WorldWideScience

Sample records for benchmark analyses results

  1. Analysis of Benchmark 2 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacha, F.; Lefievre, B.; Maillard, J.; Silva, J.

    1994-01-01

    The code GEANT315 has been compared to different codes in two benchmarks. We analyze its performances through our results, especially in the thick target case. In spite of gaps in nucleus-nucleus interaction theories at intermediate energies, benchmarks allow possible improvements of physical models used in our codes. Thereafter, a scheme of radioactive waste burning system is studied. (authors). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. BN-600 hybrid core benchmark analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.I.; Stanculescu, A.; Finck, P.; Hill, R.N.; Grimm, K.N.

    2003-01-01

    Benchmark analyses for the hybrid BN-600 reactor that contains three uranium enrichment zones and one plutonium zone in the core, have been performed within the frame of an IAEA sponsored Coordinated Research Project. The results for several relevant reactivity parameters obtained by the participants with their own state-of-the-art basic data and codes, were compared in terms of calculational uncertainty, and their effects on the ULOF transient behavior of the hybrid BN-600 core were evaluated. The comparison of the diffusion and transport results obtained for the homogeneous representation generally shows good agreement for most parameters between the RZ and HEX-Z models. The burnup effect and the heterogeneity effect on most reactivity parameters also show good agreement for the HEX-Z diffusion and transport theory results. A large difference noticed for the sodium and steel density coefficients is mainly due to differences in the spatial coefficient predictions for non fuelled regions. The burnup reactivity loss was evaluated to be 0.025 (4.3 $) within ∼ 5.0% standard deviation. The heterogeneity effect on most reactivity coefficients was estimated to be small. The heterogeneity treatment reduced the control rod worth by 2.3%. The heterogeneity effect on the k-eff and control rod worth appeared to differ strongly depending on the heterogeneity treatment method. A substantial spread noticed for several reactivity coefficients did not give a significant impact on the transient behavior prediction. This result is attributable to compensating effects between several reactivity effects and the specific design of the partially MOX fuelled hybrid core. (author)

  3. Benchmark results in radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.D.M.; Siewert, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    Several aspects of the F N method are reported, and the method is used to solve accurately some benchmark problems in radiative transfer in the field of atmospheric physics. The method was modified to solve cases of pure scattering and an improved process was developed for computing the radiation intensity. An algorithms for computing several quantities used in the F N method was done. An improved scheme to evaluate certain integrals relevant to the method is done, and a two-term recursion relation that has proved useful for the numerical evaluation of matrix elements, basic for the method, is given. The methods used to solve the encountered linear algebric equations are discussed, and the numerical results are evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  4. Analyses and results of the OECD/NEA WPNCS EGUNF benchmark phase II. Technical report; Analysen und Ergebnisse zum OECD/NEA WPNCS EGUNF Benchmark Phase II. Technischer Bericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, Volker; Sommer, Fabian

    2017-05-15

    The report summarizes the performed studies and results in the frame of the phase II benchmarks of the expert group of used nuclear fuel (EGUNF) of the working party of nuclear criticality safety (WPNCS) of the nuclear energy agency (NEA) of the organization for economic co-operation and development (OECD). The studies specified within the benchmarks have been realized to the full extent. The scope of the benchmarks was the comparison of a generic BWR fuel element with gadolinium containing fuel rods with several computer codes and cross section libraries of different international working groups and institutions. The used computational model allows the evaluation of the accuracy of fuel rod and their influence of the inventory calculations and the respective influence on BWR burnout credit calculations.

  5. Overview of cooperative international piping benchmark analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an effort initiated in 1976 by the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to evaluate detailed and simplified inelastic analysis methods for piping systems with particular emphasis on piping bends. The procedure was to collect from participating member IAEA countries descriptions of tests and test results for piping systems or bends (with emphasis on high temperature inelastic tests), to compile, evaluate, and issue a selected number of these problems for analysis, and to compile and make a preliminary evaluation of the analyses results. Of the problem descriptions submitted three were selected to be used: a 90 0 -elbow at 600 0 C with an in-plane transverse force; a 90 0 -elbow with an in-plane moment; and a 180 0 -elbow at room temperature with a reversed, cyclic, in-plane transverse force. A variety of both detailed and simplified analysis solutions were obtained. A brief comparative assessment of the analyses is contained in this paper. 15 figures

  6. KAERI results for BN600 full MOX benchmark (Phase 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kibog Lee

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the results of KAERI's calculation for the Phase-4 of BN-600 full MOX fueled core benchmark analyses according to the RCM report of IAEA CRP Action on U pdated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects. T he BN-600 full MOX core model is based on the specification in the document, F ull MOX Model (Phase4. doc ) . This document addresses the calculational methods employed in the benchmark analyses and benchmark results carried out by KAERI

  7. Benchmark exercises on PWR level-1 PSA (step 3). Analyses of accident sequence and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yuji; Takahashi, Hideaki.

    1996-01-01

    The results of level 1 PSA generate fluctuations due to the assumptions based on several engineering judgements set in the stages of PSA analysis. On the purpose of the investigation of uncertainties due to assumptions, three kinds of a standard problem, what we call benchmark exercise have been set. In this report, sensitivity studies (benchmark exercise) of sequence analyses are treated and conclusions are mentioned. The treatment of inter-system dependency would generate uncertainly of PSA. In addition, as a conclusion of the PSA benchmark exercise, several findings in the sequence analysis together with previous benchmark analyses in earlier INSS Journals are treated. (author)

  8. ZZ WPPR, Pu Recycling Benchmark Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, D.; Mattes, M.; Delpech, Marc; Juanola, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Description of program or function: The NEA NSC Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling has commissioned a series of benchmarks covering: - Plutonium recycling in pressurized-water reactors; - Void reactivity effect in pressurized-water reactors; - Fast Plutonium-burner reactors: beginning of life; - Plutonium recycling in fast reactors; - Multiple recycling in advanced pressurized-water reactors. The results have been published (see references). ZZ-WPPR-1-A/B contains graphs and tables relative to the PWR Mox pin cell benchmark, representing typical fuel for plutonium recycling, one corresponding to a first cycle, the second for a fifth cycle. These computer readable files contain the complete set of results, while the printed report contains only a subset. ZZ-WPPR-2-CYC1 are the results from cycle 1 of the multiple recycling benchmarks

  9. The Benchmark Test Results of QNX RTOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Lee, Young Jun; Cheon, Se Woo; Lee, Jang Soo; Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    A Real-Time Operating System(RTOS) is an Operating System(OS) intended for real-time applications. Benchmarking is a point of reference by which something can be measured. The QNX is a Real Time Operating System(RTOS) developed by QSSL(QNX Software Systems Ltd.) in Canada. The ELMSYS is the brand name of commercially available Personal Computer(PC) for applications such as Cabinet Operator Module(COM) of Digital Plant Protection System(DPPS) and COM of Digital Engineered Safety Features Actuation System(DESFAS). The ELMSYS PC Hardware is being qualified by KTL(Korea Testing Lab.) for use as a Cabinet Operator Module(COM). The QNX RTOS is being dedicated by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). This paper describes the outline and benchmarking test results on Context Switching, Message Passing, Synchronization and Deadline Violation of QNX RTOS under the ELMSYS PC platform

  10. The Benchmark Test Results of QNX RTOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Yeol; Lee, Young Jun; Cheon, Se Woo; Lee, Jang Soo; Kwon, Kee Choon

    2010-01-01

    A Real-Time Operating System(RTOS) is an Operating System(OS) intended for real-time applications. Benchmarking is a point of reference by which something can be measured. The QNX is a Real Time Operating System(RTOS) developed by QSSL(QNX Software Systems Ltd.) in Canada. The ELMSYS is the brand name of commercially available Personal Computer(PC) for applications such as Cabinet Operator Module(COM) of Digital Plant Protection System(DPPS) and COM of Digital Engineered Safety Features Actuation System(DESFAS). The ELMSYS PC Hardware is being qualified by KTL(Korea Testing Lab.) for use as a Cabinet Operator Module(COM). The QNX RTOS is being dedicated by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). This paper describes the outline and benchmarking test results on Context Switching, Message Passing, Synchronization and Deadline Violation of QNX RTOS under the ELMSYS PC platform

  11. The Medical Library Association Benchmarking Network: results*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam; Corcoran, Kate; Kaplan, Janice; Magouirk, Jeff; Rand, Debra C.; Smith, Bernie Todd

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article presents some limited results from the Medical Library Association (MLA) Benchmarking Network survey conducted in 2002. Other uses of the data are also presented. Methods: After several years of development and testing, a Web-based survey opened for data input in December 2001. Three hundred eighty-five MLA members entered data on the size of their institutions and the activities of their libraries. The data from 344 hospital libraries were edited and selected for reporting in aggregate tables and on an interactive site in the Members-Only area of MLANET. The data represent a 16% to 23% return rate and have a 95% confidence level. Results: Specific questions can be answered using the reports. The data can be used to review internal processes, perform outcomes benchmarking, retest a hypothesis, refute a previous survey findings, or develop library standards. The data can be used to compare to current surveys or look for trends by comparing the data to past surveys. Conclusions: The impact of this project on MLA will reach into areas of research and advocacy. The data will be useful in the everyday working of small health sciences libraries as well as provide concrete data on the current practices of health sciences libraries. PMID:16636703

  12. Results of LWR core transient benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnemann, H.; Bauer, H.; Galati, A.; Martinelli, R.

    1993-10-01

    LWR core transient (LWRCT) benchmarks, based on well defined problems with a complete set of input data, are used to assess the discrepancies between three-dimensional space-time kinetics codes in transient calculations. The PWR problem chosen is the ejection of a control assembly from an initially critical core at hot zero power or at full power, each for three different geometrical configurations. The set of problems offers a variety of reactivity excursions which efficiently test the coupled neutronic/thermal - hydraulic models of the codes. The 63 sets of submitted solutions are analyzed by comparison with a nodal reference solution defined by using a finer spatial and temporal resolution than in standard calculations. The BWR problems considered are reactivity excursions caused by cold water injection and pressurization events. In the present paper, only the cold water injection event is discussed and evaluated in some detail. Lacking a reference solution the evaluation of the 8 sets of BWR contributions relies on a synthetic comparative discussion. The results of this first phase of LWRCT benchmark calculations are quite satisfactory, though there remain some unresolved issues. It is therefore concluded that even more challenging problems can be successfully tackled in a suggested second test phase. (authors). 46 figs., 21 tabs., 3 refs

  13. The Medical Library Association Benchmarking Network: results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam; Corcoran, Kate; Kaplan, Janice; Magouirk, Jeff; Rand, Debra C; Smith, Bernie Todd

    2006-04-01

    This article presents some limited results from the Medical Library Association (MLA) Benchmarking Network survey conducted in 2002. Other uses of the data are also presented. After several years of development and testing, a Web-based survey opened for data input in December 2001. Three hundred eighty-five MLA members entered data on the size of their institutions and the activities of their libraries. The data from 344 hospital libraries were edited and selected for reporting in aggregate tables and on an interactive site in the Members-Only area of MLANET. The data represent a 16% to 23% return rate and have a 95% confidence level. Specific questions can be answered using the reports. The data can be used to review internal processes, perform outcomes benchmarking, retest a hypothesis, refute a previous survey findings, or develop library standards. The data can be used to compare to current surveys or look for trends by comparing the data to past surveys. The impact of this project on MLA will reach into areas of research and advocacy. The data will be useful in the everyday working of small health sciences libraries as well as provide concrete data on the current practices of health sciences libraries.

  14. Benchmarking von Krankenhausinformationssystemen – eine vergleichende Analyse deutschsprachiger Benchmarkingcluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahn, Franziska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is a method of strategic information management used by many hospitals today. During the last years, several benchmarking clusters have been established within the German-speaking countries. They support hospitals in comparing and positioning their information system’s and information management’s costs, performance and efficiency against other hospitals. In order to differentiate between these benchmarking clusters and to provide decision support in selecting an appropriate benchmarking cluster, a classification scheme is developed. The classification scheme observes both general conditions and examined contents of the benchmarking clusters. It is applied to seven benchmarking clusters which have been active in the German-speaking countries within the last years. Currently, performance benchmarking is the most frequent benchmarking type, whereas the observed benchmarking clusters differ in the number of benchmarking partners and their cooperation forms. The benchmarking clusters also deal with different benchmarking subjects. Assessing costs and quality application systems, physical data processing systems, organizational structures of information management and IT services processes are the most frequent benchmarking subjects. There is still potential for further activities within the benchmarking clusters to measure strategic and tactical information management, IT governance and quality of data and data-processing processes. Based on the classification scheme and the comparison of the benchmarking clusters, we derive general recommendations for benchmarking of hospital information systems.

  15. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Meylianti S., Brigita

    1999-01-01

    Benchmarking has different meaning to different people. There are five types of benchmarking, namely internal benchmarking, competitive benchmarking, industry / functional benchmarking, process / generic benchmarking and collaborative benchmarking. Each type of benchmarking has its own advantages as well as disadvantages. Therefore it is important to know what kind of benchmarking is suitable to a specific application. This paper will discuss those five types of benchmarking in detail, includ...

  16. Repeated Results Analysis for Middleware Regression Benchmarking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bulej, Lubomír; Kalibera, T.; Tůma, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, - (2005), s. 345-358 ISSN 0166-5316 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/03/0672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : middleware benchmarking * regression benchmarking * regression testing Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 0.756, year: 2005

  17. Experimental benchmark for piping system dynamic response analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, G.A.; Mallett, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The scope and status of a piping system dynamics test program are described. A 0.20-m nominal diameter test piping specimen is designed to be representative of main heat transport system piping of LMFBR plants. Attention is given to representing piping restraints. Applied loadings consider component-induced vibration as well as seismic excitation. The principal objective of the program is to provide a benchmark for verification of piping design methods by correlation of predicted and measured responses. Pre-test analysis results and correlation methods are discussed. 3 refs

  18. Experimental benchmark for piping system dynamic-response analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of a piping system dynamics test program. A 0.20 m(8 in.) nominal diameter test piping specimen is designed to be representative of main heat transport system piping of LMFBR plants. Particular attention is given to representing piping restraints. Applied loadings consider component-induced vibration as well as seismic excitation. The principal objective of the program is to provide a benchmark for verification of piping design methods by correlation of predicted and measured responses. Pre-test analysis results and correlation methods are discussed

  19. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ludewig, H.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Schmidt, E.; Todosow, M.; Parma, E.J.; Ball, R.M.; Hoovler, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate close agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors

  20. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcow, Elizabeth C.; Cerbone, Ralph J.; Ludewig, Hans; Mughabghab, Said F.; Schmidt, Eldon; Todosow, Michael; Parma, Edward J.; Ball, Russell M.; Hoovler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    Benchmark analyses have been performed of Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) critical experiments (CX) using the MCNP radiation transport code. The experiments have been conducted at the Sandia National Laboratory reactor facility in support of the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. The test reactor is a nineteen element water moderated and reflected thermal system. A series of integral experiments have been carried out to test the capabilities of the radiation transport codes to predict the performance of PBR systems. MCNP was selected as the preferred radiation analysis tool for the benchmark experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculational results indicate close agreement. This paper describes the analyses of benchmark experiments designed to quantify the accuracy of the MCNP radiation transport code for predicting the performance characteristics of PBR reactors.

  1. Reactor calculation benchmark PCA blind test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    Further improvement in calculational procedures or a combination of calculations and measurements is necessary to attain 10 to 15% (1 sigma) accuracy for neutron exposure parameters (flux greater than 0.1 MeV, flux greater than 1.0 MeV, and dpa). The calculational modeling of power reactors should be benchmarked in an actual LWR plant to provide final uncertainty estimates for end-of-life predictions and limitations for plant operations. 26 references, 14 figures, 6 tables

  2. Reactor calculation benchmark PCA blind test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    Further improvement in calculational procedures or a combination of calculations and measurements is necessary to attain 10 to 15% (1 sigma) accuracy for neutron exposure parameters (flux greater than 0.1 MeV, flux greater than 1.0 MeV, and dpa). The calculational modeling of power reactors should be benchmarked in an actual LWR plant to provide final uncertainty estimates for end-of-life predictions and limitations for plant operations. 26 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  3. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de; Voet, J. van der; Verhagen, F.C.M.

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs

  4. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pijlgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs., 9 figs., 30 tabs.

  5. Benchmarking multi-dimensional large strain consolidation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priestley, D.; Fredlund, M.D.; Van Zyl, D.

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing the consolidation of tailings slurries and dredged fills requires a more extensive formulation than is used for common (small strain) consolidation problems. Large strain consolidation theories have traditionally been limited to 1-D formulations. SoilVision Systems has developed the capacity to analyze large strain consolidation problems in 2 and 3-D. The benchmarking of such formulations is not a trivial task. This paper presents several examples of modeling large strain consolidation in the beta versions of the new software. These examples were taken from the literature and were used to benchmark the large strain formulation used by the new software. The benchmarks reported here are: a comparison to the consolidation software application CONDES0, Townsend's Scenario B and a multi-dimensional analysis of long-term column tests performed on oil sands tailings. All three of these benchmarks were attained using the SVOffice suite. (author)

  6. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The present work is the results of JNC, Japan, for the Phase 4 of the BN-600 core benchmark problem (Hex-Z fully MOX fuelled core model) organized by IAEA. The benchmark specification is based on 1) the RCM report of IAEA CRP on 'Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of LMFR Reactivity Effects, Action 3.12' (Calculations for BN-600 fully fuelled MOX core for subsequent transient analyses). JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library was used for calculating 70 group ABBN-type group constants. Cell models for fuel assembly and control rod calculations were applied: homogeneous and heterogeneous (cylindrical supercell) model. Basic diffusion calculation was three-dimensional Hex-Z model, 18 group (Citation code). Transport calculations were 18 group, three-dimensional (NSHEC code) based on Sn-transport nodal method developed at JNC. The generated thermal power per fission was based on Sher's data corrected on the basis of ENDF/B-IV data library. Calculation results are presented in Tables for intercomparison

  7. Evaluation of PWR and BWR pin cell benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilgroms, B.J.; Gruppelaar, H.; Janssen, A.J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)); Hoogenboom, J.E.; Leege, P.F.A. de (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Voet, J. van der (Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland NV, Dodewaard (Netherlands)); Verhagen, F.C.M. (Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands))

    1991-12-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on the PWR and BWR pin cell calculational benchmark as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. The observed discrepancies are problem dependent: a part of the results is satisfactory, some other results require further analysis. A brief overview is given of the different code packages used in this analysis. (author). 14 refs.; 9 figs.; 30 tabs.

  8. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abanades, Alberto; Aliberti, Gerardo; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto; Bornos, Victor; Kiyavitskaya, Anna; Carta, Mario; Janczyszyn, Jerzy; Maiorino, Jose; Pyeon, Cheolho; Stanculescu, Alexander; Titarenko, Yury; Westmeier, Wolfram

    2008-01-01

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  9. ANL results for LMFR reactivity coefficients benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The fast reactor analysis methods developed at ANL were extensively tested in ZPR and ZPPR experiments, applied to EBR-2 and FFTF test reactors. The basic nuclear data library used was ENDF/B-V.2 with the ETOE-2 data processing code and the ENDF/B-VI. Multigroup constants were generated by Monte Carlo code MCNP 2 -2. Neutron flux calculation were done by DIF3D code applying neutron diffusion theory and finite difference method. The results obtained include basic parameters; fuel and structure regional Doppler coefficients; geometry expansion fuel coefficients; kinetics parameters. In general, agreement between phase 1 and 2 results were excellent

  10. Reactor physics tests and benchmark analyses of STACY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Umano, Takuya

    1996-01-01

    The Static Experiment Critical Facility, STACY in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, NUCEF is a solution type critical facility to accumulate fundamental criticality data on uranyl nitrate solution, plutonium nitrate solution and their mixture. A series of critical experiments have been performed for 10 wt% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using a cylindrical core tank. In these experiments, systematic data of the critical height, differential reactivity of the fuel solution, kinetic parameter and reactor power were measured with changing the uranium concentration of the fuel solution from 313 gU/l to 225 gU/l. Critical data through the first series of experiments for the basic core are reported in this paper for evaluating the accuracy of the criticality safety calculation codes. Benchmark calculations of the neutron multiplication factor k eff for the critical condition were made using a neutron transport code TWOTRAN in the SRAC system and a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP 4A with a Japanese evaluated nuclear data library, JENDL 3.2. (J.P.N.)

  11. Criticality Benchmark Results Using Various MCNP Data Libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankle, Stephanie C.

    1999-01-01

    A suite of 86 criticality benchmarks has been recently implemented in MCNPtrademark as part of the nuclear data validation effort. These benchmarks have been run using two sets of MCNP continuous-energy neutron data: ENDF/B-VI based data through Release 2 (ENDF60) and the ENDF/B-V based data. New evaluations were completed for ENDF/B-VI for a number of the important nuclides such as the isotopes of H, Be, C, N, O, Fe, Ni, 235,238 U, 237 Np, and 239,240 Pu. When examining the results of these calculations for the five manor categories of 233 U, intermediate-enriched 235 U (IEU), highly enriched 235 U (HEU), 239 Pu, and mixed metal assembles, we find the following: (1) The new evaluations for 9 Be, 12 C, and 14 N show no net effect on k eff ; (2) There is a consistent decrease in k eff for all of the solution assemblies for ENDF/B-VI due to 1 H and 16 O, moving k eff further from the benchmark value for uranium solutions and closer to the benchmark value for plutonium solutions; (3) k eff decreased for the ENDF/B-VI Fe isotopic data, moving the calculated k eff further from the benchmark value; (4) k eff decreased for the ENDF/B-VI Ni isotopic data, moving the calculated k eff closer to the benchmark value; (5) The W data remained unchanged and tended to calculate slightly higher than the benchmark values; (6) For metal uranium systems, the ENDF/B-VI data for 235 U tends to decrease k eff while the 238 U data tends to increase k eff . The net result depends on the energy spectrum and material specifications for the particular assembly; (7) For more intermediate-energy systems, the changes in the 235,238 U evaluations tend to increase k eff . For the mixed graphite and normal uranium-reflected assembly, a large increase in k eff due to changes in the 238 U evaluation moved the calculated k eff much closer to the benchmark value. (8) There is little change in k eff for the uranium solutions due to the new 235,238 U evaluations; and (9) There is little change in k eff

  12. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  13. Analyzing the BBOB results by means of benchmarking concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersmann, O; Preuss, M; Trautmann, H; Bischl, B; Weihs, C

    2015-01-01

    We present methods to answer two basic questions that arise when benchmarking optimization algorithms. The first one is: which algorithm is the "best" one? and the second one is: which algorithm should I use for my real-world problem? Both are connected and neither is easy to answer. We present a theoretical framework for designing and analyzing the raw data of such benchmark experiments. This represents a first step in answering the aforementioned questions. The 2009 and 2010 BBOB benchmark results are analyzed by means of this framework and we derive insight regarding the answers to the two questions. Furthermore, we discuss how to properly aggregate rankings from algorithm evaluations on individual problems into a consensus, its theoretical background and which common pitfalls should be avoided. Finally, we address the grouping of test problems into sets with similar optimizer rankings and investigate whether these are reflected by already proposed test problem characteristics, finding that this is not always the case.

  14. Results of the benchmark for blade structural models, part A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekou, D.J.; Chortis, D.; Belen Fariñas, A.

    2013-01-01

    A benchmark on structural design methods for blades was performed within the InnWind.Eu project under WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design”. The present document is describes the results of the comparison simulation runs that were performed by the partners involved within...... Task 2.2 of the InnWind.Eu project. The benchmark is based on the reference wind turbine and the reference blade provided by DTU [1]. "Structural Concept developers/modelers" of WP2 were provided with the necessary input for a comparison numerical simulation run, upon definition of the reference blade...

  15. Compilation of benchmark results for fusion related Nuclear Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Wada, Masayuki; Oyama, Yukio; Ichihara, Chihiro; Makita, Yo; Takahashi, Akito

    1998-11-01

    This report compiles results of benchmark tests for validation of evaluated nuclear data to be used in nuclear designs of fusion reactors. Parts of results were obtained under activities of the Fusion Neutronics Integral Test Working Group organized by the members of both Japan Nuclear Data Committee and the Reactor Physics Committee. The following three benchmark experiments were employed used for the tests: (i) the leakage neutron spectrum measurement experiments from slab assemblies at the D-T neutron source at FNS/JAERI, (ii) in-situ neutron and gamma-ray measurement experiments (so-called clean benchmark experiments) also at FNS, and (iii) the pulsed sphere experiments for leakage neutron and gamma-ray spectra at the D-T neutron source facility of Osaka University, OKTAVIAN. Evaluated nuclear data tested were JENDL-3.2, JENDL Fusion File, FENDL/E-1.0 and newly selected data for FENDL/E-2.0. Comparisons of benchmark calculations with the experiments for twenty-one elements, i.e., Li, Be, C, N, O, F, Al, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zr, Nb, Mo, W and Pb, are summarized. (author). 65 refs

  16. Evaluation of the computer code system RADHEAT-V4 by analysing benchmark problems on radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Yukio; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1990-11-01

    A computer code system RADHEAT-V4 has been developed for safety evaluation on radiation shielding of nuclear fuel facilities. To evaluate the performance of the code system, 18 benchmark problem were selected and analysed. Evaluated radiations are neutron and gamma-ray. Benchmark problems consist of penetration, streaming and skyshine. The computed results show more accurate than those by the Sn codes ANISN and DOT3.5 or the Monte Carlo code MORSE. Big core memory and many times I/O are, however, required for RADHEAT-V4. (author)

  17. Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Beretta Sergio; Dossi Andrea; Grove Hugh

    2000-01-01

    Due to their particular nature, the benchmarking methodologies tend to exceed the boundaries of management techniques, and to enter the territories of managerial culture. A culture that is also destined to break into the accounting area not only strongly supporting the possibility of fixing targets, and measuring and comparing the performance (an aspect that is already innovative and that is worthy of attention), but also questioning one of the principles (or taboos) of the accounting or...

  18. Results from the IAEA benchmark of spallation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leray, S.; David, J.C.; Khandaker, M.; Mank, G.; Mengoni, A.; Otsuka, N.; Filges, D.; Gallmeier, F.; Konobeyev, A.; Michel, R.

    2011-01-01

    Spallation reactions play an important role in a wide domain of applications. In the simulation codes used in this field, the nuclear interaction cross-sections and characteristics are computed by spallation models. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has recently organised a benchmark of the spallation models used or that could be used in the future into high-energy transport codes. The objectives were, first, to assess the prediction capabilities of the different spallation models for the different mass and energy regions and the different exit channels and, second, to understand the reason for the success or deficiency of the models. Results of the benchmark concerning both the analysis of the prediction capabilities of the models and the first conclusions on the physics of spallation models are presented. (authors)

  19. Benchmarking NNWSI flow and transport codes: COVE 1 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, N.K.

    1985-06-01

    The code verification (COVE) activity of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is the first step in certification of flow and transport codes used for NNWSI performance assessments of a geologic repository for disposing of high-level radioactive wastes. The goals of the COVE activity are (1) to demonstrate and compare the numerical accuracy and sensitivity of certain codes, (2) to identify and resolve problems in running typical NNWSI performance assessment calculations, and (3) to evaluate computer requirements for running the codes. This report describes the work done for COVE 1, the first step in benchmarking some of the codes. Isothermal calculations for the COVE 1 benchmarking have been completed using the hydrologic flow codes SAGUARO, TRUST, and GWVIP; the radionuclide transport codes FEMTRAN and TRUMP; and the coupled flow and transport code TRACR3D. This report presents the results of three cases of the benchmarking problem solved for COVE 1, a comparison of the results, questions raised regarding sensitivities to modeling techniques, and conclusions drawn regarding the status and numerical sensitivities of the codes. 30 refs

  20. Systems reliability Benchmark exercise part 1-Description and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, A.

    1986-01-01

    The report describes aims, rules and results of the Systems Reliability Benchmark Exercise, which has been performed in order to assess methods and procedures for reliability analysis of complex systems and involved a large number of European organizations active in NPP safety evaluation. The exercise included both qualitative and quantitative methods and was structured in such a way that separation of the effects of uncertainties in modelling and in data on the overall spread was made possible. Part I describes the way in which RBE has been performed, its main results and conclusions

  1. JNC results of BN-600 benchmark calculation (phase 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is the result of phase 3 BN-600 core benchmark problem, meaning burnup and heterogeneity. Analytical method applied consisted of: JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library, group constants (70 group, ABBN type self shielding transport factors), heterogeneous cell model for fuel and control rod, basic diffusion calculation (CITATION code), transport theory and mesh size correction (NSHEX code based on SN transport nodal method developed by JNC). Burnup and heterogeneity calculation results are presented obtained by applying both diffusion and transport approach for beginning and end of cycle

  2. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Rattoni, B.; Vienne, C.; Vabre, A.; Cattiaux, G.; Sollier, T.

    2015-01-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software

  3. Experiment vs simulation RT WFNDEC 2014 benchmark: CIVA results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisseur, D., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Costin, M., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Rattoni, B., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Vienne, C., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Vabre, A., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr; Cattiaux, G., E-mail: david.tisseur@cea.fr [CEA LIST, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Sollier, T. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, B.P.17 92262 Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-31

    The French Atomic Energy Commission and Alternative Energies (CEA) has developed for years the CIVA software dedicated to simulation of NDE techniques such as Radiographic Testing (RT). RT modelling is achieved in CIVA using combination of a determinist approach based on ray tracing for transmission beam simulation and a Monte Carlo model for the scattered beam computation. Furthermore, CIVA includes various detectors models, in particular common x-ray films and a photostimulable phosphor plates. This communication presents the results obtained with the configurations proposed in the World Federation of NDEC 2014 RT modelling benchmark with the RT models implemented in the CIVA software.

  4. Actinides transmutation - a comparison of results for PWR benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Luiz H.

    2009-01-01

    The physical aspects involved in the Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) of minor actinides (MA) and fission products (FP) generated by reactors PWR are of great interest in the nuclear industry. Besides these the reduction in the storage of radioactive wastes are related with the acceptability of the nuclear electric power. From the several concepts for partitioning and transmutation suggested in literature, one of them involves PWR reactors to burn the fuel containing plutonium and minor actinides reprocessed of UO 2 used in previous stages. In this work are presented the results of the calculations of a benchmark in P and T carried with WIMSD5B program using its new cross sections library generated from the ENDF-B-VII and the comparison with the results published in literature by other calculations. For comparison, was used the benchmark transmutation concept based in a typical PWR cell and the analyzed results were the k∞ and the atomic density of the isotopes Np-239, Pu-241, Pu-242 and Am-242m, as function of burnup considering discharge of 50 GWd/tHM. (author)

  5. Benchmarking Benchmarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Blitz (David)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBenchmarking benchmarks is a bundle of six studies that are inspired by the prevalence of benchmarking in academic finance research as well as in investment practice. Three studies examine if current benchmark asset pricing models adequately describe the cross-section of stock returns.

  6. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark. Volume II: Summary Results of Exercise 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Olson, Andy M.

    2005-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) completed under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship a PWR main steam line break (MSLB) benchmark against coupled system three-dimensional (3-D) neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic codes. Another OECD/NRC coupled-code benchmark was recently completed for a BWR turbine trip (TT) transient and is the object of the present report. Turbine trip transients in a BWR are pressurisation events in which the coupling between core space-dependent neutronic phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. The data made available from actual experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 plant make the present benchmark particularly valuable. While defining and coordinating the BWR TT benchmark, a systematic approach and level methodology not only allowed for a consistent and comprehensive validation process, but also contributed to the study of key parameters of pressurisation transients. The benchmark consists of three separate exercises, two initial states and five transient scenarios. The BWR TT Benchmark will be published in four volumes as NEA reports. CD-ROMs will also be prepared and will include the four reports and the transient boundary conditions, decay heat values as a function of time, cross-section libraries and supplementary tables and graphs not published in the paper version. BWR TT Benchmark - Volume I: Final Specifications was issued in 2001 [NEA/NSC/DOC(2001)]. The benchmark team [Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in co-operation with Exelon Nuclear and the NEA] has been responsible for coordinating benchmark activities, answering participant questions and assisting them in developing their models, as well as analysing submitted solutions and providing reports summarising the results for each phase. The benchmark team has also been involved in the technical aspects of the benchmark, including sensitivity studies for the different exercises. Volume II summarises the results for Exercise 1 of the

  7. IAEA coordinated research project on 'analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait-Abderrahim, H.; Stanculescu, A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides the general background and the main specifications of the benchmark exercises performed within the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Dept., is to contribute to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e. heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. (authors)

  8. Benchmark Calculations on Halden IFA-650 LOCA Test Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, Mirkka; Kekkonen, Laura; Kelppe, Seppo; Stengaard, J.O.; Josek, Radomir; Wiesenack, Wolfgang; Aounallah, Yacine; Wallin, Hannu; Grandjean, Claude; Herb, Joachim; Lerchl, Georg; Trambauer, Klaus; Sonnenburg, Heinz-Guenther; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Spykman, Gerold; Struzik, Christine

    2010-01-01

    through several blow-downs and heat-ups and reached peak clad temperatures of more than 1000 C. In the second run, where the rod was sufficiently pre-pressurised, ballooning and burst was obtained. The first benchmark consisted of three rounds of code calculations related to IFA-650.3: 1. Pre-test calculations: Participants were provided with information regarding the setup of the Halden LOCA test facility, data from the commissioning runs, and information about the test pin and power conditions to be applied in the execution of the test. 2. Post-test calculations I: In addition to the information from the first round, participants were provided with the in-pile results from the test. 3. Post-test calculations II, unified thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions: Calculations were repeated using a cladding temperature distribution calculated with ATHLET-CD at GRS. Since the test, when executed, did not produce the expected ballooning and fuel relocation, it was decided to continue with a second benchmark using tests 650.4 and 650.5, this time as post-test calculations. The fourth test of the series, IFA-650.4 conducted in April 2006, caused particular attention in the international nuclear community. The fuel used in the experiment had a high burnup, 92 MWd/kgU, and a low pre-test hydrogen content of about 50 ppm. The cladding burst at about 790 deg. C caused a marked temperature increase at the lower end of the segment and a decrease at the upper end, indicating that fuel relocation had occurred. Subsequent gamma scanning showed that approximately 19 cm (40%) of the fuel stack were missing from the upper part of the rod. PIE at the IFE-Kjeller hot cells corroborated this evidence of substantial fuel relocation. This report presents the results of the codes which participated in the various benchmarks. The two main parts, on benchmark I and II, each start with a brief description of the most important experimental data. Then, the code calculation results follow

  9. IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on 'Analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, Alberto [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Aliberti, Gerardo; Gohar, Yousry; Talamo, Alberto [ANL, Argonne (United States); Bornos, Victor; Kiyavitskaya, Anna [Joint Institute of Power Eng. and Nucl. Research ' Sosny' , Minsk (Belarus); Carta, Mario [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy); Janczyszyn, Jerzy [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Maiorino, Jose [IPEN, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pyeon, Cheolho [Kyoto University (Japan); Stanculescu, Alexander [IAEA, Vienna (Austria); Titarenko, Yury [ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation); Westmeier, Wolfram [Wolfram Westmeier GmbH, Ebsdorfergrund (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In December 2005, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has started a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems'. The overall objective of the CRP, performed within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWGFR) of IAEA's Nuclear Energy Department, is to increase the capability of interested Member States in developing and applying advanced reactor technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The specific objective of the CRP is to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source (e.g. spallation source) with a multiplicative sub-critical core. The participants are performing computational and experimental benchmark analyses using integrated calculation schemes and simulation methods. The CRP aims at integrating some of the planned experimental demonstration projects of the coupling between a sub-critical core and an external neutron source (e.g. YALINA Booster in Belarus, and Kyoto University's Critical Assembly (KUCA)). The objective of these experimental programs is to validate computational methods, obtain high energy nuclear data, characterize the performance of sub-critical assemblies driven by external sources, and to develop and improve techniques for sub-criticality monitoring. The paper summarizes preliminary results obtained to-date for some of the CRP benchmarks. (authors)

  10. Comparison of typical inelastic analysis predictions with benchmark problem experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, J.A.; Corum, J.M.; Sartory, W.K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of exemplary inelastic analyses are presented for a series of experimental benchmark problems. Consistent analytical procedures and constitutive relations were used in each of the analyses, and published material behavior data were used in all cases. Two finite-element inelastic computer programs were employed. These programs implement the analysis procedures and constitutive equations for Type 304 stainless steel that are currently used in many analyses of elevated-temperature nuclear reactor system components. The analysis procedures and constitutive relations are briefly discussed, and representative analytical results are presented and compared to the test data. The results that are presented demonstrate the feasibility of performing inelastic analyses, and they are indicative of the general level of agreement that the analyst might expect when using conventional inelastic analysis procedures. (U.S.)

  11. Comparison of typical inelastic analysis predictions with benchmark problem experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, J.A.; Corum, J.M.; Sartory, W.K.

    1975-01-01

    The results of exemplary inelastic analyses for experimental benchmark problems on reactor components are presented. Consistent analytical procedures and constitutive relations were used in each of the analyses, and the material behavior data presented in the Appendix were used in all cases. Two finite-element inelastic computer programs were employed. These programs implement the analysis procedures and constitutive equations for type 304 stainless steel that are currently used in many analyses of elevated-temperature nuclear reactor system components. The analysis procedures and constitutive relations are briefly discussed, and representative analytical results are presented and compared to the test data. The results that are presented demonstrate the feasibility of performing inelastic analyses for the types of problems discussed, and they are indicative of the general level of agreement that the analyst might expect when using conventional inelastic analysis procedures. (U.S.)

  12. Benchmarking Evaluation Results for Prototype Extravehicular Activity Gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitchison, Lindsay; McFarland, Shane

    2012-01-01

    The Space Suit Assembly (SSA) Development Team at NASA Johnson Space Center has invested heavily in the advancement of rear-entry planetary exploration suit design but largely deferred development of extravehicular activity (EVA) glove designs, and accepted the risk of using the current flight gloves, Phase VI, for unique mission scenarios outside the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) Program realm of experience. However, as design reference missions mature, the risks of using heritage hardware have highlighted the need for developing robust new glove technologies. To address the technology gap, the NASA Game-Changing Technology group provided start-up funding for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Project in the spring of 2012. The overarching goal of the HPEG Project is to develop a robust glove design that increases human performance during EVA and creates pathway for future implementation of emergent technologies, with specific aims of increasing pressurized mobility to 60% of barehanded capability, increasing the durability by 100%, and decreasing the potential of gloves to cause injury during use. The HPEG Project focused initial efforts on identifying potential new technologies and benchmarking the performance of current state of the art gloves to identify trends in design and fit leading to establish standards and metrics against which emerging technologies can be assessed at both the component and assembly levels. The first of the benchmarking tests evaluated the quantitative mobility performance and subjective fit of four prototype gloves developed by Flagsuit LLC, Final Frontier Designs, LLC Dover, and David Clark Company as compared to the Phase VI. All of the companies were asked to design and fabricate gloves to the same set of NASA provided hand measurements (which corresponded to a single size of Phase Vi glove) and focus their efforts on improving mobility in the metacarpal phalangeal and carpometacarpal joints. Four test

  13. Benchmark analyses for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyasu, E-mail: mochizki@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Muranaka, Kohmei; Asai, Takayuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Rooijen, W.F.G. van, E-mail: rooijen@u-fukui.ac.jp [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The IAEA EBR-II benchmarks SHRT-17 and SHRT-45R are analyzed with a 1D system code. • The calculated result of SHRT-17 corresponds well to the measured results. • For SHRT-45R ERANOS is used for various core parameters and reactivity coefficients. • SHRT-45R peak temperature is overestimated with the ERANOS feedback coefficients. • The peak temperature is well predicted when the feedback coefficient is reduced. - Abstract: Benchmark problems of several experiments in EBR-II, proposed by ANL and coordinated by the IAEA, are analyzed using the plant system code NETFLOW++ and the neutronics code ERANOS. The SHRT-17 test conducted as a loss-of-flow test is calculated using only the NETFLOW++ code because it is a purely thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data were made available to the benchmark participants after the results of the blind benchmark calculations were submitted. Our work shows that major parameters of the plant are predicted with good accuracy. The SHRT-45R test, an unprotected loss of flow test is calculated using the NETFLOW++ code with the aid of delayed neutron data and reactivity coefficients calculated by the ERANOS code. These parameters are used in the NETFLOW++ code to perform a semi-coupled analysis of the neutronics – thermal–hydraulic problem. The measured data are compared with our calculated results. In our work, the peak temperature is underestimated, indicating that the reactivity feedback coefficients are too strong. When the reactivity feedback coefficient for thermal expansion is adjusted, good agreement is obtained in general for the calculated plant parameters, with a few exceptions.

  14. Results of the event sequence reliability benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, E.

    1990-01-01

    The Event Sequence Reliability Benchmark Exercise is the fourth of a series of benchmark exercises on reliability and risk assessment, with specific reference to nuclear power plant applications, and is the logical continuation of the previous benchmark exercises on System Analysis Common Cause Failure and Human Factors. The reference plant is the Nuclear Power Plant at Grohnde Federal Republic of Germany a 1300 MW PWR plant of KWU design. The specific objective of the Exercise is to model, to quantify and to analyze such event sequences initiated by the occurrence of a loss of offsite power that involve the steam generator feed. The general aim is to develop a segment of a risk assessment, which ought to include all the specific aspects and models of quantification, such as common canal failure, Human Factors and System Analysis, developed in the previous reliability benchmark exercises, with the addition of the specific topics of dependences between homologous components belonging to different systems featuring in a given event sequence and of uncertainty quantification, to end up with an overall assessment of: - the state of the art in risk assessment and the relative influences of quantification problems in a general risk assessment framework. The Exercise has been carried out in two phases, both requiring modelling and quantification, with the second phase adopting more restrictive rules and fixing certain common data, as emerged necessary from the first phase. Fourteen teams have participated in the Exercise mostly from EEC countries, with one from Sweden and one from the USA. (author)

  15. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L.

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs

  16. Pericles and Attila results for the C5G7 MOX benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Recently the Nuclear Energy Agency has published a new benchmark entitled, 'C5G7 MOX Benchmark.' This benchmark is to test the ability of current transport codes to treat reactor core problems without spatial homogenization. The benchmark includes both a two- and three-dimensional problem. We have calculated results for these benchmark problems with our Pericles and Attila codes. Pericles is a one-,two-, and three-dimensional unstructured grid discrete-ordinates code and was used for the twodimensional benchmark problem. Attila is a three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete-ordinate code and was used for the three-dimensional problem. Both codes use discontinuous finite element spatial differencing. Both codes use diffusion synthetic acceleration (DSA) for accelerating the inner iterations.

  17. Results of the Monte Carlo 'simple case' benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    A new 'simple case' benchmark intercomparison exercise was launched, intended to study the importance of the fundamental nuclear data constants, physics treatments and geometry model approximations, employed by Monte Carlo codes in common use. The exercise was also directed at determining the level of agreement which can be expected between measured and calculated quantities, using current state or the art modelling codes and techniques. To this end, measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of the total (or gross) neutron count rates have been performed using a simple moderated 3 He cylindrical proportional counter array or 'slab monitor' counting geometry, deciding to select a very simple geometry for this exercise

  18. Spectrum integrated (n,He) cross section comparisons and least squares analyses for 6Li and 10B in benchmark fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, R.E.; Oliver, B.M.; Farrar, H. IV.

    1986-06-01

    Spectrum integrated cross sections for 6 Li and 10 B from five benchmark fast reactor neutron fields are compared with calculated values obtained using the ENDF/B-V Cross Section Files. The benchmark fields include the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the 10% Enriched U-235 Critical Assembly (BIG-10) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Sigma-Sigma and Fission Cavity fields of the BR-1 reactor at CEN/SCK, and the Intermediate Energy Standard Neutron Field (ISNF) at the National Bureau of Standards. Results from least square analyses using the FERRET computer code to obtain adjusted cross section values and their uncertainties are presented. Input to these calculations include the above five benchmark data sets. These analyses indicate a need for revision in the ENDF/B-V files for the 10 B and 6 Li cross sections for energies above 50 keV

  19. The VENUS-7 benchmarks. Results from state-of-the-art transport codes and nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwermann, Winfried; Pautz, Andreas; Timm, Wolf

    2010-01-01

    For the validation of both nuclear data and computational methods, comparisons with experimental data are necessary. Most advantageous are assemblies where not only the multiplication factors or critical parameters were measured, but also additional quantities like reactivity differences or pin-wise fission rate distributions have been assessed. Currently there is a comprehensive activity to evaluate such measure-ments and incorporate them in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. A large number of such experiments was performed at the VENUS zero power reactor at SCK/CEN in Belgium in the sixties and seventies. The VENUS-7 series was specified as an international benchmark within the OECD/NEA Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS), and results obtained with various codes and nuclear data evaluations were summarized. In the present paper, results of high-accuracy transport codes with full spatial resolution with up-to-date nuclear data libraries from the JEFF and ENDF/B evaluations are presented. The comparisons of the results, both code-to-code and with the measured data are augmented by uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to nuclear data uncertainties. For the multiplication factors, these are performed with the TSUNAMI-3D code from the SCALE system. In addition, uncertainties in the reactivity differences are analyzed with the TSAR code which is available from the current SCALE-6 version. (orig.)

  20. Development of computer code SIMPSEX for simulation of FBR fuel reprocessing flowsheets: II. additional benchmarking results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhar Kumar; Koganti, S.B.

    2003-07-01

    Benchmarking and application of a computer code SIMPSEX for high plutonium FBR flowsheets was reported recently in an earlier report (IGC-234). Improvements and recompilation of the code (Version 4.01, March 2003) required re-validation with the existing benchmarks as well as additional benchmark flowsheets. Improvements in the high Pu region (Pu Aq >30 g/L) resulted in better results in the 75% Pu flowsheet benchmark. Below 30 g/L Pu Aq concentration, results were identical to those from the earlier version (SIMPSEX Version 3, code compiled in 1999). In addition, 13 published flowsheets were taken as additional benchmarks. Eleven of these flowsheets have a wide range of feed concentrations and few of them are β-γ active runs with FBR fuels having a wide distribution of burnup and Pu ratios. A published total partitioning flowsheet using externally generated U(IV) was also simulated using SIMPSEX. SIMPSEX predictions were compared with listed predictions from conventional SEPHIS, PUMA, PUNE and PUBG. SIMPSEX results were found to be comparable and better than the result from above listed codes. In addition, recently reported UREX demo results along with AMUSE simulations are also compared with SIMPSEX predictions. Results of the benchmarking SIMPSEX with these 14 benchmark flowsheets are discussed in this report. (author)

  1. Analysis result for OECD benchmark on thermal fatigue problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Nakamura, Akira; Fujii, Yuzou

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this analysis is to understand the crack growth behavior under three-dimensional (3D) thermal fatigue by conducting 3D crack initiation and propagation analyses. The possibility of crack propagation through the wall thickness of pipe, and the accuracy of the prediction of crack initiation and propagation are of major interest. In this report, in order to estimate the heat transfer coefficients and evaluate the thermal stress, conventional finite element analysis (FEA) is conducted. Then, the crack driving force is evaluated by using the finite element alternating method (FEAM), which can derive the stress intensity factor (SIF) under 3D mechanical loading based on finite element analysis without generating the mesh for a cracked body. Through these two realistic 3D numerical analyses, it has been tried to predict the crack initiation and propagation behavior. The thermal fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior were numerically analyzed. The conventional FEA was conducted in order to estimate the heat transfer coefficient and evaluate the thermal stress. Then, the FEAM was conducted to evaluate the SIFs of surface single cracks and interacting multiple cracks, and crack growth was evaluated. The results are summarized as follows: 1. The heat transfer coefficients were estimated as H air = 40 W/m 2 K and H water = 5000 W/m 2 K. This allows simulation of the change in temperature with time at the crack initiation points obtained by the experiment. 2. The maximum stress occurred along the line of symmetry and the maximum Mises equivalent stress was 572 MPa. 3. By taking the effect of mean stress into account according to the modified Goodman diagram, the equivalent stress range and the number of cycles to crack initiation were estimated as 1093 MPa and 3.8x10 4 , respectively, although the tensile strength was assumed to be 600 MPa. 4. It was shown from the evaluated SIFs that longitudinal cracks can penetrate the wall of the pipe

  2. Accelerator driven systems. ADS benchmark calculations. Results of stage 2. Radiotoxic waste transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenreich, W.E.; Gruppelaar, H

    1998-12-01

    This report contains the results of calculations made at ECN-Petten of a benchmark to study the neutronic potential of a modular fast spectrum ADS (Accelerator-Driven System) for radiotoxic waste transmutation. The study is focused on the incineration of TRans-Uranium elements (TRU), Minor Actinides (MA) and Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFP), in this case {sup 99}Tc. The benchmark exercise is made in the framework of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme. A simplified description of an ADS, restricted to the reactor part, with TRU or MA fuel (k{sub eff}=0.96) has been analysed. All spectrum calculations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The burnup calculations have been performed with the code FISPACT coupled to MCNP-4A by means of our OCTOPUS system. The cross sections are based upon JEF-2.2 for transport calculations and supplemented with EAF-4 data for inventory calculations. The determined quantities are: core dimensions, fuel inventories, system power, sensitivity on external source spectrum and waste transmutation rates. The main conclusions are: The MA-burner requires only a small accelerator current increase during burnup, in contrast to the TRU-burner. The {sup 99} Tc-burner has a large initial loading; a more effective design may be possible. 5 refs.

  3. Accelerator driven systems. ADS benchmark calculations. Results of stage 2. Radiotoxic waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenreich, W.E.; Gruppelaar, H.

    1998-12-01

    This report contains the results of calculations made at ECN-Petten of a benchmark to study the neutronic potential of a modular fast spectrum ADS (Accelerator-Driven System) for radiotoxic waste transmutation. The study is focused on the incineration of TRans-Uranium elements (TRU), Minor Actinides (MA) and Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFP), in this case 99 Tc. The benchmark exercise is made in the framework of an IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme. A simplified description of an ADS, restricted to the reactor part, with TRU or MA fuel (k eff =0.96) has been analysed. All spectrum calculations have been performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4A. The burnup calculations have been performed with the code FISPACT coupled to MCNP-4A by means of our OCTOPUS system. The cross sections are based upon JEF-2.2 for transport calculations and supplemented with EAF-4 data for inventory calculations. The determined quantities are: core dimensions, fuel inventories, system power, sensitivity on external source spectrum and waste transmutation rates. The main conclusions are: The MA-burner requires only a small accelerator current increase during burnup, in contrast to the TRU-burner. The 99 Tc-burner has a large initial loading; a more effective design may be possible. 5 refs

  4. Analysis of the European results on the HTTR's core physics benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, X.; Damian, F.; Ohlig, U.A.; Brockmann, H.J.; Haas, J.B.M. de; Wallerboss, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    Within the frame of the European contract HTR-N1 calculations are performed on the benchmark problems of the HTTR's start-up core physics experiments initially proposed by the IAEA in a Co-ordinated Research Programme. Three European partners, the FZJ in Germany, NRG and IRI in the Netherlands, and CEA in France, have joined this work package with the aim to validate their calculational methods. Pre-test and post-test calculational results, obtained by the partners, are compared with each other and with the experiment. Parts of the discrepancies between experiment and pre-test predictions are analysed and tackled by different treatments. In the case of the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4, used by CEA, the discrepancy between measurement and calculation at the first criticality is reduced to Δk/k∼0.85%, when considering the revised data of the HTTR benchmark. In the case of the diffusion codes, this discrepancy is reduced to: Δk/k∼0.8% (FZJ) and 2.7 or 1.8% (CEA). (author)

  5. Results of KNS-1 acoustic boiling noise benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, K.; Arnaoutis, N.; Voss, J.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the KNS I loop at KfK Karlsruhe. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. (author). 13 figs, 1 tab

  6. Fast burner reactor benchmark results from the NEA working party on physics of plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Wade, D.C.; Palmiotti, G.

    1995-01-01

    As part of a program proposed by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) to evaluate different scenarios for the use of plutonium, fast reactor physics benchmarks were developed; fuel cycle scenarios using either PUREX/TRUEX (oxide fuel) or pyrometallurgical (metal fuel) separation technologies were specified. These benchmarks were designed to evaluate the nuclear performance and radiotoxicity impact of a transuranic-burning fast reactor system. International benchmark results are summarized in this paper; and key conclusions are highlighted

  7. Benchmark analyses for EFF-1, -3 and FENDL-1, -2 beryllium data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Wu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The present article is part of the summary report on the Consultants' Meeting on the transport sublibrary of the Fusion Evaluated Data Library version 2.0. It reports on the comparison between beryllium benchmark experiments and Monte Carlo calculations, using different versions of the FENDL and EFF libraries

  8. Post test analyses of Revisa benchmark based on a creep test at 1100 Celsius degrees performed on a notched tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Bernard, A.; Bhandari, S.

    2001-01-01

    In the Euratom 4. Framework Program of the European Commission, REVISA Project deals with the Reactor Vessel Integrity under Severe Accidents. One of the tasks consists in the experimental validation of the models developed in the project. To do this, a benchmark was designed where the participants use their models to test the results against an experiment. The experiment called RUPTHER 15 was conducted by the coordinating organisation, CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) in France. It is a 'delayed fracture' test on a notched tube. Thermal loading is an axial gradient with a temperature of about 1130 C in the mid-part. Internal pressure is maintained at 0.8 MPa. This paper presents the results of Finite Element calculations performed by Framatome-ANP using the SYSTUS code. Two types of analyses were made: -) one based on the 'time hardening' Norton-Bailey creep law, -) the other based on the coupled creep/damage Lemaitre-Chaboche model. The purpose of this paper is in particular to show the influence of temperature on the simulation results. At high temperatures of the kind dealt with here, slight errors in the temperature measurements can lead to very large differences in the deformation behaviour. (authors)

  9. NUPEC BWR Full-size Fine-mesh Bundle Test (BFBT) Benchmark. Volume II: uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of void distribution and critical power - Specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydogan, F.; Hochreiter, L.; Ivanov, K.; Martin, M.; Utsuno, H.; Sartori, E.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides the specification for the uncertainty exercises of the international OECD/NEA, NRC and NUPEC BFBT benchmark problem including the elemental task. The specification was prepared jointly by Pennsylvania State University (PSU), USA and the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety (JNES) Organisation, in cooperation with the OECD/NEA and the Commissariat a l'energie atomique (CEA Saclay, France). The work is sponsored by the US NRC, METI-Japan, the OECD/NEA and the Nuclear Engineering Program (NEP) of Pennsylvania State University. This uncertainty specification covers the fourth exercise of Phase I (Exercise-I-4), and the third exercise of Phase II (Exercise II-3) as well as the elemental task. The OECD/NRC BFBT benchmark provides a very good opportunity to apply uncertainty analysis (UA) and sensitivity analysis (SA) techniques and to assess the accuracy of thermal-hydraulic models for two-phase flows in rod bundles. During the previous OECD benchmarks, participants usually carried out sensitivity analysis on their models for the specification (initial conditions, boundary conditions, etc.) to identify the most sensitive models or/and to improve the computed results. The comprehensive BFBT experimental database (NEA, 2006) leads us one step further in investigating modelling capabilities by taking into account the uncertainty analysis in the benchmark. The uncertainties in input data (boundary conditions) and geometry (provided in the benchmark specification) as well as the uncertainties in code models can be accounted for to produce results with calculational uncertainties and compare them with the measurement uncertainties. Therefore, uncertainty analysis exercises were defined for the void distribution and critical power phases of the BFBT benchmark. This specification is intended to provide definitions related to UA/SA methods, sensitivity/ uncertainty parameters, suggested probability distribution functions (PDF) of sensitivity parameters, and selected

  10. Benchmark of Space Charge Simulations and Comparison with Experimental Results for High Intensity, Low Energy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cousineau, Sarah M

    2005-01-01

    Space charge effects are a major contributor to beam halo and emittance growth leading to beam loss in high intensity, low energy accelerators. As future accelerators strive towards unprecedented levels of beam intensity and beam loss control, a more comprehensive understanding of space charge effects is required. A wealth of simulation tools have been developed for modeling beams in linacs and rings, and with the growing availability of high-speed computing systems, computationally expensive problems that were inconceivable a decade ago are now being handled with relative ease. This has opened the field for realistic simulations of space charge effects, including detailed benchmarks with experimental data. A great deal of effort is being focused in this direction, and several recent benchmark studies have produced remarkably successful results. This paper reviews the achievements in space charge benchmarking in the last few years, and discusses the challenges that remain.

  11. Results of the ISPRS benchmark on urban object detection and 3D building reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottensteiner, F.; Sohn, G.; Gerke, M.; Wegner, J.D.; Breitkopf, U.; Jung, J.

    2014-01-01

    For more than two decades, many efforts have been made to develop methods for extracting urban objects from data acquired by airborne sensors. In order to make the results of such algorithms more comparable, benchmarking data sets are of paramount importance. Such a data set, consisting of airborne

  12. Results of the GABLS3 diurnal-cycle benchmark for wind energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Allaerts, D.; Avila, M.

    2017-01-01

    errors are used to quantify model performance. The results of the benchmark are used to discuss input uncertainties from mesoscale modelling, different meso-micro coupling strategies (online vs offline) and consistency between RANS and LES codes when dealing with boundary-layer mean flow quantities....... Overall, all the microscale simulations produce a consistent coupling with mesoscale forcings....

  13. Results of the reliability benchmark exercise and the future CEC-JRC program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendola, A.

    1985-01-01

    As a contribution towards identifying problem areas and for assessing probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methods and procedures of analysis, JRC has organized a wide-range Benchmark Exercise on systems reliability. This has been executed by ten different teams involving seventeen organizations from nine European countries. The exercise has been based on a real case (Auxiliary Feedwater System of EDF Paluel PWR 1300 MWe Unit), starting from analysis of technical specifications, logical and topological layout and operational procedures. Terms of references included both qualitative and quantitative analyses. The subdivision of the exercise into different phases and the rules adopted allowed assessment of the different components of the spread of the overall results. It appeared that modelling uncertainties may overwhelm data uncertainties and major efforts must be spent in order to improve consistency and completeness of qualitative analysis. After successful completion of the first exercise, CEC-JRC program has planned separate exercises on analysis of dependent failures and human factors before approaching the evaluation of a complete accident sequence

  14. Posture Control—Human-Inspired Approaches for Humanoid Robot Benchmarking: Conceptualizing Tests, Protocols and Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mergner

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Posture control is indispensable for both humans and humanoid robots, which becomes especially evident when performing sensorimotor tasks such as moving on compliant terrain or interacting with the environment. Posture control is therefore targeted in recent proposals of robot benchmarking in order to advance their development. This Methods article suggests corresponding robot tests of standing balance, drawing inspirations from the human sensorimotor system and presenting examples from robot experiments. To account for a considerable technical and algorithmic diversity among robots, we focus in our tests on basic posture control mechanisms, which provide humans with an impressive postural versatility and robustness. Specifically, we focus on the mechanically challenging balancing of the whole body above the feet in the sagittal plane around the ankle joints in concert with the upper body balancing around the hip joints. The suggested tests target three key issues of human balancing, which appear equally relevant for humanoid bipeds: (1 four basic physical disturbances (support surface (SS tilt and translation, field and contact forces may affect the balancing in any given degree of freedom (DoF. Targeting these disturbances allows us to abstract from the manifold of possible behavioral tasks. (2 Posture control interacts in a conflict-free way with the control of voluntary movements for undisturbed movement execution, both with “reactive” balancing of external disturbances and “proactive” balancing of self-produced disturbances from the voluntary movements. Our proposals therefore target both types of disturbances and their superposition. (3 Relevant for both versatility and robustness of the control, linkages between the posture control mechanisms across DoFs provide their functional cooperation and coordination at will and on functional demands. The suggested tests therefore include ankle-hip coordination. Suggested benchmarking

  15. The Monte Carlo performance benchmark test - AIMS, specifications and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard, E-mail: j.e.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Martin, William R., E-mail: wrm@umich.edu [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Petrovic, Bojan, E-mail: Bojan.Petrovic@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo performance benchmark for detailed power density calculation in a full-size reactor core is organized under the auspices of the OECD NEA Data Bank. It aims at monitoring over a range of years the increase in performance, measured in terms of standard deviation and computer time, of Monte Carlo calculation of the power density in small volumes. A short description of the reactor geometry and composition is discussed. One of the unique features of the benchmark exercise is the possibility to upload results from participants at a web site of the NEA Data Bank which enables online analysis of results and to graphically display how near we are at the goal of doing a detailed power distribution calculation with acceptable statistical uncertainty in an acceptable computing time. First results are discussed which show that 10 to 100 billion histories must be simulated to reach a standard deviation of a few percent in the estimated power of most of the requested the fuel zones. Even when using a large supercomputer, a considerable speedup is still needed to reach the target of 1 hour computer time. An outlook is given of what to expect from this benchmark exercise over the years. Possible extensions of the benchmark for specific issues relevant in current Monte Carlo calculation for nuclear reactors are also discussed. (author)

  16. The Monte Carlo performance benchmark test - AIMS, specifications and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenboom, J. Eduard; Martin, William R.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo performance benchmark for detailed power density calculation in a full-size reactor core is organized under the auspices of the OECD NEA Data Bank. It aims at monitoring over a range of years the increase in performance, measured in terms of standard deviation and computer time, of Monte Carlo calculation of the power density in small volumes. A short description of the reactor geometry and composition is discussed. One of the unique features of the benchmark exercise is the possibility to upload results from participants at a web site of the NEA Data Bank which enables online analysis of results and to graphically display how near we are at the goal of doing a detailed power distribution calculation with acceptable statistical uncertainty in an acceptable computing time. First results are discussed which show that 10 to 100 billion histories must be simulated to reach a standard deviation of a few percent in the estimated power of most of the requested the fuel zones. Even when using a large supercomputer, a considerable speedup is still needed to reach the target of 1 hour computer time. An outlook is given of what to expect from this benchmark exercise over the years. Possible extensions of the benchmark for specific issues relevant in current Monte Carlo calculation for nuclear reactors are also discussed. (author)

  17. Radiochemical analyses of surface water from U.S. Geological Survey hydrologic bench-mark stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzer, V.J.; Saindon, L.G.

    1972-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's program for collecting and analyzing surface-water samples for radiochemical constituents at hydrologic bench-mark stations is described. Analytical methods used during the study are described briefly and data obtained from 55 of the network stations in the United States during the period from 1967 to 1971 are given in tabular form.Concentration values are reported for dissolved uranium, radium, gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity. Values are also given for suspended gross alpha radioactivity in terms of natural uranium. Suspended gross beta radioactivity is expressed both as the equilibrium mixture of strontium-90/yttrium-90 and as cesium-137.Other physical parameters reported which describe the samples include the concentrations of dissolved and suspended solids, the water temperature and stream discharge at the time of the sample collection.

  18. Effects of benchmarking on the quality of type 2 diabetes care: results of the OPTIMISE (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment) study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Kostapanos, Michael S.; Moulis, Alexandros; Nikas, Nikos; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of benchmarking on the quality of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) care in Greece. Methods: The OPTIMISE (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment) study [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00681850] was an international multicenter, prospective cohort study. It included physicians randomized 3:1 to either receive benchmarking for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment targets (benchmarking group) or not (control group). The proportions of patients achieving the targets of the above-mentioned parameters were compared between groups after 12 months of treatment. Also, the proportions of patients achieving those targets at 12 months were compared with baseline in the benchmarking group. Results: In the Greek region, the OPTIMISE study included 797 adults with T2DM (570 in the benchmarking group). At month 12 the proportion of patients within the predefined targets for SBP and LDL-C was greater in the benchmarking compared with the control group (50.6 versus 35.8%, and 45.3 versus 36.1%, respectively). However, these differences were not statistically significant. No difference between groups was noted in the percentage of patients achieving the predefined target for HbA1c. At month 12 the increase in the percentage of patients achieving all three targets was greater in the benchmarking (5.9–15.0%) than in the control group (2.7–8.1%). In the benchmarking group more patients were on target regarding SBP (50.6% versus 29.8%), LDL-C (45.3% versus 31.3%) and HbA1c (63.8% versus 51.2%) at 12 months compared with baseline (p Benchmarking may comprise a promising tool for improving the quality of T2DM care. Nevertheless, target achievement rates of each, and of all three, quality indicators were suboptimal, indicating there are still unmet needs in the management of T2DM. PMID:26445642

  19. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III

  20. MCNP benchmark analyses of critical experiments for space nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcow, E.C.; Cerbone, R.J.; Ludewig, H.

    1993-01-01

    The particle-bed reactor (PBR) system is being developed for use in the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program. This reactor system is characterized by a highly heterogeneous, compact configuration with many streaming pathways. The neutronics analyses performed for this system must be able to accurately predict reactor criticality, kinetics parameters, material worths at various temperatures, feedback coefficients, and detailed fission power and heating distributions. The latter includes coupled axial, radial, and azimuthal profiles. These responses constitute critical inputs and interfaces with the thermal-hydraulics design and safety analyses of the system

  1. Final results of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark calculation results received with the code DYN3D/ATHLET at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the seventh Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Hoernitz near Zittau, 1997). Its initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one stuck out control rod group. The calculations were performed with the externally coupled codes ATHLET Mod.1.1 Cycle C and DYN3DH1.1/M3. The standard WWER-440/213 input deck of ATHLET code was adopted for benchmark purposes and for coupling with the code DYN3D. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristics of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. In comparison with the results published at the eighth Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Bystrice nad Pernstejnem, 1998), the results published in this paper are based on improved ATHLET descriptions of control and safety systems. (Author)

  2. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  3. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brady, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  4. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are 149 Sm, 151 Sm, and 155 Gd

  5. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V.; Brady, M.C.

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155

  6. International Benchmark on Pressurised Water Reactor Sub-channel and Bundle Tests. Volume II: Benchmark Results of Phase I: Void Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Adam; Avramova, Maria; Velazquez-Lozada, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    This report summarised the first phase of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Benchmark based on NUPEC PWR Sub-channel and Bundle Tests (PSBT), which was intended to provide data for the verification of void distribution models in participants' codes. This phase was composed of four exercises; Exercise 1: steady-state single sub-channel benchmark, Exercise 2: steady-state rod bundle benchmark, Exercise 3: transient rod bundle benchmark and Exercise 4: a pressure drop benchmark. The experimental data provided to the participants of this benchmark is from a series of void measurement tests using full-size mock-up tests for both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurised Water Reactors (PWRs). These tests were performed from 1987 to 1995 by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) in Japan and made available by the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organisation (JNES) for the purposes of this benchmark, which was organised by Pennsylvania State University. Twenty-one institutions from nine countries participated in this benchmark. Seventeen different computer codes were used in Exercises 1, 2, 3 and 4. Among the computer codes were porous media, sub-channel, systems thermal-hydraulic code and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. It was observed that the codes tended to overpredict the thermal equilibrium quality at lower elevations and under predict it at higher elevations. There was also a tendency to overpredict void fraction at lower elevations and underpredict it at high elevations for the bundle test cases. The overprediction of void fraction at low elevations is likely caused by the x-ray densitometer measurement method used. Under sub-cooled boiling conditions, the voids accumulate at heated surfaces (and are therefore not seen in the centre of the sub-channel, where the measurements are being taken), so the experimentally-determined void fractions will be lower than the actual void fraction. Some of the best

  7. 3-D extension C5G7 MOX benchmark results using PARTISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, J.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, CCS-4 Transport Methods Group, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2005-07-01

    We have participated in the Expert Group of 3-D Radiation Transport Benchmarks' proposed 3-dimensional Extension C5G7 MOX problems using the discrete ordinate transport code PARTISN. The computational mesh was created using the FRAC-IN-THE-BOX code, which produces a volume fraction Cartesian mesh from combinatorial geometry descriptions. k{sub eff} eigenvalues, maximum pin powers, and average fuel assembly powers are reported and compared to a benchmark quality Monte Carlo solution. We also present a two dimensional mesh convergence study examining the affects of using volume fractions to approximate the water-pin cell interface. It appears that the control rod pin cell must be meshed twice as fine as a fuel pin cell in order to achieve the same spatial error when using the volume fraction method to define water channel-pin cell interfaces. It is noted that the previous PARTISN results provided to the OECD/NEA Expert Group on 3-dimensional Radiation Benchmarks contained a cross section error, and therefore should be disregarded.

  8. 3-D extension C5G7 MOX benchmark results using PARTISN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    We have participated in the Expert Group of 3-D Radiation Transport Benchmarks' proposed 3-dimensional Extension C5G7 MOX problems using the discrete ordinate transport code PARTISN. The computational mesh was created using the FRAC-IN-THE-BOX code, which produces a volume fraction Cartesian mesh from combinatorial geometry descriptions. k eff eigenvalues, maximum pin powers, and average fuel assembly powers are reported and compared to a benchmark quality Monte Carlo solution. We also present a two dimensional mesh convergence study examining the affects of using volume fractions to approximate the water-pin cell interface. It appears that the control rod pin cell must be meshed twice as fine as a fuel pin cell in order to achieve the same spatial error when using the volume fraction method to define water channel-pin cell interfaces. It is noted that the previous PARTISN results provided to the OECD/NEA Expert Group on 3-dimensional Radiation Benchmarks contained a cross section error, and therefore should be disregarded

  9. The reactive transport benchmark proposed by GdR MoMaS: presentation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrayrou, J. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides et des Solides, UMR ULP-CNRS 7507, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Lagneau, V. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geosciences, 77 - Fontainebleau (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present here the actual context of reactive transport modelling and the major numerical challenges. GdR MoMaS proposes a benchmark on reactive transport. We present this benchmark and some results obtained on it by two reactive transport codes HYTEC and SPECY. (authors)

  10. The reactive transport benchmark proposed by GdR MoMaS: presentation and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrayrou, J.; Lagneau, V.

    2007-01-01

    We present here the actual context of reactive transport modelling and the major numerical challenges. GdR MoMaS proposes a benchmark on reactive transport. We present this benchmark and some results obtained on it by two reactive transport codes HYTEC and SPECY. (authors)

  11. Validation of the WIMSD4M cross-section generation code with benchmark results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, J.R.; Woodruff, W.L.; Leal, L.E.

    1995-01-01

    The WIMSD4 code has been adopted for cross-section generation in support of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Subsequently, the code has undergone several updates, and significant improvements have been achieved. The capability of generating group-collapsed micro- or macroscopic cross sections from the ENDF/B-V library and the more recent evaluation, ENDF/B-VI, in the ISOTXS format makes the modified version of the WIMSD4 code, WIMSD4M, very attractive, not only for the RERTR program, but also for the reactor physics community. The intent of the present paper is to validate the WIMSD4M cross-section libraries for reactor modeling of fresh water moderated cores. The results of calculations performed with multigroup cross-section data generated with the WIMSD4M code will be compared against experimental results. These results correspond to calculations carried out with thermal reactor benchmarks of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) unreflected HEU critical spheres, the TRX LEU critical experiments, and calculations of a modified Los Alamos HEU D 2 O moderated benchmark critical system. The benchmark calculations were performed with the discrete-ordinates transport code, TWODANT, using WIMSD4M cross-section data. Transport calculations using the XSDRNPM module of the SCALE code system are also included. In addition to transport calculations, diffusion calculations with the DIF3D code were also carried out, since the DIF3D code is used in the RERTR program for reactor analysis and design. For completeness, Monte Carlo results of calculations performed with the VIM and MCNP codes are also presented

  12. Validation of the WIMSD4M cross-section generation code with benchmark results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deen, J.R.; Woodruff, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Leal, L.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The WIMSD4 code has been adopted for cross-section generation in support of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Subsequently, the code has undergone several updates, and significant improvements have been achieved. The capability of generating group-collapsed micro- or macroscopic cross sections from the ENDF/B-V library and the more recent evaluation, ENDF/B-VI, in the ISOTXS format makes the modified version of the WIMSD4 code, WIMSD4M, very attractive, not only for the RERTR program, but also for the reactor physics community. The intent of the present paper is to validate the WIMSD4M cross-section libraries for reactor modeling of fresh water moderated cores. The results of calculations performed with multigroup cross-section data generated with the WIMSD4M code will be compared against experimental results. These results correspond to calculations carried out with thermal reactor benchmarks of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) unreflected HEU critical spheres, the TRX LEU critical experiments, and calculations of a modified Los Alamos HEU D{sub 2}O moderated benchmark critical system. The benchmark calculations were performed with the discrete-ordinates transport code, TWODANT, using WIMSD4M cross-section data. Transport calculations using the XSDRNPM module of the SCALE code system are also included. In addition to transport calculations, diffusion calculations with the DIF3D code were also carried out, since the DIF3D code is used in the RERTR program for reactor analysis and design. For completeness, Monte Carlo results of calculations performed with the VIM and MCNP codes are also presented.

  13. Jet Substructure at the Tevatron and LHC: New results, new tools, new benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Altheimer, A; Asquith, L; Brooijmans, G; Butterworth, J; Campanelli, M; Chapleau, B; Cholakian, A E; Chou, J P; Dasgupta, M; Davison, A; Dolen, J; Ellis, S D; Essig, R; Fan, J J; Field, R; Fregoso, A; Gallicchio, J; Gershtein, Y; Gomes, A; Haas, A; Halkiadakis, E; Halyo, V; Hoeche, S; Hook, A; Hornig, A; Huang, P; Izaguirre, E; Jankowiak, M; Kribs, G; Krohn, D; Larkoski, A J; Lath, A; Lee, C; Lee, S J; Loch, P; Maksimovic, P; Martinez, M; Miller, D W; Plehn, T; Prokofiev, K; Rahmat, R; Rappoccio, S; Safonov, A; Salam, G P; Schumann, S; Schwartz, M D; Schwartzman, A; Seymour, M; Shao, J; Sinervo, P; Son, M; Soper, D E; Spannowsky, M; Stewart, I W; Strassler, M; Strauss, E; Takeuchi, M; Thaler, J; Thomas, S; Tweedie, B; Vasquez Sierra, R; Vermilion, C K; Villaplana, M; Vos, M; Wacker, J; Walker, D; Walsh, J R; Wang, L-T; Wilbur, S; Yavin, I; Zhu, W

    2012-01-01

    In this report we review recent theoretical progress and the latest experimental results in jet substructure from the Tevatron and the LHC. We review the status of and outlook for calculation and simulation tools for studying jet substructure. Following up on the report of the Boost 2010 workshop, we present a new set of benchmark comparisons of substructure techniques, focusing on the set of variables and grooming methods that are collectively known as "top taggers". To facilitate further exploration, we have attempted to collect, harmonise, and publish software implementations of these techniques.

  14. Non-grey benchmark results for two temperature non-equilibrium radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, B.; Olson, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Benchmark solutions to time-dependent radiative transfer problems involving non-equilibrium coupling to the material temperature field are crucial for validating time-dependent radiation transport codes. Previous efforts on generating analytical solutions to non-equilibrium radiative transfer problems were all restricted to the one-group grey model. In this paper, a non-grey model, namely the picket-fence model, is considered for a two temperature non-equilibrium radiative transfer problem in an infinite medium. The analytical solutions, as functions of space and time, are constructed in the form of infinite integrals for both the diffusion description and transport description. These expressions are evaluated numerically and the benchmark results are generated. The asymptotic solutions for large and small times are also derived in terms of elementary functions and are compared with the exact results. Comparisons are given between the transport and diffusion solutions and between the grey and non-grey solutions. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Research coordination meeting of the coordinated research project on analytical and experimental benchmark analyses of accelerator driven systems. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Technical Meeting hosted at the Belarus National Academy of Sciences in Minsk by the Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research 'SOSNY' from 5-9 December 2005 was the kick-off Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS)'. The CRP had received proposals for research agreements and contracts from scientists representing the following 25 institutions: Centro Atomico Bariloche, SCK CEN Mol, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares Sao Paulo, Joint Institute of Power Engineering and Nuclear Research SOSNY Minsk, China Institute of Atomic Energy, CEA Cadarache, CNRS Paris, FZ Rossendorf, FZ Karlsruhe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) Petten, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, AGH-University of Science and Technology Krakow, Institute of Atomic Energy Otwock/Swierk, ITEP Moscow, MEPHI Moscow, Kurchatov Institute, JINR Dubna, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CIEMAT Madrid, Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, National Science Center 'Kharkov Institute and Technology', and Argonne National Laboratory). These institutions represent 18 IAEA Member States (i.e., Argentina, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Pakistan, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Ukraine, USA), and one International Organization (JINR Dubna). The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R and D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP

  16. Comparison of the results of the fifth dynamic AER benchmark-a benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three-dimensional hexagonal kinetic core models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliem, S.

    1998-01-01

    The fifth dynamic benchmark was defined at seventh AER-Symposium, held in Hoernitz, Germany in 1997. It is the first benchmark for coupled thermohydraulic system/three-dimensional hexagonal neutron kinetic core models. In this benchmark the interaction between the components of a WWER-440 NPP with the reactor core has been investigated. The initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one control rod group stucking. This break causes an overcooling of the primary circuit. During this overcooling the scram reactivity is compensated and the scrammed reactor becomes re critical. The calculation was continued until the highly-borated water from the high pressure injection system terminated the power excursion. Each participant used own best-estimate nuclear cross section data. Only the initial subcriticality at the beginning of the transient was given. Solutions were received from Kurchatov Institute Russia with the code BIPR8/ATHLET, VTT Energy Finland with HEXTRAN/SMABRE, NRI Rez Czech Republic with DYN3/ATHLET, KFKI Budapest Hungary with KIKO3D/ATHLET and from FZR Germany with the code DYN3D/ATHLET.In this paper the results are compared. Beside the comparison of global results, the behaviour of several thermohydraulic and neutron kinetic parameters is presented to discuss the revealed differences between the solutions.(Authors)

  17. Survey of the results of a two- and three-dimensional kinetics benchmark problem typical for a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, W.

    1975-01-01

    In 1973, NEACRP and CSNI posed a number of kinetic benchmark problems intended to be solved by different groups. Comparison of the submitted results should lead to estimates on the accuracy and efficiency of the employed codes. This was felt to be of great value since the codes involved become more and more important in the field of reactor safety. In this paper the results of the 2d and 3d benchmark problem for a BWR are presented. The specification of the problem is included in the appendix of this survey. For the 2d benchmark problem, 5 contributions have been obtained, while for the 3d benchmark problem 2 contributions have been submitted. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Comparative analysis of exercise 2 results of the OECD WWER-1000 MSLB benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.; Petrov, N.; Royer, E.; Ivanov, B.; Ivanov, K.

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of joint effort between OECD/NEA, US DOE and CEA France a coupled three-dimensional (3D) thermal-hydraulic/neutron kinetics benchmark for WWER-1000 was defined. Phase 2 of this benchmark is labeled W1000CT-2 and consists of calculation of a vessel mixing experiment and main steam line break (MSLB) transients. The reference plant is Kozloduy-6 in Bulgaria. Plant data are available for code validation consisting of one experiment of pump start-up (W1000CT-1) and one experiment of steam generator isolation (W1000CT-2). The validated codes can be used to calculate asymmetric MSLB transients involving similar mixing patterns. This paper summarizes a comparison of the available results for W1000CT-2 Exercise 2 devoted to core-vessel calculation with imposed MSLB vessel boundary conditions. Because of the recent re-calculation of the cross-section libraries, core physics results from PARCS and CRONOS codes could be compared only. The comparison is code-to-code (including BIPR7A/TVS-M lib) and code vs. plant measured data in a steady state close to the MSLB initial state. The results provide a test of the cross-section libraries and show a good agreement of plant measured and computed data. The comparison of full vessel calculations was made from the point of view of vessel mixing, considering mainly the coarse-mesh features of the flow. The FZR and INRNE results from multi-1D calculations with different mixing models are similar, while the FZK calculations with a coarse-3D vessel model show deviations from the others. These deviations seem to be due to an error in the use of a boundary condition after flow reversal (Authors)

  19. Mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel performance benchmark. Summary of the results for the PRIMO MOX rod BD8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.; Sartori, E.; Costa, A.; ); Sobolev, V.; Lee, B-H.; Alekseev, P.N.; Shestopalov, A.A.; Mikityuk, K.O.; Fomichenko, P.A.; Shatrova, L.P.; Medvedev, A.V.; Bogatyr, S.M.; Khvostov, G.A.; Kuznetsov, V.I.; Stoenescu, R.; Chatwin, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee has established an Expert Group that deals with the status and trends of reactor physics, nuclear fuel performance, and fuel cycle issues related to the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium as MOX fuel. The activities of the NEA Expert Group on Reactor-based Plutonium Disposition are carried out in close cooperation with the NEA Working Party on Scientific Issues in Reactor Systems (WPRS). A major part of these activities includes benchmark studies. This report describes the results of the PRIMO rod BD8 benchmark exercise, the second benchmark by the TFRPD relative to MOX fuel behaviour. The corresponding PRIMO experimental data have been released, compiled and reviewed for the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database. The observed ranges (as noted in the text) in the predicted thermal and FGR responses are reasonable given the variety and combination of thermal conductivity and FGR models employed by the benchmark participants with their respective fuel performance codes

  20. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark - Steady-state results and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Han, J.; Ivanov, K.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated. Since only a few pebble-bed HTR experimental facilities or plant data are available the use of code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MW design and a representative set of transient cases is defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well-defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross-sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The OECD benchmark includes steady-state and transients cases. Although the focus of the benchmark is on the modelling of the transient behaviour of the PBMR core, it was also necessary to define some steady-state cases to ensure consistency between the different approaches before results of transient cases could be compared. This paper describes the status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the three steady state exercises defined as a standalone neutronics calculation, a standalone thermal-hydraulic core calculation, and a coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulic simulation. (authors)

  1. Detection of sodium/water reaction in a steam generator: Results of a 1995 benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriol, L.

    1997-01-01

    The CEA analysis of the 1995 benchmark test has been focused on the location of the injections. Two techniques have been tested: the pulse timing technique, and the time-domain delay and sum beamforming technique. The two methods gave coherent locations of the injector even if there was a difference of 25% of the SGU height between the vertical locations. Prior to that analysis, the RMS values of the signals were calculated in different frequency bands. The results obtained in the 200-1000 Hz were used to draw a rough estimation of the beginnings of the injections in order to determine the parts of the records on which the location signal processing can be carried out. (author). 2 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  2. A comparison of recent results from HONDO III with the JSME nuclear shipping cask benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    The results of two calculations related to the impact response of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks are compared to the benchmark results reported in a recent study by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers Subcommittee on Structural Analysis of Nuclear Shipping Casks. Two idealized impacts are considered. The first calculation utilizes a right circular cylinder of lead subjected to a 9.0 m free fall onto a rigid target, while the second calculation utilizes a stainless steel clad cylinder of lead subjected to the same impact conditions. For the first problem, four calculations from graphical results presented in the original study have been singled out for comparison with HONDO III. The results from DYNA3D, STEALTH, PISCES, and ABAQUS are reproduced. In the second problem, the results from four separate computer programs in the original study, ABAQUS, ANSYS, MARC, and PISCES, are used and compared with HONDO III. The current version of HONDO III contains a fully automated implementation of the explicit-explicit partitioning procedure for the central difference method time integration which results in a reduction of computational effort by a factor in excess of 5. The results reported here further support the conclusion of the original study that the explicit time integration schemes with automated time incrementation are effective and efficient techniques for computing the transient dynamic response of nuclear fuel shipping casks subject to impact loading. (orig.)

  3. WLUP benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA-WIMS Library Update Project (WLUP) is on the end stage. The final library will be released on 2002. It is a result of research and development made by more than ten investigators during 10 years. The organization of benchmarks for testing and choosing the best set of data has been coordinated by the author of this paper. It is presented the organization, name conventions, contents and documentation of WLUP benchmarks, and an updated list of the main parameters for all cases. First, the benchmarks objectives and types are given. Then, comparisons of results from different WIMSD libraries are included. Finally it is described the program QVALUE for analysis and plot of results. Some examples are given. The set of benchmarks implemented on this work is a fundamental tool for testing new multigroup libraries. (author)

  4. HTR-PROTEUS benchmark calculations. Pt. 1. Unit cell results LEUPRO-1 and LEUPRO-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.; Stad, R.C.L. van der; Janssen, A.J.; Klippel, H.T.; Kuijper, J.C.

    1995-09-01

    In the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low-Enriched (LEU) HTGRs' calculational benchmarks are performed on the basis of LEU-HTR pebble-bed critical experiments carried out in the PROTEUS facility at PSI, Switzerland. Of special interest is the treatment of the double heterogeneity of the fuel and the spherical fuel elements of these pebble bed core configurations. Also of interest is the proper calculation of the safety related physics parameters like the effect of water ingress and control rod worth. This document describes the ECN results of the LEUPRO-1 and LEUPRO-2 unitcell calculations performed with the codes WIMS-E, SCALE-4 and MCNP4A. Results of the LEUPRO-1 unit cell with 20% water ingress in the void is also reported for both the single and the double heterogeneous case. Emphasis is put on the intercomparison of the results obtained by the deterministic codes WIMS-E and SCALE-4, and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A. The LEUPRO whole core calculations will be reported later. (orig.)

  5. Benchmarking the quality of breast cancer care in a nationwide voluntary system: the first five-year results (2003–2007 from Germany as a proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezai Mahdi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main study objectives were: to establish a nationwide voluntary collaborative network of breast centres with independent data analysis; to define suitable quality indicators (QIs for benchmarking the quality of breast cancer (BC care; to demonstrate existing differences in BC care quality; and to show that BC care quality improved with benchmarking from 2003 to 2007. Methods BC centres participated voluntarily in a scientific benchmarking procedure. A generic XML-based data set was developed and used for data collection. Nine guideline-based quality targets serving as rate-based QIs were initially defined, reviewed annually and modified or expanded accordingly. QI changes over time were analysed descriptively. Results During 2003–2007, respective increases in participating breast centres and postoperatively confirmed BCs were from 59 to 220 and from 5,994 to 31,656 (> 60% of new BCs/year in Germany. Starting from 9 process QIs, 12 QIs were developed by 2007 as surrogates for long-term outcome. Results for most QIs increased. From 2003 to 2007, the most notable increases seen were for preoperative histological confirmation of diagnosis (58% (in 2003 to 88% (in 2007, appropriate endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (27 to 93%, appropriate radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy (20 to 79% and appropriate radiotherapy after mastectomy (8 to 65%. Conclusion Nationwide external benchmarking of BC care is feasible and successful. The benchmarking system described allows both comparisons among participating institutions as well as the tracking of changes in average quality of care over time for the network as a whole. Marked QI increases indicate improved quality of BC care.

  6. Benchmarking the quality of breast cancer care in a nationwide voluntary system: the first five-year results (2003–2007) from Germany as a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Sara Y; Schumacher, Claudia; Sohn, Christoph; Rezai, Mahdi; Bamberg, Michael; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2008-01-01

    Background The main study objectives were: to establish a nationwide voluntary collaborative network of breast centres with independent data analysis; to define suitable quality indicators (QIs) for benchmarking the quality of breast cancer (BC) care; to demonstrate existing differences in BC care quality; and to show that BC care quality improved with benchmarking from 2003 to 2007. Methods BC centres participated voluntarily in a scientific benchmarking procedure. A generic XML-based data set was developed and used for data collection. Nine guideline-based quality targets serving as rate-based QIs were initially defined, reviewed annually and modified or expanded accordingly. QI changes over time were analysed descriptively. Results During 2003–2007, respective increases in participating breast centres and postoperatively confirmed BCs were from 59 to 220 and from 5,994 to 31,656 (> 60% of new BCs/year in Germany). Starting from 9 process QIs, 12 QIs were developed by 2007 as surrogates for long-term outcome. Results for most QIs increased. From 2003 to 2007, the most notable increases seen were for preoperative histological confirmation of diagnosis (58% (in 2003) to 88% (in 2007)), appropriate endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (27 to 93%), appropriate radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy (20 to 79%) and appropriate radiotherapy after mastectomy (8 to 65%). Conclusion Nationwide external benchmarking of BC care is feasible and successful. The benchmarking system described allows both comparisons among participating institutions as well as the tracking of changes in average quality of care over time for the network as a whole. Marked QI increases indicate improved quality of BC care. PMID:19055735

  7. Benchmarking the quality of breast cancer care in a nationwide voluntary system: the first five-year results (2003-2007) from Germany as a proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, Sara Y; Schumacher, Claudia; Sohn, Christoph; Rezai, Mahdi; Bamberg, Michael; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2008-12-02

    The main study objectives were: to establish a nationwide voluntary collaborative network of breast centres with independent data analysis; to define suitable quality indicators (QIs) for benchmarking the quality of breast cancer (BC) care; to demonstrate existing differences in BC care quality; and to show that BC care quality improved with benchmarking from 2003 to 2007. BC centres participated voluntarily in a scientific benchmarking procedure. A generic XML-based data set was developed and used for data collection. Nine guideline-based quality targets serving as rate-based QIs were initially defined, reviewed annually and modified or expanded accordingly. QI changes over time were analysed descriptively. During 2003-2007, respective increases in participating breast centres and postoperatively confirmed BCs were from 59 to 220 and from 5,994 to 31,656 (> 60% of new BCs/year in Germany). Starting from 9 process QIs, 12 QIs were developed by 2007 as surrogates for long-term outcome. Results for most QIs increased. From 2003 to 2007, the most notable increases seen were for preoperative histological confirmation of diagnosis (58% (in 2003) to 88% (in 2007)), appropriate endocrine therapy in hormone receptor-positive patients (27 to 93%), appropriate radiotherapy after breast-conserving therapy (20 to 79%) and appropriate radiotherapy after mastectomy (8 to 65%). Nationwide external benchmarking of BC care is feasible and successful. The benchmarking system described allows both comparisons among participating institutions as well as the tracking of changes in average quality of care over time for the network as a whole. Marked QI increases indicate improved quality of BC care.

  8. Criticality benchmark results for the ENDF60 library with MCNP trademark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, N.D.; Frankle, S.C.; MacFarlane, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The continuous-energy neutron data library ENDF60, for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle radiation transport code MCNP4A, was released in the fall of 1994. The ENDF60 library is comprised of 124 nuclide data files based on the ENDF/B-VI (B-VI) evaluations through Release 2. Fifty-two percent of these B-VI evaluations are translations from ENDF/B-V (B-V). The remaining forty-eight percent are new evaluations which have sometimes changed significantly. Among these changes are greatly increased use of isotopic evaluations, more extensive resonance-parameter evaluations, and energy-angle correlated distributions for secondary particles. In particular, the upper energy limit for the resolved resonance region of 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu has been extended from 0.082, 4.0, and 0.301 keV to 2..25, 10.0, and 2.5 keV respectively. As regulatory oversight has advanced and performing critical experiments has become more difficult, there has been an increased reliance on computational methods. For the criticality safety community, the performance of the combined transport code and data library is of interest. The purpose of this abstract is to provide benchmarking results to aid the user in determining the best data library for their application

  9. Application of PHEBUS results to benchmarking of nuclear plant safety codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchley, J.; Cripps, R.; Guentay, S.; Hosemann, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The PHEBUS Fission Product project comprises six nuclear reactor severe accident simulations, using prototypic core materials and representative geometry and boundary conditions for the coolant loop and containment. The data thus produced are being used to benchmark the computer tools used for nuclear plant accident analysis to reduce the excessive conservatism typical for estimates of the radiological source term. A set of calculations has been carried out to simulate the results of experiment PHEBUS FPT-1 through each of its main stages, using computer models and methods analogous to those currently employed at PSI for assessments of Swiss nuclear plants. Good agreement for the core degradation and containment behaviour builds confidence in the models, while some open questions remain concerning some aspects of the release of fission products from the fuel, their transport and chemical speciation. Of potentially great importance to the reduction in source term estimates is the formation of the non-volatile species, silver iodide. Current investigations are focused on the uncertainty concerning fission product behaviour and the stability of silver iodide under irradiation. (author)

  10. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-02-02

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition, now an Expert Group, was set up through the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency to facilitate technical assessments of burning weapons-grade plutonium mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in U.S. pressurized-water reactors and Russian VVER nuclear reactors. More than ten countries participated to advance the work of the Task Force in a major initiative, which was a blind benchmark study to compare code benchmark calculations against experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code was used to perform a comprehensive study of pin-cell and core calculations for the VENUS-2 benchmark.

  11. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  12. Characterization of the dynamic friction of woven fabrics: Experimental methods and benchmark results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, Ulrich; Akkerman, Remko; Fetfatsidis, K.; Vidal-Sallé, E.; Schumacher, J.; Ziegmann, G.; Allaoui, S.; Hivet, G.; Maron, B.; Vanclooster, K.; Lomov, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    A benchmark exercise was conducted to compare various friction test set-ups with respect to the measured coefficients of friction. The friction was determined between Twintex®PP, a fabric of commingled yarns of glass and polypropylene filaments, and a metal surface. The same material was supplied to

  13. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR 400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: transient results - 290

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strydom, G.; Reitsma, F.; Ngeleka, P.T.; Ivanov, K.N.

    2010-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated, and code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MWth design and a representative set of transient exercises are defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. This paper describes the current status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the six transient exercises, consisting of three Loss of Cooling Accidents, two Control Rod Withdrawal transients, a power load-follow transient, and a Helium over-cooling Accident. The participants' results are compared using a statistical method and possible areas of future code improvement are identified. (authors)

  14. Nuclear power plants: Results of recent safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinmetz, E.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions deal with the problems posed by low radiation doses, with the information currently available from analyses of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and with risk assessments in connection with nuclear power plant accidents. Other points of interest include latest results on fission product release from reactor core or reactor building, advanced atmospheric dispersion models for incident and accident analyses, reliability studies on safety systems, and assessment of fire hazard in nuclear installations. The various contributions are found as separate entries in the database. (DG) [de

  15. JNC results of BFS-62-3A benchmark calculation (CRP: Phase 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    The present work is the results of JNC, Japan, for the Phase 5 of IAEA CRP benchmark problem (BFS-62-3A critical experiment). Analytical Method of JNC is based on Nuclear Data Library JENDL-3.2; Group Constant Set JFS-3-J3.2R: 70-group, ABBN-type self-shielding factor table based on JENDL-3.2; Effective Cross-section - Current-weighted multigroup transport cross-section. Cell model for the BFS as-built tube and pellets was (Case 1) Homogeneous Model based on IPPE definition; (Case 2) Homogeneous atomic density equivalent to JNC's heterogeneous calculation only to cross-check the adjusted correction factors; (Case 3) Heterogeneous model based on JNC's evaluation, One-dimensional plate-stretch model with Tone's background cross-section method (CASUP code). Basic diffusion Calculation was done in 18-groups and three-dimensional Hex-Z model (by the CITATION code), with Isotropic diffusion coefficients (Case 1 and 2), and Benoist's anisotropic diffusion coefficients (Case 3). For sodium void reactivity, the exact perturbation theory was applied both to basic calculation and correction calculations, ultra-fine energy group correction - approx. 100,000 group constants below 50 keV, and ABBN-type 175 group constants with shielding factors above 50 keV. Transport theory and mesh size correction 18-group, was used for three-dimensional Hex-Z model (the MINIHEX code based on the S4-P0 transport method, which was developed by JNC. Effective delayed Neutron fraction in the reactivity scale was fixed at 0.00623 by IPPE evaluation. Analytical Results of criticality values and sodium void reactivity coefficient obtained by JNC are presented. JNC made a cross-check of the homogeneous model and the adjusted correction factors submitted by IPPE, and confirmed they are consistent. JNC standard system showed quite satisfactory analytical results for the criticality and the sodium void reactivity of BFS-62-3A experiment. JNC calculated the cross-section sensitivity coefficients of BFS

  16. VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmark: Results of ORNL Calculations Using HELIOS-1.4 - Revised Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, RJ

    2001-06-01

    The Task Force on Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition (TFRPD) was formed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) to study reactor physics, fuel performance, and fuel cycle issues related to the disposition of weapons-grade (WG) plutonium as mixed-oxide (MOX) reactor fuel. To advance the goals of the TFRPD, 10 countries and 12 institutions participated in a major TFRPD activity: a blind benchmark study to compare code calculations to experimental data for the VENUS-2 MOX core at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the HELIOS-1.4 code system was used to perform the comprehensive study of pin-cell and MOX core calculations for the VENUS-2 MOX core benchmark study.

  17. Results of neutronic benchmark analysis for a high temperature reactor of the GT-MHR type - HTR2008-58107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Bryzgalov, V. I.; Davidenko, V. D.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Glushkov, E. S.; Gomin, E. A.; Gurevich, M. I.; Kodochigov, N. G.; Marova, E. V.; Mitenkova, E. F.; Novikov, N. V.; Osipov, S. L.; Sukharev, Y. P.; Tsibulsky, V. F.; Yudkevich, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a description of benchmark cases, achieved results, analysis of possible reasons of differences of calculation results obtained by various neutronic codes. The comparative analysis is presented showing the benchmark-results obtained with reference and design codes by Russian specialists (WIMS-D, JAR-HTGR, UNK, MCU, MCNP5-MONTEBURNS1.0-ORIGEN2.0), by French specialists (AP0LL02, TRIP0LI4 codes), and by Korean specialists (HELIOS, MASTER, MCNP5 codes). The analysis of possible reasons for deviations was carried out, which was aimed at the decrease of uncertainties in calculated characteristics. This additional investigation was conducted with the use of 2D models of a fuel assembly cell and a reactor plane section. (authors)

  18. BWR stability analysis: methodology of the stability analysis and results of PSI for the NEA/NCR benchmark task; SWR Stabilitaetsanalyse: Methodik der Stabilitaetsanalyse und PSI-Ergebnisse zur NEA/NCR Benchmarkaufgabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, D.; Nechvatal, L. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    The report describes the PSI stability analysis methodology and the validation of this methodology based on the international OECD/NEA BWR stability benchmark task. In the frame of this work, the stability properties of some operation points of the NPP Ringhals 1 have been analysed and compared with the experimental results. (author) figs., tabs., 45 refs.

  19. CEC thermal-hydraulic benchmark exercise on Fiploc verification experiment F2 in Battelle model containment. Experimental phases 2, 3 and 4. Results of comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Schall, M.; Wolf, L.

    1993-01-01

    The present final report comprises the major results of Phase II of the CEC thermal-hydraulic benchmark exercise on Fiploc verification experiment F2 in the Battelle model containment, experimental phases 2, 3 and 4, which was organized and sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities for the purpose of furthering the understanding and analysis of long-term thermal-hydraulic phenomena inside containments during and after severe core accidents. This benchmark exercise received high European attention with eight organizations from six countries participating with eight computer codes during phase 2. Altogether 18 results from computer code runs were supplied by the participants and constitute the basis for comparisons with the experimental data contained in this publication. This reflects both the high technical interest in, as well as the complexity of, this CEC exercise. Major comparison results between computations and data are reported on all important quantities relevant for containment analyses during long-term transients. These comparisons comprise pressure, steam and air content, velocities and their directions, heat transfer coefficients and saturation ratios. Agreements and disagreements are discussed for each participating code/institution, conclusions drawn and recommendations provided. The phase 2 CEC benchmark exercise provided an up-to-date state-of-the-art status review of the thermal-hydraulic capabilities of present computer codes for containment analyses. This exercise has shown that all of the participating codes can simulate the important global features of the experiment correctly, like: temperature stratification, pressure and leakage, heat transfer to structures, relative humidity, collection of sump water. Several weaknesses of individual codes were identified, and this may help to promote their development. As a general conclusion it may be said that while there is still a wide area of necessary extensions and improvements, the

  20. Experimental investigations and seismic analyses for benchmark study of 1000 MW WWER type (water-cooled and moderated reactor) nuclear power plant Kozloduy. Final report 15 June 1993 - 14 June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachansky, S.

    1995-01-01

    This report includes preparation and compilation of all existing studies related to seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy WWER-1000, i.e. Units 5 and 6; description of previous full scale testing of Unit 5; and the results obtained from seismic analyses performed under benchmark experimental studies. The results are concerned with analysis of the geological conditions; analysis of the seismic wave velocities in the soil layers; analysis of the predominant natural periods; dynamic characteristics of the Unit 5; soil-structure interaction and laboratory testing and analysis of the reactor containment tenders

  1. Experimental investigations and seismic analyses for benchmark study of 1000 MW WWER type (water-cooled and moderated reactor) nuclear power plant Kozloduy. Final report 15 June 1993 - 14 June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachansky, S [Building Research Institute (NISI), Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-07-01

    This report includes preparation and compilation of all existing studies related to seismic safety assessment of Kozloduy WWER-1000, i.e. Units 5 and 6; description of previous full scale testing of Unit 5; and the results obtained from seismic analyses performed under benchmark experimental studies. The results are concerned with analysis of the geological conditions; analysis of the seismic wave velocities in the soil layers; analysis of the predominant natural periods; dynamic characteristics of the Unit 5; soil-structure interaction and laboratory testing and analysis of the reactor containment tenders.

  2. OECD/NEA expert group on uncertainty analysis for criticality safety assessment: Results of benchmark on sensitivity calculation (phase III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, T.; Laville, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses (France); Dyrda, J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mennerdahl, D. [E Mennerdahl Systems EMS, Starvaegen 12, 18357 Taeby (Sweden); Golovko, Y.; Raskach, K.; Tsiboulia, A. [Inst. for Physics and Power Engineering IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., 249033 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Lee, G. S.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety KINS, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Bidaud, A.; Sabouri, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie LPSC, CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, Grenoble (France); Patel, A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Bledsoe, K.; Rearden, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory ORNL, M.S. 6170, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Gulliford, J.; Michel-Sendis, F. [OECD/NEA, 12, Bd des Iles, 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivities of the k{sub eff} eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods. (authors)

  3. Current status and results of the PBMR -Pebble Box- benchmark within the framework of the IAEA CRP5 - 341

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Tyobeka, B.

    2010-01-01

    The verification and validation of computer codes used in the analysis of high temperature gas cooled pebble bed reactor systems has not been an easy goal to achieve. A limited amount of tests and operating reactor measurements are available. Code-to-code comparisons for realistic pebble bed reactor designs often exhibit differences that are difficult to explain and are often blamed on the complexity of the core models or the variety of analysis methods and cross section data sets employed. For this reason, within the framework of the IAEA CRP5, the 'Pebble Box' benchmark was formulated as a simple way to compare various treatments of neutronics phenomena. The problem is comprised of six test cases which were designed to investigate the treatments and effects of leakage and heterogeneity. This paper presents the preliminary results of the benchmark exercise as received during the CRP and suggests possible future steps towards the resolution of discrepancies between the results. Although few participants took part in the benchmarking exercise, the results presented here show that there is still a need for further evaluation and in-depth understanding in order to build the confidence that all the different methods, codes and cross-section data sets have the capability to handle the various neutronics effects for such systems. (authors)

  4. The calculational VVER burnup Credit Benchmark No.3 results with the ENDF/B-VI rev.5 (1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gual, Maritza [Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: mrgual@ctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this papers to present the results of CB3 phase of the VVER calculational benchmark with the recent evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI Rev.5 (1999). This results are compared with the obtained from the other participants in the calculations (Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Slovaquia, Spain and the United Kingdom). The phase (CB3) of the VVER calculation benchmark is similar to the Phase II-A of the OECD/NEA/INSC BUC Working Group benchmark for PWR. The cases without burnup profile (BP) were performed with the WIMS/D-4 code. The rest of the cases have been carried with DOTIII discrete ordinates code. The neutron library used was the ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999). The WIMS/D-4 (69 groups) is used to collapse cross sections from the ENDF/B-VI Rev. 5 (1999) to 36 groups working library for 2-D calculations. This work also comprises the results of CB1 (obtained with ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999), too) and CB3 for cases with Burnup of 30 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 and 5 years and for case with Burnup of 40 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 year. (author)

  5. Benchmark Analyses on the Control Rod Withdrawal Tests Performed During the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008–2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The IAEA supports Member State activities in advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. In the broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at improving Member States’ capabilities in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to conduct collaborative research activities was provided by the experimental campaign run by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives) at the PHÉNIX, a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor. Before the definitive shutdown in 2009, end-of-life tests were conducted to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. Thanks to the CEA opening the experiments to international cooperation, the IAEA decided in 2007 to launch the CRP entitled Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. The CRP, together with institutes from seven States, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this publication is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the control rod withdrawal test performed within the framework of the PHÉNIX end-of-life experimental campaign

  6. Benchmark Analyses on the Natural Circulation Test Performed During the PHENIX End-of-Life Experiments. Final Report of a Co-ordinated Research Project 2008-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supports Member State activities in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a forum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The Agency's activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. Among its broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at the improvement of Member State capabilities in the area of fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to undertake collaborative research was provided by the experimental campaign of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in the prototype sodium fast reactor PHENIX before it was shut down in 2009. The overall purpose of the end of life tests was to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. As the CEA opened the experiments to international cooperation, in 2007 the IAEA launched a CRP on ''Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHENIX End-of-Life Experiments''. The CRP, with the participation of institutes from eight countries, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this report is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the natural circulation test performed in the framework of the PHENIX end of life experimental campaign

  7. Benchmark Analyses on the Control Rod Withdrawal Tests Performed During the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008–2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-06-15

    The IAEA supports Member State activities in advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA activities and ensures that all technical activities are in line with the expressed needs of Member States. In the broad range of activities, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs) aimed at improving Member States’ capabilities in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to conduct collaborative research activities was provided by the experimental campaign run by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA, Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives) at the PHÉNIX, a prototype sodium cooled fast reactor. Before the definitive shutdown in 2009, end-of-life tests were conducted to gather additional experience on the operation of sodium cooled reactors. Thanks to the CEA opening the experiments to international cooperation, the IAEA decided in 2007 to launch the CRP entitled Control Rod Withdrawal and Sodium Natural Circulation Tests Performed during the PHÉNIX End-of-Life Experiments. The CRP, together with institutes from seven States, contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactor simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on temperature and power distribution calculations and the analysis of sodium natural circulation phenomena. The objective of this publication is to document the results and main achievements of the benchmark analyses on the control rod withdrawal test performed within the framework of the PHÉNIX end-of-life experimental campaign.

  8. A Fuzzy Logic Based Method for Analysing Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Xuan Vinh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Network operators must perform many tasks to ensure smooth operation of the network, such as planning, monitoring, etc. Among those tasks, regular testing of network performance, network errors and troubleshooting is very important. Meaningful test results will allow the operators to evaluate network performanceof any shortcomings and to better plan for network upgrade. Due to the diverse and mainly unquantifiable nature of network testing results, there is a needs to develop a method for systematically and rigorously analysing these results. In this paper, we present STAM (System Test-result Analysis Method which employs a bottom-up hierarchical processing approach using Fuzzy logic. STAM is capable of combining all test results into a quantitative description of the network performance in terms of network stability, the significance of various network erros, performance of each function blocks within the network. The validity of this method has been successfully demonstrated in assisting the testing of a VoIP system at the Research Instiute of Post and Telecoms in Vietnam. The paper is organized as follows. The first section gives an overview of fuzzy logic theory the concepts of which will be used in the development of STAM. The next section describes STAM. The last section, demonstrating STAM’s capability, presents a success story in which STAM is successfully applied.

  9. Results of a survey on accident and safety analysis codes, benchmarks, verification and validation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Wilkin, G.B.

    1996-03-01

    During the 'Workshop on R and D needs' at the 3rd Meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR-III), the participants agreed that it would be useful to compile a survey of the computer codes and nuclear data libraries used in accident and safety analyses for research reactors and the methods various organizations use to verify and validate their codes and libraries. Five organizations, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL, Canada), China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE, People's Republic of China), Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI, Japan), Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL, USA), and Siemens (Germany) responded to the survey. The results of the survey are compiled in this report. (author) 36 refs., 3 tabs

  10. Benchmarking MELCOR 1.8.2 for ITER Against Recent EVITA Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad J

    2007-11-01

    A version of MELCOR 1.8.2 modified for use in ITER Preliminary Safety Report analyses was validated against recent data from the EVITA facility located in Cadarache, France. EVITA Test Series 7 was used for this study to verify MELCOR’s ability to predict the pressures, temperatures, cryoplate ice mass, and vaccum vessel (VV) condensate mass for test conditions in EVITA that include injections of steam, nitrogen, and water in to the EVITA VV after the walls had been heated to 165 ºC and the cryoplate had been cooled to -193 ºC. In general, the ability of MELCOR to predict the VV pressure and wall temperatures for the steam only and water only injection tests was very good. Predicted ice layer masses where larger than reported for the EVITA cryoplate, in particular for the steam only injection tests (~40% too high), and the predicted condensate masses were less that measured in EVITA. Both of these descrpancies can be explained by ice porosity. The modified MELCOR 1.8.2 over predicts the EVITA VV pressure for the co-injection tests (e.g., steam plus nitrogen, or water plus nitrogen injections) by almost a factor of two. Based on parametric runs that where made by increasing the predicted cryoplate condensation rate, it is believed that this pressure over prediction is a result of an under predicted cryoplate condensation rate. The particulars of this study are documented in this report as well as conclusions about the impact this study has regarding the use of this verions of MELCOR for consequence analyses for ITER safety reports.

  11. Benchmarking MELCOR 1.8.2 for ITER Against Recent EVITA Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, Brad J.

    2007-01-01

    A version of MELCOR 1.8.2 modified for use in ITER Preliminary Safety Report analyses was validated against recent data from the EVITA facility located in Cadarache, France. EVITA Test Series 7 was used for this study to verify MELCOR's ability to predict the pressures, temperatures, cryoplate ice mass, and vacuum vessel (VV) condensate mass for test conditions in EVITA that include injections of steam, nitrogen, and water in to the EVITA VV after the walls had been heated to 165 C and the cryoplate had been cooled to -193 C. In general, the ability of MELCOR to predict the VV pressure and wall temperatures for the steam only and water only injection tests was very good. Predicted ice layer masses where larger than reported for the EVITA cryoplate, in particular for the steam only injection tests (∼40% too high), and the predicted condensate masses were less that measured in EVITA. Both of these discrepancies can be explained by ice porosity. The modified MELCOR 1.8.2 over predicts the EVITA VV pressure for the co-injection tests (e.g., steam plus nitrogen, or water plus nitrogen injections) by almost a factor of two. Based on parametric runs that where made by increasing the predicted cryoplate condensation rate, it is believed that this pressure over prediction is a result of an under predicted cryoplate condensation rate. The particulars of this study are documented in this report as well as conclusions about the impact this study has regarding the use of this version of MELCOR for consequence analyses for ITER safety reports

  12. Benchmarking Glucose Results through Automation: The 2009 Remote Automated Laboratory System Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marcy; Zito, Denise; Kongable, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia in the adult inpatient population remains a topic of intense study in U.S. hospitals. Most hospitals have established glycemic control programs but are unable to determine their impact. The 2009 Remote Automated Laboratory System (RALS) Report provides trends in glycemic control over 4 years to 576 U.S. hospitals to support their effort to manage inpatient hyperglycemia. Methods A proprietary software application feeds de-identified patient point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) data from the Medical Automation Systems RALS-Plus data management system to a central server. Analyses include the number of tests and the mean and median BG results for intensive care unit (ICU), non-ICU, and each hospital compared to the aggregate of the other hospitals. Results More than 175 million BG results were extracted from 2006–2009; 25% were from the ICU. Mean range of BG results for all inpatients in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 was 142.2–201.9, 145.6–201.2, 140.6–205.7, and 140.7–202.4 mg/dl, respectively. The range for ICU patients was 128–226.5, 119.5–219.8, 121.6–226.0, and 121.1–217 mg/dl, respectively. The range for non-ICU patients was 143.4–195.5, 148.6–199.8, 145.2–201.9, and 140.7–203.6 mg/dl, respectively. Hyperglycemia rates of >180 mg/dl in 2008 and 2009 were examined, and hypoglycemia rates of Automated POC-BG data management software can assist in this effort. PMID:21129348

  13. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M.; Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  14. Analyses results of the EHF FW Panel with welded fingers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviridenko, M.N.; Leshukov, A.Yu.; Razmerov, A.V.; Tomilov, S.N.; Danilov, I.V.; Strebkov, Yu.S.; Mazul, I.V.; Labusov, A.; Gervash, A.A.; Belov, A.V.; Semichev, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The design of FW panel with welded fingers has been developed. • The FW panel with welded fingers has been analyzed. • The pressure drop in FW panel coolant path do not exceed allowable one. • The mass flow rate distribution between finger pairs are on acceptable level. • Temperatures in FW components do not exceed allowable one. - Abstract: According to Procurement Arrangement (PA) Russian Federation will procure 40% of enhanced heat flux first wall (FW) panels. The signing of PA is scheduled on November 2013. In framework of PA preparation the RF specialists perform EHF FW design optimization in order to provide the ability to operation of EHF FW panel under ITER conditions. This article contains the design description of EHF FW 14 developed by RF and following analysis have been performed: • Hydraulic analysis; • Transient thermal analysis; • Structural analysis. Analyses results show that new design of FW panel with two straight welds for finger fixation on FW beam developed by RF specialists can be used as a reference design for ITER blanket EHF FW panel loaded by 5 MW/m 2 peak heat flux

  15. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  16. Influence of constitutive equations and calculation methods on the results of inelastic analysis of benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konter, A.W.A.; Kusters, G.M.A.

    1981-01-01

    Several constitutive equations are used to analyse the structural behaviour of a simply supported beam and circular plate loaded at its center, both tested at 1100 0 F. The time-independent plastic behaviour has been analysed with the isotropic and kinematic hardening model as well as with the ORNL 10th cycle model and the fraction model of Besseling. The time-dependent creep behaviour has been analysed using the isotropic hardening rules and the ORNL auxiliary hardening rules. No interaction of the creep and plastic behaviour was taken into account. Especially for cyclic loading conditions, large differences occur in the predictions of the inelastic behaviour. Good agreement between theory and prediction can be obtained with models which accurately account for the ratio of kinematic and saturating isotropic hardening of the used material. (orig./HP)

  17. Benchmarking Reactor Systems Studies by Comparison of EU and Japanese System Code Results for Different DEMO Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, R.; Ward, D.J., E-mail: richard.kemp@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Association, Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nakamura, M.; Tobita, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan); Federici, G. [EFDA Garching, Max Plank Institut fur Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Recent systems studies work within the Broader Approach framework has focussed on benchmarking the EU systems code PROCESS against the Japanese code TPC for conceptual DEMO designs. This paper describes benchmarking work for a conservative, pulsed DEMO and an advanced, steady-state, high-bootstrap fraction DEMO. The resulting former machine is an R{sub 0} = 10 m, a = 2.5 m, {beta}{sub N} < 2.0 device with no enhancement in energy confinement over IPB98. The latter machine is smaller (R{sub 0} = 8 m, a = 2.7 m), with {beta}{sub N} = 3.0, enhanced confinement, and high bootstrap fraction f{sub BS} = 0.8. These options were chosen to test the codes across a wide range of parameter space. While generally in good agreement, some of the code outputs differ. In particular, differences have been identified in the impurity radiation models and flux swing calculations. The global effects of these differences are described and approaches to identifying the best models, including future experiments, are discussed. Results of varying some of the assumptions underlying the modelling are also presented, demonstrating the sensitivity of the solutions to technological limitations and providing guidance for where further research could be focussed. (author)

  18. The InterFrost benchmark of Thermo-Hydraulic codes for cold regions hydrology - first inter-comparison results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Christophe; Roux, Nicolas; Anbergen, Hauke; Collier, Nathaniel; Costard, Francois; Ferrry, Michel; Frampton, Andrew; Frederick, Jennifer; Holmen, Johan; Jost, Anne; Kokh, Samuel; Kurylyk, Barret; McKenzie, Jeffrey; Molson, John; Orgogozo, Laurent; Rivière, Agnès; Rühaak, Wolfram; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Therrien, René; Vidstrand, Patrik

    2015-04-01

    The impacts of climate change in boreal regions has received considerable attention recently due to the warming trends that have been experienced in recent decades and are expected to intensify in the future. Large portions of these regions, corresponding to permafrost areas, are covered by water bodies (lakes, rivers) that interact with the surrounding permafrost. For example, the thermal state of the surrounding soil influences the energy and water budget of the surface water bodies. Also, these water bodies generate taliks (unfrozen zones below) that disturb the thermal regimes of permafrost and may play a key role in the context of climate change. Recent field studies and modeling exercises indicate that a fully coupled 2D or 3D Thermo-Hydraulic (TH) approach is required to understand and model the past and future evolution of landscapes, rivers, lakes and associated groundwater systems in a changing climate. However, there is presently a paucity of 3D numerical studies of permafrost thaw and associated hydrological changes, and the lack of study can be partly attributed to the difficulty in verifying multi-dimensional results produced by numerical models. Numerical approaches can only be validated against analytical solutions for a purely thermic 1D equation with phase change (e.g. Neumann, Lunardini). When it comes to the coupled TH system (coupling two highly non-linear equations), the only possible approach is to compare the results from different codes to provided test cases and/or to have controlled experiments for validation. Such inter-code comparisons can propel discussions to try to improve code performances. A benchmark exercise was initialized in 2014 with a kick-off meeting in Paris in November. Participants from USA, Canada, Germany, Sweden and France convened, representing altogether 13 simulation codes. The benchmark exercises consist of several test cases inspired by existing literature (e.g. McKenzie et al., 2007) as well as new ones. They

  19. Radcalc for windows benchmark study: A comparison of software results with Rocky Flats hydrogen gas generation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCFADDEN, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Radcalc for Windows Version 2.01 is a user-friendly software program developed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations for the U.S. Department of Energy (McFadden et al. 1998). It is used for transportation and packaging applications in the shipment of radioactive waste materials. Among its applications are the classification of waste per the US. Department of Transportation regulations, the calculation of decay heat and daughter products, and the calculation of the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas. The Radcalc program has been extensively tested and validated (Green et al. 1995, McFadden et al. 1998) by comparison of each Radcalc algorithm to hand calculations. An opportunity to benchmark Radcalc hydrogen gas generation calculations to experimental data arose when the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) Residue Stabilization Program collected hydrogen gas generation data to determine compliance with requirements for shipment of waste in the TRUPACT-II (Schierloh 1998). The residue/waste drums tested at RFETS contain contaminated, solid, inorganic materials in polyethylene bags. The contamination is predominantly due to plutonium and americium isotopes. The information provided by Schierloh (1 998) of RFETS includes decay heat, hydrogen gas generation rates, calculated G eff values, and waste material type, making the experimental data ideal for benchmarking Radcalc. The following sections discuss the RFETS data and the Radcalc cases modeled with the data. Results are tabulated and also provided graphically

  20. RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF BENCHMARKING METHODS OF INNOVATION SYSTEMS ASSESSMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH AIMS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vylegzhanina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce results of comparative analysis of international ratings indexes of innovation systems for their compliance with purposes of sustainable development. Purpose of this research is defining requirements to benchmarking methods of assessing national or regional innovation systems and compare them basing on assumption, that innovation system is aligned with sustainable development concept. Analysis of goal sets and concepts, which underlie observed international composite innovation indexes, comparison of their metrics and calculation techniques, allowed us to reveal opportunities and limitations of using these methods in frames of sustainable development concept. We formulated targets of innovation development on the base of innovation priorities of sustainable socio-economic development. Using comparative analysis of indexes with these targets, we revealed two methods of assessing innovation systems, maximally connected with goals of sustainable development. Nevertheless, today no any benchmarking method, which meets need of innovation systems assessing in compliance with sustainable development concept to a sufficient extent. We suggested practical directions of developing methods, assessing innovation systems in compliance with goals of societal sustainable development.

  1. Results of investigations within the IWGFR benchmark test acoustic boiling noise detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauersberger, H.; Froehlich, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    The present paper deals with investigations of acoustic signals from a boiling experiment performed on the KNS I loop at KfK Karlsruhe. Signals have been analysed in frequency as well as in time domain. Signal characteristics successfully used to detect the boiling process have been found in time domain. A proposal for in-service boiling monitoring by acoustic means is briefly described. (author). 10 refs, 16 figs, 1 tab

  2. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results.

  3. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Satoshi; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results

  4. Results of a survey on accident and safety analysis codes, benchmarks, verification and validation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Wilkin, G.B.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the information submitted by AECL, CIAE, JAERI, ORNL and Siemens in response to a need identified at the 'Workshop on R and D Needs' at the IGORR-3 meeting. The survey compiled information on the national standards applied to the Safety Quality Assurance (SQA) programs undertaken by the participants. Information was assembled for the computer codes and nuclear data libraries used in accident and safety analyses for research reactors and the methods used to verify and validate the codes and libraries. Although the survey was not comprehensive, it provides a basis for exchanging information of common interest to the research reactor community

  5. Dynamic benchmarking of simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.E.; Paik, C.Y.; Hauser, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Computer simulation of nuclear power plant response can be a full-scope control room simulator, an engineering simulator to represent the general behavior of the plant under normal and abnormal conditions, or the modeling of the plant response to conditions that would eventually lead to core damage. In any of these, the underlying foundation for their use in analysing situations, training of vendor/utility personnel, etc. is how well they represent what has been known from industrial experience, large integral experiments and separate effects tests. Typically, simulation codes are benchmarked with some of these; the level of agreement necessary being dependent upon the ultimate use of the simulation tool. However, these analytical models are computer codes, and as a result, the capabilities are continually enhanced, errors are corrected, new situations are imposed on the code that are outside of the original design basis, etc. Consequently, there is a continual need to assure that the benchmarks with important transients are preserved as the computer code evolves. Retention of this benchmarking capability is essential to develop trust in the computer code. Given the evolving world of computer codes, how is this retention of benchmarking capabilities accomplished? For the MAAP4 codes this capability is accomplished through a 'dynamic benchmarking' feature embedded in the source code. In particular, a set of dynamic benchmarks are included in the source code and these are exercised every time the archive codes are upgraded and distributed to the MAAP users. Three different types of dynamic benchmarks are used: plant transients; large integral experiments; and separate effects tests. Each of these is performed in a different manner. The first is accomplished by developing a parameter file for the plant modeled and an input deck to describe the sequence; i.e. the entire MAAP4 code is exercised. The pertinent plant data is included in the source code and the computer

  6. Cooperative biogas plants. Economic results and analyses. Status report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjort-Gregersen, K.

    1998-11-01

    The years 1995 - 1998 have been characterised by stabilisation of operation and economy of the Danish co-operative biogas plants. Most of the plants have obtained increasingly better economic results although the increase has been less significant than during earlier periods. There are several reasons for the increase. Most of the plants have been able to increase the sales income because of larger amounts of biomass available resulting in an increased biogas production. Furthermore it has been possible to contain the income level for biomass receipt. Several plants have established gas collection in storage tanks, which has resulted in increased gas yield. The operational stability related to both technique and processes have improved. The operational costs have been stabilised and are under control at most of the plants. The improved economic results have resulted in most of the plants having a satisfactory operation and economy. However, it must be stressed that some of the oldest plants have not been able to settle the investment dept at normal conditions. Also some, even rather new plants, still are in a difficult economic situation. Most of the plants established in the 90'ies have had a good start both operationally and economically. Thus the economic risk of establishing a plant has been reduced compared to earlier years. Generally the prerequisites for establishing a biogas plant are favourable economic conditions and quality assurance of the project. (LN)

  7. OECD/NEA source convergence benchmark program: overview and summary of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, Roger; Nouri, Ali; Armishaw, Malcolm; Jacquet, Olivier; Naito, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Source Convergence in Criticality Safety Analysis. A set of test problems is presented, some computational results are given, and the effects of source convergence difficulties are described

  8. OECD/NEA source convergence benchmark program. Overview and summary of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomquist, Roger; Nouri, Ali; Armishaw, Malcolm; Jacquet, Olivier; Naito, Yoshitaka; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the work of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Source Convergence in Criticality Safety Analysis. A set of test problems is presented, some computational results are given, and the effects of source convergence difficulties are described. (author)

  9. Comparing the Floating Point Systems, Inc. AP-190L to representative scientific computers: some benchmark results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengle, T.A.; Maron, N.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of comparative timing tests made by running a typical FORTRAN physics simulation code on the following machines: DEC PDP-10 with KI processor; DEC PDP-10, KI processor, and FPS AP-190L; CDC 7600; and CRAY-1. Factors such as DMA overhead, code size for the AP-190L, and the relative utilization of floating point functional units for the different machines are discussed. 1 table

  10. Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-11-01

    The IAEA supports Member States in the area of advanced fast reactor technology development by providing a major fulcrum for information exchange and collaborative research programmes. The IAEA’s activities in this field are mainly carried out within the framework of the Technical Working Group on Fast Reactors (TWG-FR), which assists in the implementation of corresponding IAEA support, and ensures that all technical activities are in line with expressed needs of Member States. Among this broad range, the IAEA proposes and establishes coordinated research projects (CRPs), aimed at improving Member State capability in fast reactor design and analysis. An important opportunity to perform collaborative research activities was provided by the system startup tests carried out by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the prototype loop type sodium cooled fast reactor Monju, in particular a turbine trip test performed in December 1995. As the JAEA opened the experimental dataset to international collaboration in 2008, the IAEA launched the CRP on Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. The CRP, together with eight institutes from seven States, has contributed to improving capabilities in sodium cooled fast reactors simulation through code verification and validation, with particular emphasis on thermal stratification and natural circulation phenomena

  11. Weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization: benchmark analytical results for two-electron atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinh, Vinh H; Morishita, Toru; Tolstikhin, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    The recently developed many-electron weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization of atoms and molecules in an external static electric field (Tolstikhin et al 2014, Phys. Rev. A 89, 013421) is extended to the first-order terms in the asymptotic expansion in field. To highlight the results, here we present a simple analytical formula giving the rate of tunneling ionization of two-electron atoms H − and He. Comparison with fully-correlated ab initio calculations available for these systems shows that the first-order theory works quantitatively in a wide range of fields up to the onset of over-the-barrier ionization and hence is expected to find numerous applications in strong-field physics. (fast track communication)

  12. Results of Analyses of the Next Generation Solvent for Parsons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of ∼150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

  13. Library Benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiji Suwarno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The term benchmarking has been encountered in the implementation of total quality (TQM or in Indonesian termed holistic quality management because benchmarking is a tool to look for ideas or learn from the library. Benchmarking is a processof measuring and comparing for continuous business process of systematic and continuous measurement, the process of measuring and comparing for continuous business process of an organization to get information that can help these organization improve their performance efforts.

  14. Final results of the 'Benchmark on computer simulation of radioactive nuclides production rate and heat generation rate in a spallation target'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janczyszyn, J.; Pohorecki, W.; Domanska, G.; Maiorino, R.J.; David, J.C.; Velarde, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    A benchmark has been organized to assess the computer simulation of nuclide production and heat generation in a spallation lead target. The physical models applied for the calculation of thick lead target activation do not produce satisfactory results for the majority of analysed nuclides, however one can observe better or worse quantitative compliance with the experimental results. Analysis of the quality of calculated results show the best performance for heavy nuclides (A: 170 - 190). For intermediate nuclides (A: 60 - 130) almost all are underestimated while for A: 130 - 170 mainly overestimated. The shape of the activity distribution in the target is well reproduced in calculations by all models but the numerical comparison shows similar performance as for the whole target. The Isabel model yields best results. As for the whole target heating rate, the results from all participants are consistent. Only small differences are observed between results from physical models. As for the heating distribution in the target it looks not quite similar. The quantitative comparison of the distributions yielded by different spallation reaction models shows for the major part of the target no serious differences - generally below 10%. However, in the most outside parts of the target front layers and the part of the target at its end behind the primary protons range, a spread higher than 40 % is obtained

  15. Calculations of the IAEA-CRP-6 Benchmark Cases by Using the ABAQUS FE Model for a Comparison with the COPA Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Moon-Sung; Kim, Y. M.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, K. C.; Kim, Y. K.; Oh, S. C.

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental design for a gas-cooled reactor relies on an understanding of the behavior of a coated particle fuel. KAERI, which has been carrying out the Korean VHTR (Very High Temperature modular gas cooled Reactor) Project since 2004, is developing a fuel performance analysis code for a VHTR named COPA (COated Particle fuel Analysis). COPA predicts temperatures, stresses, a fission gas release and failure probabilities of a coated particle fuel in normal operating conditions. Validation of COPA in the process of its development is realized partly by participating in the benchmark section of the international CRP-6 program led by IAEA which provides comprehensive benchmark problems and analysis results obtained from the CRP-6 member countries. Apart from the validation effort through the CRP-6, a validation of COPA was attempted by comparing its benchmark results with the visco-elastic solutions obtained from the ABAQUS code calculations for the same CRP-6 TRISO coated particle benchmark problems involving creep, swelling, and pressure. The study shows the calculation results of the IAEA-CRP-6 benchmark cases 5 through 7 by using the ABAQUS FE model for a comparison with the COPA results

  16. Benchmarking and Learning in Public Healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckmaster, Natalie; Mouritsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This research investigates the effects of learning-oriented benchmarking in public healthcare settings. Benchmarking is a widely adopted yet little explored accounting practice that is part of the paradigm of New Public Management. Extant studies are directed towards mandated coercive benchmarking...... applications. The present study analyses voluntary benchmarking in a public setting that is oriented towards learning. The study contributes by showing how benchmarking can be mobilised for learning and offers evidence of the effects of such benchmarking for performance outcomes. It concludes that benchmarking...... can enable learning in public settings but that this requires actors to invest in ensuring that benchmark data are directed towards improvement....

  17. Solutions of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model: Benchmarks and Results from a Wide Range of Numerical Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerical results for ground-state and excited-state properties (energies, double occupancies, and Matsubara-axis self-energies of the single-orbital Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are presented, in order to provide an assessment of our ability to compute accurate results in the thermodynamic limit. Many methods are employed, including auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo, bare and bold-line diagrammatic Monte Carlo, method of dual fermions, density matrix embedding theory, density matrix renormalization group, dynamical cluster approximation, diffusion Monte Carlo within a fixed-node approximation, unrestricted coupled cluster theory, and multireference projected Hartree-Fock methods. Comparison of results obtained by different methods allows for the identification of uncertainties and systematic errors. The importance of extrapolation to converged thermodynamic-limit values is emphasized. Cases where agreement between different methods is obtained establish benchmark results that may be useful in the validation of new approaches and the improvement of existing methods.

  18. Reactor fuel depletion benchmark of TINDER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.J.; Oliveira, C.R.E. de; Hecht, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A reactor burnup benchmark of TINDER, coupling MCNP6 to CINDER2008, was performed. • TINDER is a poor candidate for fuel depletion calculations using its current libraries. • Data library modification is necessary if fuel depletion is desired from TINDER. - Abstract: Accurate burnup calculations are key to proper nuclear reactor design, fuel cycle modeling, and disposal estimations. The TINDER code, originally designed for activation analyses, has been modified to handle full burnup calculations, including the widely used predictor–corrector feature. In order to properly characterize the performance of TINDER for this application, a benchmark calculation was performed. Although the results followed the trends of past benchmarked codes for a UO 2 PWR fuel sample from the Takahama-3 reactor, there were obvious deficiencies in the final result, likely in the nuclear data library that was used. Isotopic comparisons versus experiment and past code benchmarks are given, as well as hypothesized areas of deficiency and future work

  19. Interactive benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, Lartey; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss individual learning by interactive benchmarking using stochastic frontier models. The interactions allow the user to tailor the performance evaluation to preferences and explore alternative improvement strategies by selecting and searching the different frontiers using directional...... in the suggested benchmarking tool. The study investigates how different characteristics on dairy farms influences the technical efficiency....

  20. RUNE benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo

    This report contains the description of a number of benchmarks with the purpose of evaluating flow models for near-shore wind resource estimation. The benchmarks are designed based on the comprehensive database of observations that the RUNE coastal experiment established from onshore lidar...

  1. Benchmark selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Tvede, Mich

    2002-01-01

    Within a production theoretic framework, this paper considers an axiomatic approach to benchmark selection. It is shown that two simple and weak axioms; efficiency and comprehensive monotonicity characterize a natural family of benchmarks which typically becomes unique. Further axioms are added...... in order to obtain a unique selection...

  2. BN-600 MOX Core Benchmark Analysis. Results from Phases 4 and 6 of a Coordinated Research Project on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    For those Member States that have or have had significant fast reactor development programmes, it is of utmost importance that they have validated up to date codes and methods for fast reactor physics analysis in support of R and D and core design activities in the area of actinide utilization and incineration. In particular, some Member States have recently focused on fast reactor systems for minor actinide transmutation and on cores optimized for consuming rather than breeding plutonium; the physics of the breeder reactor cycle having already been widely investigated. Plutonium burning systems may have an important role in managing plutonium stocks until the time when major programmes of self-sufficient fast breeder reactors are established. For assessing the safety of these systems, it is important to determine the prediction accuracy of transient simulations and their associated reactivity coefficients. In response to Member States' expressed interest, the IAEA sponsored a coordinated research project (CRP) on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the Calculational Uncertainties of the LMFR Reactivity Effects. The CRP started in November 1999 and, at the first meeting, the members of the CRP endorsed a benchmark on the BN-600 hybrid core for consideration in its first studies. Benchmark analyses of the BN-600 hybrid core were performed during the first three phases of the CRP, investigating different nuclear data and levels of approximation in the calculation of safety related reactivity effects and their influence on uncertainties in transient analysis prediction. In an additional phase of the benchmark studies, experimental data were used for the verification and validation of nuclear data libraries and methods in support of the previous three phases. The results of phases 1, 2, 3 and 5 of the CRP are reported in IAEA-TECDOC-1623, BN-600 Hybrid Core Benchmark Analyses, Results from a Coordinated Research Project on Updated Codes and Methods to Reduce the

  3. Mean Abnormal Result Rate: Proof of Concept of a New Metric for Benchmarking Selectivity in Laboratory Test Ordering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, Christopher T; Guo, Maggie

    2016-04-01

    There is a need to develop and validate new metrics to access the appropriateness of laboratory test requests. The mean abnormal result rate (MARR) is a proposed measure of ordering selectivity, the premise being that higher mean abnormal rates represent more selective test ordering. As a validation of this metric, we compared the abnormal rate of lab tests with the number of tests ordered on the same requisition. We hypothesized that requisitions with larger numbers of requested tests represent less selective test ordering and therefore would have a lower overall abnormal rate. We examined 3,864,083 tests ordered on 451,895 requisitions and found that the MARR decreased from about 25% if one test was ordered to about 7% if nine or more tests were ordered, consistent with less selectivity when more tests were ordered. We then examined the MARR for community-based testing for 1,340 family physicians and found both a wide variation in MARR as well as an inverse relationship between the total tests ordered per year per physician and the physician-specific MARR. The proposed metric represents a new utilization metric for benchmarking relative selectivity of test orders among physicians. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Strong-coupling expansion for the momentum distribution of the Bose-Hubbard model with benchmarking against exact numerical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freericks, J. K.; Krishnamurthy, H. R.; Kato, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Naoki; Trivedi, Nandini

    2009-01-01

    A strong-coupling expansion for the Green's functions, self-energies, and correlation functions of the Bose-Hubbard model is developed. We illustrate the general formalism, which includes all possible (normal-phase) inhomogeneous effects in the formalism, such as disorder or a trap potential, as well as effects of thermal excitations. The expansion is then employed to calculate the momentum distribution of the bosons in the Mott phase for an infinite homogeneous periodic system at zero temperature through third order in the hopping. By using scaling theory for the critical behavior at zero momentum and at the critical value of the hopping for the Mott insulator-to-superfluid transition along with a generalization of the random-phase-approximation-like form for the momentum distribution, we are able to extrapolate the series to infinite order and produce very accurate quantitative results for the momentum distribution in a simple functional form for one, two, and three dimensions. The accuracy is better in higher dimensions and is on the order of a few percent relative error everywhere except close to the critical value of the hopping divided by the on-site repulsion. In addition, we find simple phenomenological expressions for the Mott-phase lobes in two and three dimensions which are much more accurate than the truncated strong-coupling expansions and any other analytic approximation we are aware of. The strong-coupling expansions and scaling-theory results are benchmarked against numerically exact quantum Monte Carlo simulations in two and three dimensions and against density-matrix renormalization-group calculations in one dimension. These analytic expressions will be useful for quick comparison of experimental results to theory and in many cases can bypass the need for expensive numerical simulations.

  5. Regional Competitive Intelligence: Benchmarking and Policymaking

    OpenAIRE

    Huggins , Robert

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking exercises have become increasingly popular within the sphere of regional policymaking in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyse the concept of regional benchmarking and its links with regional policymaking processes. It develops a typology of regional benchmarking exercises and regional benchmarkers, and critically reviews the literature, both academic and policy oriented. It is argued that critics who suggest regional benchmarking is a flawed concept and technique fai...

  6. Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, Mark D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mausolff, Zander [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Weems, Zach [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Popp, Dustin [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Smith, Kristin [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Shriver, Forrest [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Goluoglu, Sedat [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Prince, Zachary [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Ragusa, Jean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    One goal of the MAMMOTH M&S project is to validate the analysis capabilities within MAMMOTH. Historical data has shown limited value for validation of full three-dimensional (3D) multi-physics methods. Initial analysis considered the TREAT startup minimum critical core and one of the startup transient tests. At present, validation is focusing on measurements taken during the M8CAL test calibration series. These exercises will valuable in preliminary assessment of the ability of MAMMOTH to perform coupled multi-physics calculations; calculations performed to date are being used to validate the neutron transport solver Rattlesnake\\cite{Rattlesnake} and the fuels performance code BISON. Other validation projects outside of TREAT are available for single-physics benchmarking. Because the transient solution capability of Rattlesnake is one of the key attributes that makes it unique for TREAT transient simulations, validation of the transient solution of Rattlesnake using other time dependent kinetics benchmarks has considerable value. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently developed a computational benchmark for transient simulations. This benchmark considered both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D configurations for a total number of 26 different transients. All are negative reactivity insertions, typically returning to the critical state after some time.

  7. Preliminary Results for the OECD/NEA Time Dependent Benchmark using Rattlesnake, Rattlesnake-IQS and TDKENO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHart, Mark D.; Mausolff, Zander; Weems, Zach; Popp, Dustin; Smith, Kristin; Shriver, Forrest; Goluoglu, Sedat; Prince, Zachary; Ragusa, Jean

    2016-01-01

    One goal of the MAMMOTH M&S project is to validate the analysis capabilities within MAMMOTH. Historical data has shown limited value for validation of full three-dimensional (3D) multi-physics methods. Initial analysis considered the TREAT startup minimum critical core and one of the startup transient tests. At present, validation is focusing on measurements taken during the M8CAL test calibration series. These exercises will valuable in preliminary assessment of the ability of MAMMOTH to perform coupled multi-physics calculations; calculations performed to date are being used to validate the neutron transport solver Rattlesnake\\citelesnake) and the fuels performance code BISON. Other validation projects outside of TREAT are available for single-physics benchmarking. Because the transient solution capability of Rattlesnake is one of the key attributes that makes it unique for TREAT transient simulations, validation of the transient solution of Rattlesnake using other time dependent kinetics benchmarks has considerable value. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has recently developed a computational benchmark for transient simulations. This benchmark considered both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D configurations for a total number of 26 different transients. All are negative reactivity insertions, typically returning to the critical state after some time.

  8. Benchmarking Investments in Advancement: Results of the Inaugural CASE Advancement Investment Metrics Study (AIMS). CASE White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Juidith A.

    2012-01-01

    The inaugural Advancement Investment Metrics Study, or AIMS, benchmarked investments and staffing in each of the advancement disciplines (advancement services, alumni relations, communications and marketing, fundraising and advancement management) as well as the return on the investment in fundraising specifically. This white paper reports on the…

  9. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  10. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  11. Verification and validation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2008-01-01

    Verification and validation (V and V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V and V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V and V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the

  12. Comparative analysis of results between CASMO, MCNP and Serpent for a suite of Benchmark problems on BWR reactors; Analisis comparativo de resultados entre CASMO, MCNP y SERPENT para una suite de problemas Benchmark en reactores BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xolocostli M, J. V.; Vargas E, S.; Gomez T, A. M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Reyes F, M. del C.; Del Valle G, E., E-mail: vicente.xolocostli@inin.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, UP - Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper a comparison is made in analyzing the suite of Benchmark problems for reactors type BWR between CASMO-4, MCNP6 and Serpent code. The Benchmark problem consists of two different geometries: a fuel cell of a pin and assembly type BWR. To facilitate the study of reactors physics in the fuel pin their nuclear characteristics are provided to detail, such as burnt dependence, the reactivity of selected nuclide, etc. With respect to the fuel assembly, the presented results are regarding to infinite multiplication factor for burning different steps and different vacuum conditions. Making the analysis of this set of Benchmark problems provides comprehensive test problems for the next fuels generation of BWR reactors with high extended burned. It is important to note that when making this comparison the purpose is to validate the methodologies used in modeling for different operating conditions, if the case is of other BWR assembly. The results will be within a range with some uncertainty, considering that does not depend on code that is used. Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas of Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN (Mexico) has accumulated some experience in using Serpent, due to the potential of this code over other commercial codes such as CASMO and MCNP. The obtained results for the infinite multiplication factor are encouraging and motivate the studies to continue with the generation of the X S of a core to a next step a respective nuclear data library is constructed and this can be used by codes developed as part of the development project of the Mexican Analysis Platform of Nuclear Reactors AZTLAN. (Author)

  13. Benchmark analyses for the ITER bulk shield experiment with EFF-3.0, -3.1 and FENDL-1, -2 nuclear cross-section data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Wu, Y.; Hansen, W.; Richter, D.; Seidel, K.; Unholzer, S.

    1999-01-01

    The present article is part of the summary report on the Consultants' Meeting on the transport sublibrary of the Fusion Evaluated Data Library version 2.0. It reports on the comparison between benchmark experiments on a mock-up of the ITER inboard shield system at FNG, Frascati and Monte Carlo calculations, using different versions of the FENDL and EFF libraries

  14. The development of code benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken a code benchmarking effort to define a series of cask-like problems having both numerical solutions and experimental data. The development of the benchmarks includes: (1) model problem definition, (2) code intercomparison, and (3) experimental verification. The first two steps are complete and a series of experiments are planned. The experiments will examine the elastic/plastic behavior of cylinders for both the end and side impacts resulting from a nine meter drop. The cylinders will be made from stainless steel and aluminum to give a range of plastic deformations. This paper presents the results of analyses simulating the model's behavior using materials properties for stainless steel and aluminum

  15. Global benchmarking of medical student learning outcomes? Implementation and pilot results of the International Foundations of Medicine Clinical Sciences Exam at The University of Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David; Schafer, Jennifer; Hewett, David; Eley, Diann; Swanson, Dave

    2014-01-01

    To report pilot results for international benchmarking of learning outcomes among 426 final year medical students at the University of Queensland (UQ), Australia. Students took the International Foundations of Medicine (IFOM) Clinical Sciences Exam (CSE) developed by the National Board of Medical Examiners, USA, as a required formative assessment. IFOM CSE comprises 160 multiple-choice questions in medicine, surgery, obstetrics, paediatrics and mental health, taken over 4.5 hours. Significant implementation issues; IFOM scores and benchmarking with International Comparison Group (ICG) scores and United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores; and correlation with UQ medical degree cumulative grade point average (GPA). Implementation as an online exam, under university-mandated conditions was successful. Mean IFOM score was 531.3 (maximum 779-minimum 200). The UQ cohort performed better (31% scored below 500) than the ICG (55% below 500). However 49% of the UQ cohort did not meet the USMLE Step 2 CK minimum score. Correlation between IFOM scores and UQ cumulative GPA was reasonable at 0.552 (p benchmarking is feasible and provides a variety of useful benchmarking opportunities.

  16. Evaluation of PWR and BWR assembly benchmark calculations. Status report of EPRI computational benchmark results, performed in the framework of the Netherlands` PINK programme (Joint project of ECN, IRI, KEMA and GKN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruppelaar, H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Klippel, H.T. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Kloosterman, J.L. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN), Petten (Netherlands); Hoogenboom, J.E. [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Instituut; Leege, P.F.A. de [Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands). Interfacultair Reactor Instituut; Verhagen, F.C.M. [Keuring van Electrotechnische Materialen NV, Arnhem (Netherlands); Bruggink, J.C. [Gemeenschappelijke Kernenergiecentrale Nederland N.V., Dodewaard (Netherlands)

    1993-11-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on calculational benchmarks on single pin cell and multipin assemblies as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. First a short update of methods used by the various institutes involved is given as well as an update of the status with respect to previous performed pin-cell calculations. Problems detected in previous pin-cell calculations are inspected more closely. Detailed discussion of results of multipin assembly calculations is given. The assembly consists of 9 pins in a multicell square lattice in which the central pin is filled differently, i.e. a Gd pin for the BWR assembly and a control rod/guide tube for the PWR assembly. The results for pin cells showed a rather good overall agreement between the four participants although BWR pins with high void fraction turned out to be difficult to calculate. With respect to burnup calculations good overall agreement for the reactivity swing was obtained, provided that a fine time grid is used. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of PWR and BWR assembly benchmark calculations. Status report of EPRI computational benchmark results, performed in the framework of the Netherlands' PINK programme (Joint project of ECN, IRI, KEMA and GKN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Klippel, H.T.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Bruggink, J.C.

    1993-11-01

    Benchmark results of the Dutch PINK working group on calculational benchmarks on single pin cell and multipin assemblies as defined by EPRI are presented and evaluated. First a short update of methods used by the various institutes involved is given as well as an update of the status with respect to previous performed pin-cell calculations. Problems detected in previous pin-cell calculations are inspected more closely. Detailed discussion of results of multipin assembly calculations is given. The assembly consists of 9 pins in a multicell square lattice in which the central pin is filled differently, i.e. a Gd pin for the BWR assembly and a control rod/guide tube for the PWR assembly. The results for pin cells showed a rather good overall agreement between the four participants although BWR pins with high void fraction turned out to be difficult to calculate. With respect to burnup calculations good overall agreement for the reactivity swing was obtained, provided that a fine time grid is used. (orig.)

  18. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  19. Benchmarking and the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, M; Nadin, L

    2001-01-01

    This article describes how benchmarking can be used to assess laboratory performance. Two benchmarking schemes are reviewed, the Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report and the College of American Pathologists' Q-Probes scheme. The Clinical Benchmarking Company's Pathology Report is undertaken by staff based in the clinical management unit, Keele University with appropriate input from the professional organisations within pathology. Five annual reports have now been completed. Each report is a detailed analysis of 10 areas of laboratory performance. In this review, particular attention is focused on the areas of quality, productivity, variation in clinical practice, skill mix, and working hours. The Q-Probes scheme is part of the College of American Pathologists programme in studies of quality assurance. The Q-Probes scheme and its applicability to pathology in the UK is illustrated by reviewing two recent Q-Probe studies: routine outpatient test turnaround time and outpatient test order accuracy. The Q-Probes scheme is somewhat limited by the small number of UK laboratories that have participated. In conclusion, as a result of the government's policy in the UK, benchmarking is here to stay. Benchmarking schemes described in this article are one way in which pathologists can demonstrate that they are providing a cost effective and high quality service. Key Words: benchmarking • pathology PMID:11477112

  20. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of bench-marking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  1. Regulatory Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators. The appli......Benchmarking methods, and in particular Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), have become well-established and informative tools for economic regulation. DEA is now routinely used by European regulators to set reasonable revenue caps for energy transmission and distribution system operators....... The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  2. EPRI depletion benchmark calculations using PARAGON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucukboyaci, Vefa N.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PARAGON depletion calculations are benchmarked against the EPRI reactivity decrement experiments. • Benchmarks cover a wide range of enrichments, burnups, cooling times, and burnable absorbers, and different depletion and storage conditions. • Results from PARAGON-SCALE scheme are more conservative relative to the benchmark data. • ENDF/B-VII based data reduces the excess conservatism and brings the predictions closer to benchmark reactivity decrement values. - Abstract: In order to conservatively apply burnup credit in spent fuel pool criticality analyses, code validation for both fresh and used fuel is required. Fresh fuel validation is typically done by modeling experiments from the “International Handbook.” A depletion validation can determine a bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of the isotopes not found in the fresh fuel critical experiments. Westinghouse’s burnup credit methodology uses PARAGON™ (Westinghouse 2-D lattice physics code) and its 70-group cross-section library, which have been benchmarked, qualified, and licensed both as a standalone transport code and as a nuclear data source for core design simulations. A bias and bias uncertainty for the worth of depletion isotopes, however, are not available for PARAGON. Instead, the 5% decrement approach for depletion uncertainty is used, as set forth in the Kopp memo. Recently, EPRI developed a set of benchmarks based on a large set of power distribution measurements to ascertain reactivity biases. The depletion reactivity has been used to create 11 benchmark cases for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 GWd/MTU and 3 cooling times 100 h, 5 years, and 15 years. These benchmark cases are analyzed with PARAGON and the SCALE package and sensitivity studies are performed using different cross-section libraries based on ENDF/B-VI.3 and ENDF/B-VII data to assess that the 5% decrement approach is conservative for determining depletion uncertainty

  3. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  4. Benchmarking Swiss electricity grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walti, N.O.; Weber, Ch.

    2001-01-01

    This extensive article describes a pilot benchmarking project initiated by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises that assessed 37 Swiss utilities. The data collected from these utilities on a voluntary basis included data on technical infrastructure, investments and operating costs. These various factors are listed and discussed in detail. The assessment methods and rating mechanisms that provided the benchmarks are discussed and the results of the pilot study are presented that are to form the basis of benchmarking procedures for the grid regulation authorities under the planned Switzerland's electricity market law. Examples of the practical use of the benchmarking methods are given and cost-efficiency questions still open in the area of investment and operating costs are listed. Prefaces by the Swiss Association of Electricity Enterprises and the Swiss Federal Office of Energy complete the article

  5. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargalló, Enric, E-mail: enric.bargallo@esss.se [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Arroyo, Jose Manuel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos [Fusion Energy Engineering Laboratory (FEEL), Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) Barcelona-Tech, Barcelona (Spain); Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión por Confinamiento Magnético – CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  6. Results of the RAMI analyses performed for the IFMIF accelerator facility in the engineering design phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargalló, Enric; Arroyo, Jose Manuel; Abal, Javier; Dies, Javier; De Blas, Alfredo; Tapia, Carlos; Moya, Joaquin; Ibarra, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • RAMI methodology used for IFMIF accelerator facility is presented. • Availability analyses and results are shown. • Main accelerator design changes are proposed. • Consequences and conclusions of the RAMI analyses are described. - Abstract: This paper presents a summary of the RAMI (Reliability Availability Maintainability Inspectability) analyses done for the IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) Accelerator facility in the Engineering Design Phase. The methodology followed, the analyses performed, the results obtained and the conclusions drawn are described. Moreover, the consequences of the incorporation of the RAMI studies in the IFMIF design are presented and the main outcomes of these analyses are shown.

  7. VVER-1000 coolant transient benchmark. Phase 1 (V1000CT-1). Vol. 3: summary results of exercise 2 on coupled 3-D kinetics/core thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts, as well as current applications. (authors) Recently developed best-estimate computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for the coupling of core phenomena and system dynamics need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present volume is a follow-up to the first two volumes. While the first described the specification of the benchmark, the second presented the results of the first exercise that identified the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermal-hydraulic system modelling of the simulated transient caused by the switching on of a main coolant pump when the other three were in operation. Volume 3 summarises the results for Exercise 2 of the benchmark that identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the 3-D neutron kinetics modelling of the simulated transient. These studies are based on an experiment that was conducted by Bulgarian and Russian engineers during the plant-commissioning phase at the VVER-1000 Kozloduy Unit 6. The final volume will soon be published, completing Phase 1 of this study. (authors)

  8. PHISICS/RELAP5-3D RESULTS FOR EXERCISES II-1 AND II-2 OF THE OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 BENCHMARK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Methods group currently leads the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) 350 benchmark. The benchmark consists of a set of lattice-depletion, steady-state, and transient problems that can be used by HTGR simulation groups to assess the performance of their code suites. The paper summarizes the results obtained for the first two transient exercises defined for Phase II of the benchmark. The Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS), coupled with the INL system code RELAP5-3D, was used to generate the results for the Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) (exercise II-1a) and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) (exercise II-2) transients. These exercises require the time-dependent simulation of coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics phenomena, and utilize the steady-state solution previously obtained for exercise I-3 of Phase I. This paper also includes a comparison of the benchmark results obtained with a traditional system code “ring” model against a more detailed “block” model that include kinetics feedback on an individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher spatial fidelity that can be obtained by the block model is illustrated with comparisons of the maximum fuel temperatures, especially in the case of natural convection conditions that dominate the DCC and PCC events. Differences up to 125 K (or 10%) were observed between the ring and block model predictions of the DCC transient, mostly due to the block model’s capability of tracking individual block decay powers and more detailed helium flow distributions. In general, the block model only required DCC and PCC calculation times twice as long as the ring models, and it therefore seems that the additional development and calculation time required for the block model could be worth the gain that can be

  9. Medico-economic evaluation of healthcare products. Methodology for defining a significant impact on French health insurance costs and selection of benchmarks for interpreting results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dervaux, Benoît; Baseilhac, Eric; Fagon, Jean-Yves; Biot, Claire; Blachier, Corinne; Braun, Eric; Debroucker, Frédérique; Detournay, Bruno; Ferretti, Carine; Granger, Muriel; Jouan-Flahault, Chrystel; Lussier, Marie-Dominique; Meyer, Arlette; Muller, Sophie; Pigeon, Martine; De Sahb, Rima; Sannié, Thomas; Sapède, Claudine; Vray, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    Decree No. 2012-1116 of 2 October 2012 on medico-economic assignments of the French National Authority for Health (Haute autorité de santé, HAS) significantly alters the conditions for accessing the health products market in France. This paper presents a theoretical framework for interpreting the results of the economic evaluation of health technologies and summarises the facts available in France for developing benchmarks that will be used to interpret incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. This literature review shows that it is difficult to determine a threshold value but it is also difficult to interpret then incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) results without a threshold value. In this context, round table participants favour a pragmatic approach based on "benchmarks" as opposed to a threshold value, based on an interpretative and normative perspective, i.e. benchmarks that can change over time based on feedback. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  10. Analysis of an OECD/NEA high-temperature reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosking, J. G.; Newton, T. D.; Koeberl, O.; Morris, P.; Goluoglu, S.; Tombakoglu, T.; Colak, U.; Sartori, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes analyses of the OECD/NEA HTR benchmark organized by the 'Working Party on the Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS)', formerly the 'Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles'. The benchmark was specifically designed to provide inter-comparisons for plutonium and thorium fuels when used in HTR systems. Calculations considering uranium fuel have also been included in the benchmark, in order to identify any increased uncertainties when using plutonium or thorium fuels. The benchmark consists of five phases, which include cell and whole-core calculations. Analysis of the benchmark has been performed by a number of international participants, who have used a range of deterministic and Monte Carlo code schemes. For each of the benchmark phases, neutronics parameters have been evaluated. Comparisons are made between the results of the benchmark participants, as well as comparisons between the predictions of the deterministic calculations and those from detailed Monte Carlo calculations. (authors)

  11. Interim results of the sixth three-dimensional AER dynamic benchmark problem calculation. Solution of problem with DYN3D and RELAP5-3D codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.; Kral, P.; Macek, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the 6 th three-dimensional AER dynamic benchmark calculation results received with the codes DYN3D and RELAPS-3D at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the 10 th AER Symposium. Its initiating event is a double ended break in the steam line of steam generator No. I in a WWER-440/213 plant at the end of the first fuel cycle and in hot full power conditions. Stationary and burnup calculations as well as tuning of initial state before the transient were performed with the code DYN3D. Transient calculations were made with the system code RELAPS-3D.The KASSETA library was used for the generation of reactor core neutronic parameters. The detailed six loops model of NPP Dukovany was adopted for the 6 th AER dynamic benchmark purposes. The RELAPS-3D full core neutronic model was connected with seven coolant channels thermal-hydraulic model of the core (Authors)

  12. Hospital benchmarking: are U.S. eye hospitals ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korne, Dirk F; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen D H; Sol, Kees J C A; Betz, Robert; Thomas, Richard C; Schein, Oliver D; Klazinga, Niek S

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking is increasingly considered a useful management instrument to improve quality in health care, but little is known about its applicability in hospital settings. The aims of this study were to assess the applicability of a benchmarking project in U.S. eye hospitals and compare the results with an international initiative. We evaluated multiple cases by applying an evaluation frame abstracted from the literature to five U.S. eye hospitals that used a set of 10 indicators for efficiency benchmarking. Qualitative analysis entailed 46 semistructured face-to-face interviews with stakeholders, document analyses, and questionnaires. The case studies only partially met the conditions of the evaluation frame. Although learning and quality improvement were stated as overall purposes, the benchmarking initiative was at first focused on efficiency only. No ophthalmic outcomes were included, and clinicians were skeptical about their reporting relevance and disclosure. However, in contrast with earlier findings in international eye hospitals, all U.S. hospitals worked with internal indicators that were integrated in their performance management systems and supported benchmarking. Benchmarking can support performance management in individual hospitals. Having a certain number of comparable institutes provide similar services in a noncompetitive milieu seems to lay fertile ground for benchmarking. International benchmarking is useful only when these conditions are not met nationally. Although the literature focuses on static conditions for effective benchmarking, our case studies show that it is a highly iterative and learning process. The journey of benchmarking seems to be more important than the destination. Improving patient value (health outcomes per unit of cost) requires, however, an integrative perspective where clinicians and administrators closely cooperate on both quality and efficiency issues. If these worlds do not share such a relationship, the added

  13. Benchmark Credentialing Results for NRG-BR001: The First National Cancer Institute-Sponsored Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Multiple Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: halhallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Lowenstein, Jessica R. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McNulty, Susan; Galvin, James M. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) PHILADELPHIA RT, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Pisansky, Thomas M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); White, Julia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Xiao, Ying [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group (IROC) PHILADELPHIA RT, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Matuszak, Martha M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The NRG-BR001 trial is the first National Cancer Institute–sponsored trial to treat multiple (range 2-4) extracranial metastases with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Benchmark credentialing is required to ensure adherence to this complex protocol, in particular, for metastases in close proximity. The present report summarizes the dosimetric results and approval rates. Methods and Materials: The benchmark used anonymized data from a patient with bilateral adrenal metastases, separated by <5 cm of normal tissue. Because the planning target volume (PTV) overlaps with organs at risk (OARs), institutions must use the planning priority guidelines to balance PTV coverage (45 Gy in 3 fractions) against OAR sparing. Submitted plans were processed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core and assessed by the protocol co-chairs by comparing the doses to targets, OARs, and conformity metrics using nonparametric tests. Results: Of 63 benchmarks submitted through October 2015, 94% were approved, with 51% approved at the first attempt. Most used volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) (78%), a single plan for both PTVs (90%), and prioritized the PTV over the stomach (75%). The median dose to 95% of the volume was 44.8 ± 1.0 Gy and 44.9 ± 1.0 Gy for the right and left PTV, respectively. The median dose to 0.03 cm{sup 3} was 14.2 ± 2.2 Gy to the spinal cord and 46.5 ± 3.1 Gy to the stomach. Plans that spared the stomach significantly reduced the dose to the left PTV and stomach. Conformity metrics were significantly better for single plans that simultaneously treated both PTVs with VMAT, intensity modulated radiation therapy, or 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy compared with separate plans. No significant differences existed in the dose at 2 cm from the PTVs. Conclusions: Although most plans used VMAT, the range of conformity and dose falloff was large. The decision to prioritize either OARs or PTV coverage varied considerably, suggesting that

  14. 2nd RCM of the CRP on Benchmark Analyses of Sodium Natural Convection in the Upper Plenum of the Monju Reactor Vessel. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of the CRP is to improve the Member States’ analytical capabilities in the field of fast reactor in-vessel sodium thermal hydraulics. A necessary condition towards achieving this objective is a wide international validation effort of the data and codes currently employed for the simulation of the various physical effects involved in this field. Therefore, in providing the required wide international basis of interested Member States, each applying different methodologies, the CRP will contribute towards achieving the stated objective with the help of benchmark exercises focusing, in a first stage, on the numerical simulation of temperature stratification of sodium observed in the Monju reactor vessel at a turbine trip test conducted in December 1995 during the original start-up experiments, and with the help of a thorough assessment of the calculation versus measured data comparisons

  15. WIPP Benchmark calculations with the large strain SPECTROM codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, G.D.; DeVries, K.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides calculational results from the updated Lagrangian structural finite-element programs SPECTROM-32 and SPECTROM-333 for the purpose of qualifying these codes to perform analyses of structural situations in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Results are presented for the Second WIPP Benchmark (Benchmark II) Problems and for a simplified heated room problem used in a parallel design calculation study. The Benchmark II problems consist of an isothermal room problem and a heated room problem. The stratigraphy involves 27 distinct geologic layers including ten clay seams of which four are modeled as frictionless sliding interfaces. The analyses of the Benchmark II problems consider a 10-year simulation period. The evaluation of nine structural codes used in the Benchmark II problems shows that inclusion of finite-strain effects is not as significant as observed for the simplified heated room problem, and a variety of finite-strain and small-strain formulations produced similar results. The simplified heated room problem provides stratigraphic complexity equivalent to the Benchmark II problems but neglects sliding along the clay seams. The simplified heated problem does, however, provide a calculational check case where the small strain-formulation produced room closures about 20 percent greater than those obtained using finite-strain formulations. A discussion is given of each of the solved problems, and the computational results are compared with available published results. In general, the results of the two SPECTROM large strain codes compare favorably with results from other codes used to solve the problems

  16. Programs in Fortran language for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three programs, written in FORTRAN IV language, for reporting the results of the analyses by ICP emission spectroscopy from data stored in files on floppy disks have been developed. They are intended, respectively, for the analyses of: 1) waters, 2) granites and slates, and 3) different kinds of geological materials. (Author) 8 refs

  17. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Plaček Michal; Ochrana František; Půček Milan

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Base...

  18. Benchmarking Using Basic DBMS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain; Ghazal, Ahmad

    The TPC-H benchmark proved to be successful in the decision support area. Many commercial database vendors and their related hardware vendors used these benchmarks to show the superiority and competitive edge of their products. However, over time, the TPC-H became less representative of industry trends as vendors keep tuning their database to this benchmark-specific workload. In this paper, we present XMarq, a simple benchmark framework that can be used to compare various software/hardware combinations. Our benchmark model is currently composed of 25 queries that measure the performance of basic operations such as scans, aggregations, joins and index access. This benchmark model is based on the TPC-H data model due to its maturity and well-understood data generation capability. We also propose metrics to evaluate single-system performance and compare two systems. Finally we illustrate the effectiveness of this model by showing experimental results comparing two systems under different conditions.

  19. Benchmarking of MCNPX Results with Measured Tritium Production Rate and Neutron Flux at the Mock-up of EU TBM (HCPB concept)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tore, C.; Ortego, P.

    2013-07-01

    In order to reassesses the available design results of Test Breeder Modules (TBMs) a framework contract agreement between F4E and IDOM-Spain has been signed. SEA SL-Spain and UNED-Spain participate as sub-contractors of IDOM. In this study, a qualification of MCNPX code and nuclear data libraries are performed with benchmarking of measured tritium production and neutron flux at the mock-up of the EU TBM, HCPB concept. The irradiation and measurements had been performed in the frame of European Fusion Technology Program by ENEA-Italy, TUD-Germany and JAERI -Japan.

  20. Deviating From the Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Van Praag, Mirjam; Carneiro, Anabela

    This paper studies three related questions: To what extent otherwise similar startups employ different quantities and qualities of human capital at the moment of entry? How persistent are initial human capital choices over time? And how does deviating from human capital benchmarks influence firm......, founders human capital, and the ownership structure of startups (solo entrepreneurs versus entrepreneurial teams). We then study the survival implications of exogenous deviations from these benchmarks, based on spline models for survival data. Our results indicate that (especially negative) deviations from...... the benchmark can be substantial, are persistent over time, and hinder the survival of firms. The implications may, however, vary according to the sector and the ownership structure at entry. Given the stickiness of initial choices, wrong human capital decisions at entry turn out to be a close to irreversible...

  1. HPCG Benchmark Technical Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Luszczek, Piotr [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The High Performance Conjugate Gradient (HPCG) benchmark [cite SNL, UTK reports] is a tool for ranking computer systems based on a simple additive Schwarz, symmetric Gauss-Seidel preconditioned conjugate gradient solver. HPCG is similar to the High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] in its purpose, but HPCG is intended to better represent how today’s applications perform. In this paper we describe the technical details of HPCG: how it is designed and implemented, what code transformations are permitted and how to interpret and report results.

  2. RB reactor benchmark cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1998-01-01

    A selected set of the RB reactor benchmark cores is presented in this paper. The first results of validation of the well-known Monte Carlo MCNP TM code and adjoining neutron cross section libraries are given. They confirm the idea for the proposal of the new U-D 2 O criticality benchmark system and support the intention to include this system in the next edition of the recent OECD/NEA Project: International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Experiment, in near future. (author)

  3. Preliminary results of the seventh three-dimensional AER dynamic benchmark problem calculation. Solution with DYN3D and RELAP5-3D codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, M.; Hadek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the seventh three-dimensional AER dynamic benchmark calculation results received with the codes DYN3D and RELAP5-3D at Nuclear Research Institute Rez. This benchmark was defined at the twentieth AER Symposium in Hanassari (Finland). It is focused on investigation of transient behaviour in a WWER-440 nuclear power plant. Its initiating event is opening of the main isolation valve and re-connection of the loop with its main circulation pump in operation. The WWER-440 plant is at the end of the first fuel cycle and in hot full power conditions. Stationary and burnup calculations were performed with the code DYN3D. Transient calculation was made with the system code RELAP5-3D. The two-group homogenized cross sections library HELGD05 created by HELIOS code was used for the generation of reactor core neutronic parameters. The detailed six loops model of NPP Dukovany was adopted for the seventh AER dynamic benchmark purposes. The RELAP5-3D full core neutronic model was coupled with 49 core thermal-hydraulic channels and 8 reflector channels connected with the three-dimensional model of the reactor vessel. The detailed nodalization of reactor downcomer, lower and upper plenum was used. Mixing in lower and upper plenum was simulated. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristic of RELAP5-3D system code and a short description of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. (Authors)

  4. Benchmarking of the FENDL-3 Neutron Cross-section Data Starter Library for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Angelone, M. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Via E. Fermi 27, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Bohm, T. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kondo, K. [Association KIT-Euratom, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Konno, C. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Villari, R. [Associazione ENEA-Euratom, ENEA Fusion Division, Via E. Fermi 27, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Walker, B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    This paper summarizes the benchmark analyses performed in a joint effort of ENEA (Italy), JAEA (Japan), KIT (Germany), and the University of Wisconsin (USA) on a computational ITER benchmark and a series of 14 MeV neutron benchmark experiments. The computational benchmark revealed a modest increase of the neutron flux levels in the deep penetration regions and a substantial increase of the gas production in steel components. The comparison to experimental results showed good agreement with no substantial differences between FENDL-3.0 and FENDL-2.1 for most of the responses. In general, FENDL-3 shows an improved performance for fusion neutronics applications.

  5. Association between Adult Height and Risk of Colorectal, Lung, and Prostate Cancer : Results from Meta-analyses of Prospective Studies and Mendelian Randomization Analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khankari, Nikhil K.; Shu, Xiao Ou; Wen, Wanqing; Kraft, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Peters, Ulrike; Schildkraut, Joellen; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bofetta, Paolo; Risch, Angela; Bickeböller, Heike; Amos, Christopher I.; Easton, Douglas; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Pierce, Brandon L.; Zheng, Wei; Blalock, Kendra; Campbell, Peter T.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Figueiredo, Jane; James Gauderman, W.; Gong, Jian; Green, Roger C.; Harju, John F.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jiao, Shuo; Li, Li; Lin, Yi; Manion, Frank J.; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Raskin, Leon; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Stenzel, Stephanie L.; Thomas, Duncan C.; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Ahsan, Habib; Whittemore, Alice; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Crisponi, Laura; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Easton, Douglas F.; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Eeles, Rosalind; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher; Schumacher, Fred; Travis, Ruth; Riboli, Elio; Hunter, David; Gapstur, Susan; Berndt, Sonja; Chanock, Stephen; Han, Younghun; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; McLaughlin, John; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James D.; Rosenberger, Albert; Houlston, Richard S.; Caporaso, Neil; Teresa Landi, Maria; Heinrich, Joachim; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Christiani, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies examining associations between adult height and risk of colorectal, prostate, and lung cancers have generated mixed results. We conducted meta-analyses using data from prospective cohort studies and further carried out Mendelian randomization analyses, using

  6. International benchmarking of electricity transmission by regulators: A contrast between theory and practice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haney, Aoife Brophy; Pollitt, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarking of electricity networks has a key role in sharing the benefits of efficiency improvements with consumers and ensuring regulated companies earn a fair return on their investments. This paper analyses and contrasts the theory and practice of international benchmarking of electricity transmission by regulators. We examine the literature relevant to electricity transmission benchmarking and discuss the results of a survey of 25 national electricity regulators. While new panel data techniques aimed at dealing with unobserved heterogeneity and the validity of the comparator group look intellectually promising, our survey suggests that they are in their infancy for regulatory purposes. In electricity transmission, relative to electricity distribution, choosing variables is particularly difficult, because of the large number of potential variables to choose from. Failure to apply benchmarking appropriately may negatively affect investors’ willingness to invest in the future. While few of our surveyed regulators acknowledge that regulatory risk is currently an issue in transmission benchmarking, many more concede it might be. In the meantime new regulatory approaches – such as those based on tendering, negotiated settlements, a wider range of outputs or longer term grid planning – are emerging and will necessarily involve a reduced role for benchmarking. -- Highlights: •We discuss how to benchmark electricity transmission. •We report survey results from 25 national energy regulators. •Electricity transmission benchmarking is more challenging than benchmarking distribution. •Many regulators concede benchmarking may raise capital costs. •Many regulators are considering new regulatory approaches

  7. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.

    2003-09-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E, Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC. (orig.)

  8. Benchmarking computer platforms for lattice QCD applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenbusch, M.; Jansen, K.; Pleiter, D.; Stueben, H.; Wegner, P.; Wettig, T.; Wittig, H.

    2004-01-01

    We define a benchmark suite for lattice QCD and report on benchmark results from several computer platforms. The platforms considered are apeNEXT, CRAY T3E; Hitachi SR8000, IBM p690, PC-Clusters, and QCDOC

  9. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify usage of foodservice performance measures, important activities in foodservice benchmarking, and benchmarking attitudes, beliefs, and practices by foodservice directors...

  10. Benchmarking the cad-based attila discrete ordinates code with experimental data of fusion experiments and to the results of MCNP code in simulating ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M. Z.

    2007-01-01

    Attila is a newly developed finite element code based on Sn neutron, gamma, and charged particle transport in 3-D geometry in which unstructured tetrahedral meshes are generated to describe complex geometry that is based on CAD input (Solid Works, Pro/Engineer, etc). In the present work we benchmark its calculation accuracy by comparing its prediction to the measured data inside two experimental mock-ups bombarded with 14 MeV neutrons. The results are also compared to those based on MCNP calculations. The experimental mock-ups simulate parts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in-vessel components, namely: (1) the Tungsten mockup configuration (54.3 cm x 46.8 cm x 45 cm), and (2) the ITER shielding blanket followed by the SCM region (simulated by alternating layers of SS316 and copper). In the latter configuration, a high aspect ratio rectangular streaming channel was introduced (to simulate steaming paths between ITER blanket modules) which ends with a rectangular cavity. The experiments on these two fusion-oriented integral experiments were performed at the Fusion Neutron Generator (FNG) facility, Frascati, Italy. In addition, the nuclear performance of the ITER MCNP 'Benchmark' CAD model has been performed with Attila to compare its results to those obtained with CAD-based MCNP approach developed by several ITER participants. The objective of this paper is to compare results based on two distinctive 3-D calculation tools using the same nuclear data, FENDL2.1, and the same response functions of several reaction rates measured in ITER mock-ups and to enhance confidence from the international neutronics community in the Attila code and how it can precisely quantify the nuclear field in large and complex systems, such as ITER. Attila has the advantage of providing a full flux mapping visualization everywhere in one run where components subjected to excessive radiation level and strong streaming paths can be identified. In addition, the

  11. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D “ring” model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  12. Results of radiotherapy in craniopharyngiomas analysed by the linear quadratic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerkaynak, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Oezyar, E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Zorlu, F. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Akyol, F.H. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Lale Atahan, I. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey)

    1994-12-31

    In 23 craniopharyngioma patients treated by limited surgery and external radiotherapy, the results concerning local control were analysed by linear quadratic formula. A biologically effective dose (BED) of 55 Gy, calculated with time factor and an {alpha}/{beta} value of 10 Gy, seemed to be adequate for local control. (orig.).

  13. Effects of Secondary Circuit Modeling on Results of Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark Calculations with New Coupled Code TRAB-3D/SMABRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daavittila, Antti; Haemaelaeinen, Anitta; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Riitta

    2003-01-01

    All of the three exercises of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Regulatory Commission pressurized water reactor main steam line break (PWR MSLB) benchmark were calculated at VTT, the Technical Research Centre of Finland. For the first exercise, the plant simulation with point-kinetic neutronics, the thermal-hydraulics code SMABRE was used. The second exercise was calculated with the three-dimensional reactor dynamics code TRAB-3D, and the third exercise with the combination TRAB-3D/SMABRE. VTT has over ten years' experience of coupling neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes, but this benchmark was the first time these two codes, both developed at VTT, were coupled together. The coupled code system is fast and efficient; the total computation time of the 100-s transient in the third exercise was 16 min on a modern UNIX workstation. The results of all the exercises are similar to those of the other participants. In order to demonstrate the effect of secondary circuit modeling on the results, three different cases were calculated. In case 1 there is no phase separation in the steam lines and no flow reversal in the aspirator. In case 2 the flow reversal in the aspirator is allowed, but there is no phase separation in the steam lines. Finally, in case 3 the drift-flux model is used for the phase separation in the steam lines, but the aspirator flow reversal is not allowed. With these two modeling variations, it is possible to cover a remarkably broad range of results. The maximum power level reached after the reactor trip varies from 534 to 904 MW, the range of the time of the power maximum being close to 30 s. Compared to the total calculated transient time of 100 s, the effect of the secondary side modeling is extremely important

  14. International benchmark tests of the FENDL-1 Nuclear Data Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.

    1997-01-01

    An international benchmark validation task has been conducted to validate the fusion evaluated nuclear data library FENDL-1 through data tests against integral 14 MeV neutron experiments. The main objective of this task was to qualify the FENDL-1 working libraries for fusion applications and to elaborate recommendations for further data improvements. Several laboratories and institutions from the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and US have contributed to the benchmark task. A large variety of existing integral 14 MeV benchmark experiments was analysed with the FENDL-1 working libraries for continuous energy Monte Carlo and multigroup discrete ordinate calculations. Results of the benchmark analyses have been collected, discussed and evaluated. The major findings, conclusions and recommendations are presented in this paper. With regard to the data quality, it is summarised that fusion nuclear data have reached a high confidence level with the available FENDL-1 data library. With few exceptions this holds for the materials of highest importance for fusion reactor applications. As a result of the performed benchmark analyses, some existing deficiencies and discrepancies have been identified that are recommended for removal in theforthcoming FENDL-2 data file. (orig.)

  15. Track 3: growth of nuclear technology and research numerical and computational aspects of the coupled three-dimensional core/plant simulations: organization for economic cooperation and development/U.S. nuclear regulatory commission pressurized water reactor main-steam-line-break benchmark-I. 5. Analyses of the OECD MSLB Benchmark with the Codes DYN3D and DYN3D/ATHLET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundmann, U.; Kliem, S.

    2001-01-01

    The code DYN3D coupled with ATHLET was used for the analysis of the OECD Main-Steam-Line-Break (MSLB) Benchmark, which is based on real plant design and operational data of the TMI-1 pressurized water reactor (PWR). Like the codes RELAP or TRAC,ATHLET is a thermal-hydraulic system code with point or one-dimensional neutron kinetic models. ATHLET, developed by the Gesellschaft for Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, is widely used in Germany for safety analyses of nuclear power plants. DYN3D consists of three-dimensional nodal kinetic models and a thermal-hydraulic part with parallel coolant channels of the reactor core. DYN3D was coupled with ATHLET for analyzing more complex transients with interactions between coolant flow conditions and core behavior. It can be applied to the whole spectrum of operational transients and accidents, from small and intermediate leaks to large breaks of coolant loops or steam lines at PWRs and boiling water reactors. The so-called external coupling is used for the benchmark, where the thermal hydraulics is split into two parts: DYN3D describes the thermal hydraulics of the core, while ATHLET models the coolant system. Three exercises of the benchmark were simulated: Exercise 1: point kinetics plant simulation (ATHLET) Exercise 2: coupled three-dimensional neutronics/core thermal-hydraulics evaluation of the core response for given core thermal-hydraulic boundary conditions (DYN3D) Exercise 3: best-estimate coupled core-plant transient analysis (DYN3D/ATHLET). Considering the best-estimate cases (scenarios 1 of exercises 2 and 3), the reactor does not reach criticality after the reactor trip. Defining more serious tests for the codes, the efficiency of the control rods was decreased (scenarios 2 of exercises 2 and 3) to obtain recriticality during the transient. Besides the standard simulation given by the specification, modifications are introduced for sensitivity studies. The results presented here show (a) the influence of a reduced

  16. WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark (CB5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolova, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper the specification of WWER-1000 Burnup Credit Benchmark first phase (depletion calculations), given. The second phase - criticality calculations for the WWER-1000 fuel pin cell, will be given after the evaluation of the results, obtained at the first phase. The proposed benchmark is a continuation of the WWER benchmark activities in this field (Author)

  17. Probabilistic approach in treatment of deterministic analyses results of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnc, B.; Mavko, B.

    1996-01-01

    Severe accidents sequences resulting in loss of the core geometric integrity have been found to have small probability of the occurrence. Because of their potential consequences to public health and safety, an evaluation of the core degradation progression and the resulting effects on the containment is necessary to determine the probability of a significant release of radioactive materials. This requires assessment of many interrelated phenomena including: steel and zircaloy oxidation, steam spikes, in-vessel debris cooling, potential vessel failure mechanisms, release of core material to the containment, containment pressurization from steam generation, or generation of non-condensable gases or hydrogen burn, and ultimately coolability of degraded core material. To asses the answer from the containment event trees in the sense of weather certain phenomenological event would happen or not the plant specific deterministic analyses should be performed. Due to the fact that there is a large uncertainty in the prediction of severe accidents phenomena in Level 2 analyses (containment event trees) the combination of probabilistic and deterministic approach should be used. In fact the result of the deterministic analyses of severe accidents are treated in probabilistic manner due to large uncertainty of results as a consequence of a lack of detailed knowledge. This paper discusses approach used in many IPEs, and which assures that the assigned probability for certain question in the event tree represent the probability that the event will or will not happen and that this probability also includes its uncertainty, which is mainly result of lack of knowledge. (author)

  18. Preliminary Results of Ancillary Safety Analyses Supporting TREAT LEU Conversion Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunett, A. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fei, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Strons, P. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papadias, D. D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kontogeorgakos, D. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Connaway, H. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wright, A. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Report (FSAR) [3]. Depending on the availability of historical data derived from HEU TREAT operation, results calculated for the LEU core are compared to measurements obtained from HEU TREAT operation. While all analyses in this report are largely considered complete and have been reviewed for technical content, it is important to note that all topics will be revisited once the LEU design approaches its final stages of maturity. For most safety significant issues, it is expected that the analyses presented here will be bounding, but additional calculations will be performed as necessary to support safety analyses and safety documentation. It should also be noted that these analyses were completed as the LEU design evolved, and therefore utilized different LEU reference designs. Preliminary shielding, neutronic, and thermal hydraulic analyses have been completed and have generally demonstrated that the various LEU core designs will satisfy existing safety limits and standards also satisfied by the existing HEU core. These analyses include the assessment of the dose rate in the hodoscope room, near a loaded fuel transfer cask, above the fuel storage area, and near the HEPA filters. The potential change in the concentration of tramp uranium and change in neutron flux reaching instrumentation has also been assessed. Safety-significant thermal hydraulic items addressed in this report include thermally-induced mechanical distortion of the grid plate, and heating in the radial reflector.

  19. Results and analyses of the smoke from compression ignition CI engines (diesel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrovski, Mile; Mitreski, Stevo M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this examination is to improve the knowledge about the actual ecological condition which is a result of the gas and particles emission from the diesel engines. The mechanism of the production of combustion products including the particles in the combustion chamber has been studied, as well as the options for reduction of the emission. Measurements of the smoke emission from the vehicles in Skopje have been made and the results are given, including their analyses. The conclusion from the analyses is that it is necessary to improve the conditions for normal use of the diesel engine vehicles, as well as to engage new vehicles which cause less damage for the environment (Author)

  20. Benchmarking and Performance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, J. Stephen

    This paper defines benchmarking and its relationship to quality management, describes a project which applied the technique in a library context, and explores the relationship between performance measurement and benchmarking. Numerous benchmarking methods contain similar elements: deciding what to benchmark; identifying partners; gathering…

  1. Selected problems and results of the transient event and reliability analyses for the German safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoertner, H.

    1977-01-01

    For the investigation of the risk of nuclear power plants loss-of-coolant accidents and transients have to be analyzed. The different functions of the engineered safety features installed to cope with transients are explained. The event tree analysis is carried out for the important transient 'loss of normal onsite power'. Preliminary results of the reliability analyses performed for quantitative evaluation of this event tree are shown. (orig.) [de

  2. Benchmarking the Multidimensional Stellar Implicit Code MUSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffrey, T.; Pratt, J.; Viallet, M.; Baraffe, I.; Popov, M. V.; Walder, R.; Folini, D.; Geroux, C.; Constantino, T.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of a numerical benchmark study for the MUltidimensional Stellar Implicit Code (MUSIC) based on widely applicable two- and three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamics problems relevant to stellar interiors. MUSIC is an implicit large eddy simulation code that uses implicit time integration, implemented as a Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method. A physics based preconditioning technique which can be adjusted to target varying physics is used to improve the performance of the solver. The problems used for this benchmark study include the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and the decay of the Taylor-Green vortex. Additionally we show a test of hydrostatic equilibrium, in a stellar environment which is dominated by radiative effects. In this setting the flexibility of the preconditioning technique is demonstrated. This work aims to bridge the gap between the hydrodynamic test problems typically used during development of numerical methods and the complex flows of stellar interiors. A series of multidimensional tests were performed and analysed. Each of these test cases was analysed with a simple, scalar diagnostic, with the aim of enabling direct code comparisons. As the tests performed do not have analytic solutions, we verify MUSIC by comparing it to established codes including ATHENA and the PENCIL code. MUSIC is able to both reproduce behaviour from established and widely-used codes as well as results expected from theoretical predictions. This benchmarking study concludes a series of papers describing the development of the MUSIC code and provides confidence in future applications.

  3. Benchmarking in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In two articles an overview is given of the activities in the Dutch industry and energy sector with respect to benchmarking. In benchmarking operational processes of different competitive businesses are compared to improve your own performance. Benchmark covenants for energy efficiency between the Dutch government and industrial sectors contribute to a growth of the number of benchmark surveys in the energy intensive industry in the Netherlands. However, some doubt the effectiveness of the benchmark studies

  4. HS06 Benchmark for an ARM Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  5. HS06 benchmark for an ARM server

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluth, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  6. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-01-01

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results

  7. Byblos Speech Recognition Benchmark Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kubala, F; Austin, S; Barry, C; Makhoul, J; Placeway, P; Schwartz, R

    1991-01-01

    .... Surprisingly, the 12-speaker model performs as well as the one made from 109 speakers. Also within the RM domain, we demonstrate that state-of-the-art SI models perform poorly for speakers with strong dialects...

  8. Benchmark Analysis for Condition Monitoring Test Techniques of Aged Low Voltage Cables in Nuclear Power Plants. Final Results of a Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-10-01

    This publication provides information and guidelines on how to monitor the performance of insulation and jacket materials of existing cables and establish a programme of cable degradation monitoring and ageing management for operating reactors and the next generation of nuclear facilities. This research was done through a coordinated research project (CRP) with participants from 17 Member States. This group of experts compiled the current knowledge in a report together with areas of future research and development to cover aging mechanisms and means to identify and manage the consequences of aging. They established a benchmarking programme using cable samples aged under thermal and/or radiation conditions, and tested before and after ageing by various methods and organizations. In particular, 12 types of cable insulation or jacket material were tested, each using 14 different condition monitoring techniques. Condition monitoring techniques yield usable and traceable results. Techniques such as elongation at break, indenter modulus, oxidation induction time and oxidation induction temperature were found to work reasonably well for degradation trending of all materials. However, other condition monitoring techniques, such as insulation resistance, were only partially successful on some cables and other methods like ultrasonic or Tan δ were either unsuccessful or failed to provide reliable information to qualify the method for degradation trending or ageing assessment of cables. The electrical in situ tests did not show great promise for cable degradation trending or ageing assessment, although these methods are known to be very effective for finding and locating faults in cable insulation material. In particular, electrical methods such as insulation resistance and reflectometry techniques are known to be rather effective for locating insulation damage, hot spots or other faults in essentially all cable types. The advantage of electrical methods is that they can be

  9. Defining a methodology for benchmarking spectrum unfolding codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.; Kirmser, P.G.; Miller, W.H.; Hu, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    It has long been recognized that different neutron spectrum unfolding codes will produce significantly different results when unfolding the same measured data. In reviewing the results of such analyses it has been difficult to determine which result if any is the best representation of what was measured by the spectrometer detector. A proposal to develop a benchmarking procedure for spectrum unfolding codes is presented. The objective of the procedure will be to begin to develop a methodology and a set of data with a well established and documented result that could be used to benchmark and standardize the various unfolding methods and codes. It is further recognized that development of such a benchmark must involve a consensus of the technical community interested in neutron spectrum unfolding

  10. Results of neutron physics analyses of WWER-440 cores with modified reactor protection and control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, M.; Pecka, M.; Rocek, J.; Zalesky, K.

    1993-12-01

    Detailed results are given of neutron physics analyses performed to assess the efficiency and acceptability of modifications of the WWER-440 core protection and control system; the modifications have been proposed with a view to increasing the proportion of mechanical control in the compensation of reactivity effects during reactor unit operation in the variable load mode. The calculations were carried out using the modular MOBY-DICK macrocode system together with the SMV42G36 library of two-group parametrized diffusion constants, containing corrections which allow new-design WWER-440 fuel assemblies to be discriminated. (J.B). 37 tabs., 18 figs., 5 refs

  11. The validation benchmark analyses for CMS data

    CERN Document Server

    Holub, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this report is to summarize my work at CERN during this summer. My first task was to transport code and dataset files from CERN Open Data Portal to Github that will be more convenient for users. The second part of my work was to copy environment from CERN Open Data Virtual Machine and apply it in the analysis environment SWAN. The last task was to rescale X-axis of the histogram.

  12. Diplodon shells from Northwest Patagonia as continental proxy archives: Oxygen isotopic results and sclerochronological analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, A. L.; Beierlein, L.; Jacob, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Freshwater mussels of the genus Diplodon (Bivalvia, Hyriidae) are the most abundant bivalve (today and in the past) in freshwater bodies at both sides of the South-Andean Cordillera. There are about 25 different Diplodon genera in Argentina and Chile that could be assigned almost completely to the species Diplodon chilensis (Gray, 1828) and two subspecies: D. ch. chilensis and D. ch. patagonicus; this latter species is found in Argentina between Mendoza (32˚ 52' S; 68˚ 51' W) and Chubut (45˚ 51' S; 67˚ 28' W), including the lakes and rivers of the target area, the Nahuel Huapi National Park (Castellanos, 1960). Despite their wide geographic distribution, Diplodon species have only rarely been used as climate archives in the southern hemisphere. Kaandorp et al. (2005) demonstrated for Diplodon longulus (Conrad 1874) collected from the Peruvian Amazonas that oxygen isotopic patterns in the shells could be used in order to reconstruct the precipitation regime and dry/wet seasonal of the monsoonal system in Amazonia. Although this study demonstrated the potential of Diplodon in climatological and ecological reconstructions in the southern hemisphere, as of yet, no systematic study of Diplodon as a multi-proxy archive has been undertaken for the Patagonian region. In this work we present sclerochronological analyses supported by ^18Oshell in recent mussel of Diplodon chilensis patagonicus (D'Orbigny, 1835) collected at Laguna El Trébol (42°S-71°W, Patagonia Argentina), one of the best studied water bodies in the region for paleoclimate analysis. Water temperature was measured every six hours for one year using a temperature sensor (Starmon mini®) placed at 5m depth in the lake, close to a mussel bank. Additionally, ^18Owater was measured monthly for the same time range.g^18Oshell values obtained by micro-milling at high spatial resolution in the growth increments of three Diplodon shells were compared to these records, and to air temperature and

  13. Results of initial analyses of the salt (macro) batch 11 Tank 21H qualification samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-10-23

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt (Macro) Batch 11 for processing through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Analysis of the Tank 21H Salt (Macro) Batch 11 composite sample indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics or observations, such as floating solids, the presence of large amounts of solids, or unusual colors. Further sample results will be reported in a future document. This memo satisfies part of Deliverable 3 of the Technical Task Request (TTR).

  14. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in the...

  15. Benchmarking Linked Open Data Management Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Angles Rojas (Renzo); M.-D. Pham (Minh-Duc); P.A. Boncz (Peter)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractWith inherent support for storing and analysing highly interconnected data, graph and RDF databases appear as natural solutions for developing Linked Open Data applications. However, current benchmarks for these database technologies do not fully attain the desirable characteristics

  16. Benchmarks for GADRAS performance validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Rhykerd, Charles L. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) was validated by comparing GADRAS model results to experimental measurements for a series of benchmark sources. Sources for the benchmark include a plutonium metal sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, plutonium oxide in cans, a highly enriched uranium sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, a depleted uranium shell and spheres, and a natural uranium sphere. The benchmark experimental data were previously acquired and consist of careful collection of background and calibration source spectra along with the source spectra. The calibration data were fit with GADRAS to determine response functions for the detector in each experiment. A one-dimensional model (pie chart) was constructed for each source based on the dimensions of the benchmark source. The GADRAS code made a forward calculation from each model to predict the radiation spectrum for the detector used in the benchmark experiment. The comparisons between the GADRAS calculation and the experimental measurements are excellent, validating that GADRAS can correctly predict the radiation spectra for these well-defined benchmark sources.

  17. Benchmarking in Czech Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaček Michal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this article surveys the current experience with the use of benchmarking at Czech universities specializing in economics and management. The results indicate that collaborative benchmarking is not used on this level today, but most actors show some interest in its introduction. The expression of the need for it and the importance of benchmarking as a very suitable performance-management tool in less developed countries are the impetus for the second part of our article. Based on an analysis of the current situation and existing needs in the Czech Republic, as well as on a comparison with international experience, recommendations for public policy are made, which lie in the design of a model of a collaborative benchmarking for Czech economics and management in higher-education programs. Because the fully complex model cannot be implemented immediately – which is also confirmed by structured interviews with academics who have practical experience with benchmarking –, the final model is designed as a multi-stage model. This approach helps eliminate major barriers to the implementation of benchmarking.

  18. The CEC benchmark interclay on rheological models for clays results of pilot phase (January-June 1989) about the boom clay at Mol (B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot phase of a benchmark exercise for rheological models for boom clay, called interclay, was launched by the CEC in January 1989. The purpose of the benchmark is to compare predictions of calculations made about well-defined rock-mechanical problems, similar to real cases at the Mol facilities, using existing data from laboratory tests on samples. Basically, two approaches were to be compared: one considering clay as an elasto-visco-plastic medium (rock-mechanics approach), and one isolating the role of pore-pressure dissipation (soil-mechanics approach)

  19. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson…

  20. Results of a benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER type NPPs: Overview and general comparison for Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerpinar, A.; Zola, M.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the IAEA coordinated 'Benchmark Study for the seismic analysis and testing of WWER-type NPPs', in-situ dynamic structural testing activities have been performed at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary. The specific objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data on the actual dynamic structural behaviour of the plant's major constructions and equipment under normal operating conditions, for enabling a valid seismic safety review to be made. This paper refers on the comparison of the results obtained from the experimental activities performed by ISMES with those coming from analytical studies performed for the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) by Siemens (Germany), EQE (Bulgaria), Central Laboratory (Bulgaria), M. David Consulting (Czech Republic), IVO (Finland). This paper gives a synthetic description of the conducted experiments and presents some results, regarding in particular the free-field excitations produced during the earthquake-simulation experiments and an experiment of the dynamic soil-structure interaction global effects at the base of the reactor containment structure. The specific objective of the experimental investigation was to obtain valid data on the dynamic behaviour of the plant's major constructions, under normal operating conditions, to support the analytical assessment of their actual seismic safety. The full-scale dynamic structural testing activities have been performed in December 1994 at the Paks (H) Nuclear Power Plant. The Paks NPP site has been subjected to low level earthquake-like ground shaking, through appropriately devised underground explosions, and the dynamic response of the plant's 1st reactor unit important structures was appropriately measured and digitally recorded, with the whole nuclear power plant under normal operating conditions. In-situ free field response was measured concurrently and, moreover, site-specific geophysical and seismological data were simultaneously

  1. Benchmarking of AREVA BWR FDIC-PEZOG model against first BFE3 cycle 15 application of On-Line NobleChem results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, M.G.; Lamanna, L.S.; Hoornik, A.; Storey, G.C.; Lemons, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of AREVA's BWR FDIC-PEZOG tools allows the calculation of the total liftoff as a measure of fuel performance and a risk indicator for fuel reliability. The AREVA BWR FDIC tool is a crud modeling tool. The PEZOG tool models the platinum-enhanced zirconium oxide growth of fuel cladding when exposed to platinum during operation. Continuous effort to improve these tools used for the total liftoff calculations is illustrated by the benchmarking of the tools after the application of On-Line NobleChem TM at TVA Browns Ferry Unit 3 during Cycle 15. A set of runs using the modified FDIC-PEZOG model and actual plant water chemistry for Cycle 15 and partial data for Cycle 16 were performed. The updated results' deposit thickness and deposit composition predictions for EOC15 were compared to the measured data from EOC15 and are presented in this paper. The updated predicted deposit thickness matched the actual, measured value exactly. Predicted deposit composition near the fuel rod boundary, nearer to the bulk reactor water, and as an averaged deposit, as presented in the paper, compared extremely well with the measured data at EOC15. The updated AREVA methodology resulted in lower fuel oxide thickness predictions over the life of the fuel as compared to the initial evaluations for BFE3 by incorporating more recent experimental data on the thermal conductivity of zirconia; unnecessary conservatism in the prediction of the fuel oxide thickness over the life of the fuel was removed in the improved model. (authors)

  2. Benchmarking in Identifying Priority Directions of Development of Telecommunication Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaharchenko Lolita A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses evolution of development and possibilities of application of benchmarking in the telecommunication sphere. It studies essence of benchmarking on the basis of generalisation of approaches of different scientists to definition of this notion. In order to improve activity of telecommunication operators, the article identifies the benchmarking technology and main factors, that determine success of the operator in the modern market economy, and the mechanism of benchmarking and component stages of carrying out benchmarking by a telecommunication operator. It analyses the telecommunication market and identifies dynamics of its development and tendencies of change of the composition of telecommunication operators and providers. Having generalised the existing experience of benchmarking application, the article identifies main types of benchmarking of telecommunication operators by the following features: by the level of conduct of (branch, inter-branch and international benchmarking; by relation to participation in the conduct (competitive and joint; and with respect to the enterprise environment (internal and external.

  3. High-Alpha Research Vehicle Lateral-Directional Control Law Description, Analyses, and Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Hoffler, Keith D.; Bacon, Barton J.

    1998-01-01

    This report contains a description of a lateral-directional control law designed for the NASA High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). The HARV is a F/A-18 aircraft modified to include a research flight computer, spin chute, and thrust-vectoring in the pitch and yaw axes. Two separate design tools, CRAFT and Pseudo Controls, were integrated to synthesize the lateral-directional control law. This report contains a description of the lateral-directional control law, analyses, and nonlinear simulation (batch and piloted) results. Linear analysis results include closed-loop eigenvalues, stability margins, robustness to changes in various plant parameters, and servo-elastic frequency responses. Step time responses from nonlinear batch simulation are presented and compared to design guidelines. Piloted simulation task scenarios, task guidelines, and pilot subjective ratings for the various maneuvers are discussed. Linear analysis shows that the control law meets the stability margin guidelines and is robust to stability and control parameter changes. Nonlinear batch simulation analysis shows the control law exhibits good performance and meets most of the design guidelines over the entire range of angle-of-attack. This control law (designated NASA-1A) was flight tested during the Summer of 1994 at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center.

  4. Summary of results from the IPIRG-2 round-robin analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, S.; Olson, R.; Rosenfield, A.; Wilkowski, G.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents a summary of the results from three one-day international round-robin workshops which were organized by Battelle in conjunction with the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) Program. The objective of these workshops was to develop a consensus in handling difficult analytical problems in leak-before-break and pipe flaw evaluations. The workshops, which were held August 5, 1993, March 4, 1994, and October 21, 1994 at Columbus, Ohio, involved various technical presentations on the related research efforts by the IPIRG-2 member organizations and solutions to several round-robin problems. Following review by the IPIRG-2 members, four sets of round-robin problems were developed. They involved: (1) evaluations of fracture properties and pipe loads, (2) crack-opening and leak-rate evaluations, (3) dynamic analysis of cracked pipes, and (4) evaluations of elbows. A total of 18 organizations from the United States, Japan, Korea, and Europe solved these round-robin problems. The analysis techniques employed by the participants included both finite element and engineering methods. Based on the results from these analyses, several important observations were made concerning the predictive capability of the current fracture-mechanics and thermal-hydraulics models for their applications in nuclear piping and piping welds

  5. Benchmarking semantic web technology

    CERN Document Server

    García-Castro, R

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses the problem of benchmarking Semantic Web Technologies; first, from a methodological point of view, proposing a general methodology to follow in benchmarking activities over Semantic Web Technologies and, second, from a practical point of view, presenting two international benchmarking activities that involved benchmarking the interoperability of Semantic Web technologies using RDF(S) as the interchange language in one activity and OWL in the other.The book presents in detail how the different resources needed for these interoperability benchmarking activities were defined:

  6. A Benchmark for Virtual Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Automatically animating and placing the virtual camera in a dynamic environment is a challenging task. The camera is expected to maximise and maintain a set of properties — i.e. visual composition — while smoothly moving through the environment and avoiding obstacles. A large number of different....... For this reason, in this paper, we propose a benchmark for the problem of virtual camera control and we analyse a number of different problems in different virtual environments. Each of these scenarios is described through a set of complexity measures and, as a result of this analysis, a subset of scenarios...

  7. Analysis of a molten salt reactor benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Biplab; Bajpai, Anil; Degweker, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses results of our studies of an IAEA molten salt reactor (MSR) benchmark. The benchmark, proposed by Japan, involves burnup calculations of a single lattice cell of a MSR for burning plutonium and other minor actinides. We have analyzed this cell with in-house developed burnup codes BURNTRAN and McBURN. This paper also presents a comparison of the results of our codes and those obtained by the proposers of the benchmark. (author)

  8. "What If" Analyses: Ways to Interpret Statistical Significance Test Results Using EXCEL or "R"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif

    2012-01-01

    The present paper aims to review two motivations to conduct "what if" analyses using Excel and "R" to understand the statistical significance tests through the sample size context. "What if" analyses can be used to teach students what statistical significance tests really do and in applied research either prospectively to estimate what sample size…

  9. Beyond-CMOS Device Benchmarking for Boolean and Non-Boolean Logic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Chenyun; Naeemi, Azad

    2017-01-01

    The latest results of benchmarking research are presented for a variety of beyond-CMOS charge- and spin-based devices. In addition to improving the device-level models, several new device proposals and a few majorly modified devices are investigated. Deep pipelining circuits are employed to boost the throughput of low-power devices. Furthermore, the benchmarking methodology is extended to interconnect-centric analyses and non-Boolean logic applications. In contrast to Boolean circuits, non-Bo...

  10. Benchmarking of nuclear economics tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Megan; Korinny, Andriy; Shropshire, David; Sadhankar, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • INPRO and GIF economic tools exhibited good alignment in total capital cost estimation. • Subtle discrepancies in the cost result from differences in financing and the fuel cycle assumptions. • A common set of assumptions was found to reduce the discrepancies to 1% or less. • Opportunities for harmonisation of economic tools exists. - Abstract: Benchmarking of the economics methodologies developed by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), was performed for three Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The Economic Modeling Working Group of GIF developed an Excel based spreadsheet package, G4ECONS (Generation 4 Excel-based Calculation Of Nuclear Systems), to calculate the total capital investment cost (TCIC) and the levelised unit energy cost (LUEC). G4ECONS is sufficiently generic in the sense that it can accept the types of projected input, performance and cost data that are expected to become available for Generation IV systems through various development phases and that it can model both open and closed fuel cycles. The Nuclear Energy System Assessment (NESA) Economic Support Tool (NEST) was developed to enable an economic analysis using the INPRO methodology to easily calculate outputs including the TCIC, LUEC and other financial figures of merit including internal rate of return, return of investment and net present value. NEST is also Excel based and can be used to evaluate nuclear reactor systems using the open fuel cycle, MOX (mixed oxide) fuel recycling and closed cycles. A Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor system with an open fuel cycle and two Fast Reactor systems, one with a break-even fuel cycle and another with a burner fuel cycle, were selected for the benchmarking exercise. Published data on capital and operating costs were used for economics analyses using G4ECONS and NEST tools. Both G4ECONS and

  11. Benchmarking in University Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kuźmicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the face of global competition and rising challenges that higher education institutions (HEIs meet, it is imperative to increase innovativeness and efficiency of their management. Benchmarking can be the appropriate tool to search for a point of reference necessary to assess institution’s competitive position and learn from the best in order to improve. The primary purpose of the paper is to present in-depth analysis of benchmarking application in HEIs worldwide. The study involves indicating premises of using benchmarking in HEIs. It also contains detailed examination of types, approaches and scope of benchmarking initiatives. The thorough insight of benchmarking applications enabled developing classification of benchmarking undertakings in HEIs. The paper includes review of the most recent benchmarking projects and relating them to the classification according to the elaborated criteria (geographical range, scope, type of data, subject, support and continuity. The presented examples were chosen in order to exemplify different approaches to benchmarking in higher education setting. The study was performed on the basis of the published reports from benchmarking projects, scientific literature and the experience of the author from the active participation in benchmarking projects. The paper concludes with recommendations for university managers undertaking benchmarking, derived on the basis of the conducted analysis.

  12. Core Benchmarks Descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Actual regulations while designing of new fuel cycles for nuclear power installations comprise a calculational justification to be performed by certified computer codes. It guarantees that obtained calculational results will be within the limits of declared uncertainties that are indicated in a certificate issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russian Federation (GAN) and concerning a corresponding computer code. A formal justification of declared uncertainties is the comparison of calculational results obtained by a commercial code with the results of experiments or of calculational tests that are calculated with an uncertainty defined by certified precision codes of MCU type or of other one. The actual level of international cooperation provides an enlarging of the bank of experimental and calculational benchmarks acceptable for a certification of commercial codes that are being used for a design of fuel loadings with MOX fuel. In particular, the work is practically finished on the forming of calculational benchmarks list for a certification of code TVS-M as applied to MOX fuel assembly calculations. The results on these activities are presented

  13. Criteria of benchmark selection for efficient flexible multibody system formalisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valášek M.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the selection process of benchmarks for testing and comparing efficient flexible multibody formalisms. The existing benchmarks are briefly summarized. The purposes for benchmark selection are investigated. The result of this analysis is the formulation of the criteria of benchmark selection for flexible multibody formalisms. Based on them the initial set of suitable benchmarks is described. Besides that the evaluation measures are revised and extended.

  14. Synthetic analyses of the LAVA experimental results on in-vessel corium retention through gap cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Cho, Young Ro; Koo, Kil Mo; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Jong Hwan; Kim, Jong Tae; Ha, Kwang Sun; Kim, Sang Baik; Kim, Hee Dong

    2001-03-01

    LAVA(Lower-plenum Arrested Vessel Attack) has been performed to gather proof of gap formation between the debris and lower head vessel and to evaluate the effect of the gap formation on in-vessel cooling. Through the total of 12 tests, the analyses on the melt relocation process, gap formation and the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the vessel were performed. The thermal behaviors of the lower head vessel were affected by the formation of the fragmented particles and melt pool during the melt relocation process depending on mass and composition of melt and subcooling and depth of water. During the melt relocation process 10.0 to 20.0 % of the melt mass was fragmented and also 15.5 to 47.5 % of the thermal energy of the melt was transferred to water. The experimental results address the non-adherence of the debris to the lower head vessel and the consequent gap formation between the debris and the lower head vessel in case there was an internal pressure load across the vessel abreast with the thermal load induced by the thermite melt. The thermal behaviors of the lower head vessel during the cooldown period were mainly affected by the heat removal characteristics through this gap, which were determined by the possibilities of the water ingression into the gap depending on the melt composition of the corium simulant. The enhanced cooling capacity through the gap was distinguished in the Al 2 O 3 melt tests. It could be inferred from the analyses on the heat removal capacity through the gap that the lower head vessel could effectively cooldown via heat removal in the gap governed by counter current flow limits(CCFL) even if 2mm thick gap should form in the 30 kg Al 2 O 3 melt tests, which was also confirmed through the variations of the conduction heat flux in the vessel and rapid cool down of the vessel outer surface in the Al 2 O 3 melt tests. In the case of large melt mass of 70 kg Al 2 O 3 melt, however, the infinite possibility of heat removal through the

  15. High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Yoshiji; Ichii, Shingo; Yashiro, Shigeo; Hirayama, Hideo; Kokufuda, Akihiro; Suzuki, Eishin.

    1993-01-01

    High Energy Physics (HEP) benchmark programs are indispensable tools to select suitable computer for HEP application system. Industry standard benchmark programs can not be used for this kind of particular selection. The CERN and the SSC benchmark suite are famous HEP benchmark programs for this purpose. The CERN suite includes event reconstruction and event generator programs, while the SSC one includes event generators. In this paper, we found that the results from these two suites are not consistent. And, the result from the industry benchmark does not agree with either of these two. Besides, we describe comparison of benchmark results using EGS4 Monte Carlo simulation program with ones from two HEP benchmark suites. Then, we found that the result from EGS4 in not consistent with the two ones. The industry standard of SPECmark values on various computer systems are not consistent with the EGS4 results either. Because of these inconsistencies, we point out the necessity of a standardization of HEP benchmark suites. Also, EGS4 benchmark suite should be developed for users of applications such as medical science, nuclear power plant, nuclear physics and high energy physics. (author)

  16. A benchmarking study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Groessing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A benchmark study for permeability measurement is presented. In the past studies of other research groups which focused on the reproducibility of 1D-permeability measurements showed high standard deviations of the gained permeability values (25%, even though a defined test rig with required specifications was used. Within this study, the reproducibility of capacitive in-plane permeability testing system measurements was benchmarked by comparing results of two research sites using this technology. The reproducibility was compared by using a glass fibre woven textile and carbon fibre non crimped fabric (NCF. These two material types were taken into consideration due to the different electrical properties of glass and carbon with respect to dielectric capacitive sensors of the permeability measurement systems. In order to determine the unsaturated permeability characteristics as function of fibre volume content the measurements were executed at three different fibre volume contents including five repetitions. It was found that the stability and reproducibility of the presentedin-plane permeability measurement system is very good in the case of the glass fibre woven textiles. This is true for the comparison of the repetition measurements as well as for the comparison between the two different permeameters. These positive results were confirmed by a comparison to permeability values of the same textile gained with an older generation permeameter applying the same measurement technology. Also it was shown, that a correct determination of the grammage and the material density are crucial for correct correlation of measured permeability values and fibre volume contents.

  17. Review of Statistical Analyses Resulting from Performance of HLDWD-DWPF-005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Engineering Department at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reviewed two reports from the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) involving the statistical analysis of test results for analysis of small sample inserts (references 1 ampersand 2). The test results cover two proposed analytical methods, a room temperature hydrofluoric acid preparation (Cold Chem) and a sodium peroxide/sodium hydroxide fusion modified for insert samples (Modified Fusion). The reports support implementation of the proposed small sample containers and analytical methods at DWPF. Hydragard sampler valve performance was typical of previous results (reference 3). Using an element from each major feed stream. lithium from the frit and iron from the sludge, the sampler was determined to deliver a uniform mixture in either sample container.The lithium to iron ratios were equivalent for the standard 15 ml vial and the 3 ml insert.The proposed method provide equivalent analyses as compared to the current methods. The biases associated with the proposed methods on a vitrified basis are less than 5% for major elements. The sum of oxides for the proposed method compares favorably with the sum of oxides for the conventional methods. However, the average sum of oxides for the Cold Chem method was 94.3% which is below the minimum required recovery of 95%. Both proposed methods, cold Chem and Modified Fusion, will be required at first to provide an accurate analysis which will routinely meet the 95% and 105% average sum of oxides limit for Product Composition Control System (PCCS).Issued to be resolved during phased implementation are as follows: (1) Determine calcine/vitrification factor for radioactive feed; (2) Evaluate covariance matrix change against process operating ranges to determine optimum sample size; (3) Evaluate sources for low sum of oxides; and (4) Improve remote operability of production versions of equipment and instruments for installation in 221-S.The specifics of

  18. Selected examples on multi physics researches at KFKI AEKI-results for phase I of the OECD/NEA UAM benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panka, I.; Kereszturi, A.; Maraczy, C.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, there is a tendency to use best estimate plus uncertainty methods in the field of nuclear energy. This implies the application of best estimate code systems and the determination of the corresponding uncertainties. For the latter one an OECD benchmark was set up. The objective of the OECD/NEA Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modeling (UAM) LWR benchmark is to determine the uncertainties of the coupled reactor physics/thermal hydraulics LWR calculations at all stages. In this paper the AEKI participation in Phase I will be presented. This Phase is dealing with the evaluation of the uncertainties of the neutronic calculations starting from the pin cell spectral calculations up to the stand-alone neutronics core simulations. (Authors)

  19. The Isprs Benchmark on Indoor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshelham, K.; Díaz Vilariño, L.; Peter, M.; Kang, Z.; Acharya, D.

    2017-09-01

    Automated generation of 3D indoor models from point cloud data has been a topic of intensive research in recent years. While results on various datasets have been reported in literature, a comparison of the performance of different methods has not been possible due to the lack of benchmark datasets and a common evaluation framework. The ISPRS benchmark on indoor modelling aims to address this issue by providing a public benchmark dataset and an evaluation framework for performance comparison of indoor modelling methods. In this paper, we present the benchmark dataset comprising several point clouds of indoor environments captured by different sensors. We also discuss the evaluation and comparison of indoor modelling methods based on manually created reference models and appropriate quality evaluation criteria. The benchmark dataset is available for download at: html"target="_blank">http://www2.isprs.org/commissions/comm4/wg5/benchmark-on-indoor-modelling.html.

  20. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  1. 3-D neutron transport benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.; Ikeda, H.

    1991-03-01

    A set of 3-D neutron transport benchmark problems proposed by the Osaka University to NEACRP in 1988 has been calculated by many participants and the corresponding results are summarized in this report. The results of K eff , control rod worth and region-averaged fluxes for the four proposed core models, calculated by using various 3-D transport codes are compared and discussed. The calculational methods used were: Monte Carlo, Discrete Ordinates (Sn), Spherical Harmonics (Pn), Nodal Transport and others. The solutions of the four core models are quite useful as benchmarks for checking the validity of 3-D neutron transport codes

  2. Strategic behaviour under regulatory benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamasb, T. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Applied Economics; Nillesen, P. [NUON NV (Netherlands); Pollitt, M. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Judge Inst. of Management

    2004-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of electricity distribution networks, some regulators have adopted incentive regulation schemes that rely on performance benchmarking. Although regulation benchmarking can influence the ''regulation game,'' the subject has received limited attention. This paper discusses how strategic behaviour can result in inefficient behaviour by firms. We then use the Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) method with US utility data to examine implications of illustrative cases of strategic behaviour reported by regulators. The results show that gaming can have significant effects on the measured performance and profitability of firms. (author)

  3. A simplified approach to WWER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehlbauer, P.

    2010-01-01

    The WWER-440 fuel assembly head benchmark was simulated with FLUENT 12 code as a first step of validation of the code for nuclear reactor safety analyses. Results of the benchmark together with comparison of results provided by other participants and results of measurement will be presented in another paper by benchmark organisers. This presentation is therefore focused on our approach to this simulation as illustrated on the case 323-34, which represents a peripheral assembly with five neighbours. All steps of the simulation and some lessons learned are described. Geometry of the computational region supplied as STEP file by organizers of the benchmark was first separated into two parts (inlet part with spacer grid, and the rest of assembly head) in order to keep the size of the computational mesh manageable with regard to the hardware available (HP Z800 workstation with Intel Zeon four-core CPU 3.2 GHz, 32 GB of RAM) and then further modified at places where shape of the geometry would probably lead to highly distorted cells. Both parts of the geometry were connected via boundary profile file generated at cross section, where effect of grid spacers is still felt but the effect of out flow boundary condition used in the computations of the inlet part of geometry is negligible. Computation proceeded in several steps: start with basic mesh, standard k-ε model of turbulence with standard wall functions and first order upwind numerical schemes; after convergence (scaled residuals lower than 10-3) and near-wall meshes local adaptation when needed, realizable k-ε of turbulence was used with second order upwind numerical schemes for momentum and energy equations. During iterations, area-average temperature of thermocouples and area-averaged outlet temperature which are the main figures of merit of the benchmark were also monitored. In this 'blind' phase of the benchmark, effect of spacers was neglected. After results of measurements are available, standard validation

  4. Preventive intervention possibilities in radiotherapy- and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis : Results of meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokman, M A; Spijkervet, F K L; Boezen, H M; Schouten, J.P.; Roodenburg, J L N; de Vries, E. G. E.

    The aim of these meta-analyses was to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention of oral mucositis in cancer patients treated with head and neck radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, with a focus on randomized clinical trials. A literature search was performed for reports of

  5. Influence of assessment setting on the results of functional analyses of problem behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, R.B.; Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.; Rispoli, M.

    2010-01-01

    Analogue functional analyses are widely used to identify the operant function of problem behavior in individuals with developmental disabilities. Because problem behavior often occurs across multiple settings (e.g., homes, schools, outpatient clinics), it is important to determine whether the

  6. Compilation and analyses of results from cross-hole tracer tests with conservative tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerne, Calle; Nordqvist, Rune; Harrstroem, Johan (Geosigma AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    Radionuclide transport in hydrogeological formations is one of the key factors for the safety analysis of a future repository of nuclear waste. Tracer tests have therefore been an important field method within the SKB investigation programmes at several sites since the late 1970's. This report presents a compilation and analyses of results from cross-hole tracer tests with conservative tracers performed within various SKB investigations. The objectives of the study are to facilitate, improve and reduce uncertainties in predictive tracer modelling and to provide supporting information for SKB's safety assessment of a final repository of nuclear waste. More specifically, the focus of the report is the relationship between the tracer mean residence time and fracture hydraulic parameters, i.e. the relationship between mass balance aperture and fracture transmissivity, hydraulic diffusivity and apparent storativity. For 74 different combinations of pumping and injection section at six different test sites (Studsvik, Stripa, Finnsjoen, Aespoe, Forsmark, Laxemar), estimates of mass balance aperture from cross-hole tracer tests as well as transmissivity were extracted from reports or in the SKB database Sicada. For 28 of these combinations of pumping and injection section, estimates of hydraulic diffusivity and apparent storativity from hydraulic interference tests were also found. An empirical relationship between mass balance aperture and transmissivity was estimated, although some uncertainties for individual data exist. The empirical relationship between mass balance aperture and transmissivity presented in this study deviates considerably from other previously suggested relationships, such as the cubic law and transport aperture as suggested by /Dershowitz and Klise 2002/, /Dershowitz et al. 2002/ and /Dershowitz et al. 2003/, which also is discussed in this report. No clear and direct empirical relationship between mass balance aperture and hydraulic

  7. MCNP neutron benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.S.; Whalen, D.J.; Cardon, D.A.; Uhle, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Over 50 neutron benchmark calculations have recently been completed as part of an ongoing program to validate the MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The new and significant aspects of this work are as follows: These calculations are the first attempt at a validation program for MCNP and the first official benchmarking of version 4 of the code. We believe the chosen set of benchmarks is a comprehensive set that may be useful for benchmarking other radiation transport codes and data libraries. These calculations provide insight into how well neutron transport calculations can be expected to model a wide variety of problems

  8. Manned systems utilization analysis (study 2.1). Volume 3: LOVES computer simulations, results, and analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, L. T.

    1975-01-01

    The LOVES computer program was employed to analyze the geosynchronous portion of the NASA's 1973 automated satellite mission model from 1980 to 1990. The objectives of the analyses were: (1) to demonstrate the capability of the LOVES code to provide the depth and accuracy of data required to support the analyses; and (2) to tradeoff the concept of space servicing automated satellites composed of replaceable modules against the concept of replacing expendable satellites upon failure. The computer code proved to be an invaluable tool in analyzing the logistic requirements of the various test cases required in the tradeoff. It is indicated that the concept of space servicing offers the potential for substantial savings in the cost of operating automated satellite systems.

  9. Association between Adult Height and Risk of Colorectal, Lung, and Prostate Cancer: Results from Meta-analyses of Prospective Studies and Mendelian Randomization Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankari, Nikhil K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Wen, Wanqing; Kraft, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Peters, Ulrike; Schildkraut, Joellen; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bofetta, Paolo; Risch, Angela; Bickeböller, Heike; Amos, Christopher I.; Easton, Douglas; Gruber, Stephen B.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hunter, David J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Pierce, Brandon L.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational studies examining associations between adult height and risk of colorectal, prostate, and lung cancers have generated mixed results. We conducted meta-analyses using data from prospective cohort studies and further carried out Mendelian randomization analyses, using height-associated genetic variants identified in a genome-wide association study (GWAS), to evaluate the association of adult height with these cancers. Methods and Findings A systematic review of prospective studies was conducted using the PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science databases. Using meta-analyses, results obtained from 62 studies were summarized for the association of a 10-cm increase in height with cancer risk. Mendelian randomization analyses were conducted using summary statistics obtained for 423 genetic variants identified from a recent GWAS of adult height and from a cancer genetics consortium study of multiple cancers that included 47,800 cases and 81,353 controls. For a 10-cm increase in height, the summary relative risks derived from the meta-analyses of prospective studies were 1.12 (95% CI 1.10, 1.15), 1.07 (95% CI 1.05, 1.10), and 1.06 (95% CI 1.02, 1.11) for colorectal, prostate, and lung cancers, respectively. Mendelian randomization analyses showed increased risks of colorectal (odds ratio [OR] = 1.58, 95% CI 1.14, 2.18) and lung cancer (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.00, 1.22) associated with each 10-cm increase in genetically predicted height. No association was observed for prostate cancer (OR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.92, 1.15). Our meta-analysis was limited to published studies. The sample size for the Mendelian randomization analysis of colorectal cancer was relatively small, thus affecting the precision of the point estimate. Conclusions Our study provides evidence for a potential causal association of adult height with the risk of colorectal and lung cancers and suggests that certain genetic factors and biological pathways affecting adult height may also affect the

  10. First 5 tower WIMP-search results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search with improved understanding of neutron backgrounds and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings-Yeomans, Raul [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Non-baryonic dark matter makes one quarter of the energy density of the Universe and is concentrated in the halos of galaxies, including the Milky Way. The Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is a dark matter candidate with a scattering cross section with an atomic nucleus of the order of the weak interaction and a mass comparable to that of an atomic nucleus. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) experiment, using Ge and Si cryogenic particle detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, aims to directly detect nuclear recoils from WIMP interactions. This thesis presents the first 5 tower WIMP-search results from CDMS-II, an estimate of the cosmogenic neutron backgrounds expected at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, and a proposal for a new measurement of high-energy neutrons underground to benchmark the Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the non-observation of WIMPs and using standard assumptions about the galactic halo [68], the 90% C.L. upper limit of the spin-independent WIMPnucleon cross section for the first 5 tower run is 6.6 × 10-44cm2 for a 60 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. A combined limit using all the data taken at Soudan results in an upper limit of 4.6×10-44cm2 at 90% C.L.for a 60 GeV/c2 WIMP mass. This new limit corresponds to a factor of ~3 improvement over any previous CDMS-II limit and a factor of ~2 above 60 GeV/c 2 better than any other WIMP search to date. This thesis presents an estimation, based on Monte Carlo simulations, of the nuclear recoils produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries (at the Soudan site) for a 5 tower Ge and Si configuration as well as for a 7 supertower array. The results of the Monte Carlo are that CDMS-II should expect 0.06 ± 0.02+0.18 -0.02 /kgyear unvetoed single nuclear recoils in Ge for the 5 tower configuration, and 0.05 ± 0.01+0.15 -0.02 /kg-year for the 7 supertower configuration. The systematic error is based on the available

  11. [Inguinal hernia repair: results of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, K; Vons, C

    2008-01-01

    This evidence-based review of the literature aims to answer two questions regarding inguinal hernia repair: 1. should a prosthetic patch be used routinely? 2. Which approach is better - laparoscopic or open surgery? After a comprehensive search of electronic databases we retained only meta-analyses (n=14) and/or randomised clinical trials (n=4). Review of this literature suggests with a good level of evidence that prosthetic hernia repair is the gold standard; the laparoscopic approach has very few proven benefits and may involve more serious complications when performed outside expert centers. The role of laparoscopy for the repair of bilateral or recurrent hernias needs better evaluation.

  12. Benchmarking Academic Anatomic Pathologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara S. Ducatman MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most common benchmarks for faculty productivity are derived from Medical Group Management Association (MGMA or Vizient-AAMC Faculty Practice Solutions Center ® (FPSC databases. The Association of Pathology Chairs has also collected similar survey data for several years. We examined the Association of Pathology Chairs annual faculty productivity data and compared it with MGMA and FPSC data to understand the value, inherent flaws, and limitations of benchmarking data. We hypothesized that the variability in calculated faculty productivity is due to the type of practice model and clinical effort allocation. Data from the Association of Pathology Chairs survey on 629 surgical pathologists and/or anatomic pathologists from 51 programs were analyzed. From review of service assignments, we were able to assign each pathologist to a specific practice model: general anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists, 1 or more subspecialties, or a hybrid of the 2 models. There were statistically significant differences among academic ranks and practice types. When we analyzed our data using each organization’s methods, the median results for the anatomic pathologists/surgical pathologists general practice model compared to MGMA and FPSC results for anatomic and/or surgical pathology were quite close. Both MGMA and FPSC data exclude a significant proportion of academic pathologists with clinical duties. We used the more inclusive FPSC definition of clinical “full-time faculty” (0.60 clinical full-time equivalent and above. The correlation between clinical full-time equivalent effort allocation, annual days on service, and annual work relative value unit productivity was poor. This study demonstrates that effort allocations are variable across academic departments of pathology and do not correlate well with either work relative value unit effort or reported days on service. Although the Association of Pathology Chairs–reported median work relative

  13. Multitemporal satellite data analyses for archaeological mark detection: preliminary results in Italy and Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    within Basilicata and Puglia Region, southern Patagonia and Payunia-Campo Volcanicos Liancanelo e PayunMatru respectively, in Italy and Argentina. We focused our attention on diverse surfaces and soil types in different periods of the year in order to assess the capabilities of both optical and radar data to detect archaeological marks in different ecosystems and seasons. We investigated not only crop culture during the "favourable vegetative period" to enhance the presence of subsurface remains but also the "spectral response" of spontaneous, sparse herbaceous covers during periods considered and expected to be less favourable (as for example summer and winter) for this type of investigation. The main interesting results were the capability of radar (cosmoskymed) and multispectral optical data satellite data (Pleiades, Quickbird, Geoeye) to highlight the presence of structures below the surface even (i) in during period of years generally considered not "suitable for crop mark investigations" and even (ii) in areas only covered by sparse, spontaneous herbaceous plants in several test sites investigate din both Argentine and Italian areas of interest. Preliminary results conducted in both Italian and Argentina sites pointed out that Earth Observation (EO) technology can be successfully used for extracting useful information on traces the past human activities still fossilized in the modern landscape in different ecosystems and seasons. Moreover the multitemporal analyses of satellite data can fruitfully applied to: (i) improve knowledge, (ii) support monitoring of natural and cultural site, (iii) assess natural and man-made risks including emerging threats to the heritage sites. References Lasaponara R, N Masini 2009 Full-waveform Airborne Laser Scanning for the detection of medieval archaeological microtopographic relief Journal of Cultural Heritage 10, e78-e82 Ciminale M, D Gallo, R Lasaponara, N Masini 2009 A multiscale approach for reconstructing archaeological

  14. SSI and structural benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes, currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to cut-off depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils. Further, the paper presents some key aspects of the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop (NUREG/CP-0054) which was held in Bethesda, MD on June 1, 1986. Finally, recent efforts related to the task on the structural benchmarks are described

  15. Benchmarking af kommunernes sagsbehandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    Fra 2007 skal Ankestyrelsen gennemføre benchmarking af kommuernes sagsbehandlingskvalitet. Formålet med benchmarkingen er at udvikle praksisundersøgelsernes design med henblik på en bedre opfølgning og at forbedre kommunernes sagsbehandling. Dette arbejdspapir diskuterer metoder for benchmarking...

  16. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  17. The Drill Down Benchmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); T. Rühl (Tim); F. Kwakkel

    1998-01-01

    textabstractData Mining places specific requirements on DBMS query performance that cannot be evaluated satisfactorily using existing OLAP benchmarks. The DD Benchmark - defined here - provides a practical case and yardstick to explore how well a DBMS is able to support Data Mining applications. It

  18. Benchmarking Tool Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Health Libraries Association.

    Nine Canadian health libraries participated in a pilot test of the Benchmarking Tool Kit between January and April, 1998. Although the Tool Kit was designed specifically for health libraries, the content and approach are useful to other types of libraries as well. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to…

  19. Psychosocial Factors Related to Lateral and Medial Epicondylitis: Results From Pooled Study Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiese, Matthew S; Hegmann, Kurt T; Kapellusch, Jay; Merryweather, Andrew; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Tang, Ruoliang; Garg, Arun

    2016-06-01

    The goal is to assess the relationships between psychosocial factors and both medial and lateral epicondylitis after adjustment for personal and job physical exposures. One thousand eight hundred twenty-four participants were included in pooled analyses. Ten psychosocial factors were assessed. One hundred twenty-one (6.6%) and 34 (1.9%) participants have lateral and medial epicondylitis, respectively. Nine psychosocial factors assessed had significant trends or associations with lateral epicondylitis, the largest of which was between physical exhaustion after work and lateral epicondylitis with and odds ratio of 7.04 (95% confidence interval = 2.02 to 24.51). Eight psychosocial factors had significant trends or relationships with medial epicondylitis, with the largest being between mental exhaustion after work with an odds ratio of 6.51 (95% confidence interval = 1.57 to 27.04). The breadth and strength of these associations after adjustment for confounding factors demonstrate meaningful relationships that need to be further investigated in prospective analyses.

  20. Medical school benchmarking - from tools to programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Tim J; Hudson, Judith N; Mccoll, Geoffrey J; Hu, Wendy C Y; Jolly, Brian C; Schuwirth, Lambert W T

    2015-02-01

    Benchmarking among medical schools is essential, but may result in unwanted effects. To apply a conceptual framework to selected benchmarking activities of medical schools. We present an analogy between the effects of assessment on student learning and the effects of benchmarking on medical school educational activities. A framework by which benchmarking can be evaluated was developed and applied to key current benchmarking activities in Australia and New Zealand. The analogy generated a conceptual framework that tested five questions to be considered in relation to benchmarking: what is the purpose? what are the attributes of value? what are the best tools to assess the attributes of value? what happens to the results? and, what is the likely "institutional impact" of the results? If the activities were compared against a blueprint of desirable medical graduate outcomes, notable omissions would emerge. Medical schools should benchmark their performance on a range of educational activities to ensure quality improvement and to assure stakeholders that standards are being met. Although benchmarking potentially has positive benefits, it could also result in perverse incentives with unforeseen and detrimental effects on learning if it is undertaken using only a few selected assessment tools.

  1. Benchmark Analysis of EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    This publication presents the results and main achievements of an IAEA coordinated research project to verify and validate system and safety codes used in the analyses of liquid metal thermal hydraulics and neutronics phenomena in sodium cooled fast reactors. The publication will be of use to the researchers and professionals currently working on relevant fast reactors programmes. In addition, it is intended to support the training of the next generation of analysts and designers through international benchmark exercises

  2. How Activists Use Benchmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Wigan, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Non-governmental organisations use benchmarks as a form of symbolic violence to place political pressure on firms, states, and international organisations. The development of benchmarks requires three elements: (1) salience, that the community of concern is aware of the issue and views...... are put to the test. The first is a reformist benchmarking cycle where organisations defer to experts to create a benchmark that conforms with the broader system of politico-economic norms. The second is a revolutionary benchmarking cycle driven by expert-activists that seek to contest strong vested...... interests and challenge established politico-economic norms. Differentiating these cycles provides insights into how activists work through organisations and with expert networks, as well as how campaigns on complex economic issues can be mounted and sustained....

  3. EGS4 benchmark program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasu, Y.; Hirayama, H.; Namito, Y.; Yashiro, S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes EGS4 Benchmark Suite which consists of three programs called UCSAMPL4, UCSAMPL4I and XYZDOS. This paper also evaluates optimization methods of recent RISC/UNIX systems, such as IBM, HP, DEC, Hitachi and Fujitsu, for the benchmark suite. When particular compiler option and math library were included in the evaluation process, system performed significantly better. Observed performance of some of the RISC/UNIX systems were beyond some so-called Mainframes of IBM, Hitachi or Fujitsu. The computer performance of EGS4 Code System on an HP9000/735 (99MHz) was defined to be the unit of EGS4 Unit. The EGS4 Benchmark Suite also run on various PCs such as Pentiums, i486 and DEC alpha and so forth. The performance of recent fast PCs reaches that of recent RISC/UNIX systems. The benchmark programs have been evaluated with correlation of industry benchmark programs, namely, SPECmark. (author)

  4. Human factors reliability benchmark exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poucet, A.

    1989-08-01

    The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission has organised a Human Factors Reliability Benchmark Exercise (HF-RBE) with the aim of assessing the state of the art in human reliability modelling and assessment. Fifteen teams from eleven countries, representing industry, utilities, licensing organisations and research institutes, participated in the HF-RBE. The HF-RBE was organised around two study cases: (1) analysis of routine functional Test and Maintenance (TPM) procedures: with the aim of assessing the probability of test induced failures, the probability of failures to remain unrevealed and the potential to initiate transients because of errors performed in the test; (2) analysis of human actions during an operational transient: with the aim of assessing the probability that the operators will correctly diagnose the malfunctions and take proper corrective action. This report summarises the contributions received from the participants and analyses these contributions on a comparative basis. The aim of this analysis was to compare the procedures, modelling techniques and quantification methods used, to obtain insight in the causes and magnitude of the variability observed in the results, to try to identify preferred human reliability assessment approaches and to get an understanding of the current state of the art in the field identifying the limitations that are still inherent to the different approaches

  5. MOx Depletion Calculation Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Felice, Laurence; Eschbach, Romain; Dewi Syarifah, Ratna; Maryam, Seif-Eddine; Hesketh, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems (WPRS) has been established to study the reactor physics, fuel performance, radiation transport and shielding, and the uncertainties associated with modelling of these phenomena in present and future nuclear power systems. The WPRS has different expert groups to cover a wide range of scientific issues in these fields. The Expert Group on Reactor Physics and Advanced Nuclear Systems (EGRPANS) was created in 2011 to perform specific tasks associated with reactor physics aspects of present and future nuclear power systems. EGRPANS provides expert advice to the WPRS and the nuclear community on the development needs (data and methods, validation experiments, scenario studies) for different reactor systems and also provides specific technical information regarding: core reactivity characteristics, including fuel depletion effects; core power/flux distributions; Core dynamics and reactivity control. In 2013 EGRPANS published a report that investigated fuel depletion effects in a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR). This was entitled 'International Comparison of a Depletion Calculation Benchmark on Fuel Cycle Issues' NEA/NSC/DOC(2013) that documented a benchmark exercise for UO 2 fuel rods. This report documents a complementary benchmark exercise that focused on PuO 2 /UO 2 Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel rods. The results are especially relevant to the back-end of the fuel cycle, including irradiated fuel transport, reprocessing, interim storage and waste repository. Saint-Laurent B1 (SLB1) was the first French reactor to use MOx assemblies. SLB1 is a 900 MWe PWR, with 30% MOx fuel loading. The standard MOx assemblies, used in Saint-Laurent B1 reactor, include three zones with different plutonium enrichments, high Pu content (5.64%) in the center zone, medium Pu content (4.42%) in the intermediate zone and low Pu content (2.91%) in the peripheral zone

  6. Essential results of analyses accompanying the leak rate experiments E22 at HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1994-01-01

    Under the E22 test group of phase III of the HDR safety programme, experiments were performed on the crack opening and leak rate behaviour of pipe components of smaller nominal bores. The experiments were complemented by computations, in particular verifications, to qualify the computation models as one of the main aims of the HDR safety programme. Most of the analyses to determine crack openings were performed by means of the finite-element method, including elastic-plastic materials behaviour and, complementarily, assessing engineering methods. The leak rate was calculated by means of separate 2-phase computation models. Altogether, it may be concluded from the structural and fracture mechanical experiments with pipes, elbows and branch pieces, that crack openings and incipient cracks at loading with internal pressure or bending moment can be described with good accuracy by means of the finite-element programme ADINA and the developed FE-models. (orig.) [de

  7. Performance Against WELCOA's Worksite Health Promotion Benchmarks Across Years Among Selected US Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, GracieLee M; Mendenhall, Brandon N; Hunnicutt, David; Picarella, Ryan; Leffelman, Brittanie; Perko, Michael; Bibeau, Daniel L

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the performance of organizations' worksite health promotion (WHP) activities against the benchmarking criteria included in the Well Workplace Checklist (WWC). The Wellness Council of America (WELCOA) developed a tool to assess WHP with its 100-item WWC, which represents WELCOA's 7 performance benchmarks. Workplaces. This study includes a convenience sample of organizations who completed the checklist from 2008 to 2015. The sample size was 4643 entries from US organizations. The WWC includes demographic questions, general questions about WHP programs, and scales to measure the performance against the WELCOA 7 benchmarks. Descriptive analyses of WWC items were completed separately for each year of the study period. The majority of the organizations represented each year were multisite, multishift, medium- to large-sized companies mostly in the services industry. Despite yearly changes in participating organizations, results across the WELCOA 7 benchmark scores were consistent year to year. Across all years, benchmarks that organizations performed the lowest were senior-level support, data collection, and programming; wellness teams and supportive environments were the highest scoring benchmarks. In an era marked with economic swings and health-care reform, it appears that organizations are staying consistent in their performance across these benchmarks. The WWC could be useful for organizations, practitioners, and researchers in assessing the quality of WHP programs.

  8. The number and choice of muscles impact the results of muscle synergy analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Muterspaugh Steele

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available One theory for how humans control movement is that muscles are activated in weighted groups or synergies. Studies have shown that electromyography (EMG from a variety of tasks can be described by a low-dimensional space thought to reflect synergies. These studies use algorithms, such as nonnegative matrix factorization, to identify synergies from EMG. Due to experimental constraints, EMG can rarely be taken from all muscles involved in a task. However, it is unclear if the choice of muscles included in the analysis impacts estimated synergies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the number and choice of muscles on synergy analyses. We used a musculoskeletal model to calculate muscle activations required to perform an isometric upper-extremity task. Synergies calculated from the activations from the musculoskeletal model were similar to a prior experimental study. To evaluate the impact of the number of muscles included in the analysis, we randomly selected subsets of between 5 and 29 muscles and compared the similarity of the synergies calculated from each subset to a master set of synergies calculated from all muscles. We determined that the structure of synergies is dependent upon the number and choice of muscles included in the analysis. When five muscles were included in the analysis, the similarity of the synergies to the master set was only 0.57 ± 0.54; however, the similarity improved to over 0.8 with more than ten muscles. We identified two methods, selecting dominant muscles from the master set or selecting muscles with the largest maximum isometric force, which significantly improved similarity to the master set and can help guide future experimental design. Analyses that included a small subset of muscles also over-estimated the variance accounted for (VAF by the synergies compared to an analysis with all muscles. Thus, researchers should use caution using VAF to evaluate synergies when EMG is measured from a small

  9. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Multi-Probe Methodology and Simulated Likelihood Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, E.; et al.

    2017-06-28

    We present the methodology for and detail the implementation of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) 3x2pt DES Year 1 (Y1) analysis, which combines configuration-space two-point statistics from three different cosmological probes: cosmic shear, galaxy-galaxy lensing, and galaxy clustering, using data from the first year of DES observations. We have developed two independent modeling pipelines and describe the code validation process. We derive expressions for analytical real-space multi-probe covariances, and describe their validation with numerical simulations. We stress-test the inference pipelines in simulated likelihood analyses that vary 6-7 cosmology parameters plus 20 nuisance parameters and precisely resemble the analysis to be presented in the DES 3x2pt analysis paper, using a variety of simulated input data vectors with varying assumptions. We find that any disagreement between pipelines leads to changes in assigned likelihood $\\Delta \\chi^2 \\le 0.045$ with respect to the statistical error of the DES Y1 data vector. We also find that angular binning and survey mask do not impact our analytic covariance at a significant level. We determine lower bounds on scales used for analysis of galaxy clustering (8 Mpc$~h^{-1}$) and galaxy-galaxy lensing (12 Mpc$~h^{-1}$) such that the impact of modeling uncertainties in the non-linear regime is well below statistical errors, and show that our analysis choices are robust against a variety of systematics. These tests demonstrate that we have a robust analysis pipeline that yields unbiased cosmological parameter inferences for the flagship 3x2pt DES Y1 analysis. We emphasize that the level of independent code development and subsequent code comparison as demonstrated in this paper is necessary to produce credible constraints from increasingly complex multi-probe analyses of current data.

  10. The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, B. J.; Dean, V. F.; Pesic, M. P.

    2001-01-01

    experimenters or individuals who are familiar with the experimenters or the experimental facility; (3) compile the data into a standardized format; (4) perform calculations of each experiment with standard criticality safety codes, and (5) formally document the work into a single source of verified benchmark critical data. The work of the ICSBEP is documented as an OECD handbook, in 7 volumes, entitled, 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments'. This handbook is available on CD-ROM or on the Internet (http://icsbep.inel.gov/icsbep). Over 150 scientists from around the world have combined their efforts to produce this Handbook. The 2000 publication of the handbook will span over 19,000 pages and contain benchmark specifications for approximately 284 evaluations containing 2352 critical configurations. The handbook is currently in use in 45 different countries by criticality safety analysts to perform necessary validation of their calculation techniques and it is expected to be a valuable tool for decades to come. As a result of the efforts of the ICSBEP: (1) a large portion of the tedious, redundant, and very costly research and processing of criticality safety experimental data has been eliminated; (2) the necessary step in criticality safety analyses of validating computer codes with benchmark data is greatly streamlined; (3) gaps in data are being highlighted; (4) lost data are being retrieved; (5) deficiencies and errors in cross section processing codes and neutronic codes are being identified, and (6) over a half-century of valuable criticality safety data are being preserved. (author)

  11. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. Part 4: Results of failure analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    KOH concentration effects on cycle life of a Ni/H2 cell have been studied by carrying out a cycle life test of ten Ni/H2 boiler plate cells which contain electrolytes of various KOH concentrations. Failure analyses of these cells were carried out after completion of the life test which accumulated up to 40,000 cycles at an 80 percent depth of discharge over a period of 3.7 years. These failure analyses included studies on changes of electrical characteristics of test cells and component analyses after disassembly of the cell. The component analyses included visual inspections, dimensional changes, capacity measurements of nickel electrodes, scanning electron microscopy, BET surface area measurements, and chemical analyses. Results have indicated that failure mode and change in the nickel electrode varied as the concentration was varied, especially, when the concentration was changed from 31 percent or higher to 26 percent or lower.

  12. The relationship between hope and patient activation in consumers with schizophrenia: Results from longitudinal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oles, Sylwia K; Fukui, Sadaaki; Rand, Kevin L; Salyers, Michelle P

    2015-08-30

    Hope (goal-directed thinking) and patient activation (knowledge and skills to manage one's illness) are both important in managing chronic conditions like schizophrenia. The relationship between hope and patient activation has not been clearly defined. However, hope may be viewed as a foundational, motivating factor that can lead to greater involvement in care and feelings of efficacy. The purpose of the present study was to understand the prospective relationship between hope and patient activation in a sample of adults with schizophrenia (N=118). This study was a secondary data analysis from a study on Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) - a curriculum-based approach to schizophrenia self-management. Data were collected at baseline (prior to any intervention), and at 9 and 18-month follow-up. As predicted, hope and patient activation were significantly related with each other, showing large positive concurrent correlations. Demographics and background characteristics were not significantly related to patient activation or hope. Longitudinal analyses found no specific directional effect, yet suggested that hope and patient activation mutually influence each other over time. Our findings add flexibility in designing recovery-based interventions - fostering hope may not be a pre-requisite for activating consumers to be more involved in their own care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A dynamic bivariate Poisson model for analysing and forecasting match results in the English Premier League

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, S.J.; Lit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We develop a statistical model for the analysis and forecasting of football match results which assumes a bivariate Poisson distribution with intensity coefficients that change stochastically over time. The dynamic model is a novelty in the statistical time series analysis of match results

  14. TRIPOLI 01, a three-dimensional polykinetic Monte Carlo program. Pt.2. Constant data input and results obtained for a complex bench-mark example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Bourdet, L.; Gonnord, J.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1977-01-01

    Some properties of the sub-routines included in TRIPOLI for the constant data input are briefly reviewed. The bench-mark example then proposed is a problem of the contour lines of a neutron-opaque shield. The example is derived from activation calculations for the secondary sodium in a fast reactor provided with an integrated shield of Phenix type. The dimensions have been reduced so as the geometry to be simplified, and the constant data load reduced. Besides the rate of 24 Na formation by capture in the exchanger region, the attenuation of various detector responses all along the neutron trajectory was taken into account. The detectors chiefly used were: 103 Rh activation from (n,n') reactions for fast neutron detection, the activation Mn detectors, either bare or under cadmium, for detecting thermal and epithermal neutrons respectively [fr

  15. Numisheet2005 Benchmark Analysis on Forming of an Automotive Underbody Cross Member: Benchmark 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buranathiti, Thaweepat; Cao Jian

    2005-01-01

    This report presents an international cooperation benchmark effort focusing on simulations of a sheet metal stamping process. A forming process of an automotive underbody cross member using steel and aluminum blanks is used as a benchmark. Simulation predictions from each submission are analyzed via comparison with the experimental results. A brief summary of various models submitted for this benchmark study is discussed. Prediction accuracy of each parameter of interest is discussed through the evaluation of cumulative errors from each submission

  16. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  17. Benchmarking the energy efficiency of commercial buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, William; Hui, Y.V.; Lam, Y. Miu

    2006-01-01

    Benchmarking energy-efficiency is an important tool to promote the efficient use of energy in commercial buildings. Benchmarking models are mostly constructed in a simple benchmark table (percentile table) of energy use, which is normalized with floor area and temperature. This paper describes a benchmarking process for energy efficiency by means of multiple regression analysis, where the relationship between energy-use intensities (EUIs) and the explanatory factors (e.g., operating hours) is developed. Using the resulting regression model, these EUIs are then normalized by removing the effect of deviance in the significant explanatory factors. The empirical cumulative distribution of the normalized EUI gives a benchmark table (or percentile table of EUI) for benchmarking an observed EUI. The advantage of this approach is that the benchmark table represents a normalized distribution of EUI, taking into account all the significant explanatory factors that affect energy consumption. An application to supermarkets is presented to illustrate the development and the use of the benchmarking method

  18. Effectiveness of a selective alcohol prevention program targeting personality risk factors: Results of interaction analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Jeroen; Goossens, Ferry; Conrod, Patricia; Engels, Rutger; Wiers, Reinout W; Kleinjan, Marloes

    2017-08-01

    To explore whether specific groups of adolescents (i.e., scoring high on personality risk traits, having a lower education level, or being male) benefit more from the Preventure intervention with regard to curbing their drinking behaviour. A clustered randomized controlled trial, with participants randomly assigned to a 2-session coping skills intervention or a control no-intervention condition. Fifteen secondary schools throughout The Netherlands; 7 schools in the intervention and 8 schools in the control condition. 699 adolescents aged 13-15; 343 allocated to the intervention and 356 to the control condition; with drinking experience and elevated scores in either negative thinking, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity or sensation seeking. Differential effectiveness of the Preventure program was examined for the personality traits group, education level and gender on past-month binge drinking (main outcome), binge frequency, alcohol use, alcohol frequency and problem drinking, at 12months post-intervention. Preventure is a selective school-based alcohol prevention programme targeting personality risk factors. The comparator was a no-intervention control. Intervention effects were moderated by the personality traits group and by education level. More specifically, significant intervention effects were found on reducing alcohol use within the anxiety sensitivity group (OR=2.14, CI=1.40, 3.29) and reducing binge drinking (OR=1.76, CI=1.38, 2.24) and binge drinking frequency (β=0.24, p=0.04) within the sensation seeking group at 12months post-intervention. Also, lower educated young adolescents reduced binge drinking (OR=1.47, CI=1.14, 1.88), binge drinking frequency (β=0.25, p=0.04), alcohol use (OR=1.32, CI=1.06, 1.65) and alcohol use frequency (β=0.47, p=0.01), but not those in the higher education group. Post hoc latent-growth analyses revealed significant effects on the development of binge drinking (β=-0.19, p=0.02) and binge drinking frequency (β=-0.10, p=0

  19. Analyses and results from standard surveillance programmes of WWER 440/V-213C reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcnik, M; Brumovsky, M; Pav, T [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    In Czech and Slovak republics, six units of WWER 440/C type reactors are monitored by surveillance specimens programmes; the specimens are determined for static tensile testing, impact notch toughness testing and fracture toughness evaluation. Results of mechanical properties of these specimens after irradiation in intervals between 1 and 5 years of operation, are summarized and discussed with respect to the effect of individual heats and welded joints, radiation embrittlement, and annealing recovery. (authors). 3 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  1. Benchmarking and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrell, Per J.; Bogetoft, Peter

    . The application of benchmarking in regulation, however, requires specific steps in terms of data validation, model specification and outlier detection that are not systematically documented in open publications, leading to discussions about regulatory stability and economic feasibility of these techniques...

  2. Financial Integrity Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of Jackson, Mississippi — This data compiles standard financial integrity benchmarks that allow the City to measure its financial standing. It measure the City's debt ratio and bond ratings....

  3. Benchmarking in Foodservice Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Bonnie

    1998-01-01

    .... The design of this study included two parts: (1) eleven expert panelists involved in a Delphi technique to identify and rate importance of foodservice performance measures and rate the importance of benchmarking activities, and (2...

  4. Comparative analyses reveal discrepancies among results of commonly used methods for Anopheles gambiaemolecular form identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto João

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles gambiae M and S molecular forms, the major malaria vectors in the Afro-tropical region, are ongoing a process of ecological diversification and adaptive lineage splitting, which is affecting malaria transmission and vector control strategies in West Africa. These two incipient species are defined on the basis of single nucleotide differences in the IGS and ITS regions of multicopy rDNA located on the X-chromosome. A number of PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches based on form-specific SNPs in the IGS region are used for M and S identification. Moreover, a PCR-method to detect the M-specific insertion of a short interspersed transposable element (SINE200 has recently been introduced as an alternative identification approach. However, a large-scale comparative analysis of four widely used PCR or PCR-RFLP genotyping methods for M and S identification was never carried out to evaluate whether they could be used interchangeably, as commonly assumed. Results The genotyping of more than 400 A. gambiae specimens from nine African countries, and the sequencing of the IGS-amplicon of 115 of them, highlighted discrepancies among results obtained by the different approaches due to different kinds of biases, which may result in an overestimation of MS putative hybrids, as follows: i incorrect match of M and S specific primers used in the allele specific-PCR approach; ii presence of polymorphisms in the recognition sequence of restriction enzymes used in the PCR-RFLP approaches; iii incomplete cleavage during the restriction reactions; iv presence of different copy numbers of M and S-specific IGS-arrays in single individuals in areas of secondary contact between the two forms. Conclusions The results reveal that the PCR and PCR-RFLP approaches most commonly utilized to identify A. gambiae M and S forms are not fully interchangeable as usually assumed, and highlight limits of the actual definition of the two molecular forms, which might

  5. HYDROCOIN [HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison] Level 1: Benchmarking and verification test results with CFEST [Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport] code: Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabusaki, S.; Cole, C.; Monti, A.M.; Gupta, S.K.

    1987-04-01

    Part of the safety analysis is evaluating groundwater flow through the repository and the host rock to the accessible environment by developing mathematical or analytical models and numerical computer codes describing the flow mechanisms. This need led to the establishment of an international project called HYDROCOIN (HYDROlogic COde INtercomparison) organized by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, a forum for discussing techniques and strategies in subsurface hydrologic modeling. The major objective of the present effort, HYDROCOIN Level 1, is determining the numerical accuracy of the computer codes. The definition of each case includes the input parameters, the governing equations, the output specifications, and the format. The Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) code was applied to solve cases 1, 2, 4, 5, and 7; the Finite Element Three-Dimensional Groundwater (FE3DGW) Flow Model was used to solve case 6. Case 3 has been ignored because unsaturated flow is not pertinent to SRP. This report presents the Level 1 results furnished by the project teams. The numerical accuracy of the codes is determined by (1) comparing the computational results with analytical solutions for cases that have analytical solutions (namely cases 1 and 4), and (2) intercomparing results from codes for cases which do not have analytical solutions (cases 2, 5, 6, and 7). Cases 1, 2, 6, and 7 relate to flow analyses, whereas cases 4 and 5 require nonlinear solutions. 7 refs., 71 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Performance of laboratories analysing welding fume on filter samples: results from the WASP proficiency testing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Peter; Butler, Owen

    2008-06-01

    This paper emphasizes the need for occupational hygiene professionals to require evidence of the quality of welding fume data from analytical laboratories. The measurement of metals in welding fume using atomic spectrometric techniques is a complex analysis often requiring specialist digestion procedures. The results from a trial programme testing the proficiency of laboratories in the Workplace Analysis Scheme for Proficiency (WASP) to measure potentially harmful metals in several different types of welding fume showed that most laboratories underestimated the mass of analyte on the filters. The average recovery was 70-80% of the target value and >20% of reported recoveries for some of the more difficult welding fume matrices were welding fume trial filter samples. Consistent rather than erratic error predominated, suggesting that the main analytical factor contributing to the differences between the target values and results was the effectiveness of the sample preparation procedures used by participating laboratories. It is concluded that, with practice and regular participation in WASP, performance can improve over time.

  7. Water Use in Parabolic Trough Power Plants: Summary Results from WorleyParsons' Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchi, C. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) contracted with WorleyParsons Group, Inc. to examine the effect of switching from evaporative cooling to alternative cooling systems on a nominal 100-MW parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) plant. WorleyParsons analyzed 13 different cases spanning three different geographic locations (Daggett, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Alamosa, Colorado) to assess the performance, cost, and water use impacts of switching from wet to dry or hybrid cooling systems. NREL developed matching cases in its Solar Advisor Model (SAM) for each scenario to allow for hourly modeling and provide a comparison to the WorleyParsons results.Our findings indicate that switching from 100% wet to 100% dry cooling will result in levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) increases of approximately 3% to 8% for parabolic trough plants throughout most of the southwestern United States. In cooler, high-altitude areas like Colorado's San Luis Valley, WorleyParsons estimated the increase at only 2.5%, while SAM predicted a 4.4% difference. In all cases, the transition to dry cooling will reduce water consumption by over 90%. Utility time-of-delivery (TOD) schedules had similar impacts for wet- and dry-cooled plants, suggesting that TOD schedules have a relatively minor effect on the dry-cooling penalty.

  8. Evaluating the Accuracy of Results for Teacher Implemented Trial-Based Functional Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Mandy; Ninci, Jennifer; Burke, Mack D; Zaini, Samar; Hatton, Heather; Sanchez, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the systematic and experimental assessment of challenging behavior in applied settings. The purposes of this study were to evaluate a professional development package focused on training three Head Start teachers to conduct TBFAs with fidelity during ongoing classroom routines. To assess the accuracy of the TBFA results, the effects of a function-based intervention derived from the TBFA were compared with the effects of a non-function-based intervention. Data were collected on child challenging behavior and appropriate communication. An A-B-A-C-D design was utilized in which A represented baseline, and B and C consisted of either function-based or non-function-based interventions counterbalanced across participants, and D represented teacher implementation of the most effective intervention. Results showed that the function-based intervention produced greater decreases in challenging behavior and greater increases in appropriate communication than the non-function-based intervention for all three children. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Statistical analyses of fracture toughness results for two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Haggag, F.M.; Bowman, K.O.; Downing, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Fifth Irradiation Series were to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the transition temperature shift and the shape of the K Ic curve described in Sect. 6 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31% were commercially fabricated in 215-mm-thick plates. Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact, tensile, drop-weight, and compact specimens up to 203.2 mm thick [1T, 2T, 4T, 6T, and 8T C(T)] were tested to provide a large data base for unirradiated material. Similar specimens with compacts up to 4T were irradiated at about 288 degrees C to a mean fluence of about 1.5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV) in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Both linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods were used to analyze all cleavage fracture results and local cleavage instabilities (pop-ins). Evaluation of the results showed that the cleavage fracture toughness values determined at initial pop-ins fall within the same scatter band as the values from failed specimens; thus, they were included in the data base for analysis (all data are designated K Jc )

  10. MFTF TOTAL benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, J.H.

    1979-06-01

    A benchmark of the TOTAL data base management system as applied to the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) data base was implemented and run in February and March of 1979. The benchmark was run on an Interdata 8/32 and involved the following tasks: (1) data base design, (2) data base generation, (3) data base load, and (4) develop and implement programs to simulate MFTF usage of the data base

  11. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  12. Shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1978-09-01

    Shielding benchmark problems were prepared by the Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Comittee on Shielding Design of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and compiled by the Shielding Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Twenty-one kinds of shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm and the accuracy of computer codes based on the discrete ordinates method and the Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in the codes. (author)

  13. Trial sequential analysis reveals insufficient information size and potentially false positive results in many meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, J.; Thorlund, K.; Gluud, C.

    2008-01-01

    in 80% (insufficient information size). TSA(15%) and TSA(LBHIS) found that 95% and 91% had absence of evidence. The remaining nonsignificant meta-analyses had evidence of lack of effect. CONCLUSION: TSA reveals insufficient information size and potentially false positive results in many meta......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate meta-analyses with trial sequential analysis (TSA). TSA adjusts for random error risk and provides the required number of participants (information size) in a meta-analysis. Meta-analyses not reaching information size are analyzed with trial sequential monitoring boundaries...... analogous to interim monitoring boundaries in a single trial. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We applied TSA on meta-analyses performed in Cochrane Neonatal reviews. We calculated information sizes and monitoring boundaries with three different anticipated intervention effects of 30% relative risk reduction (TSA...

  14. The Evaluation of Real Time Milk Analyse Result Reliability in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oto Hanuš

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The good result reliability of regular analyzes of milk composition could improve the health monitoring of dairy cows and herd management. The aim of this study was the analysis of measurement of abilities and properties of RT (Real Time system (AfiLab = AfiMilk (NIR measurement unit (near infrared spectroscopy and electrical conductivity (C of milk by conductometry + AfiFarm (calibration and interpretation software for the analysis of individual milk samples (IMSs. There were 2 × 30 IMSs in the experiment. The reference values (RVs of milk components and properties (fat (F, proteins (P, lactose (L, C and the somatic cell count (SCC were determined by conventional (direct and indirect: conductometry (C; infrared spectroscopy 1 with the filter technology and 2 with the Fourier transformations (F, P, L; fluoro-opto-electronic cell counting (SCC in the film on the rotation disc (1 and by flow cytometry (2 methods. AfiLab method (alternative showed less close relationships as compared to the RVs as relationships between reference methods. This was expected. However, these relationships (r were mostly significant: F from .597 to .738 (P ≤ 0.01 and ≤ 0.001; P from .284 to .787 (P > 0.05 and P ≤ 0.001; C .773 (P ≤ 0.001. Correlations (r were not significant (P > 0.05: L from −.013 to .194; SCC from −.148 to −.133. Variability of the RVs explained the following percentages of variability in AfiLab results: F to 54.4 %; P to 61.9 %; L only 3.8 %; C to 59.7 %. Explanatory power (reliability of AfiLab results to the animal is increasing with the regularity of their measurements (principle of real time application. Correlation values r (x minus 1.64 × sd for confidence interval (one-sided at a level of 95 % can be used for an alternative method in assessing the calibration quality. These limits are F 0.564, P 0.784 and C 0.715 and can be essential with the further implementation of this advanced technology of dairy herd management.

  15. Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF6 cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF 6 in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF 6 is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF 6 may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF 6 cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail

  16. Regression Benchmarking: An Approach to Quality Assurance in Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Bulej, Lubomír

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a short summary of our work in the area of regression benchmarking and its application to software development. Specially, we explain the concept of regression benchmarking, the requirements for employing regression testing in a software project, and methods used for analyzing the vast amounts of data resulting from repeated benchmarking. We present the application of regression benchmarking on a real software project and conclude with a glimpse at the challenges for the fu...

  17. Benchmarking electricity distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, K. [Department of Justice and Attorney-General, QLD (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Benchmarking has been described as a method of continuous improvement that involves an ongoing and systematic evaluation and incorporation of external products, services and processes recognised as representing best practice. It is a management tool similar to total quality management (TQM) and business process re-engineering (BPR), and is best used as part of a total package. This paper discusses benchmarking models and approaches and suggests a few key performance indicators that could be applied to benchmarking electricity distribution utilities. Some recent benchmarking studies are used as examples and briefly discussed. It is concluded that benchmarking is a strong tool to be added to the range of techniques that can be used by electricity distribution utilities and other organizations in search of continuous improvement, and that there is now a high level of interest in Australia. Benchmarking represents an opportunity for organizations to approach learning from others in a disciplined and highly productive way, which will complement the other micro-economic reforms being implemented in Australia. (author). 26 refs.

  18. Excavation damage and disturbance in crystalline rock - results from experiments and analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckblom, Goeran (Conrox AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-11-15

    SKB plans to submit the application to site and construct the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in 2010. One important basis for the application is the results of the safety assessments, for which one particular dataset is the axial hydraulic properties along the underground openings used to calculate the transport resistance for radionuclide transport in the event that the canister is impaired. SKB initiated a project (Zuse) to be run over the period 2007-2009 to: - establish the current knowledge base on excavation damage and disturbance with particular focus on the axial hydraulic properties along the underground openings; - provide a basis for the requirements and compliance criteria for the excavation damaged and disturbed zone; - devise methods and instruments to infer or measure the excavation damage and disturbance at different times during the repository construction and operation before closure; - propose demonstration tests for which the methods are used in situ to qualify appropriate data for use in the safety reports. This report presents the results of the first stage of the Zuse project. Previous major experiments and studies in Canada, Finland, Japan, Sweden and Switzerland on spalling, excavation damage and disturbance was compiled and evaluated to provide the SR-Site report with a defendable database on the properties for the excavation damage and disturbance. In preparation for the SR-Site report, a number of sensitivity studies were conducted in which reasonable ranges of values for spalling and damage were selected in combination with an impaired backfill. The report here describes the construction of the repository in eleven steps and for each of these steps, the potential evolution of THMCB (Thermal, Mechanical, Hydraulic and Chemical/ Biological) processes are reviewed. In this work it was found that descriptions of the chemical and microbiological evolution connected with excavation damage and disturbance was lacking. The preliminary

  19. Biosphere analyses for the safety assessment SR-Site - synthesis and summary of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saetre, Peter

    2010-12-01

    This report summarises nearly 20 biosphere reports and gives a synthesis of the work performed within the SR-Site Biosphere project, i.e. the biosphere part of SR-Site. SR-Site Biosphere provides the main project with dose conversion factors (LDFs), given a unit release rate, for calculation of human doses under different release scenarios, and assesses if a potential release from the repository would have detrimental effects on the environment. The intention of this report is to give sufficient details for an overview of methods, results and major conclusions, with references to the biosphere reports where methods, data and results are presented and discussed in detail. The philosophy of the biosphere assessment was to make estimations of the radiological risk for humans and the environment as realistic as possible, based on the knowledge of present-day conditions at Forsmark and the past and expected future development of the site. This was achieved by using the best available knowledge, understanding and data from extensive site investigations from two sites. When sufficient information was not available, uncertainties were handled cautiously. A systematic identification and evaluation of features and processes that affect transport and accumulation of radionuclides at the site was conducted, and the results were summarised in an interaction matrix. Data and understanding from the site investigation was an integral part of this work, the interaction matrix underpinned the development of the radionuclide model used in the biosphere assessment. Understanding of the marine, lake and river and terrestrial ecosystems at the site was summarized in a conceptual model, and relevant features and process have been characterized to capture site specific parameter values. Detailed investigations of the structure and history of the regolith at the site and simulations of regolith dynamics were used to describe the present day state at Forsmark and the expected development of

  20. Excavation damage and disturbance in crystalline rock - results from experiments and analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeckblom, Goeran

    2008-11-01

    SKB plans to submit the application to site and construct the final repository for spent nuclear fuel in 2010. One important basis for the application is the results of the safety assessments, for which one particular dataset is the axial hydraulic properties along the underground openings used to calculate the transport resistance for radionuclide transport in the event that the canister is impaired. SKB initiated a project (Zuse) to be run over the period 2007-2009 to: - establish the current knowledge base on excavation damage and disturbance with particular focus on the axial hydraulic properties along the underground openings; - provide a basis for the requirements and compliance criteria for the excavation damaged and disturbed zone; - devise methods and instruments to infer or measure the excavation damage and disturbance at different times during the repository construction and operation before closure; - propose demonstration tests for which the methods are used in situ to qualify appropriate data for use in the safety reports. This report presents the results of the first stage of the Zuse project. Previous major experiments and studies in Canada, Finland, Japan, Sweden and Switzerland on spalling, excavation damage and disturbance was compiled and evaluated to provide the SR-Site report with a defendable database on the properties for the excavation damage and disturbance. In preparation for the SR-Site report, a number of sensitivity studies were conducted in which reasonable ranges of values for spalling and damage were selected in combination with an impaired backfill. The report here describes the construction of the repository in eleven steps and for each of these steps, the potential evolution of THMCB (Thermal, Mechanical, Hydraulic and Chemical/ Biological) processes are reviewed. In this work it was found that descriptions of the chemical and microbiological evolution connected with excavation damage and disturbance was lacking. The preliminary

  1. Benchmarking in the globalised world and its impact on South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to understand the potential impact of international benchmarking on South African institutions, it is important to explore the future role of benchmarking on the international level. In this regard, examples of transnational benchmarking activities will be considered. As a result of the involvement of South African ...

  2. Vver-1000 Mox core computational benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Science Committee has established an Expert Group that deals with the status and trends of reactor physics, fuel performance and fuel cycle issues related to disposing of weapons-grade plutonium in mixed-oxide fuel. The objectives of the group are to provide NEA member countries with up-to-date information on, and to develop consensus regarding, core and fuel cycle issues associated with burning weapons-grade plutonium in thermal water reactors (PWR, BWR, VVER-1000, CANDU) and fast reactors (BN-600). These issues concern core physics, fuel performance and reliability, and the capability and flexibility of thermal water reactors and fast reactors to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium in standard fuel cycles. The activities of the NEA Expert Group on Reactor-based Plutonium Disposition are carried out in close co-operation (jointly, in most cases) with the NEA Working Party on Scientific Issues in Reactor Systems (WPRS). A prominent part of these activities include benchmark studies. At the time of preparation of this report, the following benchmarks were completed or in progress: VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); VVER-1000 LEU and MOX Benchmark (completed); KRITZ-2 Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); Hollow and Solid MOX Fuel Behaviour Benchmark (completed); PRIMO MOX Fuel Performance Benchmark (ongoing); VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled Reactor Dosimetry Calculation (ongoing); VVER-1000 In-core Self-powered Neutron Detector Calculational Benchmark (started); MOX Fuel Rod Behaviour in Fast Power Pulse Conditions (started); Benchmark on the VENUS Plutonium Recycling Experiments Configuration 7 (started). This report describes the detailed results of the benchmark investigating the physics of a whole VVER-1000 reactor core using two-thirds low-enriched uranium (LEU) and one-third MOX fuel. It contributes to the computer code certification process and to the

  3. Results of the analyses of the intercomparison samples of natural dioxide SR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Kuhn, E.; Deron, S.

    1980-08-01

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of natural uranium dioxide, SR-1, were distributed to 37 laboratories in November 1977 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assays. 17 laboratories reported 18 sets of results (one laboratory applied two techniques). The analytical methods which were applied were: titration (11), coulometry (2), precipitation-gravimetry (1), flourimetry (2), X-Ray flourescence (1) and neutron activation (1). Analysis of variance yield for each combination of laboratory and technique the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the fluctuation of the measurements between sample bottles. Time effects have also been tested. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 6.4%. Eleven laboratories agree within 0.25% with the reference value. No mean obtained by wet chemical methods is biased by more than 0.4%. The biases of the other methods (flourimetry, X-Ray fluorescence and neutron activation) vary between 0.5% and 4.3%. The biases of 9 laboratories or techniques are greater than expected from their random errors. The mean bias of the fourteen wet chemical methods is equal to 0.08% U with a standard deviation of +-0.18% U

  4. Essential results of analyses accompanying the leak rate experiments E22 at HDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebner, H.; Hoefler, A.; Hunger, H.

    1997-01-01

    During phase III of the HDR Safety Programme (HDR: decommissioned overheated steam reactor in Karlstein, Germany), experiments were performed in test group E22 on small-bore austenitic straight piping and on pipe elbows and branches containing through-wall cracks. The main aim was the determination of crack opening and leak rate behaviour for the cracked components under almost operational pressure and temperature loading conditions, especially including transient bending moments. In addition to machined slits, naturally grown fatigue cracks were also considered to cover the leakage behaviour. The experiments were accompanied by calculations, mainly performed by GRS. The paper describes the most important aspects and the essential results of the calculations and analysis. The main outcome was that the crack opening and initiation of crack growth can be described with the finite element techniques applied with sufficient accuracy. However, the qualification of the leak rate models could not be completed successfully, and therefore more sophisticated experiments of this kind are needed. (orig.)

  5. Biosphere analyses for the safety assessment SR-Site - synthesis and summary of results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saetre, Peter [comp.

    2010-12-15

    This report summarises nearly 20 biosphere reports and gives a synthesis of the work performed within the SR-Site Biosphere project, i.e. the biosphere part of SR-Site. SR-Site Biosphere provides the main project with dose conversion factors (LDFs), given a unit release rate, for calculation of human doses under different release scenarios, and assesses if a potential release from the repository would have detrimental effects on the environment. The intention of this report is to give sufficient details for an overview of methods, results and major conclusions, with references to the biosphere reports where methods, data and results are presented and discussed in detail. The philosophy of the biosphere assessment was to make estimations of the radiological risk for humans and the environment as realistic as possible, based on the knowledge of present-day conditions at Forsmark and the past and expected future development of the site. This was achieved by using the best available knowledge, understanding and data from extensive site investigations from two sites. When sufficient information was not available, uncertainties were handled cautiously. A systematic identification and evaluation of features and processes that affect transport and accumulation of radionuclides at the site was conducted, and the results were summarised in an interaction matrix. Data and understanding from the site investigation was an integral part of this work, the interaction matrix underpinned the development of the radionuclide model used in the biosphere assessment. Understanding of the marine, lake and river and terrestrial ecosystems at the site was summarized in a conceptual model, and relevant features and process have been characterized to capture site specific parameter values. Detailed investigations of the structure and history of the regolith at the site and simulations of regolith dynamics were used to describe the present day state at Forsmark and the expected development of

  6. Reporting the results of meta-analyses: a plea for incorporating clinical relevance referring to an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Ronald H M A; Donk, Roland D; Verhagen, Wim I M; Hosman, Allard J F; Verbeek, André L M

    2017-11-01

    The results of meta-analyses are frequently reported, but understanding and interpreting them is difficult for both clinicians and patients. Statistical significances are presented without referring to values that imply clinical relevance. This study aimed to use the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) to rate the clinical relevance of a meta-analysis. This study is a review of the literature. This study is a review of meta-analyses relating to a specific topic, clinical results of cervical arthroplasty. The outcome measure used in the study was the MCID. We performed an extensive literature search of a series of meta-analyses evaluating a similar subject as an example. We searched in Pubmed and Embase through August 9, 2016, and found articles concerning meta-analyses of the clinical outcome of cervical arthroplasty compared with that of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in cases of cervical degenerative disease. We evaluated the analyses for statistical significance and their relation to MCID. MCID was defined based on results in similar patient groups and a similar disease entity reported in the literature. We identified 21 meta-analyses, only one of which referred to MCID. However, the researchers used an inappropriate measurement scale and, therefore, an incorrect MCID. The majority of the conclusions were based on statistical results without mentioning clinical relevance. The majority of the articles we reviewed drew conclusions based on statistical differences instead of clinical relevance. We recommend introducing the concept of MCID while reporting the results of a meta-analysis, as well as mentioning the explicit scale of the analyzed measurement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct data access protocols benchmarking on DPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furano, Fabrizio; Devresse, Adrien; Keeble, Oliver; Mancinelli, Valentina

    2015-12-01

    The Disk Pool Manager is an example of a multi-protocol, multi-VO system for data access on the Grid that went though a considerable technical evolution in the last years. Among other features, its architecture offers the opportunity of testing its different data access frontends under exactly the same conditions, including hardware and backend software. This characteristic inspired the idea of collecting monitoring information from various testbeds in order to benchmark the behaviour of the HTTP and Xrootd protocols for the use case of data analysis, batch or interactive. A source of information is the set of continuous tests that are run towards the worldwide endpoints belonging to the DPM Collaboration, which accumulated relevant statistics in its first year of activity. On top of that, the DPM releases are based on multiple levels of automated testing that include performance benchmarks of various kinds, executed regularly every day. At the same time, the recent releases of DPM can report monitoring information about any data access protocol to the same monitoring infrastructure that is used to monitor the Xrootd deployments. Our goal is to evaluate under which circumstances the HTTP-based protocols can be good enough for batch or interactive data access. In this contribution we show and discuss the results that our test systems have collected under the circumstances that include ROOT analyses using TTreeCache and stress tests on the metadata performance.

  8. Benchmarking local healthcare-associated infections: Available benchmarks and interpretation challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiman El-Saed

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Growing numbers of healthcare facilities are routinely collecting standardized data on healthcare-associated infection (HAI, which can be used not only to track internal performance but also to compare local data to national and international benchmarks. Benchmarking overall (crude HAI surveillance metrics without accounting or adjusting for potential confounders can result in misleading conclusions. Methods commonly used to provide risk-adjusted metrics include multivariate logistic regression analysis, stratification, indirect standardization, and restrictions. The characteristics of recognized benchmarks worldwide, including the advantages and limitations are described. The choice of the right benchmark for the data from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC states is challenging. The chosen benchmark should have similar data collection and presentation methods. Additionally, differences in surveillance environments including regulations should be taken into consideration when considering such a benchmark. The GCC center for infection control took some steps to unify HAI surveillance systems in the region. GCC hospitals still need to overcome legislative and logistic difficulties in sharing data to create their own benchmark. The availability of a regional GCC benchmark may better enable health care workers and researchers to obtain more accurate and realistic comparisons. Keywords: Benchmarking, Comparison, Surveillance, Healthcare-associated infections

  9. The KMAT: Benchmarking Knowledge Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Martha

    Provides an overview of knowledge management and benchmarking, including the benefits and methods of benchmarking (e.g., competitive, cooperative, collaborative, and internal benchmarking). Arthur Andersen's KMAT (Knowledge Management Assessment Tool) is described. The KMAT is a collaborative benchmarking tool, designed to help organizations make…

  10. Benchmarking of the FENDL-3 Neutron Cross-Section Data Library for Fusion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Kondo, K.; Angelone, M.; Batistoni, P.; Villari, R.; Bohm, T.; Sawan, M.; Walker, B.; Konno, C.

    2014-03-01

    This report summarizes the benchmark analyses performed in a joint effort of ENEA (Italy), JAEA (Japan), KIT (Germany), and the University of Wisconsin (USA) with the objective to test and qualify the neutron induced general purpose FENDL-3.0 data library for fusion applications. The benchmark approach consisted of two major steps including the analysis of a simple ITER-like computational benchmark, and a series of analyses of benchmark experiments conducted previously at the 14 MeV neutron generator facilities at ENEA Frascati, Italy (FNG) and JAEA, Tokai-mura, Japan (FNS). The computational benchmark revealed a modest increase of the neutron flux levels in the deep penetration regions and a substantial increase of the gas production in steel components. The comparison to experimental results showed good agreement with no substantial differences between FENDL-3.0 and FENDL-2.1 for most of the responses analysed. There is a slight trend, however, for an increase of the fast neutron flux in the shielding experiment and a decrease in the breeder mock-up experiments. The photon flux spectra measured in the bulk shield and the tungsten experiments are significantly better reproduced with FENDL-3.0 data. In general, FENDL-3, as compared to FENDL-2.1, shows an improved performance for fusion neutronics applications. It is thus recommended to ITER to replace FENDL-2.1 as reference data library for neutronics calculation by FENDL-3.0. (author)

  11. Benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Ikehara, Tadashi; Ito, Takuya; Saji, Etsuro

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a benchmark problem suite for studying the physics of next-generation fuels of light water reactors. The target discharge burnup of the next-generation fuel was set to 70 GWd/t considering the increasing trend in discharge burnup of light water reactor fuels. The UO 2 and MOX fuels are included in the benchmark specifications. The benchmark problem consists of three different geometries: fuel pin cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly. In the pin cell problem, detailed nuclear characteristics such as burnup dependence of nuclide-wise reactivity were included in the required calculation results to facilitate the study of reactor physics. In the assembly benchmark problems, important parameters for in-core fuel management such as local peaking factors and reactivity coefficients were included in the required results. The benchmark problems provide comprehensive test problems for next-generation light water reactor fuels with extended high burnup. Furthermore, since the pin cell, the PWR assembly and the BWR assembly problems are independent, analyses of the entire benchmark suite is not necessary: e.g., the set of pin cell and PWR fuel assembly problems will be suitable for those in charge of PWR in-core fuel management, and the set of pin cell and BWR fuel assembly problems for those in charge of BWR in-core fuel management. (author)

  12. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity growth. Throughout

  13. Benchmarking the Netherlands. Benchmarking for growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Ministry of Economic Affairs' publication 'Benchmarking the Netherlands', which aims to assess the competitiveness of the Dutch economy. The methodology and objective of the benchmarking remain the same. The basic conditions for economic activity (institutions, regulation, etc.) in a number of benchmark countries are compared in order to learn from the solutions found by other countries for common economic problems. This publication is devoted entirely to the potential output of the Dutch economy. In other words, its ability to achieve sustainable growth and create work over a longer period without capacity becoming an obstacle. This is important because economic growth is needed to increase prosperity in the broad sense and meeting social needs. Prosperity in both a material (per capita GDP) and immaterial (living environment, environment, health, etc) sense, in other words. The economy's potential output is determined by two structural factors: the growth of potential employment and the structural increase in labour productivity. Analysis by the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) shows that in recent years the increase in the capacity for economic growth has been realised mainly by increasing the supply of labour and reducing the equilibrium unemployment rate. In view of the ageing of the population in the coming years and decades the supply of labour is unlikely to continue growing at the pace we have become accustomed to in recent years. According to a number of recent studies, to achieve a respectable rate of sustainable economic growth the aim will therefore have to be to increase labour productivity. To realise this we have to focus on for six pillars of economic policy: (1) human capital, (2) functioning of markets, (3) entrepreneurship, (4) spatial planning, (5) innovation, and (6) sustainability. These six pillars determine the course for economic policy aiming at higher productivity

  14. A framework for benchmarking land models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Q. Luo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1 targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2 a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3 metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4 model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1 a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2 a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties

  15. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Ghasemi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance incompanies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, ithas rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan’s Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aimsto share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how the projectsystematic implementation led to succes.

  16. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    OpenAIRE

    Sasan Ghasemi; Mohammad Nazemi; Mehran Nejati

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance in companies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, it has rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan's Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aims to share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how th...

  17. IAEA sodium void reactivity benchmark calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.N.; Finck, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the IAEA-1 992 ''Benchmark Calculation of Sodium Void Reactivity Effect in Fast Reactor Core'' problem is evaluated. The proposed design is a large axially heterogeneous oxide-fueled fast reactor as described in Section 2; the core utilizes a sodium plenum above the core to enhance leakage effects. The calculation methods used in this benchmark evaluation are described in Section 3. In Section 4, the calculated core performance results for the benchmark reactor model are presented; and in Section 5, the influence of steel and interstitial sodium heterogeneity effects is estimated

  18. Benchmarking gate-based quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Kristel; Nocon, Madita; Willsch, Dennis; Jin, Fengping; Lippert, Thomas; De Raedt, Hans

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of public access to small gate-based quantum processors, it becomes necessary to develop a benchmarking methodology such that independent researchers can validate the operation of these processors. We explore the usefulness of a number of simple quantum circuits as benchmarks for gate-based quantum computing devices and show that circuits performing identity operations are very simple, scalable and sensitive to gate errors and are therefore very well suited for this task. We illustrate the procedure by presenting benchmark results for the IBM Quantum Experience, a cloud-based platform for gate-based quantum computing.

  19. Benchmarking Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakic, I.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main tasks an owner have is to keep its business competitive on the market while delivering its product. Being owner of nuclear power plant bear the same (or even more complex and stern) responsibility due to safety risks and costs. In the past, nuclear power plant managements could (partly) ignore profit or it was simply expected and to some degree assured through the various regulatory processes governing electricity rate design. It is obvious now that, with the deregulation, utility privatization and competitive electricity market, key measure of success used at nuclear power plants must include traditional metrics of successful business (return on investment, earnings and revenue generation) as well as those of plant performance, safety and reliability. In order to analyze business performance of (specific) nuclear power plant, benchmarking, as one of the well-established concept and usual method was used. Domain was conservatively designed, with well-adjusted framework, but results have still limited application due to many differences, gaps and uncertainties. (author).

  20. Virtual machine performance benchmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Steve G; French, Todd

    2011-10-01

    The attractions of virtual computing are many: reduced costs, reduced resources and simplified maintenance. Any one of these would be compelling for a medical imaging professional attempting to support a complex practice on limited resources in an era of ever tightened reimbursement. In particular, the ability to run multiple operating systems optimized for different tasks (computational image processing on Linux versus office tasks on Microsoft operating systems) on a single physical machine is compelling. However, there are also potential drawbacks. High performance requirements need to be carefully considered if they are to be executed in an environment where the running software has to execute through multiple layers of device drivers before reaching the real disk or network interface. Our lab has attempted to gain insight into the impact of virtualization on performance by benchmarking the following metrics on both physical and virtual platforms: local memory and disk bandwidth, network bandwidth, and integer and floating point performance. The virtual performance metrics are compared to baseline performance on "bare metal." The results are complex, and indeed somewhat surprising.

  1. Process of Integrating Screening and Detailed Risk-based Modeling Analyses to Ensure Consistent and Scientifically Defensible Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, John W.; McDonald, John P.; Taira, Randal Y.

    2002-01-01

    To support cleanup and closure of these tanks, modeling is performed to understand and predict potential impacts to human health and the environment. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a screening tool for the United States Department of Energy, Office of River Protection that estimates the long-term human health risk, from a strategic planning perspective, posed by potential tank releases to the environment. This tool is being conditioned to more detailed model analyses to ensure consistency between studies and to provide scientific defensibility. Once the conditioning is complete, the system will be used to screen alternative cleanup and closure strategies. The integration of screening and detailed models provides consistent analyses, efficiencies in resources, and positive feedback between the various modeling groups. This approach of conditioning a screening methodology to more detailed analyses provides decision-makers with timely and defensible information and increases confidence in the results on the part of clients, regulators, and stakeholders

  2. Uranium-fuel thermal reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping

    2001-01-01

    CENDL-3, the new version of China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library are being processed, and distributed for thermal reactor benchmark analysis recently. The processing was carried out using the NJOY nuclear data processing system. The calculations and analyses of uranium-fuel thermal assemblies TRX-1,2, BAPL-1,2,3, ZEEP-1,2,3 were done with lattice code WIMSD5A. The results were compared with the experimental results, the results of the '1986'WIMS library and the results based on ENDF/B-VI. (author)

  3. Benchmarking Variable Selection in QSAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Martin; Norinder, Ulf; Boyer, Scott; Carlsson, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Variable selection is important in QSAR modeling since it can improve model performance and transparency, as well as reduce the computational cost of model fitting and predictions. Which variable selection methods that perform well in QSAR settings is largely unknown. To address this question we, in a total of 1728 benchmarking experiments, rigorously investigated how eight variable selection methods affect the predictive performance and transparency of random forest models fitted to seven QSAR datasets covering different endpoints, descriptors sets, types of response variables, and number of chemical compounds. The results show that univariate variable selection methods are suboptimal and that the number of variables in the benchmarked datasets can be reduced with about 60 % without significant loss in model performance when using multivariate adaptive regression splines MARS and forward selection. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models

  5. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models.

  6. Determination of Benchmarks Stability within Ahmadu Bello ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heights of six geodetic benchmarks over a total distance of 8.6km at the Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria, Nigeria were recomputed and analysed using least squares adjustment technique. The network computations were tied to two fix primary reference pillars situated outside the campus. The two-tail Chi-square ...

  7. Inelastic finite element analysis of a pipe-elbow assembly (benchmark problem 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, H P [Internationale Atomreaktorbau GmbH (INTERATOM) Bergisch Gladbach (Germany); Prij, J [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation (ECN) Petten (Netherlands)

    1979-06-01

    In the scope of the international benchmark problem effort on piping systems, benchmark problem 2 consisting of a pipe elbow assembly, subjected to a time dependent in-plane bending moment, was analysed using the finite element program MARC. Numerical results are presented and a comparison with experimental results is made. It is concluded that the main reason for the deviation between the calculated and measured values is due to the fact that creep-plasticity interaction is not taken into account in the analysis. (author)

  8. Benchmarking for Best Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Zairi, Mohamed

    1998-01-01

    Benchmarking for Best Practice uses up-to-the-minute case-studies of individual companies and industry-wide quality schemes to show how and why implementation has succeeded. For any practitioner wanting to establish best practice in a wide variety of business areas, this book makes essential reading. .It is also an ideal textbook on the applications of TQM since it describes concepts, covers definitions and illustrates the applications with first-hand examples. Professor Mohamed Zairi is an international expert and leading figure in the field of benchmarking. His pioneering work in this area l

  9. Benchmarking Danish Industries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Britta; Bentzen, Eric; Aagaard Andreassen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    compatible survey. The International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS) doesbring up the question of supply chain management, but unfortunately, we did not have access to thedatabase. Data from the members of the SCOR-model, in the form of benchmarked performance data,may exist, but are nonetheless...... not public. The survey is a cooperative project "Benchmarking DanishIndustries" with CIP/Aalborg University, the Danish Technological University, the DanishTechnological Institute and Copenhagen Business School as consortia partners. The project has beenfunded by the Danish Agency for Trade and Industry...

  10. [Do you mean benchmarking?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, F; Solignac, S; Marty, J

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of benchmarking is to settle improvement processes by comparing the activities to quality standards. The proposed methodology is illustrated by benchmark business cases performed inside medical plants on some items like nosocomial diseases or organization of surgery facilities. Moreover, the authors have built a specific graphic tool, enhanced with balance score numbers and mappings, so that the comparison between different anesthesia-reanimation services, which are willing to start an improvement program, is easy and relevant. This ready-made application is even more accurate as far as detailed tariffs of activities are implemented.

  11. Thermal reactor benchmark testing of 69 group library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng; Wang Yaoqing; Liu Ping; Zhang Baocheng

    1994-01-01

    Using a code system NSLINK, AMPX master library in WIMS 69 groups structure are made from nuclides relating to 4 newest evaluated nuclear data libraries. Some integrals of 10 thermal reactor benchmark assemblies recommended by the U.S. CSEWG are calculated using rectified PASC-1 code system and compared with foreign results, the authors results are in good agreement with others. 69 group libraries of evaluated data bases in TPFAP interface file are generated with NJOY code system. The k ∞ values of 6 cell lattice assemblies are calculated by the code CBM. The calculated results are analysed and compared

  12. Benchmark analysis of MCNP trademark ENDF/B-VI iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, J.D.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets

  13. Benchmarking Danish Vocational Education and Training Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wittrup, Jesper

    This study paper discusses methods whereby Danish vocational education and training colleges can be benchmarked, and presents results from a number of models. It is conceptually complicated to benchmark vocational colleges, as the various colleges in Denmark offer a wide range of course programmes...... attempt to summarise the various effects that the colleges have in two relevant figures, namely retention rates of students and employment rates among students who have completed training programmes....

  14. Results of de-novo and Motif activity analyses - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us FANTOM... JASPAR) Data file File name: Motifs File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/phase1.3...tabase Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Results of de-novo and Motif activity analyses - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  15. Incorporating Variational Local Analysis and Prediction System (vLAPS) Analyses with Nudging Data Assimilation: Methodology and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    in the hybrid scheme. They conclude that in the Lorenz model they investigated, the hybrid scheme cannot result in errors that are simultaneously ...centered on the analysis time. Note that the spatial and temporal refinement of the analyses are taking place simultaneously (i.e., the first analysis...of a strong capping inversion and then a deep elevated mixed layer. At 1800 UTC (Fig. 5b), daytime heating along with the formation of a convective

  16. Benchmarking and Performance Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TANTAU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the chosen topic is explained by the meaning of the firm efficiency concept - the firm efficiency means the revealed performance (how well the firm performs in the actual market environment given the basic characteristics of the firms and their markets that are expected to drive their profitability (firm size, market power etc.. This complex and relative performance could be due to such things as product innovation, management quality, work organization, some other factors can be a cause even if they are not directly observed by the researcher. The critical need for the management individuals/group to continuously improve their firm/company’s efficiency and effectiveness, the need for the managers to know which are the success factors and the competitiveness determinants determine consequently, what performance measures are most critical in determining their firm’s overall success. Benchmarking, when done properly, can accurately identify both successful companies and the underlying reasons for their success. Innovation and benchmarking firm level performance are critical interdependent activities. Firm level variables, used to infer performance, are often interdependent due to operational reasons. Hence, the managers need to take the dependencies among these variables into account when forecasting and benchmarking performance. This paper studies firm level performance using financial ratio and other type of profitability measures. It uses econometric models to describe and then propose a method to forecast and benchmark performance.

  17. Surveys and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Surveys and benchmarks continue to grow in importance for community colleges in response to several factors. One is the press for accountability, that is, for colleges to report the outcomes of their programs and services to demonstrate their quality and prudent use of resources, primarily to external constituents and governing boards at the state…

  18. Numerical methods: Analytical benchmarking in transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical methods applied to reactor technology have reached a high degree of maturity. Certainly one- and two-dimensional neutron transport calculations have become routine, with several programs available on personal computer and the most widely used programs adapted to workstation and minicomputer computational environments. With the introduction of massive parallelism and as experience with multitasking increases, even more improvement in the development of transport algorithms can be expected. Benchmarking an algorithm is usually not a very pleasant experience for the code developer. Proper algorithmic verification by benchmarking involves the following considerations: (1) conservation of particles, (2) confirmation of intuitive physical behavior, and (3) reproduction of analytical benchmark results. By using today's computational advantages, new basic numerical methods have been developed that allow a wider class of benchmark problems to be considered

  19. Benchmarking ENDF/B-VII.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marck, Steven C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The new major release VII.0 of the ENDF/B nuclear data library has been tested extensively using benchmark calculations. These were based upon MCNP-4C3 continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutronics simulations, together with nuclear data processed using the code NJOY. Three types of benchmarks were used, viz., criticality safety benchmarks (fusion) shielding benchmarks, and reference systems for which the effective delayed neutron fraction is reported. For criticality safety, more than 700 benchmarks from the International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were used. Benchmarks from all categories were used, ranging from low-enriched uranium, compound fuel, thermal spectrum ones (LEU-COMP-THERM), to mixed uranium-plutonium, metallic fuel, fast spectrum ones (MIX-MET-FAST). For fusion shielding many benchmarks were based on IAEA specifications for the Oktavian experiments (for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, LiF, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, W, Zr), Fusion Neutronics Source in Japan (for Be, C, N, O, Fe, Pb), and Pulsed Sphere experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (for 6 Li, 7 Li, Be, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Ti, Fe, Pb, D 2 O, H 2 O, concrete, polyethylene and teflon). For testing delayed neutron data more than thirty measurements in widely varying systems were used. Among these were measurements in the Tank Critical Assembly (TCA in Japan) and IPEN/MB-01 (Brazil), both with a thermal spectrum, and two cores in Masurca (France) and three cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA, Japan), all with fast spectra. In criticality safety, many benchmarks were chosen from the category with a thermal spectrum, low-enriched uranium, compound fuel (LEU-COMP-THERM), because this is typical of most current-day reactors, and because these benchmarks were previously underpredicted by as much as 0.5% by most nuclear data libraries (such as ENDF/B-VI.8, JEFF-3.0). The calculated results presented here show that this underprediction is no longer there for ENDF/B-VII.0. The average over 257

  20. BENCHMARKING ORTEC ISOTOPIC MEASUREMENTS AND CALCULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewberry, R; Raymond Sigg, R; Vito Casella, V; Nitin Bhatt, N

    2008-09-29

    This report represents a description of compiled benchmark tests conducted to probe and to demonstrate the extensive utility of the Ortec ISOTOPIC {gamma}-ray analysis computer program. The ISOTOPIC program performs analyses of {gamma}-ray spectra applied to specific acquisition configurations in order to apply finite-geometry correction factors and sample-matrix-container photon absorption correction factors. The analysis program provides an extensive set of preset acquisition configurations to which the user can add relevant parameters in order to build the geometry and absorption correction factors that the program determines from calculus and from nuclear g-ray absorption and scatter data. The Analytical Development Section field nuclear measurement group of the Savannah River National Laboratory uses the Ortec ISOTOPIC analysis program extensively for analyses of solid waste and process holdup applied to passive {gamma}-ray acquisitions. Frequently the results of these {gamma}-ray acquisitions and analyses are to determine compliance with facility criticality safety guidelines. Another use of results is to designate 55-gallon drum solid waste as qualified TRU waste3 or as low-level waste. Other examples of the application of the ISOTOPIC analysis technique to passive {gamma}-ray acquisitions include analyses of standard waste box items and unique solid waste configurations. In many passive {gamma}-ray acquisition circumstances the container and sample have sufficient density that the calculated energy-dependent transmission correction factors have intrinsic uncertainties in the range 15%-100%. This is frequently the case when assaying 55-gallon drums of solid waste with masses of up to 400 kg and when assaying solid waste in extensive unique containers. Often an accurate assay of the transuranic content of these containers is not required, but rather a good defensible designation as >100 nCi/g (TRU waste) or <100 nCi/g (low level solid waste) is required. In

  1. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  2. US/JAERI calculational benchmarks for nuclear data and codes intercomparison. Article 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Jung, J.; Sawan, M.E.; Nakagawa, M.; Mori, T.; Kosako, K.

    1986-01-01

    Prior to analyzing the integral experiments performed at the FNS facility at JAERI, both US and JAERI's analysts have agreed upon four calculational benchmark problems proposed by JAERI to intercompare results based on various codes and data base used independently by both countries. To compare codes the same data base is used (ENDF/B-IV). To compare nuclear data libraries, common codes were applied. Some of the benchmarks chosen were geometrically simple and consisted of a single material to clearly identify sources of discrepancies and thus help in analysing the integral experiments

  3. The quality of reporting methods and results of cost-effectiveness analyses in Spain: a methodological systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Ridao, Manuel; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; García-Altés, Anna; Cameron, Chris; González-Bermejo, Diana; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Bernal-Delgado, Enrique; Peiró, Salvador; Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael; Hutton, Brian

    2016-01-07

    Cost-effectiveness analysis has been recognized as an important tool to determine the efficiency of healthcare interventions and services. There is a need for evaluating the reporting of methods and results of cost-effectiveness analyses and establishing their validity. We describe and examine reporting characteristics of methods and results of cost-effectiveness analyses conducted in Spain during more than two decades. A methodological systematic review was conducted with the information obtained through an updated literature review in PubMed and complementary databases (e.g. Scopus, ISI Web of Science, National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) databases from Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD), Índice Médico Español (IME) Índice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud (IBECS)). We identified cost-effectiveness analyses conducted in Spain that used quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) as outcome measures (period 1989-December 2014). Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each paper. The data were analysed descriptively. In total, 223 studies were included. Very few studies (10; 4.5 %) reported working from a protocol. Most studies (200; 89.7 %) were simulation models and included a median of 1000 patients. Only 105 (47.1 %) studies presented an adequate description of the characteristics of the target population. Most study interventions were categorized as therapeutic (189; 84.8 %) and nearly half (111; 49.8 %) considered an active alternative as the comparator. Effectiveness of data was derived from a single study in 87 (39.0 %) reports, and only few (40; 17.9 %) used evidence synthesis-based estimates. Few studies (42; 18.8 %) reported a full description of methods for QALY calculation. The majority of the studies (147; 65.9 %) reported that the study intervention produced "more costs and more QALYs" than the comparator. Most studies (200; 89.7 %) reported favourable

  4. XRF analyses for the study of painting technique and degradation on frescoes by Beato Angelico: first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzinghi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Beato Angelico is one of the most important Italian painters of the Renaissance period, in particular he was a master of the so-called 'Buon fresco' technique for mural paintings. A wide diagnostic campaign with X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyses has been carried out on three masterworks painted by Beato Angelico in the San Marco monastery in Florence: the Crocifissione con Santi, the 'Annunciazione' and the 'Madonna delle Ombre'. The latter is painted by mixing fresco and secco techniques, which makes it of particular interest for the study of two different paintings techniques of the same artist. Then the aim of the study was focused on the characterization of the painting palette, and therefore the painting techniques, used by Beato Angelico. Moreover, the conservators were interested in the study of degradation processes and old restoration treatments. Our analyses have been carried out by means of the XRF spectrometer developed at LABEC laboratory at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Florence (Italy). XRF is indeed especially suited for such a kind of study, allowing for multi-elemental, nondestructive, non-invasive analyses in a short time, with portable instruments. In this paper the first results concerning the XRF analysis are presented.

  5. Benchmark neutron porosity log calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Michael, M.; Verghese, K.; Gardner, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations have been made for a benchmark neutron porosity log problem with the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP and the specific purpose Monte Carlo code McDNL. For accuracy and timing comparison purposes the CRAY XMP and MicroVax II computers have been used with these codes. The CRAY has been used for an analog version of the MCNP code while the MicroVax II has been used for the optimized variance reduction versions of both codes. Results indicate that the two codes give the same results within calculated standard deviations. Comparisons are given and discussed for accuracy (precision) and computation times for the two codes

  6. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Artjom; Riazanov, Alexandre; Hindle, Matthew M; Baker, Christopher Jo

    2014-02-25

    Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption.

  7. Benchmarking for Cost Improvement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) conducted the Benchmarking for Cost Improvement initiative with three objectives: Pilot test benchmarking as an EM cost improvement tool; identify areas for cost improvement and recommend actions to address these areas; provide a framework for future cost improvement. The benchmarking initiative featured the use of four principal methods (program classification, nationwide cost improvement survey, paired cost comparison and component benchmarking). Interested parties contributed during both the design and execution phases. The benchmarking initiative was conducted on an accelerated basis. Of necessity, it considered only a limited set of data that may not be fully representative of the diverse and complex conditions found at the many DOE installations. The initiative generated preliminary data about cost differences and it found a high degree of convergence on several issues. Based on this convergence, the report recommends cost improvement strategies and actions. This report describes the steps taken as part of the benchmarking initiative and discusses the findings and recommended actions for achieving cost improvement. The results and summary recommendations, reported below, are organized by the study objectives.

  8. Lesson learned from the SARNET wall condensation benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, W.; Forgione, N.; Merli, F.; Oriolo, F.; Paci, S.; Kljenak, I.; Kostka, P.; Vyskocil, L.; Travis, J.R.; Lehmkuhl, J.; Kelm, S.; Chin, Y.-S.; Bucci, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The results of the benchmarking activity on wall condensation are reported. • The work was performed in the frame of SARNET. • General modelling techniques for condensation are discussed. • Results of University of Pisa and of other benchmark participants are discussed. • The lesson learned is drawn. - Abstract: The prediction of condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases has received continuing attention in the frame of the Severe Accident Research Network of Excellence, both in the first (2004–2008) and in the second (2009–2013) EC integrated projects. Among the different reasons for considering so relevant this basic phenomenon, coped with by classical treatments dated in the first decades of the last century, there is the interest for developing updated CFD models for reactor containment analysis, requiring validating at a different level the available modelling techniques. In the frame of SARNET, benchmarking activities were undertaken taking advantage of the work performed at different institutions in setting up and developing models for steam condensation in conditions of interest for nuclear reactor containment. Four steps were performed in the activity, involving: (1) an idealized problem freely inspired at the actual conditions occurring in an experimental facility, CONAN, installed at the University of Pisa; (2) a first comparison with experimental data purposely collected by the CONAN facility; (3) a second comparison with data available from experimental campaigns performed in the same apparatus before the inclusion of the activities in SARNET; (4) a third exercise involving data obtained at lower mixture velocity than in previous campaigns, aimed at providing conditions closer to those addressed in reactor containment analyses. The last step of the benchmarking activity required to change the configuration of the experimental apparatus to achieve the lower flow rates involved in the new test specifications. The

  9. Benchmarking i den offentlige sektor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj; Dietrichson, Lars; Sandalgaard, Niels

    2008-01-01

    I artiklen vil vi kort diskutere behovet for benchmarking i fraværet af traditionelle markedsmekanismer. Herefter vil vi nærmere redegøre for, hvad benchmarking er med udgangspunkt i fire forskellige anvendelser af benchmarking. Regulering af forsyningsvirksomheder vil blive behandlet, hvorefter...

  10. CEC thermal-hydraulic benchmark exercise on Fiploc verification experiment F2 in Battelle model containment long-term heat-up phase. Results for phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Schall, M.; Wolf, L.

    1991-01-01

    The major objective of the F2 experiment was to investigate the thermal-hydraulic long-term phenomena with special emphasis on natural convection phenomena in a loop-type geometry affected by variations of steam and air injections at different locations as well as dry energy supply into various compartments. The open post-test exercise is being performed in two consecutive phases, with Phase I covering the initial long-term heat-up phase. The exercise received widespread international attention with nine organizations from six European countries participating with seven different computer codes (FUMO, Jericho2, Fiploc, Wavco, Contain, Melcor, Cobra/Fathoms). These codes cover a broad spectrum of presently known European computational tools in severe accident containment analyses. The participants used either the specified mass flow or pressure control boundary conditions. Some exercised their codes for both. In total, 14 different computations were officially provided by the participants indicating strong interests and cooperative efforts by various institutions

  11. Common Nearest Neighbor Clustering—A Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lemke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cluster analyses are often conducted with the goal to characterize an underlying probability density, for which the data-point density serves as an estimate for this probability density. We here test and benchmark the common nearest neighbor (CNN cluster algorithm. This algorithm assigns a spherical neighborhood R to each data point and estimates the data-point density between two data points as the number of data points N in the overlapping region of their neighborhoods (step 1. The main principle in the CNN cluster algorithm is cluster growing. This grows the clusters by sequentially adding data points and thereby effectively positions the border of the clusters along an iso-surface of the underlying probability density. This yields a strict partitioning with outliers, for which the cluster represents peaks in the underlying probability density—termed core sets (step 2. The removal of the outliers on the basis of a threshold criterion is optional (step 3. The benchmark datasets address a series of typical challenges, including datasets with a very high dimensional state space and datasets in which the cluster centroids are aligned along an underlying structure (Birch sets. The performance of the CNN algorithm is evaluated with respect to these challenges. The results indicate that the CNN cluster algorithm can be useful in a wide range of settings. Cluster algorithms are particularly important for the analysis of molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We demonstrate how the CNN cluster results can be used as a discretization of the molecular state space for the construction of a core-set model of the MD improving the accuracy compared to conventional full-partitioning models. The software for the CNN clustering is available on GitHub.

  12. Transferability of results of cost utility analyses for biologicals in inflammatory conditions for Central and Eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulácsi, László; Rencz, Fanni; Péntek, Márta; Brodszky, Valentin; Lopert, Ruth; Hevér, Noémi V; Baji, Petra

    2014-05-01

    Several Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries require cost-utility analyses (CUAs) to support reimbursement formulary listing. However, CUAs informed by local evidence are often unavailable, and the cost-effectiveness of the several currently reimbursed biologicals is unclear. To estimate the cost-effectiveness as multiples of per capita GDP/quality adjusted life years (QALY) of four biologicals (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab) currently reimbursed in six CEE countries in six inflammatory rheumatoid and bowel disease conditions. Systematic literature review of published cost-utility analyses in the selected conditions, using the United Kingdom (UK) as reference country and with study selection criteria set to optimize the transfer of results to the CEEs. Prices in each CEE country were pro-rated against UK prices using purchasing power parity (PPP)-adjusted per capita GDP, and local GDP per capita/QALY ratios estimated. Central and Eastern European countries list prices were 144-333% higher than pro rata prices. Out of 85 CUAs identified by previous systematic literature reviews, 15 were selected as a convenience sample for estimating the cost-effectiveness of biologicals in the CEE countries in terms of per capita GDP/QALY. Per capita GDP/QALY values varied from 0.42 to 6.4 across countries and conditions (Bulgaria: 0.97-6.38; Czech Republic: 0.42-2.76; Hungary: 0.54-3.54; Poland: 0.59-3.90; Romania: 0.77-5.07; Slovakia: 0.55-3.61). While results must be interpreted with caution, calculating pro rata (cost-effective) prices and per capita GDP/QALY ratios based on CUAs can aid reimbursement decision-making in the absence of analyses using local data.

  13. KOH concentration effect on the cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. 4: Results of failure analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of KOH concentrations on failure modes and mechanisms of nickel-hydrogen cells were studied using long cycled boiler plate cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations ranging 21 to 36 percent. Life of these cells were up to 40,000 cycles in an accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. An interim life test results were reported earlier in J. Power Sources, 22, 213-220, 1988. The results of final life test, end-of-life cell performance, and teardown analyses are discussed. These teardown analyses included visual observations, measurements of nickel electrode capacity in an electrolyte-flooded cell, dimensional changes of cell components, SEM studies on cell cross section, BET surface area and pore volume distribution in cycled nickel electrodes, and chemical analyses. Cycle life of a nickel-hydrogen cell was improved tremendously as KOH concentration was decreased from 36 to 31 percent and from 31 to 26 percent while effect of further concentration decrease was complicated as described in our earlier report. Failure mode of high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells was gradual capacity decrease, while that of low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells was mainly formation of a soft short. Long cycled (25,000 to 40,000 cycles) nickel electrodes were expanded more than 50 percent of the initial value, but no correlation was found between this expansion and measured capacity. All electrodes cycled in low concentration (21 to 26 percent) cells had higher capacity than those cycled in high concentration (31 to 36 percent) cells.

  14. Benchmarking, benchmarks, or best practices? Applying quality improvement principles to decrease surgical turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, L

    1996-01-01

    The processes of benchmarking, benchmark data comparative analysis, and study of best practices are distinctly different. The study of best practices is explained with an example based on the Arthur Andersen & Co. 1992 "Study of Best Practices in Ambulatory Surgery". The results of a national best practices study in ambulatory surgery were used to provide our quality improvement team with the goal of improving the turnaround time between surgical cases. The team used a seven-step quality improvement problem-solving process to improve the surgical turnaround time. The national benchmark for turnaround times between surgical cases in 1992 was 13.5 minutes. The initial turnaround time at St. Joseph's Medical Center was 19.9 minutes. After the team implemented solutions, the time was reduced to an average of 16.3 minutes, an 18% improvement. Cost-benefit analysis showed a potential enhanced revenue of approximately $300,000, or a potential savings of $10,119. Applying quality improvement principles to benchmarking, benchmarks, or best practices can improve process performance. Understanding which form of benchmarking the institution wishes to embark on will help focus a team and use appropriate resources. Communicating with professional organizations that have experience in benchmarking will save time and money and help achieve the desired results.

  15. Cloud benchmarking for performance

    OpenAIRE

    Varghese, Blesson; Akgun, Ozgur; Miguel, Ian; Thai, Long; Barker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Date of Acceptance: 20/09/2014 How can applications be deployed on the cloud to achieve maximum performance? This question has become significant and challenging with the availability of a wide variety of Virtual Machines (VMs) with different performance capabilities in the cloud. The above question is addressed by proposing a six step benchmarking methodology in which a user provides a set of four weights that indicate how important each of the following groups: memory, processor, computa...

  16. Full sphere hydrodynamic and dynamo benchmarks

    KAUST Repository

    Marti, P.

    2014-01-26

    Convection in planetary cores can generate fluid flow and magnetic fields, and a number of sophisticated codes exist to simulate the dynamic behaviour of such systems. We report on the first community activity to compare numerical results of computer codes designed to calculate fluid flow within a whole sphere. The flows are incompressible and rapidly rotating and the forcing of the flow is either due to thermal convection or due to moving boundaries. All problems defined have solutions that alloweasy comparison, since they are either steady, slowly drifting or perfectly periodic. The first two benchmarks are defined based on uniform internal heating within the sphere under the Boussinesq approximation with boundary conditions that are uniform in temperature and stress-free for the flow. Benchmark 1 is purely hydrodynamic, and has a drifting solution. Benchmark 2 is a magnetohydrodynamic benchmark that can generate oscillatory, purely periodic, flows and magnetic fields. In contrast, Benchmark 3 is a hydrodynamic rotating bubble benchmark using no slip boundary conditions that has a stationary solution. Results from a variety of types of code are reported, including codes that are fully spectral (based on spherical harmonic expansions in angular coordinates and polynomial expansions in radius), mixed spectral and finite difference, finite volume, finite element and also a mixed Fourier-finite element code. There is good agreement between codes. It is found that in Benchmarks 1 and 2, the approximation of a whole sphere problem by a domain that is a spherical shell (a sphere possessing an inner core) does not represent an adequate approximation to the system, since the results differ from whole sphere results. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Royal Astronomical Society.

  17. Numerical analyses of an ex-core fuel incident: Results of the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Z., E-mail: hozer@aeki.kfki.h [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Aszodi, A. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Barnak, M. [IVS, Trnava (Slovakia); Boros, I. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Fogel, M. [VUJE, Trnava (Slovakia); Guillard, V. [IRSN, Cadarache (France); Gyori, Cs. [ITU, EU, Karlsruhe (Germany); Hegyi, G. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Horvath, G.L. [VEIKI, Budapest (Hungary); Nagy, I. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Junninen, P. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kobzar, V. [KI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Legradi, G. [BME NTI Budapest (Hungary); Molnar, A. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Pietarinen, K. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Perneczky, L. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Makihara, Y. [ATMEA, Paris (France); Matejovic, P. [IVS, Trnava (Slovakia); Perez-Fero, E.; Slonszki, E. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2010-03-15

    The OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was developed to support the understanding of fuel behaviour in accident conditions on the basis of analyses of the Paks-2 incident. Numerical simulation of the most relevant aspects of the event and comparison of the calculation results with the available data from the incident was carried out between 2006 and 2007. A database was compiled to provide input for the code calculations. The activities covered the following three areas: (a) Thermal hydraulic calculations described the cooling conditions possibly established during the incident. (b) Simulation of fuel behaviour described the oxidation and degradation mechanisms of the fuel assemblies. (c) The release of fission products from the failed fuel rods was estimated and compared to available measured data. The applied used codes captured the most important events of the Paks-2 incident and the calculated results improved the understanding of the causes and mechanisms of fuel failure. The numerical analyses showed that the by-pass flow leading to insufficient cooling amounted to 75-90% of the inlet flow rate, the maximum temperature in the tank was between 1200 and 1400 deg. C, the degree of zirconium oxidation reached 4-12% and the mass of produced hydrogen was between 3 and 13 kg.

  18. International piping benchmarks: Use of simplified code PACE 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J; Spence, J [University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Blundell, C [Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment, Central Technical Services, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1979-06-01

    This report compares the results obtained using the code PACE 2 with the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) International Piping Benchmark solutions. PACE 2 is designed to analyse systems of pipework using a simplified method which is economical of computer time and hence inexpensive. This low cost is not achieved without some loss of accuracy in the solution, but for most parts of a system this inaccuracy is acceptable and those sections of particular importance may be reanalysed using more precise methods in order to produce a satisfactory analysis of the complete system at reasonable cost. (author)

  19. International piping benchmarks: Use of simplified code PACE 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, J.; Spence, J.; Blundell, C.

    1979-01-01

    This report compares the results obtained using the code PACE 2 with the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) International Piping Benchmark solutions. PACE 2 is designed to analyse systems of pipework using a simplified method which is economical of computer time and hence inexpensive. This low cost is not achieved without some loss of accuracy in the solution, but for most parts of a system this inaccuracy is acceptable and those sections of particular importance may be reanalysed using more precise methods in order to produce a satisfactory analysis of the complete system at reasonable cost. (author)

  20. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water-dimer III: Mixed Jacobi-valence parametrization and benchmark results for the zero point energy, vibrationally excited states, and infrared spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Brill, Michael; Gatti, Fabien; Lauvergnat, David; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2009-06-21

    Quantum dynamical calculations are reported for the zero point energy, several low-lying vibrational states, and the infrared spectrum of the H(5)O(2)(+) cation. The calculations are performed by the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. A new vector parametrization based on a mixed Jacobi-valence description of the system is presented. With this parametrization the potential energy surface coupling is reduced with respect to a full Jacobi description, providing a better convergence of the n-mode representation of the potential. However, new coupling terms appear in the kinetic energy operator. These terms are derived and discussed. A mode-combination scheme based on six combined coordinates is used, and the representation of the 15-dimensional potential in terms of a six-combined mode cluster expansion including up to some 7-dimensional grids is discussed. A statistical analysis of the accuracy of the n-mode representation of the potential at all orders is performed. Benchmark, fully converged results are reported for the zero point energy, which lie within the statistical uncertainty of the reference diffusion Monte Carlo result for this system. Some low-lying vibrationally excited eigenstates are computed by block improved relaxation, illustrating the applicability of the approach to large systems. Benchmark calculations of the linear infrared spectrum are provided, and convergence with increasing size of the time-dependent basis and as a function of the order of the n-mode representation is studied. The calculations presented here make use of recent developments in the parallel version of the MCTDH code, which are briefly discussed. We also show that the infrared spectrum can be computed, to a very good approximation, within D(2d) symmetry, instead of the G(16) symmetry used before, in which the complete rotation of one water molecule with respect to the other is allowed, thus simplifying the dynamical problem.

  1. Benchmarking and performance enhancement framework for multi-staging object-oriented languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed H. Yousef

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on verifying the readiness, feasibility, generality and usefulness of multi-staging programming in software applications. We present a benchmark designed to evaluate the performance gain of different multi-staging programming (MSP languages implementations of object oriented languages. The benchmarks in this suite cover different tests that range from classic simple examples (like matrix algebra to advanced examples (like encryption and image processing. The benchmark is applied to compare the performance gain of two different MSP implementations (Mint and Metaphor that are built on object oriented languages (Java and C# respectively. The results concerning the application of this benchmark on these languages are presented and analysed. The measurement technique used in benchmarking leads to the development of a language independent performance enhancement framework that allows the programmer to select which code segments need staging. The framework also enables the programmer to verify the effectiveness of staging on the application performance. The framework is applied to a real case study. The case study results showed the effectiveness of the framework to achieve significant performance enhancement.

  2. The influence of bilirubin, haemolysis and turbidity on 20 analytical tests performed on automatic analysers. Results of an interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmeyer, D; Bondon, M; Manchon, M; Levillain, P

    1995-01-01

    The director of a laboratory has to be sure to give out reliable results for routine tests on automatic analysers regardless of the clinical context. However, he may find hyperbilirubinaemia in some circumstances, parenteral nutrition causing turbidity in others, and haemolysis occurring if sampling is difficult. For this reason, the Commission for Instrumentation of the Société Française de Biologie Clinique (SFBC) (president Alain Feuillu) decided to look into "visible" interferences--bilirubin, haemolysis and turbidity--and their effect on 20 major tests: 13 substrates/chemistries: albumin, calcium, cholesterol, creatinine, glucose, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, total bilirubin, total proteins, triacylglycerols, uric acid, urea, and 7 enzymatic activities: alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, alpha-amylase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, gamma-glutamyl transferase and lactate dehydrogenase measured on 15 automatic analysers representative of those found on the French market (Astra 8, AU 510, AU 5010, AU 5000, Chem 1, CX 7, Dax 72, Dimension, Ektachem, Hitachi 717, Hitachi 737, Hitachi 747, Monarch, Open 30, Paramax, Wako 30 R) and to see how much they affect the accuracy of results under routine conditions in the laboratory. The study was carried out following the SFBC protocol for the validation of techniques using spiked plasma pools with bilirubin, ditauro-bilirubin, haemoglobin (from haemolysate) and Intralipid (turbidity). Overall, the following results were obtained: haemolysis affects tests the most often (34.5% of cases); total bilirubin interferes in 21.7% of cases; direct bilirubin and turbidity seem to interfere less at around 17%. The different tests are not affected to the same extent; enzyme activity is hardly affected at all; on the other hand certain major tests are extremely sensitive, increasingly so as we go through the following: creatinine (interference of bilirubin), triacylglycerols (interference of bilirubin and

  3. Benchmarking reference services: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J G; Buchanan, H S

    1995-01-01

    Benchmarking is based on the common sense idea that someone else, either inside or outside of libraries, has found a better way of doing certain things and that your own library's performance can be improved by finding out how others do things and adopting the best practices you find. Benchmarking is one of the tools used for achieving continuous improvement in Total Quality Management (TQM) programs. Although benchmarking can be done on an informal basis, TQM puts considerable emphasis on formal data collection and performance measurement. Used to its full potential, benchmarking can provide a common measuring stick to evaluate process performance. This article introduces the general concept of benchmarking, linking it whenever possible to reference services in health sciences libraries. Data collection instruments that have potential application in benchmarking studies are discussed and the need to develop common measurement tools to facilitate benchmarking is emphasized.

  4. Benchmark calculations of power distribution within assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavarec, C.; Perron, J.F.; Verwaerde, D.; West, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    The main objective of this Benchmark is to compare different techniques for fine flux prediction based upon coarse mesh diffusion or transport calculations. We proposed 5 ''core'' configurations including different assembly types (17 x 17 pins, ''uranium'', ''absorber'' or ''MOX'' assemblies), with different boundary conditions. The specification required results in terms of reactivity, pin by pin fluxes and production rate distributions. The proposal for these Benchmark calculations was made by J.C. LEFEBVRE, J. MONDOT, J.P. WEST and the specification (with nuclear data, assembly types, core configurations for 2D geometry and results presentation) was distributed to correspondents of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. 11 countries and 19 companies answered the exercise proposed by this Benchmark. Heterogeneous calculations and homogeneous calculations were made. Various methods were used to produce the results: diffusion (finite differences, nodal...), transport (P ij , S n , Monte Carlo). This report presents an analysis and intercomparisons of all the results received

  5. Benchmarking Non-Hardware Balance of System (Soft) Costs for U.S. Photovoltaic Systems Using a Data-Driven Analysis from PV Installer Survey Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardani, K.; Barbose, G.; Margolis, R.; Wiser, R.; Feldman, D.; Ong, S.

    2012-11-01

    This report presents results from the first U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored, bottom-up data-collection and analysis of non-hardware balance-of-system costs--often referred to as 'business process' or 'soft' costs--for residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems.

  6. Production of neutronic discrete equations for a cylindrical geometry in one group energy and benchmark the results with MCNP-4B code with one group energy library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, A. A.; Vosoughi, N.; Shahriari, M.

    2002-01-01

    In reactor core neutronic calculations, we usually choose a control volume and investigate about the input, output, production and absorption inside it. Finally, we derive neutron transport equation. This equation is not easy to solve for simple and symmetrical geometry. The objective of this paper is to introduce a new direct method for neutronic calculations. This method is based on physics of problem and with meshing of the desired geometry, writing the balance equation for each mesh intervals and with notice to the conjunction between these mesh intervals, produce the final discrete equation series without production of neutron transport differential equation and mandatory passing form differential equation bridge. This method, which is named Direct Discrete Method, was applied in static state, for a cylindrical geometry in one group energy. The validity of the results from this new method are tested with MCNP-4B code with a one group energy library. One energy group direct discrete equation produces excellent results, which can be compared with the results of MCNP-4B

  7. Benchmarking of FA2D/PARCS Code Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.; Pevec, D.

    2006-01-01

    FA2D/PARCS code package is used at Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER), University of Zagreb, for static and dynamic reactor core analyses. It consists of two codes: FA2D and PARCS. FA2D is a multigroup two dimensional transport theory code for burn-up calculations based on collision probability method, developed at FER. It generates homogenised cross sections both of single pins and entire fuel assemblies. PARCS is an advanced nodal code developed at Purdue University for US NRC and it is based on neutron diffusion theory for three dimensional whole core static and dynamic calculations. It is modified at FER to enable internal 3D depletion calculation and usage of neutron cross section data in a format produced by FA2D and interface codes. The FA2D/PARCS code system has been validated on NPP Krsko operational data (Cycles 1 and 21). As we intend to use this code package for development of IRIS reactor loading patterns the first logical step was to validate the FA2D/PARCS code package on a set of IRIS benchmarks, starting from simple unit fuel cell, via fuel assembly, to full core benchmark. The IRIS 17x17 fuel with erbium burnable absorber was used in last full core benchmark. The results of modelling the IRIS full core benchmark using FA2D/PARCS code package have been compared with reference data showing the adequacy of FA2D/PARCS code package model for IRIS reactor core design.(author)

  8. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puton, Tomasz; Kozlowski, Lukasz P.; Rother, Kristian M.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative performance of RNA secondary structure prediction methods on RNAs of different size and with respect to different types of structure. According to our tests, on the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by a comparative approach are generated by CentroidAlifold, MXScarna, RNAalifold and TurboFold. On the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by single-sequence analyses are generated by CentroidFold, ContextFold and IPknot. The best comparative methods typically outperform the best single-sequence methods if an alignment of homologous RNA sequences is available. This article presents the results of our benchmarks as of 3 October 2012, whereas the rankings presented online are continuously updated. We will gladly include new prediction methods and new measures of accuracy in the new editions of CompaRNA benchmarks. PMID:23435231

  9. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puton, Tomasz; Kozlowski, Lukasz P; Rother, Kristian M; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-04-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative performance of RNA secondary structure prediction methods on RNAs of different size and with respect to different types of structure. According to our tests, on the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by a comparative approach are generated by CentroidAlifold, MXScarna, RNAalifold and TurboFold. On the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by single-sequence analyses are generated by CentroidFold, ContextFold and IPknot. The best comparative methods typically outperform the best single-sequence methods if an alignment of homologous RNA sequences is available. This article presents the results of our benchmarks as of 3 October 2012, whereas the rankings presented online are continuously updated. We will gladly include new prediction methods and new measures of accuracy in the new editions of CompaRNA benchmarks.

  10. The benchmark testing of 9Be of CENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping

    2002-01-01

    CENDL-3, the latest version of China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library was finished. The data of 9 Be were updated, and distributed for benchmark analysis recently. The calculated results were presented, and compared with the experimental data and the results based on other evaluated nuclear data libraries. The results show that CENDL-3 is better than others for most benchmarks

  11. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care we...... document pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for assessment and benchmarking the clinical management of HIV-patients in any setting worldwide....

  12. Benchmarking Cloud Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    With the rise of cloud computing, many cloud storage systems like Dropbox, Google Drive and Mega have been built to provide decentralized and reliable file storage. It is thus of prime importance to know their features, performance, and the best way to make use of them. In this context, we introduce BenchCloud, a tool designed as part of this thesis to conveniently and efficiently benchmark any cloud storage system. First, we provide a study of six commonly-used cloud storage systems to ident...

  13. The COST Benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Tiesyte, Dalia; Tradisauskas, Nerius

    2006-01-01

    An infrastructure is emerging that enables the positioning of populations of on-line, mobile service users. In step with this, research in the management of moving objects has attracted substantial attention. In particular, quite a few proposals now exist for the indexing of moving objects...... takes into account that the available positions of the moving objects are inaccurate, an aspect largely ignored in previous indexing research. The concepts of data and query enlargement are introduced for addressing inaccuracy. As proof of concepts of the benchmark, the paper covers the application...

  14. ATOP - The Advanced Taiwan Ocean Prediction System Based on the mpiPOM. Part 1: Model Descriptions, Analyses and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Oey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A data-assimilated Taiwan Ocean Prediction (ATOP system is being developed at the National Central University, Taiwan. The model simulates sea-surface height, three-dimensional currents, temperature and salinity and turbulent mixing. The model has options for tracer and particle-tracking algorithms, as well as for wave-induced Stokes drift and wave-enhanced mixing and bottom drag. Two different forecast domains have been tested: a large-grid domain that encompasses the entire North Pacific Ocean at 0.1° × 0.1° horizontal resolution and 41 vertical sigma levels, and a smaller western North Pacific domain which at present also has the same horizontal resolution. In both domains, 25-year spin-up runs from 1988 - 2011 were first conducted, forced by six-hourly Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP and NCEP reanalysis Global Forecast System (GSF winds. The results are then used as initial conditions to conduct ocean analyses from January 2012 through February 2012, when updated hindcasts and real-time forecasts begin using the GFS winds. This paper describes the ATOP system and compares the forecast results against satellite altimetry data for assessing model skills. The model results are also shown to compare well with observations of (i the Kuroshio intrusion in the northern South China Sea, and (ii subtropical counter current. Review and comparison with other models in the literature of ¡§(i¡¨ are also given.

  15. DORT-TD/THERMIX solutions for the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, Bismark; Pautz, Andreas; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2008-01-01

    In new reactor designs that are still under review such as the PBMR, not much experimental data exists to benchmark newly developed computer codes against. Such a situation requires that nuclear engineers and designers of this novel reactor design must resort to the validation of a newly developed code through a code-to-code benchmarking exercise because there are validated codes that are currently in use to analyze this reactor design, albeit very few of them. There are numerous HTR core physics benchmarks that are currently being pursued by different organizations, for different purposes. One such benchmark exercise is the PBMR-400 MW OECD/NEA/NSC coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark. In this paper, a newly developed coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics code system, DORT-TD/THERMIX with both transport and diffusion theory options, is used to simulate the transient scenarios in the above-mentioned benchmark problem. Steady-state calculations results are compared with selected participants' results as well as transient models in which the diffusion and transport theory solutions of the same code system are directly compared. Several sensitivity studies are also shown in order to determine how much the change in certain parameters influences the overall behaviour of a given transient. It is shown in this paper that DORT-TD/THERMIX is a versatile tool which can be deployed for design and safety analyses of high temperature reactors of pebble-bed type. (authors)

  16. Modeling of Phenix End-of-Life control rod withdrawal benchmark with DYN3D SFR version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Evgeny; Fridman, Emil [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Reactor Safety

    2017-06-01

    The reactor dynamics code DYN3D is currently under extension for Sodium cooled Fast Reactor applications. The control rod withdrawal benchmark from the Phenix End-of-Life experiments was selected for verification and validation purposes. This report presents some selected results to demonstrate the feasibility of using DYN3D for steady-state Sodium cooled Fast Reactor analyses.

  17. Benchmarking multimedia performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Ahmad; Sudharsanan, Subramania I.

    1998-03-01

    With the introduction of faster processors and special instruction sets tailored to multimedia, a number of exciting applications are now feasible on the desktops. Among these is the DVD playback consisting, among other things, of MPEG-2 video and Dolby digital audio or MPEG-2 audio. Other multimedia applications such as video conferencing and speech recognition are also becoming popular on computer systems. In view of this tremendous interest in multimedia, a group of major computer companies have formed, Multimedia Benchmarks Committee as part of Standard Performance Evaluation Corp. to address the performance issues of multimedia applications. The approach is multi-tiered with three tiers of fidelity from minimal to full compliant. In each case the fidelity of the bitstream reconstruction as well as quality of the video or audio output are measured and the system is classified accordingly. At the next step the performance of the system is measured. In many multimedia applications such as the DVD playback the application needs to be run at a specific rate. In this case the measurement of the excess processing power, makes all the difference. All these make a system level, application based, multimedia benchmark very challenging. Several ideas and methodologies for each aspect of the problems will be presented and analyzed.

  18. SCWEB, Scientific Workstation Evaluation Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffenetti, R C [Computing Services-Support Services Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    1988-06-16

    1 - Description of program or function: The SCWEB (Scientific Workstation Evaluation Benchmark) software includes 16 programs which are executed in a well-defined scenario to measure the following performance capabilities of a scientific workstation: implementation of FORTRAN77, processor speed, memory management, disk I/O, monitor (or display) output, scheduling of processing (multiprocessing), and scheduling of print tasks (spooling). 2 - Method of solution: The benchmark programs are: DK1, DK2, and DK3, which do Fourier series fitting based on spline techniques; JC1, which checks the FORTRAN function routines which produce numerical results; JD1 and JD2, which solve dense systems of linear equations in double- and single-precision, respectively; JD3 and JD4, which perform matrix multiplication in single- and double-precision, respectively; RB1, RB2, and RB3, which perform substantial amounts of I/O processing on files other than the input and output files; RR1, which does intense single-precision floating-point multiplication in a tight loop, RR2, which initializes a 512x512 integer matrix in a manner which skips around in the address space rather than initializing each consecutive memory cell in turn; RR3, which writes alternating text buffers to the output file; RR4, which evaluates the timer routines and demonstrates that they conform to the specification; and RR5, which determines whether the workstation is capable of executing a 4-megabyte program

  19. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  20. Performance Evaluation of Supercomputers using HPCC and IMB Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Subhash; Ciotti, Robert; Gunney, Brian T. N.; Spelce, Thomas E.; Koniges, Alice; Dossa, Don; Adamidis, Panagiotis; Rabenseifner, Rolf; Tiyyagura, Sunil R.; Mueller, Matthias; hide

    2006-01-01

    The HPC Challenge (HPCC) benchmark suite and the Intel MPI Benchmark (IMB) are used to compare and evaluate the combined performance of processor, memory subsystem and interconnect fabric of five leading supercomputers - SGI Altix BX2, Cray XI, Cray Opteron Cluster, Dell Xeon cluster, and NEC SX-8. These five systems use five different networks (SGI NUMALINK4, Cray network, Myrinet, InfiniBand, and NEC IXS). The complete set of HPCC benchmarks are run on each of these systems. Additionally, we present Intel MPI Benchmarks (IMB) results to study the performance of 11 MPI communication functions on these systems.

  1. A 3D stylized half-core CANDU benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pounders, Justin M.; Rahnema, Farzad; Serghiuta, Dumitru; Tholammakkil, John

    2011-01-01

    A 3D stylized half-core Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor benchmark problem is presented. The benchmark problem is comprised of a heterogeneous lattice of 37-element natural uranium fuel bundles, heavy water moderated, heavy water cooled, with adjuster rods included as reactivity control devices. Furthermore, a 2-group macroscopic cross section library has been developed for the problem to increase the utility of this benchmark for full-core deterministic transport methods development. Monte Carlo results are presented for the benchmark problem in cooled, checkerboard void, and full coolant void configurations.

  2. Benchmarking & European Sustainable Transport Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, H.

    2003-01-01

    , Benchmarking is one of the management tools that have recently been introduced in the transport sector. It is rapidly being applied to a wide range of transport operations, services and policies. This paper is a contribution to the discussion of the role of benchmarking in the future efforts to...... contribution to the discussions within the Eusponsored BEST Thematic Network (Benchmarking European Sustainable Transport) which ran from 2000 to 2003....

  3. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  4. Pathways from fertility history to later life health: Results from analyses of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Grundy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous research shows associations between fertility histories and later life health. The childless, those with large families, and those with a young age at entry to parenthood generally have higher mortality and worse health than parents of two or three children. These associations are hypothesised to reflect a range of biosocial influences, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Objective: To identify pathways from fertility histories to later life health by examining mediation through health-related behaviours, social support and strain, and wealth. Additionally to examine mediation through allostatic load - an indicator of multisystem physical dysregulation, hypothesised to be an outcome of chronic stress. Methods: Associations between fertility histories, mediators, and outcomes were analysed using path models. Data were drawn from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Outcomes studied were a measure of allostatic load based on 9 biomarkers and self-reported long-term illness which limited activities. Results: Early parenthood (Conclusions: In England early parenthood and larger family size are associated with less wealth and poorer health behaviours and this accounts for much of the association with health. At least part of this operates through stress-related physiological dysfunction (allostatic load.

  5. Benchmarking criticality safety calculations with subcritical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1984-06-01

    Calculation of the neutron multiplication factor at delayed criticality may be necessary for benchmarking calculations but it may not be sufficient. The use of subcritical experiments to benchmark criticality safety calculations could result in substantial savings in fuel material costs for experiments. In some cases subcritical configurations could be used to benchmark calculations where sufficient fuel to achieve delayed criticality is not available. By performing a variety of measurements with subcritical configurations, much detailed information can be obtained which can be compared directly with calculations. This paper discusses several measurements that can be performed with subcritical assemblies and presents examples that include comparisons between calculation and experiment where possible. Where not, examples from critical experiments have been used but the measurement methods could also be used for subcritical experiments

  6. Benchmarking Severe Accident Computer Codes for Heavy Water Reactor Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    Requests for severe accident investigations and assurance of mitigation measures have increased for operating nuclear power plants and the design of advanced nuclear power plants. Severe accident analysis investigations necessitate the analysis of the very complex physical phenomena that occur sequentially during various stages of accident progression. Computer codes are essential tools for understanding how the reactor and its containment might respond under severe accident conditions. The IAEA organizes coordinated research projects (CRPs) to facilitate technology development through international collaboration among Member States. The CRP on Benchmarking Severe Accident Computer Codes for HWR Applications was planned on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Nuclear Energy Department's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for HWRs (the TWG-HWR). This publication summarizes the results from the CRP participants. The CRP promoted international collaboration among Member States to improve the phenomenological understanding of severe core damage accidents and the capability to analyse them. The CRP scope included the identification and selection of a severe accident sequence, selection of appropriate geometrical and boundary conditions, conduct of benchmark analyses, comparison of the results of all code outputs, evaluation of the capabilities of computer codes to predict important severe accident phenomena, and the proposal of necessary code improvements and/or new experiments to reduce uncertainties. Seven institutes from five countries with HWRs participated in this CRP

  7. Adjuvant Sunitinib for High-risk Renal Cell Carcinoma After Nephrectomy: Subgroup Analyses and Updated Overall Survival Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motzer, Robert J; Ravaud, Alain; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Pandha, Hardev S; George, Daniel J; Patel, Anup; Chang, Yen-Hwa; Escudier, Bernard; Donskov, Frede; Magheli, Ahmed; Carteni, Giacomo; Laguerre, Brigitte; Tomczak, Piotr; Breza, Jan; Gerletti, Paola; Lechuga, Mariajose; Lin, Xun; Casey, Michelle; Serfass, Lucile; Pantuck, Allan J; Staehler, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant sunitinib significantly improved disease-free survival (DFS) versus placebo in patients with locoregional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at high risk of recurrence after nephrectomy (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.98; p=0.03). To report the relationship between baseline factors and DFS, pattern of recurrence, and updated overall survival (OS). Data for 615 patients randomized to sunitinib (n=309) or placebo (n=306) in the S-TRAC trial. Subgroup DFS analyses by baseline risk factors were conducted using a Cox proportional hazards model. Baseline risk factors included: modified University of California Los Angeles integrated staging system criteria, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS), weight, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), and Fuhrman grade. Of 615 patients, 97 and 122 in the sunitinib and placebo arms developed metastatic disease, with the most common sites of distant recurrence being lung (40 and 49), lymph node (21 and 26), and liver (11 and 14), respectively. A benefit of adjuvant sunitinib over placebo was observed across subgroups, including: higher risk (T3, no or undetermined nodal involvement, Fuhrman grade ≥2, ECOG PS ≥1, T4 and/or nodal involvement; hazard ratio [HR] 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.99; p=0.04), NLR ≤3 (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.95; p=0.02), and Fuhrman grade 3/4 (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55-0.98; p=0.04). All subgroup analyses were exploratory, and no adjustments for multiplicity were made. Median OS was not reached in either arm (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.66-1.28; p=0.6); 67 and 74 patients died in the sunitinib and placebo arms, respectively. A benefit of adjuvant sunitinib over placebo was observed across subgroups. The results are consistent with the primary analysis, which showed a benefit for adjuvant sunitinib in patients at high risk of recurrent RCC after nephrectomy. Most subgroups of patients at high risk of recurrent renal cell carcinoma after

  8. Interactions among Candidate Genes Selected by Meta-Analyses Resulting in Higher Risk of Ischemic Stroke in a Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Luo

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke (IS is a multifactorial disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. The combined effects of multiple susceptibility genes might result in a higher risk for IS than a single gene. Therefore, we investigated whether interactions among multiple susceptibility genes were associated with an increased risk of IS by evaluating gene polymorphisms identified in previous meta-analyses, including methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, beta fibrinogen (FGB, β-FG A455G and T148C, apolipoprotein E (APOE ε2-4, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE insertion/deletion (I/D, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS G894T. In order to examine these interactions, 712 patients with IS and 774 controls in a Chinese Han population were genotyped using the SNaPshot method, and multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis was used to detect potential interactions among the candidate genes. The results of this study found that ACE I/D and β-FG T148C were significant synergistic contributors to IS. In particular, the ACE DD + β-FG 148CC, ACE DD + β-FG 148CT, and ACE ID + β-FG 148CC genotype combinations resulted in higher risk of IS. After adjusting for potential confounding IS risk factors (age, gender, family history of IS, hypertension history and history of diabetes mellitus using a logistic analysis, a significant correlation between the genotype combinations and IS patients persisted (overall stroke: adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.57, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.22-2.02, P < 0.001, large artery atherosclerosis subtype: adjusted OR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.08-2.07, P = 0.016, small-artery occlusion subtype: adjusted OR = 2.04, 95% CI: 1.43-2.91, P < 0.001. The results of this study indicate that the ACE I/D and β-FG T148C combination may result in significantly higher risk of IS in this Chinese population.

  9. Communicating human biomonitoring results to ensure policy coherence with public health recommendations: analysing breastmilk whilst protecting, promoting and supporting breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arendt Maryse

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article addresses the problem of how to ensure consistency in messages communicating public health recommendations on environmental health and on child health. The World Health Organization states that the protection, promotion and support of breastfeeding rank among the most effective interventions to improve child survival. International public health policy recommends exclusive breastfeeding for six months, followed by continued breastfeeding with the addition of safe and adequate complementary foods for two years and beyond. Biomonitoring of breastmilk is used as an indicator of environmental pollution ending up in mankind. This article will therefore present the biomonitoring results of concentrations of residues in breastmilk in a wider context. These results are the mirror that reflects the chemical substances accumulated in the bodies of both men and women in the course of a lifetime. The accumulated substances in our bodies may have an effect on male or female reproductive cells; they are present in the womb, directly affecting the environment of the fragile developing foetus; they are also present in breastmilk. Evidence of man-made chemical residues in breastmilk can provide a shock tactic to push for stronger laws to protect the environment. However, messages about chemicals detected in breastmilk can become dramatized by the media and cause a backlash against breastfeeding, thus contradicting the public health messages issued by the World Health Organization. Analyses of breastmilk show the presence of important nutritional components and live protective factors active in building up the immune system, in gastro intestinal maturation, in immune defence and in providing antiviral, antiparasitic and antibacterial activity. Through cohort studies researchers in environmental health have concluded that long-term breastfeeding counterbalances the effect of prenatal exposure to chemicals causing delay in mental and

  10. The Live program - Results of test L1 and joint analyses on transient molten pool thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, M.; Buerger, M. [Univ Stuttgart, Inst Kernenerget and Energiesyst, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Miassoedov, A.; Gaus-Liu, X.; Palagin, A. [IRSN Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, D-76021 Karlsruhe, (Germany); Godin-Jacqmin, L. [CEA Cadarache, DEN STRI LMA, F-13115 St Paul Les Durance (France); Tran, C. T.; Ma, W. M. [KTH, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Chudanov, V. [Nucl Safety Inst, Moscow 113191 (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    of the LIVE activities also provide data for a better understanding of in-core corium pool behaviour. The experimental results are being used for the development and validation of mechanistic models for the description of molten pool behaviour, In the present paper, a range of different models is used for post-test calculations and comparative analyses. This includes simplified, but fast running models implemented in the severe accident codes ASTEC and ATHLET-CD. Further, a computational tool developed at KTH (PECM model implemented in Fluent) is applied. These calculations are complemented by analyses with the CFD code CONV (thermal hydraulics of heterogeneous, viscous and heat-generating melts) which was developed at IBRAE (Nuclear Safety Institute of Russian Academy) within the RASPLAV project and was further improved within the ISTC 2936 Project. (authors)

  11. TVSA-T fuel assembly for 'Temelin' NPP. Main results of design and safety analyses. Trends of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlov, O.B.; Kajdalov, V.B.; Falkov, A.A.; Bolnov, V.A.; Morozkin, O.N.; Molchanov, V.L.; Ugryumov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    TVSA is a fuel assembly with rigid skeleton formed by 6 angle pieces and SG is successfully operated at 17 VVER-1000 power units of Kalinin NPP, as well as at Ukrainian and Bulgarian NPPs. Based on a contract for fuel supply to the Temelin NPP, the TVSA-T fuel assembly was developed, building on proven solutions confirmed by operation of TVSA modifications during 4-6 years and by the results of post-irradiation examination. The TVSA-T design includes combined spacer grids (SG+MG) and by fuel column elongation by 150 mm. A set of analyses and experiments was performed to validate the design, including thermal hydraulic tests, validation of critical heat flux correlation for TVSA-T, integrated mechanical, vibration and lifetime tests. A licence to use the fuel has been granted by the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety. The TVSA-T core is currently in operation at the Temelin-1 reactor unit. The presentation is concluded as follows: TVSA-T fuel assembly for Temelin has been validated. The TVSA-T design is based on approved technical decisions and meets the current requirements for lifetime, operational maneuverability and safety. The results of post-irradiation examination of TVSA-T operated at the Kalinin-1 unit for 4 years confirm the assembly operability, skeleton stiffness, geometric stability and normal fuel rod cladding condition. The properties of the TVSA fuel with MG allow the core power to be increased up to 3300 MW to match the envisaged future VVER (MIR-1200) design, providing allowable fuel rod power FΔh =1.63 (to implement effective fuel cycles). (P.A.)

  12. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  13. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  14. Shielding benchmark tests of JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Akira; Ueki, Kohtaro; Yamano, Naoki; Sasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Morio; Ohtani, Nobuo; Sakurai, Kiyoshi.

    1994-03-01

    The integral test of neutron cross sections for major shielding materials in JENDL-3 has been performed by analyzing various shielding benchmark experiments. For the fission-like neutron source problem, the following experiments are analyzed: (1) ORNL Broomstick experiments for oxygen, iron and sodium, (2) ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, (3) ORNL neutron transmission experiments for iron, stainless steel, sodium and graphite, (4) KfK leakage spectrum measurements from iron spheres, (5) RPI angular neutron spectrum measurements in a graphite block. For D-T neutron source problem, the following two experiments are analyzed: (6) LLNL leakage spectrum measurements from spheres of iron and graphite, and (7) JAERI-FNS angular neutron spectrum measurements on beryllium and graphite slabs. Analyses have been performed using the radiation transport codes: ANISN(1D Sn), DIAC(1D Sn), DOT3.5(2D Sn) and MCNP(3D point Monte Carlo). The group cross sections for Sn transport calculations are generated with the code systems PROF-GROUCH-G/B and RADHEAT-V4. The point-wise cross sections for MCNP are produced with NJOY. For comparison, the analyses with JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV have been also carried out. The calculations using JENDL-3 show overall agreement with the experimental data as well as those with ENDF/B-IV. Particularly, JENDL-3 gives better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV for sodium. It has been concluded that JENDL-3 is very applicable for fission and fusion reactor shielding analyses. (author)

  15. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  16. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. Review for session K - benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Eight of the papers to be considered in Session K are directly concerned, at least in part, with the Pool Critical Assembly (P.C.A.) benchmark at Oak Ridge. The remaining seven papers in this session, the subject of this review, are concerned with a variety of topics related to the general theme of Benchmarks and will be considered individually

  18. Internal Benchmarking for Institutional Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    Internal benchmarking is an established practice in business and industry for identifying best in-house practices and disseminating the knowledge about those practices to other groups in the organization. Internal benchmarking can be done with structures, processes, outcomes, or even individuals. In colleges or universities with multicampuses or a…

  19. Entropy-based benchmarking methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temurshoev, Umed

    2012-01-01

    We argue that benchmarking sign-volatile series should be based on the principle of movement and sign preservation, which states that a bench-marked series should reproduce the movement and signs in the original series. We show that the widely used variants of Denton (1971) method and the growth

  20. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, U.; Alex, J; Batstone, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to p...

  1. EPA's Benchmark Dose Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA developed the Benchmark Dose Software (BMDS) as a tool to help Agency risk assessors facilitate applying benchmark dose (BMD) method’s to EPA’s human health risk assessment (HHRA) documents. The application of BMD methods overcomes many well know limitations ...

  2. Benchmark for Strategic Performance Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Annette

    1997-01-01

    Explains benchmarking, a total quality management tool used to measure and compare the work processes in a library with those in other libraries to increase library performance. Topics include the main groups of upper management, clients, and staff; critical success factors for each group; and benefits of benchmarking. (Author/LRW)

  3. Benchmarking: A Process for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Thomas M.

    One problem with the outcome-based measures used in higher education is that they measure quantity but not quality. Benchmarking, or the use of some external standard of quality to measure tasks, processes, and outputs, is partially solving that difficulty. Benchmarking allows for the establishment of a systematic process to indicate if outputs…

  4. Benchmark job – Watch out!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On 12 December 2016, in Echo No. 259, we already discussed at length the MERIT and benchmark jobs. Still, we find that a couple of issues warrant further discussion. Benchmark job – administrative decision on 1 July 2017 On 12 January 2017, the HR Department informed all staff members of a change to the effective date of the administrative decision regarding benchmark jobs. The benchmark job title of each staff member will be confirmed on 1 July 2017, instead of 1 May 2017 as originally announced in HR’s letter on 18 August 2016. Postponing the administrative decision by two months will leave a little more time to address the issues related to incorrect placement in a benchmark job. Benchmark job – discuss with your supervisor, at the latest during the MERIT interview In order to rectify an incorrect placement in a benchmark job, it is essential that the supervisor and the supervisee go over the assigned benchmark job together. In most cases, this placement has been done autom...

  5. Teaching Benchmark Strategy for Fifth-Graders in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Der-Ching; Lai, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    The key purpose of this study was how we taught the use of benchmark strategy when comparing fraction for fifth-graders in Taiwan. 26 fifth graders from a public elementary in south Taiwan were selected to join this study. Results of this case study showed that students had a much progress on the use of benchmark strategy when comparing fraction…

  6. WWER in-core fuel management benchmark definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolov, T.; Alekova, G.; Prodanova, R.; Petrova, T.; Ivanov, K.

    1994-01-01

    Two benchmark problems for WWER-440, including design parameters, operating conditions and measured quantities are discussed in this paper. Some benchmark results for infinitive multiplication factor -K eff , natural boron concentration - C β and relative power distribution - K q obtained by use of the code package are represented. (authors). 5 refs., 3 tabs

  7. Review of Seismic Evaluation Methodologies for Nuclear Power Plants Based on a Benchmark Exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Niigataken-chuetsu-oki (NCO) earthquake (Mw = 6.6) occurred on 16 July 2007 and affected the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa (K-K) NPP in Japan. Although there was significant loss of main shock data due to transmission problems, a significant number of instruments were still able to measure the acceleration at different locations in soil (boreholes) and in structures at the K-K NPP during the main shock and the aftershocks. The availability of all these instrumental data provided an excellent background for initiating a benchmarking exercise known as the KAshiwazaki-Kariwa Research Initiative for Seismic Margin Assessment (KARISMA). The main objective of the KARISMA benchmark exercise is to study a comparison between analytical seismic response versus real response of selected structure, system and components (SSCs) of K-K NPP Unit 7. The KARISMA benchmark exercise includes benchmarking the analytical tools and numerical simulation techniques used for predicting seismic response of NPP structures (in linear and non-linear ranges), site response, soil-structure interaction phenomena, seismic response of piping systems, 'sloshing' in the spent fuel pool and buckling of tanks. The benchmark is primarily based on data provided by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). It is not linked to the seismic re-evaluation of K-K NPP carried out by TEPCO. Twenty-one organizations, comprising researchers, operating organizations, regulatory authorities, vendors and technical support organizations from 14 countries, participated in the benchmarking exercises. This publication, including a CD-ROM, summarizes the analyses of the main results of the benchmarking exercise for the K-K NPP reactor building (including static and modal analyses of the fixed base model, soil column analyses, analyses of the soil-structure models and margin assessment of the K-K NPP reactor building), the analyses of the main results of the benchmarking exercise for the residual heat removal piping system (including

  8. Benchmarking Academic Libraries: An Australian Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Margaret; Trahn, Isabella

    1997-01-01

    Discusses experiences and outcomes of benchmarking at the Queensland University of Technology (Australia) library that compared acquisitions, cataloging, document delivery, and research support services with those of the University of New South Wales. Highlights include results as a catalyst for change, and the use of common output and performance…

  9. Status, results and usefulness of risk analyses for HTGR type reactors of different capacity accessory to planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, W.; Mertens, J.

    1985-01-01

    As regards system-inherent risks, HTGR type reactors are evaluated with reference to the established light-water-moderated reactor types. Probabilistic HTGR risk analyses have shown modern HTGR systems to possess a balanced safety concept with a risk remaining distinctly below legally accepted values. Inversely, the development and optimization of the safety concepts have been (and are being) essentially co-determined by the probabilistic analyses, as it is technically sensible and economically necessary to render the specific safety-related HTGR properties eligible for licensing. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calculation of Single Cell and Fuel Assembly IRIS Benchmarks Using WIMSD5B and GNOMER Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.; Jecmenica, R.

    2002-01-01

    IRIS reactor (an acronym for International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, small to medium power (100-335 MWe/module) reactor, which addresses the requirements defined by the United States Department of Energy for Generation IV nuclear energy systems, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics, and waste reduction. An international consortium led by Westinghouse/BNFL was created for development of IRIS reactor; it includes universities, institutes, commercial companies, and utilities. Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb joined the consortium in year 2001, with the aim to take part in IRIS neutronics design and safety analyses of IRIS transients. A set of neutronic benchmarks for IRIS reactor was defined with the objective to compare results of all participants with exactly the same assumptions. In this paper a calculation of Benchmark 44 for IRIS reactor is described. Benchmark 44 is defined as a core depletion benchmark problem for specified IRIS reactor operating conditions (e.g., temperatures, moderator density) without feedback. Enriched boron, inhomogeneously distributed in axial direction, is used as an integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). The aim of this benchmark was to enable a more direct comparison of results of different code systems. Calculations of Benchmark 44 were performed using the modified CORD-2 code package. The CORD-2 code package consists of WIMSD and GNOMER codes. WIMSD is a well-known lattice spectrum calculation code. GNOMER solves the neutron diffusion equation in three-dimensional Cartesian geometry by the Green's function nodal method. The following parameters were obtained in Benchmark 44 analysis: effective multiplication factor as a function of burnup, nuclear peaking factor as a function of burnup, axial offset as a function of burnup, core-average axial power profile, core radial power profile, axial power profile for selected

  12. Use of results of microbiological analyses for risk-based control of Listeria monocytogenes in marinated broiler legs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnisalo, Kaarina; Vihavainen, Elina; Rantala, Leila; Maijala, Riitta; Suihko, Maija-Liisa; Hielm, Sebastian; Tuominen, Pirkko; Ranta, Jukka; Raaska, Laura

    2008-02-10

    Microbial risk assessment provides a means of estimating consumer risks associated with food products. The methods can also be applied at the plant level. In this study results of microbiological analyses were used to develop a robust single plant level risk assessment. Furthermore, the prevalence and numbers of Listeria monocytogenes in marinated broiler legs in Finland were estimated. These estimates were based on information on the prevalence, numbers and genotypes of L. monocytogenes in 186 marinated broiler legs from 41 retail stores. The products were from three main Finnish producers, which produce 90% of all marinated broiler legs sold in Finland. The prevalence and numbers of L. monocytogenes were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation using WinBUGS, but the model is applicable to any software featuring standard probability distributions. The estimated mean annual number of L. monocytogenes-positive broiler legs sold in Finland was 7.2x10(6) with a 95% credible interval (CI) 6.7x10(6)-7.7x10(6). That would be 34%+/-1% of the marinated broiler legs sold in Finland. The mean number of L. monocytogenes in marinated broiler legs estimated at the sell-by-date was 2 CFU/g, with a 95% CI of 0-14 CFU/g. Producer-specific L. monocytogenes strains were recovered from the products throughout the year, which emphasizes the importance of characterizing the isolates and identifying strains that may cause problems as part of risk assessment studies. As the levels of L. monocytogenes were low, the risk of acquiring listeriosis from these products proved to be insignificant. Consequently there was no need for a thorough national level risk assessment. However, an approach using worst-case and average point estimates was applied to produce an example of single producer level risk assessment based on limited data. This assessment also indicated that the risk from these products was low. The risk-based approach presented in this work can provide estimation of public health risk

  13. Benchmarking school nursing practice: the North West Regional Benchmarking Group

    OpenAIRE

    Littler, Nadine; Mullen, Margaret; Beckett, Helen; Freshney, Alice; Pinder, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    It is essential that the quality of care is reviewed regularly through robust processes such as benchmarking to ensure all outcomes and resources are evidence-based so that children and young people’s needs are met effectively. This article provides an example of the use of benchmarking in school nursing practice. Benchmarking has been defined as a process for finding, adapting and applying best practices (Camp, 1994). This concept was first adopted in the 1970s ‘from industry where it was us...

  14. OWL2 benchmarking for the evaluation of knowledge based systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sher Afgun Khan

    Full Text Available OWL2 semantics are becoming increasingly popular for the real domain applications like Gene engineering and health MIS. The present work identifies the research gap that negligible attention has been paid to the performance evaluation of Knowledge Base Systems (KBS using OWL2 semantics. To fulfil this identified research gap, an OWL2 benchmark for the evaluation of KBS is proposed. The proposed benchmark addresses the foundational blocks of an ontology benchmark i.e. data schema, workload and performance metrics. The proposed benchmark is tested on memory based, file based, relational database and graph based KBS for performance and scalability measures. The results show that the proposed benchmark is able to evaluate the behaviour of different state of the art KBS on OWL2 semantics. On the basis of the results, the end users (i.e. domain expert would be able to select a suitable KBS appropriate for his domain.

  15. Benchmark problems for numerical implementations of phase field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokisaari, A. M.; Voorhees, P. W.; Guyer, J. E.; Warren, J.; Heinonen, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first set of benchmark problems for phase field models that are being developed by the Center for Hierarchical Materials Design (CHiMaD) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). While many scientific research areas use a limited set of well-established software, the growing phase field community continues to develop a wide variety of codes and lacks benchmark problems to consistently evaluate the numerical performance of new implementations. Phase field modeling has become significantly more popular as computational power has increased and is now becoming mainstream, driving the need for benchmark problems to validate and verify new implementations. We follow the example set by the micromagnetics community to develop an evolving set of benchmark problems that test the usability, computational resources, numerical capabilities and physical scope of phase field simulation codes. In this paper, we propose two benchmark problems that cover the physics of solute diffusion and growth and coarsening of a second phase via a simple spinodal decomposition model and a more complex Ostwald ripening model. We demonstrate the utility of benchmark problems by comparing the results of simulations performed with two different adaptive time stepping techniques, and we discuss the needs of future benchmark problems. The development of benchmark problems will enable the results of quantitative phase field models to be confidently incorporated into integrated computational materials science and engineering (ICME), an important goal of the Materials Genome Initiative.

  16. Results report. Sampling and analyses of gases and microorganisms in the water from MINICAN in 2007, 2008 and 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydmark, Sara; Hallbeck, Lotta (Microbial Analytics Sweden AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    The MINICAN project is located at the depth of 450 m in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and was initiated to study how corrosion of the cast iron insert inside a perforated copper canister would evolve with time. Miniature canisters with different perforations and with and without bentonite buffer in steel cages were installed and monitored. Samples for microbiological and gas composition together with samples for groundwater chemistry have been analysed at three occasions in 2007, 2008 and 2010. The results show how the microbial populations outside the canisters have evolved from a mixture of microorganism able to grow on organic material, like heterotrophic organisms, and acetogens that grow on hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide in 2007, to populations with a large proportion of sulphate-reducing bacteria in 2010. The highest number of sulphate-reducing bacteria was found in MINICAN experiment A02C, canister with one hole at the top of the copper canister, in 2010 with 2.4 x 104 mL-1 followed by 8 x 103 mL-1 in A03 (hole in the bottom of the canister) and 7 x 103 mL-1 in A06 (two holes at the top and no bentonite). The numbers of culturable heterotrophic bacteria were between 200 and 530 mL-1 in the experiments with bentonite in 2007 but below detection in all experiments in 2010. The same trend was shown for acetogenes. Measurable amounts of hydrogen gas were found in all experiments at all sampling occasions. There was no general trend for the amounts of hydrogen but there was an increase in three of the experiments and in the groundwater outside MINICAN. It was found that the water chemistry differed between A06 and A02-A04 experiment by higher sulphate and chloride concentrations in A06 compared to the others. By plotting the concentrations of chloride, sulphate against time, a decrease in sulphate concentration was found in all canister experiments. The chloride concentrations were stable during the same period. On the other hand, an increase in sulphate

  17. Results report. Sampling and analyses of gases and microorganisms in the water from MINICAN in 2007, 2008 and 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lydmark, Sara; Hallbeck, Lotta

    2011-04-01

    The MINICAN project is located at the depth of 450 m in the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory and was initiated to study how corrosion of the cast iron insert inside a perforated copper canister would evolve with time. Miniature canisters with different perforations and with and without bentonite buffer in steel cages were installed and monitored. Samples for microbiological and gas composition together with samples for groundwater chemistry have been analysed at three occasions in 2007, 2008 and 2010. The results show how the microbial populations outside the canisters have evolved from a mixture of microorganism able to grow on organic material, like heterotrophic organisms, and acetogens that grow on hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide in 2007, to populations with a large proportion of sulphate-reducing bacteria in 2010. The highest number of sulphate-reducing bacteria was found in MINICAN experiment A02C, canister with one hole at the top of the copper canister, in 2010 with 2.4 x 10 4 mL -1 followed by 8 x 10 3 mL -1 in A03 (hole in the bottom of the canister) and 7 x 10 3 mL -1 in A06 (two holes at the top and no bentonite). The numbers of culturable heterotrophic bacteria were between 200 and 530 mL-1 in the experiments with bentonite in 2007 but below detection in all experiments in 2010. The same trend was shown for acetogenes. Measurable amounts of hydrogen gas were found in all experiments at all sampling occasions. There was no general trend for the amounts of hydrogen but there was an increase in three of the experiments and in the groundwater outside MINICAN. It was found that the water chemistry differed between A06 and A02-A04 experiment by higher sulphate and chloride concentrations in A06 compared to the others. By plotting the concentrations of chloride, sulphate against time, a decrease in sulphate concentration was found in all canister experiments. The chloride concentrations were stable during the same period. On the other hand, an increase in sulphate

  18. ZZ ECN-BUBEBO, ECN-Petten Burnup Benchmark Book, Inventories, Afterheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloosterman, Jan Leen

    1999-01-01

    Description of program or function: Contains experimental benchmarks which can be used for the validation of burnup code systems and accompanied data libraries. Although the benchmarks presented here are thoroughly described in literature, it is in many cases not straightforward to retrieve unambiguously the correct input data and corresponding results from the benchmark Descriptions. Furthermore, results which can easily be measured, are sometimes difficult to calculate because of conversions to be made. Therefore, emphasis has been put to clarify the input of the benchmarks and to present the benchmark results in such a way that they can easily be calculated and compared. For more thorough Descriptions of the benchmarks themselves, the literature referred to here should be consulted. This benchmark book is divided in 11 chapters/files containing the following in text and tabular form: chapter 1: Introduction; chapter 2: Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Phase 1-B; chapter 3: Yankee-Rowe Core V Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 4: H.B. Robinson Unit 2 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 5: Turkey Point Unit 3 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 6: Turkey Point Unit 3 Afterheat Power Study; chapter 7: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of U-235; chapter 8: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of Pu-239; chapter 9: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-233; chapter 10: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-235; chapter 11: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of Pu-239

  19. AER benchmark specification sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the VVER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D CFD modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the 23rd cycle of the Paks NPP's Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (authors)

  20. AER Benchmark Specification Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aszodi, A.; Toth, S.

    2009-01-01

    In the WWER-440/213 type reactors, the core outlet temperature field is monitored with in-core thermocouples, which are installed above 210 fuel assemblies. These measured temperatures are used in determination of the fuel assembly powers and they have important role in the reactor power limitation. For these reasons, correct interpretation of the thermocouple signals is an important question. In order to interpret the signals in correct way, knowledge of the coolant mixing in the assembly heads is necessary. Computational fluid dynamics codes and experiments can help to understand better these mixing processes and they can provide information which can support the more adequate interpretation of the thermocouple signals. This benchmark deals with the 3D computational fluid dynamics modeling of the coolant mixing in the heads of the profiled fuel assemblies with 12.2 mm rod pitch. Two assemblies of the twenty third cycle of the Paks NPPs Unit 3 are investigated. One of them has symmetrical pin power profile and another possesses inclined profile. (Authors)

  1. Benchmarking biofuels; Biobrandstoffen benchmarken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croezen, H.; Kampman, B.; Bergsma, G.

    2012-03-15

    A sustainability benchmark for transport biofuels has been developed and used to evaluate the various biofuels currently on the market. For comparison, electric vehicles, hydrogen vehicles and petrol/diesel vehicles were also included. A range of studies as well as growing insight are making it ever clearer that biomass-based transport fuels may have just as big a carbon footprint as fossil fuels like petrol or diesel, or even bigger. At the request of Greenpeace Netherlands, CE Delft has brought together current understanding on the sustainability of fossil fuels, biofuels and electric vehicles, with particular focus on the performance of the respective energy carriers on three sustainability criteria, with the first weighing the heaviest: (1) Greenhouse gas emissions; (2) Land use; and (3) Nutrient consumption [Dutch] Greenpeace Nederland heeft CE Delft gevraagd een duurzaamheidsmeetlat voor biobrandstoffen voor transport te ontwerpen en hierop de verschillende biobrandstoffen te scoren. Voor een vergelijk zijn ook elektrisch rijden, rijden op waterstof en rijden op benzine of diesel opgenomen. Door onderzoek en voortschrijdend inzicht blijkt steeds vaker dat transportbrandstoffen op basis van biomassa soms net zoveel of zelfs meer broeikasgassen veroorzaken dan fossiele brandstoffen als benzine en diesel. CE Delft heeft voor Greenpeace Nederland op een rijtje gezet wat de huidige inzichten zijn over de duurzaamheid van fossiele brandstoffen, biobrandstoffen en elektrisch rijden. Daarbij is gekeken naar de effecten van de brandstoffen op drie duurzaamheidscriteria, waarbij broeikasgasemissies het zwaarst wegen: (1) Broeikasgasemissies; (2) Landgebruik; en (3) Nutriëntengebruik.

  2. Benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosso, John A; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Nappi, Jean; Gubbins, Paul O; Ross, Leigh Ann

    2010-10-11

    Benchmarking in academic pharmacy, and recommendations for the potential uses of benchmarking in academic pharmacy departments are discussed in this paper. Benchmarking is the process by which practices, procedures, and performance metrics are compared to an established standard or best practice. Many businesses and industries use benchmarking to compare processes and outcomes, and ultimately plan for improvement. Institutions of higher learning have embraced benchmarking practices to facilitate measuring the quality of their educational and research programs. Benchmarking is used internally as well to justify the allocation of institutional resources or to mediate among competing demands for additional program staff or space. Surveying all chairs of academic pharmacy departments to explore benchmarking issues such as department size and composition, as well as faculty teaching, scholarly, and service productivity, could provide valuable information. To date, attempts to gather this data have had limited success. We believe this information is potentially important, urge that efforts to gather it should be continued, and offer suggestions to achieve full participation.

  3. Summary of Results from Analyses of Deposits of the Deep-Ocean Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer

    2005-01-01

    Deposits of the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact are unique in the known geological record. The only known example of a km-sized asteroid to impact a deep-ocean (5 km) basin, is the most meterorite-rich locality known. This was discovered as an Ir anomaly in sediments from three cores collected in 1965 by the USNS Eltanin. These cores contained mm-sized shock-melted asteroid materials and unmelted meteorite fragments. Mineral chemistry of meteorite fragments, and siderophole concentrations in melt rocks, indicate that the parent asteroid was a low-metal (4\\%) mesosiderite. A geological exploration of the impact in 1995 by Polarstern expedition ANT-XIV4 was near the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5 W), and successfully collected three cores with impact deposits. Analyses showed that sediments as old as Eocene were eroded by the impact disturbance and redeposited in three distinct units. The lowermost is a chaotic assemblage of sediment fragments up to 50 cm in size. Above this is a laminated sand-rich unit that deposited as a turbulent flow, and this is overlain by a more fine-grained deposit of silts and clays that settled from a cloud of sediment suspended in the water column. Meteoritic ejecta particles were concentrated near the base of the uppermost unit, where coarse ejecta caught up with the disturbed sediment. Here we will present results from a new suite of cores collected on Polarstern expedition ANT-XVIIU5a. In 2001, the Polarstern returned to the impact area and explored a region of 80,000 sq-km., collecting at least 16 sediment cores with meteoritic ejecta. The known strewn field extends over a region 660 by 200 km. The meteoritic ejecta is most concentrated in cores on the Freeden seamounts, and in the basins to the north, where the amount of meteoritic material deposited on the ocean floor was as much as 3 g/sq-cm. These concentrations drop off to the north and the east to levels as low as approximately 0.1 g/sq-cm. We were unable to sample the

  4. Issues in Benchmark Metric Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolotte, Alain

    It is true that a metric can influence a benchmark but will esoteric metrics create more problems than they will solve? We answer this question affirmatively by examining the case of the TPC-D metric which used the much debated geometric mean for the single-stream test. We will show how a simple choice influenced the benchmark and its conduct and, to some extent, DBMS development. After examining other alternatives our conclusion is that the “real” measure for a decision-support benchmark is the arithmetic mean.

  5. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  6. JENDL-4.0 benchmarking for fission reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Go; Okumura, Keisuke; Sugino, Kazuteru; Nagaya, Yasunobu; Yokoyama, Kenji; Kugo, Teruhiko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Okajima, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Benchmark testing for the newly developed Japanese evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 is carried out by using a huge amount of integral data. Benchmark calculations are performed with a continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and with the deterministic procedure, which has been developed for fast reactor analyses in Japan. Through the present benchmark testing using a wide range of benchmark data, significant improvement in the performance of JENDL-4.0 for fission reactor applications is clearly demonstrated in comparison with the former library JENDL-3.3. Much more accurate and reliable prediction for neutronic parameters for both thermal and fast reactors becomes possible by using the library JENDL-4.0. (author)

  7. A Global Vision over Benchmarking Process: Benchmarking Based Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Sitnikov, Catalina; Giurca Vasilescu, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking uses the knowledge and the experience of others to improve the enterprise. Starting from the analysis of the performance and underlying the strengths and weaknesses of the enterprise it should be assessed what must be done in order to improve its activity. Using benchmarking techniques, an enterprise looks at how processes in the value chain are performed. The approach based on the vision “from the whole towards the parts” (a fragmented image of the enterprise’s value chain) redu...

  8. Developing Benchmarking Criteria for CO2 Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelis, M.; Worrell, E.; Mueller, N.; Angelini, T. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands); Cremer, C.; Schleich, J.; Eichhammer, W. [The Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation research, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    A European Union (EU) wide greenhouse gas (GHG) allowance trading scheme (EU ETS) was implemented in the EU in 2005. In the first two trading periods of the scheme (running up to 2012), free allocation based on historical emissions was the main methodology for allocation of allowances to existing installations. For the third trading period (2013 - 2020), the European Commission proposed in January 2008 a more important role of auctioning of allowances rather then free allocation. (Transitional) free allocation of allowances to industrial sectors will be determined via harmonized allocation rules, where feasible based on benchmarking. In general terms, a benchmark based method allocates allowances based on a certain amount of emissions per unit of productive output (i.e. the benchmark). This study aims to derive criteria for an allocation methodology for the EU Emission Trading Scheme based on benchmarking for the period 2013 - 2020. To test the feasibility of the criteria, we apply them to four example product groups: iron and steel, pulp and paper, lime and glass. The basis for this study is the Commission proposal for a revised ETS directive put forward on 23 January 2008 and does not take into account any changes to this proposal in the co-decision procedure that resulted in the adoption of the Energy and Climate change package in December 2008.

  9. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rarick, Heather L.; Godfrey, Sara H.; Kelly, John C.; Crumbley, Robert T.; Wifl, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    was its software assurance practices, which seemed to rate well in comparison to the other organizational groups and also seemed to include a larger scope of activities. An unexpected benefit of the software benchmarking study was the identification of many opportunities for collaboration in areas including metrics, training, sharing of CMMI experiences and resources such as instructors and CMMI Lead Appraisers, and even sharing of assets such as documented processes. A further unexpected benefit of the study was the feedback on NASA practices that was received from some of the organizations interviewed. From that feedback, other potential areas where NASA could improve were highlighted, such as accuracy of software cost estimation and budgetary practices. The detailed report contains discussion of the practices noted in each of the topic areas, as well as a summary of observations and recommendations from each of the topic areas. The resulting 24 recommendations from the topic areas were then consolidated to eliminate duplication and culled into a set of 14 suggested actionable recommendations. This final set of actionable recommendations, listed below, are items that can be implemented to improve NASA's software engineering practices and to help address many of the items that were listed in the NASA top software engineering issues. 1. Develop and implement standard contract language for software procurements. 2. Advance accurate and trusted software cost estimates for both procured and in-house software and improve the capture of actual cost data to facilitate further improvements. 3. Establish a consistent set of objectives and expectations, specifically types of metrics at the Agency level, so key trends and models can be identified and used to continuously improve software processes and each software development effort. 4. Maintain the CMMI Maturity Level requirement for critical NASA projects and use CMMI to measure organizations developing software for NASA. 5

  10. Bioelectrochemical Systems Workshop:Standardized Analyses, Design Benchmarks, and Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    measured are the measured anode and cathode potentials and Ean and Ecat are the calculated potentials based on the Nernst equation . These calculated...transport (ET), and pH gradient (EΔpH). The overpotentials can be calculated from Equations 1 and 2 (see attachment), where Ean,measured and Ecat...catalytic current (icat) and the limiting current (iL) is described by Equation 3 (see attachment), where n is the number of electrons involved in the

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathway Network Analyses: Techniques and benchmarking the AOPwiki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: As the community of toxicological researchers, risk assessors, and risk managers adopt the adverse outcome pathway (AOP) paradigm for organizing toxicological knowledge, the number and diversity of adverse outcome pathways and AOP networks are continuing to grow. This ...

  12. Benchmarking comparison and validation of MCNP photon interaction data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colling Bethany

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to test available photoatomic data libraries for fusion relevant applications, comparing against experimental and computational neutronics benchmarks. Photon flux and heating was compared using the photon interaction data libraries (mcplib 04p, 05t, 84p and 12p. Suitable benchmark experiments (iron and water were selected from the SINBAD database and analysed to compare experimental values with MCNP calculations using mcplib 04p, 84p and 12p. In both the computational and experimental comparisons, the majority of results with the 04p, 84p and 12p photon data libraries were within 1σ of the mean MCNP statistical uncertainty. Larger differences were observed when comparing computational results with the 05t test photon library. The Doppler broadening sampling bug in MCNP-5 is shown to be corrected for fusion relevant problems through use of the 84p photon data library. The recommended libraries for fusion neutronics are 84p (or 04p with MCNP6 and 84p if using MCNP-5.

  13. Benchmarking comparison and validation of MCNP photon interaction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Bethany; Kodeli, I.; Lilley, S.; Packer, L. W.

    2017-09-01

    The objective of the research was to test available photoatomic data libraries for fusion relevant applications, comparing against experimental and computational neutronics benchmarks. Photon flux and heating was compared using the photon interaction data libraries (mcplib 04p, 05t, 84p and 12p). Suitable benchmark experiments (iron and water) were selected from the SINBAD database and analysed to compare experimental values with MCNP calculations using mcplib 04p, 84p and 12p. In both the computational and experimental comparisons, the majority of results with the 04p, 84p and 12p photon data libraries were within 1σ of the mean MCNP statistical uncertainty. Larger differences were observed when comparing computational results with the 05t test photon library. The Doppler broadening sampling bug in MCNP-5 is shown to be corrected for fusion relevant problems through use of the 84p photon data library. The recommended libraries for fusion neutronics are 84p (or 04p) with MCNP6 and 84p if using MCNP-5.

  14. Thermal Performance Benchmarking: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuhui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center

    2017-10-19

    In FY16, the thermal performance of the 2014 Honda Accord Hybrid power electronics thermal management systems were benchmarked. Both experiments and numerical simulation were utilized to thoroughly study the thermal resistances and temperature distribution in the power module. Experimental results obtained from the water-ethylene glycol tests provided the junction-to-liquid thermal resistance. The finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were found to yield a good match with experimental results. Both experimental and modeling results demonstrate that the passive stack is the dominant thermal resistance for both the motor and power electronics systems. The 2014 Accord power electronics systems yield steady-state thermal resistance values around 42- 50 mm to the 2nd power K/W, depending on the flow rates. At a typical flow rate of 10 liters per minute, the thermal resistance of the Accord system was found to be about 44 percent lower than that of the 2012 Nissan LEAF system that was benchmarked in FY15. The main reason for the difference is that the Accord power module used a metalized-ceramic substrate and eliminated the thermal interface material layers. FEA models were developed to study the transient performance of 2012 Nissan LEAF, 2014 Accord, and two other systems that feature conventional power module designs. The simulation results indicate that the 2012 LEAF power module has lowest thermal impedance at a time scale less than one second. This is probably due to moving low thermally conductive materials further away from the heat source and enhancing the heat spreading effect from the copper-molybdenum plate close to the insulated gate bipolar transistors. When approaching steady state, the Honda system shows lower thermal impedance. Measurement results of the thermal resistance of the 2015 BMW i3 power electronic system indicate that the i3 insulated gate bipolar transistor module has significantly lower junction

  15. Performance Targets and External Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    Research on relative performance measures, transfer pricing, beyond budgeting initiatives, target costing, piece rates systems and value based management has for decades underlined the importance of external benchmarking in performance management. Research conceptualises external benchmarking...... as a market mechanism that can be brought inside the firm to provide incentives for continuous improvement and the development of competitive advances. However, whereas extant research primarily has focused on the importance and effects of using external benchmarks, less attention has been directed towards...... the conditions upon which the market mechanism is performing within organizations. This paper aims to contribute to research by providing more insight to the conditions for the use of external benchmarking as an element in performance management in organizations. Our study explores a particular type of external...

  16. Benchmarking and Sustainable Transport Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik; Wyatt, Andrew; Gordon, Lucy

    2004-01-01

    Order to learn from the best. In 2000 the European Commission initiated research to explore benchmarking as a tool to promote policies for ‘sustainable transport’. This paper reports findings and recommendations on how to address this challenge. The findings suggest that benchmarking is a valuable...... tool that may indeed help to move forward the transport policy agenda. However, there are major conditions and limitations. First of all it is not always so straightforward to delimit, measure and compare transport services in order to establish a clear benchmark. Secondly ‘sustainable transport......’ evokes a broad range of concerns that are hard to address fully at the level of specific practices. Thirdly policies are not directly comparable across space and context. For these reasons attempting to benchmark ‘sustainable transport policies’ against one another would be a highly complex task, which...

  17. Benchmark of the CASMO-3G/MICROBURN-B codes for Commonwealth Edison boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, J.K.; Pallotta, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The Commonwealth Edison Company has performed an extensive benchmark against measured data from three boiling water reactors using the Studsvik lattice physics code CASMO-3G and the Siemens Nuclear Power three-dimensional simulator code MICROBURN-B. The measured data of interest for this benchmark are the hot and cold reactivity, and the core power distributions as measured by the traversing incore probe system and gamma scan data for fuel pins and assemblies. A total of nineteen unit-cycles were evaluated. The database included fuel product lines manufactured by General Electric and Siemens Nuclear Power, wit assemblies containing 7 x 7 to 9 x 9 pin configurations, several water rod designs, various enrichments and gadolina loadings, and axially varying lattice designs throughout the enriched portion of the bundle. The results of the benchmark present evidence that the CASMO-3G/MICROBURN-B code package can adequately model the range of fuel and core types in the benchmark, and the codes are acceptable for performing neutronic analyses of Commonwealth Edison's boiling water reactors

  18. Operating Room Efficiency before and after Entrance in a Benchmarking Program for Surgical Process Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedron, Sara; Winter, Vera; Oppel, Eva-Maria; Bialas, Enno

    2017-08-23

    Operating room (OR) efficiency continues to be a high priority for hospitals. In this context the concept of benchmarking has gained increasing importance as a means to improve OR performance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how participation in a benchmarking and reporting program for surgical process data was associated with a change in OR efficiency, measured through raw utilization, turnover times, and first-case tardiness. The main analysis is based on panel data from 202 surgical departments in German hospitals, which were derived from the largest database for surgical process data in Germany. Panel regression modelling was applied. Results revealed no clear and univocal trend of participation in a benchmarking and reporting program for surgical process data. The largest trend was observed for first-case tardiness. In contrast to expectations, turnover times showed a generally increasing trend during participation. For raw utilization no clear and statistically significant trend could be evidenced. Subgroup analyses revealed differences in effects across different hospital types and department specialties. Participation in a benchmarking and reporting program and thus the availability of reliable, timely and detailed analysis tools to support the OR management seemed to be correlated especially with an increase in the timeliness of staff members regarding first-case starts. The increasing trend in turnover time revealed the absence of effective strategies to improve this aspect of OR efficiency in German hospitals and could have meaningful consequences for the medium- and long-run capacity planning in the OR.

  19. Benchmarking: contexts and details matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siyuan

    2017-07-05

    Benchmarking is an essential step in the development of computational tools. We take this opportunity to pitch in our opinions on tool benchmarking, in light of two correspondence articles published in Genome Biology.Please see related Li et al. and Newman et al. correspondence articles: www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1256-5 and www.dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-017-1257-4.

  20. Handbook of critical experiments benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

    1978-03-01

    Data from critical experiments have been collected together for use as benchmarks in evaluating calculational techniques and nuclear data. These benchmarks have been selected from the numerous experiments performed on homogeneous plutonium systems. No attempt has been made to reproduce all of the data that exists. The primary objective in the collection of these data is to present representative experimental data defined in a concise, standardized format that can easily be translated into computer code input

  1. Validation of Westinghouse integrated code POLCA-T against OECD NEACRP-L-335 rod ejection benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotov, Dobromir [Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB, Vaesteraas, SE-721 63 (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the work performed and results obtained in the validation of the POLCA-T code against NEACRP PWR Rod Ejection Transients Benchmark. Presented work is a part of the POLCA-T licensing Assessment Data Base for BWR Control Rod Drop Accident (CRDA) Application. The validation against a PWR Rod Ejection Accidents (REA) Benchmark is relevant for the validation of the code for BWR CRDA, as the analyses of both transients require identical phenomena to be modelled. All six benchmark cases have been analyzed in the presented work. Initial state steady-state calculations including boron search, control rod worth, and final state power search have been performed by POLCA7 code. Initial state boron adjustment and steady-state CR worth as well as the transient analyses were performed by POLCA-T code. Benchmark results including 3D transient power distributions are compared with reference PANTHER solutions and published results of other codes. Given the similarity of the kinetics modelling for a BWR CRDA and a PWR REA and the fact that POLCA-T accurately predicts the local transient power and thus, the resulting fuel enthalpy, it is concluded that POLCA-T is a state-of-art tool also for BWR CRDA analysis. (author)

  2. Validation of Westinghouse integrated code POLCA-T against OECD NEACRP-L-335 rod ejection benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayotov, Dobromir

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the work performed and results obtained in the validation of the POLCA-T code against NEACRP PWR Rod Ejection Transients Benchmark. Presented work is a part of the POLCA-T licensing Assessment Data Base for BWR Control Rod Drop Accident (CRDA) Application. The validation against a PWR Rod Ejection Accidents (REA) Benchmark is relevant for the validation of the code for BWR CRDA, as the analyses of both transients require identical phenomena to be modelled. All six benchmark cases have been analyzed in the presented work. Initial state steady-state calculations including boron search, control rod worth, and final state power search have been performed by POLCA7 code. Initial state boron adjustment and steady-state CR worth as well as the transient analyses were performed by POLCA-T code. Benchmark results including 3D transient power distributions are compared with reference PANTHER solutions and published results of other codes. Given the similarity of the kinetics modelling for a BWR CRDA and a PWR REA and the fact that POLCA-T accurately predicts the local transient power and thus, the resulting fuel enthalpy, it is concluded that POLCA-T is a state-of-art tool also for BWR CRDA analysis. (author)

  3. An improved benchmark model for the Big Ten critical assembly - 021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    2010-01-01

    A new benchmark specification is developed for the BIG TEN uranium critical assembly. The assembly has a fast spectrum, and its core contains approximately 10 wt.% enriched uranium. Detailed specifications for the benchmark are provided, and results from the MCNP5 Monte Carlo code using a variety of nuclear-data libraries are given for this benchmark and two others. (authors)

  4. ANN-Benchmarks: A Benchmarking Tool for Approximate Nearest Neighbor Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aumüller, Martin; Bernhardsson, Erik; Faithfull, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes ANN-Benchmarks, a tool for evaluating the performance of in-memory approximate nearest neighbor algorithms. It provides a standard interface for measuring the performance and quality achieved by nearest neighbor algorithms on different standard data sets. It supports several...... visualise these as images, Open image in new window plots, and websites with interactive plots. ANN-Benchmarks aims to provide a constantly updated overview of the current state of the art of k-NN algorithms. In the short term, this overview allows users to choose the correct k-NN algorithm and parameters...... for their similarity search task; in the longer term, algorithm designers will be able to use this overview to test and refine automatic parameter tuning. The paper gives an overview of the system, evaluates the results of the benchmark, and points out directions for future work. Interestingly, very different...

  5. Construction of a Benchmark for the User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schrepp

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Questionnaires are a cheap and highly efficient tool for achieving a quantitative measure of a product’s user experience (UX. However, it is not always easy to decide, if a questionnaire result can really show whether a product satisfies this quality aspect. So a benchmark is useful. It allows comparing the results of one product to a large set of other products. In this paper we describe a benchmark for the User Experience Questionnaire (UEQ, a widely used evaluation tool for interactive products. We also describe how the benchmark can be applied to the quality assurance process for concrete projects.

  6. Adjuvant Sunitinib for High-risk Renal Cell Carcinoma After Nephrectomy: Subgroup Analyses and Updated Overall Survival Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motzer, Robert J; Ravaud, Alain; Patard, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adjuvant sunitinib significantly improved disease-free survival (DFS) versus placebo in patients with locoregional renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at high risk of recurrence after nephrectomy (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59-0.98; p=0.03). OBJECTIVE: To report...... sunitinib over placebo was observed across subgroups, including: higher risk (T3, no or undetermined nodal involvement, Fuhrman grade ≥2, ECOG PS ≥1, T4 and/or nodal involvement; hazard ratio [HR] 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.99; p=0.04), NLR ≤3 (HR 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.95; p=0.02), and Fuhrman...... grade 3/4 (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.55-0.98; p=0.04). All subgroup analyses were exploratory, and no adjustments for multiplicity were made. Median OS was not reached in either arm (HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.66-1.28; p=0.6); 67 and 74 patients died in the sunitinib and placebo arms, respectively. CONCLUSIONS...

  7. Numisheet2005 Benchmark Analysis on Forming of an Automotive Deck Lid Inner Panel: Benchmark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buranathiti, Thaweepat; Cao Jian

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations in sheet metal forming processes have been a very challenging topic in industry. There are many computer codes and modeling techniques existing today. However, there are many unknowns affecting the prediction accuracy. Systematic benchmark tests are needed to accelerate the future implementations and to provide as a reference. This report presents an international cooperative benchmark effort for an automotive deck lid inner panel. Predictions from simulations are analyzed and discussed against the corresponding experimental results. The correlations between accuracy of each parameter of interest are discussed in this report

  8. Diagnostic Performance and Utility of Quantitative EEG Analyses in Delirium: Confirmatory Results From a Large Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Robert; Tränkner, Steffi; Bathe-Peters, Rouven; Rönnefarth, Maria; Schmidt, Sein; Schreiber, Stephan J; Brandt, Stephan A

    2018-03-01

    The lack of objective disease markers is a major cause of misdiagnosis and nonstandardized approaches in delirium. Recent studies conducted in well-selected patients and confined study environments suggest that quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) can provide such markers. We hypothesize that qEEG helps remedy diagnostic uncertainty not only in well-defined study cohorts but also in a heterogeneous hospital population. In this retrospective case-control study, EEG power spectra of delirious patients and age-/gender-matched controls (n = 31 and n = 345, respectively) were fitted in a linear model to test their performance as binary classifiers. We subsequently evaluated the diagnostic performance of the best classifiers in control samples with normal EEGs (n = 534) and real-world samples including pathologic findings (n = 4294). Test reliability was estimated through split-half analyses. We found that the combination of spectral power at F3-P4 at 2 Hz (area under the curve [AUC] = .994) and C3-O1 at 19 Hz (AUC = .993) provided a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 99% to identify delirious patients among normal controls. These classifiers also yielded a false positive rate as low as 5% and increased the pretest probability of being delirious by 57% in an unselected real-world sample. Split-half reliabilities were .98 and .99, respectively. This retrospective study yielded preliminary evidence that qEEG provides excellent diagnostic performance to identify delirious patients even outside confined study environments. It furthermore revealed reduced beta power as a novel specific finding in delirium and that a normal EEG excludes delirium. Prospective studies including parameters of pretest probability and delirium severity are required to elaborate on these promising findings.

  9. Benchmarking to improve the quality of cystic fibrosis care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Benchmarking involves the ascertainment of healthcare programs with most favorable outcomes as a means to identify and spread effective strategies for delivery of care. The recent interest in the development of patient registries for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been fueled in part by an interest in using them to facilitate benchmarking. This review summarizes reports of how benchmarking has been operationalized in attempts to improve CF care. Although certain goals of benchmarking can be accomplished with an exclusive focus on registry data analysis, benchmarking programs in Germany and the United States have supplemented these data analyses with exploratory interactions and discussions to better understand successful approaches to care and encourage their spread throughout the care network. Benchmarking allows the discovery and facilitates the spread of effective approaches to care. It provides a pragmatic alternative to traditional research methods such as randomized controlled trials, providing insights into methods that optimize delivery of care and allowing judgments about the relative effectiveness of different therapeutic approaches.

  10. [Benchmarking and other functions of ROM: back to basics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendregt, M

    2015-01-01

    Since 2011 outcome data in the Dutch mental health care have been collected on a national scale. This has led to confusion about the position of benchmarking in the system known as routine outcome monitoring (rom). To provide insight into the various objectives and uses of aggregated outcome data. A qualitative review was performed and the findings were analysed. Benchmarking is a strategy for finding best practices and for improving efficacy and it belongs to the domain of quality management. Benchmarking involves comparing outcome data by means of instrumentation and is relatively tolerant with regard to the validity of the data. Although benchmarking is a function of rom, it must be differentiated form other functions from rom. Clinical management, public accountability, research, payment for performance and information for patients are all functions of rom which require different ways of data feedback and which make different demands on the validity of the underlying data. Benchmarking is often wrongly regarded as being simply a synonym for 'comparing institutions'. It is, however, a method which includes many more factors; it can be used to improve quality and has a more flexible approach to the validity of outcome data and is less concerned than other rom functions about funding and the amount of information given to patients. Benchmarking can make good use of currently available outcome data.

  11. MCNP simulation of the TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeraj, R.; Glumac, B.; Maucec, M.

    1996-01-01

    The complete 3D MCNP model of the TRIGA Mark II reactor is presented. It enables precise calculations of some quantities of interest in a steady-state mode of operation. Calculational results are compared to the experimental results gathered during reactor reconstruction in 1992. Since the operating conditions were well defined at that time, the experimental results can be used as a benchmark. It may be noted that this benchmark is one of very few high enrichment benchmarks available. In our simulations experimental conditions were thoroughly simulated: fuel elements and control rods were precisely modeled as well as entire core configuration and the vicinity of the core. ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/B-V libraries were used. Partial results of benchmark calculations are presented. Excellent agreement of core criticality, excess reactivity and control rod worths can be observed. (author)

  12. Benchmark testing calculations for 232Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ping

    2003-01-01

    The cross sections of 232 Th from CNDC and JENDL-3.3 were processed with NJOY97.45 code in the ACE format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C. The K eff values and central reaction rates based on CENDL-3.0, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-6.2 were calculated using MCNP4C code for benchmark assembly, and the comparisons with experimental results are given. (author)

  13. Criticality safety benchmarking of PASC-3 and ECNJEF1.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.

    1992-09-01

    To validate the code system PASC-3 and the multigroup cross section library ECNJEF1.1 on various applications many benchmarks are required. This report presents the results of critically safety benchmarking for five calculational and four experimental benchmarks. These benchmarks are related to the transport package of fissile materials such as spent fuel. The fissile nuclides in these benchmarks are 235 U and 239 Pu. The modules of PASC-3 which have been used for the calculations are BONAMI, NITAWL and KENO.5A. The final results for the experimental benchmarks do agree well with experimental data. For the calculational benchmarks the results presented here are in reasonable agreement with the results from other investigations. (author). 8 refs.; 20 figs.; 5 tabs

  14. Spectrum integrated (n,He) cross section comparison and least squares analysis for /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B in benchmark fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, R.E.; Oliver, B.M.; Farrar, H. IV

    1987-01-01

    Spectrum integrated cross sections for /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B from five benchmark fast reactor neutron fields are compared with calculated values obtained using the ENDF/B-V Cross Section Files. The benchmark fields include the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility (CFRMF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the 10% Enriched U-235 Critical Assembly (BIG-10) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Sigma Sigma and Fission Cavity fields of the BR-1 reactor at CEN/SCK, and the Intermediate-Energy Standard Neutron Field (ISNF) at the National Bureau of Standards. Results from least square analyses using the FERRET computer code to obtain adjusted cross section values and their uncertainties are presented. Input to these calculations include the above five benchmark data sets. These analyses indicate a need for revision in the ENDF/B-V files for the /sup 10/B cross section for energies above 50 keV

  15. Benchmarking of human resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Akinnusi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the role of human resource management (HRM which, today, plays a strategic partnership role in management. The focus of the paper is on HRM in the public sector, where much hope rests on HRM as a means of transforming the public service and achieving much needed service delivery. However, a critical evaluation of HRM practices in the public sector reveals that these services leave much to be desired. The paper suggests the adoption of benchmarking as a process to revamp HRM in the public sector so that it is able to deliver on its promises. It describes the nature and process of benchmarking and highlights the inherent difficulties in applying benchmarking in HRM. It concludes with some suggestions for a plan of action. The process of identifying “best” practices in HRM requires the best collaborative efforts of HRM practitioners and academicians. If used creatively, benchmarking has the potential to bring about radical and positive changes in HRM in the public sector. The adoption of the benchmarking process is, in itself, a litmus test of the extent to which HRM in the public sector has grown professionally.

  16. Benchmark simulation models, quo vadis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, U; Alex, J; Batstone, D J; Benedetti, L; Comas, J; Copp, J B; Corominas, L; Flores-Alsina, X; Gernaey, K V; Nopens, I; Pons, M-N; Rodríguez-Roda, I; Rosen, C; Steyer, J-P; Vanrolleghem, P A; Volcke, E I P; Vrecko, D

    2013-01-01

    As the work of the IWA Task Group on Benchmarking of Control Strategies for wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is coming to an end, it is essential to disseminate the knowledge gained. For this reason, all authors of the IWA Scientific and Technical Report on benchmarking have come together to provide their insights, highlighting areas where knowledge may still be deficient and where new opportunities are emerging, and to propose potential avenues for future development and application of the general benchmarking framework and its associated tools. The paper focuses on the topics of temporal and spatial extension, process modifications within the WWTP, the realism of models, control strategy extensions and the potential for new evaluation tools within the existing benchmark system. We find that there are major opportunities for application within all of these areas, either from existing work already being done within the context of the benchmarking simulation models (BSMs) or applicable work in the wider literature. Of key importance is increasing capability, usability and transparency of the BSM package while avoiding unnecessary complexity.

  17. Does bisphenol A induce superfeminization in Marisa cornuarietis? Part II: toxicity test results and requirements for statistical power analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Valery E; Aufderheide, John; Warbritton, Ryan; van der Hoeven, Nelly; Caspers, Norbert

    2007-03-01

    This study presents results of the effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on adult egg production, egg hatchability, egg development rates and juvenile growth rates in the freshwater gastropod, Marisa cornuarietis. We observed no adult mortality, substantial inter-snail variability in reproductive output, and no effects of BPA on reproduction during 12 weeks of exposure to 0, 0.1, 1.0, 16, 160 or 640 microg/L BPA. We observed no effects of BPA on egg hatchability or timing of egg hatching. Juveniles showed good growth in the control and all treatments, and there were no significant effects of BPA on this endpoint. Our results do not support previous claims of enhanced reproduction in Marisa cornuarietis in response to exposure to BPA. Statistical power analysis indicated high levels of inter-snail variability in the measured endpoints and highlighted the need for sufficient replication when testing treatment effects on reproduction in M. cornuarietis with adequate power.

  18. Study of Finite Element Number Influence over the Obtained Results in Finite Element Analyses of a Mechanical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Budai

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the results of a study that was made to establish the influence of finite element number used to determined the real load of a structure. Actually, the study represent a linear static analyze for a link gear control mechanism of a Kaplan turbine. The all analyze was made for the normal condition of functioning having like final scope to determine de life time duration of mentioned mechanism.

  19. Requirements for a Device-Based Training and Testing Program for M1 Gunnery. Volume 2. Detailed Analyses and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    ACTIVITY 11. ASSESS RESULTS OF ENCAGENENT TC GNU IDR M Alien battle dauge/c<iua1ttis Check/adJuit MRS Dtttratiw If and how crm ihould bt... UfO Of ring« lino con fco obiorvod on CRT. Kongo It not innounctd, but oppaor on CRT diti oroo. U(0 of ringt lint con bo obior»td on CRT

  20. Thought Experiment to Examine Benchmark Performance for Fusion Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Isao; Ohta, Masayuki; Kusaka, Sachie; Sato, Fuminobu; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    There are many benchmark experiments carried out so far with DT neutrons especially aiming at fusion reactor development. These integral experiments seemed vaguely to validate the nuclear data below 14 MeV. However, no precise studies exist now. The author's group thus started to examine how well benchmark experiments with DT neutrons can play a benchmarking role for energies below 14 MeV. Recently, as a next phase, to generalize the above discussion, the energy range was expanded to the entire region. In this study, thought experiments with finer energy bins have thus been conducted to discuss how to generally estimate performance of benchmark experiments. As a result of thought experiments with a point detector, the sensitivity for a discrepancy appearing in the benchmark analysis is "equally" due not only to contribution directly conveyed to the deterctor, but also due to indirect contribution of neutrons (named (A)) making neutrons conveying the contribution, indirect controbution of neutrons (B) making the neutrons (A) and so on. From this concept, it would become clear from a sensitivity analysis in advance how well and which energy nuclear data could be benchmarked with a benchmark experiment.

  1. Thought Experiment to Examine Benchmark Performance for Fusion Nuclear Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murata Isao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many benchmark experiments carried out so far with DT neutrons especially aiming at fusion reactor development. These integral experiments seemed vaguely to validate the nuclear data below 14 MeV. However, no precise studies exist now. The author’s group thus started to examine how well benchmark experiments with DT neutrons can play a benchmarking role for energies below 14 MeV. Recently, as a next phase, to generalize the above discussion, the energy range was expanded to the entire region. In this study, thought experiments with finer energy bins have thus been conducted to discuss how to generally estimate performance of benchmark experiments. As a result of thought experiments with a point detector, the sensitivity for a discrepancy appearing in the benchmark analysis is “equally” due not only to contribution directly conveyed to the deterctor, but also due to indirect contribution of neutrons (named (A making neutrons conveying the contribution, indirect controbution of neutrons (B making the neutrons (A and so on. From this concept, it would become clear from a sensitivity analysis in advance how well and which energy nuclear data could be benchmarked with a benchmark experiment.

  2. Status on benchmark testing of CENDL-3

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Ping

    2002-01-01

    CENDL-3, the newest version of China Evaluated Nuclear Data Library has been finished, and distributed for some benchmarks analysis recently. The processing was carried out using the NJOY nuclear data processing code system. The calculations and analysis of benchmarks were done with Monte Carlo code MCNP and reactor lattice code WIMSD5A. The calculated results were compared with the experimental results based on ENDF/B6. In most thermal and fast uranium criticality benchmarks, the calculated k sub e sub f sub f values with CENDL-3 were in good agreements with experimental results. In the plutonium fast cores, the k sub e sub f sub f values were improved significantly with CENDL-3. This is duo to reevaluation of the fission spectrum and elastic angular distributions of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu and sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu. CENDL-3 underestimated the k sub e sub f sub f values compared with other evaluated data libraries for most spherical or cylindrical assemblies of plutonium or uranium with beryllium

  3. Structural code benchmarking for the analysis of impact response of nuclear material shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories has initiated a program to benchmark thermal and structural codes that are available to the nuclear material transportation community. The program consists of the following five phrases: (1) code inventory and review, (2) development of a cask-like set of problems, (3) multiple independent numerical analyses of the problems, (4) transfer of information, and (5) performance of experiments to obtain data for comparison with the numerical analyses. This paper will summarize the results obtained by the independent numerical analyses. The analyses indicate the variability that can be expected both due to differences in user-controlled parameters and from code-to-code differences. The results show that in purely elastic analyses, differences can be attributed to user controlled parameters. Model problems involving elastic/plastic material behavior and large deformations, however, have greater variability with significant differences reported for implicit and explicit integration schemes in finite element programs. This variability demonstrates the need to obtain experimental data to properly benchmark codes utilizing elastic/plastic material models and large deformation capability

  4. A Multilingual Approach to Analysing Standardized Test Results: Immigrant Primary School Children and the Role of Languages Spoken in a Bi-/Multilingual Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Gessica

    2014-01-01

    The present study adopts a multilingual approach to analysing the standardized test results of primary school immigrant children living in the bi-/multilingual context of South Tyrol, Italy. The standardized test results are from the Invalsi test administered across Italy in 2009/2010. In South Tyrol, several languages are spoken on a daily basis…

  5. Thermodynamic properties of xanthone: Heat capacities, phase-transition properties, and thermodynamic-consistency analyses using computational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirico, Robert D.; Kazakov, Andrei F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat capacities were measured for the temperature range (5 to 520) K. • The enthalpy of combustion was measured and the enthalpy of formation was derived. • Thermodynamic-consistency analysis resolved inconsistencies in literature enthalpies of sublimation. • An inconsistency in literature enthalpies of combustion was resolved. • Application of computational chemistry in consistency analysis was demonstrated successfully. - Abstract: Heat capacities and phase-transition properties for xanthone (IUPAC name 9H-xanthen-9-one and Chemical Abstracts registry number [90-47-1]) are reported for the temperature range 5 < T/K < 524. Statistical calculations were performed and thermodynamic properties for the ideal gas were derived based on molecular geometry optimization and vibrational frequencies calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. These results are combined with sublimation pressures from the literature to allow critical evaluation of inconsistent enthalpies of sublimation for xanthone, also reported in the literature. Literature values for the enthalpy of combustion of xanthone are re-assessed, a revision is recommended for one result, and a new value for the enthalpy of formation of the ideal gas is derived. Comparisons with thermophysical properties reported in the literature are made for all other reported and derived properties, where possible

  6. System to monitor data analyses and results of physics data validation between pulses at DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, S.; Schachter, J.M.; Schissel, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    A data analysis monitoring (DAM) system has been developed to monitor between pulse physics analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility (http://nssrv1.gat.com:8000/dam). The system allows for rapid detection of discrepancies in diagnostic measurements or the results from physics analysis codes. This enables problems to be detected and possibly fixed between pulses as opposed to after the experimental run has concluded, thus increasing the efficiency of experimental time. An example of a consistency check is comparing the experimentally measured neutron rate and the expected neutron emission, RDD0D. A significant difference between these two values could indicate a problem with one or more diagnostics, or the presence of unanticipated phenomena in the plasma. This system also tracks the progress of MDSplus dispatched data analysis software and the loading of analyzed data into MDSplus. DAM uses a Java Servlet to receive messages, C Language Integrated Production System to implement expert system logic, and displays its results to multiple web clients via Hypertext Markup Language. If an error is detected by DAM, users can view more detailed information so that steps can be taken to eliminate the error for the next pulse

  7. A NEW SYSTEM TO MONITOR DATA ANALYSES AND RESULTS OF PHYSICS DATA VALIDATION BETWEEN PULSES AT DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FLANAGAN, A; SCHACHTER, J.M; SCHISSEL, D.P

    2003-01-01

    A Data Analysis Monitoring (DAM) system has been developed to monitor between pulse physics analysis at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility (http://nssrv1.gat.com:8000/dam). The system allows for rapid detection of discrepancies in diagnostic measurements or the results from physics analysis codes. This enables problems to be detected and possibly fixed between pulses as opposed to after the experimental run has concluded thus increasing the efficiency of experimental time. An example of a consistency check is comparing the experimentally measured neutron rate and the expected neutron emission, RDD0D. A significant difference between these two values could indicate a problem with one or more diagnostics, or the presence of unanticipated phenomena in the plasma. This new system also tracks the progress of MDSplus dispatched data analysis software and the loading of analyzed data into MDSplus. DAM uses a Java Servlet to receive messages, CLIPS to implement expert system logic, and displays its results to multiple web clients via HTML. If an error is detected by DAM, users can view more detailed information so that steps can be taken to eliminate the error for the next pulse

  8. Analysing the Hydraulic Actuator-based Knee Unit Kinematics and Correlating the Numerical Results and Walking Human Knee Joint Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Trukhanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available State-of-the-art machinery development enables people with lost lower limb to continue their previous life despite a loss. International companies dealing with this area pursue a minimization of human behaviour problems because of amputation. Researches to create an optimal design of the artificial knee joint are under way.The work task was to define analytical relationships of changing kinematic parameters of the human walking on the flat surface such as an angle of the knee joint, knee point (moment, definition of reduced knee actuator (A load, as well as to compare obtained results with experimental data.As an A in created design, the article proposes to use a controlled shock absorber based on the hydraulic cylinder.A knee unit is a kinematic two-tier mechanism. One of the mechanism links performs rotational motion, and the other is rotation-translational to provide a rotation of the first one.When studying the hydraulic actuator device dynamics, as a generalized coordinate a coordinate of the piston x (or ρ position is chosen while in the study of link movements an angle β is preferable.Experimental data are obtained for a human with the body weight of 57.6 kg walking on the flat surface to estimate a value of the knee joint angle, speed, acceleration, torque, and capacity in the knee joint and are taken from the published works of foreign authors.A trigonometric approximation was used for fitting the experimental data. The resulting dependence of the reduced load on the stock of A is necessary to perform the synthesis of A. The criterion for linear mechanisms mentioned in the D.N. Popov’s work is advisable to use as a possible criterion for optimization of A.The results obtained are as follows:1. Kinematics linkage mechanism is described using relationships for dependencies of its geometrical parameters, namely a cylinder piston stroke x (or ρ and a links angle β.2. Obtained polynomials of kinematic relationships allow a synthesis of

  9. HPL and STREAM Benchmarks on SANAM Supercomputer

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Sulaiman, Riman A.

    2017-01-01

    SANAM supercomputer was jointly built by KACST and FIAS in 2012 ranking second that year in the Green500 list with a power efficiency of 2.3 GFLOPS/W (Rohr et al., 2014). It is a heterogeneous accelerator-based HPC system that has 300 compute nodes. Each node includes two Intel Xeon E5?2650 CPUs, two AMD FirePro S10000 dual GPUs and 128 GiB of main memory. In this work, the seven benchmarks of HPCC were installed and configured to reassess the performance of SANAM, as part of an unpublished master thesis, after it was reassembled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We present here detailed results of HPL and STREAM benchmarks.

  10. Benchmark and Continuous Improvement of Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Alecse Stanciu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present Economic Environment is challenge us to perform, to think and re-think our personal strategies in according with our entities strategies, even if we are simply employed or we are entrepreneurs. Is an environment characterised by Volatility, Uncertainity, Complexity and Ambiguity - a VUCA World in which the entities must fight for their position gained in the market, disrupt new markets and new economies, developing their client portofolio, with the Performance as one final goal. The pressure of driving forces known as the 2030 Megatrends: Globalization 2.0, Environmental Crisis and the Scarcity of Resources, Individualism and Value Pluralism, Demographic Change, This paper examines whether using benchmark is an opportunity to increase the competitiveness of Romanian SMEs and the results show that benchmark is therefore a powerful instrument, combining reduced negative impact on the environment with a positive impact on the economy and society.

  11. HPL and STREAM Benchmarks on SANAM Supercomputer

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Sulaiman, Riman A.

    2017-03-13

    SANAM supercomputer was jointly built by KACST and FIAS in 2012 ranking second that year in the Green500 list with a power efficiency of 2.3 GFLOPS/W (Rohr et al., 2014). It is a heterogeneous accelerator-based HPC system that has 300 compute nodes. Each node includes two Intel Xeon E5?2650 CPUs, two AMD FirePro S10000 dual GPUs and 128 GiB of main memory. In this work, the seven benchmarks of HPCC were installed and configured to reassess the performance of SANAM, as part of an unpublished master thesis, after it was reassembled in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We present here detailed results of HPL and STREAM benchmarks.

  12. BENCHMARKING - PRACTICAL TOOLS IDENTIFY KEY SUCCESS FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ju. Malinina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a practical example of the application of benchmarking techniques. The object of study selected fashion store Company «HLB & M Hennes & Mauritz», located in the shopping center «Gallery», Krasnodar. Hennes & Mauritz. The purpose of this article is to identify the best ways to develop a fashionable brand clothing store Hennes & Mauritz on the basis of benchmarking techniques. On the basis of conducted market research is a comparative analysis of the data from different perspectives. The result of the author’s study is a generalization of the ndings, the development of the key success factors that will allow to plan a successful trading activities in the future, based on the best experience of competitors.

  13. KENO-IV code benchmark calculation, (6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Yamakawa, Yasuhiro.

    1980-11-01

    A series of benchmark tests has been undertaken in JAERI in order to examine the capability of JAERI's criticality safety evaluation system consisting of the Monte Carlo calculation code KENO-IV and the newly developed multigroup constants library MGCL. The present report describes the results of a benchmark test using criticality experiments about Plutonium fuel in various shape. In all, 33 cases of experiments have been calculated for Pu(NO 3 ) 4 aqueous solution, Pu metal or PuO 2 -polystyrene compact in various shape (sphere, cylinder, rectangular parallelepiped). The effective multiplication factors calculated for the 33 cases distribute widely between 0.955 and 1.045 due to wide range of system variables. (author)

  14. Summary of ACCSIM and ORBIT Benchmarking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    AIBA, M

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a benchmarking study of ORBIT and ACCSIM which are accelerator tracking codes having routines to evaluate space charge effects. The study is motivated by the need of predicting/understanding beam behaviour in the CERN Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) in which direct space charge is expected to be the dominant performance limitation. Historically at CERN, ACCSIM has been employed for space charge simulation studies. A benchmark study using ORBIT has been started to confirm the results from ACCSIM and to profit from the advantages of ORBIT such as the capability of parallel processing. We observed a fair agreement in emittance evolution in the horizontal plane but not in the vertical one. This may be partly due to the fact that the algorithm to compute the space charge field is different between the two codes.

  15. The new revision of NPP Krsko decommissioning, radioactive waste and spent fuel management program: analyses and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, Nadja; Kralj, Metka; Lokner, Vladimir; Levanat, Ivica; Rapic, Andrea; Mele, Irena

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of the new revision of the Decommissioning and Spent Fuel (SF) and Low and Intermediate level Waste (LILW) Disposal Program for the NPP Krsko (Program) started in September 2008 after the acceptance of the Term of Reference for the work by Intergovernmental Committee responsible for implementation of the Agreement between the governments of Slovenia and Croatia on the status and other legal issues related to investment, exploitation, and decommissioning of the Nuclear power plant Krsko. The responsible organizations, APO and ARAO together with NEK prepared all new technical and financial data and relevant inputs for the new revision in which several scenarios based on the accepted boundary conditions were investigated. The strategy of immediate dismantling was analyzed for planned and extended NPP life time together with linked radioactive waste and spent fuel management to calculate yearly annuity to be paid by the owners into the decommissioning funds in Slovenia and Croatia. The new Program incorporated among others new data on the LILW repository including the costs for siting, construction and operation of silos at the location Vrbina in Krsko municipality, the site specific Preliminary Decommissioning Plan for NPP Krsko which included besides dismantling and decontamination approaches also site specific activated and contaminated radioactive waste, and results from the referenced scenario for spent fuel disposal but at very early stage. Important inputs for calculations presented also new amounts of compensations to the local communities for different nuclear facilities which were taken from the supplemented Slovenian regulation and updated fiscal parameters (inflation, interest, discount factors) used in the financial model based on the current development in economical environment. From the obtained data the nominal and discounted costs for the whole nuclear program related to NPP Krsko which is jointly owned by Slovenia and Croatia have

  16. Boiling water reactor turbine trip (TT) benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    In the field of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics computation there is a need to enhance scientific knowledge in order to develop advanced modelling techniques for new nuclear technologies and concepts as well as for current applications. Recently developed 'best-estimate' computer code systems for modelling 3-D coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics transients in nuclear cores and for coupling core phenomena and system dynamics (PWR, BWR, VVER) need to be compared against each other and validated against results from experiments. International benchmark studies have been set up for this purpose. The present report is the second in a series of four and summarises the results of the first benchmark exercise, which identifies the key parameters and important issues concerning the thermalhydraulic system modelling of the transient, with specified core average axial power distribution and fission power time transient history. The transient addressed is a turbine trip in a boiling water reactor, involving pressurization events in which the coupling between core phenomena and system dynamics plays an important role. In addition, the data made available from experiments carried out at the Peach Bottom 2 reactor (a GE-designed BWR/4) make the present benchmark particularly valuable. (author)

  17. Benchmarking Organisational Capability using The 20 Keys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dino Petrarolo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisations have over the years implemented many improvement initiatives, many of which were applied individually with no real, lasting improvement. Approaches such as quality control, team activities, setup reduction and many more seldom changed the fundamental constitution or capability of an organisation. Leading companies in the world have come to realise that an integrated approach is required which focuses on improving more than one factor at the same time - by recognising the importance of synergy between different improvement efforts and the need for commitment at all levels of the company to achieve total system-wide improvement.

    The 20 Keys approach offers a way to look at the strenqth of organisations and to systemically improve it, one step at a time by focusing on 20 different but interrelated aspects. One feature of the approach is the benchmarking system which forms the main focus of this paper. The benchmarking system is introduced as an important part of the 20 Keys philosophy in measuring organisational strength. Benchmarking results from selected South African companies are provided, as well as one company's results achieved through the adoption of the 20 Keys philosophy.

  18. Recognition of Earthquake-Induced Damage in the Abakainon Necropolis (NE Sicily): Results From Geomorphological, Geophysical and Numerical Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottari, C.; Albano, M.; Capizzi, P.; D'Alessandro, A.; Doumaz, F.; Martorana, R.; Moro, M.; Saroli, M.

    2018-01-01

    Seismotectonic activity and slope instability are a permanent threat in the archaeological site of Abakainon and in the nearby village of Tripi in NE Sicily. In recent times, signs of an ancient earthquake have been identified in the necropolis of Abakainon which dating was ascertained to the first century AD earthquake. The site is located on a slope of Peloritani Mts. along the Tindari Fault Line and contains evidence for earthquake-induced landslide, including fallen columns and blocks, horizontal shift and counter slope tilting of the tomb basements. In this paper, we used an integrated geomorphological and geophysical analysis to constrain the landslide. The research was directed to the acquisition of deep geological data for the reconstruction of slope process and the thickness of mobilized materials. The applied geophysical techniques included seismic refraction tomography and electrical resistivity tomography. The surveys were performed to delineate the sliding surface and to assess approximately the thickness of mobilized materials. The geophysical and geomorphologic data confirmed the presence of different overlapped landslides in the studied area. Moreover, a numerical simulation of the slope under seismic loads supports the hypothesis of a mobilization of the landslide mass in case of strong earthquakes (PGA > 0.3 g). However, numerical results highlight that the main cause of destruction for the Abakainon necropolis is the amplification of the seismic waves, occasionally accompanied by surficial sliding.

  19. Monitoring result analyses of high slope of five-step ship lock in the Three Gorges Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixiang Fan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The construction of the double-lane five-step ship lock of the Three Gorges Project (TGP was commenced in 1994, the excavation of the ship lock was completed by the end of 1999, and the ship lock was put in operation in June 2003. The side slopes of the ship lock are characterized by great height (170 m, steepness (70 m in height of upright slope, and great length (over 7000 m in total length. In association with the ship lock, the surrounding rocks in slope have a high potential to deform, with which the magnitude of deformation is restricted. Monitoring results show that the deformation of the five-step ship lock high slopes of the TGP primarily occurred in excavation period, and deformation tended to be stable and convergent during operation period, suggesting the allowable ranges of deformation. At present, the slopes and lock chambers are stable, and the ship lock works well under normal operation condition, enabling the social and economic benefits of the TGP.

  20. Analysing the economy-wide effects of the energy tax: results for Australia from the ORANI-E model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, R.A.; Dixon, P.B. [Monash Univ., Clayton, VIC (Australia); Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ABARE), Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Since the mid 1980s, economists have devoted considerable effort to greenhouse issues. Among the questions to which they have sought answers were what would be the effects on economic growth and employment of adopting different approaches to restricting greenhouse gas emissions, and what are the distributional effects of restricting greenhouse gas emissions, i.e. how would income and economic activity be re-allocated between countries, between industries, and between income classes. One approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is to impose taxes on the use of fossil fuels. Such a policy might, however, cause short-run economic disruption. This issues is investigated for Australia using a general equilibrium model, ORANI-E. The short-run effects of an energy tax are shown to depend on what is done with the tax revenue, how the labour market reacts, and on substitution possibilities between energy, capital and labour. Overall, the results indicate that energy taxes need not be damaging to the macro-economy. (author). 5 tabs., 2 figs., refs.