial airline fleet was examined and compared. The impact of the most promising fuel conserving options on fuel consumption, passenger demand, operating costs and airline profits when implemented in the U.S. domestic and international airline fleets was determined. A forecast estimate was made of the potential fuel savings achievable in the U.S. scheduled air transportation system. Specifically, the means for reducing the jet fuel consumption of the U.S. scheduled airlines in domestic and international passenger operations were investigated. A design analysis was made of two turboprop aircraft as possible fuel conserving derivatives of the DC-9-30.

  12. Recovery Act: Cedarville School District Retrofit of Heating and Cooling Systems with Geothermal Heat Pumps and Ground Source Water Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarrell, Mark

    2013-09-30

    Cedarville School District retrofitted the heating and cooling systems in three campus areas (High School, Middle School, and Upper Elementary School) with geothermal heat pumps and ground source water loops, as a demonstration project for the effective implementation of geothermal heat pump systems and other energy efficiency and air quality improvements.

  13. Projecting cumulative benefits of multiple river restoration projects: an example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River system in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondolf, G Mathias; Angermeier, Paul L; Cummins, Kenneth; Dunne, Thomas; Healey, Michael; Kimmerer, Wim; Moyle, Peter B; Murphy, Dennis; Patten, Duncan; Railsback, Steve; Reed, Denise J; Spies, Robert; Twiss, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Despite increasingly large investments, the potential ecological effects of river restoration programs are still small compared to the degree of human alterations to physical and ecological function. Thus, it is rarely possible to "restore" pre-disturbance conditions; rather restoration programs (even large, well-funded ones) will nearly always involve multiple small projects, each of which can make some modest change to selected ecosystem processes and habitats. At present, such projects are typically selected based on their attributes as individual projects (e.g., consistency with programmatic goals of the funders, scientific soundness, and acceptance by local communities), and ease of implementation. Projects are rarely prioritized (at least explicitly) based on how they will cumulatively affect ecosystem function over coming decades. Such projections require an understanding of the form of the restoration response curve, or at least that we assume some plausible relations and estimate cumulative effects based thereon. Drawing on our experience with the CALFED Bay-Delta Ecosystem Restoration Program in California, we consider potential cumulative system-wide benefits of a restoration activity extensively implemented in the region: isolating/filling abandoned floodplain gravel pits captured by rivers to reduce predation of outmigrating juvenile salmon by exotic warmwater species inhabiting the pits. We present a simple spreadsheet model to show how different assumptions about gravel pit bathymetry and predator behavior would affect the cumulative benefits of multiple pit-filling and isolation projects, and how these insights could help managers prioritize which pits to fill. PMID:18810527

  14. Projecting Cumulative Benefits of Multiple River Restoration Projects: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River System in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondolf, G. Mathias; Angermeier, Paul L.; Cummins, Kenneth; Dunne, Thomas; Healey, Michael; Kimmerer, Wim; Moyle, Peter B.; Murphy, Dennis; Patten, Duncan; Railsback, Steve; Reed, Denise J.; Spies, Robert; Twiss, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Despite increasingly large investments, the potential ecological effects of river restoration programs are still small compared to the degree of human alterations to physical and ecological function. Thus, it is rarely possible to “restore” pre-disturbance conditions; rather restoration programs (even large, well-funded ones) will nearly always involve multiple small projects, each of which can make some modest change to selected ecosystem processes and habitats. At present, such projects are typically selected based on their attributes as individual projects (e.g., consistency with programmatic goals of the funders, scientific soundness, and acceptance by local communities), and ease of implementation. Projects are rarely prioritized (at least explicitly) based on how they will cumulatively affect ecosystem function over coming decades. Such projections require an understanding of the form of the restoration response curve, or at least that we assume some plausible relations and estimate cumulative effects based thereon. Drawing on our experience with the CALFED Bay-Delta Ecosystem Restoration Program in California, we consider potential cumulative system-wide benefits of a restoration activity extensively implemented in the region: isolating/filling abandoned floodplain gravel pits captured by rivers to reduce predation of outmigrating juvenile salmon by exotic warmwater species inhabiting the pits. We present a simple spreadsheet model to show how different assumptions about gravel pit bathymetry and predator behavior would affect the cumulative benefits of multiple pit-filling and isolation projects, and how these insights could help managers prioritize which pits to fill.

  15. Synthesis of integrated absorption refrigeration systems involving economic and environmental objectives and quantifying social benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new methodology for energy integration of systems that require absorption refrigeration. It allows heat exchange among process hot and cold streams and the integration of excess process heat as well as external utilities provided by solar energy, fossil fuels and biofuels. An optimization formulation is developed to address the multiple objectives of simultaneously minimizing the total annualized cost and the greenhouse gas emissions while the social impact is measured by the number of jobs generated by the project in the entire life cycle. The economic function accounts for the tax credit obtained by the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions when cleaner technologies are used. The proposed model also considers the optimal selection of different types of solar collectors and the optimal time-based usage of solar energy, fossil fuel, and biofuel. Two example problems are presented to show the applicability of the proposed methodology. -- Highlights: ► An approach for the thermal integration of refrigeration processes is proposed. ► Different forms of sustainable energies are considered in the optimization process. ► Economic and environmental objectives are considered quantifying the number of jobs. ► The availability for the different forms of energy is taken into account. ► Results show significant advantages obtained with the proposed approach

  16. Benefits of Enterprise Social Networking Systems for High Energy Physics community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva de Sousa, B.; Wagner, A.; Ormancey, E.; Grzywaczewski, P.

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of social media platforms in the consumer space unlocked new ways of interaction between individuals on the Web. People develop now their social networks and relations based on common interests and activities with the choice to opt-in or opt-out on content of their interest. This kind of platforms have also an important place to fill inside large organizations and enterprises where communication and collaborators interaction are keys for development. Enterprise Social Networking Systems (ESN) add value to an organization by encouraging information sharing, capturing knowledge, enabling action and empowering people. CERN is currently rolling out an ESN which aims to unify and provide a single point of access to the multitude of information sources in the organization. It also implements social features that can be added on top of existing communication channels. While the deployment of this kind of platforms is not without risks we firmly believe that they are of the best interest for our community, opening the opportunity to evaluate a global social network for High Energy Physics (HEP).

  17. Wastewater garden--a system to treat wastewater with environmental benefits to community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Jaya

    2008-01-01

    Many communities and villages around the world face serious problems with lack of sanitation especially in disposing of the wastewater-black water and grey water from the houses, or wash outs from animal rearing sheds. Across the world diverting wastewater to the surroundings or to the public spaces are not uncommon. This is responsible for contaminating drinking water sources causing health risks and environmental degradation as they become the breeding grounds of mosquitoes and pathogens. Lack of collection and treatment facilities or broken down sewage systems noticed throughout the developing world are associated with this situation. Diverting the wastewater to trees and vegetable gardens was historically a common practice. However the modern world has an array of problems associated with such disposal such as generation of large quantity of wastewater, unavailability of space for onsite disposal or treatment and increase in population. This paper considers the wastewater garden as a means for wastewater treatment and to improve the vegetation and biodiversity of rural areas. This can also be implemented in urban areas in association with parks and open spaces. This also highlights environmental safety in relation to the nutrient, pathogen and heavy metal content of the wastewater. The possibilities of different types of integration and technology that can be adopted for wastewater gardens are also discussed. PMID:18701794

  18. Formula-Based Public School Funding System in Victoria: An Empirical Analysis of Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaranayake, Bandara

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the formula-based school funding system in the state of Victoria, Australia, where state funds are directly allocated to schools based on a range of equity measures. The impact of Victoria' funding system for education in terms of alleviating inequality and disadvantage is contentious, to say the least. It is difficult…

  19. Development of Performance Appraisal System for Local School Teachers in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttaramart, Suphawadee; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-am-pai, Anan

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: 1) to study current situation and problem in the performance appraisal system of secondary school teachers, under jurisdiction of the Local Administrative Organization (LAO), 2) to develop the performance appraisal system to apply with the LAO school teachers, and 3) to evaluate the application from the…

  20. ERIC Resource Management Workshops--Special Report on School System Standing Order Customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, J. Nevin

    This report summarizes descriptive information on school systems and school system-related organizations that maintain complete files of ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) materials. The data reported were provided by participants in a series of regional workshops held throughout the United States on information management practices…

  1. Why the McKinsey Reports Will Not Improve School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffield, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In the last four years McKinsey and Company have produced two highly influential reports on how to improve school systems. The first McKinsey report "How the world's best-performing school systems come out on top" has since its publication in 2007 been used to justify change in educational policy and practice in England and many other countries.…

  2. Development and Testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children: Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, Kerry L.; Brown, William H.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the development and pilot testing of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity-Elementary School (OSRAC-E) Version. Method: This system was developed to observe and document the levels and types of physical activity and physical and social contexts of physical activity in elementary school students…

  3. Investments in Building Citywide Out-of-School-Time Systems: A Six-City Study. Synopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Cheryl; Lind, Christianne; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; Stewart, Nichole; Deich, Sharon; Gersick, Andrew; McMaken, Jennifer; Campbell, Margo

    2009-01-01

    This synopsis highlights the main findings from "Investments in Building Citywide Out-of-School-Time Systems," which documents approaches six cities across the country have taken to build, finance and sustain effective citywide out-of-school-time (OST) systems. Developed by Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) and The Finance Project, the synopsis…

  4. Harnessing Technology for School Accountability: A Case Study of Implementing a Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Ernestine K.; Conley, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Schools employ educational technology to comply with pressures for greater accountability and efficiency in conducting operations. Specifically, schools use "management information systems" designed to automate data collection of student attendance, grades, test scores, and so on. These management information systems (MIS) employed widespread use…

  5. Effects of school reformon education and labor market performance: Evidence from Chile's universal voucher system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, David; Mukhopadhyay, Sankar; Todd, Petra E

    2010-07-01

    This paper studies the effects of school reform in Chile, which adopted a nationwide school voucher program along with school decentralization reforms in 1981. Since then, Chile has had a relatively unregulated, competitive market in primary and secondary education. It therefore provides a unique setting in which to study how these reforms affected school attainment and labor market outcomes. This paper develops and estimates a dynamic model of school attendance and work decisions using panel data from the 2002 and 2004 waves of the Encuesta de Protección Social survey. Some individuals in the sample completed their schooling before the voucher reforms were introduced, while others had the option of using the vouchers over part or all of their schooling careers. The impacts of the voucher reform are identified from differences in the schooling and work choices made and earnings returns received by similar aged individuals who were differentially exposed to the voucher system. Simulations based on the estimated model show that the voucher reform significantly increased the demand for private subsidized schools and decreased the demand for both public and nonsubsidized private schools. It increased high school (grades 9-12) graduation rates by 3.6 percentage points and the percentage completing at least two years of college by 2.6 percentage points. Individuals from poor and non-poor backgrounds on average experienced similar schooling attainment gains. The reform also increased lifetime utility and modestly reduced earnings inequality. PMID:22059095

  6. Maximizing the benefit of health workforce secondment in Botswana: an approach for strengthening health systems in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grignon JS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jessica S Grignon,1,2 Jenny H Ledikwe,1,2 Ditsapelo Makati,2 Robert Nyangah,2 Baraedi W Sento,2 Bazghina-werq Semo1,2 1Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2International Training and Education Center for Health, Gaborone, Botswana Abstract: To address health systems challenges in limited-resource settings, global health initiatives, particularly the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, have seconded health workers to the public sector. Implementation considerations for secondment as a health workforce development strategy are not well documented. The purpose of this article is to present outcomes, best practices, and lessons learned from a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-funded secondment program in Botswana. Outcomes are documented across four World Health Organization health systems' building blocks. Best practices include documentation of joint stakeholder expectations, collaborative recruitment, and early identification of counterparts. Lessons learned include inadequate ownership, a two-tier employment system, and ill-defined position duration. These findings can inform program and policy development to maximize the benefit of health workforce secondment. Secondment requires substantial investment, and emphasis should be placed on high-level technical positions responsible for building systems, developing health workers, and strengthening government to translate policy into programs. Keywords: human resources, health policy, health worker, HIV/AIDS, PEPFAR

  7. Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri,; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

    2012-11-30

    This report describes the development of the design of an advanced dry feed system that was carried out under Task 4.0 of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0007902 with the US DOE, “Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the use of Low- Rank Coal.” The resulting design will be used for the advanced technology IGCC case with 90% carbon capture for sequestration to be developed under Task 5.0 of the same agreement. The scope of work covered coal preparation and feeding up through the gasifier injector. Subcomponents have been broken down into feed preparation (including grinding and drying), low pressure conveyance, pressurization, high pressure conveyance, and injection. Pressurization of the coal feed is done using Posimetric1 Feeders sized for the application. In addition, a secondary feed system is described for preparing and feeding slag additive and recycle fines to the gasifier injector. This report includes information on the basis for the design, requirements for down selection of the key technologies used, the down selection methodology and the final, down selected design for the Posimetric Feed System, or PFS.

  8. A status report on the design and implementation of state renewable portfolio standards and system benefits charge policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, K.; Wiser, R.

    2000-05-01

    At last year's Windpower conference, we reported on state policies to foster renewable energy as part of efforts to restructure state electric power markets. The primary policies states are pursuing for renewables are system benefits charges (SBC) and renewable portfolio standards (RPS). Renewable portfolio standard policies began taking effect this year, while other states are continuing to work on the design of their RPS implementation strategies. In addition, states have begun distributing proceeds from their SBC funds. As a result, some renewable energy projects are beginning to materialize. This paper provides an update on state efforts with these two policies and examines some of the implementation issues and difficulties that states have faced thus far.

  9. Creating a longitudinal integrated clerkship with mutual benefits for an academic medical center and a community health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, Ann Noelle; Mazotti, Lindsay A; Blumberg, Bruce; Wamsley, Maria A; Grennan, Tim; Shore, William B

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal integrated clerkship is a model of clinical education driven by tenets of social cognitive theory, situated learning, and workplace learning theories, and built on a foundation of continuity between students, patients, clinicians, and a system of care. Principles and goals of this type of clerkship are aligned with primary care principles, including patient-centered care and systems-based practice. Academic medical centers can partner with community health systems around a longitudinal integrated clerkship to provide mutual benefits for both organizations, creating a sustainable model of clinical training that addresses medical education and community health needs. A successful one-year longitudinal integrated clerkship was created in partnership between an academic medical center and an integrated community health system. Compared with traditional clerkship students, students in this clerkship had better scores on Clinical Performance Examinations, internal medicine examinations, and high perceptions of direct observation of clinical skills.Advantages for the academic medical center include mitigating the resources required to run a longitudinal integrated clerkship while providing primary care training and addressing core competencies such as systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and interprofessional care. Advantages for the community health system include faculty development, academic appointments, professional satisfaction, and recruitment.Success factors include continued support and investment from both organizations' leadership, high-quality faculty development, incentives for community-based physician educators, and emphasis on the mutually beneficial relationship for both organizations. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship in a community health system can serve as a model for developing and expanding these clerkship options for academic medical centers. PMID:24867551

  10. Poverty and the Public School System: Student Persistence from Elementary School to College Graduation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Deborah Anne

    2013-01-01

    Children living in poverty are at an elevated risk for academic, behavioral and emotional problems compared with children who are in the middle and upper classes (Kim-Cohen et al., 2004). Students living in poverty generally have fewer opportunities in schools as schools are less likely to offer rigorous curriculum or advanced classes for poor…

  11. Effect of School System and Gender on Moral Values and Forgiveness in Pakistani School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Anam; Kausar, Rukhsana; Khan, Nashi

    2014-01-01

    The present research was conducted to compare children studying in private and public schools in Pakistan on forgiveness and moral values. It was hypothesized that the type of school and gender of the child are likely to affect forgiveness and moral values in children. A sample of 100 children with equal number of girls and boys was recruited from…

  12. Birth Pains: Emerging School Leadership Policies in Eight School Systems of Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, José; Hernández, Macarena

    2016-01-01

    School leadership has a core position within education policy worldwide. Comparative research in this area has been mainly focused on developed countries and has tended to neglect the situation of developing nations, including Latin American countries. Considering the above, this article presents the current status of school leadership policies in…

  13. England's multiethnic educational system? A classification of secondary schools

    OpenAIRE

    Ron Johnston; Deborah Wilson; Simon Burgess

    2005-01-01

    As British society has become increasingly multiethnic and multicultural, debate has grown regarding the advantages and disadvantages of ethnically segregated schools, with regard both to educational achievement and to multicultural accommodation. Compared with issues regarding the class composition of schools, however, little work has been done on the degree of ethnic segregation in schools, let alone its impact. The authors use a recently developed classification procedure to identify the d...

  14. Immigrant parents as ‘coaches’ for their children in the Danish school system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viala, Eva Silberschmidt

    generation (im)migrant parents and the school has proved particularly difficult. According to school teachers, cultural differences, socio-economic problems combined with (im)migrants’ uncertainty and feelings of powerlessness as to the upbringing of their child/children in a new cultural setting constitute...... major obstacles. The role and the responsibility of the school teachers are therefore to assist the parents in enabling their child to balance between different values and norms within the Danish society, the family and the school. While the perspectives of the professionals are well-known, (im...... system. Focus is on the following issues: Which expectations to parents and school teachers are created through the school/home partnership? Do (im)migrant parents agree/disagree with the views of the professionals? How do parents and school teachers regard their tasks and which dilemmas do they see? Are...

  15. Public and schools learning about the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinschi, Magda; Mosoia, Catalin

    2007-08-01

    The role of outreach activities is sending proper information straight to the audience. We want to add quality with a view to have a much higher dimension. It is education we are aiming at by the means of outreach activities. Be it spoken, written or read for the public. That is why we are trying to promote this kind of collaboration between professional scientists and mass media representatives. First of all, the most important target is the school children and youth people, the day after tomorrow's researchers. Secondly, we do have a very strong motivation for action because of the total lack of astronomy education in the national curricula. The future of the planetary systems education depends on how they understand and perceive the study of celestial bodies. Knowing the Solar System is important and decisive for understanding and protecting the Earth. We do have within the Solar System some kind of 'celestial teachers' who are lecturing for free even if we are considering environmentally issues. Let us think of Venus and we might have one possible scenario for our native planet if proper action is not taken. The 'beautiful planet' traps solar radiation in its atmosphere in an exaggerated version of our own Greenhouse Effect. Moreover, various impacts on celestial bodies may give us another dimension of the future. The European space missions could be the principal core of fulfilling all of these. That is the reason for better knowing the Solar System. Last but not in the least, the paper comes naturally as part of our efforts to celebrate IHY, 50 years of space research, as well as preparing IYA 2009.

  16. Silviculture and economic benefits of producing wood energy from conventional forestry systems and measures to mitigate negative impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activity ''Forest Energy Production'' focused on the development and evaluation, in the context of conventional forestry systems, silvicultural and forest management practices which optimise productivity for traditional products and wood for energy, while safeguarding the forest ecosystem. A series of meetings, workshops, and review papers involving the three participating countries of Canada, Sweden, and the United Kingdom were planned and completed. An additional workshop in Switzerland was also held. Increasing production of biomass for energy is generally found to be positive, from silvicultural, economic, and environmental perspectives. Eight specific forest management systems were investigated and/or reported: five conventional systems involving multiple products in softwood and mixed wood, and three hardwood systems emphasising production of biomass for energy. Modifications in silvercultural practice to also produce biomass for energy included increased opportunities for thinnings, intermediate cuttings, and stand and site rehabilitation as well as more flexible and efficient harvesting systems. Economic benefits accrued from increased investment in harvesting and burning technology, improvements in stand quality and site utilisation, and substitution for more expensive fuels, especially if all costs are considered. Environmental effects were found to be generally positive, but negative effects of nutrient and organic matter removal on the overall sustainability of specific systems are possible. These need to be addressed. Harvest and management guidelines are being designed and put into practice. Social, institutional, and technical barriers to the increased use of biomass for energy are being addressed by specific strategies and initiatives involving programs and incentives for production, market development, research and education. Net positive effects indicate increased use of forest biomass for energy, in the short and long term. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. New Forms of Management and Governance in the School System in England and Wales

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    The imposition of the neo-liberal agenda in the school system is a difficult entity. It requires new systems of control. These are particularly important in relation to the development of a more decentralised system of schools. This article examines how to exercise control over a more decentralised education system, the requirements of new forms of management and regulation, which this article itemises into 5 categories. All of these are accompanied by a systematic ideological offensive to pe...

  18. Cost-benefit analysis of a green electricity system in Japan considering the indirect economic impacts of tropical cyclones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global warming is likely to profoundly influence future weather patterns, and one consequence of this is the likelihood of an increase in tropical cyclone intensity. The present paper presents a cost-benefit analysis of introducing significant amounts of green energy in the electricity system in Japan in the light of the economic damage that an increase in tropical cyclone intensity could have on GDP growth between 2010 and 2085. Essentially the passage of a tropical cyclone will result not only in physical damage but also on a decrease in economic productivity due to precautionary cessation of the economic activity, which has an effect on GDP growth. By comparing the economic performance of different electricity system scenarios with the indirect economic damage of tropical cyclones from 2010 to 2085, based on the yearly economic data of green electricity, fossil fuel, GDP and population, it can be seen that the green scenarios are generally a cost-effective way of mitigating the effects of these weather systems, despite the large amount of initial investments necessary. - Highlights: ► Climate change is likely to increase the future strength of tropical cyclones. ► An increase in tropical cyclone strength would reduce GDP growth in Japan. ► Reducing green-house gas emissions is a cost-effective mitigation strategy.

  19. Benefiting All

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A new law promotes individual equality in social security benefits and forbids the misuse of funds The Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC),China’s top legislature, voted to adopt a social insurance law on October 28 that prevents the

  20. School Health Connection Goes Electronic: Developing a Health Information Management System for New Orleans' School-Based Health Centers. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastorfer, Darl

    2011-01-01

    From February 2008 through April 2011, School Health Connection, a program of the Louisiana Public Health Institute, developed an electronic health information management system for newly established school-based health centers in Greater New Orleans. School Health Connection was established as part of a broader effort to restore community health…