WorldWideScience

Sample records for bench scale tests

  1. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird(reg s ign) sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method

  2. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the

  3. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing

  4. 100 Area soil washing bench-scale test procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gerber, M.A.; Mattigod, S.V.; Serne, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    This document describes methodologies and procedures for conducting soil washing treatability tests in accordance with the 100 Area Soil Washing Treatability Test Plan (DOE-RL 1992, Draft A). The objective of this treatability study is to evaluate the use of physical separation systems and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating chemically and radioactively contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. These data will be primarily used for determining feasibility of the individual unit operations and defining the requirements for a system, or systems, for pilot-scale testing.

  5. Domestic Wastewater Reuse in Concrete Using Bench-Scale Testing and Full-Scale Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayoup M. Ghrair

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Demand for fresh water by the construction sector is expected to increase due to the high increase in the growth of construction activities in Jordan. This study aims to evaluate the potential of scale-up of the application of treated domestic wastewater in concrete from bench-scale to a full-scale. On the lab scale, concrete and mortar mixes using Primary and Secondary Treated Wastewater (PTW, STW and Distilled Water (DW were cast and tested after various curing ages (7, 28, 120, and 200 days. Based on wastewater quality, according to IS 456-2000, the STW is suitable for mortar and concrete production. Mortar made with STW at curing time up to 200 days has no significant negative effect on the mortar’s compressive strength. Conversely, the PTW exceeded the maximum permissible limits of total organic content and E coli. for concrete mixing-water. Using PTW results, a significant increase in the initial setting time of up to 16.7% and a decrease in the concrete workability are observed. In addition, using PTW as mixing water led to a significant reduction in the compressive strength up to 19.6%. The results that came out from scaling up to real production operation of ready-mix concrete were in harmony with the lab-scale results.

  6. Performance study of protective clothing against hot water splashes: from bench scale test to instrumented manikin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Wang, Faming

    2015-03-01

    Hot liquid hazards existing in work environments are shown to be a considerable risk for industrial workers. In this study, the predicted protection from fabric was assessed by a modified hot liquid splash tester. In these tests, conditions with and without an air spacer were applied. The protective performance of a garment exposed to hot water spray was investigated by a spray manikin evaluation system. Three-dimensional body scanning technique was used to characterize the air gap size between the protective clothing and the manikin skin. The relationship between bench scale test and manikin test was discussed and the regression model was established to predict the overall percentage of skin burn while wearing protective clothing. The results demonstrated strong correlations between bench scale test and manikin test. Based on these studies, the overall performance of protective clothing against hot water spray can be estimated on the basis of the results of the bench scale hot water splashes test and the information of air gap size entrapped in clothing. The findings provide effective guides for the design and material selection while developing high performance protective clothing. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society 2014.

  7. Bench-scale testing of a micronized magnetite, fine-coal cleaning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suardini, P.J. [Custom Coals, International, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Custom Coals, International has installed and is presently testing a 500 lb/hr. micronized-magnetite, fine-coal cleaning circuit at PETC`s Process Research Facility (PRF). The cost-shared project was awarded as part of the Coal Preparation Program`s, High Efficiency Preparation Subprogram. The project includes design, construction, testing, and decommissioning of a fully-integrated, bench-scale circuit, complete with feed coal classification to remove the minus 30 micron slimes, dense medium cycloning of the 300 by 30 micron feed coal using a nominal minus 10 micron size magnetite medium, and medium recovery using drain and rinse screens and various stages and types of magnetic separators. This paper describes the project circuit and goals, including a description of the current project status and the sources of coal and magnetite which are being tested.

  8. Evaluation of malodor for automobile air conditioner evaporator by using laboratory-scale test cooling bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jung, Young Rim; Kim, Man Goo

    2008-09-12

    As one of the measures to improve the environment in an automobile, malodor caused by the automobile air-conditioning system evaporator was evaluated and analyzed using laboratory-scale test cooling bench. The odor was simulated with an evaporator test cooling bench equipped with an airflow controller, air temperature and relative humidity controller. To simulate the same odor characteristics that occur from automobiles, one previously used automobile air conditioner evaporator associated with unpleasant odors was selected. The odor was evaluated by trained panels and collected with aluminum polyester bags. Collected samples were analyzed by thermal desorption into a cryotrap and subsequent gas chromatographic separation, followed by simultaneous olfactometry, flame ionization detector and identified by atomic emission detection and mass spectrometry. Compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids were identified as responsible odor-active compounds. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/olfactometry combined sensory method with instrumental analysis was very effective as an odor evaluation method in an automobile air-conditioning system evaporator.

  9. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  10. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  11. Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C.; Frank, S.

    1996-01-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form

  12. Bench scale testing of micronized magnetite beneficiation. Quarterly technical progress report 4, October--December, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, K.

    1994-01-25

    This project is aimed at development of a process that, by using ultra fine magnetite suspension, would expand the application of heavy media separation technology to processing fine, {minus}28 mesh coals. These coal fines, produced during coal mining and crushing, are separated in the conventional coal preparation plant and generally impounded in a tailings pond. Development of an economic process for processing these fines into marketable product will expand the utilization of coal for power production in an environmentally acceptable and economically viable way. This process has been successfully researched at PETC but has not been studied on a continuous bench-scale unit, which is a necessary step towards commercial development of this promising technology. The goal of the program is to investigate the technology in a continuous circuit at a reasonable scale to provide a design basis for larger plants and a commercial feasibility data.

  13. BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

    2011-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall

  14. Crucible melts and bench-scale ISV [in situ vitrification] tests on simulated wastes in INEL [Idaho National Engineering Laboratory] soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of eight crucible melt tests and three bench-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test that were performed on simulated metals/soils mixtures containing actual site soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The crucible melt and bench-scale ISV tests are a part of efforts by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assist the INEL in conducting a treatability study on ISV for application to the mixed waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area (SDA). The crucible melt tests were performed to evaluate the effect of various chemical additives and metal oxidation techniques on soil melting temperatures, melt viscosities, metals versus electrode oxidation potentials, and metals incorporation in the glass. The bench-scale ISV tests were performed to supplement the existing ISV data base with information on certain hazardous materials that have not been adequately evaluated in previous ISV tests. These materials included five EP toxicity metals, various volatile organic materials fixed in a cementitious matrix [including carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)], and asbestos. In addition, the bench-scale test were used to evaluated the effect of the proposed chemical additive on ISV processing performance and product quality. 8 refs., 24 figs., 19 tabs

  15. Bench Scale Development and Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process for Post-Combustion CO₂ Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ravi [Innosepra Limited Liability Company, Middlesex, NJ (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A physical sorption process to produce dry CO₂ at high purity (>98%) and high recovery (>90%) from the flue gas taken before or after the FGD was demonstrated both in the lab and in the field (one ton per day scale). A CO₂ recovery of over 94% and a CO₂ purity of over 99% were obtained in the field tests. The process has a moisture, SOX, and Hg removal stage followed by a CO₂ adsorption stage. Evaluations based on field testing, process simulation and detailed engineering studies indicate that the process has the potential for more than 40% reduction in the capital and more than 40% reduction in parasitic power for CO₂ capture compared to MEA. The process has the potential to provide CO₂ at a cost (<$40/tonne) and quality (<1 ppm H₂O, <1 ppm SOX, <10 ppm O₂) suitable for EOR applications which can make CO₂ capture profitable even in the absence of climate legislation. The process is applicable to power plants without SOX, Hg and NOX removal equipment.

  16. Bench Scale Development and Testing of Aerogel Sorbents for CO2 Capture Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begag, Redouane [Aspen Aerogels, Northborough, MA (United States)

    2017-03-30

    The primary objective of this project was scaling up and evaluating a novel Amine Functionalized Aerogel (AFA) sorbent in a bench scale fluidized bed reactor. The project team (Aspen Aerogels, University of Akron, ADA-ES, and Longtail Consulting) has carried out numerous tests and optimization studies to demonstrate the CO2 capture performance of the AFA sorbent in all its forms: powder, pellet, and bead. The CO2 capture target performance of the AFA sorbent (all forms) were set at > 12 wt.% and > 6 wt.% for total and working CO2 capacity, respectively (@ 40 °C adsorption / 100 – 120 °C desorption). The optimized AFA powders outperformed the performance targets by more than 30%, for the total CO2 capacity (14 - 20 wt.%), and an average of 10 % more for working CO2 capacity (6.6 – 7.0 wt.%, and could be as high as 9.6 wt. % when desorbed at 120 °C). The University of Akron developed binder formulations, pellet production methods, and post treatment technology for increased resistance to attrition and flue gas contaminants. In pellet form the AFA total CO2 capacity was ~ 12 wt.% (over 85% capacity retention of that of the powder), and there was less than 13% degradation in CO2 capture capacity after 20 cycles in the presence of 40 ppm SO2. ADA-ES assessed the performance of the AFA powder, pellet, and bead by analyzing sorption isotherms, water uptake analysis, cycling stability, jet cup attrition and crush tests. At bench scale, the hydrodynamic and heat transfer properties of the AFA sorbent pellet in fluidized bed conditions were evaluated at Particulate Solid Research, Inc. (PSRI). After the process design requirements were completed, by Longtail Consulting LLC, a techno-economic analysis was achieved using guidance from The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) report. This report provides the necessary framework to estimate costs for a temperature swing post

  17. Recommendations for Filler Material Composition and Delivery Method for Bench-Scale Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-03-01

    This report supplements Joint Workplan on Filler Investigations for DPCs (SNL 2017) providing new and some corrected information for use in planning Phase 1 laboratory testing of slurry cements as possible DPC fillers. The scope description is to "Describe a complete laboratory testing program for filler composition, delivery, emplacement in surrogate canisters, and post-test examination. To the extent possible specify filler material and equipment sources." This report includes results from an independent expert review (Dr. Arun Wagh, retired from Argonne National Laboratory and contracted by Sandia) that helped to narrow the range of cement types for consideration, and to provide further guidance on mix variations to optimize injectability, durability, and other aspects of filler performance.

  18. Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

    2008-12-01

    Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr

  19. Permeable reactive biobarriers for in situ Cr(VI) reduction: bench scale tests using Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viamajala, Sridhar; Peyton, Brent M; Gerlach, Robin; Sivaswamy, Vaideeswaran; Apel, William A; Petersen, James N

    2008-12-15

    Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr

  20. Test Bench Development for Femur Stability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel SANCHEZ-CABALLERO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the design and development of a test bench for humanfemurs. The main uses of this test bench will run from artificial femurs comparisonwith real femurs, to join stability assessment after bone a fracture repair. Amongthis uses is specially designed for condylar fractures testing. The test bench isdeveloped from a self-made existing tensile/compression testing machine. Thedesign procedure is supported by a literature review about the bone mechanicalbehavior and composition generally and the knee joint performance and repairparticularly. On the basis of this review, the machine was designed to simulate theadduction and abduction movements of the joint. The magnitudes to be measuredare: the compression force, the bone displacement (vertical and the knee jointrotation

  1. Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-24

    This document contains the third quarterly technical progress report for PTI`s Bench-Scale Testing Project of a circuit integrating PTI`s KEN-FLOTETM Column Flotation Technology and PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor and Control System. The twelve-month project involves installation and testing of a 200--300 lb/hr. bench-scale flotation circuit at PETC`s Coal Preparation Process Research Facility (CPPRF) for two bituminous coals (Upper Freeport and Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Raw Coals). Figure 1 contains the project plan, as well as the approach to completing the major tasks within the twelve-month project schedule. The project is broken down into three phases, which include: Phase I -- Preparation: The preparation phase was performed principally at PTI`s Calumet offices from October through December, 1992. It involved building of the equipment and circuitry, as well as some preliminary design and equipment testing; Phase II -- ET Circuit Installation and Testing: This installation and testing phase of the project was performed at PETC`s CPPRF from January through June, 1993, and was the major focus of the project. It involved testing of the continuous 200--300 lb/hr. circuit; and Phase III -- Project Finalization: The project finalization phase is occurring from July through September, 1993, at PTI`s Calumet offices and involves finalizing analytical work and data evaluation, as well as final project reporting. This Third Quarterly Technical Progress Report principally summarizes the results from the benchscale testing with the second coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam Coal), which occurred in April through June, 1993. It also contains preliminary economic evaluations that will go into the Final Report, as well as the plan for the final reporting task.

  2. NetBench. Automated Network Performance Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Cadeddu, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the operation of high performance routers, CERN has developed the NetBench software to run benchmarking tests by injecting various traffic patterns and observing the network devices behaviour in real-time. The tool features a modular design with a Python based console used to inject traffic and collect the results in a database, and a web user

  3. Nondestructive testing bench without rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdijon, J.

    1976-01-01

    On-line testing by ultrasonics in combination with eddy currents represents a large saving in time and equipment since the tube to be checked only needs to pass once quickly and without rotation. The answer to this problem is to use encircling transducers, which means that the mirror interposed to detect transverse defects must be conical while that used to detect longitudinal defects is helically shaped. A cell combining these two mirrors with an eddy current coil to test thin small-diameter tubes is described. The first trial year shows that defects are detected independently of their position, with a sensitivity at least equal to that of conventional systems [fr

  4. Laser damage test bench for space optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Wolfgang; Allenspacher, Paul

    2017-11-01

    At the German Aerospace Center in Stuttgart a laser damage test bench is run to evaluate damage thresholds of various optical components. The system setup is based on the current ISO standards 11254 [1-3] for single shot and multiple pulse operation. The laser damage test bench contains two repetitively pulsed laser sources, a Ti:Sapphire and a Nd:YAG laser, operating at wavelengths of 775 nm and 1064 nm, respectively. Harmonic wavelength converters to the visible spectral range are available. Both lasers are supplying the same damage testing rig. Online damage assessment techniques like sensitive scatter probe monitoring and video microscopy monitoring are used. The system is suited and has been tested extensively in the past for dielectric coated optics like beam turning mirrors, reflectors and windows, nonlinear optical components, semiconductors, and laser crystals. The damage test bench is located in a class 10,000 cleanroom environment under a laminar flowbox providing an additional isolation factor of >103. The tests can also be performed in sealed optical compartments in partial vacuum and under long term irradiation conditions. All experiments are supported by theoretical simulation of laser-material interactions, down to the sub-ps timescale [4].

  5. TDT-3R Clean Multi Fuels. ECN contribution to WP3. Lab-/bench-scale pyrolysis test of biomass and analysis of byproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.; Oudhuis, A.B.J.; Zwart, R.W.R.; Boersma, A.R.

    2005-11-01

    Under the present conditions it is expected that coal will still be used for a long period as a energy source. Furthermore, biomass is emerging as a new renewable CO2-neutral energy source in the future. Both fuels need significantly lower emissions to meet new (future) European Union environmental norms for sustainable clean energy production. Several technologies and 'end-of pipe' solutions have been developed in the past to reach these stricter emission limits. Examples are integrated combined cycle gasification systems (IGCC) for large scale use (>250 MW capacity). Also, a large number of gas cleaning technologies have been developed. These technologies are up-to-now rather complicated and/or costly and therefore also new solutions have to be developed. The 3R Multifuel process is aimed to offer a solution to these problems, especially for low-rank coals like brown coal, lignite, high sulfur coal, derived fuels and biomass. The objectives for ECN in the Work Package 3 of this project are: (a) to summarise and update data for the potential of biomass and waste streams in Europe for power production; and (b) to select biomass/waste streams to be tested in the lab/bench-scale facility and to generate design data for clean solid fuel production from biomass to be used for a pilot facility in Hungary. TDT-3R stands for Thermal Desorption Technology-Recycle-Reduce-Reuse

  6. Bench scale demonstration and conceptual engineering for DETOXSM catalyzed wet oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moslander, J.; Bell, R.; Robertson, D.; Dhooge, P.; Goldblatt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory and bench scale studies of the DETOX SM catalyzed wet oxidation process have been performed with the object of developing the process for treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes. Reaction orders, apparent rates, and activation energies have been determined for a range of organic waste surrogates. Reaction intermediates and products have been analyzed. Metals' fates have been determined. Bench scale units have been designed, fabricated, and tested with solid and liquid organic waste surrogates. Results from the laboratory and bench scale studies have been used to develop conceptual designs for application of the process to hazardous and mixed wastes

  7. Bench-scale testing of the micronized magnetite process. Eighth quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-13

    The major focus of the project is to install and test a 500 lbs./hr. fine-coal cleaning circuit at DOE`s Process Research Facility (PRF), located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). The circuit will utilize an extremely fine, micron-sized magnetite media and small diameter cyclones to make efficient density separations on minus-28-Mesh coal. The circuit consists of three subcircuits: Classification Circuit; Dense-Medium Cycloning Circuit; and Magnetite Recovery Circuit. The testing scope involves initial closed-loop testing of each subcircuit to optimize the performance of the equipment in each subcircuit (i.e., Component Testing), followed by open-circuit testing of the entire integrated circuit to optimize the process and quantify the process efficiency (i.e., Integrated Testing). This report contains a short discussion of the project description, objectives, budget, schedule, and teaming arrangement. It also includes a detailed discussion of the above mentioned project accomplishments and plans, organized by the various task series within the project work plan. The final section contains an outline of the specific project goals for the next quarterly reporting period.

  8. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 9. Results of Bench-Scale and Pilot Plant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task 1 are not severe...50 REFERENCES. ............................ 51 APPENDIX A: LCI Test Report on Expanded-Bed Al Hydroprocessing of 300*F+ Great Plains Tar ...recovered by gravity separation. The heaviest portion of the tar oil, which contains about 20 percent coal dust, is recycled to the gasifiers. The recycle

  9. Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portzer, Jeffrey W.; Gangwal, Santosh K.

    1997-01-01

    Prior to the current project, development of the DSRP was done in a laboratory setting, using synthetic gas mixtures to simulate the regeneration off-gas and coal gas feeds. The objective of the current work is to further the development of zinc titanate fluidized-bed desulfurization (ZTFBD) and the DSRP for hot-gas cleanup by testing with actual coal gas. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Develop and test an integrated, skid-mounted, bench-scale ZTFBD/DSRP reactor system with a slipstream of actual coal gas; (2) Test the bench-scale DSRP over an extended period with a slipstream of actual coal gas to quantify the degradation in performance, if any, caused by the trace contaminants present in coal gas (including heavy metals, chlorides, fluorides, and ammonia); (3) Expose the DSRP catalyst to actual coal gas for extended periods and then test its activity in a laboratory reactor to quantify the degradation in performance, if any, caused by static exposure to the trace contaminants in coal gas; (4) Design and fabricate a six-fold larger-scale DSRP reactor system for future slipstream testing; (5) Further develop the fluidized-bed DSRP to handle high concentrations (up to 14 percent) of SO 2 that are likely to be encountered when pure air is used for regeneration of desulfurization sorbents; and (6) Conduct extended field testing of the 6X DSRP reactor with actual coal gas and high concentrations of SO 2 . The accomplishment of the first three objectives--testing the DSRP with actual coal gas, integration with hot-gas desulfurization, and catalyst exposure testing--was described previously (Portzer and Gangwal, 1994, 1995; Portzer et al., 1996). This paper summarizes the results of previous work and describes the current activities and plans to accomplish the remaining objectives

  10. Diesel injector fouling bench test methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinoha, Leon L.; Yost, Douglas M.; Lestz, Sidney J.

    1992-06-01

    Compared to conventional compression ignition (CI) engine operation with the fuel being delivered at approximately 149 C (300 F), adiabatic engine operation potentially may deliver the fuel at temperatures as high as 260 C (500 F). Hypergolic CI engine combustion systems now in theoretical design stages will deliver fuel at temperatures approaching 427 to 538 C (800 to 1000 F). The ability of a fuel to resist formation of deposits on internal injector system surfaces is a form of thermal oxidative stability for which test methodology will be required. The injector Fouling Bench Test (IFBT) methodology evaluated in this report will assist in defining fuel contribution to injector fouling and control of fuel thermal stability in procurement specifications. The major observations from this project are discussed. Forty-hour cyclic IFB tests employing both Bosch APE 113 and Detroit Diesel (DD) N70 injectors are viable procedures for evaluating fuel effects on injector fouling. Cyclic operation appears to be superior to steady-state operation for both type injectors. Eighty-hour cyclic tests are more discriminating than 40-hour cyclic tests using the Bosch APE 113 injectors. JFTOT tests of fuels provide directional information on thermal stability-related deposits and filter plugging but show limited good correlation with IFBT DD N70 ratings, and none with IFBT Bosch APE 113 injector ratings. Deposition on injector pintles was more realistically rated by optical microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) than conventional visual and bench rating methods. High-sulfur fuel readily caused sticking of Detroit Diesel injectors. Injector sticking is an important mode of injector fouling.

  11. Lab and Bench-Scale Pelletization of Torrefied Wood Chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shang, Lei; Nielsen, Niels Peter K.; Stelte, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    content, additive addition, and the degree of torrefaction on the pelletizing properties and pellet quality, i.e., density, static friction, and pellet strength. Results were compared with pellet production using a bench-scale pelletizer. The results indicate that friction is the key factor when scaling...... up from single-pellet press to bench-scale pelletizer. Tuning moisture content or increasing the die temperature did not ease the pellet production of torrefied wood chips significantly. The addition of rapeseed oil as a lubricant reduced the static friction by half and stabilized pellet production...

  12. JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

    2003-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite

  13. 100 Area groundwater biodenitrification bench-scale treatability study procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, B.M.; Martin, K.R.

    1993-05-01

    This document describes the methodologies and procedures for conducting the bench-scale biodenitrification treatability tests at Pacific Northwest Laboratory{sup a} (PNL). Biodenitrification is the biological conversion of nitrate and nitrite to gaseous nitrogen. The tests will use statistically designed batch studies to determine if biodenitrification can reduce residual nitrate concentrations to 45 mg/L, the current maximum contaminant level (MCL). These tests will be carried out in anaerobic flasks with a carbon source added to demonstrate nitrate removal. At the pilot scale, an incremental amount of additional carbon will be required to remove the small amount of oxygen present in the incoming groundwater. These tests will be conducted under the guidance of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan (DOE/RL-92-73) and the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE/RL-92-48) using groundwater from 100-HR-3. In addition to the procedures, requirements for safety, quality assurance, reporting, and schedule are given. Appendices include analytical procedures, a Quality Assurance Project Plan, a Health and Safety Plan, and Applicable Material Data Safety Sheets. The procedures contained herein are designed specifically for the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Treatability Test Plan, and while the author believes that the methods described herein are scientifically valid, the procedures should not be construed or mistaken to be generally applicable to any other treatability study.

  14. The EDF/CNPP medium-scale test bench: an experimental tool to study the fire behavior of combustible materials; La cabine d'essais a moyenne echelle EDF/CNPP: un outil experimental pour l'etude du comportement au feu de materiaux combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibert, E.

    1998-07-01

    EDF has a medium-scale test bench located at the CNPP, in Vernon. The experimental bench is used to study the fire behavior of combustible materials. The present paper deals with the main dynamic measures made during a test: in-bench temperatures, gas inlet and outlet flow rates, various chemical species concentration in fumes, loss of weight of the tested sample and heat released by its combustion. Moreover, the paper details the results of a calibration test which was carried out by injecting propane gas through a burner. The purpose of such a test was to supply the response of the bench instrumentation, and to check that heat released by gas combustion could be calculated using two different methods (O{sub 2} consumption and CO{sub 2} production). The test bench will be mainly used to investigate combustion of electric cable bundles. However, its use may be extended to study fire behavior of any fuel. (authors)

  15. Bench-scale treatability studies for simulated incinerator scrubber blowdown containing radioactive cesium and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroneos, A.C.; Taylor, P.A.; Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bostick, D.A.; Perona, J.J.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the results of bench-scale testing completed to remove 137 Cs and 90 Sr from the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator blowdown at the K-25 Site Central Neutralization Facility, a wastewater treatment facility designed to remove heavy metals and uranium from various wastewaters. The report presents results of bench-scale testing using chabazite and clinoptilolite zeolites to remove cesium and strontium; using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide (KCCF) to remove cesium; and using strontium chloride coprecipitation, sodium phosphate coprecipitation, and calcium sulfate coprecipitation to remove strontium. Low-range, average-range, and high-range concentration blowdown surrogates were used to complete the bench-scale testing

  16. Polymeric Traypack Integrity: Bench-Scale Unit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Canavan, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    .... Additional experimentation was conducted to determine the applicability of the unit for non-destructive residual gas testing since current destructive tests represent a substantial continuing expense...

  17. HEV Test Bench Based on CAN Bus Sensor Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shupeng ZHAO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The HEV test bench based on Controller Area Network bus was studied and developed. Control system of HEV power test bench used the CAN bus technology. The application of CAN bus technology on control system development has opened up a new research direction for domestic automobile experimental platform. The HEV power control system development work was completed, including power master controller, electric throttle controller, driving simulation platform, CAN2.0 B communication protocol procedures for formulation, CAN communication monitoring system, the simulation model based on MATLAB code automatic generation technology research, etc. Maximum absorption power of the test bench is 90 kW, the test bench top speed is 6000 r/min, the CAN communication data baud rate is 10~500 k, the conventional electric measurement parameter part precision satisfies the requirement of development of HEV. On the HEV test bench the result of regenerative braking experiment shows that the result got by the test bench was closer to the results got by outdoor road test. And the fuel consumption experiment test results show that the HEV fuel consumption and the charge-discharge character are in linear relationship. The establishment of the test platform for the evaluation of the development of hybrid electric vehicle and power provides physical simulation and test platform.

  18. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling

  19. Brake System Analysis, Reliability Testing And Control Using Bench Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Z.; Yang, B.

    1997-01-01

    In this project, the authors investigated the dynamics and reliability of a brake control system using a test bench which is a Lincoln Town Car brake system. The objectives of the project are to: 1) experimentally characterize the brake system; 2) obtain good nonlinear models of the brake system; 3) perform reliability analysis of the brake control system; and, 4) develop algorithms for brake malfunction detection and brake reliability enhancement. By using the brake test bench, the dynamic c...

  20. A bench-scale biotreatability methodology to evaluate field bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saberiyan, A.G.; MacPherson, J.R. Jr.; Moore, R.; Pruess, A.J.; Andrilenas, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A bench-scale biotreatability methodology was designed to assess field bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soil samples. This methodology was performed successfully on soil samples from more than 40 sites. The methodology is composed of two phases, characterization and experimentation. The first phase is physical, chemical, and biological characterization of the contaminated soil sample. This phase determines soil parameters, contaminant type, presence of indigenous contaminant-degrading bacteria, and bacterial population size. The second phase, experimentation, consists of a respirometry test to measure the growth of microbes indirectly (via generation of CO 2 ) and the consumption of their food source directly (via contaminant loss). Based on a Monod kinetic analysis, the half-life of a contaminant can be calculated. Abiotic losses are accounted for based on a control test. The contaminant molecular structure is used to generate a stoichiometric equation. The stoichiometric equation yields a theoretical ratio for mg of contaminant degraded per mg of CO 2 produced. Data collected from the respirometry test are compared to theoretical values to evaluate bioremediation feasibility

  1. Electrodialytic remediation of air pollution control residues in bench scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ferreira, Celia; Hansen, Henrik K.

    2008-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residue from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is considered a hazardous waste due to its alkalinity and high content of salts and mobile heavy metals. Various solutions for the handling of APC-residue exist in different regions; however, most commercial...... solutions are concerned with deposition. A demand for more environmentally friendly alternatives exists. Electrodialysis could be such an alternative, and the potential is being explored. This work presents a bench scale study of the feasibility of treating APC-residue from a dry system by electrodialysis....... A system resembling conventional electrodialysis was designed and adjusted to fit the high solids content feed solution (10% APC residue, 90% water). Experiments were made in bench scale with raw residue (natural pH > 12), water pre-residue (natural pH > 12), acid pre-washed residue (pH 10), and acid...

  2. Hydrogen production with short contact time. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds: Recent advances in pilot- and bench-scale testing and process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarinoni, A.; Ponzo, R.; Basini, L. [ENI Refining and Marketing Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    ENI R and D has been active for fifteen years in the development of Short Contact Time - Catalytic Partial Oxidation (SCT-CPO) technologies for producing Hydrogen/Synthesis Gas. From the beginning the experimental work addressed either at defining the fundamental principles or the technical and economical potential of the technology. Good experimental responses, technical solutions' simplicity and flexibility, favourable techno-economical evaluations promoted the progressive widening of the field of the investigations. From Natural Gas (NG) the range of ''processable'' Hydrocarbons extended to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Gasoils, including those characterised by high levels of unsaturated and sulphurated molecules and, lately, to other compounds with biological origin. The extensive work led to the definition of different technological solutions, grouped as follows: Technology 1: Air Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 2: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 3: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Liquid Hydrocarbons and/or Compounds with biological origin Recently, the licence rights on a non-exclusive basis for the commercialisation of SCT-CPO based processes for H{sub 2}/Synthesis gas production from light hydrocarbons with production capacity lower than 5,000 Nm{sup 3}/h of H{sub 2} or 7,500 Nm3/h of syngas have been assigned to two external companies. In parallel, development of medium- and large-scale plant solutions is progressing within the ENI group framework. These last activities are addressed to the utilisation of SCT-CPO for matching the variable Hydrogen demand in several contexts of oil refining operation. This paper will report on the current status of SCT-CPO with a focus on experimental results obtained, either at pilot- and bench- scale level. (orig.)

  3. Simulation of Induction Traction Drive with Supercapacitor Energy Storage System Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stana Girts

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the application of supercapacitor energy storage system for induction traction drive test bench that replaces a real electric public transport for performing testing and researches. The suitability and usage of such bench for research purposes is explained and the importance of the development of software mathematical model for performing simulations to be done before physical implementation measures is reasoned. The working principle of the bench and applied components are described. A virtual model of the bench was built and simulations were performed using Matlab/Simulink software. The basic topology of the virtual bench model is described as well. The calculations of this work show the scaling of supercapacitor energy storage system by setting different limits of working voltage range in order to adjust them to test bench parameters, whereas the modelling compares two simulation cases – the application of less supercapacitors and the application of more supercapacitors with the same common rated voltage. The autonomous mode simulations were also performed. Simulation results are analyzed and recommendations for the application of the supercapacitor energy storage system, with respect to initial supercapacitor circuit voltage, are given.

  4. Test benches for studying the properties of car tyres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N. Yu.; Fedotov, A. I.; Vlasov, V. G.

    2017-12-01

    The article describes the design of the measuring systems of test benches used to study the properties of elastic tyres. The bench has two autonomous systems - for testing the braking properties of elastic tyres rolling in a plane parallel way and for testing tyre slip properties. The system for testing braking properties determines experimental characteristics of elastic tyres as the following dependencies: longitudinal response vs time, braking torque vs slip, angular velocity vs slip, and longitudinal response vs slip. The system for studying tyre slip properties determines both steady (dependence of the lateral response in a contact area on the slipping angle) and non-steady characteristics (time variation of the slipping angle as a result of turning from -40 to +40 degrees) of tyre slip. The article presents the diagrams of bench tests of elastic tyres. The experimental results show metrological parameters and functional capabilities of the bench for studying tyre properties in driving and braking modes. The metrological indices of the recorded parameters of the measuring system for studying tyre properties are presented in the table.

  5. Automatic integrated testing bench for tubes in translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufayet, J.P.; Perdijon, J.

    1976-01-01

    All the nondestructive tests required for receiving the cladding tubes intended for fast nuclear reactor are integrated on this bench: quality control by eddy currents and ultra-sounds, thickness and (inner and outer) diameter measurement. The linear displacement of the tube allows very high rates to be attained [fr

  6. Bidirectional converter interface for a battery energy storage test bench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trintis, Ionut; Thomas, Stephan; Blank, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the bidirectional converter interface for a 6 kV battery energy storage test bench. The power electronic interface consists a two stage converter topology having a low voltage dc-ac grid connected converter and a new dual active bridge dc-dc converter with high transformation...

  7. Performance evaluation of the DCMD desalination process under bench scale and large scale module operating conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Francis, Lijo

    2014-04-01

    The flux performance of different hydrophobic microporous flat sheet commercial membranes made of poly tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and poly propylene (PP) was tested for Red Sea water desalination using the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) process, under bench scale (high δT) and large scale module (low δT) operating conditions. Membranes were characterized for their surface morphology, water contact angle, thickness, porosity, pore size and pore size distribution. The DCMD process performance was optimized using a locally designed and fabricated module aiming to maximize the flux at different levels of operating parameters, mainly feed water and coolant inlet temperatures at different temperature differences across the membrane (δT). Water vapor flux of 88.8kg/m2h was obtained using a PTFE membrane at high δT (60°C). In addition, the flux performance was compared to the first generation of a new locally synthesized and fabricated membrane made of a different class of polymer under the same conditions. A total salt rejection of 99.99% and boron rejection of 99.41% were achieved under extreme operating conditions. On the other hand, a detailed water characterization revealed that low molecular weight non-ionic molecules (ppb level) were transported with the water vapor molecules through the membrane structure. The membrane which provided the highest flux was then tested under large scale module operating conditions. The average flux of the latter study (low δT) was found to be eight times lower than that of the bench scale (high δT) operating conditions.

  8. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine

  9. Bench scale flotation of spodume/quartz and lepidolite/quartz synthetic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadao, G.E.S.; Gontijo, C.F.; Peres, A.E.C.

    1985-01-01

    Based on results of zeta potential determinations and microflotation tests, bench scale flotation experiments were carried out using spodume/quartz and lepodolite/quartz synthetic mixtures. Pure natural samples, further purified in laboratory, and commercial reagents were employed. The minerals were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique. Selectivity between spodume and quartz was achieved through modification with corn starch and between lepidolite and quartz through pH control in the acidic range. (Author) [pt

  10. Towards an Automated Test Bench Environment for Prolog Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Ricardo; Areias, Miguel; Rocha, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Software testing and benchmarking is a key component of the software development process. Nowadays, a good practice in big software projects is the Continuous Integration (CI) software development technique. The key idea of CI is to let developers integrate their work as they produce it, instead of doing the integration at the end of each software module. In this paper, we extend a previous work on a benchmark suite for the Yap Prolog system and we propose a fully automated test bench environ...

  11. Simulation of the LHC injection kicker impedance test bench

    CERN Document Server

    Tsutsui, H

    2003-01-01

    The coupling impedance measurements of the LHC injection kicker test bench are simulated by HFSS code. The simulation gives qualitatively good agreement with the measurement. In order to damp the resonances, some ferrite rings are tested in the simulation. Longitudinal resonances are damped by a ferrite ring of large tan$\\delta_{\\mu}$. The effect of the ferrite ring is small for damping the transverse impedance resonance around 30 MHz.

  12. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  13. The R and D D's bearing test benches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialettes, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    In power generation plants, rotating machines are involved in energy transformation processes and safety systems. The bearings supporting the rotors and the thrust bearings play a crucial role in the reliability of these machines. The phenomena encountered straddle several disciplines: hydrodynamics, tribology, thermomechanics, materials and vibrations in a specific environment, namely: thin fluid film, solid mechanical components and shaft rotation. Means of analysing the behaviour of these components (bearings and thrust bearings) have been developed and implemented. These consists of the EDYOS (Etude Dynamique des Organes de Supportage) code for dynamically studying bearing devices and several related bench tests. In reality, in order to understand the complex physical phenomena encountered in these components, it is vital to carry out analyses and experimental validations. Since these investigations cannot be carried out on actual machines, test benches have been built which can subject the sample bearings to the equivalent stresses. (author)

  14. Development, function and test of a static test bench for UHF-RFID ear tags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Adrion

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high-frequency radio frequency identification systems (UHF-RFID systems offer multiple application possibilities for animal identification. In a present joint project, UHF transponder ear tags and readers are currently being developed especially for use with cattle and pigs. An automatic test bench was developed for measuring the detection area and signal strength of various transponders, the aim being to enable with this test bench comparison of different types of UHF-transponder ear tags in different orientations to reader antennas. Described in this paper is the constructional development and functionality of the test bench as well as trials to determine reproducibility, influence of two trial parameters and suitability of the test bench for the required purpose. The results demonstrate that the test bench fulfilled all the stipulated requirements and enabled a preliminary selection of suitable types of UHF ear tags for use in practice.

  15. Bench-scale/field-scale interpretations: Session overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, A.B.; Peyton, B.M.

    1995-04-01

    In situ bioremediation involves complex interactions between biological, chemical, and physical processes and requires integration of phenomena operating at scales ranging from that of a microbial cell (10 -6 ) to that of a remediation site (10 to 1000 m). Laboratory investigations of biodegradation are usually performed at a relatively small scale, governed by convenience, cost, and expedience. However, extending the results from a laboratory-scale experimental system to the design and operation of a field-scale system introduces (1) additional mass transport mechanisms and limitations; (2) the presence of multiple phases, contants, and competing microorganisms (3) spatial geologic heterogeneities; and (4) subsurface environmental factors that may inhibit bacterial growth such as temperature, pH, nutrient, or redox conditions. Field bioremediation rates may be limited by the availability of one of the necessary constituents for biotransformation: substrate, contaminant, electron acceptor, nutrients, or microorganisms capable of degrading the target compound. The factor that limits the rate of bioremediation may not be the same in the laboratory as it is in the field, thereby leading, to development of unsuccessful remediation strategies

  16. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Drira, Anis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, Frederick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  17. Design of a Test Bench for Intraocular Lens Optical Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba-Bueno, Francisco; Vega, Fidel; Millan, Maria S, E-mail: francisco.alba-bueno@upc.edu, E-mail: fvega@oo.upc.edu, E-mail: millan@oo.upc.edu [Departamento de Optica y Optometria, Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, C/ Violinista Vellsola 37, 08222 Terrassa (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    The crystalline lens is the responsible for focusing at different distances (accommodation) in the human eye. This organ grows throughout life increasing in size and rigidity. Moreover, due this growth it loses transparency through life, and becomes gradually opacified causing what is known as cataracts. Cataract is the most common cause of visual loss in the world. At present, this visual loss is recoverable by surgery in which the opacified lens is destroyed (phacoemulsification) and replaced by the implantation of an intraocular lens (IOL). If the IOL implanted is mono-focal the patient loses its natural capacity of accommodation, and as a consequence they would depend on an external optic correction to focus at different distances. In order to avoid this dependency, multifocal IOLs designs have been developed. The multi-focality can be achieved by using either, a refractive surface with different radii of curvature (refractive IOLs) or incorporating a diffractive surface (diffractive IOLs). To analyze the optical quality of IOLs it is necessary to test them in an optical bench that agrees with the ISO119679-2 1999 standard (Ophthalmic implants. Intraocular lenses. Part 2. Optical Properties and Test Methods). In addition to analyze the IOLs according to the ISO standard, we have designed an optical bench that allows us to simulate the conditions of a real human eye. To do that, we will use artificial corneas with different amounts of optical aberrations and several illumination sources with different spectral distributions. Moreover, the design of the test bench includes the possibility of testing the IOLs under off-axis conditions as well as in the presence of decentration and/or tilt. Finally, the optical imaging quality of the IOLs is assessed by using common metrics like the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Point Spread Function (PSF) and/or the Strehl ratio (SR), or via registration of the IOL's wavefront with a Hartmann-Shack sensor and its

  18. Oxygen-controlled Biosurfactant Production in a Bench Scale Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kronemberger, Frederico Araujo; Anna, Lidia Maria Melo Santa; Fernandes, Ana Carolina Loureiro Brito; de Menezes, Reginaldo Ramos; Borges, Cristiano Piacsek; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães

    Rhamnolipids have been pointed out as promising biosurfactants. The most studied microorganisms for the aerobic production of these molecules are the bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. The aim of this work was to produce a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant in a bench-scale bioreactor by one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from oil environments. To study the microorganism growth and production dependency on oxygen, a nondispersive oxygenation device was developed, and a programmable logic controller (PLC) was used to set the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. Using the data stored in a computer and the predetermined characteristics of the oxygenation device, it was possible to evaluate the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and the specific OUR (SOUR) of this microorganism. These rates, obtained for some different DO concentrations, were then compared to the bacterial growth, to the carbon source consumption, and to the rhamnolipid and other virulence factors production. The SOUR presented an initial value of about 60.0 mg02/gdw h. Then, when the exponential growth phase begins, there is a rise in this rate. After that, the SOUR reduces to about 20.0 mg02/gdw h. The carbon source consumption is linear during the whole process.

  19. Bidirectional converter interface for a battery energy storage test bench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trintis, Ionut; Thomas, Stephan; Blank, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the bidirectional converter interface for a 6 kV battery energy storage test bench. The power electronic interface consists a two stage converter topology having a low voltage dc-ac grid connected converter and a new dual active bridge dc-dc converter with high transformation...... ratio. The dc-dc converter controls the battery charge/discharge current while the grid converter controls the common dc-link voltage and the grid current. The applied control structures and the hardware implementation of both converters are presented, together with their interaction. Experimental...

  20. Design of a Compact and Versatile Bench Scale Tubular Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Prasad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A compact and versatile laboratory tubular reactor has been designed and fabricated keeping in view of reducing capital cost and minimising energy consumption for gas/vapor-phase heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The reactor is consisted of two coaxial corning glass tubes with a helical coil of glass tube in between the coaxial tubes serving as vaporiser and pre-heater, the catalyst bed is in the inner tube. A schematic diagram of the reactor with detailed dimensions and working principles are described. The attractive feature of the reactor is that the vaporiser, pre-heater and fixed bed reactor are merged in a single compact unit. Thus, the unit minimises separate vaporiser and pre-heater, also avoids separate furnaces used for them and eliminate auxiliary instrumentation such as temperature controller etc. To demonstrate the system operation and illustrate the key features, catalyst screening data and the efficient collection of complete, and accurate intrinsic kinetic data are provided for oxidation of CO over copper chromite catalyst. CO oxidation is an important reaction for auto-exhaust pollution control. The suitability of the versatile nature of the reactor has been ascertained for catalytic reactions where either volatile or vaporizable feeds can be introduced to the reaction zone, e.g. oxidation of iso-octane, reduction of nitric oxide, dehydrogenation of methanol, ethanol and iso-propanol, hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline, etc. Copyright (c 2009 by BCREC. All Rights reserved.[Received: 10 February 2009, Accepted: 9 May 2009][How to Cite: R. Prasad, G. Rattan. (2009. Design of a Compact and Versatile Bench Scale Tubular Reactor. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 4(1: 5-9.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.4.1.1250.5-9][How to Link/ DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.4.1.1250.5-9

  1. Dynamic MTF, an innovative test bench for detector characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Rossi; Raphaël, Lardière; Delmonte, Stephane

    2017-11-01

    PLEIADES HR are High Resolution satellites for Earth observation. Placed at 695km they reach a 0.7m spatial resolution. To allow such performances, the detectors are working in a TDI mode (Time and Delay Integration) which consists in a continuous charge transfer from one line to the consecutive one while the image is passing on the detector. The spatial resolution, one of the most important parameter to test, is characterized by the MTF (Modulation Transfer Function). Usually, detectors are tested in a staring mode. For a higher level of performances assessment, a dedicated bench has been set-up, allowing detectors' MTF characterization in the TDI mode. Accuracy and reproducibility are impressive, opening the door to new perspectives in term of HR imaging systems testing.

  2. Old star clusters: Bench tests of low mass stellar models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaris M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Old star clusters in the Milky Way and external galaxies have been (and still are traditionally used to constrain the age of the universe and the timescales of galaxy formation. A parallel avenue of old star cluster research considers these objects as bench tests of low-mass stellar models. This short review will highlight some recent tests of stellar evolution models that make use of photometric and spectroscopic observations of resolved old star clusters. In some cases these tests have pointed to additional physical processes efficient in low-mass stars, that are not routinely included in model computations. Moreover, recent results from the Kepler mission about the old open cluster NGC6791 are adding new tight constraints to the models.

  3. Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Treatment Technologies for the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coal mine water (CMW) is typically treated to remove suspended solids, acidity, and soluble metals, but high concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) have been reported to impact the environment at several CMW discharge points. Consequently, various states have established TDS wastewater regulations and the US EPA has proposed a benchmark conductivity limit to reduce TDS impacts in streams near mining sites. Traditional CMW treatment effectively removes some TDS components, but is not effective in removing major salt ions due to their higher solubility. This paper describes the basic principles, effectiveness, advantages and disadvantages of various TDS removal technologies (adsorption, bioremediation, capacitive deionization, desalination, electro-chemical ion exchange, electrocoagulation, electrodialysis, ion exchange, membrane filtration, precipitation, and reverse osmosis) that have at least been tested in bench- and pilot-scale experiments. Recent discussions about new regulations to include total dissolved solids TDS) limits would propel interest in the TDS removal technologies focused on coal mine water. TDS removal is not a new concept and has been developed using different technologies for a number of applications, but coal mine water has unique characteristics (depending on the site, mining process, and solid-water-oxygen interactions), which make it unlikely to have a single technology predominating over others. What are some novel technolog

  4. System of Thermal Balance Maintenance in Modern Test Benches for Centrifugal Pumps

    OpenAIRE

    A. I. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    The article “Systems of the heat balance maintenance in modern test benches for centrifugal pumps” makes the case to include cooling systems of a working fluid (heat setting) in test bench for impeller pumps. It briefly summarizes an experience of bench building to test centrifugal pumps, developed at the BMSTU Department E-10 over the last 10 years. The article gives the formulas and the algorithm to calculate the heat capacity of different types of impeller pumps when tested at the bench as...

  5. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Benjamin; Genovese, Sarah; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Farnum, Rachael; Sing, Surinder; Wilson, Paul; Buckley, Paul; Acharya, Harish; Chen, Wei; McDermott, John; Vipperia, Ravikumar; Yee, Michael; Steele, Ray; Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    A bench-scale system was designed and built to test an aminosilicone-based solvent. A model was built of the bench-scale system and this model was scaled up to model the performance of a carbon capture unit, using aminosilicones, for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration (CCS) for a pulverized coal (PC) boiler at 550 MW. System and economic analysis for the carbon capture unit demonstrates that the aminosilicone solvent has significant advantages relative to a monoethanol amine (MEA)-based system. The CCS energy penalty for MEA is 35.9% and the energy penalty for aminosilicone solvent is 30.4% using a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the energy penalty for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to 29%. The increase in cost of electricity (COE) over the non-capture case for MEA is ~109% and increase in COE for aminosilicone solvent is ~98 to 103% depending on the solvent cost at a steam temperature of 395 °C (743 °F). If the steam temperature is lowered to 204 °C (400 °F), the increase in COE for the aminosilicone solvent is reduced to ~95-100%.

  6. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  7. In situ remediation of hexavalent chromium with pyrite fines : bench scale demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathum, S.; Wong, W.P.; Brown, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    An in situ remediation technique for chromium contaminated soil with pyrite fines was presented. Past industrial activities and lack of disposal facilities have contributed to a serious problem dealing with chromium, which cannot be eliminated from the environment because it is an element. Both bench-scale and laboratory testing was conducted to confirm the efficiency of the proposed process which successfully converted Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in soil and water. Cr(III) is less toxic and immobile in the environment compared to Cr(VI) which moves freely in the soil matrix, posing a risk to the groundwater quality. pH in the range of 2.0 to 7.6 has no effect on the reactivity of pyrite towards Cr(VI). The optimization of the bench-scale treatment resulted in a large volume of chromium waste, mostly from the control experiments and column hydrology testing. These waste streams were treated according to municipal guidelines before disposal to the environment. Samples of chromium waste before and after treatment were analyzed. Cr (VI) was completely mineralized to below guideline levels. It was determined that several conditions, including contact time between pyrite and Cr(VI), are crucial for complete mineralization of Cr(VI). 13 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs

  8. A Test-Bench for Measurement of Electrical Static Parameters of Strip Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Golutvin, I A; Danilevich, V G; Dmitriev, A Yu; Elsha, V V; Zamiatin, Y I; Zubarev, E V; Ziaziulia, F E; Kozus, V I; Lomako, V M; Stepankov, D V; Khomich, A P; Shumeiko, N M; Cheremuhin, A E

    2003-01-01

    An automated test-bench for electrical parameters input control of the strip silicon detectors, used in the End-Cap Preshower detector of the CMS experiment, is described. The test-bench application allows one to solve a problem of silicon detectors input control in conditions of mass production - 1800 detectors over 2 years. The test-bench software is realized in Delphi environment and contains a user-friendly operator interface for measurement data processing and visualization as well as up-to-date facilities for MS-Windows used for the network database. High operating characteristics and reliability of the test-bench were confirmed while more than 800 detectors were tested. Some technical solutions applied to the test-bench could be useful for design and construction of automated facilities for electrical parameters measurements of the microstrip detectors input control.

  9. A test-bench for measurement of electrical static parameters of strip silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, I.A.; Dmitriev, A.Yu.; Elsha, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    An automated test-bench for electrical parameters input control of the strip silicon detectors, used in the End-Cap Preshower detector of the CMS experiment, is described. The test-bench application allows one to solve a problem of silicon detectors input control in conditions of mass production - 1800 detectors over 2 years. The test-bench software is realized in Delphi environment and contains a user-friendly operator interface for data processing and visualization as well as up-to-date facilities for MS-Windows used for the network database. High operating characteristics and reliability of the test-bench were confirmed while more than 800 detectors were tested. Some technical solutions applied to the test-bench could be useful for design and construction of automated facilities for electrical parameters measurements of the microstrip detectors input control. (author)

  10. BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-09-25

    Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The

  11. Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

  12. Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1991-12-31

    As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

  13. Virtual Turbine Engine Test Bench Using MGET Test Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Seonghee; Kong, Changduk; Ki, Jayoung

    2015-05-01

    Test device using virtual engine simulator can help reduce the number of engine tests through tests similar to the actual engine tests and repeat the test under the same condition, and thus reduce the engine maintenance and operating costs [1]. Also, as it is possible to easily implement extreme conditions in which it is hard to conduct actual tests, it can prevent engine damages that may happen during the actual engine test under such conditions. In this study, an upgraded MGET test device was developed that can conduct both real and virtual engine test by applying real-time engine model to the existing MGET test device that was developed and has been sold by the Company. This newly developed multi-purpose MGET test device is expected to be used for various educational and research purposes.

  14. JET real-time project test-bench software structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, N. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: nunocruz@lei.fis.uc.pt; Batista, A.J.N. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Alves, D. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Sousa, J. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Varandas, C.A.F. [Associacao EURATOM/IST, Centro de Fusao Nuclear Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Joffrin, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul-Lez Durance (France); Felton, R. [Association UKAEA/Euratom, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Farthing, J.W. [Association UKAEA/Euratom, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    A new test-bench for the JET real-time project was developed, being capable of generating analogue and digital stimulus signals to the control systems under test using previously stored JET pulse data. This platform allows systems to be more thoroughly tested in a wide range of scenarios before going on-line on the JET machine, reducing development and maintenance times and improving systems performance and reliability. This paper describes the real-time stimulus generator. Three layers of software which were developed to completely control 32 analogue output channels and 32 ATM virtual circuits as a real-time signal generator system:-Signal processing on Digital Signal Processor (DSP) software directly accesses the programmable control logic, issuing all the necessary commands using a 64-bit control register and 8-channel rate change registers. Real-time data flow from local SDRAM to digital to analogue converter (DAC) channel circular buffers is also controlled by the DSP. Interrupt service routines (ISRs) were developed to Control Software variables, as well as DMA data transfers. -Signal generation and operation as a Linux application controls the DSP in a client-server architecture. The most important functions of this software are: (i) access the JET database via MDSplus (ii) data transfer to the local DSP SDRAM (iii) issuing commands to the DSP state machine hardware controller (iv) check DSP and hardware logic blocks status for errors and (v) the ATM link control. -Remote control operation using HTTP server running CGI scripts receives the remote configuration and commands from JET operations management software interface and passes it to the high level Linux software.

  15. Cometabolic biotreatment of TCE-contaminated groundwater: Laboratory and bench-scale development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Strandberg, G.W.; Morris, M.I.; Palumbo, A.V.; Boerman, P.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting a demonstration of two cometabolic technologies for biotreatment of groundwater contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and other organics. Technologies based on methanotrophic (methane-utilizing) and toluene-degrading microorganisms will be compared side-by-side on the same groundwater stream. Laboratory and bench-scale bioreactor studies have been conducted to guide selection of microbial cultures and operating conditions for the field demonstration. This report presents the results of the laboratory and bench-scale studies for the methanotrophic system

  16. Final PHP bench-scale report for the DOE-ID/SAIC sole source contract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) Technology Development Project was established to develop, test, and evaluate a new concept for treating mixed waste. The new concept uses direct current (dc) transferred-arc plasma torch technology to process mixed waste into a glass-like end-product. Under the cognizance of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), the technology is being explored for its potential to treat mixed waste. Because it is a mature technology, well-understood and commercially available, it is expected to develop rapidly in this new application. This report summarizes the radioactive bench-scale system activities funded under PHP Sole Source Contract DE-AC07-94ID13266 through the end of the contract

  17. Bench-test comparison of 26 emergency and transport ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Her, Erwan; Roy, Annie; Marjanovic, Nicolas

    2014-10-15

    Numerous emergency and transport ventilators are commercialized and new generations arise constantly. The aim of this study was to evaluate a large panel of ventilators to allow clinicians to choose a device, taking into account their specificities of use. This experimental bench-test took into account general characteristics and technical performances. Performances were assessed under different levels of FIO2 (100%, 50% or Air-Mix), respiratory mechanics (compliance 30,70,120 mL/cmH2O; resistance 5,10,20 cmH2O/mL/s), and levels of leaks (3.5 to 12.5 L/min), using a test lung. In total 26 emergency and transport ventilators were analyzed and classified into four categories (ICU-like, n = 5; Sophisticated, n = 10; Simple, n = 9; Mass-casualty and military, n = 2). Oxygen consumption (7.1 to 15.8 L/min at FIO2 100%) and the Air-Mix mode (FIO2 45 to 86%) differed from one device to the other. Triggering performance was heterogeneous, but several sophisticated ventilators depicted triggering capabilities as efficient as ICU-like ventilators. Pressurization was not adequate for all devices. At baseline, all the ventilators were able to synchronize, but with variations among respiratory conditions. Leak compensation in most ICU-like and 4/10 sophisticated devices was able to correct at least partially for system leaks, but with variations among ventilators. Major differences were observed between devices and categories, either in terms of general characteristics or technical reliability, across the spectrum of operation. Huge variability of tidal volume delivery with some devices in response to modifications in respiratory mechanics and FIO2 should make clinicians question their use in the clinical setting.

  18. ESCRIME: testing bench for advanced operator workstations in future plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poujol, A.; Papin, B.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of optimal task allocation between man and computer for the operation of nuclear power plants is of major concern for the design of future plants. As the increased level of automation induces the modification of the tasks actually devoted to the operator in the control room, it is very important to anticipate these consequences at the plant design stage. The improvement of man machine cooperation is expected to play a major role in minimizing the impact of human errors on plant safety. The CEA has launched a research program concerning the evolution of the plant operation in order to optimize the efficiency of the human/computer systems for a better safety. The objective of this program is to evaluate different modalities of man-machine share of tasks, in a representative context. It relies strongly upon the development of a specific testing facility, the ESCRIME work bench, which is presented in this paper. It consists of an EDF 1300MWe PWR plant simulator connected to an operator workstation. The plant simulator model presents at a significant level of details the instrumentation and control of the plant and the main connected circuits. The operator interface is based on the generalization of the use of interactive graphic displays, and is intended to be consistent to the tasks to be performed by the operator. The functional architecture of the workstation is modular, so that different cooperation mechanisms can be implemented within the same framework. It is based on a thorough analysis and structuration of plant control tasks, in normal as well as in accident situations. The software architecture design follows the distributed artificial intelligence approach. Cognitive agents cooperate in order to operate the process. The paper presents the basic principles and the functional architecture of the test bed and describes the steps and the present status of the program. (author)

  19. Design and construction of a test bench to characterize the charging and discharging behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roggendorf, Christoph; Blank, Tobias; Thomas, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    for future DC-grids as well. However, as there is little expert knowledge about series connected batteries up to several kV, this makes investigations of the charging and discharging behaviour of such systems necessary. For this purpose, a test bench for high voltage storage systems is built to analyse...... these processes for different battery technologies. A special safety infrastructure for the test bench must be developed due to the high voltage and the storable energy of approximately 120 kWh. This paper presents the layout of the test bench with all components, the safety requirements with the resultant safety...

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by ozone under bench-scale plug flow and full-scale hydraulic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, P W M H; van der Helm, A W C; Dullemont, Y J; Rietveld, L C; van Dijk, J C; Medema, G J

    2006-10-01

    To determine the disinfection efficacy of ozonation, water companies can apply several disinfection calculation methods. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of the T10 and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) method to extrapolate inactivation rates of ozone sensitive microorganisms observed in laboratory tests to full-scale ozonation in drinking water treatment. The inactivation efficacy of the ozonation at the Amsterdam water treatment works was assessed by determining Escherichia coli concentrations in large volume samples before and after ozonation over a period of 1 year. The inactivation of dosed E. coli WR1 was tested in a bench-scale dissolved ozone plug flow reactor (DOPFR) on the same feed water as the full-scale ozonation in which a concentrated ozone solution in Milli-Q water was dosed. Applying the T10 method on the inactivation rates observed in the DOPFR strongly overestimated the inactivation capacity of the full-scale ozonation. The expected inactivation based on the CSTR method (LT2ESWTR) approached the observed inactivation at full-scale. Therefore, the CSTR method should be preferred to calculate inactivation of ozone sensitive organisms such as E. coli, viruses, Giardia and Campylobacter by full-scale ozonation.

  1. Bench scale demonstration of the Supermethanol concept : The synthesis of methanol from glycerol derived syngas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bennekom, J. G.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Assink, D.; Lemmens, K. P. J.; Heeres, H. J.

    2012-01-01

    An integrated process for the synthesis of methanol from aqueous glycerol involving reforming of the feed to syngas followed by methanol synthesis is successfully demonstrated in a continuous bench scale unit. Glycerol reforming was carried out at pressures of 24-27 MPa and temperatures of 948-998 K

  2. DEGRADATION OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER BENCH-SCALE COMPOST CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between biomass growth and degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, and subsequent toxicity reduction, was evaluated in 10 in-vessel, bench-scale compost units. Field soil was aquired from the Reilly Tar and Chemical Company Superfund site...

  3. Project of electro-cyclotron resonance ion source test-bench for material investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulevoy, T V; Chalykh, B B; Kuibeda, R P; Kropachev, G N; Ziiatdinova, A V

    2014-02-01

    Development of new materials for future energy facilities with higher operating efficiency is a challenging and crucial task. However, full-scale testing of radiation hardness for reactor materials is quite sophisticated and difficult as it requires long session of reactor irradiation; moreover, induced radioactivity considerably complicates further investigation. Ion beam irradiation does not have such a drawback; on the contrary, it has certain advantages. One of them is high speed of defect formation. Therefore, it provides a useful tool for modeling of different radiation damages. Improved understanding of material behavior under high dose irradiation will probably allow to simulate reactor irradiation close to real conditions and to make an adequate estimation of material radiation hardness. Since 2008 in Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, the ion beam irradiation experiments are under development at the heavy ion radio frequency quadrupole linac and very important results are obtained already [T. V. Kulevoy et al., in Proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Research Applications and Utilization of Accelerators, IAEA Vienna, Austria, 2009, http://www.pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/P1433_CD/darasets/papers/ap_p5_07.pdf]. Nevertheless, the new test bench based on electro-cyclotron resonance ion source and high voltage platform is developed. The project of the test bench is presented and discussed.

  4. Automatic Test Bench for the Measurement of the Magnetic Interference on LVDTs

    CERN Document Server

    Spiezia, G; Masi, A; Pierno, A; Martino, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a rigorous and repeatable measurement procedure to analyze the effects of magnetic interferences on Linear Variable Differential Transformer sensors. This issue is neither addressed in the sensor datasheet, nor in the scientific literature. The potential of the method and the performance of an automated test bench, that implements the procedure, are proved by measuring the drift of the position reading due to external magnetic interferences on a commercial LVDT. Finally, the repeatability of the test bench is shown.

  5. Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lail, Marty

    2017-09-12

    The project aimed to advance RTI’s non-aqueous amine solvent technology by improving the solvent to reduce volatility, demonstrating long-term continuous operation at lab- (0.5 liters solvent) and bench-scale (~120 liters solvent), showing low reboiler heat duty measured during bench-scale testing, evaluating degradation products, building a rate-based process model, and evaluating the techno-economic performance of the process. The project team (RTI, SINTEF, Linde Engineering) and the technology performed well in each area of advancement. The modifications incorporated throughout the project enabled the attainment of target absorber and regenerator conditions for the process. Reboiler duties below 2,000 kJt/kg CO2 were observed in a bench-scale test unit operated at RTI.

  6. Bench-scale demonstration of treatment technologies for contaminated sediments in Sydney Tar Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchek, K.; Velicogna, D.; Punt, M.; Wong, B.; Weimer, L.; Tsangaris, A.; Brown, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    A series of bench-scale tests were conducted to determine the capabilities of selected commercially available technologies for treating contaminated sediments from the South Pond of Sydney Tar Ponds. This study was conducted under the umbrella of a technology demonstration program aimed at evaluating technologies to be used in the remediation of such sediments. The following approach was proposed by SAIC Canada for the treatment of the sediments: (1) solvent extraction for the removal of organic contaminants, (2) acid/chelant leaching for the removal of inorganic contaminants such as heavy metals, and (3) plasma hearth process for the destruction of toxic streams resulting from the first two processes. Solvent extraction followed by plasma treatment proved effective for removing and destroying organic contaminants. The removal of metals did not achieve the expected results through leaching. An approach was proposed for treating those sediments based on the results of the study. The approach differed depending on the level of organic content. An assessment of associated process costs for both a pilot-scale field demonstration and a full-scale treatment was provided. 11 tabs., 4 figs

  7. System of Thermal Balance Maintenance in Modern Test Benches for Centrifugal Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article “Systems of the heat balance maintenance in modern test benches for centrifugal pumps” makes the case to include cooling systems of a working fluid (heat setting in test bench for impeller pumps. It briefly summarizes an experience of bench building to test centrifugal pumps, developed at the BMSTU Department E-10 over the last 10 years. The article gives the formulas and the algorithm to calculate the heat capacity of different types of impeller pumps when tested at the bench as ell as to determine the heating time of the liquid in the bench without external cooling. Based on analysis of the power balance of a centrifugal pump, it is shown that about 90% of the pump unit-consumed electric power in terminals is used for heating up the working fluid in the loop of the test bench. The article gives examples of elementary heat calculation of the pump operation within the test bench. It presents the main types of systems to maintain thermal balance, their advantages, disadvantages and possible applications. The cooling system schemes for open and closed version of the benches both with built-in and with an independent cooling circuit are analysed. The paper separately considers options of such systems for large benches using the cooling tower as a cooling device in the loop, and to test the pumps using the hydraulic fluids other than water, including those at high temperatures of working fluids; in the latter case a diagram of dual-circuit cooling system "liquid-liquid-air" is shown. The paper depicts a necessity to use ethylene glycol coolant in the two-loop cooling bench. It provides an example of combining the functions of cooling and filtration in a single cooling circuit. Criteria for effectiveness of these systems are stated. Possible ways for developing systems to maintain a thermal balance, modern methods of regulation and control are described. In particular, the paper shows the efficiency of frequency control of the

  8. Pyrolysis of automotive shredder residue in a bench scale rotary kiln.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, Michele; Cornacchia, Giacinto; De Gisi, Sabino; Di Canio, Francesco; Freda, Cesare; Garzone, Pietro; Martino, Maria; Valerio, Vito; Villone, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    Automotive shredder residue (ASR) can create difficulties when managing, with its production increasing. It is made of different type of plastics, foams, elastomers, wood, glasses and textiles. For this reason, it is complicated to dispose of in a cost effective way, while also respecting the stringent environmental restrictions. Among thermal treatments, pyrolysis seems to offer an environmentally attractive method for the treatment of ASR; it also allows for the recovery of valuable secondary materials/fuels such as pyrolysis oils, chars, and gas. While, there is a great deal of significant research on ASR pyrolysis, the literature on higher scale pyrolysis experiments is limited. To improve current literature, the aim of the study was to investigate the pyrolysis of ASR in a bench scale rotary kiln. The Italian ASR was separated by dry-sieving into two particle size fractions: d30mm. Both the streams were grounded, pelletized and then pyrolyzed in a continuous bench scale rotary kiln at 450, 550 and 650°C. The mass flow rate of the ASR pellets was 200-350g/h and each test ran for about 4-5h. The produced char, pyrolysis oil and syngas were quantified to determine product distribution. They were thoroughly analyzed with regard to their chemical and physical properties. The results show how higher temperatures increase the pyrolysis gas yield (44wt% at 650°C) as well as its heating value. The low heating value (LHV) of syngas ranges between 18 and 26MJ/Nm 3 dry. The highest pyrolysis oil yield (33wt.%) was observed at 550°C and its LHV ranges between 12.5 and 14.5MJ/kg. Furthermore, only two out of the six produced chars respect the LHV limit set by the Italian environmental regulations for landfilling. The obtained results in terms of product distribution and their chemical-physical analyses provide useful information for plant scale-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment studies of plutonium-bearing INEEL waste surrogates in a bench-scale arc furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, C.J.

    1997-05-01

    Since 1989, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) has been included on the National Priority List for remediation. Arc- and plasma-heated furnaces are being considered for converting the radioactive mixed waste buried in the SDA to a stabilized-vitreous form. Nonradioactive, surrogate SDA wastes have been melted during tests in these types of furnaces, but data are needed on the behavior of transuranic (TRU) constituents, primarily plutonium, during thermal treatment. To begin collecting this data, plutonium-spiked SDA surrogates were processed in a bench-scale arc furnace to quantify the fate of the plutonium and other hazardous and nonhazardous metals. Test conditions included elevating the organic, lead, chloride, and sodium contents of the surrogates. Blends having higher organic contents caused furnace power levels to fluctuate. An organic content corresponding to 50% INEEL soil in a soil-waste blend was the highest achievable before power fluctuations made operating conditions unacceptable. The glass, metal, and off-gas solids produced from each surrogate blend tested were analyzed for elemental (including plutonium) content and the partitioning of each element to the corresponding phase was calculated

  10. Bench-Scale Evaluation of Hydrothermal Processing Technology for Conversion of Wastewater Solids to Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, Philip A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Billing, Justin M.; Hallen, Richard T.; Hart, Todd R.; Kadota, Paul; Moeller, Jeff C.; Randel, Margaaret A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2018-04-01

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification (CHG) proof-of-concept bench-scale tests were performed to assess the potential of hydrothermal treatment for handling municipal wastewater sludge. HTL tests were conducted at 300-350°C and 20 MPa on three different feeds: primary sludge, secondary sludge, and digested solids. Corresponding CHG tests were conducted at 350°C and 20 MPa on the HTL aqueous phase output using a ruthenium based catalyst. Biocrude yields ranged from 25-37%. Biocrude composition and quality were comparable to biocrudes generated from algae feeds. Subsequent hydrotreating of biocrude resulted in a product with comparable physical and chemical properties to crude oil. CHG product gas methane yields on a carbon basis ranged from 47-64%. Siloxane concentrations in the CHG product gas were below engine limits. The HTL-CHG process resulted in a chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of > 99.9% and a reduction in residual solids for disposal of 94-99%.

  11. Extended Dry Storage Signature Bench Scale Detector Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    This report is the conceptual design of a detector based on research within the Extended Dry Storage Signature Development project under the DOE-­NE MPACT campaign. This is the second year of the project; from this year’s positive results, the next step is building a prototype and testing with real materials .

  12. Development of continuous bench scale unit for direct liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wang Lai [Korea Inst. of Energy and Resources, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Batch coal liquefaction experiments using tubing bombs and continuous experiments by cell liquefaction test facility were carried out. The main purpose was to maximize the coal liquefaction yields by improving the activity of coal dissolution catalysts which are oil soluble transition metal naphthenate and to supplement the incomplete research results. In the meantime, the study on the reaction characteristics of coal liquefaction and coal liquid upgrading catalyst upon sulfiding conditions and phosphorous addition have been conducted (author). 102 refs., 35 figs.

  13. Bench-scale and full-scale studies of nitric oxides reduction by gaseous fuel reburning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, S.; Xiang, J.; Sun, L.S.; Hu, S.; Zhu, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers are significant contributors to atmospheric pollution. China has specified more rigorous legal limits for NOx emissions from power plants. As a result of the need to reduce NOx emissions, cost-effective NOx reduction strategies must be explored. This paper presented detailed experimental studies on a gaseous fuel reburning process that was performed in a 36 kilowatt bench-scale down-fired furnace to define the optimal reburning operating conditions when different Chinese coals were fired in the furnace. In addition, the combustion system of a 350 megawatt full-scale boiler was retrofitted according to the experimental results. Finally, the gaseous fuel reburning was applied to the retrofitted full-scale boiler. The purpose of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the influence of the key parameters on nitric oxide (NO) reduction efficiency of the reburning process and demonstrate the gaseous fuel reburning on a 350 MWe coal-fired boiler in China. The paper described the experimental procedure with particular reference to the experimental facility and measurement; a schematic diagram of the experimental system; experimental fuels; and characteristics of coals for the reburning experiments. Results that were presented included influence of reburn zone residence time; influence of gaseous reburn fuel per cent; influence of excess air coefficient; and unburned carbon in fly ash. It was concluded that both an above 50 per cent NO reduction efficiency and low carbon loss can be obtained by the gaseous fuel reburning process under the optimal operating conditions. 20 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs

  14. Design and fabrication of a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process radioactive bench-scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlquist, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents some of the design considerations and fabrication techniques for building a glovebox for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) radioactive bench-scale system. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system uses a plasma torch to process a variety of radioactive materials into a final vitrified waste form. The processed waste will contain plutonium and trace amounts of other radioactive materials. The glovebox used in this system is located directly below the plasma chamber and is called the Hearth Handling Enclosure (HHE). The HHE is designed to maintain a confinement boundary between the processed waste and the operator. Operations that take place inside the HHE include raising and lowering the hearth using a hydraulic lift table, transporting the hearth within the HHE using an overhead monorail and hoist system, sampling and disassembly of the processed waste and hearth, weighing the hearth, rebuilding a hearth, and sampling HEPA filters. The PHP radioactive bench-scale system is located at the TREAT facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West in Idaho Falls, Idaho

  15. Test bench HEATREC for heat loss measurement on solar receiver tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, José M.; López-Martín, Rafael; Valenzuela, Loreto; Zarza, Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In Solar Thermal Electricity (STE) plants the thermal energy of solar radiation is absorbed by solar receiver tubes (HCEs) and it is transferred to a heat transfer fluid. Therefore, heat losses of receiver tubes have a direct influence on STE plants efficiency. A new test bench called HEATREC has been developed by Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) in order to determinate the heat losses of receiver tubes under laboratory conditions. The innovation of this test bench consists in the possibility to determine heat losses under controlled vacuum.

  16. From a single pellet press to a bench scale pellet mill - Pelletizing six different biomass feedstocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Shang, Lei; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for biomass pellets requires the investigation of alternative raw materials for pelletizetion. In the present paper, the pelletization process of fescue, alfalfa, sorghum, triticale, miscanthus and willow is studied to determine if results obtained in a single pellet press...... (SPP) can be extrapolated to larger scale pellet mills. The single pellet press was used to find the optimum moisture content and die operating temperature for pellet production. Then, these results were compared with those obtained from a bench-scale pellet mill. A moisture content of around 10 wt...

  17. Development of remote data acquisition system based on OPC for brake test bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Wu, Mengling; Tian, Chun; Ma, Tianhe

    2017-08-01

    The 1:1 train brake system test bench can be used to carry out brake-related adhesion-slid control, stability test, noise test and dynamic test. To collect data of the test bench, a data acquisition method is needed. In this paper, the remote data acquisition system of test bench is built by LabVIEW based on OPC technology. Unlike the traditional hardwire way connecting PLC acquisition module with sensors, the novel method is used to collect data and share them through the internal LAN built by Ethernet switches, which avoids the complex wiring interference in an easy, efficient and flexible way. The system has been successfully applied to the data acquisition activities of the comprehensive brake system test bench of CRRC Nanjing Puzhen Haitai Brake Equipment Co., Ltd., and the relationship test between the adhesion coefficient and the slip-ratio is realized. The speed signal, torque signal and brake disc temperature can be collected and displayed. The results show that the system is reliable, convenient, and efficient, and can meet the requirements of data acquisition.

  18. Design of the 15 GHz BPM test bench for the CLIC test facility to perform precise stretchedwire RF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Silvia Zorzetti, Silvia; Galindo Muño, Natalia; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a low emittance beam transport and preservation, thus a precise control of the beam orbit along up to 50 km of the accelerator components in the sub-m regime is required. Within the PACMAN3 (Particle Accelerator Components Metrology and Alignment to the Nanometer Scale) PhD training action a study with the objective of pre-aligning the electrical centre of a 15 GHz cavity beam position monitor (BPM) to the magnetic centre of the main beam quadrupole is initiated. Of particular importance is the design of a specific test bench to study the stretched-wire setup for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) BPM, focusing on the aspects of microwave signal excitation, transmission and impedance-matching, as well as the mechanical setup and reproducibility of the measurement method.

  19. Bench-Scale Evaluation of the Genifuel Hydrothermal Processing Technology for Wastewater Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, Philip A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Billing, Justin M.; Hallen, Richard T.; Hart, Todd R.; Kadota, Paul; Moeller, Jeff C.; Randel, Margaaret A.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2017-10-03

    Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification (CHG) proof-of-concept bench-scale tests were performed to assess the potential of the Genifuel hydrothermal process technology for handling municipal wastewater sludge. HTL tests were conducted at 300-350°C and 20 MPa on three different feeds: primary sludge (11.9 wt% solids), secondary sludge (9.7 wt% solids), and post-digester sludge (also referred to as digested solids) (16.0 wt% solids). Corresponding CHG tests were conducted at 350°C and 20 MPa on the HTL aqueous phase output using a ruthenium based catalyst. A comprehensive analysis of all feed and effluent phases was also performed. Total mass and carbon balances closed to within ± 15% in all but one case. Biocrude yields from HTL tests were 37%, 25%, and 34% for primary sludge, secondary sludge, and digested solids feeds, respectively. The biocrude yields accounted for 59%, 39%, and 49% of the carbon in the feed for primary sludge, secondary sludge, and digested solids feeds, respectively. Biocrude composition and quality were comparable to that seen with biocrudes generated from algae feeds. Subsequent hydrotreating (i.e., upgrading) of the biocrude produced from primary sludge and digested solids resulted in a product with comparable physical and chemical properties to petroleum crude oil. CHG product gas consisted primarily of methane, with methane yields (relative to CHG input) on a carbon basis of 47%, 61%, and 64% for aqueous feeds that were the output of HTL tests with primary sludge, secondary sludge, and digested solids, respectively. Siloxane concentrations in the CHG product gas were below the detection limit and well below fuel input composition limits set by several engine manufacturers. Relative to that of the sludge feeds, the HTL-CHG process resulted in a reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD) of greater than 99.9% and a reduction in residual solids for disposal of 94-99%. The test results, as a whole, support

  20. Optimization of an Optical Test Bench for Tire Properties Measurement and Tread Defects Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Castillo Aguilar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tire characteristics and behavior are of great importance in vehicle dynamics since the forces transmitted in the tire-road contact are the main contributors to global vehicle performance. Several research groups have focused on the study and modeling of tires. Some of the most important factors that need to be known are tread characteristics and pressure distribution in the tire-ground contact patch. In this work, a test bench has been used to adequately determine the aforementioned factors. The measurement principle of the test bench is the frustration of total internal reflection (FTIR of light. It makes use of a laterally illuminated glass on which the tire leans. An interposed plastic interface between them causes the reflection of light. Finally, a video camera captures the bright image formed through the glass. The brightness level in each pixel of the image is related to existing normal pressure. A study of the parameters that affect the test bench calibration such as type of interface material used, diffuse light, hysteresis, creep and transverse light absorption is performed. Experimental tests are conducted to relate tire inflation pressure and camber angle to the pressure distribution. Furthermore, the test bench is used to detect and evaluate the influence of defects in the tire on the contact pressures.

  1. Portable test bench for the studies concerning ion sources and ion beam extraction and focusing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero Lopez, F.

    1961-01-01

    A portable test bench is described, which was designed to check ion sources, ion beam extraction and focusing systems before its use in a 600 KeV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator. The vacuum possibilities of the system are specially analyzed in connection with its particular use. The whole can be considered as a portable accelerator of low energy (50 keV). (Author)

  2. Submicronic Particle Measurement Instrumentation Test Bench Data Acquisition and Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Sanz, D.; Gomez, F. J.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J. J.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the SAD-100 system characteristics. The unit makes the instrumentation test bench data acquisition and control, SAD-100 was designed and developed by Electronic and Automation Area (CIEMAT) and Aerosol Technology in Energy Generation Project (CIEMAT). (Author) 2 refs

  3. Accumulation of uranium, cesium, and radium by microbial cells: bench-scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II.

    1982-07-01

    This report describes bench-scale studies on the utilization of microbial cells for the concentration and removal of uranium, radium, and cesium from nuclear processing waste streams. Included are studies aimed at elucidating the basic mechanism of uranium uptake, process development efforts for the use of a combined denitrification-uranium removal process to treat a specific nuclear processing waste stream, and a preliminary investigation of the applicability of microorganisms for the removal of 137 Cs and 226 Ra from existing waste solutions

  4. Bench-scale arc melter for R&D in thermal treatment of mixed wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, P.C.; Grandy, J.D.; Watkins, A.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-05-01

    A small dc arc melter was designed and constructed to run bench-scale investigations on various aspects of development for high-temperature (1,500-1,800{degrees}C) processing of simulated transuranic-contaminated waste and soil located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Several recent system design and treatment studies have shown that high-temperature melting is the preferred treatment. The small arc melter is needed to establish techniques and procedures (with surrogates) prior to using a similar melter with the transuranic-contaminated wastes in appropriate facilities at the site. This report documents the design and construction, starting and heating procedures, and tests evaluating the melter`s ability to process several waste types stored at the RWMC. It is found that a thin graphite strip provides reliable starting with initial high current capability for partially melting the soil/waste mixture. The heating procedure includes (1) the initial high current-low voltage mode, (2) a low current-high voltage mode that commences after some slag has formed and arcing dominates over the receding graphite conduction path, and (3) a predominantly Joule heating mode during which the current can be increased within the limits to maintain relatively quiescent operation. Several experiments involving the melting of simulated wastes are discussed. Energy balance, slag temperature, and electrode wear measurements are presented. Recommendations for further refinements to enhance its processing capabilities are identified. Future studies anticipated with the arc melter include waste form processing development; dissolution, retention, volatilization, and collection for transuranic and low-level radionuclides, as well as high vapor pressure metals; electrode material development to minimize corrosion and erosion; refractory corrosion and/or skull formation effects; crucible or melter geometry; metal oxidation; and melt reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions.

  5. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO{sub 2} capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a bench-scale continuous CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. SiVance LLC was sub-contracted to provide the GAP-1m material and conduct an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP-1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA) were also identified for analysis. All of the solvent components and DDBSA are listed on the EPA’s TSCA Inventory allowing companies to manufacture and use the chemicals commercially. The toxicological effects of each component were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. An engineering and control system, including environmental abatement, was described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  6. Bench-scale arc melter for R ampersand D in thermal treatment of mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, P.C.; Grandy, J.D.; Watkins, A.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-05-01

    A small dc arc melter was designed and constructed to run bench-scale investigations on various aspects of development for high-temperature (1,500-1,800 degrees C) processing of simulated transuranic-contaminated waste and soil located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Several recent system design and treatment studies have shown that high-temperature melting is the preferred treatment. The small arc melter is needed to establish techniques and procedures (with surrogates) prior to using a similar melter with the transuranic-contaminated wastes in appropriate facilities at the site. This report documents the design and construction, starting and heating procedures, and tests evaluating the melter's ability to process several waste types stored at the RWMC. It is found that a thin graphite strip provides reliable starting with initial high current capability for partially melting the soil/waste mixture. The heating procedure includes (1) the initial high current-low voltage mode, (2) a low current-high voltage mode that commences after some slag has formed and arcing dominates over the receding graphite conduction path, and (3) a predominantly Joule heating mode during which the current can be increased within the limits to maintain relatively quiescent operation. Several experiments involving the melting of simulated wastes are discussed. Energy balance, slag temperature, and electrode wear measurements are presented. Recommendations for further refinements to enhance its processing capabilities are identified. Future studies anticipated with the arc melter include waste form processing development; dissolution, retention, volatilization, and collection for transuranic and low-level radionuclides, as well as high vapor pressure metals; electrode material development to minimize corrosion and erosion; refractory corrosion and/or skull formation effects; crucible or melter geometry; metal oxidation; and melt reduction/oxidation (redox) conditions

  7. EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2009-08-14

    20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

  8. Catheter-based flow measurements in hemodialysis fistulas - Bench testing and clinical performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, Søren T; Lönn, Lars; Schroeder, Torben V

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to perform bench and clinical testing of a catheter-based intravascular system capable of measuring blood flow in hemodialysis vascular accesses during endovascular procedures. Methods: We tested the Transonic ReoCath Flow Catheter System which uses...... the thermodilution method. A simulated vascular access model was constructed for the bench test. In total, 1960 measurements were conducted and the results were used to determine the accuracy and precision of the catheters, the effects of external factors (e.g., catheter placement, injection duration), and to test....... Blood flow measurements provide unique information on the hemodynamic status of a vascular access and have the potential to optimize results of interventions....

  9. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McCloskey, Pat [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Ananthasayanam, Balajee [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Lee, Julia [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wroczynski, Ron [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Stewart, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McNally, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rownaghi, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lu, Liu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goizueta, Roberto [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  10. The National Football League-225 Bench Press Test and the Size-Weight Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebbers, Paul E; Buckingham, Gavin; Butler, Michael S

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test reports that size and arrangement manipulations of weight plates (i.e., inducing a size-weight illusion [SWI]) effect athletic weightlifting performance. The participants were 72 experienced, weight-trained collegiate American football players. Across three weeks, each athlete performed three different repetitions-to-fatigue bench press tests (NFL-225, SWI-225, and SWI-215). A multiple regression revealed a positive association between participants' strength relative to the test load and repetitions for NFL-225 and SWI-215, but no association with SWI-225. To explore these results, players were ranked into quartiles based on their one-repetition maximum relative to 102.27 kg (225 lb), and a 3 × 4 repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted. The primary finding was a significant Test Condition × Quartile interaction ( p = .004). Bonferroni-corrected pairwise comparisons revealed that Quartile 4 (those with lowest strength relative to test load) completed more repetitions for SWI-225 compared with NFL-225 ( p = .049). These results suggest that alternate weight plate arrangements may be beneficial for those whose bench press load is near the lifter's one-repetition maximum. However, variations of the SWI do not appear to affect the performance of repetitions-to-fatigue bench press tests for the majority of collegiate American football players.

  11. Energy and health: three studies on test bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, Andre

    2014-06-01

    After some reminders in epidemiology, including case-control studies, logistic regression, exposure uncertainties, multiple statistical tests, splitting study populations in subgroups, memory biases and difficulty to identify very low risk, we examine three studies pertaining to low risk. These studies focus on the risk of leukemia or brain tumor after brain scan in childhood and on the impact of nuclear power plants and high voltage lines on the incidence of childhood leukemia. These examples show the weaknesses of case-control studies that require retrospective estimates of exposure and confounding factors, the interest of cohort studies and the uselessness of some studies which, taking into account previous studies, are under-powered to answer questions. (author)

  12. From the drawing board to the test bench

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    After seven years of design, prototyping and manufacturing, the Linac4 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) is being assembled in CERN's Building 181. In fact, the first DTL tank is just a few tests away from installation into the Linac4 tunnel. Let's check in on how this essential element of the accelerator complex has - at last - come into being.   A peek inside a Linac4 DTL tank. The Linac4 DTL is designed to take the new linear accelerator's H- ion beams from 3 to 50 MeV. Divided into three tanks, holding a total of 108 drift tubes in vacuum, each made from a dozen parts, and assembled with ancillary elements, cooling circuits and hundreds of bolts and screws, it’s no surprise it has been nicknamed a 'puzzle with thousands of pieces'. A trying tale Although the first tank will soon be ready for installation, constructing the DTLs has been a trying tale for the Linac4 team. “Not only were we tasked to design CERN's first drift tube lin...

  13. Test bench for thermal cycling of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Simon Dyhr; Jørgensen, Asger Bjørn; Maarbjerg, Anders Eggert

    2016-01-01

    measurement of on-state voltages and direct real-time measurement of die surface temperatures, enabled by fiber optical sensors, which are built into the power modules. A thermal model of the module prototypes, based on the temperature measurements, is established. Independent verification steps have been......This paper presents a test bench for lifetime investigation of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules. The test bench subjects high voltage switching operation to the modules while power cycling. Thus both a thermal and electrical operating point is emulated. The power cycling setup features offline...... made to validate the performance of the on-state voltage measurement and the thermal model. Issues are revealed in the form of common mode currents in gate drive supply, which should be remedied. Finally a new operating point for power cycling is suggested to better stress the power modules....

  14. A test bench for ARGOS: integration of sub-systems and validation of the wavefront sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rabien, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    ARGOS, the wide eld Laser Guide Stars adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope, is now entering its installation phase. In the meanwhile, we have started a test bench in order to integrate various Argos sub-systems and demonstrate its wavefront measurements. To this objective, we rst validate three key components of the Argos wavefront sensor which we then integrate together. The test bench therefore comprises the Argos wavefront camera system - including a large frame, fast framerate, high quantum eciency and low readout noise pnCCD -, the slope computer, and a optical gating unit. While we present here the demonstration of those three key components, it is also a step to their system level integration that enables us to validate the wavefront measurements in term of noises, timing and computation. In the near future, those system will be integrated to the wavefront sensor system of ARGOS.

  15. Bench Test Results on a new Technique for Far InfraRed Polarimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, S.; Nieswand, C.; Prunty,, S. L.; Mansfield, H. M.; O'Leary, P

    1997-01-01

    The results of bench tests performed on a new method of combined interferometry/polarimetry for the magnetic-field reconstruction of tokamak plasmas is presented. In particular, the sensitivity obtained in the polarimetric measurement shows the feasibility of Faraday rotation determination approaching a precision of ±0.2°. The method is based on an optically pumped far-infrared laser with a rotating polarization where both the interferometric and polarimetric information is determined from ph...

  16. Test-retest reliability of barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Matt S; Beck, Travis W; DeFreitas, Jason M; Dillon, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate test-retest reliability statistics for peak barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise for loads corresponding to 10-90% of the 1-repetition maximum (1RM). Twenty-one healthy, resistance-trained men (mean ± SD age = 23.5 ± 2.7 years; body mass = 90.5 ± 14.6 kg; 1RM bench press = 125.4 ± 18.4 kg) volunteered for this study. A minimum of 48 hours after a maximal strength testing and familiarization session, the subjects performed single repetitions of the free-weight bench-press exercise at each tenth percentile (10-90%) of the 1RM on 2 separate occasions. For each repetition, the subjects were instructed to press the barbell as rapidly as possible, and peak barbell velocity was measured with a Tendo Weightlifting Analyzer. The test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (model 2,1) and corresponding standard errors of measurement (expressed as percentages of the mean barbell velocity values) were 0.717 (4.2%), 0.572 (5.0%), 0.805 (3.1%), 0.669 (4.7%), 0.790 (4.6%), 0.785 (4.8%), 0.811 (5.8%), 0.714 (10.3%), and 0.594 (12.6%) for the weights corresponding to 10-90% 1RM. There were no mean differences between the barbell velocity values from trials 1 and 2. These results indicated moderate to high test-retest reliability for barbell velocity from 10 to 70% 1RM but decreased consistency at 80 and 90% 1RM. When examining barbell velocity during the free-weight bench-press exercise, greater measurement error must be overcome at 80 and 90% 1RM to be confident that an observed change is meaningful.

  17. Development of an axial suspended AMB experimental bench for load and disturbance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gouws

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the development of an axial suspended active magnetic bearing (AMB experimental bench for load and disturbance tests. This test bench must be capable of levitating a 2 kg steel disc at a stable working distance of 3 mm and a maximum attraction distance of 6 mm. The suspension is accomplished by two electromagnets producing upward and downward attraction forces to support the steel disc. An inductive sensor measures the position of the steel disc and relays this to a PC based controller board (dSPACE® controller. The control system uses this information to regulate the electromagnetic force on the steel disc. The intent is to construct this system using relatively low-cost, low-precision components, and still be able to stably levitate the 2 kg steel disc with high precision. The dSPACE® software (ControlDesk® was used for data acquisition. In this paper, an overview of the system design is presented, followed by the axial AMB model design, inductive sensor design, actuating unit design and controller development and implementation. The paper concludes with results obtained from the dSPACE® controller and evaluation of the axial suspended AMB experimental bench with load and disturbance tests.

  18. The hot bench scale plant Ester for the vitrification of high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nannicini, R.; Strazzer, A.; Cantale, C; Donato, A.; Grossi, G.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the hot bench-scale plant ESTER for the vitrification of the high-level radioactive wastes is described, and the main results of the first radioactive campaign are reported. The ESTER plant, which is placed in the ADECO-ESSOR hot cells of the C.C.R.-EURATOM-ISPRA, has been built and is operated by the ENEA, Departement of Fuel Cycle. It began operating with real radioactive wastes about 1 year ago, solidifying a total of 12 Ci of fission products into 2,02 Kg of borosilicate glass, corresponding to 757 ml of glass. During the vitrification many samples of liquid and gaseous streams have been taken and analyzed. A radioactivity balance in the plant has been calculated, as well as a mass balance of nitrates and of the 137 Cs and 106 Ru volatized in the process

  19. Performance of Dolomite Calcination in a Bench-Scale Rotary Kiln

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulandari Winny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dolomite calcination is one of process steps to prepare calcined dolomite for raw materials in magnesium production. Calcination of dolomite involves heating the raw material at sufficient temperature in order to release the carbon dioxide from its carbonate minerals. This process is commonly conducted in a rotary kiln. There have been a number of calcination studies in a laboratory scale, but the study of dolomite calcination in a larger scale is very scarce. This research is aimed to study the performance of dolomite calcination in a bench-scale rotary kiln with 500 gram of feed. The effect of various parameters, including temperatures, feed rate, rotating frequency, and particle size were examined. The temperature of rotary kiln was varied between 700 and 1000 °C, while the particle size of dolomite was varied between 0.149 – 0.297 mm and up to 10 – 15 mm. The temperature distribution inside the rotary kiln was also measured. It is obtained that a conversion of 92% was attained at operation temperature of 1000 °C, which is at a higher temperature compared to the laboratory scale, where a conversion of 100% was obtained at 900 °C. This imply that the effect of heat transfer also plays important role in the calcination of dolomite especially at a larger scale.

  20. Treatment of Synthetic Wastewater Containing AB14 Pigment by Electrooxidation in both Pilot and Bench Scale Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Basiri parsa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation process was used for the degradation of Acid Brown 14 in both bench and pilot scale reactors. The bench scale one with a working volume of 0.5 L was equipped with platinum plate used as the anode and stainless steel (SS-304 plates as the cathode. The pilot scale reactor had a volume of 9 L and was equipped with SS-304 plates used as both the anode and the cathode. Experiments were run using these reactors to investigate the two parameters of energy consumption and anode efficiency. The bench scale reactor was capable of removing 92% and 36% of the dye and COD, respectively, after 18 min of operation. The pilot scale reactor, however, was capable of removing 87% and 59% of the dye and the COD content, respectively, after 60 min of operation. The kinetic study of both the bench and pilot reactors for dye and COD removals showed that both processes followed a zero order kinetic.

  1. Design and Construction of a Test Bench to Characterize Efficiency and Reliability of High Voltage Battery Energy Storage Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blank, Tobias; Thomas, Stephan; Roggendorf, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    system efficiency. High voltage batteries may be advantageous for future medium voltage DC-grids as well. In all cases, high availability and reliability is indispensable. Investigations on the operating behavior of such systems are needed. For this purpose, a test bench for high voltage storage systems...... was built to analyze these processes for different battery technologies. A special safety infrastructure for the test bench was developed due to the high voltage and the storable energy of approximately 120 kWh. This paper presents the layout of the test bench for analyzing high voltage batteries with about...... 4,300 volts including all components, the safety requirements with the resultant safety circuit and the aim of the investigations to be performed with the test bench....

  2. Recycling of polyethene and polypropene in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor by high temperature pyrolysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, R.W.J.; Westerhout, R.W.J.; Waanders, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    The high-temperature pyrolysis of polyethene (PE), polypropene (PP), and mixtures of these polymers was studied in a novel bench-scale rotating cone reactor (RCR). Experiments showed that the effect of the sand or reactor temperature on the product spectrum obtained is large compared to the effect

  3. A novel bench-scale column assay to investigate site-specific nitrification biokinetics in biological rapid sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    A bench-scale assay was developed to obtain site-specific nitrification biokinetic information from biological rapid sand filters employed in groundwater treatment. The experimental set-up uses granular material subsampled from a full-scale filter, packed in a column, and operated with controlled...... and continuous hydraulic and ammonium loading. Flowrates and flow recirculation around the column are chosen to mimic full-scale hydrodynamic conditions, and minimize axial gradients. A reference ammonium loading rate is calculated based on the average loading experienced in the active zone of the full......-scale filter. Effluent concentrations of ammonium are analyzed when the bench-scale column is subject to reference loading, from which removal rates are calculated. Subsequently, removal rates above the reference loading are measured by imposing short-term loading variations. A critical loading rate...

  4. Flue gas conditioning for improved particle collection in electrostatic precipitators. Second topical report, Results of bench-scale screening of additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, M.D.

    1993-08-13

    ADA Technologies, Inc. (ADA) has completed the bench-scale testing phase of a program to evaluate additives that will improve the collection of fine particles in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A bench-scale ESP was installed at the Consolidation Coal Company (CONSOL) combustion research and development facility in Library, PA in order to conduct the evaluation. During a two-week test, four candidate additives were injected into the flue gas ahead of a 100 acfm ESP to determine the effect on fly ash collectability. Two additives were found to reduce the emissions from the ESP. Additives ``C`` and ``D`` performed better than initially anticipated -- reducing emissions initially by 17%. Emissions were reduced by 27% after the ESP was modified by the installation of baffles to minimize sneakage. In addition to the measured improvements in performance, no detrimental effects (i.e., electrode fouling) were observed in the operation of the ESP during the testing. The measures of success identified for the bench-scale phase of the program have been surpassed. Since the additives will affect only non-rapping reentrainment particle losses, it is expected that an even greater improvement in particle collection will be observed in larger-scale ESPs. Therefore, positive results are anticipated during the pilot-scale phase of the program and during a future full-scale demonstration test. A preliminary economic analysis was performed to evaluate the cost of the additive process and to compare its costs against alternative means for reducing emissions from ESPs. The results show that conditioning with additive C at a rate of 0.05% (wt. additive to wt. fly ash) is much less expensive than adding new ESP capacity, and more cost competitive than existing chemical conditioning processes. Preliminary chemical analysis of conditioned fly ash shows that it passes the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure criteria.

  5. Modification of a compressor performance test bench for liquid slugging observation in refrigeration compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ola, Max; Thomas, Christiane; Hesse, Ullrich

    2017-08-01

    Compressor performance test procedures are defined by the standard DIN EN 13771, wherein a variety of possible calorimeter and flow rate measurement methods are suggested. One option is the selection of two independent measurement methods. The accuracies of both selected measurement methods are essential. The second option requires only one method. However the measurement accuracy of the used device has to be verified and recalibrated on a regular basis. The compressor performance test facility at the Technische Universitaet Dresden uses a calibrated flow measurement sensor, a hot gas bypass and a mixed flow heat exchanger. The test bench can easily be modified for tests of various compressor types at different operating ranges and with various refrigerants. In addition, the modified test setup enables the investigation of long term liquid slug and its effects on the compressor. The modification comprises observational components, adjustments of the control system, safety measures and a customized oil recirculation system for compressors which do not contain an integrated oil sump or oil level regulation system. This paper describes the setup of the test bench, its functional principle, the key modifications, first test results and an evaluation of the energy balance.

  6. Sensory feedback in prosthetics: a standardized test bench for closed-loop control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, Strahinja; Markovic, Marko; Hartmann, Cornelia; Farina, Dario

    2015-03-01

    Closing the control loop by providing sensory feedback to the user of a prosthesis is an important challenge, with major impact on the future of prosthetics. Developing and comparing closed-loop systems is a difficult task, since there are many different methods and technologies that can be used to implement each component of the system. Here, we present a test bench developed in Matlab Simulink for configuring and testing the closed-loop human control system in standardized settings. The framework comprises a set of connected generic blocks with normalized inputs and outputs, which can be customized by selecting specific implementations from a library of predefined components. The framework is modular and extensible and it can be used to configure, compare and test different closed-loop system prototypes, thereby guiding the development towards an optimal system configuration. The use of the test bench was demonstrated by investigating two important aspects of closed-loop control: performance of different electrotactile feedback interfaces (spatial versus intensity coding) during a pendulum stabilization task and feedforward methods (joystick versus myocontrol) for force control. The first experiment demonstrated that in the case of trained subjects the intensity coding might be superior to spatial coding. In the second experiment, the control of force was rather poor even with a stable and precise control interface (joystick), demonstrating that inherent characteristics of the prosthesis can be an important limiting factor when considering the overall effectiveness of the closed-loop control. The presented test bench is an important instrument for investigating different aspects of human manual control with sensory feedback.

  7. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Buddle, Stanlee [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Caraher, Joel [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Chen, Wei [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Doherty, Mark [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Farnum, Rachel [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Giammattei, Mark [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Hancu, Dan [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Miebach, Barbara [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Perry, Robert [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Rubinsztajn, Gosia; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2017-05-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants. The U.S. Department of Energy’s goal for Transformational Carbon Capture Technologies is the development of technologies available for demonstration by 2025 that can capture 90% of emitted CO2 with at least 95% CO2 purity for less than $40/tonne of CO2 captured. In the first budget period of the project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance. In the second budget period of the project, individual bench-scale unit operations were tested to determine the performance of each of each unit. Solids production was demonstrated in dry simulated flue gas across a wide range of absorber operating conditions, with single stage CO2 conversion rates up to 75mol%. Desorber operation was demonstrated in batch mode, resulting in desorption performance consistent with the equilibrium isotherms for GAP-0/CO2 reaction. Important risks associated with gas humidity impact on solids consistency and desorber temperature impact on thermal degradation were explored, and adjustments to the bench-scale process were made to address those effects. Corrosion experiments were conducted to support selection of suitable materials of construction for the major

  8. Test bench for fibers of the LHAASO-WCDA time calibration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Y.; Gao, B.; Yu, C. X.; Chen, M. J.; Luo, Y. A.; Yao, Z. G.; Zha, M.; Wu, H. R.; Li, H. C.; Wang, X. J.

    2017-10-01

    The Water Cherenkov Detector Array (WCDA), which is one of the main components of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), functions in surveying the northern sky for high-energy gamma ray sources at the energy range around of 100 GeV-30 TeV. The precision of the time measurement for shower particles hitting every detector in the array is directly associated with the detection sensitivity for the sources. The calibration precision of the time offsets among the detector cells should be less than 0.1 ns to obtain less than 0.1o pointing error of the detector to any point source. In this regard, "cross calibration" is employed for the detector array, with 180 bundles of fiber systems guiding the lights of LEDs to each PMT. A test bench comprising fast PMTs and an one-dimensional slide platform is set up in the laboratory to test the fiber bundles. The test bench and the test procedure is described in this paper, and the test results are presented.

  9. Method, apparatus and system for managing queue operations of a test bench environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostler, Farrell Lynn

    2016-07-19

    Techniques and mechanisms for performing dequeue operations for agents of a test bench environment. In an embodiment, a first group of agents are each allocated a respective ripe reservation and a second set of agents are each allocated a respective unripe reservation. Over time, queue management logic allocates respective reservations to agents and variously changes one or more such reservations from unripe to ripe. In another embodiment, an order of servicing agents allocated unripe reservations is based on relative priorities of the unripe reservations with respect to one another. An order of servicing agents allocated ripe reservations is on a first come, first served basis.

  10. Bench test results on a new technique for far-infrared polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, S.; Nieswand, C.; Prunty, S.L.; Mansfield, H.M.; O'Leary, P.

    1996-11-01

    The results of bench tests performed on a new method of combined interferometry/polarimetry for the magnetic field reconstruction of tokamak plasmas is presented. In particular, the sensitivity obtained in the polarimetric measurement shows the feasibility of Faraday rotation determination approaching a precision of ±0.2 o . The method is based on an optically pumped far-infrared (FIR) laser with a rotating polarization where both the interferometric and polarimetric information is determined from phase measurements. Specific sources which introduce disturbances in the optical arrangement and which can limit the attainment of the polarimetric precision, mentioned above, are discussed. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs

  11. Novel Electrochemical Test Bench for Evaluating the Functional Fatigue Life of Biomedical Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, M. F.; Dubinskiy, S.; Zhukova, Y.; Korobkova, A.; Pustov, Y.; Brailovski, V.; Prokoshkin, S.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present work was first to develop and validate a test bench that simulates the in vitro conditions to which the biomedical implants will be actually subjected in vivo. For the preliminary application assessments, the strain-controlled fatigue tests of biomedically pure Ti and Ti-Nb-Zr alloy in simulated body fluid were undertaken. The in situ open-circuit potential measurements from the test bench demonstrated a strong dependence on the dynamic cycling and kind of material under testing. The results showed that during fatigue cycling, the passive oxide film formed on the surface of Ti-Nb-Zr alloy was more resistant to fatigue degradation when compared with pure Ti. The Ti-Nb-Zr alloy exhibited prolonged fatigue life when compared with pure Ti. The fractographic features of both materials were also characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical results and the fractographic evidence confirmed that the prolonged functional fatigue life of the Ti-Nb-Zr alloy is apparently ascribable to the reversible martensitic phase transformation.

  12. Bench-Scale Experiments to Evaluate ERT as a Monitoring Tool for Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, S. J.; Detwiler, R. L.; Carrigan, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Field-scale studies have shown Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to be an effective tool for imaging resistivity anomalies and monitoring changing saturations in the near subsurface. Despite the challenges of implementing ERT in the deep subsurface, it has potential as a surveying technology for visualizing sequestered CO2, in part because it can be localized within the target reservoir. Currently, the technology is being evaluated as part of a geologic sequestration project in Cranfield, MS, where supercritical CO2 is injected to ten thousand feet below the surface. In support of this field-scale activity, we have designed an analog bench-scale experimental system to further evaluate the ability of ERT to quantify both the volume and spatial distribution of gas injected into a saline aquifer. Our translucent sand chambers measure 58cm x 30cm x 1cm and are lined with twenty-one stainless steel electrodes on each long side, inserted into a nonconductive plastic gasket. We fill the chamber with quartz sand with different grain sizes with a filling procedure that generates small-scale layering within the injection zone, which is overlain by a fine-grained layer that serves as a capillary barrier. Prior to gas injection, the porous medium is saturated with a low resistivity salt solution. We then inject gas into the bottom of the injection zone. Buoyant forces drive gas migration into the chamber, resulting in a combination of small-scale trapping in horizontal layers, fingering between the horizontal layers, and large-scale trapping of the gas plume along the upper capillary barrier. During pauses in gas injection, a CCD camera captures high-resolution images, and an ERT data acquisition system scans the chamber. Quantitative visualization techniques are used to process the CCD images resulting in high-resolution measurements of the spatial distribution of the injected gas. These results are directly compared to resistivity fields that result from the inversion

  13. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  14. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM0 Flight Hardware in Bench Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Engineering bench system hardware for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested on a lab bench at the University of Colorado in Boulder. This is done in a horizontal arrangement to reduce pressure differences so the tests more closely resemble behavior in the microgravity of space. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  15. Destruction of chemical agent simulants in a supercritical water oxidation bench-scale reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veriansyah, Bambang; Kim, Jae-Duck; Lee, Jong-Chol

    2007-01-01

    A new design of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) bench-scale reactor has been developed to handle high-risk wastes resulting from munitions demilitarization. The reactor consists of a concentric vertical double wall in which SCWO reaction takes place inside an inner tube (titanium grade 2, non-porous) whereas pressure resistance is ensured by a Hastelloy C-276 external vessel. The performances of this reactor were investigated with two different kinds of chemical warfare agent simulants: OPA (a mixture of isopropyl amine and isopropyl alcohol) as the binary precursor for nerve agent of sarin and thiodiglycol [TDG (HOC 2 H 4 ) 2 S] as the model organic sulfur heteroatom. High destruction rates based on total organic carbon (TOC) were achieved (>99.99%) without production of chars or undesired gases such as carbon monoxide and methane. The carbon-containing product was carbon dioxide whereas the nitrogen-containing products were nitrogen and nitrous oxide. Sulfur was totally recovered in the aqueous effluent as sulfuric acid. No corrosion was noticed in the reactor after a cumulative operation time of more than 250 h. The titanium tube shielded successfully the pressure vessel from corrosion

  16. Safety analysis of the CSTR-1 bench-scale coal liquefaction unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulburt, D.A.

    1981-05-01

    The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the CSTR-1 bench scale unit located in Building 167 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. It was apparent that considerable effort was expended in the design and construction of the unit, and in the development of operating procedures, with regard to safety. Exhaust ventilation, H/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S monitoring, overpressure protection, overtemperature protection, and interlock systems have been provided. Present settings on the pressure and temperature safety systems are too high, however, to insure prevention of vessel deformation or damage in all cases. While the occurrence of catastrophic rupture of a system pressure vessel (e.g., reactor, high pressure separators) is unlikely, the potential consequences to personnel are severe. Feasibility of providing shielding for these components should be considered. A more probable mode of vessel failure in the event of overpressure or overtemperature and failure of the safety system is yielding of the closure bolts followed by high pressure flow across the mating surfaces. As a minimum, shielding should be designed to restrict travel of resultant spray. The requirements for personal protective equipment are presently stated in rather broad and general terms in the operating procedures. Safe practices and procedures would be more assured if specific requirements were stated and included for each operational step. Recommendations were developed for all hazards triggered by the guidelines.

  17. A new portable test bench for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, J.; Carrio, F.; Moreno, P.; Usai, G.; Valero, A.; Kim, H.Y.; Minashvili, I.; Shalyugin, A.; Reed, R.; Schettino, V.; Souza, J.; Solans, C.

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the upgraded portable test bench for the Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at CERN. The previous version of the portable test bench was extensively used for certification and qualification of the front-end electronics during the commissioning phase as well as during the short maintenance periods of 2010 and 2011. The new version described here is designed to be an easily upgradable version of the 10-year-old system, able to evaluate the new technologies planned for the ATLAS upgrade as well as provide new functionalities to the present system. It will be used in the consolidation of electronics campaign during the long shutdown of the LHC in 2013-14 and during future maintenance periods. The system, based on a global re-design with state-of-the-art devices, is based on a back-end electronics crate instrumented with commercial and custom modules and a front-end GUI that is executed on an external portable computer and communicates with the controller in the crate through an Ethernet connection. (authors)

  18. An integrated testing facility for bench scale catalyst research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H.D.; Hogan, R.J.; McMurtrie, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    Discovering new catalysts and designing new catalytic processes has long been hindered by equipment that is either designed for hand operation with the data acquisition functions in some stage of automation or is patterned after refinery installations to smaller, pilot plant like facilities. The latter approach has required large vessels (and hence large amounts of experimental catalyst and feedstocks) to be used or the use of improperly fitted control equipment with constant attention to the operation of a small reactor system. Constant attention partially negates the intent of the automation effort. Results from some of these systems are often unsatisfactory because of poor material balances and control. The data from some schemes must then be manually transferred into other databases for use in reports, correlations, etc. An earlier paper from this laboratory (1) described an initial attempt to provide a reliable, reproducible method for more productive catalyst screening, but that system still lacked an automatic data management system and was not flexible with regards to wide range changes of pressure and flow. Also, several different types of experiments could not be run concurrently. Recently, several schemes have appeared (2-6) which deal with distributed systems as they apply to various laboratory and pilot plant operations. This paper describes an automated system that allows for up to 21 reactors to be in operation concurrently with a staff of five people. All units are independently run without normal operator intervention and the system is designed fail safe for unattended operation. It has been used extensively for screening exploratory catalysts, catalytic process optimization, kinetic modeling and increasingly in refinery process optimization.

  19. Experience gained in pilot-scale and bench-scale fluidised beds processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hadley, TD

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available , considerable progress has been made. The earliest developments were in coal combustion. Work has been done on in-bed sulphur capture to reduce the sulphur dioxide off-gas content. Expertise in the design and commissioning of industrial-scale plants has led...

  20. In Developping a Bench-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor to Burn High Ash Brazilian Coal-Dolomites Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Behainne, Jhon Jairo; Hory, Rogério Ishikawa; Goldstein, Leonardo; Bernárdez Pécora, Araí Augusta

    This work considers some of the questions in burning high ash Brazilian coal-dolomite mixtures in a bench-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). Experimental tests were performed with the CE4500 coal from Santa Catarina State, in southern Brazil, with a Sauter mean diameter d p =43 μm. The coal particles were mixed with dolomite particles of d p = 111 μm and this fuel mixture was fed into the circulating fluidized reactor, previously loaded with quartz sand particles of d p =353 μm. This inert material was previously heated by the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas up to the ignition temperature of the fuel mixture. The CFBC unit has a 100mm internal diameter riser, 4.0m high, as well as a 62.8mm internal diameter downcomer. The loop has a cyclone, a sampling valve to collect particles and a 62.8mm internal diameter L-valve to recirculate the particles in the loop. A screw feeder with a rotation control system was used to feed the fuel mixture to the reactor. The operational conditions were monitored by pressure taps and thermocouples installed along the loop. A data acquisition system showed the main operational conditions to control. Experimental tests performed put in evidence the problems found during bed operation, with special attention to the solids feed device, to the L-valve operation, to particle size, solids inventory, fluidized gas velocity, fuel mixture and recirculated solids feeding positions.

  1. A new reference tip-timing test bench and simulator for blade synchronous and asynchronous vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnayeb, Ali; Nikpour, Masood; Moradi, Shapour; Rossi, Gianluca

    2018-02-01

    The blade tip-timing (BTT) measurement technique is at present the most promising technique for monitoring the blades of axial turbines and aircraft engines in operating conditions. It is generally used as an alternative to strain gauges in turbine testing. By conducting a comparison with the standard methods such as those based on strain gauges, one determines that the technique is not intrusive and does not require a complicated installation process. Despite its superiority to other methods, the experimental performance analysis of a new BTT method needs a test stand that includes a reference measurement system (e.g. strain gauges equipped with telemetry or other complex optical measurement systems, like rotating laser Doppler vibrometers). In this article, a new reliable, low-cost BTT test setup is proposed for simulating and analyzing blade vibrations based on kinematic inversion. In the proposed test bench, instead of the blades vibrating, it is the BTT sensor that vibrates. The vibration of the sensor is generated by a shaker and can therefore be easily controlled in terms of frequency, amplitude and waveform shape. The amplitude of vibration excitation is measured by a simple accelerometer. After introducing the components of the simulator, the proposed test bench is used in practice to simulate both synchronous and asynchronous vibration scenarios. Then two BTT methods are used to evaluate the quality of the acquired data. The results demonstrate that the proposed setup is able to generate simulated pulse sequences which are almost the same as those generated by the conventional BTT systems installed around a bladed disk. Moreover, the test setup enables its users to evaluate BTT methods by using a limited number of sensors. This significantly reduces the total costs of the experiments.

  2. Catalytic multi-stage liquefaction of coal at HTI: Bench-scale studies in coal/waste plastics coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H. [Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The development of Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction (CMSL) at HTI has focused on both bituminous and sub-bituminous coals using laboratory, bench and PDU scale operations. The crude oil equivalent cost of liquid fuels from coal has been curtailed to about $30 per barrel, thus achieving over 30% reduction in the price that was evaluated for the liquefaction technologies demonstrated in the late seventies and early eighties. Contrary to the common belief, the new generation of catalytic multistage coal liquefaction process is environmentally very benign and can produce clean, premium distillates with a very low (<10ppm) heteroatoms content. The HTI Staff has been involved over the years in process development and has made significant improvements in the CMSL processing of coals. A 24 month program (extended to September 30, 1995) to study novel concepts, using a continuous bench scale Catalytic Multi-Stage unit (30kg coal/day), has been initiated since December, 1992. This program consists of ten bench-scale operations supported by Laboratory Studies, Modelling, Process Simulation and Economic Assessments. The Catalytic Multi-Stage Liquefaction is a continuation of the second generation yields using a low/high temperature approach. This paper covers work performed between October 1994- August 1995, especially results obtained from the microautoclave support activities and the bench-scale operations for runs CMSL-08 and CMSL-09, during which, coal and the plastic components for municipal solid wastes (MSW) such as high density polyethylene (HDPE)m, polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polythylene terphthlate (PET) were coprocessed.

  3. Design of an FPGA-based embedded system for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics test-bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrió, F; Valero, A; Kim, H Y; Usai, G; Moreno, P; Reed, R; Sandrock, C; Schettino, V; Souza, J; Shalyugin, A; Solans, C

    2014-01-01

    The portable test-bench for the certification of the ATLAS tile hadronic calorimeter front-end electronics has been redesigned for the present Long Shutdown (LS1) of LHC, improving its portability and expanding its functionalities. This paper presents a new test-bench based on a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA that implements an embedded system using a PowerPC 440 microprocessor hard core and custom IP cores. A light Linux version runs on the PowerPC microprocessor and handles the IP cores which implement the different functionalities needed to perform the desired tests such as TTCvi emulation, G-Link decoding, ADC control and data reception

  4. ORNL/IAT ARMATURE DIAGNOSTICS DEMONSTRATION TEST REPORT: PART TWO: BENCH DEMONSTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Cates, Michael R [ORNL; Goedeke, Shawn [ORNL; Crawford, M. T. [Institute for Advanced Technology, Austin, TX; Ferraro, S. B. [Institute for Advanced Technology, Austin, TX; Surls, D. [Institute for Advanced Technology, Austin, TX; Stewart, J. [Institute for Advanced Technology, Austin, TX

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of the present effort was to demonstrate 'on the fly' temperature measurement of railgun armatures on a bench top railgun. The effort builds on the previous test that utilized a portable unit with armature speeds ranging from 50 to 90 m/s. The tests described here involved higher speeds, ranging from 300 to 500 m/s. The method to accomplish the measurement involves pulsed laser illumination of a phosphor-coated armature. The duration of the ensuing fluorescence indicates temperature. The measured temperatures, obtained both inside the muzzle and outside in free flight, ranged between 80 to 110 C. The required pulsed fluorescence was made possible by successfully sensing the position of the armature while traveling within the laser illumination and fluorescence sensing fields-of-view. A high-speed camera also captured images of the moving armatures after exiting the railgun. These images sometimes included the fluorescing region of the phosphor coating.

  5. Comparative assessment of several automatic CPAP devices' responses: a bench test study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Isetta

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Automatic continuous positive airway pressure (APAP devices adjust the delivered pressure based on the breathing patterns of the patient and, accordingly, they may be more suitable for patients who have a variety of pressure demands during sleep based on factors such as body posture, sleep stage or variability between nights. Devices from different manufacturers incorporate distinct algorithms and may therefore respond differently when subjected to the same disturbed breathing pattern. Our objective was to assess the response of several currently available APAP devices in a bench test. A computer-controlled model mimicking the breathing pattern of a patient with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA was connected to different APAP devices for 2-h tests during which flow and pressure readings were recorded. Devices tested were AirSense 10 (ResMed, Dreamstar (Sefam, Icon (Fisher & Paykel, Resmart (BMC, Somnobalance (Weinmann, System One (Respironics and XT-Auto (Apex. Each device was tested twice. The response of each device was considerably different. Whereas some devices were able to normalise breathing, in some cases exceeding the required pressure, other devices did not eliminate disturbed breathing events (mainly prolonged flow limitation. Mean and maximum pressures ranged 7.3–14.6 cmH2O and 10.4–17.9 cmH2O, respectively, and the time to reach maximum pressure varied from 4.4 to 96.0 min. Each APAP device uses a proprietary algorithm and, therefore, the response to a bench simulation of OSA varied significantly. This must be taken into account for nasal pressure treatment of OSA patients and when comparing results from clinical trials.

  6. OPTIMIZATION METHOD APPLIED IN CONSTRUCTION OF AN OIL TESTING BENCH PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCURTU Liviu Iacob

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, CAD and FEM software are widely used in optimal production of the parts in the automotive industry. The paper presents the topology optimization of an engine control arm used in building of a new oil properties testing bench. After a brief introduction regarding the CAD modelling and topology optimization are presented the graphical design techniques in order to draw the tridimensional model of engine control arm using SolidWorks software. The second part of the paper shows the topology optimization methodology, including the load case creation, objective function, design parameters and the generation of the optimized model of the engine arm. The results of this study give an optimal design of the engine control arm; it will have a lower weight compared to the initial model.

  7. Size distribution of chromate paint aerosol generated in a bench-scale spray booth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabty-Daily, Rania A; Hinds, William C; Froines, John R

    2005-01-01

    Spray painters are potentially exposed to aerosols containing hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] via inhalation of chromate-based paint sprays. Evaluating the particle size distribution of a paint spray aerosol, and the variables that may affect this distribution, is necessary to determine the site and degree of respiratory deposition and the damage that may result from inhaled Cr(VI)-containing paint particles. This study examined the effect of spray gun atomization pressure, aerosol generation source and aerosol aging on the size distribution of chromate-based paint overspray aerosols generated in a bench-scale paint spray booth. The study also determined the effect of particle bounce inside a Marple personal cascade impactor on measured size distributions of paint spray aerosols. Marple personal cascade impactors with a modified inlet were used for sample collection. The data indicated that paint particle bounce did not occur inside the cascade impactors sufficiently to affect size distribution when using uncoated stainless steel or PVC substrate sampling media. A decrease in paint aerosol mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) from 8.2 to 7.0 mum was observed as gun atomization pressure increased from 6 to 10 psi. Overspray aerosols were sampled at two locations in the spray booth. A downstream sampling position simulated the exposure of a worker standing between the painted surface and exhaust, a situation encountered in booths with multiple workers. The measured mean MMAD was 7.2 mum. The distance between the painted surface and sampler was varied to sample oversprays of varying ages between 2.8 and 7.7 s. Age was not a significant factor for determining MMAD. Overspray was sampled at a 90 degrees position to simulate a worker standing in front of the surface being painted with air flowing to the worker's side, a common situation in field applications. The resulting overspray MMAD averaged 5.9 mum. Direct-spray aerosols were sampled at ages from 5.3 to 11.7 s

  8. Bench-scale evaluation of drinking water treatment parameters on iron particles and water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    Discoloration of water resulting from suspended iron particles is one of the main customer complaints received by water suppliers. However, understanding of the mechanisms of discoloration as well as role of materials involved in the process is limited. In this study, an array of bench scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of the most common variables (pH, PO4, Cl2 and DOM) on the properties of iron particles and suspensions derived from the oxygenation of Fe(II) ions in NaHCO3 buffered synthetic water systems. The most important factors as well as their rank influencing iron suspension color and turbidity formation were identified for a range of water quality parameters. This was accomplished using a 2(4) full factorial design approach at a 95% confidence level. The statistical analysis revealed that phosphate was found to be the most significant factor to alter color (contribution: 37.9%) and turbidity (contribution: 45.5%) in an iron-water system. A comprehensive study revealed that phosphate and chlorine produced iron suspension with reduced color and turbidity, made ζ-potential more negative, reduced the average particle size, and increased iron suspension stability. In the presence of DOM, color was observed to increase but a reverse trend was observed to decrease the turbidity and to alter particle size distribution. HPSEC results suggest that higher molecular weight fractions of DOM tend to adsorb onto the surfaces of iron particles at early stages, resulting in alteration of the surface charge of iron particles. This in turn limits particles aggregation and makes iron colloids highly stable. In the presence of a phosphate based corrosion inhibitor, this study demonstrated that color and turbidity resulting from suspended iron were lower at a pH value of 6.5 (compared to pH of 8.5). The same trend was observed in presence of DOM. This study also suggested that iron colloid suspension color and turbidity in chlorinated drinking water

  9. Soluble Microbial Product Characterization of Biofilm Formation in Bench-Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Mines, Paul

    2012-12-01

    The biological process known as activated sludge (AS) in conjunction with membrane separation technology for the treatment of wastewater has been employed for over four decades. While, membrane biological reactors (MBR) are now widely employed, the phenomenon of membrane fouling is still the most significant factor leading to performance decline of MBRs. Although much research has been done on the subject of MBR fouling over the past two decades, many questions remain unanswered, and consensus within the scientific community is rare. However, research has led to one system parameter generally being regarded as a contributor to membrane fouling, extracellular polymeric compounds (EPS). EPS, and more specifically, the soluble fraction of EPS known as soluble microbial products (SMP), must be further investigated in order to better understand membrane fouling. The biological activity and performance of the MBR is affected by myriad operational parameters, which in turn affects the SMP generated. A commonly varied operational parameter is, depending on the specific treatment needs of a MBR, the sludge retention time (SRT). This study aims to characterize the SMP in three bench-scale MBRs as the SRT is gradually lowered. By studying how the SMP change as the operation of the system is altered, greater understanding of how SMP are related to fouling can be achieved. At the onset of the study, a steady state was established in the system with a SRT of 20 days. Upon stabilization of a 20 day SRT, the system was gradually transitioned to a five and a half day SRT, in stepwise adjustments. Initially, both the trans-membrane pressure (TMP) and the SMP concentrations were at relatively low values, indicating the presence of minimal amounts of biofilm on the membrane surfaces. As the system was altered and more activated sludge was wasted from the reactors, the SRT inherently decreased. As the lower SRT was transitioned and established, the data from TMP measurements, as well

  10. BWR Mark I pressure suppression study: characterization of the vertical load function utilizing bench top model tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Lai, W.

    1977-02-01

    A study was conducted to characterize the mechanisms which give rise to observed oscillations in the vertical load function (VLF) of bench top pool dynamics tests. This is part of a continuing investigation at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the General Electric Mark I Nuclear Reactor pressure suppression system

  11. Large scale reflood test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kemmei; Murao, Yoshio

    1980-01-01

    The large-scale reflood test with a view to ensuring the safety of light water reactors was started in fiscal 1976 based on the special account act for power source development promotion measures by the entrustment from the Science and Technology Agency. Thereafter, to establish the safety of PWRs in loss-of-coolant accidents by joint international efforts, the Japan-West Germany-U.S. research cooperation program was started in April, 1980. Thereupon, the large-scale reflood test is now included in this program. It consists of two tests using a cylindrical core testing apparatus for examining the overall system effect and a plate core testing apparatus for testing individual effects. Each apparatus is composed of the mock-ups of pressure vessel, primary loop, containment vessel and ECCS. The testing method, the test results and the research cooperation program are described. (J.P.N.)

  12. Bench Testing Results for the Electrical PCM-Assisted Thermal Heating System (ePATHS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaClair, Tim J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gao, Zhiming [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abdelaziz, Omar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Bench testing of the Electrical PCM-Assisted Thermal Heating System (ePATHS) was completed at the Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The ePATHS is a thermal energy storage device designed to reduce the energy required from the battery for cabin heating of electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). ORNL s testing of the ePATHS assessed three main aspects of operation of the device: 1.ePATHS charging evaluation: measure the time to charge and the energy input needed to fully charge the PCM for a range of different ambient conditions. 2.ePATHS Discharge Evaluations: measure the energy provided by the PCM HX, both during mode 1 and mode 2 operation, and confirm the cabin heating duration that can be provided by the ePATHS. This is the primary evaluation to validate the system performance, and an array of multiple ambient conditions and operating scenarios were tested. 3.Evaluation of Thermal Losses from the ePATHS during Cold Soak: this test will evaluate the performance of the insulation system for the ePATHS. The charged ePATHS undergoes a long-term soak in cold ambient temperature conditions, and the heat losses will be evaluated to validate that the performance meets the maximum energy loss requirement.

  13. Impact of relative position vehicle-wind blower in a roller test bench under climatic chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernández-Yáñez, P.; Armas, O.; Martínez-Martínez, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Air simulation model was developed for a vehicle test bench under climatic chamber. • Good accuracy between experimental data and simulated values were obtained. • Wind blower-vehicle relative position alters external cooling of after-treatment devices. • Vehicle emission certification can be affected by wind blower-vehicle relative position. - Abstract: In terms of energy efficiency and exhaust emissions control, an appropriate design of cooling systems of climatic chambers destined to vehicle certification and/or perform scientific research is becoming increasingly important. European vehicle emissions certification (New European Driving Cycle, NEDC) establishes the position of the wind-simulation blower at 200 mm above floor level. This height is fixed and kept constant independently of the vehicle tested. The position of the blower with respect to the vehicle can modify the external forced convection under the car, where after-treatment devices are located. Consequently, the performance of such devices could be modified and emission results during the certification cycle could be non-representative of real-world driving conditions. The aim of this work is to study the influence of different wind blower-vehicle relative heights on the air velocity and temperature profiles under the car by means of a simple computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. A steady state three-dimensional CFD model was developed and applied to the estimation of the air velocity and temperature profiles inside of a climatic chamber equipped with a vehicle roller (chassis dyno) test bench. The simulations reproduce one steady-state condition from NEDC, specifically the EU17 mode (120 km/h, maximum velocity during the cycle). The cool air propelling temperature was 20 °C (minimum temperature in the NEDC range). Simulations were performed employing the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach with the realizable k-ε model to provide closure. Air velocity and

  14. Treatment of waste gas containing low concentration of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in a bench-scale biofilter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, B S; Mudliar, S N; Deshmukh, S C; Banerjee, S; Pandey, R A

    2010-04-01

    Biological treatment of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) was investigated in a bench-scale biofilter, packed with compost along with wood chips, and enriched with DMS degrading microorganism Bacillus sphaericus. The biofilter could remove 62-74% of the inlet DMS, at an optimum loading of 0.484 g/m(3)/h with optimum empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 384 s and an average moisture range of 65-70%. The biodegradative products of DMS were sulphide, thiosulphate and sulphate. Evaluation of microbiological status of the biofilter indicated the presence of other bacterial cultures viz. Paenibacillus polymyxa, and Bacillus megaterium, besides B. sphaericus. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Large scale model testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Filip, R.; Polachova, H.; Stepanek, S.

    1989-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and fatigue calculations for WWER reactor pressure vessels were checked by large scale model testing performed using large testing machine ZZ 8000 (with a maximum load of 80 MN) at the SKODA WORKS. The results are described from testing the material resistance to fracture (non-ductile). The testing included the base materials and welded joints. The rated specimen thickness was 150 mm with defects of a depth between 15 and 100 mm. The results are also presented of nozzles of 850 mm inner diameter in a scale of 1:3; static, cyclic, and dynamic tests were performed without and with surface defects (15, 30 and 45 mm deep). During cyclic tests the crack growth rate in the elastic-plastic region was also determined. (author). 6 figs., 2 tabs., 5 refs

  16. Accuracy improvement in a calibration test bench for accelerometers by a vision system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Emilia, Giulio, E-mail: giulio.demilia@univaq.it; Di Gasbarro, David, E-mail: david.digasbarro@graduate.univaq.it; Gaspari, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.gaspari@graduate.univaq.it; Natale, Emanuela, E-mail: emanuela.natale@univaq.it [University of L’Aquila, Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics (DIIIE), via G. Gronchi, 18, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2016-06-28

    A procedure is described in this paper for the accuracy improvement of calibration of low-cost accelerometers in a prototype rotary test bench, driven by a brushless servo-motor and operating in a low frequency range of vibrations (0 to 5 Hz). Vibration measurements by a vision system based on a low frequency camera have been carried out, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the real acceleration evaluation at the installation point of the sensor to be calibrated. A preliminary test device has been realized and operated in order to evaluate the metrological performances of the vision system, showing a satisfactory behavior if the uncertainty measurement is taken into account. A combination of suitable settings of the control parameters of the motion control system and of the information gained by the vision system allowed to fit the information about the reference acceleration at the installation point to the needs of the procedure for static and dynamic calibration of three-axis accelerometers.

  17. Hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments plus anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge for dewatering and biogas production: Bench-scale research and pilot-scale verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxing; Wang, Xingdong; Zhang, Guangyi; Yu, Guangwei; Lin, Jingjiang; Wang, Yin

    2017-06-15

    To test the feasibility and practicability of the process combing hydrothermal pretreatment for dewatering with biogas production for full utilization of sewage sludge, hydrothermal/alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments and in turn anaerobic digestion of the filtrates obtained after dewatering the pretreated sludge were performed at bench- and pilot-scales. The hydrothermal temperature fell within the range of 140 °C-220 °C and the pretreatment time varied from 30 min to 120 min. For the alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment the pH value of the sludge was adjusted to 9.0-11.0 by adding Ca(OH) 2 . The results showed that the dewaterability of the sewage sludge was improved with increasing pretreatment temperature but the impact of the pretreatment time was not significant. The addition of Ca(OH) 2 gave better performance on the subsequent mechanical dewatering of the pretreated sludge compared to pure hydrothermal pretreatment, and the higher the pH value was, the better the dewaterability of the pretreated sludge was. The conditions of 180 °C/30 min and 160 °C/60 min/pH = 10.0 (for hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments, respectively) resulted in relatively good results in the theoretical energy balance, which were verified in the pilot-scale tests. Based on the data from the pilot tests, the alkaline hydrothermal process realized self-sufficiency in energy at the cost of a proper amount of CaO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bench tests of simple, handy ventilators for pandemics: performance, autonomy, and ergonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Her, Erwan; Roy, Annie

    2011-06-01

    It has been pointed out that in the wake of a virulent flu strain, patients with survivable illness will die from lack of resources unless more ventilators are made available. Numerous disaster-type ventilators are available, but few evaluations have been performed. To compare simple, lightweight, and handy ventilators that could be used in the initial care of patients with respiratory distress. We bench-tested 4 volume-cycled ventilators (Carevent ALS, EPV100, Pneupac VR1, and Medumat Easy) and 2 pressure-cycled ventilators (Oxylator EMX and VAR-Plus). We studied their general physical characteristics, sonometry, gas consumption, technical performance, ergonomy, and user-friendliness. With a test lung we assessed performance at F(IO(2)) of 0.50 and 1.0, set compliance of 30, 70, and 120 mL/cm H(2)O, and set resistance of 5, 10, and 20 cm H(2)O/L/s. To study user-friendliness and ergonomy we conducted, in randomized order, 7 or 8 objective, quantitative tests and 2 subjective tests. Compliance and resistance strongly affected tidal volume with the pressure-cycled ventilators (from 418 ± 49 mL to 1,377 ± 444 mL with the VAR-Plus, at the lowest pressure level), whereas the volume-cycled ventilators provided a consistent tidal volume in the face of changing test lung characteristics. We are concerned that the pressure-cycled ventilators did not provide a consistent tidal volume, and under certain conditions the volume delivered would be unsafe (too large or too small). Most of the volume-cycled ventilators proved to be technically efficient and reliable. Their reliability, portability, and ease of use could make them valuable in natural disasters and mass-casualty events.

  19. Comparing coronary stent material performance on a common geometric platform through simulated bench testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2012-08-01

    Absorbable metallic stents (AMSs) are a newly emerging cardiovascular technology which has the potential to eliminate long-term patient health risks associated with conventional permanent stents. AMSs developed to date have consisted of magnesium alloys or iron, materials with inferior mechanical properties to those used in permanent stents, such as stainless steel and cobalt-chromium alloys. However, for AMSs to be feasible for widespread clinical use it is important that their performance is comparable to modern permanent stents. To date, the performances of magnesium, iron, and permanent stent materials have not been compared on a common stent platform for a range of stent performance metrics, such as flexibility, radial strength, and recoil. In this study, this comparison is made through simulated bench testing, based on finite-element modelling. The significance of this study is that it allows potential limitations in current AMS performance to be identified, which will aid in focusing future AMS design. This study also allows the identification of limitations in current AMS materials, thereby informing the on-going development of candidate biodegradable alloys. The results indicate that the AMSs studied here can match the recoil characteristics and radial strength of modern permanent stents; however, to achieve this, larger strut dimensions are required. It is also predicted that the AMSs studied are inferior to permanent stents in terms of maximum absolute curvature and longitudinal stiffness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Drug-eluting stents for coronary bifurcations: bench testing of provisional side-branch strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, John A; Webster, Mark W I; El Jack, Seifeddin; Ruygrok, Peter N; Stewart, James T; Scott, Douglas; Currie, Erin; Panther, Monique J; Shaw, Bronwyn; O'Shaughnessy, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to bench-test provisional bifurcation stenting strategies to provide insights on how best to perform these with drug-eluting stents (DESs). Bifurcation stenting with DESs reduces restenosis compared with bare metal stents (BMSs). Outcomes with a single DES are better than with two DESs but if the main branch is stented, there needs to be a reliable strategy for provisionally stenting the side-branch with full ostial scaffolding and drug application. Stents were photographed in a phantom after deployment with different strategies. With provisional T-stenting, placement of the side-branch stent without gaps is difficult. The internal (or reverse) crush strategy fully scaffolds the side-branch ostium but is experimental. The culotte technique providing excellent side-branch ostial coverage is easier to perform with open-cell or large-cell stent design. In general, kissing balloon post-dilation improves stent expansion, especially at the ostium, and corrects distortion. However, a main-branch kissing balloon of smaller diameter than the deploying balloon causes distortion. Final main-branch postdilatation or sequential postdilatation prevents distortion after the internal crush strategy.

  1. Development and validation of a multilateration test bench for particle accelerator pre-alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamugasa, Solomon William; Rothacher, Markus; Gayde, Jean-Christophe; Mainaud Durand, Helene

    2018-03-01

    The development and validation of a portable coordinate measurement solution for fiducialization of compact linear collider (CLIC) components is presented. This new solution addresses two limitations of high-accuracy state-of-the-art coordinate measuring machines, i.e. lack of portability and limited measurement volume. The solution is based on frequency scanning interferometry (FSI) distances and the multilateration coordinate measurement technique. The developments include a reference sphere for localizing the FSI optical fiber tip and a kinematic mount for repositioning the reference sphere with sub-micrometric repeatability. This design enables absolute distance measurements in different directions from the same point, which is essential for multilateration. A multilateration test bench built using these prototypes has been used to fiducialize a CLIC cavity beam position monitor and 420 mm-long main beam quadrupole magnet. The combined fiducialization uncertainty achieved is 3.5 μm (k  =  1), which is better than the CLIC 5 μm (k  =  1) uncertainty specification.

  2. Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Caraher, Joel; Chen, Wei; Farnum, Rachael; Perry, Robert; Spiry, Irina; Wilson, Paul; Wood, Benjamin

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2-capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2-capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. In the first budget period of this project, the bench-scale phase-changing CO2 capture process was designed using data and operating experience generated under a previous project (ARPA-e project DE-AR0000084). Sizing and specification of all major unit operations was completed, including detailed process and instrumentation diagrams. The system was designed to operate over a wide range of operating conditions to allow for exploration of the effect of process variables on CO2 capture performance.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL AND ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR ACCELERATED FATIGUE BENCH TEST OF STRUCTURES AT REGULAR MULTI-CYCLE LOADING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Pochtenny

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents main statements of the developed general scientific principles and experimental and analytical method for accelerated bench test of bearing structures and machine parts at a regular loading. According to the test results executed in terms of the proposed methodology it is possible to predict a service life of a number of automotive bearing structures for conditions of irregular loading.The developed method has been used for execution of bench tests and calculation and experimental estimation of a service life of a truck tractor frame, prospective types of axles and elements of trailer train suspension and other bearing structures of automotive machinery of the Minsk Motor-Works.

  4. MSAP Hardware Verification: Testing Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform Hardware Using Simulation and Bench Test Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossin, Kent R.

    2005-01-01

    The Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform (MSAP) project aims to develop a system of hardware and software that will provide the core functionality necessary in many JPL missions and can be tailored to accommodate mission-specific requirements. The MSAP flight hardware is being developed in the Verilog hardware description language, allowing developers to simulate their design before releasing it to a field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGAs can be updated in a matter of minutes, drastically reducing the time and expense required to produce traditional application-specific integrated circuits. Bench test equipment connected to the FPGAs can then probe and run Tcl scripts on the hardware. The Verilog and Tcl code can be reused or modified with each design. These steps are effective in confirming that the design operates according specifications.

  5. Removal of 226Ra from tailings pond effluents and stabilization of uranium mine tailings. Bench and pilot scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidtke, N.W.; Averill, D.; Bryant, D.N.; Wilkinson, P.; Schmidt, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    Increased world demand for uranium has resulted in recent expansion of Canadian uranium mining operations. Problems have been identified with the discharge of radionuclides such as 226 Ra from tailings pond effluents and with the stabilization of mine tailings. At Environment Canada's Wastewater Technology Centre (WTC) two projects were undertaken in cooperation with the Canadian Uranium Mining Industry and other federal government agencies to address these problems. The first project reports on the progress of bench and pilot scale process simulations for the development of a data base for the design of a full scale mechanical physical/chemical 226 Ra removal waste treatment system with an effluent target level of 10 pCi 226 Ra total per litre. The second project addresses problems of the leachability of radionuclides and the stabilization of both uranium mine tailings and BaRaSO 4 sediments from the treatment of acid seepages

  6. Development of Applicable Test Scenario by the Grid Simulator of a Functional Test Bench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farajzadehbibalan, Saber

    In this thesis, a data-driven testing procedure for wind turbine generators is developed. The procedure generates a data set for a hardware-in-the-loop testing setup at a test facility. The goal is to shorten validation process, prevent damage from highly dangerous grid tests, and conduct differe...

  7. The RISQ network as an R and D catalyst and test bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Jocelyn

    2005-09-01

    The RISQ (Réseau d'Informations Scientifiques du Québec) research and education network has been a trail-blazer in the development of privately owned fiber networks, by implementing an optical fiber owner model. This model allows RISQ to have a gracefully upgradable network that is at the forefront of the large bandwidth optical communications technology. It also allows RISQ to offer a parallel network that can be used as a test equipment for the R&D community, in universities, research institutions or the industry; a real in-the-field fiber optic network test bench. RISQ is in a privileged situation to influence optical communications R&D work. It is aware of the real needs of the telecommunications industry. It is also aware of the technological needs of the next-generation networks. RISQ suggests that telecommunications R&D should be focused on increasing network reliability and decrease network operations and capital expanses, rather than on increasing their capacity. A key to decreasing expanses would be to avoid SONET network management on long-haul trunks, without affecting the transmission quality of service. IP over optics should thus be reinstalled as a priority in the telecom R&D world. RISQ thinks optical 3R might be the solution that will allow IP over optics. As for the next-generation networks: flexibility, reconfigurability, in order to offer lightpaths of adjustable bandwidth to the user; while wasting a minimum of the valuable network bandwidth, is where we believe efforts should be concentrated on.

  8. Development and experimental validation of a thermoelectric test bench for laboratory lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The refrigeration process reduces the temperature of a space or a given volume while the power generation process employs a source of thermal energy to generate electrical power. Because of the importance of these two processes, training of engineers in this area is of great interest. In engineering courses it is normally studied the vapor compression and absorption refrigeration, and power generation systems such as gas turbine and steam turbine. Another type of cooling and generation less studied within the engineering curriculum, having a great interest, it is cooling and thermal generation based on Peltier and Seebeck effects. The theoretical concepts are useful, but students have difficulties understanding the physical meaning of their possible applications. Providing students with tools to test and apply the theory in real applications, will lead to a better understanding of the subject. Engineers must have strong theoretical, computational and also experimental skills. A prototype test bench has been built and experimentally validated to perform practical lessons of thermoelectric generation and refrigeration. Using this prototype students learn the most effective way of cooling systems and thermal power generation as well as basic concepts associated with thermoelectricity. It has been proven that students learn the process of data acquisition, and the technology used in thermoelectric devices. These practical lessons are implemented for a 60 people group of students in the development of subject of Thermodynamic including in the Degree in Engineering in Industrial Technologies of Public University of Navarra. Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE The R and D D`s bearing test benches; Les bancs d`essais de paliers de la DER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vialettes, J.M. [Service Ensembles de Production, Departement Machines, Direction des Etudes et Recherches, Electricite de France (EDF), 92 - Clamart (France)

    1997-01-01

    In power generation plants, rotating machines are involved in energy transformation processes and safety systems. The bearings supporting the rotors and the thrust bearings play a crucial role in the reliability of these machines. The phenomena encountered straddle several disciplines: hydrodynamics, tribology, thermomechanics, materials and vibrations in a specific environment, namely: thin fluid film, solid mechanical components and shaft rotation. Means of analysing the behaviour of these components (bearings and thrust bearings) have been developed and implemented. These consists of the EDYOS (Etude Dynamique des Organes de Supportage) code for dynamically studying bearing devices and several related bench tests. In reality, in order to understand the complex physical phenomena encountered in these components, it is vital to carry out analyses and experimental validations. Since these investigations cannot be carried out on actual machines, test benches have been built which can subject the sample bearings to the equivalent stresses. (author) 14 figs.

  9. Experimental and modelling studies on continuous synthesis and refining of biodiesel in a dedicated bench scale unit using centrifugal contactor separator technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduh, Muhammad Yusuf; Martinez, Alberto Fernandez; Kloekhorst, Arjan; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero J.

    Continuous synthesis and refining of biodiesel (FAME) using a laboratory scale bench scale unit was explored. The unit consists of three major parts: (i) a continuous centrifugal contactor separator (CCCS) to perform the reaction between sunflower oil and methanol; (ii) a washing unit for the crude

  10. A Lego Mindstorms NXT based test bench for multiagent exploratory systems and distributed network partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Riya Raghuvir

    Networks of communicating agents require distributed algorithms for a variety of tasks in the field of network analysis and control. For applications such as swarms of autonomous vehicles, ad hoc and wireless sensor networks, and such military and civilian applications as exploring and patrolling a robust autonomous system that uses a distributed algorithm for selfpartitioning can be significantly helpful. A single team of autonomous vehicles in a field may need to self-dissemble into multiple teams, conducive to completing multiple control tasks. Moreover, because communicating agents are subject to changes, namely, addition or failure of an agent or link, a distributed or decentralized algorithm is favorable over having a central agent. A framework to help with the study of self-partitioning of such multi agent systems that have most basic mobility model not only saves our time in conception but also gives us a cost effective prototype without negotiating the physical realization of the proposed idea. In this thesis I present my work on the implementation of a flexible and distributed stochastic partitioning algorithm on the LegoRTM Mindstorms' NXT on a graphical programming platform using National Instruments' LabVIEW(TM) forming a team of communicating agents via NXT-Bee radio module. We single out mobility, communication and self-partition as the core elements of the work. The goal is to randomly explore a precinct for reference sites. Agents who have discovered the reference sites announce their target acquisition to form a network formed based upon the distance of each agent with the other wherein the self-partitioning begins to find an optimal partition. Further, to illustrate the work, an experimental test-bench of five Lego NXT robots is presented.

  11. Computational Bench Testing to Evaluate the Short-Term Mechanical Performance of a Polymeric Stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobel, A C; Petisco, S; Sarasua, J R; Wang, W; McHugh, P E

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant volume of research focussed on the utilization of biodegradable polymers such as poly-L-lactide-acid (PLLA) for applications associated with cardiovascular disease. More specifically, there has been an emphasis on upgrading current clinical shortfalls experienced with conventional bare metal stents and drug eluting stents. One such approach, the adaption of fully formed polymeric stents has led to a small number of products being commercialized. Unfortunately, these products are still in their market infancy, meaning there is a clear non-occurrence of long term data which can support their mechanical performance in vivo. Moreover, the load carry capacity and other mechanical properties essential to a fully optimized polymeric stent are difficult, timely and costly to establish. With the aim of compiling rapid and representative performance data for specific stent geometries, materials and designs, in addition to reducing experimental timeframes, Computational bench testing via finite element analysis (FEA) offers itself as a very powerful tool. On this basis, the research presented in this paper is concentrated on the finite element simulation of the mechanical performance of PLLA, which is a fully biodegradable polymer, in the stent application, using a non-linear viscous material model. Three physical stent geometries, typically used for fully polymeric stents, are selected, and a comparative study is performed in relation to their short-term mechanical performance, with the aid of experimental data. From the simulated output results, an informed understanding can be established in relation to radial strength, flexibility and longitudinal resistance, that can be compared with conventional permanent metal stent functionality, and the results show that it is indeed possible to generate a PLLA stent with comparable and sufficient mechanical performance. The paper also demonstrates the attractiveness of FEA as a tool

  12. CO2 Employment as Refrigerant Fluid with a Low Environmental Impact. Experimental Tests on Arugula and Design Criteria for a Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagio Bianchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to define design criteria for CO2 refrigeration systems to be used for agricultural products and foodstuff storage, a variable geometrical system was realized, with the goal of meeting a wide range of environmental and process conditions, such as producing low environmental impact and maintaining the highest Coefficient of Performance (COP, at the same time. This test-bench, at semi-industrial scale, was designed as a result of experimental tests carried out on Arugula. The storage tests showed that all samples stored in cold rooms with R.H. control showed a slight increase of weight but also small rot zones in all the boxes due to an excessive accumulation of water condensation; thus, the system may not have achieved conditions that RH requires in a given range, without reaching saturation condition. At the same time, the use of CO2 must be adequately tested along its thermodynamic cycle, during steady state and/or transient conditions, imposing variable working conditions that can simulate plant starting phase or some striking conservation process, like those that characterize sausages. The designed plant will allow studying these specific performances and evaluate COP variation, according to environmental and plant operating conditions.

  13. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  14. WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

    2009-03-20

    The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the

  15. Archaeal and bacterial community dynamics and bioprocess performance of a bench-scale two-stage anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Osorio, Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage technologies have been developed for anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. In this study, the archaeal and bacterial community structure dynamics and bioprocess performance of a bench-scale two-stage anaerobic digester treating urban sewage sludge have been studied by the means of high-throughput sequencing techniques and physicochemical parameters such as pH, dried sludge, volatile dried sludge, acid concentration, alkalinity, and biogas generation. The coupled analyses of archaeal and bacterial communities and physicochemical parameters showed a direct relationship between archaeal and bacterial populations and bioprocess performance during start-up and working operation of a two-stage anaerobic digester. Moreover, results demonstrated that archaeal and bacterial community structure was affected by changes in the acid/alkalinity ratio in the bioprocess. Thus, a predominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosaeta was observed in the methanogenic bioreactor at high-value acid/alkaline ratio, while a predominance of Methanomassilicoccaeceae archaea and Methanoculleus genus was observed in the methanogenic bioreactor at low-value acid/alkaline ratio. Biodiversity tag-iTag sequencing studies showed that methanogenic archaea can be also detected in the acidogenic bioreactor, although its biological activity was decreased after 4 months of operation as supported by physicochemical analyses. Also, studies of the VFA producers and VFA consumers microbial populations showed as these microbiota were directly affected by the physicochemical parameters generated in the bioreactors. We suggest that the results obtained in our study could be useful for future implementations of two-stage anaerobic digestion processes at both bench- and full-scale.

  16. Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest

  17. Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yongqi; DeVries, Nicholas; Ruhter, David; Manoranjan, Sahu; Ye, Qing; Ye, Xinhuai; Zhang, Shihan; Chen, Scott; Li, Zhiwei; O' Brien, Kevin

    2014-03-31

    A novel Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High-Pressure Stripping (Hot-CAP) has been developed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC in this three-year, bench-scale project. The Hot-CAP features a concentrated carbonate solution (e.g., K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) for CO{sub 2} absorption and a bicarbonate slurry (e.g., KHCO{sub 3}) for high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping to overcome the energy use and other disadvantages associated with the benchmark monoethanolamine (MEA) process. The project was aimed at performing laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to prove its technical feasibility and generate process engineering and scale-up data, and conducting a techno-economic analysis (TEA) to demonstrate its energy use and cost competitiveness over MEA. To meet project goals and objectives, a combination of experimental, modeling, process simulation, and economic analysis studies were applied. Carefully designed and intensive experiments were conducted to measure thermodynamic and reaction engineering data relevant to four major unit operations in the Hot-CAP (i.e., CO{sub 2} absorption, CO{sub 2} stripping, bicarbonate crystallization, and sulfate reclamation). The rate promoters that could accelerate the CO{sub 2} absorption rate into the potassium carbonate/bicarbonate (PCB) solution to a level greater than that into the 5 M MEA solution were identified, and the superior performance of CO{sub 2} absorption into PCB was demonstrated in a bench-scale packed-bed column. Kinetic data on bicarbonate crystallization were developed and applied for crystallizer design and sizing. Parametric testing of high-pressure CO{sub 2} stripping with concentrated bicarbonate-dominant slurries at high temperatures ({>=}140{degrees}C) in a bench-scale stripping column demonstrated lower heat use than with MEA. The feasibility of a modified process for combining SO{sub 2} removal with CO{sub 2} capture was preliminarily

  18. Design of the ANTARES LCM-DAQ board test bench using a FPGA-based system-on-chip approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anvar, S. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SEDI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Kestener, P. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SEDI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: pierre.kestener@cea.fr; Le Provost, H. [CEA Saclay, DAPNIA/SEDI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-11-15

    The System-on-Chip (SoC) approach consists in using state-of-the-art FPGA devices with embedded RISC processor cores, high-speed differential LVDS links and ready-to-use multi-gigabit transceivers allowing development of compact systems with substantial number of IO channels. Required performances are obtained through a subtle separation of tasks between closely cooperating programmable hardware logic and user-friendly software environment. We report about our experience in using the SoC approach for designing the production test bench of the off-shore readout system for the ANTARES neutrino experiment.

  19. SUN: A fully automated interferometric test bench aimed at measuring photolithographic grade lenses with a sub nanometer accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgois, R.; Hamy, A. L.; Pourcelot, P.

    2017-10-01

    SUN is a test bench developed by Safran Reosc to measure spherical or aspherical surface errors of litho-grade lenses with sub-nanometer accuracy. SUN provides full aperture high resolution interferometric measurements. Measurements are performed at the center of curvature using high precision transmission sphere (TS), and Computer Generated Holograms (CGH) for aspheres, in order to light the surface at normal incidence. SUN can measure lenses with diameter up to 350mm and a radius of curvature varying from 60 to 3000 mm.

  1. Design of an FPGA-based embedded system for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics test-bench

    CERN Document Server

    Carrio, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Moreno, P; Reed, R; Sandrock, C; Shalyugin, A; Schettino, V; Solans, C; Souza, J; Usai, G; Valero, A

    2013-01-01

    The portable test bench (VME based) used for the certification of the Tile calorimeter front-end electronics has been redesigned for the LHC Long Shutdown (2013-2014) improving its portability. The new version is based on a Xilinx Virtex 5 FPGA that implements an embedded system using a hard core PowerPC 440 microprocessor and custom IP cores. The PowerPC microprocessor runs a light Linux version and handles the IP cores written in VHDL that implement the different functionalities (TTC, G-Link, CAN-Bus) Description of the system and performance measurements of the different components will be shown.

  2. Real-time cavity simulator-based low-level radio-frequency test bench and applications for accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miura, Takako; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Liu, Na; Wibowo, Sigit Basuki

    2018-03-01

    A Low-level radio-frequency (LLRF) control systems is required to regulate the rf field in the rf cavity used for beam acceleration. As the LLRF system is usually complex, testing of the basic functions or control algorithms of this system in real time and in advance of beam commissioning is strongly recommended. However, the equipment necessary to test the LLRF system, such as superconducting cavities and high-power rf sources, is very expensive; therefore, we have developed a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based cavity simulator as a substitute for real rf cavities. Digital models of the cavity and other rf systems are implemented in the FPGA. The main components include cavity baseband models for the fundamental and parasitic modes, a mechanical model of the Lorentz force detuning, and a model of the beam current. Furthermore, in our simulator, the disturbance model used to simulate the power-supply ripples and microphonics is also carefully considered. Based on the presented cavity simulator, we have established an LLRF system test bench that can be applied to different cavity operational conditions. The simulator performance has been verified by comparison with real cavities in KEK accelerators. In this paper, the development and implementation of this cavity simulator is presented first, and the LLRF test bench based on the presented simulator is constructed. The results are then compared with those for KEK accelerators. Finally, several LLRF applications of the cavity simulator are illustrated.

  3. Bench scale synthesis of p-hydroxybenzoic acid using whole-cell nitrilase of Gordonia terrae mutant E9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Kumar, Virender; Thakur, Neerja; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2015-07-01

    Mutants of Gordonia terrae were generated using chemical mutagens for better activity, stability and higher substrate/product tolerance of its nitrilase enzyme. Mutant E9 showed two-time increase in activity and tolerated p-hydroxybenzonitrile (p-HBN) up to 50 mM. Response surface methodology and inducer mediation approach further enhanced the production of enzyme to 2.5-fold. The bench scale production of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HBA) was carried out in a fed-batch reaction (500-mL scale) using whole-cell nitrilase of mutant E9 in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) at 40 °C. Total six feedings each at an interval of 45 min resulted in accumulation of 360 mM (21.6 g) of p-HBA with a purity of 99%. The catalytic and volumetric productivity of bioprocess using mutant G. terrae was improved to 1.8 g h(-1) g DCW (-1) and 43.2 g L(-1), respectively, from 0.78 g h(-1) g DCW (-1) and 28.8 g L(-1) using resting cells of wild strain. K m and V max of purified nitrilase from mutant E9 were 55 U mg(-1) and 1.8 mM for p-HBN with a higher turnover number of 36 s(-1) × 10(-3).

  4. Bench- and pilot-scale demonstration of thermal desorption for removal of mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, M.I.; Sams, R.J.; Gillis, G.; Helsel, R.W.; Alperin, E.S.; Geisler, T.J.; Groen, A.; Root, D.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal desorption is an innovative technology that has seen significant growth in applications to organically contaminated soils and sludges for the remediation of hazardous, radioactive and mixed waste sites. This paper will present the results of a bench and pilot-scale demonstration of this technology for the removal of mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soil. Results demonstrate that the mercury in this soil can be successfully removed to the target treatment levels of 10 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and that all process residuals could be rendered RCRA-nonhazardous as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Sampling and analyses of the desorber off-gas before and after the air pollution control system demonstrated effective collection of mercury and organic constituents. Pilot-scale testing was also conducted to verify requirements for material handling of soil into and out of the process. This paper will also present a conceptual design and preliminary costs of a full-scale system, including feed preparation, thermal treatment, and residuals handling for the soil

  5. Appling hydrolysis acidification-anoxic–oxic process in the treatment of petrochemical wastewater: From bench scale reactor to full scale wastewater treatment plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Changyong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, Yuexi, E-mail: zhouyuexi@263.net [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Sun, Qingliang [School of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Fu, Liya [Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xi, Hongbo; Yu, Yin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Research Center of Water Pollution Control Technology, Chinese Research Academy of Environment Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yu, Ruozhen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrolysis acidification-anoxic–oxic process can be used to treat petrochemical wastewater. • The toxicity and treatability changed significantly after hydrolysis acidification. • The type and concentration of organics reduced greatly after treatment. • The effluent shows low acute toxicity by luminescent bacteria assay. • Advanced treatment is recommended for the effluent. - Abstract: A hydrolysis acidification (HA)-anoxic–oxic (A/O) process was adopted to treat a petrochemical wastewater. The operation optimization was carried out firstly by a bench scale experimental reactor. Then a full scale petrochemical wastewater treatment plant (PCWWTP, 6500 m{sup 3} h{sup −1}) was operated with the same parameters. The results showed that the BOD{sub 5}/COD of the wastewater increased from 0.30 to 0.43 by HA. The effluent COD was 54.4 mg L{sup −1} for bench scale reactor and 60.9 mg L{sup −1} for PCWWTP when the influent COD was about 480 mg L{sup −1} on optimized conditions. The organics measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) reduced obviously and the total concentration of the 5 organics (1,3-dioxolane, 2-pentanone, ethylbenzene, 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane and indene) detected in the effluent was only 0.24 mg L{sup −1}. There was no obvious toxicity of the effluent. However, low acute toxicity of the effluent could be detected by the luminescent bacteria assay, indicating the advanced treatment is needed. The clone library profiling analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the system were Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes. HA-A/O process is suitable for the petrochemical wastewater treatment.

  6. Appling hydrolysis acidification-anoxic–oxic process in the treatment of petrochemical wastewater: From bench scale reactor to full scale wastewater treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Changyong; Zhou, Yuexi; Sun, Qingliang; Fu, Liya; Xi, Hongbo; Yu, Yin; Yu, Ruozhen

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrolysis acidification-anoxic–oxic process can be used to treat petrochemical wastewater. • The toxicity and treatability changed significantly after hydrolysis acidification. • The type and concentration of organics reduced greatly after treatment. • The effluent shows low acute toxicity by luminescent bacteria assay. • Advanced treatment is recommended for the effluent. - Abstract: A hydrolysis acidification (HA)-anoxic–oxic (A/O) process was adopted to treat a petrochemical wastewater. The operation optimization was carried out firstly by a bench scale experimental reactor. Then a full scale petrochemical wastewater treatment plant (PCWWTP, 6500 m 3 h −1 ) was operated with the same parameters. The results showed that the BOD 5 /COD of the wastewater increased from 0.30 to 0.43 by HA. The effluent COD was 54.4 mg L −1 for bench scale reactor and 60.9 mg L −1 for PCWWTP when the influent COD was about 480 mg L −1 on optimized conditions. The organics measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) reduced obviously and the total concentration of the 5 organics (1,3-dioxolane, 2-pentanone, ethylbenzene, 2-chloromethyl-1,3-dioxolane and indene) detected in the effluent was only 0.24 mg L −1 . There was no obvious toxicity of the effluent. However, low acute toxicity of the effluent could be detected by the luminescent bacteria assay, indicating the advanced treatment is needed. The clone library profiling analysis showed that the dominant bacteria in the system were Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteriodetes. HA-A/O process is suitable for the petrochemical wastewater treatment.

  7. Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullery, Mark L; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-10-01

    A range of wastewaters and substrates were examined using mini microbial electrolysis cells (mini MECs) to see if they could be used to predict the performance of larger-scale cube MECs. COD removals and coulombic efficiencies corresponded well between the two reactor designs for individual samples, with 66-92% of COD removed for all samples. Current generation was consistent between the reactor types for acetate (AC) and fermentation effluent (FE) samples, but less consistent with industrial (IW) and domestic wastewaters (DW). Hydrogen was recovered from all samples in cube MECs, but gas composition and volume varied significantly between samples. Evidence for direct conversion of substrate to methane was observed with two of the industrial wastewater samples (IW-1 and IW-3). Overall, mini MECs provided organic treatment data that corresponded well with larger scale reactor results, and therefore it was concluded that they can be a useful platform for screening wastewater sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of complex effluent treatability in different bench scale microbial electrolysis cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ullery, Mark L.

    2014-10-01

    A range of wastewaters and substrates were examined using mini microbial electrolysis cells (mini MECs) to see if they could be used to predict the performance of larger-scale cube MECs. COD removals and coulombic efficiencies corresponded well between the two reactor designs for individual samples, with 66-92% of COD removed for all samples. Current generation was consistent between the reactor types for acetate (AC) and fermentation effluent (FE) samples, but less consistent with industrial (IW) and domestic wastewaters (DW). Hydrogen was recovered from all samples in cube MECs, but gas composition and volume varied significantly between samples. Evidence for direct conversion of substrate to methane was observed with two of the industrial wastewater samples (IW-1 and IW-3). Overall, mini MECs provided organic treatment data that corresponded well with larger scale reactor results, and therefore it was concluded that they can be a useful platform for screening wastewater sources. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Going for mainstream deammonification from bench to full scale for maximized resource efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wett, B; Omari, A; Podmirseg, S M; Han, M; Akintayo, O; Gómez Brandón, M; Murthy, S; Bott, C; Hell, M; Takács, I; Nyhuis, G; O'Shaughnessy, M

    2013-01-01

    A three-pronged coordinated research effort was undertaken by cooperating utilities at three different experimental scales investigating bioaugmentation, enrichment and performance of anammox organisms in mainstream treatment. Two major technological components were applied: density-based sludge wasting by a selective cyclone to retain anammox granules and intermittent aeration to repress nitrite oxidizers. This paper evaluates process conditions and operation modes to direct more nitrogen to the resource-saving metabolic route of deammonification.

  10. In-situ biogas upgrading during anaerobic digestion of food waste amended with walnut shell biochar at bench scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linville, Jessica L; Shen, Yanwen; Ignacio-de Leon, Patricia A; Schoene, Robin P; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2017-06-01

    A modified version of an in-situ CO 2 removal process was applied during anaerobic digestion of food waste with two types of walnut shell biochar at bench scale under batch operating mode. Compared with the coarse walnut shell biochar, the fine walnut shell biochar has a higher ash content (43 vs. 36 wt%) and higher concentrations of calcium (31 vs. 19 wt% of ash), magnesium (8.4 vs. 5.6 wt% of ash) and sodium (23.4 vs. 0.3 wt% of ash), but a lower potassium concentration (0.2 vs. 40% wt% of ash). The 0.96-3.83 g biochar (g VS added ) -1 fine walnut shell biochar amended digesters produced biogas with 77.5%-98.1% CH 4 content by removing 40%-96% of the CO 2 compared with the control digesters at mesophilic and thermophilic temperature conditions. In a direct comparison at 1.83 g biochar (g VS added ) -1 , the fine walnut shell biochar amended digesters (85.7% CH 4 content and 61% CO 2 removal) outperformed the coarse walnut shell biochar amended digesters (78.9% CH 4 content and 51% CO 2 removal). Biochar addition also increased alkalinity as CaCO 3 from 2800 mg L -1 in the control digesters to 4800-6800 mg L -1 , providing process stability for food waste anaerobic digestion.

  11. PNNL Report on the Development of Bench-scale CFD Simulations for Gas Absorption across a Wetted Wall Column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Zhijie; Lai, Canhai; Whyatt, Greg A.; Marcy, Peter; Gattiker, J. R.; Sun, Xin

    2016-05-01

    This report is prepared for the demonstration of hierarchical prediction of carbon capture efficiency of a solvent-based absorption column. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is first developed to simulate the core phenomena of solvent-based carbon capture, i.e., the CO2 physical absorption and chemical reaction, on a simplified geometry of wetted wall column (WWC) at bench scale. Aqueous solutions of ethanolamine (MEA) are commonly selected as a CO2 stream scrubbing liquid. CO2 is captured by both physical and chemical absorption using highly CO2 soluble and reactive solvent, MEA, during the scrubbing process. In order to provide confidence bound on the computational predictions of this complex engineering system, a hierarchical calibration and validation framework is proposed. The overall goal of this effort is to provide a mechanism-based predictive framework with confidence bound for overall mass transfer coefficient of the wetted wall column (WWC) with statistical analyses of the corresponding WWC experiments with increasing physical complexity.

  12. Modeling a bench-scale alternating aerobic/anoxic activated sludge system for nitrogen removal using a modified ASM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunook; Noh, Soohong; Colosimo, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1), developed by The International Association of Water Pollution Research and Control, was applied to model dynamics of NH4+, and NO3- in a bench scale alternating aerobic-anoxic (AAA) activated sludge system for nitrogen removal. The model was modified by eliminating inert soluble COD (S(I)) and inert particulate COD (X(I)) from the model's state variables as these two variables are not involved in any biological reaction and are not readily measurable with conventional routine COD analysis. It was assumed that the soluble COD and particulate COD of wastewater represent readily biodegradable COD (S(S)) and slowly biodegradable (X(S)) in the model, respectively. In addition, alkalinity was also removed from the model, since alkalinity of an AAA system remains stable due to the cyclic modes of the system. Even with the elimination of the three state variables and the assumption made, the model could reasonably predict the NH4+ and NO3- dynamics of the AAA system, and effluent NH4+ and NO3- concentrations with adjustment of only a few kinetic parameters. Compared to the original ASM1, it is expected that the modified ASM1 presented in this study can be more easily utilized by engineers in designing or operating an AAA system in practice, since it requires simple characterization of wastewater COD.

  13. 15N NMR investigation of the reduction and binding of TNT in an aerobic bench scale reactor simulating windrow composting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Pennington, J.C.; Hayes, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    T15NT was added to a soil of low organic carbon content and composted for 20 days in an aerobic bench scale reactor. The finished whole compost and fulvic acid, humic acid, humin, and lignocellulose fractions extracted from the compost were analyzed by solid-state CP/MAS and DP/MAS 15N NMR. 15N NMR spectra provided direct spectroscopic evidence for reduction of TNT followed by covalent binding of the reduced metabolites to organic matter of the composted soil, with the majority of metabolite found in the lignocellulose fraction, by mass also the major fraction of the compost. In general, the types of bonds formed between soil organic matter and reduced TNT amines in controlled laboratory reactions were observed in the spectra of the whole compost and fractions, confirming that during composting TNT is reduced to amines that form covalent bonds with organic matter through aminohydroquinone, aminoquinone, heterocyclic, and imine linkages, among others. Concentrations of imine nitrogens in the compost spectra suggestthat covalent binding bythe diamines 2,4DANT and 2,6DANT is a significant process in the transformation of TNT into bound residues. Liquid-phase 15N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid and humin fractions provided possible evidence for involvement of phenoloxidase enzymes in covalent bond formation.

  14. Production of uranium hexafluoride by the catalysed fluorox process: pilot plant and supporting bench-scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janov, J.; Charlton, B.G.; LePage, A.H.; Vilkaitis, V.K.

    1982-04-01

    The feasibility of producing UF 6 by the catalysed reaction of UF 4 with oxygen (the Fluorox process) was investigated in a 150 mm diameter fluidised bed reactor and in supporting bench-scale experiments. The rate of the Fluorox reaction in batch experiments was increased by an order of magnitude with 1 to 5 per cent catalyst (containing 3 to 4 per cent platinum on alumina). The maximum UF 6 production rate at 650 deg. C was 0.9 kg h -1 . However, the platinum catalyst was completely poisoned after production of only 1 and 20 kg UF 6 per kg of catalyst when using respectively French and British UF 4 . Regeneration of the catalyst was demonstrated to be technically feasible by washing with water or ammonium oxalate solution or treating with hydrogen and hydrogen fluoride at 350-650 deg. C. However, since the very fast rate of poisoning would necessitate higher catalyst concentrations and/or frequent regeneration, the catalysed Fluorox process in unlikely to be economically competitive with the direct fluorination of UF 4

  15. Bench-scale study of active mine water treatment using cement kiln dust (CKD) as a neutralization agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2012-02-01

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the potential impact on settled water quality of using cement kiln dust (CKD), a waste by-product, to replace quicklime in the active treatment of acidic mine water. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the treatment performance of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)) slurries generated using four different CKD samples compared to a control treatment with quicklime (CaO) in terms of reducing acidity and metals concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) samples taken from the effluent of a lead/zinc mine in Atlantic Canada. Results of the study showed that all of the CKD samples evaluated were capable of achieving greater than 97% removal of total zinc and iron. The amount of solid alkaline material required to achieve pH targets required for neutralization of the AMD was found to be higher for treatment with the CKD slurries compared to the quicklime slurry control experiments, and varied linearly with the free lime content of the CKD. The results of this study also showed that a potential benefit of treating mine water with CKD could be reduced settled sludge volumes generated in the active treatment process, and further research into the characteristics of the sludge generated from the use of CKD-generated calcium hydroxide slurries is recommended. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bench-scale study of the effect of phosphate on an aerobic iron oxidation plant for mine water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Judith S; Wiacek, Claudia; Janneck, Eberhard; Schlömann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    At the opencast pit Nochten acidic iron- and sulfate-rich mine waters are treated biotechnologically in a mine-water treatment plant by microbial iron oxidation. Due to the low phosphate concentration in such waters the treatment plant was simulated in bench-scale to investigate the influence of addition of potassium dihydrogen phosphate on chemical and biological parameters of the mine-water treatment. As a result of the phosphate addition the number of cells increased, which resulted in an increase of the iron oxidation rate in the reactor with phosphate addition by a factor of 1.7 compared to a reference approach without phosphate addition. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis during the cultivation revealed a shift of the microbial community depending on the phosphate addition. While almost exclusively iron-oxidizing bacteria related to "Ferrovum" sp. were detected with phosphate addition, the microbial community was more diverse without phosphate addition. In the latter case, iron-oxidizing bacteria ("Ferrovum" sp., Acidithiobacillus spp.) as well as non-iron-oxidizing bacteria (Acidiphilium sp.) were identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O' Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

    1982-05-01

    The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

  18. Dynamics of bacterial populations during bench-scale bioremediation of oily seawater and desert soil bioaugmented with coastal microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nidaa; Dashti, Narjes; Salamah, Samar; Sorkhoh, Naser; Al-Awadhi, Husain; Radwan, Samir

    2016-03-01

    This study describes a bench-scale attempt to bioremediate Kuwaiti, oily water and soil samples through bioaugmentation with coastal microbial mats rich in hydrocarbonoclastic bacterioflora. Seawater and desert soil samples were artificially polluted with 1% weathered oil, and bioaugmented with microbial mat suspensions. Oil removal and microbial community dynamics were monitored. In batch cultures, oil removal was more effective in soil than in seawater. Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria associated with mat samples colonized soil more readily than seawater. The predominant oil degrading bacterium in seawater batches was the autochthonous seawater species Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. The main oil degraders in the inoculated soil samples, on the other hand, were a mixture of the autochthonous mat and desert soil bacteria; Xanthobacter tagetidis, Pseudomonas geniculata, Olivibacter ginsengisoli and others. More bacterial diversity prevailed in seawater during continuous than batch bioremediation. Out of seven hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species isolated from those cultures, only one, Mycobacterium chlorophenolicum, was of mat origin. This result too confirms that most of the autochthonous mat bacteria failed to colonize seawater. Also culture-independent analysis of seawater from continuous cultures revealed high-bacterial diversity. Many of the bacteria belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, and were hydrocarbonoclastic. Optimal biostimulation practices for continuous culture bioremediation of seawater via mat bioaugmentation were adding the highest possible oil concentration as one lot in the beginning of bioremediation, addition of vitamins, and slowing down the seawater flow rate. © 2016 The Author. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Development and pilot testing of full-scale membrane distillation modules for deployment of waste heat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.E.; Assink, J.W.; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Medevoort, J. van; Sonsbeek, E. van

    2013-01-01

    Membrane distillation is an attractive technology for extracting fresh water from seawater. Newly developed modules have been used in pilot tests and bench scale tests to demonstrate the potential of producing excellent product water quality in a single step, little need for water pretreatment and a

  20. Comparison of different cryogenic control strategies via simulation applied to a superconducting magnet test bench at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaia, P.; Coppier, H.; De Paola, D.; di Bernardo, M.; Guarino, A.; Pedemonte, B. Luz; Pezzetti, M.

    2017-12-01

    Industrial process controllers for cryogenic systems used in test facilities for superconducting magnets are typically PIDs, tuned by operational expertise according to users’ requirements (covering cryogenic transients and associated thermo-mechanical constraints). In this paper, an alternative fully-automatic solution, equally based on PID controllers, is proposed. Following the comparison of the operational expertise and alternative fully-automatic approaches, a new process control configuration, based on an estimated multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) model is proposed. The new MIMO model-based approach fulfils the required operational constraints while improving performance compared to existing solutions. The analysis and design work is carried out using both theoretical and numerical tools and is validated on the case study of the High Field Magnet (HFM) cryogenic test bench running at the SM18 test facility located at CERN. The proposed solution have been validated by simulation using the CERN ECOSIMPRO software tools using the cryogenic library (CRYOLIB [1]) developed at CERN.

  1. Qualification of an out-of-pile Thermohydraulic test Bench (BETHY) developed to calibrate calorimetric cells under specific JHR experimental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vita, C.; Brun, J.; Carette, M.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Lyoussi, A.; Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J.F.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J.Y.

    2013-06-01

    Online in-pile measurement methods are crucial during irradiations in material testing reactors to better understand the behavior of materials under accelerated ageing conditions and of nuclear fuels under high irradiation levels. Thus, the construction of a new Material Testing Reactor such as the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) leads to new research and development programs devoted to innovative instrumentation and measurement methods. The presented works are performed in the framework of the IN-CORE program, 'Instrumentation for Nuclear radiations and Calorimetry Online in Reactor', between CEA and Aix-Marseille University. The program aim is to develop experimental devices and test bench to quantify more precisely the nuclear heating parameter in the JHR experimental channels. This in-pile parameter is usually measured by means of calorimeter or gamma thermometer. This paper focuses on a new out-of-pile test bench called BETHY. This bench was developed to study the response of a differential calorimeter during its preliminary calibration step according to specific thermal and hydraulic conditions occurring inside one type of JHR core channel. The first section of this paper is dedicated to a detailed description of the bench. The second part presents the study of the thermal characteristics established in the bench for two main thermal running modes. The last one concerns the calibration curve of the reference cell of the differential calorimeter in the case of homogenous temperature. (authors)

  2. Destruction of hazardous and mixed wastes using mediated electrochemical oxidation in a Ag(II)HNO3 bench scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, B.; Chiba, Z.; Hsu, P.; Lewis, P.; Murguia, L.; Adamson, M.

    1997-01-01

    Mediated Electrochemical Oxidation (MEO) is a promising technology for the destruction of organic containing wastes and the remediation of mixed wastes containing transuranic components. The combination of a powerful oxidant and an acid solution allows the conversion of nearly all organics, whether present in hazardous or in mixed waste, to carbon dioxide. Insoluble transuranics are dissolved in this process and may be recovered by separation and precipitation.The MEO technique offers several advantages which are inherent in the system. First, the oxidation/dissolution processes are accomplished at near ambient pressures and temperatures (30-70 degrees C). Second, all waste stream components and oxidation products (with the exception of evolved gases) are contained in an aqueous environment. This electrolyte acts as an accumulator for inorganics which were present in the original waste stream, and the large volume of electrolyte provides a thermal buffer for the energy released during oxidation of the organics. Third, the generation of secondary waste is minimal, as the process needs no additional reagents. Finally, the entire process can be shut down by simply turning off the power, affording a level of control unavailable in some other techniques.Numerous groups, both in the United States and Europe, have made substantial progress in the last decade towards understanding the mechanistic pathways, kinetics, and engineering aspects of the process. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, substantial contributions have been made to this knowledge base in these areas and others. Conceptual design and engineering development have been completed for a pilot plant-scale MEO system, and numerous data have been gathered on the efficacy of the process for a wide variety of anticipated waste components. This presentation will review the data collected at LLNL for a bench scale system based primarily on the use of a Ag(II) mediator in a nitric acid electrolyte; results

  3. Treatability study for the bench-scale solidification of nonincinerable LDR low-level mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gering, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this report is the solidification of nonincinerable, land disposal restricted (LDR) low-level mixed waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Benchscale solidification was performed on samples of this mixed waste, which was done under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act treatability study. Waste forms included liquids, sludges, and solids, and treatment techniques included the use of conventional Portland cement and sulphur polymer cement (SPC). A total of 113 monoliths were made under the experimental design matrix for this study; 8 of these were ''blank'' monoliths (contained no waste). Thus, 105 monoliths were used to solidify 21.6 kg of mixed waste; 92 were made with Portland cement systems, and 13 were made with SPC. Recipes for all monoliths are given, and suggested recipes (as based on the minimized leaching of toxic components) are summarized. In most cases, the results presented herein indicate that solidification was successful in immobilizing toxic metals, thereby transforming low-level mixed waste into low-level nonhazardous waste. The ultimate goal of this project is to use appropriate solidification techniques, as described in the literature, to transform low-level mixed waste to low-level nonhazardous waste by satisfying pertinent disposal requirements for this waste. Disposal requirements consider the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure tests, a free liquids test, and radiological analyses. This work is meaningful in that it will provide a basis for the disposal of waste that is currently categorized as LDR low-level mixed waste

  4. Accuracy determination of the CERN Linac4 emittance measurements at the test bench for 3 and 12 Mev

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, F; Bravin, E; Raich, U

    2010-01-01

    The CERN LINAC4 commissioning will start in 2011, at first in a laboratory test stand where the 45 KeV Hsource is already installed and presently tested, and later in the LINAC4 tunnel. A movable diagnostics bench will be equipped with the necessary sensors capable of characterizing the H- beam in different stages, from 3 MeV up to the first DTL tank at 12 MeV. In this paper we will discuss the accuracy of the transverse emittance measurement that will be performed with the slit-grid method. The system’s mechanical and geometric parameters have been determined in order to achieve the required resolution and sensitivity. Space charge effects during the beam transfer from the slit to the grid and scattering effects at the slit have been considered to determine the overall emittance measurement accuracy.

  5. Copper recovery in a bench-scale carrier facilitated tubular supported liquid membrane system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makaka S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of copper ions in a tubular supported liquid membrane using LIX 984NC as a mobile carrier was studied, evaluating the effect of the feed characteristics (flowrate, density, viscosity on the feedside laminar layer of the membrane. A vertical countercurrent, double pipe perspex benchscale reactor consisting of a single hydrophobic PVDF tubular membrane mounted inside was used in all test work. The membrane was impregnated with LIX 984NC and became the support for this organic transport medium. Dilute Copper solution passed through the centre pipe and sulphuric acid as strippant passed through the shell side. Copper was successfully transported from the feedside to the stripside and from the data obtained, a relationship between Schmidt, Reynolds and Sherwood number was achieved of.

  6. Bench test evaluation of volume delivered by modern ICU ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyazidi, Aissam; Thille, Arnaud W; Carteaux, Guillaume; Galia, Fabrice; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2010-12-01

    During volume-controlled ventilation, part of the volume delivered is compressed into the circuit. To correct for this phenomenon, modern ventilators use compensation algorithms. Humidity and temperature also influence the delivered volume. In a bench study at a research laboratory in a university hospital, we compared nine ICU ventilators equipped with compensation algorithms, one with a proximal pneumotachograph and one without compensation. Each ventilator was evaluated under normal, obstructive, and restrictive conditions of respiratory mechanics. For each condition, three tidal volumes (V (T)) were set (300, 500, and 800 ml), with and without an inspiratory pause. The insufflated volume and the volume delivered at the Y-piece were measured independently, without a humidification device, under ambient temperature and pressure and dry gas conditions. We computed the actually delivered V (T) to the lung under body temperature and pressure and saturated water vapour conditions (BTPS). For target V (T) values of 300, 500, and 800 ml, actually delivered V (T) under BTPS conditions ranged from 261 to 396 ml (-13 to +32%), from 437 to 622 ml (-13 to +24%), and from 681 to 953 ml (-15 to +19%), respectively (p ventilators.

  7. Uncertainty Quantification Analysis of Both Experimental and CFD Simulation Data of a Bench-scale Fluidized Bed Gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahnam, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States). Research and Innovation Center, Energy Conversion Engineering Directorate; Gel, Aytekin [ALPEMI Consulting, LLC, Phoeniz, AZ (United States); Subramaniyan, Arun K. [GE Global Research Center, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Musser, Jordan [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States). Research and Innovation Center, Energy Conversion Engineering Directorate; Dietiker, Jean-Francois [West Virginia Univ. Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2017-10-02

    Adequate assessment of the uncertainties in modeling and simulation is becoming an integral part of the simulation based engineering design. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the application of non-intrusive Bayesian uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology in multiphase (gas-solid) flows with experimental and simulation data, as part of our research efforts to determine the most suited approach for UQ of a bench scale fluidized bed gasifier. UQ analysis was first performed on the available experimental data. Global sensitivity analysis performed as part of the UQ analysis shows that among the three operating factors, steam to oxygen ratio has the most influence on syngas composition in the bench-scale gasifier experiments. An analysis for forward propagation of uncertainties was performed and results show that an increase in steam to oxygen ratio leads to an increase in H2 mole fraction and a decrease in CO mole fraction. These findings are in agreement with the ANOVA analysis performed in the reference experimental study. Another contribution in addition to the UQ analysis is the optimization-based approach to guide to identify next best set of additional experimental samples, should the possibility arise for additional experiments. Hence, the surrogate models constructed as part of the UQ analysis is employed to improve the information gain and make incremental recommendation, should the possibility to add more experiments arise. In the second step, series of simulations were carried out with the open-source computational fluid dynamics software MFiX to reproduce the experimental conditions, where three operating factors, i.e., coal flow rate, coal particle diameter, and steam-to-oxygen ratio, were systematically varied to understand their effect on the syngas composition. Bayesian UQ analysis was performed on the numerical results. As part of Bayesian UQ analysis, a global sensitivity analysis was performed based on the simulation results, which shows

  8. Effect of temperature downshifts on a bench-scale hybrid A/O system: Process performance and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hexi; Li, Xiangkun; Chu, Zhaorui; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Effect of temperature downshifts on process performance and bacterial community dynamics was investigated in a bench-scale hybrid A/O system treating real domestic wastewater. Results showed that the average COD removal in this system reached 90.5%, 89.1% and 90.3% for Run 1 (25 °C), Run 2 (15 °C) and Run 3 (10 °C), respectively, and variations in temperature barely affected the effluent COD concentration. The average removal efficiencies of NH4(+)-N were 98.4%, 97.8%, 95.7%, and that of TN were 77.1%, 61.8%, 72% at 25 °C, 15 °C and 10 °C, respectively. Although the hybrid system was subjected to low temperature, this process effectively removed NH4(+)-N and TN even at 10 °C with the average effluent concentrations of 2.4 mg/L and 14.3 mg/L, respectively. Results from high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that when the operation temperature decreased from 25 °C to 10 °C, the richness and diversity indexes of the system decreased in the sludge samples, while underwent an increase in the biofilm samples. Furthermore, the major heterotrophic bacteria consisted of Lewinella, Lutimonas, Chitinophaga and Fluviicola at 10 °C, which could be central to effective COD removal at low temperature. Additionally, Azospira, one denitrifying-related genus increased from 0.4% to 4.45% in the biofilm samples, with a stable TN removal in response to temperature downshifts. Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira increased significantly in the biofilm samples, implying that the attached biofilm contributed to more nitrification at low temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen generation from bioethanol reforming : bench-scale unit performance with Cu/Nb2O5 catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, N.R.C.F.; Rizzo, R.C.P.; Calsavara, V.; Takahashi, F.; Almeida, A.A.; Melo, F.R. de; Zschornack, M.A.; Bessani, A.N.; Rodrigues, R.M.O. [State University of Maringa, Maringa (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lab. of Catalysis; Schmal, M. [Cidade Universitaria, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia, Graduate School and Research in Engineering Alberto Luiz Coimbra Institute; Cantao, M.P. [Institute of Technology for Development, Curitiba (Brazil). Dept. of Materials

    2003-07-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to produce hydrogen from ethanol reforming. This paper presents the bench-scale study unit that uses a 5 per cent copper-niobium2oxygen5 (Cu/Nb2O5) catalyst previously selected in a micro reactor. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the catalyst contained copper oxide in an amorphous form and that the Nb2O5 was highly crystalline. The calcinated catalyst was analysed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and showed that 35 per cent of total copper was on the surface as Cu{sup I} (55 per cent) and Cu{sup II} (45 per cent). The surface area was mainly comprised of meso and macro pores. There was a two-step reduction of Cu{sup II} to Cu at 245 and 306 degrees C, as shown by temperature programmed reduction, as well as a 6 per cent reduction of Nb2O5. An internal reactor with 16 grams (g) of catalyst pellets was contained in the reaction unit. To optimize hydrogen production, reaction temperature and feed rate were varied, and the major by-product was carbon dioxide. Reagents (water and ethanol) were fed into and vaporized in, an electric pre-heater in stoichiometric proportion. Mean conversion increased from 17 per cent to 35 per cent through an increase of reaction temperature from 300 to 400 degrees C. Minor by-products were detected in the form of ethene and ethyl ether. 9 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Experimental investigation of pyrolysis of rice straw using bench-scale auger, batch and fluidized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyungseok; Capareda, Sergio C.; Ashwath, Nanjappa; Kongkasawan, Jinjuta

    2015-01-01

    Energy conversion efficiencies of three pyrolysis reactors (bench-scale auger, batch, and fluidized bed) were investigated using rice straw as the feedstock at a temperature of 500 °C. The highest bio-oil yield of 43% was obtained from the fluidized bed reactor, while the maximum bio-char yield of 48% was obtained from the batch reactor. Similar bio-oil yields were obtained from the auger and batch type reactors. The GCMS and FTIR were used to evaluate the liquid products from all reactors. The best quality bio-oil and bio-char from the batch reactor was determined to have a heating value of 31 MJ/kg and 19 MJ/kg, respectively. The highest alkali mineral was found in the bio-char produced from the auger reactor. The energy conversion efficiencies of the three reactors indicated that the majority of the energy (50–64%) was in the bio-char products from the auger and batch reactors, while the bio-oil from the fluidized bed reactor contained the highest energy (47%). A Sankey diagram has been produced to show the flows of product energy from each pyrolysis process. The result will help determine which conversion process would be optimal for producing specific products of bio-char, bio-oil, and gas depending on the needs. - Highlights: • Pyrolysis products from auger, batch, and fluidized bed reactor were examined. • O/C ratios of bio-oils stayed in specific ranges depending on the process reactors. • The largest quantity of bio-oil from fluidized, while the best quality from batch. • The highest alkali concentration of 37 g/kg included in the auger based bio-char. • Sankey diagram was used to understand the energy distribution from reactors.

  11. Flexible Bench-Scale Recirculating Flow CPC Photoreactor for Solar Photocatalytic Degradation of Methylene Blue Using Removable TiO2 Immobilized on PET Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa M. EL-Mekkawi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 immobilized on polyethylene (PET nonwoven sheet was used in the solar photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB. TiO2 Evonik Aeroxide P25 was used in this study. The amount of loaded TiO2 on PET was approximately 24%. Immobilization of TiO2 on PET was conducted by dip coating process followed by exposing to mild heat and pressure. TiO2/PET sheets were wrapped on removable Teflon rods inside home-made bench-scale recirculating flow Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC photoreactor prototype (platform 0.7 × 0.2 × 0.4 m3. CPC photoreactor is made up of seven low iron borosilicate glass tubes connected in series. CPC reflectors are made of stainless steel 304. The prototype was mounted on a platform tilted at 30°N local latitude in Cairo. A centrifugal pump was used to circulate water containing methylene blue (MB dye inside the glass tubes. Efficient photocatalytic degradation of MB using TiO2/PET was achieved upon the exposure to direct sunlight. Chemical oxygen demand (COD analyses reveal the complete mineralization of MB. Durability of TiO2/PET composite was also tested under sunlight irradiation. Results indicate only 6% reduction in the amount of TiO2 after seven cycles. No significant change was observed for the physicochemical characteristics of TiO2/PET after the successive irradiation processes.

  12. Characterization of L-asparaginase from marine-derived Aspergillus niger AKV-MKBU, its antiproliferative activity and bench scale production using industrial waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vala, Anjana K; Sachaniya, Bhumi; Dudhagara, Dushyant; Panseriya, Haresh Z; Gosai, Haren; Rawal, Rakesh; Dave, Bharti P

    2018-03-01

    L-asparaginase (LA), an enzyme with anticancer activities, produced by marine-derived Aspergillus niger was subjected to purification and characterization. The purified enzyme was observed to have molecular weight ∼90KDa. The enzyme retained activity over a wide range of pH, i.e. pH 4-10. The enzyme was quite stable in temperature range 20-40°C. Tween 80 and Triton X-100 were observed to enhance LA activity while inhibition of LA activity was observed in presence of heavy metals. The values for K m was found to be 0.8141 mM and V max was 6.228μM/mg/min. The enzyme exhibited noteworthy antiproliferative activity against various cancer cell lines tested. Successful bench scale production (in 5L bioreacator) of LA using groundnut oil cake as low cost substrate has also been carried out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Hybrid Design Approach for Data Acquisition and Real Time Control of a Universal Motor Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamen Gadzhanov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in technology have led to the development of a number of laboratories for motion control throughout the world. The increased Internet bandwidth allowed many of them to be used remotely by distant users. The benefit of using a motorised linear stage in the laboratory test bench is that it represents various industrial applications for precise position control. This paper presents a novel comprehensive flexible motion platform that can be a base for remote experimentations with Brushless DC (BLDC/Permanent Magnet Synchronous motors (PMSM and drives, single/multiple axes flexible mechanical systems with friction/backlash uncertainties, inverted pendulums, etc. A LabVIEW software environment has been utilised to gain from the advantages of the virtual instrumentation representation and data acquisition capabilities.

  14. Impact of contrast agent viscosity on coronary balloon deflation times: bench testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogabgab, Owen; Patel, Vishal G; Michael, Tesfaldet T; Kotsia, Anna; Christopoulos, George; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2014-04-01

    To assess the impact of viscosity on angioplasty balloon deflation times. Lower contrast viscosity could result in more rapid coronary balloon deflation times. We performed a bench comparison of coronary balloon deflation times using 2 contrast agents with different viscosity (ioxaglate and iodixanol), 3 contrast dilutions, and 2 inflation syringe filling volumes. Ten identical pairs of coronary angioplasty balloons were used to conduct each comparison after balloon inflation to 12 atmospheres. Simultaneous deflations were performed under cineangiography. The time to full contrast extraction and the area of contrast remaining after 5 seconds of deflation (quantified by opaque pixel count) were compared between groups. The mean time to full contrast extraction during balloon deflation was 8.3 ± 2.5 seconds for ioxaglate (lower viscosity) versus 10.1 ± 2.9 seconds for iodixanol (higher viscosity) (17.4% decrease, P = 0.005), with a 35.6% (P = 0.004) reduction in contrast area at 5 seconds. Compared to 1:1 ioxaglate-saline mixture, 1:2 and 1:3 ioxaglate/saline mixes resulted in 26.7% (P deflation time, respectively, but at the expense of decreased balloon opacity. Filling the inflation syringe with 5 versus 15 ml of contrast/saline solution was associated with 7.5% decrease in balloon deflation time (P = 0.005), but no difference in contrast area at 5 seconds (P = 0.749). Use of a lower viscosity contrast agent and higher contrast dilution significantly reduced coronary balloon deflation times, whereas use of lower syringe filling volume had a modest effect. Rapid coronary balloon deflation could improve the safety of interventional procedures. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Influence of toluene and salinity on biosurfactant production by Bacillus sp.: scale up from flasks to a bench-scale bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Cristina Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To select the best biosurfactant producer, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus megatherium, Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis were cultured in flasks on media with different salinity [low salinity (LS, Bushnell-Haas (BH and artificial sea water (SW media] supplemented or not with toluene as a model pollutant. Toluene inhibited the growth of all microorganisms and stimulated the biosurfactant production. B. subtilis exhibited the best performance, being able to lower the surface tension (ST in the LS medium to 65.5 mN/min in the absence of toluene, and to 46.5 mN/min in the BH medium in the presence of toluene, corresponding to ST reductions of 13.0 and 27.5 mN/m, respectively. Scaling up the process to a bench-scale fermentor, the best results were obtained in the LS medium, where B. subtilis was able to reduce the toluene concentration from 26.0 to 4.3 g/L within 12 h and ST by 17.2 mN/m within 18 h. The results of this study point out that B. subtilis is an interesting biosurfactant producer, which could be used in the bioremediation of toluene-contaminated water.

  16. Bench-Scale Synthetic Optimization of 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane (APO-Link) Used in the Production of APO-BMI Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilary Wheeler; Crystal Densmore

    2007-07-31

    The diamine reagent 1,2-bis(2-aminophenylthio)ethane is no longer commercially available but still required for the synthesis of the bismaleimide resin, APO-BMI, used in syntactic foams. In this work, we examined the hydrolysis of benzothiazole followed the by reaction with dichloroethane or dibromoethane. We also studied the deprotonation of 2-aminothiophenol followed by the reaction with dibromoethane. We optimized the latter for scale-up by scrutinizing all aspects of the reaction conditions, work-up and recrystallization. On bench-scale, our optimized procedure consistently produced a 75-80% overall yield of finely divided, high purity product (>95%).

  17. Release of K, Cl, and S during combustion and co-combustion with wood of high-chlorine biomass in bench and pilot scale fuel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Joakim Myung; Aho, Martti; Paakkinen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Studies of the release of critical ash-forming elements from combustion of biomass are typically conducted with small sample masses under well controlled conditions. In biomass combustion on a grate, secondary recapture and release reactions in the fuel-bed may affect the overall release...... and partitioning of these elements. Earlier work by the authors on the release of K, Cl, and S from a high-chlorine biomass (corn stover) in a lab-scale setup is, in the present work, supplemented with novel results from a bench-scale fixed bed reactor and a 100kW moving grate pilot facility. The results from...

  18. Stent longitudinal strength assessed using point compression: insights from a second-generation, clinically related bench test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, John A; Webber, Bruce; Ubod, Ben; White, Jonathon; Webster, Mark W I

    2014-02-01

    Stent longitudinal distortion, while infrequent, can lead to adverse clinical events. Our first bench comparison of susceptibility of different stent designs to distortion applied force to the entire circumference of the proximal stent hoop. The test increased understanding of stent design and led to recommendations for design change in some. Our second-generation test more closely mimics clinical scenarios by applying force to a point on the proximal hoop of a malapposed stent. Each 3-mm-diameter stent was secured in a test apparatus so that its proximal 5 mm was malapposed in a 3.5-mm tube. An instron applied force to the proximal hoop of each of 5 examples of each of 6 stent designs using a narrow rod so that force applied and distance compressed could be measured. Hoops on the side of the force were pushed together, became malapposed, and obstructed the lumen. In addition, the proximal stent hoop tilted causing malapposition, the contralateral side of the stent from the applied force causing lumen obstruction. This second-generation, more clinically relevant test showed the Biomatrix Flex was the most resistant to deformation and the Element the most easily deformed. The addition of more connectors between the proximal hoops in the Promus Premier design has reduced the potential for distortion when compared with the Element, so that distortion was similar to the Vision, Multi-Link 8, and Integrity designs. The test also provided insight into the way in which stents are likely to distort in clinical practice.

  19. Design of a right ventricular mock circulation loop as a test bench for right ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Indra; Jansen-Park, So-Hyun; Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Abel, Dirk; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Rossaint, Rolf; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Sonntag, Simon Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Right heart failure (RHF), e.g. due to pulmonary hypertension (PH), is a serious health issue with growing occurrence and high mortality rate. Limited efficacy of medication in advanced stages of the disease constitutes the need for mechanical circulatory support of the right ventricle (RV). An essential contribution to the process of developing right ventricular assist devices (RVADs) is the in vitro test bench, which simulates the hemodynamic behavior of the native circulatory system. To model healthy and diseased arterial-pulmonary hemodynamics in adults (mild and severe PH and RHF), a right heart mock circulation loop (MCL) was developed. Incorporating an anatomically shaped silicone RV and a silicone atrium, it not only enables investigations of hemodynamic values but also suction events or the handling of minimal invasive RVADs in an anatomical test environment. Ventricular pressure-volume loops of all simulated conditions as well as pressure and volume waveforms were recorded and compared to literature data. In an exemplary test, an RVAD was connected to the apex to further test the feasibility of studying such devices with the developed MCL. In conclusion, the hemodynamic behavior of the native system was well reproduced by the developed MCL, which is a useful basis for future RVAD tests.

  20. An optical test bench for the precision characterization of absolute quantum efficiency for the TESS CCD detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, A.; Villasenor, J.; Kissel, S.; Ricker, G.; Vanderspek, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search for planets transiting bright stars with Ic ∼< 13. TESS has been selected by NASA for launch in 2018 as an Astrophysics Explorer mission, and is expected to discover a thousand or more planets that are smaller in size than Neptune. TESS will employ four wide-field optical charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras with a band-pass of 650 nm–1050 nm to detect temporary drops in brightness of stars due to planetary transits. The 1050 nm limit is set by the quantum efficiency (QE) of the CCDs. The detector assembly consists of four back-illuminated MIT Lincoln Laboratory CCID-80 devices. Each CCID-80 device consists of 2048×2048 imaging array and 2048×2048 frame store regions. Very precise on-ground calibration and characterization of CCD detectors will significantly assist in the analysis of the science data obtained in space. The characterization of the absolute QE of the CCD detectors is a crucial part of the characterization process because QE affects the performance of the CCD significantly over the redder wavelengths at which TESS will be operating. An optical test bench with significantly high photometric stability has been developed to perform precise QE measurements. The design of the test setup along with key hardware, methodology, and results from the test campaign are presented.

  1. Design studies for a tracking upgrade of the Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA and installation of tracking test bench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winnebeck, Alexander

    2009-12-17

    Ever since mankind was interested in the understanding of the universe and especially the matter in it. The fundamental building blocks of matter seem to be quarks and gluons, whose interactions are investigated in hadron physics. To study this strong interaction different experimental approaches can be used. One way is to do spectroscopy similar to atomic physics. The Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA performs spectroscopy of nucleons to learn more about the strong interaction. A major improvement of this experimental setup will be the introducing of charged particle tracking as it is shown in this thesis. Different detector concepts are discussed concerning feasibility, material budget and especially momentum resolution. It turns out that a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the optimal solution. Then it is shown how a prototype TPC is tested using a newly installed tracking test bench with an electron beam, and obtained results are presented. The design of the final TPC and its integration into the Crystal Barrel experiment are discussed as well as methods to calibrate the detector. (orig.)

  2. Design studies for a tracking upgrade of the Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA and installation of tracking test bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winnebeck, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Ever since mankind was interested in the understanding of the universe and especially the matter in it. The fundamental building blocks of matter seem to be quarks and gluons, whose interactions are investigated in hadron physics. To study this strong interaction different experimental approaches can be used. One way is to do spectroscopy similar to atomic physics. The Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA performs spectroscopy of nucleons to learn more about the strong interaction. A major improvement of this experimental setup will be the introducing of charged particle tracking as it is shown in this thesis. Different detector concepts are discussed concerning feasibility, material budget and especially momentum resolution. It turns out that a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the optimal solution. Then it is shown how a prototype TPC is tested using a newly installed tracking test bench with an electron beam, and obtained results are presented. The design of the final TPC and its integration into the Crystal Barrel experiment are discussed as well as methods to calibrate the detector. (orig.)

  3. Revision to dedicated short range communication roadside equipment specification - RSU 4.1.Bench Test Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-28

    The document describes the overall process for evaluating Dedicated Short Range Communication (DSRC) Roadside Units (RSU) against USDOT RSU Specification 4.1 in preparation for field evaluation. The Test Cases contained in this document only evaluate...

  4. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 100-HR-3 operable unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump-and-treat testing at the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. The test will be conducted in fulfillment of interim Milestone M-15-06E to begin pilot-scale pump-and-treat operations by August 1994. The scope of the test was determined based on the results of lab/bench-scale tests (WHC 1993a) conducted in fulfillment of Milestone M-15-06B. These milestones were established per agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and documented on Hanford Federal of Ecology Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form M-15-93-02. This test plan discusses a pilot-scale pump-and-treat test for the chromium plume associated with the D Reactor portion of the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit. Data will be collected during the pilot test to assess the effectiveness, operating parameters, and resource needs of the ion exchange (IX) pump-and-treat system. The test will provide information to assess the ability to remove contaminants by extracting groundwater from wells and treating extracted groundwater using IX. Bench-scale tests were conducted previously in which chromium VI was identified as the primary contaminant of concern in the 100-D reactor plume. The DOWEX 21K trademark resin was recommended for pilot-scale testing of an IX pump-and-treat system. The bench-scale test demonstrated that the system could remove chromium VI from groundwater to concentrations less than 50 ppb. The test also identified process parameters to monitor during pilot-scale testing. Water will be re-injected into the plume using wells outside the zone of influence and upgradient of the extraction well

  5. Construction and bench testing of a prototype rotatable collimator for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Markiewicz, T; Keller, L; Aberle, O; Bertarelli, A; Gradassi, P; Marsili, A; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G

    2014-01-01

    A second generation prototype rotatable collimator has been fabricated at SLAC and delivered to CERN for further vacuum, metrology, function and impedance tests. The design features two cylindrical Glidcop jaws designed to each absorb 12 kW of beam in steady state and up to 60 kW in transitory beam loss with no damage and minimal thermal distortion [1]. The design is motivated by the use of a radiation resistant high Z low impedance readily available material. A vacuum rotation mechanism using the standard LHC collimation jaw positioning motor system allows each jaw to be rotated to present a new 2 cm high surface to the beam if the jaw surface were to be damaged by multiple full intensity beam bunch impacts in a asynchronous beam abort. Design modifications to improve on the first generation prototype, pre-delivery functional tests performed at SLAC and post-delivery test results at CERN are presented.

  6. EFFECT OF COMPLEX BORATING ON THE CHARACTERISTICS OF HARDENING GEARS IN BENCH TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Pischov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper dwells upon the necessity to increase the operating life of the toothed gearing of skidder transmission by means of strengthening by complex borating. The methodology of comparative testing of tooth gear as well as the stand construction are described. The causes of destruction of tooth gear surface strengthened by different methods have been determined.

  7. Teaching elliptical excision skills to novice medical students: a randomized controlled study comparing low- and high-fidelity bench models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Oshiiwa, Marie; Saad-Hossne, Rogério

    2014-03-01

    The search for alternative and effective forms of training simulation is needed due to ethical and medico-legal aspects involved in training surgical skills on living patients, human cadavers and living animals. To evaluate if the bench model fidelity interferes in the acquisition of elliptical excision skills by novice medical students. Forty novice medical students were randomly assigned to 5 practice conditions with instructor-directed elliptical excision skills' training (n = 8): didactic materials (control); organic bench model (low-fidelity); ethylene-vinyl acetate bench model (low-fidelity); chicken legs' skin bench model (high-fidelity); or pig foot skin bench model (high-fidelity). Pre- and post-tests were applied. Global rating scale, effect size, and self-perceived confidence based on Likert scale were used to evaluate all elliptical excision performances. The analysis showed that after training, the students practicing on bench models had better performance based on Global rating scale (all P skills (all P 0.05) between the groups that trained on bench models. The magnitude of the effect (basic cutaneous surgery skills' training) was considered large (>0.80) in all measurements. The acquisition of elliptical excision skills after instructor-directed training on low-fidelity bench models was similar to the training on high-fidelity bench models; and there was a more substantial increase in elliptical excision performances of students that trained on all simulators compared to the learning on didactic materials.

  8. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Soukri, Mustapha [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Farmer, Justin [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Mobley, Paul [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Tanthana, Jak [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Dongxiang [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Song, Chunshan [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  9. Standard test bench for calibrating instruments used to measure natural or artificial radioactive airborne particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charuau, J.; Grivaud, L.; Le Breton, M.

    1992-01-01

    An aerodynamic calibration device, known as ICARE, has been set up in France at the Saclay Research Centre to certify instruments used to measure natural or artificial airborne radioactive particulate contamination or radon. ICARE can calibrate passive detectors and monitors with sampling air flow-rates of less than 60 m 3 /h. The adjustment of such parameters as 222 Rn daughters volume activity, attached fraction and equilibrium factor, and the volume activity and size of α or β emitter carrying aerosols, allows realistic conditions to be obtained. ICARE complies with monitor test method standard currently under development by the International Electrotechnical Commission

  10. Second-Order Geometric Sliding Mode Attitude Observer with Application to Quadrotor on a Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglei An

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sliding mode observer design framework is proposed based on the Lie group method of numerical integration on manifolds, and a Second-Order Geometric Sliding Mode Attitude Observer (SOGSMAO is designed for angular velocity estimation of quadrotor attitude. The algorithm constructs feedback in the angular velocity space and the space of equivalent Lie algebra of unit quaternion space, respectively. It avoids not only the complexity of constructing feedback in unit quaternion space but also the process of mandatory rescaling which is seen to deteriorate the accuracy of the angular velocity estimates during sliding. The performance of SOGSMAO is compared with traditional quaternion based sliding mode observer in which multiplicative quaternion correction is used and the results show that SOGSMAO gains better tracking performance. Then SOGSMAO is realized on a test bed and the effectiveness of the observer algorithm is verified by experimental studies.

  11. Effect of Shoes on Stiffness and Energy Efficiency of Ankle-Foot Orthosis: Bench Testing Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Toshiki; Gao, Fan; LeCursi, Nicholas; Foreman, K Bo; Orendurff, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) is important to maximize their benefit for those with movement disorders during gait. Though mechanical properties such as stiffness and/or energy efficiency of AFOs have been extensively studied, it remains unknown how and to what extent shoes influence their properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of shoes on stiffness and energy efficiency of an AFO using a custom mechanical testing device. Stiffness and energy efficiency of the AFO were measured in the plantar flexion and dorsiflexion range, respectively, under AFO-alone and AFO-Shoe combination conditions. The results of this study demonstrated that the stiffness of the AFO-Shoe combination was significantly decreased compared to the AFO-alone condition, but no significant differences were found in energy efficiency. From the results, we recommend that shoes used with AFOs should be carefully selected not only based on their effect on alignment of the lower limb, but also their effects on overall mechanical properties of the AFO-Shoe combination. Further study is needed to clarify the effects of differences in shoe designs on AFO-Shoe combination mechanical properties.

  12. Linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating response to thermal gradient: from bench tests to the real-time assessment during in vivo laser ablations of biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Varalda, Ambra; Gassino, Riccardo; Tosi, Daniele; Massaroni, Carlo; Caponero, Michele A.; Pop, Raoul; Korganbayev, Sanzhar; Perrone, Guido; Diana, Michele; Vallan, Alberto; Costamagna, Guido; Marescaux, Jacques; Schena, Emiliano

    2017-09-01

    The response of a fiber optic sensor [linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating (LCFBG)] to a linear thermal gradient applied on its sensing length (i.e., 1.5 cm) has been investigated. After these bench tests, we assessed their feasibility for temperature monitoring during thermal tumor treatment. In particular, we performed experiments during ex vivo laser ablation (LA) in pig liver and in vivo thermal ablation in animal models (pigs). We investigated the following: (i) the relationship between the full width at half maximum of the LCFBG spectrum and the temperature difference among the extremities of the LCFBG and (ii) the relationship between the mean spectrum wavelength and the mean temperature acting on the LCFBG sensing area. These relationships showed a linear trend during both bench tests and LA in animal models. Thermal sensitivity was significant although different values were found with regards to bench tests and animal experiments. The linear trend and significant sensitivity allow hypothesizing a future use of this kind of sensor to monitor both temperature gradient and mean temperature within a tissue undergoing thermal treatment.

  13. Characterizing the Influence of Abstraction in Full-Scale Wind Turbine Nacelle Testing: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schkoda, Ryan; Bibo, Amin; Guo, Yi; Lambert, Scott; Wallen, Robb

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in full-scale wind turbine nacelle testing to complement individual component testing. As a result, several wind turbine nacelle test benches have been built to perform such testing with the intent of loading the integrated components as they are in the field. However, when mounted on a test bench the nacelle is not on the top of a tower and does not have blades attached to it--this is a form of abstraction. This paper aims to quantify the influence of such an abstraction on the dynamic response of the nacelle through a series of simulation case studies. The responses of several nacelle components are studied including the main bearing, main shaft, gearbox supports, generator, and yaw bearing interface. Results are presented to highlight the differences in the dynamic response of the nacelle caused by the abstraction. Additionally, the authors provide recommendations for mitigating the effects of the abstraction.

  14. Characterizing the Influence of Abstraction in Full-Scale Wind Turbine Nacelle Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schkoda, Ryan; Bibo, Amin; Guo, Yi; Lambert, Scott; Wallen, Robb

    2016-08-21

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest in full-scale wind turbine nacelle testing to complement individual component testing. As a result, several wind turbine nacelle test benches have been built to perform such testing with the intent of loading the integrated components as they are in the field. However, when mounted on a test bench the nacelle is not on the top of a tower and does not have blades attached to it - this is a form of abstraction. This paper aims to quantify the influence of such an abstraction on the dynamic response of the nacelle through a series of simulation case studies. The responses of several nacelle components are studied including the main bearing, main shaft, gearbox supports, generator, and yaw bearing interface. Results are presented to highlight the differences in the dynamic response of the nacelle caused by the abstraction. Additionally, the authors provide recommendations for mitigating the effects of the abstraction.

  15. Test of the electric vehicles at the roller bench; Prove al banco a rulli del veicolo elettrico porter Piaggio/Microvett

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervati, L.; Cipolletta, L.; De Andreis, L.; Indiano, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, RM (Italy). Dipt. Energia

    1999-07-01

    Starting from the existing international regulations on the test of the electric vehicles a series of specific test to carry out at the roller bench of ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) has been defined. The paper presents the numeric result applying such procedures to the test on an electric vehicles, whose main performances are described. [Italian] Partendo dalle normative internazionali esistenti sulla prova dei veicoli elettrici sono state definite una serie di prove specifiche da effettuare presso il banco a rulli dell'ENEA. Il presente lavoro riporta i risultati ottenuti applicando le procedure ad un veicolo elettrico. Le principali prestazioni sono messe in evidenza.

  16. The effects of physical separtation treatment on the removal of uranium from contaminated soils at Fernald: A bench-scale study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadler, K.G.; Krstich, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    A bench-scale treatability study incorporating the use of physical separation techniques and chemical dispersants/extractants was conducted on uranium contaminated soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. The soils contained approximately 497 and 450 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of total uranium, respectively. Geotechnical characterization indicated that 77.4 and 74.6 percent of the soil was in the less that 50 micrometer (μm) size fraction for the ID-A and ID-B soils, respectively. An initial characterization effort indicated that uranium was distributed among all particle size fractions. After each soil was dispersed in water, it was noted that the uranium concentrated in the sand and clay fractions for the ID-A soil (1028 and 1475 mg kg -1 , respectively) and the clay fraction for ID-B soil (2710 mg kg -1 ). Four 1 millimolar (mM) sodium reagent solutions (sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, and a sodium citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite mixture) and potable water were evaluated for effectiveness in dispersing each soil into single grain separates and extracting total uranium from each of the resulting particle size fractions. Dilute sodium solutions were more effective than water in dispersing the soil. The use of dispersants, as compared to water, on the less than 2 mm size fraction causes a shift in the distribution of uranium out of the sand fraction and into the silt and clay fractions for ID-A soil and into the clay fraction for the ID-B soil. Attrition scrubbing tests were conducted on the less than 2 mm size fraction for the ID-A and ID-B soils using water and three alkaline extraction solutions, sodium pyrophosphate, sodium carbonate/bicarbonate, and ammonium carbonate/bicarbonate. There was little difference among the chemical extractants on their effectiveness in removing uranium from the greater than 53 μm (sand) or less than 53 μm (silt and clay) soil fraction

  17. EVALUATION OF THE TREATABILITY OF MUNICIPAL WASTE LANDFILL LEACHATE IN A SBR AND BY COAGULATION-FLOCCULATION ON A BENCH SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fleck

    Full Text Available Abstract This article describes bench scale sequential, biological and coagulation-flocculation treatment of mature leachate for the removal of nitrogen and biodegradable and recalcitrant carbonaceous material. The biological stage was conducted on two SBRs, one of which inoculated with nitrifying sludge, another without an inoculum, for 152 and 133 days, respectively. The coagulation-flocculation stage used four coagulants at different doses and pH adjustments. The treatment conducted on the inoculated SBR when a pH control was used produced mean removals of BOD5, COD and TKN of 69.6%, 38.5% and 51.6%, respectively, and practically complete denitrification. Coagulation-flocculation applied to the effluent of the inoculated biological reactor showed a superior effectiveness of the ferric coagulants, when the pH was adjusted to close to 6.0, producing removals of turbidity, COD and true color close to 95%, 78% and 92%, respectively.

  18. Determination and modeling of the influence of the fluid-dynamics in hydro-treating bench scale plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, T.

    1999-09-16

    At an industrial scale, the hydro-treating of oil fractions is carried out in multiphase fixed bed reactors. The oil and hydrogen cross the catalyst bed, usually in co-current downflow. Since the product specifications are steadily becoming more severe, the testing of new catalysts and of modified operating conditions in pilot plants becomes increasingly important. Although these pilot plants are frequently by a factor of 100 000 smaller than the industrial units, they still have to allow the up-scaling to industrial units. In the literature relatively low conversion degrees in pilot plants are frequently reported, especially in downflow. The significantly lower fluid velocities in pilot plants seem to be responsible for such differences, as the influence of fluid-dynamic non-idealities and of the extra-particle mass transfer phenomena increases with a decrease of the fluid velocities. In the present work, the influence of important fluid-dynamic non-idealities on the hydro-treating of gas oil fractions in pilot plants was examined. This was done on the one hand in experiments with different pilot plants and on the other hand by simulations with an especially developed multiphase model. The phenomena were considered as well in an isolated manner. In order to examine any interactions with the chemical reactions, they were also studied in a reactive system. This methodology was applied to the phenomena, 'axial dispersion'and 'gas-liquid mass transfer'. (author)

  19. Evaluation of adipic acid addition to a bench-scale Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, G.P.

    1981-12-01

    An experimental laboratory study testing the effectiveness of adipic acid in the Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD system has been sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. Additionally, economic calculations for the cost effectiveness of usng adipic acid in a commercial scale CT-121 FGD system have been performed. The results of this study indicate that although adipic acid can increase the SO/sub 2/ removal capability of the CT-121 system, it is not an economically attractive process improvement. This result is due to the CT-121 process chemistry which minimizes limestone consumption and sludge volume without the need of adipic acid. These two areas realize major cost savings when adipic is used in a conventional limestone FGD system. The economic evaluation indicates even though a lower gas-side pressue drop is achieved when adipic acid is used, the savings in electrical costs are insufficient to offset the cost of adipic acid.

  20. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1153 Dust... tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. 84.1153 Section 84.1153 Public...

  1. Development of the virtual experimental bench on the basis of modernized research centrifugal compressor stage test unit with the 3D impeller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, A. A.; Danilishin, A. M.; Dubenko, A. M.; Kozhukov, Y. V.

    2017-08-01

    Design modernization of the centrifugal compressor stage test bench with three dimensional impeller blades was carried out for the possibility of holding a series of experimental studies of different 3D impeller models. The studies relates to the problem of joint work of the impeller and the stationary channels of the housing when carrying out works on modernization with the aim of improving the parameters of the volumetric capacity or pressure in the presence of design constraints. The object of study is the experimental single end centrifugal compressor stage with the 3D impeller. Compressor stage consists of the 3D impeller, vaneless diffuser (VLD), outlet collector - folded side scroll and downstream pipe. The drive is a DC motor 75 kW. The increase gear (multiplier) was set between the compressor and DC motor, gear ratio is i = 9.8. To obtain the characteristics of the compressor and the flow area the following values were measured: total pressure, static pressure, direction (angles) of the stream in different cross sections. Additional pneumometric probes on the front wall of the VLD of the test bench have been installed. Total pressure probes and foster holes for the measurement of total and static pressure by the new drainage scheme. This allowed carrying out full experimental studies for two elements of centrifugal compressor stage. After the experimental tests the comprehensive information about the performance of model stage were obtained. Was measured geometric parameters and the constructed virtual model of the experimental bench flow part with the help of Creo Parametric 3.0 and ANSYS v. 16.2. Conducted CFD calculations and verification with experimental data. Identifies the steps for further experimental and virtual works.

  2. Hierarchical calibration and validation for modeling bench-scale solvent-based carbon capture. Part 1: Non-reactive physical mass transfer across the wetted wall column: Original Research Article: Hierarchical calibration and validation for modeling bench-scale solvent-based carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Xu, Zhijie [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Lai, Canhai [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Whyatt, Greg [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy and Environment Directorate, Richland WA; Marcy, Peter [Statistical Sciences Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM; Sun, Xin [Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA

    2017-04-27

    A hierarchical model calibration and validation is proposed for quantifying the confidence level of mass transfer prediction using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, where the solvent-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is simulated and simulation results are compared to the parallel bench-scale experimental data. Two unit problems with increasing level of complexity are proposed to breakdown the complex physical/chemical processes of solvent-based CO2 capture into relatively simpler problems to separate the effects of physical transport and chemical reaction. This paper focuses on the calibration and validation of the first unit problem, i.e. the CO2 mass transfer across a falling ethanolamine (MEA) film in absence of chemical reaction. This problem is investigated both experimentally and numerically using nitrous oxide (N2O) as a surrogate for CO2. To capture the motion of gas-liquid interface, a volume of fluid method is employed together with a one-fluid formulation to compute the mass transfer between the two phases. Bench-scale parallel experiments are designed and conducted to validate and calibrate the CFD models using a general Bayesian calibration. Two important transport parameters, e.g. Henry’s constant and gas diffusivity, are calibrated to produce the posterior distributions, which will be used as the input for the second unit problem to address the chemical adsorption of CO2 across the MEA falling film, where both mass transfer and chemical reaction are involved.

  3. Heavy metal contaminant remediation study of western Xiamen Bay sediment, China: laboratory bench scale testing results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luoping; Feng, Huan; Li, Xiaoxia; Ye, Xin; Jing, Youhai; Ouyang, Tong; Yu, Xingtian; Liang, Rongyuan; Chen, Weiqi

    2009-12-15

    A surface sediment sample (metal removal, whereas agitation, aeration and rotation of the samples in chemical complexation solutions yield much better metal removal efficiency (up to 90%). A low pH condition (e.g., pHliquid ratio (e.g., S:L=1:50) could increase metal removal efficiency. The experimental results suggest that 0.20 M (NH4)2C2O4+0.025 M EDTA combination with solid:liquid ratio=1:50 and 0.50 M ammonium acetate (NH4Ac)+0.025 M EDTA combination with solid:liquid ratio=1:50 are the most effective methods for metal removal from the contaminated sediments. This research provides additional useful information for sediment metal remediation technology development.

  4. 76 FR 18348 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 201 RIN 0580-AB10 Required Scale... Register on January 20, 2011 (76 FR 3485), defining required scale tests. That document incorrectly defined... read as follows: Sec. 201.72 Scales; testing of. (a) * * * Except that if scales are used on a limited...

  5. Integrating a 250 mL-spinner flask with other stirred bench-scale cell culture devices: a mass transfer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos, Jose R; Brorson, Kurt A; Moreira, Antonio R; Rao, Govind

    2011-01-01

    The bioprocess development cycle is a complex task that requires a complete understanding of the engineering of the process (e.g., mass transfer, mixing, CO(2) removal, process monitoring, and control) and its affect on cell biology and product quality. Despite their widespread use in bioprocess development, spinner flasks generally lack engineering characterization of critical physical parameters such as k(L)a, P/V, or mixing time. In this study, mass transfer characterization of a 250-mL spinner flask using optical patch-based sensors is presented. The results quantitatively show the effect of the impeller type, liquid filling volume, and agitation speed on the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a) in a 250-mL spinner flask, and how they can be manipulated to match mass transfer capability at large culture devices. Thus, process understanding in spinner flasks can be improved, and these devices can be seamlessly integrated in a rational scale-up strategy from cell thawing to bench-scale bioreactors (and beyond) in biomanufacturing. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  6. 76 FR 50881 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ..., Packers and Stockyards Administration 9 CFR Part 201 RIN 0580-AB10 Required Scale Tests AGENCY: Grain... January 20, 2011, and on April 4, 2011, concerning required scale tests. Those documents defined ``limited...), concerning required scale tests. Those documents incorrectly defined limited seasonal basis in Sec. 201.72(a...

  7. Design of a test-bench to validate a model of a thermal window design; Diseno de un banco de ensayos para la validacion de un modelo de diseno termico de ventanas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra O, Claudio; Fissore Sch, Adelqui; Mottard, Jean-Michel [Universidad de Concepcion (Chile). Facultad de Ingenieria. Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica]. E-mail: clsaaved @udec.cl; afissore@udec.cl

    2000-07-01

    Paper presents the design of a test-bench and instrumentation to validate a window thermal mathematical model. The test-bench simulate the thermal performance of a office with a only one wall in directly contact with outdoors, where a single glass window is mounted. To obtain a similar heat transfer relation as the real building, the chamber has been designed and manufactured with an inner and an outer envelope, and with an air spacing maintaining at the same temperature that the test chamber. To change the window size, the test-bench is equipped with a single modifiable outer wall. Instrumentation and methods of measurement for solar radiation, infra red outdoor radiation, indoor and outdoor air temperatures, wind velocity, heat transfer, air ventilating flow and temperature, wall temperatures, etc. are specified. (author)

  8. Characterization of mercury, arsenic, and selenium in the product streams of a bench-scale, inert-gas, oil shale retort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, K.B.; Evans, J.C.; Fruchter, J.S.; Girvin, D.C.; Nelson, C.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of heating rates and maximum temperatures on the redistribution of mercury, arsenic, and selenium into the shale oil, retort water, and offgas of a 6-kg bench-scale retort. A Green River shale (western) from Colorado and a New Albany shale (eastern) from Kentucky were heated at 1-2{degree}C/min to a maximum temperature of 500{degree}C. The eastern and western shales were also heated at 2{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C and at 10{degree}C/min to 750{degree}C. Real-time monitoring of the offgas stream for mercury was accomplished with Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy or a microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy. Microwave-induced helium plasma spectroscopy was also used to monitor for arsenic in the offgas during retorting; little or no arsenic was observed in the offgas. Mass balance calculations for arsenic and selenium accounted for essentially 100% of those elements in the spent shale, shale oil, and retort water. The mass balance calculations suggest little offgas component for arsenic and selenium. This agrees with the results of the MPD monitoring of the offgas. These results indicate the potential pathway for mercury to enter the environment is from the offgas. Arsenic and selenium preferential redistribution into the shale oil may present problems during the upgrading process.

  9. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Topical Report EH&S Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Herwig, Mark; Giolando, Salvatore; Green, Dianne; Morall, Donna

    2016-05-11

    GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2 capture solvent (award number DEFE0013687). As part of this program, a technology EH&S assessment (Subtask 5.1) has been completed for a CO2 capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. The assessment focuses on two chemicals used in the process, the aminosilicone solvent, GAP-0, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA), the GAP-0 carbamate formed upon reaction of the GAP-0 with CO2, and two potential byproducts formed in the process, GAP-0/SOx salts and amine-terminated, urea-containing silicone (also referred to as “ureas” in this report). The EH&S assessment identifies and estimates the magnitude of the potential air and water emissions and solid waste generated by the process and reviews the toxicological profiles of the chemicals associated with the process. Details regarding regulatory requirements, engineering controls, and storage and handling procedures are also provided in the following sections.

  10. Determination of the primary technical parameters of the test bench for controlling the temperature of rails and rail bars of continuous welded rail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tertychnyi Vitalii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors determining the reliability and safety of operation of the continuous welded rail track is the temperature of the rails. All conditions of laying, repair and maintenance of the track during the entire cycle of rails operation depend on it. The existing rail temperature monitoring method does not take into account a few significant factors and that leads to significant errors in determining the actual temperature of the rail bar. The authors propose a new rail temperature measurement method on a special test bench which maximally simulates possible environmental operating conditions for the rail bars, the profile of the roadway (embankment or cut, as well as the actual spatial latitude and meridian location of the rail slabs. At the bench, the studied rails are fastened with the help of rail braces on half ties, in the ballast bed, with sizes in accordance with the existing reference documents. At the first stage, the most common KB-65 intermediate fastener for the continuous welded rail in Ukraine will be used, while in subsequent stages KPP-5 fastening will be used.

  11. CFD modeling of space-time evolution of fast pyrolysis products in a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boateng, A.A.; Mtui, P.L.

    2012-01-01

    A model for the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed has been developed. In this study the unsteady constitutive transport equations for inert gas flow and decomposition kinetics were modeled using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT-12. The Eulerarian-Eulerian multiphase model system described herein is a fluidized bed of sand externally heated to a predetermined temperature prior to introduction of agricultural biomass. We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis vapors, char and non-condensable (permanent) gases and confirm the observation that the kinetics are fast and that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds, and occupying two-thirds of the spatial volume of the reactor as widely reported in the open literature. The model could be advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors and their optimization to meet economic scales required for distributed or satellite units. - Highlights: ► We model the evolution of pyrolysis products in a fluidized bed via CFD. ► We predict the spontaneous emergence of pyrolysis products. ► We confirm the experimental observation that the kinetics are fast. ► And that bio-oil vapor evolution is accomplished in a few seconds. ► The model is advantageous in the virtual design of fast pyrolysis reactors.

  12. Effects of turbulence modelling on prediction of flow characteristics in a bench-scale anaerobic gas-lift digester

    OpenAIRE

    Coughtrie, AR; Borman, DJ; Sleigh, PA

    2013-01-01

    Flow in a gas-lift digester with a central draft-tube was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different turbulence closure models. The k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST), Renormalization-Group (RNG) k-∊, Linear Reynolds-Stress-Model (RSM) and Transition-SST models were tested for a gas-lift loop reactor under Newtonian flow conditions validated against published experimental work. The results identify that flow predictions within the reactor (where flow is transitional) ar...

  13. Removal of strontium from drinking water by conventional treatment and lime softening in bench-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Alissa J; Lytle, Darren A; Harmon, Stephen; Vu, Kevin; Chait, Hannah; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-10-15

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency Contaminant Candidate List 3 lists strontium as a contaminant for potential regulatory consideration in drinking water. Very limited data is available on strontium removal from drinking water and as a result, there is an immediate need for treatment information. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness of coagulation/filtration and lime-soda ash softening treatment methods to remove strontium from surface and ground waters. Coagulation/filtration jar test results on natural waters showed that conventional treatment with aluminum and iron coagulants were able to achieve only 12% and 5.9% strontium removal, while lime softening removed as high as 78% from natural strontium-containing ground water. Controlled batch experiments on synthetic water showed that strontium removal during the lime-soda ash softening was affected by pH, calcium concentration and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration. In all softening jar tests, the final strontium concentration was directly related to the initial strontium concentration and the removal of strontium was directly associated with calcium removal. Precipitated solids showed well-formed crystals or agglomerates of mixed solids, two polymorphs of calcium carbonate (vaterite and calcite), and strontianite, depending on initial water quality conditions. X-ray diffraction analysis suggested that strontium was likely incorporated in the calcium carbonate crystal lattice and was likely responsible for removal during lime softening. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A bench-scale study on the removal and recovery of phosphate by hydrous zirconia-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhe; Fang, Wenkan; Xing, Mingchao; Wu, Deyi, E-mail: dywu@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-02-15

    Owing to the easy magnetic separation from water for reuse, magnetic nanoparticles have drawn great interest as adsorbents. Herein hydrous zirconia-coated magnetite nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@ZrO{sub 2}) were created by a facile method and a bench–scale study was undertaken to evaluate its effectiveness and mechanism to remove phosphate at low concentrations. Results indicated that phosphate removal by Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@ZrO{sub 2} was fast (95% of phosphate removal within 10 min) and nearly complete removal could be achieved at the adsorbent dosage >0.6 g/L. In tap water or wastewater where competitive anions coexist, regulation of pH was found to be quite effective to augment the performance of phosphate removal. In pH–lowered adsorption systems, phosphate removal followed a good pattern similarly to pure water, i.e., a continuous high efficiency removal followed by a rapid saturation. Adsorption–desorption–regeneration studies showed that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@ZrO{sub 2} could be repeatedly used for phosphate removal and adsorbed phosphate could be stripped for recovery. The fractionation of adsorbed phosphorus suggested that NaOH-P fraction was dominant. We also found that the adsorption reaction of phosphate with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@ZrO{sub 2} shifted the isoelectric point of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@ZrO{sub 2} from ~9.0 to ~3.0. FTIR measurements further showed the direct coordination of phosphate onto zirconium by replacement of hydroxyl groups. The formation of the monodentate (ZrO)PO{sub 2}(OH) complex was proposed. - Highlights: • Hydrous zirconia–coated magnetite was used for phosphate capture. • Regulation of pH was able to enhance P removal in the presence of coexisting ions. • Phosphate was coordinated onto zirconium by replacement of hydroxyl groups. • The material could be easily separated from water for reuse by a magnet. • Desorption of phosphate from the material could be achieved with NaOH treatment.

  15. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  16. Effects of turbulence modelling on prediction of flow characteristics in a bench-scale anaerobic gas-lift digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughtrie, A R; Borman, D J; Sleigh, P A

    2013-06-01

    Flow in a gas-lift digester with a central draft-tube was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and different turbulence closure models. The k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST), Renormalization-Group (RNG) k-∊, Linear Reynolds-Stress-Model (RSM) and Transition-SST models were tested for a gas-lift loop reactor under Newtonian flow conditions validated against published experimental work. The results identify that flow predictions within the reactor (where flow is transitional) are particularly sensitive to the turbulence model implemented; the Transition-SST model was found to be the most robust for capturing mixing behaviour and predicting separation reliably. Therefore, Transition-SST is recommended over k-∊ models for use in comparable mixing problems. A comparison of results obtained using multiphase Euler-Lagrange and singlephase approaches are presented. The results support the validity of the singlephase modelling assumptions in obtaining reliable predictions of the reactor flow. Solver independence of results was verified by comparing two independent finite-volume solvers (Fluent-13.0sp2 and OpenFOAM-2.0.1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bench scale experiments for the remediation of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Poirier, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-11

    The Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The plan for disposition of this stream during baseline operations is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. The primary reason to recycle this stream is so that the semi-volatile 99Tc isotope eventually becomes incorporated into the glass. This stream also contains non-radioactive salt components that are problematic in the melter, so diversion of this stream to another process would eliminate recycling of these salts and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. This diversion from recycling this stream within WTP would have the effect of decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The concept being tested here involves removing the 99Tc so that the decontaminated aqueous stream, with the problematic salts, can be disposed elsewhere.

  18. A computational methodology for a micro launcher engine test bench using a combined linear static and dynamic in frequency response analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion DIMA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to provide a quick methodology to determine the critical values of the forces, displacements and stress function of frequency, under a combined linear static (101 Solution - Linear Static and dynamic load in frequency response (108 Solution - Frequency Response, Direct Method, applied to a micro launcher engine test bench, using NASTRAN 400 Solution - Implicit Nonlinear. NASTRAN/PATRAN software is used. Practically in PATRAN the preprocessor has to define a linear or nonlinear static load at step 1 and a dynamic in frequency response load (time dependent at step 2. In Analyze the following options are chosen: for Solution Type Implicit Nonlinear Solution (SOL 400 is selected, for Subcases Static Load and Transient Dynamic is chosen and for Subcase Select the two cases static and dynamic will be selected. NASTRAN solver will overlap results from static analysis with the dynamic analysis. The running time will be reduced three times if using Krylov solver. NASTRAN SYSTEM (387 = -1 instruction is used in order to activate Krylov option. Also, in Analysis the OP2 Output Format shall be selected, meaning that in bdf NASTRAN input file the PARAM POST 1 instruction shall be written. The structural damping can be defined in two different ways: either at the material card or using the PARAM, G, 0.05 instruction (in this example a damping coefficient by 5% was used. The SDAMPING instruction in pair with TABDMP1 work only for dynamic in frequency response, modal method, or in direct method with viscoelastic material, not for dynamic in frequency response, direct method (DFREQ, with linear elastic material. The Direct method – DFREQ used in this example is more accurate. A set in translation of boundary conditions was used and defined at the base of the test bench.

  19. Hydrogen generation from bioethanol reforming: bench-scale unit performance with Cu/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Machado, N.R.C. [State Univ. of Maringa (UEM), Chemical Engineering Dept., Lab. of Catalysis, Maringa (Brazil); Schmal, M. [PEQ/COPPE/UFRJ Cidade Univ., Centro de Tecnologia, Graduate School and Research in Engineering Alberto Luiz Coimbra Institute, Rio De Janeiro (Brazil); Cantao, M.P. [LACTEC, Dept. of Materials, Inst. of Technology for Development, Curitiba (Brazil)] [and others

    2003-07-01

    As an alternative route for hydrogen production, ethanol reforming was studied in a bench-scale unit using a 5%Cu/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst previously selected in a micro reactor. X-Ray Diffraction analysis has shown that this catalyst contains copper oxide in an amorphous form, or in particles smaller than 20 nm, while the Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is highly crystalline. Analysis of the calcinated catalyst by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy revealed that 35% of total copper was on the surface as Cu{sup I} (55%) or Cu{sup II} (45%). The catalyst presented a low surface area (35 m{sup 2}/g), mainly from meso and macropores, as textural analysis revealed. Temperature Programmed Reduction showed a two-step reduction of Cu{sup II} to Cu, at 245{sup o}C and 306{sup o}C. It was also observed the reduction of 6% of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The reaction unit consisted of an integral reactor with 16 g of catalyst pellets, approximately 3 mm x 5 mm in size. Reaction temperature and feed rate were varied to optimize hydrogen production, with CO{sub 2} as the main byproduct. Reagents (water and ethanol) in stoichiometric proportion were fed into an electric pre-heater and vaporized. An increase on reaction temperature from 300{sup o}C to 400{sup o}C has led to an increase in mean conversion from 17% to 35%. Ethene and ethyl ether were also detected as minor byproducts. (author)

  20. Testing the barriers to healthy eating scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, Eileen R; Feucht, Jeanette

    2004-06-01

    Clarifying barriers to dietary intake may identify factors that place pregnant women at risk for complications. This methodological study assessed the psychometric properties of the Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale. Item generation was based on constructs in Pender's health promotion model. The instrument was tested in two separate samples of pregnant women. Content validity was assessed, and construct validity testing resulted in an expected negative relationship between scores on the Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale and the Nutrition subscale of the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II. Factor analysis resulted in a 5-factor scale that explained 73% of the variance. Alpha coefficients for the total scale ranged from.73 to.77, and subscales ranged from.48 to.99. Test-retest reliability for the total scale was.79. The Barriers to Healthy Eating Scale appears to be a reliable and valid instrument to assess barriers that may impede healthy eating in pregnant women.

  1. In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, Me

  2. In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, Paul M.; Fimmen, Ryan; Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, Me

  3. Portable test bench for the studies concerning ion sources and ion beam extraction and focusing systems; Banco de pruebas portatil para el estudio de fuentes de iones y de la extraccion y enfoque del haz de iones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordero Lopez, F.

    1961-07-01

    A portable test bench is described, which was designed to check ion sources, ion beam extraction and focusing systems before its use in a 600 KeV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator. The vacuum possibilities of the system are specially analyzed in connection with its particular use. The whole can be considered as a portable accelerator of low energy (50 keV). (Author)

  4. Algal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: Laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Seubert, Erica L.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing globally during the past few decades. The impact of these events on seawater desalination facilities has become an important topic in recent years due to enhanced societal interest and reliance on this technology for augmenting world water supplies. A variety of harmful bloom-forming species of microalgae occur in southern California, as well as many other locations throughout the world, and several of these species are known to produce potent neurotoxins. These algal toxins can cause a myriad of human health issues, including death, when ingested via contaminated seafood. This study was designed to investigate the impact that algal toxin presence may have on both the intake and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process; most importantly, whether or not the naturally occurring algal toxins can pass through the RO membrane and into the desalination product. Bench-scale RO experiments were conducted to explore the potential of extracellular algal toxins contaminating the RO product. Concentrations exceeding maximal values previously reported during natural blooms were used in the laboratory experiments, with treatments comprised of 50 μg/L of domoic acid (DA), 2 μg/L of saxitoxin (STX) and 20 μg/L of brevetoxin (PbTx). None of the algal toxins used in the bench-scale experiments were detectable in the desalinated product water. Monitoring for intracellular and extracellular concentrations of DA, STX, PbTx and okadaic acid (OA) within the intake and desalinated water from a pilot RO desalination plant in El Segundo, CA, was conducted from 2005 to 2009. During the five-year monitoring period, DA and STX were detected sporadically in the intake waters but never in the desalinated water. PbTx and OA were not detected in either the intake or desalinated water. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for HAB toxins to be inducted into coastal RO intake facilities, and the

  5. Large Scale Leach Test Facility: Development of equipment and methods, and comparison to MCC-1 leach tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellarin, D.J.; Bickford, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the test equipment and methods, and documents the results of the first large-scale MCC-1 experiments in the Large Scale Leach Test Facility (LSLTF). Two experiments were performed using 1-ft-long samples sectioned from the middle of canister MS-11. The leachant used in the experiments was ultrapure deionized water - an aggressive and well characterized leachant providing high sensitivity for liquid sample analyses. All the original test plan objectives have been successfully met. Equipment and procedures have been developed for large-sample-size leach testing. The statistical reliability of the method has been determined, and ''bench mark'' data developed to relate small scale leach testing to full size waste forms. The facility is unique, and provides sampling reliability and flexibility not possible in smaller laboratory scale tests. Future use of this facility should simplify and accelerate the development of leaching models and repository specific data. The factor of less than 3 for leachability, corresponding to a 200,000/1 increase in sample volume, enhances the credibility of small scale test data which precedes this work, and supports the ability of the DWPF waste form to meet repository criteria

  6. BWR Mark I pressure suppression study: bench mark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations representative of the wetwell of Mark I BWR's have predicted pressures and related phenomena. However, calculational predictions for purposes of engineering decision will be possible only if the code can be verified, i.e., shown to compute in accord with measured values. Described in the report is a set of single downcomer spherical flask bench mark experiments designed to produce quantitative data to validate various air-water dynamic computations; the experiments were performed since relevant bench mark data were not available from outside sources. Secondary purposes of the study were to provide a test bed for the instrumentation and post-experiment data processing techniques to be used in the Laboratory's reactor safety research program and to provide additional masurements for the air-water scaling study

  7. Distal clavicular osteolysis in adults: association with bench pressing intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevalainen, Mika T.; Morrison, William B.; Zoga, Adam C.; Roedl, Johannes B. [Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Interventions, Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ciccotti, Michael G. [Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    To investigate the association between distal clavicular osteolysis (DCO) and bench pressing intensity. From a retrospective review of MRI shoulder reports of individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, 262 male patients with DCO and 227 age-matched male patients without DCO were selected. All patients had completed a bench pressing questionnaire. The patients' bench pressing frequency (times per week), duration (years of bench pressing), bench pressing weight (maximum bench pressing weight with one repetition = 1RM) and the ratio of bench pressing weight to body weight were compared between both groups using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests. The results showed that 56 % (146/262) of patients with DCO were high-intensity bench pressers (1RM more than 1.5 times the body weight) compared to 6 % (14/227) in patients without DCO. High-intensity bench pressing was a risk factor for DCO (OR = 19; 95 %CI = 11-35; p < 0.001). Low-intensity bench pressing (1RM less than 1.5 times the body weight) was not a risk factor for DCO (OR = 0.6; 95 % CI = 0.4-0.8). High frequency (>1 x /week) and duration (>5 years) of bench pressing were risk factors. In bench pressers who suffered from DCO, the mean 1RM was 283 lbs (±SD 57) compared to 209 lbs (±SD 60) in bench pressers not affected by DCO (p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney). High-intensity, but not low-intensity bench pressing is a risk factor for DCO. (orig.)

  8. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a PhaseChanging Absorbent: Techno-Economic Analysis Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miebach, Barbara [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); McDuffie, Dwayne [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Spiry, Irina [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Westendorf, Tiffany [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States)

    2017-01-27

    The objective of this project is to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing CO2 capture solvent. The project will establish scalability and technical and economic feasibility of using a phase-changing CO2 capture absorbent for post-combustion capture of CO2 from coal-fired power plants with 90% capture efficiency and 95% CO2 purity at a cost of $40/tonne of CO2 captured by 2025 and a cost of <$10/tonne of CO2 captured by 2035. This report presents system and economic analysis for a process that uses a phase changing aminosilicone solvent to remove CO2 from pulverized coal (PC) power plant flue gas. The aminosilicone solvent is a pure 1,3-bis(3-aminopropyl)-1,1,3,3-tetramethyldisiloxane (GAP-0). Performance of the phase-changing aminosilicone technology is compared to that of a conventional carbon capture system using aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA). This analysis demonstrates that the aminosilicone process has significant advantages relative to an MEA-based system. The first-year CO2 removal cost for the phase-changing CO2 capture process is $52.1/tonne, compared to $66.4/tonne for the aqueous amine process. The phase-changing CO2 capture process is less costly than MEA because of advantageous solvent properties that include higher working capacity, lower corrosivity, lower vapor pressure, and lower heat capacity. The phase-changing aminosilicone process has approximately 32% lower equipment capital cost compared to that of the aqueous amine process. However, this solvent is susceptible to thermal degradation at CSTR desorber operating temperatures, which could add as much as $88/tonne to the CO2 capture cost associated with solvent makeup. Future work is focused on mitigating this critical risk by developing an advanced low-temperature desorber that can deliver comparable desorption performance and significantly reduced

  9. Hierarchical calibration and validation framework of bench-scale computational fluid dynamics simulations for solvent-based carbon capture. Part 2: Chemical absorption across a wetted wall column: Original Research Article: Hierarchical calibration and validation framework of bench-scale computational fluid dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Richland WA; Xu, Zhijie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Richland WA; Lai, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Richland WA; Whyatt, Greg [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA; Marcy, Peter W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Statistical Sciences Group, Los Alamos NM; Sun, Xin [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Energy and Transportation Science Division, Oak Ridge TN

    2017-10-24

    The first part of this paper (Part 1) presents a numerical model for non-reactive physical mass transfer across a wetted wall column (WWC). In Part 2, we improved the existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate chemical absorption occurring in a WWC as a bench-scale study of solvent-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. To generate data for WWC model validation, CO2 mass transfer across a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent was first measured on a WWC experimental apparatus. The numerical model developed in this work has the ability to account for both chemical absorption and desorption of CO2 in MEA. In addition, the overall mass transfer coefficient predicted using traditional/empirical correlations is conducted and compared with CFD prediction results for both steady and wavy falling films. A Bayesian statistical calibration algorithm is adopted to calibrate the reaction rate constants in chemical absorption/desorption of CO2 across a falling film of MEA. The posterior distributions of the two transport properties, i.e., Henry’s constant and gas diffusivity in the non-reacting nitrous oxide (N2O)/MEA system obtained from Part 1 of this study, serves as priors for the calibration of CO2 reaction rate constants after using the N2O/CO2 analogy method. The calibrated model can be used to predict the CO2 mass transfer in a WWC for a wider range of operating conditions.

  10. 76 FR 3485 - Required Scale Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... believes that this final rule will facilitate GIPSA's ability to regulate the business operations of... rule requires that regulated entities complete the first of the two scale tests between January 1 and... not maintain accuracy between tests. Finally, we are amending that same section of the regulations to...

  11. WTP Pilot-Scale Evaporation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    QURESHI, ZAFAR

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the design, assembly, and operation of a Pilot-Scale Evaporator built and operated by SRTC in support of Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) Project at the DOE's Hanford Site. The WTP employs three identical evaporators, two for the Waste Feed and one for the Treated LAW. The Pilot-Scale Evaporator was designed to test simulants for both of these waste streams. The Pilot-Scale Evaporator is 1/76th scale in terms of evaporation rates. The basic configuration of forced circulation vacuum evaporator was employed. A detailed scaling analysis was performed to preserve key operating parameters such as basic loop configuration, system vacuum, boiling temperature, recirculation rates, vertical distances between important hardware pieces, reboiler heat transfer characteristics, vapor flux, configuration of demisters and water spray rings. Three evaporation test campaigns were completed. The first evaporation run used water in order to shake down the system. The water runs were important in identifying a design flaw that inhibited mixing in the evaporator vessel, thus resulting in unstable boiling operation. As a result the loop configuration was modified and the remaining runs were completed successfully. Two simulant runs followed the water runs. Test 1: Simulated Ultrafiltration Recycles with HLW SBS, and Test 2: Treated AN102 with Envelop C LAW. Several liquid and offgas samples were drawn from the evaporator facility for regulatory and non-regulatory analyses. During Test 2, the feed and the concentrate were spiked with organics to determine organic partitioning. The decontamination factor (DF) for Test 1 was measured to be 110,000 (more than the expected value of 100,000). Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam agent was tested during both Tests 1 and 2. It was determined that 500 ppm of this antifoam agent was sufficient to control the foaminess to less than 5 per cent of the liquid height. The long-term testing (around 100 hours of operation) did not show any

  12. Nurse competence scale: development and psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meretoja, Riitta; Isoaho, Hannu; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2004-07-01

    Self-assessment assists nurses to maintain and improve their practice by identifying their strengths and areas that may need to be further developed. Professional competence profiles encourage them to take an active part in the learning process of continuing education. Although competence recognition offers a way to motivate practising nurses to produce quality care, few measuring tools are available for this purpose. This paper describes the development and testing of the Nurse Competence Scale, an instrument with which the level of nurse competence can be assessed in different hospital work environments. The categories of the Nurse Competence Scale were derived from Benner's From Novice to Expert competency framework. A seven-step approach, including literature review and six expert groups, was used to identify and validate the indicators of nurse competence. After a pilot test, psychometric testing of the Nurse Competence Scale (content, construct and concurrent validity, and internal consistency) was undertaken with 498 nurses. The 73-item scale consists of seven categories, with responses on a visual analogy scale format. The frequency of using competencies was additionally tested with a four-point scale. Self-assessed overall scores indicated a high level of competence across categories. The Nurse Competence Scale data were normally distributed. The higher the frequency of using competencies, the higher was the self-assessed level of competence. Age and length of work experience had a positive but not very strong correlation with level of competence. According to the item analysis, the categories of the Nurse Competence Scale showed good internal consistency. The results provide strong evidence of the reliability and validity of the Nurse Competence Scale.

  13. Characterization of High-Power Turbomachinery Tilting Pad Journal Bearings: First Results Obtained on a Novel Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Ciulli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tilting pad journal bearings are usually employed in turbomachines for their stable behavior at high rotational speeds. Devoted test rigs have been realized to validate the predictions of theoretical models. However, the design of new high-performance and large-size bearings needs to be supported by experimental investigations on high-performance large test rigs. The main characteristics of a recently built facility for testing large tilting pad journal bearings with diameters from 150 to 300 mm are described in this work. The test rig is versatile and can be used to test bearings of different size, configurations and to investigate the influence of many parameters, even the effect of misalignment. Sample results of the static characterization of a four-pad high-performance tilting pad journal bearing are reported evidencing some transient effects. A few sample dynamic results are also reported. The presented experimental results demonstrated the capabilities of the rig for investigating the static and the dynamic characteristics of the bearings accurately measuring slow and fast variables.

  14. Experimental simulations of interactions between glass and environmental materials, from laboratory benches to in-site testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of 26 long-duration tests simulating a variety of storage conditions. The effects of the back-filling materials, glass cracking and the nature of the host rock are discussed. Moreover, two experiments have been in progress for over 15 and 7 years in a granite medium and a clay medium. (author)

  15. Calibration bench of flowmeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bremond, J.; Da Costa, D.; Calvet, A.; Vieuxmaire, C.

    1966-01-01

    This equipment is devoted to the comparison of signals from two turbines installed in the Cabri experimental loop. The signal is compared to the standard turbine. The characteristics and the performance of the calibration bench are presented. (A.L.B.)

  16. Test bench for operational investigation of photovoltaic pumping systems; Bancada de ensaio para averiguacao operacional de sistemas fotovoltaicos de bombeamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Alaan Ubaiara; Fedrizzi, Maria Cristina; Zilles, Roberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia], Emails: alaan@iee.usp.br, fedrizzi@iee.usp.br, zilles@iee.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    From the daily water demand, total head and the daily average irradiation, is possible to determine the size of the PV generator for pumping systems. However, once the equipment is acquired some tests are recommended, specially to verify its performance. One of the most relevant parameters to qualify a pumping system is the daily water delivered (m{sup 3}/day) as a function of daily solar irradiation (Wh/m{sup 2}). Facilities that fit different boundaries conditions, as for example constant total head (m) are not easily available, and just few laboratories have this capability. In this way a simple instrumentation with the capability to determine the daily performance of PV pumping systems is presented. The proposed test tools use a hydraulic circuit with two pumps, one connected to the PV system and the other to the electric grid. The total head is maintained constant by the variable speed drive connected to the grid. (author)

  17. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  18. New research assessing the effect of engine operating conditions on regulated emissions of a 4-stroke motorcycle by test bench measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodice, Paolo; Senatore, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    In the latest years the effect of powered two-wheelers on air polluting emissions is generally noteworthy all over the world, notwithstanding advances in internal combustion engines allowed to reduce considerably both fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of SI engines. Nowadays, in fact, these vehicles represent common means of quotidian moving, serving to meet daily urban transport necessities with a significant environmental impact on air quality. Besides, the emissive behavior of the two-wheelers measured under fixed legislative driving standards (and not on the local driving conditions) might not be sufficiently representative of real world motorcycle riding. The purpose of this investigation is a deeper research on emissive levels of in-use motorcycles equipped with last generation SI engines under real world driving behavior. In order to analyze the effect of vehicle instantaneous speed and acceleration on emissive behavior, instantaneous emissions of CO, HC and NO X were measured in the exhaust of a four-stroke motorcycle, equipped with a three-way catalyst and belonging to the Euro-3 legislative category. Experimental tests were executed on a chassis dynamometer bench in the laboratories of the National Research Council (Italy), during the Type Approval test cycle, at constant speed and under real-world driving cycles. This analytical-experimental investigation was executed with a methodology that improves vehicles emission assessment in comparison with the modeling approaches that are based on fixed legislative driving standards. The statistical processing results so obtained are very useful also in order to improve the database of emission models commonly used for estimating emissions from road transport sector, then they can be used to evaluate the environmental impact of last generation medium-size motorcycles under real driving behaviors.

  19. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  20. YMP Engineered Barrier Systems Scaled Ventilation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.D. Dunn; B. Lowry; B. Walsh; J.D. Mar; C. Howard; R. Johnston; T. Williams

    2002-11-22

    Yucca Mountain, approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, has been selected as the site for the nation's first geologic repository for high level nuclear waste. The Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) is currently developing the design for the underground facilities. Ventilation is a key component of the design as a way to maintain the desired thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts prior to closure. As a means of determining the effects of continuous ventilation on heat removal from the emplacement drifts two series of scaled ventilation tests have been performed. Both test series were performed in the DOE/North Las Vegas Atlas facility. The tests provided scaled (nominally 25% of the full scale emplacement drift design) thermal and flow process data that will be used to validate YMP heat and mass transport codes. The Phase I Ventilation Test series evaluated the ability of ambient ventilation air to remove energy under varying flow and input power conditions. The Phase II Ventilation Test series evaluated the ability of pre-conditioned ventilation air to remove energy under varying flow, input temperature and moisture content, and simulated waste package input power conditions. Twenty-two distinct ventilation tests were run.

  1. Effects of the bench shirt on sagittal bar path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Tobin; Fortenbaugh, Dave; Williams, Ryan

    2009-07-01

    Powerlifting, like many sports, uses specialized equipment to enhance performance and decrease the chance of injury. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine whether wearing a bench press shirt would alter the natural mechanics of the bench press, causing a more efficient lift when pressing the same weight as without the bench shirt. Participants (n = 5) completed 2 series of 1-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press tests, with 1 week of rest in between 1 series without the bench shirt (no-shirt), and 1 series with a bench shirt (bench shirt). Results revealed that the vertical bar path ranges were significantly less in the bench shirt condition (35.7 +/- 4.8 cm) compared with the no-shirt condition (40.2 +/- 7.0 cm) (p < 0.05). Significant differences were found between the bar's optimal (81.4 +/- 14.2 cm) and observed (96.7 +/- 19.1 cm) total distances traveled in the no-shirt condition (p < 0.01), but no significant differences were found between the bar's optimal (71.6 +/- 12.7 cm) and observed (86.3 +/- 10.5 cm) total distances traveled in the bench shirt condition. These findings suggest that the bar path in bench shirt trials is more efficient and consistent than in the no-shirt trials. This pattern demonstrates that a bench shirt can improve load capacity. It is also possible that the bench shirt decreases the forces that act on the shoulder for a given weight and, thus, may decrease the risk of injury.

  2. Bioresorbable scaffolds on the bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, John; Motreff, Pascal; Darremont, Olivier; Webber, Bruce; Guerin, Patrice; Webster, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds (BRS) in bifurcations have all of the potential advantages of BRS in non-bifurcating lesions and, in addition, the absorption of side branch (SB) ostial struts may at least partially release the branch from "jail". Polymeric BRS struts may break when post-dilated beyond their safe limits and multiple fractures may lead to adverse clinical events. Bench testing provides insights into the behaviour of different BRS in bifurcations and helps the interventional cardiologist to choose, deliver and post-dilate appropriately. Bench testing of polymeric BRS must be in a water bath at 37ºC as polymer performance is temperature sensitive. Balloon dilatation through the side of a BRS or a durable metallic stent causes distortion corrected by mini-kissing balloon post-dilatation (mini-KBPD) where the SB balloon extends only a short distance into the main branch (MB), limiting the length of MB scaffold exposed to the inflation of two balloons. The safe pressure threshold for SB dilatation of a 3.0 mm Absorb scaffold with a 3.0 mm non-compliant balloon is 10 atm and for mini-KBPD with two 3.0 mm balloons it is 5 atm. Strategies such as culotte, crush and simultaneous kissing scaffolds (SKS) may not be appropriate for the current Absorb scaffold.

  3. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  4. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs

  5. Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

    2013-09-12

    The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutions’ Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

  6. Small Scale Hydrocarbon Fire Test Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Søreng Bjørge

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the oil and gas industry, hydrocarbon process equipment was previously often thermally insulated by applying insulation directly to the metal surface. Fire protective insulation was applied outside the thermal insulation. In some cases, severe corrosion attacks were observed due to ingress of humidity and condensation at cold surfaces. Introducing a 25 mm air gap to prevent wet thermal insulation and metal wall contact is expected to solve the corrosion issues. This improved insulation methodology does, however, require more space that may not be available when refurbishing older process plants. Relocating structural elements would introduce much hot work, which should be minimized in live plants. It is also costly. The aim of the present study is therefore to develop a test concept for testing fire resistance of equipment protected with only air-gap and thermal insulation, i.e., without the fire-protective insulation. The present work demonstrates a conceptual methodology for small scale fire testing of mockups resembling a section of a distillation column. The mockups were exposed to a small-scale propane flame in a test configuration where the flow rate and the flame zone were optimized to give heat flux levels in the range 250–350 kW/m2. Results are presented for a mockup resembling a 16 mm thick distillation column steel wall. It is demonstrated that the modern distance insulation in combination with the heat capacity of the column wall indicates 30+ minutes fire resistance. The results show that this methodology has great potentials for low cost fire testing of other configurations, and it may serve as a set-up for product development.

  7. Yucca Mountain drift scale test progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apps, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Peterson,J.E.; Sonnenthal, E.; Spycher, N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Williams, K.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Drift Scale Test (DST) is part of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Thermal Test being conducted underground at the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purpose of the ESF Thermal Test is to acquire a more in-depth understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes likely to be encountered in the rock mass surrounding the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. These processes are monitored by a multitude of sensors to measure the temperature, humidity, gas pressure, and mechanical displacement, of the rock formation in response to the heat generated by the heaters. In addition to collecting passive monitoring data, active hydrological and geophysical testing is also being carried out periodically in the DST. These active tests are intended to monitor changes in the moisture redistribution in the rock mass, to collect water and gas samples for chemical and isotopic analysis, and to detect microfiacturing due to heating. On December 3, 1998, the heaters in the DST were activated. The planned heating phase of the DST is 4 years, and the cooling phase following the power shutoff will be of similar duration. The present report summarizes interpretation and analysis of thermal, hydrological, chemical, and geophysical data for the first 6 months; it is the first of many progress reports to be prepared during the DST.

  8. RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

    2012-02-02

    ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of amorphous solid dispersions generated by different bench-scale processes, using griseofulvin as a model compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Po-Chang; Cui, Yong; Ran, Yingqing; Lubach, Joe; Chou, Kang-Jye; Bao, Linda; Jia, Wei; La, Hank; Hau, Jonathan; Sambrone, Amy; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Wong, Harvey

    2013-04-01

    Drug polymer-based amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry to improve bioavailability for poorly water-soluble compounds. Spray-drying is the most common process involved in the manufacturing of ASD material. However, spray-drying involves a high investment of material quantity and time. Lower investment manufacturing processes such as fast evaporation and freeze-drying (lyophilization) have been developed to manufacture ASD at the bench level. The general belief is that the overall performance of ASD material is thermodynamically driven and should be independent of the manufacturing process. However, no formal comparison has been made to assess the in vivo performance of material generated by different processes. This study compares the in vitro and in vivo properties of ASD material generated by fast evaporation, lyophilization, and spray-drying methods using griseofulvin as a model compound and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate as the polymer matrix. Our data suggest that despite minor differences in the formulation release properties and stability of the ASD materials, the overall exposure is comparable between the three manufacturing processes under the conditions examined. These results suggest that fast evaporation and lyophilization may be suitable to generate ASD material for oral evaluation. However, caution should be exercised since the general applicability of the present findings will need to be further evaluated.

  10. A hybrid froth flotation-filtration system as a pretreatment for oil sands tailings pond recycle water management: Bench- and pilot-scale studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Kavithaa; Bromley, David; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2015-09-15

    Through sustainable water management, oil sands companies are working to reduce their reliance on fresh water by minimizing the amount of water required for their operations and by recycling water from tailings ponds. This study was the first pilot-scale testing of a hybrid technology consisting of froth flotation combined with filtration through precoated submerged stainless steel membranes used to treat recycle water from an oil sands facility. The results indicated that the most important factor affecting the performance of the hybrid system was the influent water quality. Any rise in the levels of suspended solids or total organic carbon of the feed water resulted in changes of chemical consumption rates, flux rates, and operating cycle durations. The selections of chemical type and dosing rates were critical in achieving optimal performance. In particular, the froth application rate heavily affected the overall recovery of the hybrid system as well as the performance of the flotation process. Optimum surfactant usage to generate froth (per liter of treated water) was 0.25 mL/L at approximately 2000 NTU of influent turbidity and 0.015 mL/L at approximately 200 NTU of influent turbidity. At the tested conditions, the optimal coagulant dose was 80 mg/L (as Al) at approximately 2000 NTU of influent turbidity and recycle water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Astrophysics on the Lab Bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    In this article some basic laboratory bench experiments are described that are useful for teaching high school students some of the basic principles of stellar astrophysics. For example, in one experiment, students slam a plastic water-filled bottle down onto a bench, ejecting water towards the ceiling, illustrating the physics associated with a…

  12. Additive Manufactured Coronagraph Bench for Detection of Exoplanets

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to use additive manufacturing (AM) to build a Coronagraph Bench engineering test unit.  The versatility inherent in the 3D-printing process allows for a...

  13. Report on Tier-0 Scaling Tests

    CERN Document Server

    M. Branco; L. Goossens; A. Nairz

    To get prepared for handling the enormous data rates and volumes during LHC operation, ATLAS is currently running so-called Tier-0 Scaling Tests, which were started beginning of November and will last until Christmas. These tests are carried out in the context of LCG (LHC Computing Grid) Service Challenge 3 (SC3), a joint exercise of CERN IT and the LHC experiments to test the infrastructure of computing, network, and data management, in particular for its architecture, scalabilty and readiness for LHC data taking. ATLAS has adopted a multi-Tier hierarchical model to organise the workflow, with dedicated tasks to be performed at the individual levels in the Tier hierarchy. The Tier-0 centre located at CERN will be responsible for performing a first-pass reconstruction of the data arriving from the Event Filter farm, thus producing Event Summary Data (ESDs), Analysis Object Data (AODs) and event Tags, for processing calibration and alignment information, for archiving both raw and reconstructed data, and for ...

  14. Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, C. W.

    1993-09-01

    To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

  15. Waste acid detoxification and reclamation: Summary of bench-scale tests for FY 1986 and FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, T.L.

    1987-09-01

    Processes to reduce the volume, quantity, and toxicity of metal-bearing waste acid are being demonstrated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Two precipitation processes and a distillation process are being developed to minimize waste from fuel fabrication operations, which comprise a series of metal-finishing operations. Waste process acids such as HF-HNO/sub 3/, etch solutions containing Zr as a major metal impurity, and HNO/sub 3/ strip solution containing Cu as a major metal impurity are detoxified and reclaimed by concurrently precipitating heavy metals and regenerating acid for recycle. Acid from a third waste acid stream generated from chemical milling operations will be reclaimed using distillation. This stream comprises HNO/sub 3/ and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing U as the major metal impurity. Distillation allows NO/sub 3//sup -/ to be displaced by SO/sub 4//sup -2/ in metal salts; free HNO/sub 3/ is then vaporized from the U-bearing sulfate stream. Uranium can be recovered from the sulfate stream in a downstream precipitation step. 10 refs., 15 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Review of bench-, pilot-, and full-scale Orimulsion trademark combustion tests. Report for November 1998--January 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.A.; Srivastava, R.K.; Hall, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    During the late 1980s and through the 1990s, a new fossil fuel with the trade name Orimulsion has been marketed by its producer, Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PdVSA), as an alternative to coal and heavy fuel oil. Orimulsion, a bitumen-in-water emulsion, is produced from bitumen extracted from the Cerro Negro field of the Orinoco Belt of eastern Venezuela. Economically recoverable Orinoco bitumen reserves are estimated at 267 billion barrels (oil equivalent) representing approximately 26% of the world's recoverable crude oil reserves and 27% of the US recoverable coal reserves. Orimulsion is produced by Bitumenes Orinoco, S.A. (Bitor), a subsidiary of PdVSA, and derives its name from the combination of Orinoco and emulsion. In 1997, the US Congress directed the Environmental Protection Agency to ''initiate a research activity to provide better scientific data on the qualities and characteristics of this product and the potential environmental impact of its introduction.'' As a first step in conducting this research activity, a review of the available literature on the topic of Orimulsion combustion and emissions was undertaken. The emphasis of this review is on the emissions of air pollutants rather than on the combustion behavior of the fuel, and particular emphasis will be placed on emissions from electric utility power boilers. While the combustion characteristics of Orimulsion will be addressed, it will be addressed primarily from the perspective of its ability to strongly influence the emissions of air pollutants

  17. Research-scale melter test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

  18. Increasing Desalination by Mitigating Anolyte pH Imbalance Using Catholyte Effluent Addition in a Multi-Anode Bench Scale Microbial Desalination Cell

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, Robert J.

    2013-09-03

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) uses exoelectrogenic bacteria to oxidize organic matter while desalinating water. Protons produced from the oxidation of organics at the anode result in anolyte acidification and reduce performance. A new method was used here to mitigate anolyte acidification based on adding non-buffered saline catholyte effluent from a previous cycle to the anolyte at the beginning of the next cycle. This method was tested using a larger-scale MDC (267 mL) containing four anode brushes and a three cell pair membrane stack. With an anolyte salt concentration increased by an equivalent of 75 mM NaCl using the catholyte effluent, salinity was reduced by 26.0 ± 0.5% (35 g/L NaCl initial solution) in a 10 h cycle, compared to 18.1 ± 2.0% without catholyte addition. This improvement was primarily due to the increase in buffering capacity of the anolyte, although increased conductivity slightly improved performance as well. There was some substrate loss from the anolyte by diffusion into the membrane stack, but this was decreased from 11% to 2.6% by increasing the anolyte conductivity (7.6 to 14 mS/cm). These results demonstrated that catholyte effluent can be utilized as a useful product for mitigating anolyte acidification and improving MDC performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  20. Testing Group of Helicoidal Expander – Electric Generator at Comoti Test Bench, Using Air Supplied by 3 Compressors Type CU128G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian UNGUREANU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describe a project dedicated to exploitation of natural gas, an important quantity of mechanical clean energy is loosed continuously by not using expansion energy in laminating process gas. A group of helicoidal expander – electrical generator was manufactured and tested. It is designed to produce electric energy for own facilities of a gas station or to supply local networks of gas distribution.

  1. [Mokken scaling of the Cognitive Screening Test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesfeldt, H F A

    2009-10-01

    The Cognitive Screening Test (CST) is a twenty-item orientation questionnaire in Dutch, that is commonly used to evaluate cognitive impairment. This study applied Mokken Scale Analysis, a non-parametric set of techniques derived from item response theory (IRT), to CST-data of 466 consecutive participants in psychogeriatric day care. The full item set and the standard short version of fourteen items both met the assumptions of the monotone homogeneity model, with scalability coefficient H = 0.39, which is considered weak. In order to select items that would fulfil the assumption of invariant item ordering or the double monotonicity model, the subjects were randomly partitioned into a training set (50% of the sample) and a test set (the remaining half). By means of an automated item selection eleven items were found to measure one latent trait, with H = 0.67 and item H coefficients larger than 0.51. Cross-validation of the item analysis in the remaining half of the subjects gave comparable values (H = 0.66; item H coefficients larger than 0.56). The selected items involve year, place of residence, birth date, the monarch's and prime minister's names, and their predecessors. Applying optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) it was found that the full set of twenty CST items performed best in distinguishing two predefined groups of patients of lower or higher cognitive ability, as established by an independent criterion derived from the Amsterdam Dementia Screening Test. The chance corrected predictive value or prognostic utility was 47.5% for the full item set, 45.2% for the fourteen items of the standard short version of the CST, and 46.1% for the homogeneous, unidimensional set of selected eleven items. The results of the item analysis support the application of the CST in cognitive assessment, and revealed a more reliable 'short' version of the CST than the standard short version (CST14).

  2. Cassini RTG's -- Small scale module tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft, scheduled for a 1997 launch to Saturn, will be powered by three GPHS RTGs (General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope thermoelectric Generators). The RTGs are the same type as those powering the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft. Three new converters (F-6, F-7, and F-8) are to be built and one converter (F-2) remaining from the GPHS program will be used. F-6 and F-7 are to be fueled and F-8 serves as a spare converter. In addition, the back-up RTG (F-5) from the Ulysses launch, which is still fueled, will serve as the Cassini back-up RTG. The new RTGs will have a lower fuel loading than in the past and will provide a minimum of 276 watts each at B.O.M. (beginning of mission). The mission length is 10.75 years, at which time these RTGs will provide a minimum of 216 watts and a possible extension to 16 years when the power will be 199 watts. This paper discusses tests performed to date to confirm the successful re-establishment of the unicouple production at Martin Marietta. This production line, shut down 10 years ago, has been restarted and over 1,500 unicouples have been produced to date. Confirmation will be primarily obtained by the performance of three small scale converters in comparison with previously tested modules from the Multi Hundred Watt (MHW) (Voyager) and GPHS (Galileo, Ulysses) programs. Test results to date have shown excellent agreement with the data base

  3. Case Study regarding the test of the new screw compressor with high delivery pressure - 45 bara - on the test bench (with air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin PETRESCU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Screw compressors, which are part of positive displacement compressors, can find an increasing use in gas industry and beyond due to their advantages. Maximal parameters of these devices, done by Comoti under GHH-Rand license stop at a maximum flow of 3000 Nm3/hour and 26 bara discharge pressure. The needs of potential beneficiaries have imposed the necessity to design and manufacture a new family of screw compressors and oil injection able to develop a discharge pressure of 45 bara with flow rates up to 5000 Nm3/hour. This paper presents the design and experimental test phases – for the first screw compressor with discharge of pressure up to 45 bara – CU90 HP. Continue research and development have allowed to this type of screw-compressor – to find a market position, diversifying its size range in the last decade in a manner more explosive, if we refer to other types of compressors.

  4. Test equating, scaling, and linking methods and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Kolen, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to test equating, scaling, and linking, including those concepts and practical issues that are critical for developers and all other testing professionals.  In addition to statistical procedures, successful equating, scaling, and linking involves many aspects of testing, including procedures to develop tests, to administer and score tests, and to interpret scores earned on tests. Test equating methods are used with many standardized tests in education and psychology to ensure that scores from multiple test forms can be used interchangeably.  Test scaling is the process of developing score scales that are used when scores on standardized tests are reported. In test linking, scores from two or more tests are related to one another. Linking has received much recent attention, due largely to investigations of linking similarly named tests from different test publishers or tests constructed for different purposes. In recent years, researchers from the education, psychology, and...

  5. Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

    1988-03-01

    The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

  6. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) process bench studies with bituminous coal. Final report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE contract during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with the application of coal cleaning methods and solids separation methods to the Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL) Process. Additionally a predispersed catalyst was evaluated in a thermal/catalytic configuration, and an alternative nickel molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for the CTSL process. Three coals were evaluated in this program: Bituminous Illinois No. 6 Burning Star and Sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The tests involving the Illinois coal are reported herein, and the tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico coals are described in Topical Report No. 1. On the laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects are reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests, such as tests on rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids, and cleaned coals, are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL process are described in the CTSL Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  7. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture. Manufacturing Plan for Aminosilicone-based CO{sub 2} Absorption Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Kirkland

    2013-02-01

    A commercially cost effective manufacturing plan was developed for GAP-1m, the aminosilicone-based part of the CO{sub 2} capture solvent described in DE-FE0007502, and the small-scale synthesis of GAP-1m was confirmed. The plan utilizes a current intermediate at SiVance LLC to supply the 2013-2015 needs for GE Global Research. Material from this process was supplied to GE Global Research for evaluation and creation of specifications. GE Global Research has since ordered larger quantities (60 liters) for the larger scale evaluations that start in first quarter, 2013. For GE’s much larger future commercial needs, an improved, more economical pathway to make the product was developed after significant laboratory and literature research. Suppliers were identified for all raw materials.

  8. Bench-Scale Study of Hydrogen Separation Using Pre-Commercial Membranes; Estudio, a Escala de Planta Piloto, del Proceso de Separacion de Hidrogeno mediante Membranas Pre-Comerciales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Hervas, J. M.; Marano, M.

    2011-11-10

    This report compiles the research undertaken by CIEMAT over 2009-2011 in the sub-project 8 Purification and Separation of Hydrogen of the PSE H2ENOV Project funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation, MICINN. Permeability and hydrogen selectivity of a pre-commercial palladium membrane was studied at bench scale level. The effect of main operating parameters - pressure, temperature and feed-flow-rate- on permeate flow-rate was determined. The influence of other gas components on hydrogen permeation was evaluated. Mixtures of H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} were studied. Although nitrogen and carbon dioxide did not permeate, both components decreased hydrogen permeation rate. Operating the membrane for around 1000 h under various conditions showed a small decrease in hydrogen permeation, but not in selectivity. A literature review was done in order to identify causes for permeation inhibition and reduction and for the definition of procedures for membrane regeneration. (Author) 29 refs.

  9. Inhibition of microbial fuel cell operation for municipal wastewater treatment by impact loads of free ammonia in bench- and 45L-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiegemann, Heinz; Lübken, Manfred; Schulte, Patrick; Schmelz, Karl-Georg; Gredigk-Hoffmann, Sylvia; Wichern, Marc

    2018-05-15

    A 45-liter microbial fuel cell (MFC) system was integrated into a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The system was operated under practical conditions with supernatant of a pre-thickener for 50days in order to identify, whether higher power output and energy recovery is possible compared to the use of primary clarifier effluent, as used in a previous study. The higher COD (chemical oxygen demand) loading rates of supernatant neither increased power densities, nor energy recovery, but impact loads of total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) in concentrations >800mg/L (free ammonia nitrogen (FAN)>40mg/L) led to an instant collapse of power output and nutrient removal, which was reversed when ammonia concentrations decreased. Investigations in lab-scale under defined conditions verified that the inhibition of the exoelectrogenic biofilm is in fact caused by high levels of FAN. Here, COD removal, power output and energy recovery constantly decreased, when FAN-concentrations were increased above 64mg/L. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lessons from the real bench: non-BRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiston, John; Darremont, Olivier; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Murasato, Yoshinobu; Hikichi, Yutaka; Webber, Bruce; Webster, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Bench testing of stents used in bifurcations can provide information on the general properties that influence performance including crossing profile, radial strength, recoil, flexibility and radiopacity. Problems with device delivery can be clarified. Bench testing identified that side branch dilatation caused stent distortion and elucidated correction strategies. Bench testing led to a stent design change adding connectors between hoops to help overcome the clinical problem of longitudinal distortion. Testing on the bench can determine best deployment strategies and showed that a two-step post-dilatation strategy produced the best deployment with "crush" stenting. Scanning electron microscopy showed that withdrawal of a coronary guidewire trapped between a stent (or scaffold) and a mock arterial wall during a provisional side branch stenting strategy caused only mild linear polymer coating damage. Stent fracture can cause adverse clinical events and our repetitive bend test identified the stents most resistant to fracture. Causes of obstruction of the passage of a balloon over a wire through the side of a stent include damage to the catheter tip, complex cell geometry and inadvertent passage of a wire behind a strut. Bench testing plays a major role in validation of computer modelling of bifurcation treatments and flow alterations.

  11. 27 CFR 19.776 - Record of scale tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Record of scale tests. 19.776 Section 19.776 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... of scale tests. Proprietors shall maintain records of results of tests conducted in accordance with...

  12. "Full-Scale Testing of Pavement Response"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Ekdahl, Peter

    1998-01-01

    methods for determining stresses, strains and deflections in pavement structurers.Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) test were done on the test sections, and stresses and strains were measured both under FWD loading and under a rolling wheel load. Different back-analysis procedures were used to derive...

  13. Psychometric Testing of a Religious Belief Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yi-Chien; Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Chu, Tsung-Lan; Han, Chin-Yen; Hsiao, Ya-Chu

    2017-12-01

    Nurses account for a significant percentage of staff in the healthcare system. The religious beliefs of nurses may affect their competence to provide spiritual care to patients. No reliable and valid instruments are currently available to measure the religious beliefs of nurses in Taiwan. The aims of this study were to develop a religious belief scale (RBS) for Taiwanese nurses and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this scale. A cross-sectional study design was used, and 24 RBS items were generated from in-depth interviews, a literature review, and expert recommendations. The RBS self-administered questionnaire was provided to 619 clinical nurses, who were recruited from two medical centers and one local hospital in Taiwan during 2011-2012. A calibration sample was used to explore the factor structure, whereas a validation sample was used to validate the factor structure that was constructed by the calibration sample. Known-group validity and criterion-related validity were also assessed. An exploratory factor analysis resulted in an 18-item RBS with four factors, including "religious effects," "divine," "religious query," and "religious stress." A confirmatory factor analysis recommended the deletion of one item, resulting in a final RBS of 17 items. The convergent validity and discriminate validity of the RBS were acceptable. The RBS correlated positively with spiritual health and supported concurrent validity. The known-group validity was supported by showing that the mean RBS between nurses with or without religious affiliation was significant. The 17-item RBS developed in this study is a reliable, valid, and useful scale for measuring the religious beliefs of nurses in Taiwan. This scale may help measure the religious beliefs of nurses and elicit the relationship between these beliefs and spirituality.

  14. Correlation of elastomer material properties from small specimen tests and scale-size bearing tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    Tests were performed on small-size elastomer specimens and scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings to correlate the material properties in shear between the two types of tests. An objective of the tests was to see how well the material properties that were determined from specimen tests could predict the response of scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings. Another objective was to compare the results of specimen test and scale-size bearing test conducted by different testing organizations. A comparison between the test results from different organizations on small specimens showed very good agreement. In contrast, the correlation of scale-size bearing tests showed differences in bearing stiffness

  15. DEBATES SCALING UP HIV TESTING IN RESOURCE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    annaline

    2005-09-02

    Sep 2, 2005 ... 61 of 2003) has codified these rights, stating that no health service may be provided to a user without their consent (s 7, National Health. Act). In other words, patients must give their consent to medical treatment including HIV testing (Dada and McQuoid Mason,4 p. 8). Accordingly, they may also refuse to be ...

  16. Effective Rating Scale Development for Speaking Tests: Performance Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred; Kemp, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale design and development for testing speaking is generally conducted using one of two approaches: the measurement-driven approach or the performance data-driven approach. The measurement-driven approach prioritizes the ordering of descriptors onto a single scale. Meaning is derived from the scaling methodology and the agreement of…

  17. Laboratory-scale integrated ARP filter test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently treating radioactive liquid waste with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Recently, the low filter flux through the ARP of approximately 5 gallons per minute has limited the rate at which radioactive liquid waste can be treated. Salt Batch 6 had a lower processing rate and required frequent filter cleaning. There is a desire to understand the causes of the low filter flux and to increase ARP/MCU throughput. This task attempted to simulate the entire ARP process, including multiple batches (5), washing, chemical cleaning, and blending the feed with heels and recycle streams. The objective of the tests was to determine whether one of these processes is causing excessive fouling of the crossflow or secondary filter. The authors conducted the tests with feed solutions containing 6.6 M sodium Salt Batch 6 simulant supernate with no MST.

  18. Eficiencia del proceso de lavado en la obtención del citrato de calcio y magnesio a escala de banco Effectiveness of washout process to obtain calcium and magnesium citrate at bench scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge E Rodríguez Chanfrau

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la optimización del proceso tecnológico para obtener citrato de calcio y magnesio a partir de dolomitas, se estudió a escala de banco la etapa de lavado para disminuir el contenido de ácido cítrico libre. Las variantes de lavado estudiadas permitieron disminuir el contenido de ácido cítrico libre por debajo del 3 %, mientras que los valores de calcio y magnesio son similares a los del lote antes de realizar el proceso de lavado. Por otro lado, el estudio toxicológico en ratas, comprobó que los lotes a los cuales se les aplicó las diferentes variantes de lavado no provocaron irritabilidad gástrica a las dosis de 2 000 mg/kg de peso corporal, por lo que se puede afirmar que el proceso de lavado establecido es adecuado para garantizar la calidad de la materia prima.As part of the technological process optomization to obtain calcium citrate and magnesium from dolomites, we studied at bench scale, the washout stage to decrease the free citric acid content. Washout variants allowed to decrease the free citric acid content under 3 %, whereas the calcium and magnesium values are similar to those of batch before to carry out the wahout process. On the other hand, toxicity study in rats, proved that the batches where different washout variables were applied not provoke gastric irritability at doses of 2 000 mg/kg of body weight confirming that above mentioned established process is approproate to guarantee the raw material quality.

  19. 30 CFR 75.211 - Roof testing and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Roof testing and scaling. 75.211 Section 75.211 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.211 Roof testing and scaling. (a) A...

  20. Diagnostics at JINR LHEP photogun bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozdrin, M.A.; Balalykin, N.I.; Minashkin, V.F.; Shirkov, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    The photoinjector electron beam quality dramatically depends on the laser driver beam quality. For laser beam diagnostics a 'virtual cathode' system was realized at the JINR LHEP photogun bench. The system allows one to image laser beam profile at the cathode. The AVINE software complex developed in DESY Zeuthen is being used for imaging. Equipment for emittance measurement using the slit method was installed. The original emittance calculation software EmCa was created and tested with the laser beam.

  1. Development of Fuzzy Logic Controller for Quanser Bench-Top Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, M. H.; Mansor, H.; Gunawan, T. S.

    2017-11-01

    Bench-top helicopter is a laboratory scale helicopter that usually used as a testing bench of the real helicopter behavior. This helicopter is a 3 Degree of Freedom (DOF) helicopter which works by three different axes wshich are elevation, pitch and travel. Thus, fuzzy logic controller has been proposed to be implemented into Quanser bench-top helicopter because of its ability to work with non-linear system. The objective for this project is to design and apply fuzzy logic controller for Quanser bench-top helicopter. Other than that, fuzzy logic controller performance system has been simulated to analyze and verify its behavior over existing PID controller by using Matlab & Simulink software. In this research, fuzzy logic controller has been designed to control the elevation angle. After simulation has been performed, it can be seen that simulation result shows that fuzzy logic elevation control is working for 4°, 5° and 6°. These three angles produce zero steady state error and has a fast response. Other than that, performance comparisons have been performed between fuzzy logic controller and PID controller. Fuzzy logic elevation control has a better performance compared to PID controller where lower percentage overshoot and faster settling time have been achieved in 4°, 5° and 6° step response test. Both controller are have zero steady state error but fuzzy logic controller is managed to produce a better performance in term of settling time and percentage overshoot which make the proposed controller is reliable compared to the existing PID controller.

  2. The HSOB GAIA: a cryogenic high stability cesic optical bench for missions requiring sub-nanometric optical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courteau, Pascal; Poupinet, Anne; Kroedel, Mathias; Sarri, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    Global astrometry, very demanding in term of stability, requires extremely stable material for optical bench. CeSiC developed by ECM and Alcatel Alenia Space for mirrors and high stability structures, offers the best compromise in term of structural strength, stability and very high lightweight capability, with characteristics leading to be insensitive to thermo-elastic at cryogenic T°. The HSOB GAIA study realised by Alcatel Alenia Space under ESA contract aimed to design, develop and test a full scale representative High Stability Optical Bench in CeSiC. The bench has been equipped with SAGEIS-CSO laser metrology system MOUSE1, Michelson interferometer composed of integrated optics with a nm resolution. The HSOB bench has been submitted to an homogeneous T° step under vacuum to characterise the homothetic behaviour of its two arms. The quite negligible inter-arms differential measured with a nm range reproducibility, demonstrates that a complete 3D structure in CeSiC has the same CTE homogeneity as characterisation samples, fully in line with the GAIA need (1pm at 120K). This participates to the demonstration that CeSiC properties at cryogenic T° is fully appropriate to the manufacturing of complex highly stable optical structures. This successful study confirms ECM and Alcatel Alenia Space ability to define and manufacture monolithic lightweight highly stable optical structures, based on inner cells triangular design made only possible by the unique CeSiC manufacturing process.

  3. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

    2003-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

  4. TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

    2003-05-21

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

  5. TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

    2003-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

  6. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

    2003-05-21

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

  7. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful

  8. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

  9. Trends in large-scale testing of reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, T.E.

    2003-01-01

    Large-scale tests of reactor structures have been conducted at Sandia National Laboratories since the late 1970s. This paper describes a number of different large-scale impact tests, pressurization tests of models of containment structures, and thermal-pressure tests of models of reactor pressure vessels. The advantages of large-scale testing are evident, but cost, in particular limits its use. As computer models have grown in size, such as number of degrees of freedom, the advent of computer graphics has made possible very realistic representation of results - results that may not accurately represent reality. A necessary condition to avoiding this pitfall is the validation of the analytical methods and underlying physical representations. Ironically, the immensely larger computer models sometimes increase the need for large-scale testing, because the modeling is applied to increasing more complex structural systems and/or more complex physical phenomena. Unfortunately, the cost of large-scale tests is a disadvantage that will likely severely limit similar testing in the future. International collaborations may provide the best mechanism for funding future programs with large-scale tests. (author)

  10. In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  11. In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  12. Fiscal year 1993 1/25-scale sludge mobilization testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, M.R.; Golcar, G.R.; Hymas, C.R.; McKay, R.L.

    1995-04-01

    Sixteen 1/25-scale sludge mobilization experiments were conducted in fiscal year (FY) 1993. The results of this testing are presented in this document. The ability of a single, centrally-located, scale model mixer pump to resuspend a layer of simulated tank sludge was evaluated for five different simulant types. The resistance of these simulants to the mobilizing action of the mixer pump jets was not found to adequately correlate with simulant vane shear strength. The data indicate that the simulant cohesion, as quantified by tensile strength, may provide a good measure of mobilization resistance. A single test was done to evaluate whether indexed mixer pump rotation is significantly more effective than the planned continuous oscillation. No significant difference was found in the sludge mobilization caused by these two modes of operation. Two tests were conducted using a clay-based sludge simulant that contained approximately 5 wt% soluble solids. The distance to which the mixer pump jets were effective for this simulant was approximately 50% greater than on similar simulants that did not contain soluble solids. The implication is that sludge dissolution effects may significantly enhance the performance of mixer pumps in some tanks. The development of a means to correlate the magnitude of this effect with waste properties is a direction for future work. Two tests were performed with the goal of determining whether the 1/25-scale sludge mobilization data can be scaled linearly to 1/12-scale. The two 1/25-scale tests were conducted using the same simulant recipe as had been used in previous 1/12-scale tests. The difficulty of matching the 1/25-scale simulants, with those used previously is thought to have adversely affected the results. Further tests are needed to determine whether the data from sludge mobilization tests can be linearly scaled

  13. Unit-Weighted Scales Imply Models that Should Be Tested!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Beauducel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In several studies unit-weighted sum scales based on the unweighted sum of items are derived from the pattern of salient loadings in confirmatory factor analysis. The problem of this procedure is that the unit-weighted sum scales imply a model other than the initially tested confirmatory factor model. In consequence, it remains generally unknown how well the model implied by the unit-weighted sum scales fits the data. Nevertheless, the derived unit-weighted sum scales are often used in applied settings. The paper demonstrates how model parameters for the unit-weighted sum scales can be computed and tested by means of structural equation modeling. An empirical example based on a personality questionnaire and subsequent unit-weighted scale analyses are presented in order to demonstrate the procedure.

  14. Unit-Weighted Scales Imply Models that Should Be Tested!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauducel, Andre; Leue, Anja

    2013-01-01

    In several studies unit-weighted sum scales based on the unweighted sum of items are derived from the pattern of salient loadings in confirmatory factor analysis. The problem of this procedure is that the unit-weighted sum scales imply a model other than the initially tested confirmatory factor model. In consequence, it remains generally unknown…

  15. Test plan for engineering scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    This test plan describes experimental details of an engineering-scale electrostatic enclosure demonstration to be performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in fiscal year (FY)-93. This demonstration will investigate, in the engineering scale, the feasibility of using electrostatic enclosures and devices to control the spread of contaminants during transuranic waste handling operations. Test objectives, detailed experimental procedures, and data quality objectives necessary to perform the FY-93 experiments are included in this plan

  16. Homogeneity and scale testing of generalized gamma distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehlik, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive the exact distributions of the likelihood ratio tests of homogeneity and scale hypothesis when the observations are generalized gamma distributed. The special cases of exponential, Rayleigh, Weibull or gamma distributed observations are discussed exclusively. The photoemulsion experiment analysis and scale test with missing time-to-failure observations are present to illustrate the applications of methods discussed

  17. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holmes, Aimee E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lee, Kearn P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, Steven E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  18. Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2013-09-18

    This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

  19. Pelamis WEC - full-scale joint system test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yemm, R.

    2003-07-01

    This report describes the building and testing of a full-scale Pelamis Wave Energy Converter (WEC) two-axis joint system using a laboratory joint test rig. The main project objective to develop an intermediate demonstration model to confirm full scale control, hydraulic and data acquisition systems is discussed, and the key objectives of the programme are listed. Details are given of the semi-submerged articulated structure of cylindrical elements linked by hinged joints, and the integrated testing of all key components. A summary of the work programme and a description of the test rig are presented.

  20. Methods for testing of geometrical down-scaled rotor blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter

    as requirements for experimental facilities are very demanding and furthermore the time for performing the experimental test campaign and the cost are not well suitable for most research projects. This report deals with the advantages, disadvantages and open questions of using down-scaled testing on wind turbine......Full scale fatigue test is an important part of the development and design of wind turbine blades. Testing is also needed for the approval of the blades in order for them to be used on large wind turbines. Fatigue test of wind turbine blades was started in the beginning of the 1980s and has been...... further developed since then. Structures in composite materials are generally difficult and time consuming to test for fatigue resistance. Therefore, several methods for testing of blades have been developed and exist today. Those methods are presented in [1]. Current experimental test performed on full...

  1. One-fifth-scale and one-half-scale two-dimensional seismic tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, D.; Olsen, B.E.

    1978-06-01

    Uni-axial seismic tests were performed on 1 / 5 -scale and 1 / 2 -scale two-dimensional models of the HTGR core consisting of 73 graphite elements in a hexagonal array. Core displacement and velocity, boundary support force, and in-core element force were measured. The test rigs were excited in two directions: across-the-flats of an element and across-the-corners. Results from the two models were compared on a normalized scale basis to check the scaling laws

  2. Testing of materials and scale models for impact limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maji, A.K.; Satpathi, D.; Schryer, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminum Honeycomb and Polyurethane foam specimens were tested to obtain experimental data on the material's behavior under different loading conditions. This paper reports the dynamic tests conducted on the materials and on the design and testing of scale models made out of these open-quotes Impact Limiters,close quotes as they are used in the design of transportation casks. Dynamic tests were conducted on a modified Charpy Impact machine with associated instrumentation, and compared with static test results. A scale model testing setup was designed and used for preliminary tests on models being used by current designers of transportation casks. The paper presents preliminary results of the program. Additional information will be available and reported at the time of presentation of the paper

  3. Centrifugal contractors for laboratory-scale solvent extraction tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, R.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.

    1995-01-01

    A 2-cm contactor (minicontactor) was developed and used at Argonne National Laboratory for laboratory-scale testing of solvent extraction flowsheets. This new contactor requires only 1 L of simulated waste feed, which is significantly less than the 10 L required for the 4-cm unit that had previously been used. In addition, the volume requirements for the other aqueous and organic feeds are reduced correspondingly. This paper (1) discusses the design of the minicontactor, (2) describes results from having applied the minicontactor to testing various solvent extraction flowsheets, and (3) compares the minicontactor with the 4-cm contactor as a device for testing solvent extraction flowsheets on a laboratory scale

  4. Systems for animal exposure in full-scale fire tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Two systems for exposing animals in full-scale fire tests are described. Both systems involve the simultaneous exposure of two animal species, mice and rats, in modular units; determination of mortality, morbidity, and behavioral response; and analysis of the blood for carboxyhemoglobin. The systems described represent two of many possible options for obtaining bioassay data from full-scale fire tests. In situations where the temperatures to which the test animals are exposed can not be controlled, analytical techniques may be more appropriate than bioassay techniques.

  5. Impedance Determination from Bench Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm

    2000-01-01

    The concept of the coaxial wire technique as a bench method for beam coupling impedance measurements is presented. Starting with the lumped element impedance model formulae are given for impedance evaluation from measured scattering parameters, both for the longitudinal and transverse case and also for the loss-factor. Followed by a section on distributed impedances many hints, precautions and practical aspects for the proper use of the measuring instrument are mentioned. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on special methods in particular for simulation of slow beams, measurements beyond waveguide cutoff and resonator techniques for evaluation of very small impedances.

  6. Small-scale fixed wing airplane software verification flight test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Natasha R.

    The increased demand for micro Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV) driven by military requirements, commercial use, and academia is creating a need for the ability to quickly and accurately conduct low Reynolds Number aircraft design. There exist several open source software programs that are free or inexpensive that can be used for large scale aircraft design, but few software programs target the realm of low Reynolds Number flight. XFLR5 is an open source, free to download, software program that attempts to take into consideration viscous effects that occur at low Reynolds Number in airfoil design, 3D wing design, and 3D airplane design. An off the shelf, remote control airplane was used as a test bed to model in XFLR5 and then compared to flight test collected data. Flight test focused on the stability modes of the 3D plane, specifically the phugoid mode. Design and execution of the flight tests were accomplished for the RC airplane using methodology from full scale military airplane test procedures. Results from flight test were not conclusive in determining the accuracy of the XFLR5 software program. There were several sources of uncertainty that did not allow for a full analysis of the flight test results. An off the shelf drone autopilot was used as a data collection device for flight testing. The precision and accuracy of the autopilot is unknown. Potential future work should investigate flight test methods for small scale UAV flight.

  7. Influence of the "Slingshot" bench press training aid on bench press kinematics and neuromuscular activity in competitive powerlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, James H; Hunter, Angus; Di Virgilio, Thomas; Macgregor, Lewis J; Hamilton, D Lee

    2017-02-13

    This study examined the acute effects of the 'Slingshot' on bench-press performance, prime-mover surface electromyographic (sEMG) amplitude, and barbell velocity during maximal and submaximal bench-pressing in competitive male powerlifters. Fifteen male powerlifters (mean ± SD age: 27.05 ± 5.94 years; mass: 94.15kg; 1RM bench-press: 139.7 ± 16.79kg) participated in the study. Bench-press strength, average barbell velocity, and sEMG amplitude of the prime mover muscles (triceps brachii, pectoralis major and anterior deltoid) were measured during two conditions; 'Raw' (without use of any assistance) and 'Slingshot' [using the 'Slingshot' to perform both the weight achieved during 'Raw' 1RM testing (Raw max/SS), and absolute 1RM using the 'Slingshot' (SS)]. The results showed that the 'Slingshot' significantly increased bench press 1RM performance by a mean ± SD of 20.67kg ± 3.4kg. Barbell velocity and stick point analysis indicate that this improvement is likely driven by an increase in peak and pre-stick barbell velocity as triceps RMS was lower throughout all rep max phases with the 'Slingshot'. The 'Slingshot' also caused reductions in RMS, specifically of the triceps at all rep ranges but barbell velocity was better maintained in the last reps of all sets. These data indicate that the 'Slingshot' specifically de-loaded the triceps muscle throughout all rep ranges and provide assistance to maintaining barbell velocity under fatigue during later repetitions of multiple-repetition sets. The 'Slingshot' training aid could therefore be used in de-load phases of bench press training or as an over-reaching and velocity training aid.

  8. Large-Scale Multiobjective Static Test Generation for Web-Based Testing with Integer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M. L.; Hui, Siu Cheung; Fong, A. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based testing has become a ubiquitous self-assessment method for online learning. One useful feature that is missing from today's web-based testing systems is the reliable capability to fulfill different assessment requirements of students based on a large-scale question data set. A promising approach for supporting large-scale web-based…

  9. Engineering scale mixing system tests for MWTF title II design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.C.

    1994-01-01

    Mixing tests for the Multifunction Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) were conducted in 1/25 and 1/10 scale test tanks with different slurry levels, solids concentrations, different jet mixers and with simulated in-tank structures. The same test procedure was used as in the Title I program, documented in WHC-SD-W236A-ER-005. The test results support the scaling correlation derived previously in the Title I program. The tests also concluded that a partially filled tank requires less mixing power, and horizontal and angled jets in combination (H/A mixer) are significantly more effective than the two horizontal jet mixers (H/H mixer) when used for mixing slurry with a high solids concentrations

  10. Scaling, experiment, and code assessment on an integral testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.; Choi, S.W.; Lim, J.; Lee, D.Y.; Rassame, S.; Hibiki, T.; Ishii, M.

    2011-01-01

    A series of integral tests simulating different types of Loss-Of-Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) for new Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) design were conducted on an integral test facility (Purdue University Multi-Dimensional Integral Test Assembly, PUMA) facility. The PUMA facility was built with a scaling methodology addressing both the conservation principles and constitutive laws. A systemic study about the safety evaluation of the advanced passively safe BWR design has been performed with the collaboration of experiments on the scaled-down test facility and RELAP5/Mod3.3 code simulation. Various types of LOCA tests were performed, such as Main Steam Line Break (MSLB), Bottom Drain Line Break (BDLB), Gravity-Driven Line Break (GDLB), and Feed Water Line Break (FWLB). (author)

  11. Full Scale Test of a SSP 34m boxgirder 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Find Mølholt; Branner, Kim; Nielsen, Per Hørlyk

    was part of a proof of concept investigation for a patent. The tests were performed at the Blaest test facility in August 2007. The tests are an important part of a research project established in cooperation between Risø National Laboratory for sustainable energy – Technical university of Denmark, SSP......This report presents the setup and result from three static full-scale tests of the reinforced glass fiber/epoxy box girder used in a 34m wind turbine blade. One test was without reinforcement one with cap reinforcement and the final test was with rib reinforcement. The cap reinforcement test......-Technology A/S and Blaest (Blade test centre A/S) and it has been performed as a part of Find Mølholt Jensen’s PhD thesis. This report is the second data report containing the complete test data for the three full-scale tests. This report deals only with the test methods and the obtained results...

  12. Rotor blade full-scale fatigue testing technology and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Hørlyk; Berring, Peter; Pavese, Christian

    was started in the beginning of the 1980´s and has been further developed since then. Structures in composite materials are generally difficult and time consuming to test for fatigue resistance. Therefore, several methods for testing of blades have been developed and exist today. These methods......Full scale fatigue test is an important part of the development and design of wind turbine blades. Testing is also needed for the approval of the blades in order for them to be used on large wind turbines. However, usually only one prototype blade is tested. Fatigue test of wind turbine blades...... will be presented in this report giving the blade test facility operator a guide to choose the method that best fit the needs and economic constraints. The state of the art method is currently dual axis mass resonance, where the purpose of the test is to emulate the loads the blades encounter in operation....

  13. The upgraded WIYN bench spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Patricia M.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Willmarth, Daryl; Glaspey, John; Poczulp, Gary; Blanco, Dan; Britanik, Lana; McDougall, Eugene; Corson, Charles; Liang, Ming; Keyes, Joe; Jacoby, George

    2010-07-01

    We present the as-built design overview and post-installation performance of the upgraded WIYN Bench Spectrograph. This Bench is currently fed by either of the general-use multi-fiber instruments at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak, the Hydra multi-object positioner, and the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU). It is very versatile, and can be configured to accommodate low-order, echelle, and volume phase holographic gratings. The overarching goal of the upgrade was to increase the average spectrograph throughput by ~60% while minimizing resolution loss (three major thrusts: (1) a new CCD was provided with a nearly constant 30% increase is throughput over 320-1000 nm; (2) two Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings were delivered; and (3) installed a new all-refractive collimator that properly matches the output fiber irradiance (EE90) and optimizes pupil placement. Initial analysis of commissioning data indicates that the total throughput of the system has increased 50-70% using the 600 l/mm surface ruled grating, indicating that the upgrade has achieved its goal. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that overall image resolution meets the requirement of <20% loss.

  14. Dish/Stirling Hybrid-Receiver Sub-Scale Tests and Full-Scale Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andraka, Charles; Bohn, Mark S.; Corey, John; Mehos, Mark; Moreno, James; Rawlinson, Scott

    1999-01-01

    We have designed and tested a prototype dish/Stirling hybrid-receiver combustion system. The system consists of a pre-mixed natural-gas burner heating a pin-finned sodium heat pipe. The design emphasizes simplicity, low cost, and ruggedness. Our test was on a 1/6 th -scale device, with a nominal firing rate of 18kWt, a power throughput of 13kWt, and a sodium vapor temperature of 750 ampersand deg;C. The air/fuel mixture was electrically preheated to 640 ampersand deg;C to simulate recuperation. The test rig was instrumented for temperatures, pressures, flow rates, overall leak rate, and exhaust emissions. The data verify our burner and heat-transfer models. Performance and post-test examinations validate our choice of materials and fabrication methods. Based on the 1/6 th -scale results, we are designing a till-scale hybrid receiver. This is a fully-integrated system, including burner, pin-fin primary heat exchanger, recuperator (in place of the electrical pre-heater used in the prototype system), solar absorber, and sodium heat pipe. The major challenges of the design are to avoid pre-ignition, achieve robust heat-pipe performance, and attain long life of the burner matrix, recuperator, and flue-gas seals. We have used computational fluid dynamics extensively in designing to avoid pre-ignition and for designing the heat-pipe wick, and we have used individual component tests and results of the 1/6 th -scale test to optimize for long life. In this paper, we present our design philosophy and basic details of our design. We describe the sub-scale test rig and compare test results with predictions. Finally, we outline the evolution of our full-scale design, and present its current status

  15. Methods for Quantifying the Uncertainties of LSIT Test Parameters, Test Results, and Full-Scale Mixing Performance Using Models Developed from Scaled Test Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Cooley, Scott K.; Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This report discusses the statistical methods for quantifying uncertainties in 1) test responses and other parameters in the Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT), and 2) estimates of coefficients and predictions of mixing performance from models that relate test responses to test parameters. Testing at a larger scale has been committed to by Bechtel National, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ''address uncertainties and increase confidence in the projected, full-scale mixing performance and operations'' in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  16. Methods for Quantifying the Uncertainties of LSIT Test Parameters, Test Results, and Full-Scale Mixing Performance Using Models Developed from Scaled Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cooley, Scott K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuhn, William L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rector, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report discusses the statistical methods for quantifying uncertainties in 1) test responses and other parameters in the Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT), and 2) estimates of coefficients and predictions of mixing performance from models that relate test responses to test parameters. Testing at a larger scale has been committed to by Bechtel National, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to “address uncertainties and increase confidence in the projected, full-scale mixing performance and operations” in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  17. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the NASA Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Program initiated the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program by obtaining two CH-46E helicopters from the Navy CH-46E Program Office (PMA-226) at the Navy Flight Readiness Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. Full-scale crash tests were planned to assess dynamic responses of transport-category rotorcraft under combined horizontal and vertical impact loading. The first crash test (TRACT 1) was performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR), which enables the study of critical interactions between the airframe, seat, and occupant during a controlled crash environment. The CH-46E fuselage is categorized as a medium-lift rotorcraft with fuselage dimensions comparable to a regional jet or business jet. The first TRACT test (TRACT 1) was conducted in August 2013. The primary objectives for TRACT 1 were to: (1) assess improvements to occupant loads and displacement with the use of crashworthy features such as pre-tensioning active restraints and energy absorbing seats, (2) develop novel techniques for photogrammetric data acquisition to measure occupant and airframe kinematics, and (3) provide baseline data for future comparison with a retrofitted airframe configuration. Crash test conditions for TRACT 1 were 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocity onto soft soil, which represent a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. The extraordinary value of the TRACT 1 test was reflected by the breadth of meaningful experiments. A total of 8 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and photogrammetric techniques. A combination of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. Loads from ATDs in energy

  18. Plan for 3-D full-scale earthquake testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, K.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the lessons learnt from the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention plan to construct the 3-D Full-Scale Earthquake Testing Facility. This will be the world's largest and strongest shaking table facility. This paper describes the outline of the project for this facility. This facility will be completed in early 2005. (author)

  19. Full-scale load tests of Pearl-Chain arches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halding, Philip Skov; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup

    2017-01-01

    -Decks: First an investigation of the system’s elastic response (maximum load of 648kN), and second a demonstration of its collapse mechanism and ultimate capacity (maximum load of 970kN). The full-scale test showed formation of plastic hinges and clear warning signs are observed at 84% of the failure load...

  20. Allometric Scaling of Wingate Anaerobic Power Test Scores in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzler, Ronald K.; Stickley, Christopher D.; Kimura, Iris F.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we developed allometric exponents for scaling Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) power data that are reflective in controlling for body mass (BM) and lean body mass (LBM) and established a normative WAnT data set for college-age women. One hundred women completed a standard WAnT. Allometric exponents and percentile ranks for peak (PP)…

  1. Lessons from Small-scale Standardised Testing of English Reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The superior performance by the public school can partly be explained by teachers teaching experience, most of them have been teaching for more than ten years and greater community support for the school. It is recommended that data produced through small-scale standardised testing should be used by school ...

  2. Clinimetric testing of the comprehensive cervical dystonia rating scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comella, Cynthia L; Perlmutter, Joel S; Jinnah, Hyder A; Waliczek, Tracy A; Rosen, Ami R; Galpern, Wendy R; Adler, Charles A; Barbano, Richard L; Factor, Stewart A; Goetz, Christopher G; Jankovic, Joseph; Reich, Stephen G; Rodriguez, Ramon L; Severt, William L; Zurowski, Mateusz; Fox, Susan H; Stebbins, Glenn T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test the clinimetric properties of the Comprehensive Cervical Dystonia Rating Scale. This is a modular scale with modifications of the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (composed of three subscales assessing motor severity, disability, and pain) now referred to as the revised Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Scale-2; a newly developed psychiatric screening instrument; and the Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile-58 as a quality of life measure. Ten dystonia experts rated subjects with cervical dystonia using the comprehensive scale. Clinimetric techniques assessed each module of the scale for reliability, item correlation, and factor structure. There were 208 cervical dystonia patients (73% women; age, 59 ± 10 years; duration, 15 ± 12 years). Internal consistency of the motor severity subscale was acceptable (Cronbach's alpha = 0.57). Item to total correlations showed that elimination of items with low correlations (Rating Scale are internally consistent with a logical factor structure. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. USING BENCH PRESS LOAD TO PREDICT UPPER BODY EXERCISE LOADS IN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del P. Wong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m-2 were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p < 0.01. The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises (r ranged from 0.80 to 0.93, p < 0.01. Linear regression revealed that the bench press load was a significant (R2 range from 0.64 to 0.86, p < 0.01 predictor for the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. The following 6RM prediction equations were determined: (a Hammer curl = Bench press load (0.28 + 6.30 kg, (b Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33 + 6.20 kg, (c Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33 - 0.60 kg, and (d Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42 + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises.

  4. Horizontal impact testing of quarter scale flasks using masonry targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tufton, E.P.S.

    1985-01-01

    The programme leading up to the Train Crash Demonstration included investigation of flask impacts, in horizontal motion, against masonry targets representing abutment structures. An outline is given of a series of eight tests, of which five are described in detail. All the tests used quarter-scale flasks, and the design and construction of the appropriate brick and stone masonry targets is described. A summary of results is given in terms of damage to the model flask compared with the more severe damage seen in regulatory drop tests. (author)

  5. Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m 3 Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes

  6. Concepts for Small-Scale Testing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marschman, Steven Craig [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Winston, Philip Lon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report documents a concept for a small-scale test involving between one and three Boiling Water Rector (BWR) high burnup (HBU) fuel assemblies. This test would be similar to the DOE funded High Burn-Up (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project to confirm the behavior of used high burn-up fuel under prototypic conditions, only on a smaller scale. The test concept proposed would collect data from fuel stored under prototypic dry storage conditions to mimic, as closely as possible, the conditions HBU UNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) for multi-year storage.

  7. Experimental Test Bench for Magnetorheological Damper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltosi, Alexandru; Hule, Voichiţa; Ţîrdea, Amalia; Simoiu, Dorin; Chiriac, Adrian

    2009-05-01

    In the paper it is presented a non conventional method to characterize the work of a semi-active damper with magnetorheological fluid, using a modified Charpy pendulum. In order to obtain different impact velocities, the pendulum can be launched at different angles; in this way, it is modified the kinetic energy before the impact, which can be considered as input energy in system. The measurements were effected using the Spider-8 device and the dedicated Catman Program.

  8. Properties Important To Mixing For WTP Large Scale Integrated Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koopman, D.; Martino, C.; Poirier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being planned by Bechtel National, Inc. to address uncertainties in the full scale mixing performance of the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Testing will use simulated waste rather than actual Hanford waste. Therefore, the use of suitable simulants is critical to achieving the goals of the test program. External review boards have raised questions regarding the overall representativeness of simulants used in previous mixing tests. Accordingly, WTP requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to assist with development of simulants for use in LSIT. Among the first tasks assigned to SRNL was to develop a list of waste properties that matter to pulse-jet mixer (PJM) mixing of WTP tanks. This report satisfies Commitment 5.2.3.1 of the Department of Energy Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2010-2: physical properties important to mixing and scaling. In support of waste simulant development, the following two objectives are the focus of this report: (1) Assess physical and chemical properties important to the testing and development of mixing scaling relationships; (2) Identify the governing properties and associated ranges for LSIT to achieve the Newtonian and non-Newtonian test objectives. This includes the properties to support testing of sampling and heel management systems. The test objectives for LSIT relate to transfer and pump out of solid particles, prototypic integrated operations, sparger operation, PJM controllability, vessel level/density measurement accuracy, sampling, heel management, PJM restart, design and safety margin, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Verification and Validation (V and V) and comparison, performance testing and scaling, and high temperature operation. The slurry properties that are most important to Performance Testing and Scaling depend on the test objective and rheological classification of the slurry (i

  9. An Improved Test for Detecting Multiplicative Homeostatic Synaptic Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jimok; Tsien, Richard W.; Alger, Bradley E.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostatic scaling of synaptic strengths is essential for maintenance of network “gain”, but also poses a risk of losing the distinctions among relative synaptic weights, which are possibly cellular correlates of memory storage. Multiplicative scaling of all synapses has been proposed as a mechanism that would preserve the relative weights among them, because they would all be proportionately adjusted. It is crucial for this hypothesis that all synapses be affected identically, but whether or not this actually occurs is difficult to determine directly. Mathematical tests for multiplicative synaptic scaling are presently carried out on distributions of miniature synaptic current amplitudes, but the accuracy of the test procedure has not been fully validated. We now show that the existence of an amplitude threshold for empirical detection of miniature synaptic currents limits the use of the most common method for detecting multiplicative changes. Our new method circumvents the problem by discarding the potentially distorting subthreshold values after computational scaling. This new method should be useful in assessing the underlying neurophysiological nature of a homeostatic synaptic scaling transformation, and therefore in evaluating its functional significance. PMID:22615990

  10. Electromagnetic pulse/transient threat testing of protection devices for amateur/military affiliate radio system equipment. Volume 3. Test data, electromagnetic pulse testing of protection devices. Section 6. Equipment and devices bench check measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodson, D.; Frizzell, J.; Higdon, T.; Rabke, W.

    1985-10-01

    The results of two test programs are presented: one to evaluate existing transient suppression devices and components, and one to evaluate the response of amateur radio equipment to an EMP transient environment. Oscilloscope photographs of the following transmitters/receivers are included: YAESU FT 726R, YAESU F7 757GX, ICOM IC-745, ICOM IC-27A, ICOM IC-02AT, ICOM IC-271A, ICOM IC-471A, Kenwood TS-4305, Kenwood TR-2600, Kenwood 7930, and Swan 250.

  11. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Gareth L; Thornton, Steven F; Wilson, Ryan D

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  12. Identification of small-scale low and high permeability layers using single well forced-gradient tracer tests: Fluorescent dye imaging and modelling at the laboratory-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barns, Gareth L.; Thornton, Steven F.; Wilson, Ryan D.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in aquifer permeability, which creates paths of varying mass flux and spatially complex contaminant plumes, can complicate the interpretation of contaminant fate and transport in groundwater. Identifying the location of high mass flux paths is critical for the reliable estimation of solute transport parameters and design of groundwater remediation schemes. Dipole flow tracer tests (DFTTs) and push-pull tests (PPTs) are single well forced-gradient tests which have been used at field-scale to estimate aquifer hydraulic and transport properties. In this study, the potential for PPTs and DFTTs to resolve the location of layered high- and low-permeability layers in granular porous media was investigated with a pseudo 2-D bench-scale aquifer model. Finite element fate and transport modelling was also undertaken to identify appropriate set-ups for in situ tests to determine the type, magnitude, location and extent of such layered permeability contrasts at the field-scale. The characteristics of flow patterns created during experiments were evaluated using fluorescent dye imaging and compared with the breakthrough behaviour of an inorganic conservative tracer. The experimental results show that tracer breakthrough during PPTs is not sensitive to minor permeability contrasts for conditions where there is no hydraulic gradient. In contrast, DFTTs are sensitive to the type and location of permeability contrasts in the host media and could potentially be used to establish the presence and location of high or low mass flux paths. Numerical modelling shows that the tracer peak breakthrough time and concentration in a DFTT is sensitive to the magnitude of the permeability contrast (defined as the permeability of the layer over the permeability of the bulk media) between values of 0.01-20. DFTTs are shown to be more sensitive to deducing variations in the contrast, location and size of aquifer layered permeability contrasts when a shorter central packer is used

  13. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Kurath, Dean E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Mahoney, Lenna A.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak event involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids that behave as a Newtonian fluid. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and in processing facilities across the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are mostly absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale testing. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b), and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used

  14. On the scaling of pressure for integral test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Marzo, M.; Almenas, K.; Hsu, Y.Y.

    1991-01-01

    Two Small Break LOCA transients are compared to illustrate a scaling methodology for reduced pressure integral facilities. Mapping test 3004 is conducted in the MIST full pressure, full height facility. The counter-part test MIS0317 is scaled and performed in the reduced height, reduced pressure UMCP facility. Inventory is used as the chronological scale and pressure, normalized with the initial and system saturation pressures, is used as characteristic parameter to describe the system behavior. The appropriately normalized results conclusively demonstrate that: (a) the same phenomena are observed in the two facilities; (b) the sequence of events is analogous and (c) the trends described by the normalized pressure versus inventory traces are in good quantitative agreement. Each energy transport mode traversed by the two facilities is compared and the phenomena present are described in detail. The differences between the high and reduced pressure test are outlined. The findings clearly indicate that pressure and height can be scaled for transients where limited boundary conditions are applied (Auxiliary Feed Water only) and where the break is subcooled. A statement on sensitivity to the initial conditions is also included to define the limitations of the quantitative results. (orig.)

  15. Commensurate scale relations: Precise tests of quantum chromodynamics without scale or scheme ambiguity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Lu, H.J.

    1994-10-01

    We derive commensurate scale relations which relate perturbatively calculable QCD observables to each other, including the annihilation ratio R e+ e - , the heavy quark potential, τ decay, and radiative corrections to structure function sum rules. For each such observable one can define an effective charge, such as α R (√s)/π ≡ R e+ e - (√s)/(3Σe q 2 )-1. The commensurate scale relation connecting the effective charges for observables A and B has the form α A (Q A ) α B (Q B )(1 + r A/Bπ / αB + hor-ellipsis), where the coefficient r A/B is independent of the number of flavors ∫ contributing to coupling renormalization, as in BLM scale-fixing. The ratio of scales Q A /Q B is unique at leading order and guarantees that the observables A and B pass through new quark thresholds at the same physical scale. In higher orders a different renormalization scale Q n* is assigned for each order n in the perturbative series such that the coefficients of the series are identical to that of a invariant theory. The commensurate scale relations and scales satisfy the renormalization group transitivity rule which ensures that predictions in PQCD are independent of the choice of an intermediate renormalization scheme C. In particular, scale-fixed predictions can be made without reference to theoretically constructed singular renormalization schemes such as MS. QCD can thus be tested in a new and precise way by checking that the effective charges of observables track both in their relative normalization and in their commensurate scale dependence. The commensurate scale relations which relate the radiative corrections to the annihilation ratio R e + e - to the radiative corrections for the Bjorken and Gross-Llewellyn Smith sum rules are particularly elegant and interesting

  16. Phase III (full scale) agitated mixing test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruff, D.T.

    1994-01-01

    Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A (WRAP 2A) is the proposed second module of the WRAP facility. This facility will provide the required treatment for contact Handled (CH) Low Level (LL) Mixed Waste (MW) to allow its permanent disposal. Solidification of a portion of this waste using a cement based grout has been selected in order to reduce the toxicity and mobility of the waste in the disposal site. Mixing of the waste with the cement paste and material handling constraints/requirements associated with the mixed material is, therefore, a key process in the overall treatment strategy. This test plan addresses Phase 3, Full Scale Testing. The objectives of these tests are to determine if there are scale-up issues associated with the mixing results obtained in Phase 1 and 2 mixing tests, verify the workability of mixtures resulting from previous formulation development efforts (Waste Immobilization Development [WID]), and provide a baseline for WRAP 2A mixing equipment design. To this end, the following objectives are of particular interest: determine geometric influence of mixing blade at full scale (i.e., size, type, and location: height/offset); determine if similar results in terms of mixing effectiveness and product quality are achievable at this scale; determine if vibration is as effective at this larger scale in fluidizing the mixture and aiding in cleaning the vessel; determine if baffles or sweeping blades are needed to aid in mixing at the larger size and for cleaning the vessel; and determine quality of the poured monolithic product and investigate exotherm and filling influences at this larger size

  17. Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale: development and psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiro, Rei

    2009-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to develop and test the psychometric properties of the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale. The importance of cooperation between healthcare professionals is widely acknowledged in Europe and the United States of America, but there have been no specific studies of interactions between healthcare professionals or of nurse-physician cooperation in Japan. The 51-item Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale was developed using a process of item design, item refinement, and testing for reliability and validity. Random sampling was used to identify potential respondents from 27 of the 87 acute care hospitals in one city in Japan in 2006. Valid responses were obtained from 446 physicians and 1217 nurses (response rate 78.7% for nurses, and 54.4% for physicians). Construct validity was first confirmed by an exploratory factor analysis and then by a confirmatory factor analysis. Finally, a simultaneous analysis of several groups was performed. The test-retest method and Cronbach's alpha coefficients were used to assess reliability. Exploratory factor analysis yielded three factors. The three-factor models were confirmed by a confirmatory factor analysis (CFI >0.9, RMSEA test-retest reliability correlations were all 0.7 or above. Internal consistency was demonstrated by a Cronbach's alpha = 0.8 or above. The Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale can be used to establish standards for nurse-physician collaboration, to measure the frequency of collaborative activity, and to verify unit-specific relationships between collaboration and quality of care.

  18. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Additional Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, G. N.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2013-08-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. To expand the data set upon which the WTP accident and safety analyses were based, an aerosol spray leak testing program was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL’s test program addressed two key technical areas to improve the WTP methodology (Larson and Allen 2010). The first technical area was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where slurry particles may plug the hole and prevent high-pressure sprays. The results from an effort to address this first technical area can be found in Mahoney et al. (2012a). The second technical area was to determine aerosol droplet size distribution and total droplet volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, including sprays from larger breaches and sprays of slurries for which literature data are largely absent. To address the second technical area, the testing program collected aerosol generation data at two scales, commonly referred to as small-scale and large-scale. The small-scale testing and resultant data are described in Mahoney et al. (2012b) and the large-scale testing and resultant data are presented in Schonewill et al. (2012). In tests at both scales, simulants were used to mimic the

  19. Health Belief Model Scale for Cervical Cancer and Pap Smear Test: psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Gulten; Akyuz, Aygul; Açikel, Cengiz Han

    2011-02-01

    This study is a report of the development and psychometric testing of the Health Belief Model Scale for Cervical Cancer and the Pap Smear Test. While the Champion Health Belief Model scales have been tested extensively for breast cancer and screening for this, evaluation of these scales in explaining the beliefs of women with regard to cervical cancer and the Pap Smear Test has only received limited attention. This methodological research was carried out in Turkey in 2007. The data were collected with 237 randomly selected women who met the criteria for inclusion and agreed to participate in this study. The Champion Health Belief Model scales were translated into Turkish, adapted for cervical cancer, validated by professional experts, translated back into English and pilot-tested. Factor analysis yielded five factors: Pap smear benefits and health motivation, Pap smear barriers, seriousness, susceptibility and health motivation. Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients for the five subscales ranged from 0·62 to 0·86, and test-retest reliability coefficients ranged from 0·79 to 0·87 for the subscales. The Health Belief Model Scale for Cervical Cancer and the Pap Smear Test was found to be a valid and reliable tool in assessing the women's health beliefs. Understanding the beliefs of women in respect of cervical cancer and the Pap Smear Test will help healthcare professionals to develop more effective cervical cancer screening programmes. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Transfer of Emission Test Data from Small Scale to Full Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Gunnar P.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Test conditions such as temperature, relative humidity, and air velocities are chosen within the range that are found in ventilated rooms. H:owever, the difference in scale can lead to some problems and misconception of the size of the actual emission rate for a building material. This paper high...

  1. Gait in children with cerebral palsy : observer reliability of Physician Rating Scale and Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maathuis, KGB; van der Schans, CP; van Iperen, A; Rietman, HS; Geertzen, JHB

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the Physician Rating Scale (PRS) and the Edinburgh Visual Gait Analysis Interval Testing (GAIT) scale for use in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Both assessment scales are quantitative observational scales, evaluating

  2. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  3. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME's) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump

  4. Comparison of Test and Finite Element Analysis for Two Full-Scale Helicopter Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Horta,Lucas G.

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analyses have been performed for two full-scale crash tests of an MD-500 helicopter. The first crash test was conducted to evaluate the performance of a composite deployable energy absorber under combined flight loads. In the second crash test, the energy absorber was removed to establish the baseline loads. The use of an energy absorbing device reduced the impact acceleration levels by a factor of three. Accelerations and kinematic data collected from the crash tests were compared to analytical results. Details of the full-scale crash tests and development of the system-integrated finite element model are briefly described along with direct comparisons of acceleration magnitudes and durations for the first full-scale crash test. Because load levels were significantly different between tests, models developed for the purposes of predicting the overall system response with external energy absorbers were not adequate under more severe conditions seen in the second crash test. Relative error comparisons were inadequate to guide model calibration. A newly developed model calibration approach that includes uncertainty estimation, parameter sensitivity, impact shape orthogonality, and numerical optimization was used for the second full-scale crash test. The calibrated parameter set reduced 2-norm prediction error by 51% but did not improve impact shape orthogonality.

  5. The Grief Support in Healthcare Scale: development and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Keith A; Ewen, Heidi H; Miles, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    Social support is an important factor to consider in understanding the grief process. However, existing measures of social support fail to account adequately for the unique characteristics of grief experienced by healthcare workers in relation to the deaths of patients or nursing home residents. The purposes of this study were to develop and to test a grief support measure specific to the experiences of healthcare workers. Using a cross-sectional design, 380 nursing assistants completed self-administered surveys focusing on grief and loss in the nursing home setting. Exploratory factor analysis and regression analysis were conducted to test the psychometric properties of the Grief Support in Healthcare Scale (GSHCS) and to investigate the scale's relationships with grief outcomes. Reflective of the theory of disenfranchised grief, the 15 items of the GSHCS were loaded onto three distinct factors: recognition of the relationship, acknowledgement of the loss, and inclusion of the griever. Reliability was acceptable to high across these factors (Cronbach's α of .89, .86, and .78, respectively). Regression analysis indicated that the three subscales of the GSHCS were related significantly to both distress from grief and growth from grief, yet these relationships were unique for each factor. This research demonstrated that the GSHCS has acceptable reliability and face validity for understanding grief in healthcare workers and may aid in the development of interventions targeted at enfranchising grief in this population. Additional testing is needed to estimate the validity and the reliability of the scale with other groups of healthcare workers.

  6. PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2010-05-21

    This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

  7. Development and testing of the health care system distrust scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Abigail; Peters, Nikki; Shea, Judy A; Armstrong, Katrina

    2004-01-01

    Distrust of the health care system may be a significant barrier to seeking medical care, adhering to preventive health care and treatment regimens, and participating in medical research. To describe the development and psychometric testing of an instrument (the Health Care System Distrust Scale) to measure distrust of the health care system. Scale development involved 2 phases. In Phase 1, a pilot instrument was developed based on a conceptual model of health care-related distrust. Draft items were created using focus group sessions with members of the general public, literature review, and expert opinion. Draft items were pilot tested with 55 individuals waiting to be assigned to jury duty at the Municipal Court of Philadelphia. A priori, candidate items for elimination or revision included those with >5% missing data, extremely low or high interitem or item-total correlations, or those having a negative effect on the scale's internal consistency. In Phase 2, we conducted a survey of 400 prospective jurors to assess the reliability and validity of the final scale scores. In Phase 1, a 10-item scale was constructed that included 4 items measuring honesty, 2 items measuring confidentiality, 2 items measuring competence, and 2 items measuring fidelity. The participants in Phase 2 had a mean age of 41 years. Forty-three percent were African-American, 45% white, and 4% Hispanic. Scores on the Health Care System Distrust scale ranged from 12 to 46 with a possible range from 10 to 50. The mean score was 29.4 with a standard deviation of 6.33. No item had over 5% missing data. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was 0.75. Item-total correlations ranged from 0.27 to 0.57. Principal components analysis revealed 1 general component accounting for 32% of the variance. Nine of the variables had loadings higher than 0.40. As predicted, distrust of the health care system was higher among African Americans than whites and was inversely correlated with trust in personal

  8. Testing general relativity at cosmological scales: Implementation and parameter correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossett, Jason N.; Ishak, Mustapha; Moldenhauer, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The testing of general relativity at cosmological scales has become a possible and timely endeavor that is not only motivated by the pressing question of cosmic acceleration but also by the proposals of some extensions to general relativity that would manifest themselves at large scales of distance. We analyze here correlations between modified gravity growth parameters and some core cosmological parameters using the latest cosmological data sets including the refined Cosmic Evolution Survey 3D weak lensing. We provide the parametrized modified growth equations and their evolution. We implement known functional and binning approaches, and propose a new hybrid approach to evolve the modified gravity parameters in redshift (time) and scale. The hybrid parametrization combines a binned redshift dependence and a smooth evolution in scale avoiding a jump in the matter power spectrum. The formalism developed to test the consistency of current and future data with general relativity is implemented in a package that we make publicly available and call ISiTGR (Integrated Software in Testing General Relativity), an integrated set of modified modules for the publicly available packages CosmoMC and CAMB, including a modified version of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe-galaxy cross correlation module of Ho et al. and a new weak-lensing likelihood module for the refined Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey weak gravitational lensing tomography data. We obtain parameter constraints and correlation coefficients finding that modified gravity parameters are significantly correlated with σ 8 and mildly correlated with Ω m , for all evolution methods. The degeneracies between σ 8 and modified gravity parameters are found to be substantial for the functional form and also for some specific bins in the hybrid and binned methods indicating that these degeneracies will need to be taken into consideration when using future high precision data.

  9. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2013-05-29

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and net generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of antifoam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  10. Using Bench Press Load to Predict Upper Body Exercise Loads in Physically Active Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Del P.; Ngo, Kwan-Lung; Tse, Michael A.; Smith, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether loads for assistance exercises of the upper body can be predicted from the loads of the bench press exercise. Twenty-nine physically active collegiate students (age: 22.6 ± 2.5; weight training experience: 2.9 ± 2.1 years; estimated 1RM bench press: 54.31 ± 14.60 kg; 1RM: body weight ratio: 0.80 ± 0.22; BMI: 22.7 ± 2.1 kg·m-2) were recruited. The 6RM loads for bench press, barbell bicep curl, overhead dumbbell triceps extension, hammer curl and dumbbell shoulder press were measured. Test-retest reliability for the 5 exercises as determined by Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was very high to nearly perfect (0.82-0.98, p Barbell biceps curl = Bench press load (0.33) + 6.20 kg, (c) Overhead triceps extension = Bench press load (0.33) - 0.60 kg, and (d) Dumbbell shoulder press = Bench press load (0.42) + 5.84 kg. The difference between the actual load and the predicted load using the four equations ranged between 6.52% and 8.54%, such difference was not significant. Fitness professionals can use the 6RM bench press load as a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. Key points The bench press load was significantly correlated with the loads of the 4 assistance exercises. No significant differences were found between the actual load and the predicted load in the four equations. 6RM bench press load can be a time effective and accurate method to predict training loads for upper body assistance exercises. PMID:24149723

  11. Hydrogen-combustion analyses of large-scale tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gido, R.G.; Koestel, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report uses results of the large-scale tests with turbulence performed by the Electric Power Research Institute at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate hydrogen burn-analysis procedures based on lumped-parameter codes like COMPARE-H2 and associated burn-parameter models. The test results: (1) confirmed, in a general way, the procedures for application to pulsed burning, (2) increased significantly our understanding of the burn phenomenon by demonstrating that continuous burning can occur, and (3) indicated that steam can terminate continuous burning. Future actions recommended include: (1) modification of the code to perform continuous-burn analyses, which is demonstrated, (2) analyses to determine the type of burning (pulsed or continuous) that will exist in nuclear containments and the stable location if the burning is continuous, and (3) changes to the models for estimating burn parameters

  12. Full scale torch tests on spent fuel cask shipping system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, M.G.; Trujillo, A.A.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Joseph, B.J.; Eggers, P.E.; Crawford, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    Full scale experimental measurements, including the instrumentation designed to obtain the data, are presented on the thermal effects of torch fires on a large, spent nuclear fuel shipping cask. The measured temperature data in the various materials of the multilayered cask are unique, since no torch tests have been previously performed on a cask: These data were obtained during a series of four torch tests which simulate a situation in which the relief valve of a liquefied gas tank railcar has been opened and and the contents are vented and ignited so that the resultant torch impinges on the cask. The modified cask instrumentation geometry and materials are discussed. Temperature data throughout the cask are compared for two cask on the corrugated outer jacket surface, within the neutron shield, on the carbon steel shell, on the inner stainless steel shell and near the cask head closure seals are presented for the four torch tests

  13. Small-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Brown, Garrett N.; Kurath, Dean E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Smith, Dennese M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Song, Chen; Daniel, Richard C.; Wells, Beric E.; Tran, Diana N.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-11-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  14. A small-scale study of magneto-rheological track vibration isolation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Mu, Wenjun; Zhang, Luyang; Wang, Xiaojie

    2016-04-01

    A magneto-rheological bearing (MRB) is proposed to improve the vibration isolation performance of a floating slab track system. However, it's difficult to carry out the test for the full-scale track vibration isolation system in the laboratory. In this paper, the research is based on scale analysis of the floating slab track system, from the point view of the dimensionless of the dynamic characteristics of physical quantity, to establish a small scale test bench system for the MRBs. A small scale MRB with squeeze mode using magneto-rheological grease is designed and its performance is tested. The major parameters of a small scale test bench are obtained according to the similarity theory. The force transmissibility ratio and the relative acceleration transmissibility ratio are selected as evaluation index of system similarity. Dynamics of these two similarity systems are calculated by MATLAB experiment. Simulation results show that the dynamics of the prototype and scale models have good similarity. Further, a test bench is built according to the small-scale model parameter analysis. The experiment shows that the bench testing results are consistency with that of theoretical model in evaluating the vibration force and acceleration. Therefore, the small-scale study of magneto-rheological track vibration isolation system based on similarity theory reveals the isolation performance of a real slab track prototype system.

  15. Development of a Large Scale, High Speed Wheel Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoleon, Anthony; Seltzer, Donald; Thornton, Richard; Thompson, Marc

    1996-01-01

    Draper Laboratory, with its internal research and development budget, has for the past two years been funding a joint effort with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the development of a large scale, high speed wheel test facility. This facility was developed to perform experiments and carry out evaluations on levitation and propulsion designs for MagLev systems currently under consideration. The facility was developed to rotate a large (2 meter) wheel which could operate with peripheral speeds of greater than 100 meters/second. The rim of the wheel was constructed of a non-magnetic, non-conductive composite material to avoid the generation of errors from spurious forces. A sensor package containing a multi-axis force and torque sensor mounted to the base of the station, provides a signal of the lift and drag forces on the package being tested. Position tables mounted on the station allow for the introduction of errors in real time. A computer controlled data acquisition system was developed around a Macintosh IIfx to record the test data and control the speed of the wheel. This paper describes the development of this test facility. A detailed description of the major components is presented. Recently completed tests carried out on a novel Electrodynamic (EDS) suspension system, developed by MIT as part of this joint effort are described and presented. Adaptation of this facility for linear motor and other propulsion and levitation testing is described.

  16. Segmentation by Large Scale Hypothesis Testing - Segmentation as Outlier Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darkner, Sune; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We propose a novel and efficient way of performing local image segmentation. For many applications a threshold of pixel intensities is sufficient but determine the appropriate threshold value can be difficult. In cases with large global intensity variation the threshold value has to be adapted...... locally. We propose a method based on large scale hypothesis testing with a consistent method for selecting an appropriate threshold for the given data. By estimating the background distribution we characterize the segment of interest as a set of outliers with a certain probability based on the estimated...

  17. Full-Scale Crash Test of an MD-500 Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale crash test was successfully conducted in March 2010 of an MD-500 helicopter at NASA Langley Research Center s Landing and Impact Research Facility. The reasons for conducting this test were threefold: 1 To generate data to be used with finite element computer modeling efforts, 2 To study the crashworthiness features typically associated with a small representative helicopter, and 3 To compare aircraft response to data collected from a previously conducted MD-500 crash test, which included an externally deployable energy absorbing (DEA) concept. Instrumentation on the airframe included accelerometers on various structural components of the airframe; and strain gages on keel beams, skid gear and portions of the skin. Three Anthropomorphic Test Devices and a specialized Human Surrogate Torso Model were also onboard to collect occupant loads for evaluation with common injury risk criteria. This paper presents background and results from this crash test conducted without the DEA concept. These results showed accelerations of approximately 30 to 50 g on the airframe at various locations, little energy attenuation through the airframe, and moderate to high probability of occupant injury for a variety of injury criteria.

  18. Large scale high strain-rate tests of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the stages of development of some innovative equipment, based on Hopkinson bar techniques, for performing large scale dynamic tests of concrete specimens. The activity is centered at the recently upgraded HOPLAB facility, which is basically a split Hopkinson bar with a total length of approximately 200 m and with bar diameters of 72 mm. Through pre-tensioning and suddenly releasing a steel cable, force pulses of up to 2 MN, 250 μs rise time and 40 ms duration can be generated and applied to the specimen tested. The dynamic compression loading has first been treated and several modifications in the basic configuration have been introduced. Twin incident and transmitter bars have been installed with strong steel plates at their ends where large specimens can be accommodated. A series of calibration and qualification tests has been conducted and the first real tests on concrete cylindrical specimens of 20cm diameter and up to 40cm length have commenced. Preliminary results from the analysis of the recorded signals indicate proper Hopkinson bar testing conditions and reliable functioning of the facility.

  19. Study and designing of the ''caliprax'' measurement bench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriere, J.Ch.

    2001-09-01

    Probing the matter in order to check its elementary constituents, that is the goal of the particle physic. In this field, the experiments consist in colliding highly energetic particle beams and observing the new born particles. These observations are based on big particle detectors whose running is dependant on the precise knowledge of their geometry (position of the detection chambers). To achieve this, the detectors are equipped with alignment sensors, which have to be calibrated before. This document describes the study and the making of a calibration bench for the 'Praxial' (PRoximity AXIAL) type sensors, and other works related to these sensors. In a first part, we determine and apply a method to set the tools used to fix the sensor stands on the detection chambers. These settings are made with the use of a tridimensional measuring machine. Then, we study the stands themselves. These investigations concern mechanics: positioning quality of the sensors in their stands, bending of the supports due to the tightening. In this part too, the studies are in the field of dimensional metrology. After this, the works are reoriented toward the bench, with the choice of the displacement sensors among two different technologies: optical, with the Rasnik system, and mechanical, with linear probes as LVDT (Linear Variable Differential Transformer). Following the discovery of an ambiguity on the Rasnik system, we go on the tests to understand its behaviour. We introduce the theory of the alignment sensors calibration, which is based on a minimization calculation. The computer programs are explained in a chapter, and in an other, the implementation of the quality assurance procedures. An other part describes the mechanical studies and the problems they cause. Because of a delay onset of the project, we make a model of the bench. This dummy allows us to test every single function of the final bench. With this device, we record manually the first calibration data and use them

  20. Large-Scale Spray Releases: Initial Aerosol Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Kurath, Dean E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Davis, James M.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Lukins, Craig D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Smith, Dennese M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the events postulated in the hazard analysis at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities is a breach in process piping that produces aerosols with droplet sizes in the respirable range. The current approach for predicting the size and concentration of aerosols produced in a spray leak involves extrapolating from correlations reported in the literature. These correlations are based on results obtained from small engineered spray nozzles using pure liquids with Newtonian fluid behavior. The narrow ranges of physical properties on which the correlations are based do not cover the wide range of slurries and viscous materials that will be processed in the WTP and across processing facilities in the DOE complex. Two key technical areas were identified where testing results were needed to improve the technical basis by reducing the uncertainty due to extrapolating existing literature results. The first technical need was to quantify the role of slurry particles in small breaches where the slurry particles may plug and result in substantially reduced, or even negligible, respirable fraction formed by high-pressure sprays. The second technical need was to determine the aerosol droplet size distribution and volume from prototypic breaches and fluids, specifically including sprays from larger breaches with slurries where data from the literature are scarce. To address these technical areas, small- and large-scale test stands were constructed and operated with simulants to determine aerosol release fractions and generation rates from a range of breach sizes and geometries. The properties of the simulants represented the range of properties expected in the WTP process streams and included water, sodium salt solutions, slurries containing boehmite or gibbsite, and a hazardous chemical simulant. The effect of anti-foam agents was assessed with most of the simulants. Orifices included round holes and

  1. SAES St 909 pilot scale methane cracking tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J. E.; Sessions, H. T.

    2008-01-01

    Pilot scale (0.5 kg) SAES St 909 methane cracking tests were conducted for potential tritium process applications. Up to 1400 hours tests were done at 700 deg.C, 202.7 kPa (1520 torr) with a 0.03 sLPM feed of methane plus impurities, in a 20 vol% hydrogen, balance helium, stream. Carbon dioxide gettered by St 909 can be equated to an equivalent amount of methane gettered, but equating nitrogen to an equivalent amount of methane was nitrogen feed composition dependent. A decreased hydrogen feed increased methane getter rates while a 30 deg.C drop in one furnace zone increased methane emissions by over a factor of 30. The impact of gettered nitrogen can be somewhat minimized if nitrogen feed to the bed has been stopped and sufficient time given to recover the methane cracking rate. (authors)

  2. Pilot Scale Tests Alden/Concepts NREC Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Cook; George E.Hecker; Stephen Amaral; Philip Stacy; Fangbiao Lin; Edward Taft

    2003-09-30

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. has completed pilot scale testing of the new Alden/Concepts NREC turbine that was designed to minimize fish injury at hydropower projects. The test program was part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. The prototype turbine operating point was 1,000 cfs at 80ft head and 100 rpm. The turbine was design to: (1) limit peripheral runner speed; (2) have a high minimum pressure; (3) limit pressure change rates; (4) limit the maximum flow shear; (5) minimize the number and total length of leading blade edges; (6) maximize the distance between the runner inlet and the wicket gates and minimize clearances (i.e., gaps) between other components; and (7) maximize the size of flow passages.

  3. The development and performance testing of a biodegradable scale inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Julie; Fidoe, Steve; Jones, Chris

    2006-03-15

    The oil industry is currently facing severe restrictions concerning the discharge of oil field chemicals into the environment. Many commonly used materials in both topside and downhole applications are phased for substitution for use in the North Sea, and more will be identified. The development of biodegradable and low toxicity chemicals, which afford equal or improved efficacy, compared to conventional technology, available at a competitive price, is a current industry challenge. A range of biodegradable materials are increasingly available, however their limited performance can result in a restricted range of applications. This paper discusses the development and commercialization of a readily biodegradable scale inhibitor, ideal for use in topside applications. This material offers a broad spectrum of activity, notably efficiency against barium sulphate, calcium sulphate and calcium carbonate scales, in a range of water chemistries. A range of performance testing, compatibility, stability and OCNS dataset will be presented. Comparisons with commonly used chemicals have been made to identify the superior performance of this phosphate ester. This paper will discuss a scale inhibitor suitable for use in a variety of conditions which offers enhanced performance combined with a favourable biodegradation profile. This material is of great benefit to the industry, particularly in North Sea applications. (author) (tk)

  4. LOFT test support branch data abstract report: one-sixth scale model BWR jet pump test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crapo, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    Pump performance data are presented for a 1/6 scale model jet pump in tests conducted at the LOFT Test Support Blowdown Facility. Steady-state subcooled pump characterization tests were performed over a wide range of forward and reverse flow conditions, both at room temperature, and at elevated temperature (555 0 K). Blowdown tests were also performed to obtain two-phase performance data in configurations simulating the flow patterns in the intact and broken loops of a BWR during a recirculation line break transient

  5. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-03-31

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is injected into the pressurized waste stream, and the air/liquid mixture is preheated to the required reactor inlet temperature. The reactor provides sufficient retention time to allow the oxidation to approach the desired level of organic decomposition. Typical reaction time is about 30-120 minutes. Heat exchangers are routinely employed to recover energy contained in the reactor effluent to preheat the waste feed/air entering the reactor. Auxiliary energy, usually steam, is necessary for startup and can provide trim heat if required. Since the oxidation reactions are exothermic, sufficient energy may be released in the reactor to allow the WAO system to operate without any additional heat input. After cooling, the oxidized reactor effluent passes through a pressure control valve where the pressure is reduced. A separator downstream of the pressure control valve allows the depressurized and cooled vapor to separate from the liquid. Typical industrial WAO applications have a feed flow rate of 1 to 220 gallons per minute (gpm) per train, with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) from 10,000 to 150,000 mg/L (higher CODs with dilution). Note that catalysts, such as homogeneous copper and iron, their heterogeneous counterparts, or precious metals can be used to enhance the effectiveness (i.e., to lower temperature, pressure, and residence time as well as increase oxidation efficiencies) of the WAO reaction if deemed necessary.

  6. Full scale BWR containment LOCA response test at the INKA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Leyer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    KERENA is an innovative boiling water reactor concept with passive safety systems (Generation III+) of AREVA. The reactor is an evolutionary design of operating BWRs (Generation II). In order to verify the functionality and performance of the KERENA safety concept required for the transient and accident management, the test facility “Integral Teststand Karlstein” (INKA) was built at Karlstein (Germany). It is a mock-up of the KERENA boiling water reactor containment, with integrated pressure suppression system. The complete chain of passive safety components is available. The passive components and the levels are represented in full scale. The volume scaling of the containment compartments is approximately 1:24. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is simulated via the steam accumulator of the Karlstein Large Valve Test Facility. This vessel provides an energy storage capacity of approximately 1/6 of the KERENA RPV and is supplied by a Benson boiler with a thermal power of 22 MW. With respect to the available power supply, the containment- and system-sizing of the facility is by far the largest one of its kind worldwide. From 2009 to 2012, several single component tests were conducted (Emergency Condenser, Containment Cooling Condenser, Core Flooding System etc.). On March 21st, 2013, the worldwide first large-scale only passively managed integral accident test of a boiling water reactor was simulated at INKA. The integral test measured the combined response of the KERENA passive safety systems to the postulated initiating event was the “Main Steam Line Break” (MSLB) inside the Containment with decay heat simulation. The results of the performed integral test (MSLB) showed that the passive safety systems alone are capable to bring the plant to stable conditions meeting all required safety targets with sufficient margins. Therefore the test verified the function of those components and the interplay between them as response to an anticipated accident scenario

  7. Testing the Situationism Scale in Europe: Scale validation, self-regulation and regional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Megan E; Wagner, Lisa; Zorjan, Saša; Nèmeth, Enikö; van Toor, Désie; Czaplinski, Michał

    2017-08-01

    The term situationism refers to an individual's belief about the importance of a behaviour's context. This study tested whether the degree of situationism expressed by individuals in various regions of Europe was consistent with self-regulation and cross-cultural theories. The English version of a Situationism Scale (measuring beliefs about the relation between the environment and one's own behaviour) was translated into five additional languages: Dutch, German, Hungarian, Italian and Slovenian. Young adults (N = 1106, M Age  = 22.9 years, 79% female) across Europe responded to one of the six language versions of the scale as part of a larger survey. Results indicated that: new language versions were psychometrically valid; there was a positive relation between situationism and the use of situation-control strategies; and situationism was higher for individuals from regions that are Eastern European and relatively more interdependent, compared with individuals from regions that are Western European and relatively less interdependent. As the first evaluation of the Situationism Scale outside America, this study supports the Scale's validity and suggests not only may some effects of situationism be universal, but between- and within-culture differences in situationism exist. Overall, when making judgments and decisions about the self, cultural background and individual differences in situationism may come into play. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  8. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction for small-scale material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cackett, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. In the fusion and fission industries there is an increasing need for the development of small scale testing methods that can deliver engineering relevant mechanical properties for materials research. In all concepts for dedicated neutron sources for fusion material testing there is a commonality that the sample volumes available will be extremely small. This means that in order to gather significant and usable data the analysis method must be capable of achieving high resolution results. Additionally, a reduced sample size will greatly decrease the safety hazard when dealing with irradiated material. In the case of fission, the availability of a testing technique that only requires a small sample to be extracted from a reactor offers the potential to gauge the condition of components without causing significant down-time. This would be a huge advantage in power plant life-extension projects. One such technique that has recently been developed is Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). It is currently the only method capable of being performed in a SEM that can produce crystallographic information at a spatial resolution of 10 nm and only needs sample volumes on the order of a few mm 3 or less. TKD uses a sample in the form of a thin <200 nm foil similar to that used in TEM. It is held at a much shallower tilt (typically no more than 20 degrees) from the detector than previous diffraction techniques such as Electron Backscatter Diffraction, which is why it is able to produce such small, isotropic resolutions. The diffraction patterns resulting from forward-scattered electrons provide information on crystal lattice orientations, the relative angle of which can be translated into a measure of strain. A direct application of this method has been employed in this work, for measuring the strain within the plastically deformed zone underneath a nano-scale indentation. This has been accomplished at CCFE, resulting in a high resolution (10

  9. Characteristics of North Korea nuclear test and KMA magnitude scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Y. S.; Lee, D.; Min, K.; Hwang, E. H.; Lee, J.; Park, E.; Jo, E.; Lee, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Democratic People's Republic of Korea(DPRK) carried out 6th nuclear test on 3 Sep. 2017 at 03:30 UTC. Korea Meteorological Administration(KMA) announced to the public that the event took place in the DPRK's test site, Punggye-ri with the magnitude 5.7. This event is larger than previous one in terms of magnitude and showed that measured magnitude strongly depends on the frequency band of data. After we applied several magnitude scales such as Everdon(1967), Nuttli(1967), and Hong & Lee(2012) to this event, we found that magnitude ranges from 5.3 to 6.7 which depends on frequency band and epicentral distance of signal. 6th DPRK test experiment indicated that spectral amplitude ratio of 6th/5th near 2.37 Hz shows similar amplification compatible to relative spectral magnitude 5.7, while spectral amplitude ratio of 6th/5th near 1.0 Hz marks relative spectral magnitude about 6.1. Relative spectral magnitude varies with frequencies and decreases as frequency increase. We found that systematic non-linearity exists for spectral amplitude ratio of 6th/5th from 1.0 to 10.0 Hz, while it's characteristic is not found at 5th/4th and 4th/3th. A methodology is presented for determining mb(Pn) magnitude of underground nuclear explosions from local Pn phase. 582 waveforms from vertical component of broadband and acceleration seismographs at 120 stations in the epicenter distance from 340 to 800 km are used to calibrate mb(Pn) magnitude scaling for DPRK's nuclear tests. The mb(Pn) estimates of regional events for Korean Peninsula are determined to be mb(Pn) ? = log10(A) + 2.1164×log10(d) - 0.2721, where A is the peak-to-peak Pn amplitude in μm and d is the epicentral distance in km. Systematic non-linearity does not observed at frequency band from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz. The magnitude of 6th event is mb(Pn) 6.08 and mb(Pn) 4.52, 4.92, 4.84 and 5.03 for 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th respectively. Further research of applicable mb(Pn) magnitude scaling is required for all frequency band and

  10. Test-retest reliability of the Neuromuscular Recovery Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrman, Andrea L; Velozo, Craig; Suter, Sarah; Lorenz, Doug; Basso, D Michele

    2015-08-01

    To determine the test-retest reliability of the Neuromuscular Recovery Scale (NRS), a measure to classify lower extremity and trunk recovery of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to typical preinjury performance of functional tasks without use of external and behavioral compensation. Multicenter observational study. Five outpatient rehabilitation clinics. Physical therapists (N=13), trained and competent in conducting NRS, rated outpatients with SCI (N=69) using the NRS. Testing occurred on 2 days, separated by 24 to 48 hours, on the same patient by the same therapist. Not applicable. Spearman rank correlation coefficients to compare NRS results. The NRS scores of motor performance were based on normal, preinjury function on 11 items: 4 treadmill-based items (standing and stepping), 7 overground/mat items (sitting, sit-up, reverse sit-up, trunk extension, sit to stand, standing, walking). Test-retest reliability was very strong for the NRS items. Ten of the 11 items exhibited Spearman correlation coefficients ≥.92, and lower bounds of the 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for these items met or exceeded .83. The exception was stand retraining (ρ=.84; 95% CI, .68-.96). The test-retest reliability of the measurement model-derived summary score was very strong (ρ=.99; 95% CI, .96-.99). The NRS had excellent test-retest reliability when conducted by trained therapists in adults with chronic SCI across all levels of injury severity. All raters had undergone standardized training in use of the NRS. The minimal requirement of training to achieve test-retest reliability has not been established. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pilot-scale verification test for Hanford grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagaasen, L.M.; Powell, W.J.

    1993-02-01

    The Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) at Hanford, Washington will process the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank (DST) wastes on the Hanford Site, to produce a cementitious waste form. This facility, which is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford), mixes liquid wastes with cementitious materials and pumps the resulting grout slurry into large [5,300 cubic meters (m 3 )] concrete vaults. Once in the vault, the grout cures to produce a waste form that immobilizes radioactive and hazardous constituents through chemical reactions and/or microencapsulation. Although this disposal scheme has several advantages, pouring grout into large vaults raises concerns about how to handle the heat generated from the exothermic hydration reactions that occur as the grout cures. WHC's current strategy for addressing the problem of hydration heat is to fill the vault in stages and use forced ventilation in the airspace above the grout to speed heat removal. The varying composition of Hanford tank waste requires that each tank be processed in a separate campaign using a grout formulation specifically designed for that waste. The next tank scheduled for treatment is DST 241-AN-106. A four-phase process for developing the grout formulation development process is used to assure that the formulation will meet various processing and waste form requirements. These phases are: (1) laboratory formulation development studies and modeling with simulated wastes, (2) laboratory variability studies with simulated waste, (3) pilot-scale verification tests with simulated wastes, and (4) laboratory verification tests with actual waste. This paper presents an overview of the pilot-scale verification tests conducted as part of the grout formulation development for the 241-AN-106 tank waste. The paper specifically discusses results dealing with (1) the grout slurry critical flow rate and (2) the ability to handle grout hydration heat with forced ventilation

  12. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale tests of low-level nuclear-waste-drum response to accident environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta, M.; Lamoreaux, G.H.; Romesberg, L.E.; Yoshimura, H.R.; Joseph, B.J.; May, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes extensive full-scale and scale-model testing of 55-gallon drums used for shipping low-level radioactive waste materials. The tests conducted include static crush, single-can impact tests, and side impact tests of eight stacked drums. Static crush forces were measured and crush energies calculated. The tests were performed in full-, quarter-, and eighth-scale with different types of waste materials. The full-scale drums were modeled with standard food product cans. The response of the containers is reported in terms of drum deformations and lid behavior. The results of the scale model tests are correlated to the results of the full-scale drums. Two computer techniques for calculating the response of drum stacks are presented. 83 figures, 9 tables.

  13. Analysis, scale modeling, and full-scale tests of low-level nuclear-waste-drum response to accident environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, M.; Lamoreaux, G. H.; Romesberg, L. E.; Yoshimura, H. R.; Joseph, B. J.; May, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive full scale and scale model testing of 55 gallon drums used for shipping low level radioactive waste materials are described. The tests conducted include static crush, single can impact tests, and side impact tests of eight stacked drums. Static crush forces were measured and crush energies calculated. The tests were performed in full, quarter, and eight scale with different types of waste materials. The full scale drums were modeled with standard food product cans. The response of the containers is reported in terms of drum deformations and lid behavior. The results of the scale model tests are correlated to the results of the full scale drums. Two computer techniques for calculating the response of drum stacks are presented.

  14. In situ vitrification pilot-scale radioactive test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as an in-place stabilization technique for selected liquid radioactive waste disposal sites. The process melts the wastes and surrounding soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form. These ISV process development testing and evaluation studies are being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June of 1983 in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified are discussed. The primary objectives of the radioactive test were to: demonstrate containment and confinement of the radioactive material; verify equipment performance of the power and off-gas systems; identify losses to the off-gas system; and characterize the behavior of the radioactive material in the vitrified soil. The test successfully demonstrated the processing containment of radionuclides both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was measured during testing operations. The vitrified soil had a greater than 99% retention of all radionuclides. Losses to the off-gas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. No migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred, as indicated by analysis of soil samples from around the block. Previous waste form leaching studies indicate an acceptable durability of the ISV product. 8 references, 34 figures, 8 tables

  15. In situ vitrification pilot-scale radioactive test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as an in-place stabilization technique for selected liquid radioactive waste disposal sites. The process melts the wastes and surrounding soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form. These ISV process development testing and evaluation studies are being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June of 1983 in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified are discussed. The primary objectives of the radioactive test were to: demonstrate containment and confinement of the radioactive material; verify equipment performance of the power and off-gas systems; identify losses to the off-gas system; and characterize the behavior of the radioactive material in the vitrified soil. The test successfully demonstrated the processing containment of radionuclides both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was measured during testing operations. The vitrified soil had a greater than 99% retention of all radionuclides. Losses to the off-gas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. No migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred, as indicated by analysis of soil samples from around the block. Previous waste form leaching studies indicate an acceptable durability of the ISV product. 8 references, 34 figures, 8 tables.

  16. Large-Scale Seismic Test Program at Hualien, Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.T.; Graves, H.L.; Yeh, Y.S.

    1991-01-01

    The Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST) Program at Hualien, Taiwan, is a follow-on to the soil-structure interaction (SSI) experiments at Lotung, Taiwan. The planned SSI studies will be performed at a stiff soil site in Hualien, Taiwan, that historically has had slightly more destructive earthquakes in the past than Lotung. The objectives of the LSST project is as follows: To obtain earthquake-induced SSI data at a stiff soil site having similar prototypical nuclear power plant soil conditions. To confirm the findings and methodologies validated against the Lotung soft soil SSI data for prototypical plant condition applications. To further validate the technical basis of realistic SSI analysis approaches. To further support the resolution of USI A-40 Seismic Design Criteria issue. These objectives will be accomplished through an integrated and carefully planned experimental program consisting of: soil characterization, test model design and field construction, instrumentation layout and deployment, in-situ geophysical information collection, forced vibration test, and synthesis of results and findings. The LSST is a joint effort among many interested parties. EPRI and Taipower are the organizers of the program and have the lead in planning and managing the program

  17. A large scale test of the gaming-enhancement hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Andrew K; Wang, John C

    2016-01-01

    A growing research literature suggests that regular electronic game play and game-based training programs may confer practically significant benefits to cognitive functioning. Most evidence supporting this idea, the gaming-enhancement hypothesis , has been collected in small-scale studies of university students and older adults. This research investigated the hypothesis in a general way with a large sample of 1,847 school-aged children. Our aim was to examine the relations between young people's gaming experiences and an objective test of reasoning performance. Using a Bayesian hypothesis testing approach, evidence for the gaming-enhancement and null hypotheses were compared. Results provided no substantive evidence supporting the idea that having preference for or regularly playing commercially available games was positively associated with reasoning ability. Evidence ranged from equivocal to very strong in support for the null hypothesis over what was predicted. The discussion focuses on the value of Bayesian hypothesis testing for investigating electronic gaming effects, the importance of open science practices, and pre-registered designs to improve the quality of future work.

  18. A large scale test of the gaming-enhancement hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K. Przybylski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A growing research literature suggests that regular electronic game play and game-based training programs may confer practically significant benefits to cognitive functioning. Most evidence supporting this idea, the gaming-enhancement hypothesis, has been collected in small-scale studies of university students and older adults. This research investigated the hypothesis in a general way with a large sample of 1,847 school-aged children. Our aim was to examine the relations between young people’s gaming experiences and an objective test of reasoning performance. Using a Bayesian hypothesis testing approach, evidence for the gaming-enhancement and null hypotheses were compared. Results provided no substantive evidence supporting the idea that having preference for or regularly playing commercially available games was positively associated with reasoning ability. Evidence ranged from equivocal to very strong in support for the null hypothesis over what was predicted. The discussion focuses on the value of Bayesian hypothesis testing for investigating electronic gaming effects, the importance of open science practices, and pre-registered designs to improve the quality of future work.

  19. Large-Scale Seismic Test Program at Hualien, Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.T.; Graves, H.L.; Chen, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST) Program at Hualien, Taiwan, is a follow-on to the soil-structure interaction (SSI) experiments at Lotung, Taiwan. The planned SSI studies will be performed at a stiff soil site in Hualien, Taiwan, that historically has had slightly more destructive earthquakes in the past than Lotung. The LSST is a joint effort among many interested parties. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Taipower are the organizers of the program and have the lead in planning and managing the program. Other organizations participating in the LSST program are US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, the Tokyo Electric Power Company, the Commissariat A L'Energie Atomique, Electricite de France and Framatome. The LSST was initiated in January 1990, and is envisioned to be five years in duration. Based on the assumption of stiff soil and confirmed by soil boring and geophysical results the test model was designed to provide data needed for SSI studies covering: free-field input, nonlinear soil response, non-rigid body SSI, torsional response, kinematic interaction, spatial incoherency and other effects. Taipower had the lead in design of the test model and received significant input from other LSST members. Questions raised by LSST members were on embedment effects, model stiffness, base shear, and openings for equipment. This paper describes progress in site preparation, design and construction of the model and development of an instrumentation plan

  20. The harp: a vehicle crash test apparatus for full-scale crash test experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Johnsen, J. S.; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Robbersmyr, Kjell G.

    2012-01-01

    Published version of an article in the journal: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology. Also available from the publisher at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00170-012-3960-3 The current paper describes an apparatus for full-scale vehicle crash test experimentation. This apparatus is referred to as the harp. In brief, the harp may either accelerate a trolley which is impacted into a test vehicle or the test vehicle itself may be accelerated and impacted into an object su...

  1. [Development and testing of a nurse turnover intention scale (NTIS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Eun Ja; Kim, Heejeong

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measurement tool of nurse's turnover intention. Data were collected from questionnaires completed by 678 nurses who worked in 3 university hospitals in South Korea and analyzed using the SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18 programs. Thirty-seven preliminary items were selected from 161 basic items extracted via a literature review and in depth interviews with 6 hospital nurses. Three steps with factor analysis were undertaken to verify the reliability and validity of the preliminary instruments. Finally, confirmative factor analysis was carried out. As a result of the analysis, 3 factors including 10 items were selected. Cronbach's Alpha for the 10 items was .83, for job satisfaction (4 items), .78, for interpersonal relationships (3 items), .80, and for work performance (3 items), .74, which was stable. This study is meaningful because through it a scale reflecting Korean culture was developed to measure turnover intention in nurses. Further studies that test the psychometrics of this scale in more diverse samples are warranted.

  2. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    Moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate peaks in the relative humidity (RH) of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. This can help to ensure healthier indoor environments by preventing many processes...... that are harmful such as growth of house dust mites, surface condensation and mould growth. Therefore a series of experiments has been carried out in a full scale test facility to determine the moisture buffer effect of interior walls of cellular concrete and plaster board constructions. For the cellular concrete...... of the changes of moisture content in specimens of the wall composites exposed to the same environment. It was found that the finishes had a big impact on the buffer performance of the underlying materials. Even though the untreated cellular concrete had a very high buffer capacity, the effect was strongly...

  3. Ambiguous tests of general relativity on cosmological scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuntz, Joe; Baker, Tessa; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Skordis, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using parameterized frameworks for modifying cosmological perturbation theory. It is sometimes assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we argue that this is not necessarily so. First we show that adopting alternative combinations of modifications to the field equations significantly changes the constraints that one obtains. In addition, we show that using a parameterization with insufficient freedom significantly tightens the apparent theoretical constraints. Fundamentally we argue that it is almost never appropriate to consider modifications to the perturbed Einstein equations as being constraints on the effective gravitational constant, for example, in the same sense that solar system constraints are. The only consistent modifications are either those that grant near-total freedom, as in decomposition methods, or ones which map directly to a particular part of theory space

  4. Test plan: Potash Core Test. WIPP experimental program borehole plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, C.L.

    1979-09-01

    The Potash Core Test will utilize a WIPP emplaced plug to obtain samples of an in-situ cured plug of known mix constituents for bench scale testing. An earlier effort involved recovery at the salt horizon of Plug 217, a 17 year old plug in a potash exploration hole for bond testing, but the lack of particulars in the emplacement precluded significant determination of plug performance

  5. Full scale leak test of the MEGAPIE containment hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samec, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Full Scale Leak Test (FSLT) experiment is designed to replicate an accidental leak of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) liquid metal from the MEGAPIE neutron spallation source. The neutron source is totally encased in an aluminum containment hull cooled by heavy water. Any liquid metal which would, in a hypothetical accident, leak into the helium-filled insulation gap between the source and the aluminum containment hull, would immediately impact the hull. Furthermore, during irradiation in the PSI SINQ facility, the LBE in the MEGAPIE Lower Liquid Metal Container (LLMC) accumulates radio-active substances which, in the event of a leak, must be cooled and contained under controlled conditions, as they may otherwise contaminate the facility. The FSLT experiment has been devised to fully test the structural integrity of the containment hull against a sudden liquid metal leak, and in addition, to resolve the peak temperature of he coolant, to validate the sensors used in detecting a leak and of proof-test the analytical methods used in predicting the consequences of a leak. The FSLT experiment has been analysed ahead of the test, and both thermal and structural aspects calculated using commercial codes. The predictions applied conservative assumptions to the analysis of the thermal shock so as to preclude the likelihood of an unforeseen failure of the hull. In this document, these initial predictions are compared to the temperature and strain data recorded in the experiment. Further analysis, to be published at a later stage, will focus on applying actual conditions realised in the experiment, as opposed to the envelope case used in the test predictions. The integrity of the containment hull under loads resulting from liquid metal-leak is therefore the focal point of the experiment described in the current document, and serves as a key reference test for the Iicensing of the facility. The data recorded during the SLT experiment shows that the MEGAPIE containment hull is

  6. Full scale dynamic testing of Paks nuclear power plant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Rin, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    This report refers to the full-scale dynamic structural testing activities that have been performed in December 1994 at the Paks (H) Nuclear Power Plant, within the framework of: the IAEA Coordinated research Programme 'Benchmark Study for the Seismic Analysis and Testing of WWER-type Nuclear Power Plants, and the nuclear research activities of ENEL-WR/YDN, the Italian National Electricity Board in Rome. The specific objective of the conducted investigation was to obtain valid data on the dynamic behaviour of the plant's major constructions, under normal operating conditions, for enabling an assessment of their actual seismic safety to be made. As described in more detail hereafter, the Paks NPP site has been subjected to low level earthquake like ground shaking, through appropriately devised underground explosions, and the dynamic response of the plant's 1 st reactor unit important structures was appropriately measured and digitally recorded. In-situ free field response was measured concurrently and, moreover, site-specific geophysical and seismological data were simultaneously acquired too. The above-said experimental data is to provide basic information on the geophysical and seismological characteristics of the Paks NPP site, together with useful reference information on the true dynamic characteristics of its main structures and give some indications on the actual dynamic soil-structure interaction effects for the case of low level excitation

  7. US bureau of mines small-scale arc melter tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Davis, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines, in cooperation with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), conducted over 30 hours of melting tests to vitrify simulated low-level radioactive wastes from the INEL. Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Five separate waste compositions were investigated, each consisting of noncontaminated soil from the RWMC and surrogate materials used to simulate the actual buried wastes. The RWMC soil and five waste compositions were melted in a 50-lb, single-phase electric arc furnace with a water-cooled shell. These tests were conducted to determine melting parameters in preparation for a large-scale melting campaign to be conducted in the Bureau's 1-metric ton (mt), water-cooled-wall, 3-phase electric arc furnace. Bulk chemical composition was determined for each of the feed materials and for the slag, metal, fume solids, and offgas furnace products, and distributions were calculated for the key elements. The material balance for the furnace operation indicates that from 63 to 84 pct of the feed reported to the slag. Cerium, used as the surrogate for the radionuclides in the wastes, demonstrated an extremely strong affinity for the slag product. Although slag temperatures as low as 1,250 C were recorded when melting the RWMC soil, temperatures in excess of 1,600 C were necessary to achieve the fluidity required for a successful slag tap

  8. Effects of Introduced Materials in the Drift Scale Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L; Jones, RL

    2002-01-01

    Water samples previously acquired from superheated (>140 C) zones within hydrological test boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) show relatively high fluoride concentrations (5-66 ppm) and low pH (3.1-3.5) values. In these high temperature regions of the rock, water is present superheated vapor only--liquid water for sampling purposes is obtained during the sampling process by cooling. Based on data collected to date, it is evident that the source of the fluoride and low pH is from introduced man-made materials (Teflon(trademark) and/or Viton(trademark) fluoroelastomer) used in the test. The test materials may contribute fluoride either by degassing hydrogen fluoride (HF) directly to produce trace concentrations of HF gas (∼0.1 ppm) in the high temperature steam, or by leaching fluoride in the sampling tubes after condensation of the superheated steam. HF gas is known to be released from Viton(trademark) at high temperatures (Dupont Dow Elastomers L.L.C., Elkton, MD, personal communication) and the sample water compositions indicate near stoichiometric balance of hydrogen ion and fluoride ion, indicating dissolution of HF gas into the aqueous phase. These conclusions are based on a series of water samples collected to determine if the source of the fluoride is from the degradation of materials originally installed to facilitate measurements. Analyses of these water samples show that the source of the fluoride is the introduced materials, that is the Viton(trademark) packers used to isolate test zones and/or Teflon(trademark) tubing used to draw water and steam from the test zones. In particular, water samples collected from borehole (BH) 72 high temperatures (∼ 170 C) prior to introduction of any Viton(trademark) or Teflon(trademark) show pH Values (4.8 to 5.5) and fluoride concentrations well below 1 ppm over a period of six months. These characteristics are typical of condensing DST steam that contains only some dissolved carbon dioxide generated by water

  9. POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

    2001-04-30

    suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

  10. Full scale dynamic testing of Kozloduy NPP unit 5 structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Rin, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    As described in this report, the Kozloduy NPP western site has been subjected to low level earthquake-like ground shaking - through appropriately devised underground explosions - and the resulting dynamic response of the NPP reactor Unit 5 important structures appropriately measured and digitally recorded. In-situ free-field response was measured concurrently more than 100 m aside the main structures of interest. The collected experimental data provide reference information on the actual dynamic characteristics of the Kozloduy NPPs main structures, as well as give some useful indications on the dynamic soil-structure interaction effects for the case of low level excitation. Performing the present full-scale dynamic structural testing activities took advantage of the experience gained by ISMES during similar tests, lately performed in Italy and abroad (in particular, at the Paks NPP in 1994). The IAEA promoted dynamic testing of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 5 by means of pertinently designed buried explosion-induced ground motions which has provided a large amount of data on the dynamic structural response of its major structures. In the present report, the conducted investigation is described and the acquired digital data presented. A series of preliminary analyses were undertaken for examining in detail the ground excitation levels that were produced by these weak earthquake simulation experiments, as well as for inferring some structural characteristics and behaviour information from the collected data. These analyses ascertained the high quality of the collected digital data. Presumably due to soil-structure dynamic interaction effects, reduced excitation levels were observed at the reactor building foundation raft level with respect to the concurrent free-field ground motions. measured at a 140 m distance from the reactor building centre. Further more detailed and systematic analyses are worthwhile to be performed for extracting more complete information about the

  11. Simulation-based rhomboid flap skills training during medical education: comparing low- and high-fidelity bench models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Saad-Hossne, Rogerio; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2014-11-01

    To assess if the bench model fidelity interferes in the acquisition of rhomboid flap skills by medical students. Sixty novice medical students were randomly assigned to 5 practice conditions with instructor-directed Limberg rhomboid flap skills training: didactic materials (control group 1), low-fidelity rubberized line (group 2) or ethylene-vinyl acetate (group 3) bench models; high-fidelity chicken leg skin (group 4) or pig foot skin (group 5) bench models. Pretests and posttests were applied, and Global Rating Scale, effect size, and self-perceived confidence were used to evaluate all flap performances. Medical students from groups 2 to 5 showed better flap performances based on the Global Rating Scale (all P 0.05). The magnitude of the effect was considered large (>0.80) in all measurements. There was acquisition of rhomboid flap skills regardless of bench model fidelity.

  12. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 2. Tracer tests in the block scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Peter; Byegaard, Johan; Winberg, Anders

    2002-05-01

    The tracer test programme of the TRUE Block Scale Project involved 14 tracer tests campaigns, including performance of 32 tracer injections in 16 different combinations of source and sink sections (flow paths) varying in length between 10 to 130 metres, and involving one or more structures. Average, travel times varied between 1.5 and >2000 hours. Tracer dilution tests performed in conjunction with cross-hole hydraulic pumping tests were found to be a very important part of the pre-tests, where the results were used to identify and screen among possible injection points, and to verify the hydrostructural model valid at a given time. The main problem faced in the block scale tests was to select a test geometry, which gave a sufficiently high mass recovery, and at the same time enabled performance of cross-hole sorbing tracer tests within reasonable time frames. Three different injection methods were applied during the test programme; decaying pulse, finite pulse and forced pulse (unequal dipole). During the later phases of the tracer test programme it was identified that forced injection had to be employed in order to enable detection of tracer at the sink due to strong dilution, and also to avoid problems with artificially induced tailing in the injection signal. Sorbing (reactive) tracers were selected among the radioactive isotopes of the alkali and alkaline earth metals previously used in the TRUE- 1 experiments. It was decided that at least one slightly sorbing tracer and one strongly sorbing tracer should be used in each injection. Non-sorbing tracers were used for conservative reference, e.g., 82 Br - , 186 ReO 4 , HTO (tritiated water) and 131 I - . In two of the injections the radioactive non-sorbing tracers were rather short-lived and Uranine and Naphthionate were used as complementary conservative tracers. Surface distribution coefficients, K a , were evaluated from TRUE-1 and TRUE Block Scale data, making use of the retardation noted in the injection

  13. DHS small-scale safety and thermal testing of improvised explosives-comparison of testing performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, J G; Hsu, P C; Sandstrom, M M; Brown, G W; Warner, K F; Phillips, J J; Shelley, T J; Reyes, J A

    2014-01-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or homemade explosives (HMEs) to SSST testing, 16 HME materials were compared to three standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories-two DoD and three DOE-sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials-powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. More than 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for developing safe handling and storage practices. This paper presents a generalized comparison of the results among the testing participants, comparison of friction results from BAM (German Bundesanstalt für Materi-alprüfung) and ABL (Allegany Ballistics Laboratory) designed testing equipment, and an overview of the statistical results from the RDX (1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) standard tested throughout the proficiency test.

  14. DHS small-scale safety and thermal testing of improvised explosives-comparison of testing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J. G.; Sandstrom, M. M.; Brown, G. W.; Warner, K. F.; Phillips, J. J.; Shelley, T. J.; Reyes, J. A.; Hsu, P. C.

    2014-05-01

    One of the first steps in establishing safe handling procedures for explosives is small-scale safety and thermal (SSST) testing. To better understand the response of improvised materials or homemade explosives (HMEs) to SSST testing, 16 HME materials were compared to three standard military explosives in a proficiency-type round robin study among five laboratories-two DoD and three DOE-sponsored by DHS. The testing matrix has been designed to address problems encountered with improvised materials-powder mixtures, liquid suspensions, partially wetted solids, immiscible liquids, and reactive materials. More than 30 issues have been identified that indicate standard test methods may require modification when applied to HMEs to derive accurate sensitivity assessments needed for developing safe handling and storage practices. This paper presents a generalized comparison of the results among the testing participants, comparison of friction results from BAM (German Bundesanstalt für Materi-alprüfung) and ABL (Allegany Ballistics Laboratory) designed testing equipment, and an overview of the statistical results from the RDX (1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine) standard tested throughout the proficiency test.

  15. Scale-dependence of hydraulic properties observed in fractured sedimentary rocks through large scale pumping test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Dausse, A.; de Dreuzy, J. R.; Cherry, J. A.; Parker, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting flow in fractured reservoirs remains challenging as it highly depends on hydraulic connectivity of fractures which can vary from point to point. Classical pumping experiments conducted in fractured reservoirs often display fractional flow and anomalous slow diffusion due to bottlenecks or dead zones, characteristic of heterogeneity. In order to investigate reservoir properties at a contaminated site in the Simi Hills (South California, USA), composed by sandstones (dominant calcite cement) inter-bedded with fine-grained formations (shales, siltstones and mudstones), a large scale pumping test was performed in a major fault over 151 days. Deconvolution was applied first to remove the effect of variable flow rates and obtain constant-rate responses of the reservoir. Next, pressure-transients were analyzed both in time and space to get flow dimension, n, through the pressure derivative and extract the anomalous diffusion exponent, dw, as well as the fractal dimension, df. Analysis revealed at least two kinds of responses characterized by flow dimensions of 0.08 and 0.39 and anomalous diffusion exponents of 2.16 and 2.93, respectively. These properties, which can be related to major geological structures (i.e. major faults and surrounding fractures network), shows decreasing hydraulic properties (transmissivity, T, and storativity, S), and consequently, decreasing hydraulic connectivity, with increasing scale of investigation. In particular, the major fault (n = 0.39 ; dw = 2.93) shows a relationship of about T S3 with T r-1.36 and S r-0.43, consistent with flow within a fracture, while the surrounding fractures network (n = 0.08 ; dw = 2.16) displays a relationship which follow T S with T r-1.07 and S r-0.91. This scale-dependence of hydraulic properties may help improve groundwater flow prediction in such fractured reservoirs and could be taken into account for long-term transport of contaminants at this site.

  16. Meso-scale modeling of irradiated concrete in test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorla, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Vaitová, M. [Czech Technical University, Thakurova 7, 166 29 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Le Pape, Y., E-mail: lepapeym@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Štemberk, P. [Czech Technical University, Thakurova 7, 166 29 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A meso-scale finite element model for irradiated concrete is developed. • Neutron radiation-induced volumetric expansion is a predominant degradation mode. • Confrontation with expansion and damage obtained from experiments is successful. • Effects of paste shrinkage, creep and ductility are discussed. - Abstract: A numerical model accounting for the effects of neutron irradiation on concrete at the mesoscale is detailed in this paper. Irradiation experiments in test reactor (Elleuch et al., 1972), i.e., in accelerated conditions, are simulated. Concrete is considered as a two-phase material made of elastic inclusions (aggregate) subjected to thermal and irradiation-induced swelling and embedded in a cementitious matrix subjected to shrinkage and thermal expansion. The role of the hardened cement paste in the post-peak regime (brittle-ductile transition with decreasing loading rate), and creep effects are investigated. Radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE) of the aggregate cause the development and propagation of damage around the aggregate which further develops in bridging cracks across the hardened cement paste between the individual aggregate particles. The development of damage is aggravated when shrinkage occurs simultaneously with RIVE during the irradiation experiment. The post-irradiation expansion derived from the simulation is well correlated with the experimental data and, the obtained damage levels are fully consistent with previous estimations based on a micromechanical interpretation of the experimental post-irradiation elastic properties (Le Pape et al., 2015). The proposed modeling opens new perspectives for the interpretation of test reactor experiments in regards to the actual operation of light water reactors.

  17. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Principles of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an autologous Stem Cell Transplant · Slide 8 · Conditioning · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Stem Cell Transplantation · Slide 13.

  18. Vibration phenomena in large scale pressure suppression tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aust, E.; Boettcher, G.; Kolb, M.; Sattler, P.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1982-01-01

    Structure und fluid vibration phenomena (acceleration, strain; pressure, level) were observed during blow-down experiments simulating a LOCA in the GKSS full scale multivent pressure suppression test facility. The paper describes first the source related excitations during the two regimes of condensation oscillation and of chugging, and deals then with the response vibrations of the facility's wetwell. Modal analyses of the wetwell were run using excitation by hammer and by shaker in order to separate phenomena that are particular to the GKSS facility from more general ones, i.e. phenomena specific to the fluid related parameters of blowdown and to the geometry of the vent pipes only. The lowest periodicities at about 12 and 16 Hz stem from the vent acoustics. A frequency of about 36 to 38 Hz prominent during chugging seems to result from the lowest local models of two of the wetwell's walls when coupled by the wetwell pool. Further peaks found during blowdown in the spectra of signals at higher frequencies correspond to global vibration modes of the wetwell. (orig.)

  19. Development of a vacuum leak test method for large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Katsumi; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed leak detection technology for liquid helium temperature experiments in large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities. In JAEA, a cryosorption pump that uses an absorbent cooled by liquid nitrogen with a conventional helium leak detector, is used to detect helium gas that is leaking from pressurized welded joints of pipes and valves in a vacuum chamber. The cryosorption pump plays the role of decreasing aerial components, such as water, nitrogen and oxygen, to increase the sensitivity of helium leak detection. The established detection sensitivity for helium leak testing is 10 -10 to 10 -9 Pam 3 /s. A total of 850 welded and mechanical joints inside the cryogenic test facility for the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) experiments have been tested. In the test facility, 73 units of glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) insulation break are used. The amount of helium permeation through the GFRP was recorded during helium leak testing. To distinguish helium leaks from insulation-break permeation, the helium permeation characteristic of the GFRP part was measured as a function of the time of helium charging. Helium permeation was absorbed at 6 h after helium charging, and the detected permeation is around 10 -7 Pam 3 /s. Using the helium leak test method developed, CSMC experiments have been successfully completed. (author)

  20. Sand Impact Tests of a Half-Scale Crew Module Boilerplate Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Hardy, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed primarily for water landings, a further investigation of launch abort scenarios reveals the possibility of an onshore landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). To gather data for correlation against simulations of beach landing impacts, a series of sand impact tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Both vertical drop tests and swing tests with combined vertical and horizontal velocity were performed onto beds of common construction-grade sand using a geometrically scaled crew module boilerplate test article. The tests were simulated using the explicit, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material models for the sand utilized in the simulations were based on tests of sand specimens. Although the LSDYNA models provided reasonable predictions for peak accelerations, they were not always able to track the response through the duration of the impact. Further improvements to the material model used for the sand were identified based on results from the sand specimen tests.

  1. Scaling analysis of the integral test loop to simulate Korean PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J. and others

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of scaling analysis on the integral test loop to simulate Korean PWR plants, which includes the scaling methodology, scaling priority and scaling distortion Based on the priority of the key test matrix, the scaling priority is drawn to apply to the design of the integral test loop. Scaling analysis on the test loop is done based on the design basis and performed by the so-called ''Modified Volume Scaling'' methodology. In the first stage of scaling analysis(global scaling), the specifications and capacity of the components in the major systems are determined by the volume scaling methodology. In the second stage of scaling, local phenomena scaling is performed on major thermal hydraulic phenomena in each component and reproduction of local thermal hydraulic phenomena is checked. According to the local phenomena scaling results, specifications and capacity of the components in a system are modified. Finally, scaling distortion, which might occur in a certain system, is analyzed. Scaling results in this report might be modified in the stage of detailed design of the integral test loop, which will be carried out in near future. More comprehensive analysis on scaling distortion shall be carried out based on manufacturing specifications and performance verification test results of the integral test loop

  2. RemBench: A Digital Workbench for Rembrandt Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, Suzan; Van Leeuwen, Rudie; Gerritsen, G.H.; Boves, Lou

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present RemBench, a search engine for research into the life and works of Rembrandt van Rijn. RemBench combines the data from four different databases behind one interface using federated search technology. Metadata filtering is enabled through faceted search. RemBench enables art

  3. An elegant Breadboard of the optical bench for eLISA/NGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arcio, Luigi; Bogenstahl, Johanna; Diekmann, Christian; Fitzsimons, Ewan D.; Heinzel, Gerhard; Hogenhuis, Harm; Killow, Christian J.; Lieser, Maike; Nikolov, Susanne; Perreur-Lloyd, Michael; Pijnenburg, Joep; Robertson, David I.; Taylor, Alasdair; Tröbs, Michael; Ward, Harry; Weise, Dennis

    2017-11-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, as well as its reformulated European-only evolution, the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory, both employ heterodyne laser interferometry on million kilometer scale arm lengths in a triangular spacecraft formation, to observe gravitational waves at frequencies between 3 × 10-5 Hz and 1 Hz. The Optical Bench as central payload element realizes both the inter-spacecraft as well as local laser metrology with respect to inertial proof masses, and provides further functions, such as point-ahead accommodation, acquisition sensing, transmit beam conditioning, optical power monitoring, and laser redundancy switching. These functions have been combined in a detailed design of an Optical Bench Elegant Breadboard, which is currently under assembly and integration. We present an overview of the realization and current performances of the Optical Bench subsystems, which employ ultraprecise piezo mechanism, ultrastable assembly techniques, and shot noise limited RF detection to achieve translation and tilt metrology at Picometer and Nanoradian noise levels.

  4. Comparative Performance of Rear Facing Child Restraint Systems on the CMVSS 213 Bench and Vehicle Seats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylko, Suzanne; Locey, Caitlin M.; Garcia-Espana, J. Felipe; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Maltese, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dynamic response of rear-facing child restraint systems (RFCRS) installed on the CMVSS 213 sled bench and a selection of vehicle seats. Thirty-six sled tests were conducted: three models of rear facing CRS with an anthropomorphic test device (ATD) representing a 12 month old child (CRABI) were affixed via lower anchors (LATCH), 3 point belt without CRS base, and 3 point belt with CRS base to one of three vehicle seats or the CMVSS 213 bench seat. All CRS were subjected to an identical sled acceleration pulse. Two types of matched pair analysis: “bench-to-vehicle” and “method of attachment” were conducted. Statistically significant differences were observed in the kinematic responses of the ATD and the CRS. This is the first study to quantify differences between the regulatory bench and vehicle seats on a system level and evaluate the influence of attachment method. Our results show that the difference in RFCRS forward excursion between 3-point belt with base and LATCH installations was between 1 and 7 percent on the bench and 22 to 76 percent on the vehicle seats. When evaluating the dynamic performance of RFCRS, the use of real vehicle seats from vehicles that commonly carry children may provide valuable insight. The findings would require further confirmation using a broader selection of RFCRS and vehicle seats, before generalizable conclusions can be drawn. PMID:24406967

  5. Development of a new bench for puncturing of irradiated fuel rods in STAR hot laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petitprez B.

    2018-01-01

    After leak tests of the device and remote handling simulation in a mock-up cell, several punctures of calibrated specimens have been performed in 2016. The bench will be implemented soon in hot cell 2 of STAR facility for final qualification tests. PWR rod punctures are already planned for 2018.

  6. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  7. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

    2001-09-30

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide >99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50 {micro}m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of the

  8. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

    2001-01-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide and gt;99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50(micro)m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of

  9. Virtual Reality Compared with Bench-Top Simulation in the Acquisition of Arthroscopic Skill: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszek, Daniel; You, Daniel; Chang, Justues; Pickell, Michael; Hesse, Daniel; Hopman, Wilma M; Borschneck, Daniel; Bardana, Davide

    2017-04-05

    Work-hour restrictions as set forth by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and other governing bodies have forced training programs to seek out new learning tools to accelerate acquisition of both medical skills and knowledge. As a result, competency-based training has become an important part of residency training. The purpose of this study was to directly compare arthroscopic skill acquisition in both high-fidelity and low-fidelity simulator models and to assess skill transfer from either modality to a cadaveric specimen, simulating intraoperative conditions. Forty surgical novices (pre-clerkship-level medical students) voluntarily participated in this trial. Baseline demographic data, as well as data on arthroscopic knowledge and skill, were collected prior to training. Subjects were randomized to 5-week independent training sessions on a high-fidelity virtual reality arthroscopic simulator or on a bench-top arthroscopic setup, or to an untrained control group. Post-training, subjects were asked to perform a diagnostic arthroscopy on both simulators and in a simulated intraoperative environment on a cadaveric knee. A more difficult surprise task was also incorporated to evaluate skill transfer. Subjects were evaluated using the Global Rating Scale (GRS), the 14-point arthroscopic checklist, and a timer to determine procedural efficiency (time per task). Secondary outcomes focused on objective measures of virtual reality simulator motion analysis. Trainees on both simulators demonstrated a significant improvement (p virtual reality simulation group consistently outperformed the bench-top model group in the diagnostic arthroscopy crossover tests and in the simulated cadaveric setup. Furthermore, the virtual reality group demonstrated superior skill transfer in the surprise skill transfer task. Both high-fidelity and low-fidelity simulation trainings were effective in arthroscopic skill acquisition. High-fidelity virtual reality

  10. A new faces scale in pain measurement: a test of bias from current mood, trait affectivity, and scale range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Achim; Grebner, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Faces pain rating scales used among children have been criticized to confound affective states with pain when smiling faces are included. This experimental study is an attempt to examine the possible confounding of affective states with pain when smiling faces are used as part of a faces scale. The meaning of the faces was tested to depend on current mood, current pain, trait affectivity, and inclusion versus exclusion of smiling faces. Sixty-four participants made 6,720 two-categorical pain judgments on faces with different mouth curvature. In multilevel regression analysis, current level of pain and negative trait affectivity biased faces' meaning only when the smiling faces were excluded from the scale. In adults, the new full range faces pain scale including a midpoint neutral face and smiling faces was more robust than the restricted scale. The faces scale that was tested in this study is not applicable for patient measurement but it is an interesting tool for psychological research.

  11. Improved HIV testing coverage after scale-up of antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In both years, 63-73% of medical inpatients were HIV-infected and 98.5% of inpatients agreed to testing. On-the-ward testing in 2006 avoided the 2003 problem of patient discharge before learning of their test results. Hospital-based HIV testing is an essential clinical service in high prevalence settings and can serve further ...

  12. Validation of laboratory-scale recycling test method of paper PSA label products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Richard Oldack

    2008-01-01

    Starting with test methods and a specification developed by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) Environmentally Benign Pressure Sensitive Adhesive Postage Stamp Program, a laboratory-scale test method and a specification were developed and validated for pressure-sensitive adhesive labels, By comparing results from this new test method and pilot-scale tests, which have been...

  13. Hydrodynamics and sedimentology of concave benches in a lowland river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietz, Geoff J.; Rutherfurd, Ian D.; Stewardson, Michael J.; Finlayson, Brian L.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the hydrodynamics and sedimentation associated with concave-bank benches (concave benches) which are the fine-grained sediment deposits considered geomorphically and ecologically important in meandering rivers. Most notions previously associated with concave bench formation ignore hydrodynamic complexities and consequently fail to recognise the importance of bankfull flows: being commonly based on inference from stratigraphic profiling or casual observation of hydrodynamics. Concave benches are a depositional anomaly since their location in the channel is commonly associated with scour. Mature concave benches are formed by separation of the reverse flow (upriver flow) from the stem flow (downriver flow) in an abrupt bend whereby deposition is dominated by vertical accretion of suspended sediments. For this study two-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling in conjunction with the collection and analysis of contemporary sediments is used to demonstrate the persistence of reverse flow over concave benches for stages from incipient bench inundation to bankfull and greater. For two mature concave benches on the Ovens River, southeast Australia, bankfull flows were depositional with shear stresses commonly deposition were found to be higher than anticipated, in the range of 40 to 80% of bankfull (benches initially inundated at 20% of bankfull), and could be responsible for bench formation. These findings highlight the potential negative impact of river regulation on channel morphology by reducing the frequency of flows forming in-channel benches and increasing the occurrence of destructive flows.

  14. Meso-scale testing and development of test procedures to maintain mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, James; Page, Cheryl; Fuller, Chris

    2003-01-01

    The Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science (Texas A&M University--Corpus Christi) has conducted numerous petroleum experiments at the Shoreline Environmental Research Facility (Corpus Christi, Texas, USA). The meso-scale facility has multiple wave tanks, permitting some control in experimental design of the investigations, but allowing for real-world conditions. This paper outlines the evolution of a materials balance approach in conducting petroleum experiments at the facility. The first attempt at a materials balance was during a 1998 study on the fate/effects of dispersant use on crude oil. Both water column and beach sediment samples were collected. For the materials balance, the defined environmental compartments for oil accumulation were sediments, water column, and the water surface, while the discharge from the tanks was presumed to be the primary sink. The "lessons learned" included a need to quantify oil adhesion to the tank surfaces. This was resolved by adhering strips of the polymer tank lining to the tank sides that could be later removed and extracted for oil. Also, a protocol was needed to quantify any floating oil on the water surface. A water surface (oil slick) quantification protocol was developed, involving the use of solid-phase extraction disks. This protocol was first tested during a shoreline cleaner experiment, and later refined in subsequent dispersant effectiveness studies. The effectiveness tests were designed to simulate shallow embayments which created the need for additional adjustments in the tanks. Since dispersant efficacy is largely affected by hydrodynamics, it was necessary to scale the hydrodynamic conditions of the tanks to those expected in our prototype system (Corpus Christi Bay, Texas). The use of a scaled model permits the experiment to be reproduced and/or evaluated under different conditions. To minimize wave reflection in the tank, a parabolic wave dissipater was built. In terms of materials balance, this

  15. Deicer scaling resistance of concrete mixtures containing slag cement. Phase 2 : evaluation of different laboratory scaling test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    With the use of supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) in concrete mixtures, salt scaling tests such as ASTM C672 have been found to be overly aggressive and do correlate well with field scaling performance. The reasons for this are thought to be b...

  16. Test program of the drop tests with full scale and 1/2.5 scale models of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuri, S.; Matsuoka, T.; Kishimoto, J.; Ishiko, D.; Saito, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2004-01-01

    MHI have been developing 5 types of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask (MSF cask fleet) as a cask line-up. In order to demonstrate their safety, a representative cask model for the cask fleet have been designed for drop test regulated in IAEA TS-R-1. The drop test with a full and a 1/2.5 scale models are to be performed. It describes the test program of the drop test and manufacturing process of the scale models used for the tests

  17. Bench-to-bedside review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Zingg, Walter; Classen, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable in modern pediatric medicine. CVCs provide secure vascular access, but are associated with a risk of severe complications, in particular bloodstream infection. We provide a review of the recent literature about the diagnostic and therapeutic...... challenges of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in children and its prevention. Variations in blood sampling and limitations in blood culturing interfere with accurate and timely diagnosis of CRBSI. Although novel molecular testing methods appear promising in overcoming some of the present...... diagnostic limitations of conventional blood sampling in children, they still need to solidly prove their accuracy and reliability in clinical practice. Standardized practices of catheter insertion and care remain the cornerstone of CRBSI prevention although their implementation in daily practice may...

  18. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  19. Full-Scale Mark II CRT program data report No. 11 (TEST 1204)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukita, Yutaka; Takeshita, Isao; Yamamoto, Nobuo; Namatame, Ken; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1981-03-01

    Recorded data for TEST 1204 conducted on the Full-Scale Mark II CRT (Containment Response Test) Facility are presented. The TEST 1204 is the fourth test run of a series of steam discharge pool swell tests. The test conditions are similar to those of the TEST 1203 except for lower initial pool temperature. The test was successful and the maximum level of pool surface was fairly lower than in the TEST 1203 due to the lower pool temperature. (author)

  20. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Instrumentation for Acoustic and Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Counter, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) is a 5% scale model test of the Ares I vehicle, launch pad and support structures conducted at MSFC to verify acoustic and ignition environments and evaluate water suppression systems Test design considerations 5% measurements must be scaled to full scale requiring high frequency measurements Users had different frequencies of interest Acoustics: 200 - 2,000 Hz full scale equals 4,000 - 40,000 Hz model scale Ignition Transient: 0 - 100 Hz full scale equals 0 - 2,000 Hz model scale Environment exposure Weather exposure: heat, humidity, thunderstorms, rain, cold and snow Test environments: Plume impingement heat and pressure, and water deluge impingement Several types of sensors were used to measure the environments Different instrument mounts were used according to the location and exposure to the environment This presentation addresses the observed effects of the selected sensors and mount design on the acoustic and pressure measurements

  1. Tests of data quality, scaling assumptions, and reliability of the Danish SF-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorner, J B; Damsgaard, M T; Watt, T

    1998-01-01

    We used general population data (n = 4084) to examine data completeness, response consistency, tests of scaling assumptions, and reliability of the Danish SF-36 Health Survey. We compared traditional multitrait scaling analyses to analyses using polychoric correlations and Spearman correlations...

  2. Test Plan for Cask Identification Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This document serves to outline the testing of a Used Fuel Cask Identification Detector (CID) currently being designed under the DOE-NE MPACT Campaign. A bench-scale prototype detector will be constructed and tested using surrogate neutron sources. The testing will serve to inform the design of the full detector that is to be used as a way of fingerprinting used fuel storage casks based on the neutron signature produced by the used fuel inside the cask.

  3. An international psychometric testing of the Care Dependency Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Brown, L.; Havens, B.; Romeren, T.I.; Zanotti, R.; Dassen, T.; van den Heuvel, W.

    In an international study, psychometric properties of the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) were examined by analysing data gathered in Dutch, Canadian, Italian and Norwegian nursing homes. For that purpose, from these countries a convenience sample was developed consisting of 525 patients with dementia.

  4. Test Review: Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Maisha M.; Climie, Emma A.

    2014-01-01

    The "Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition" (WPPSI-IV; Wechsler, 2012a, 2012b) is a comprehensive clinical tool, intended for assessing cognitive functioning among children aged 2 years 6 months through 7 years 7 months. Published by Pearson, the WPPSI-IV is an individually administered tool, to be used by…

  5. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...

  6. Full-Scale Dynamic Testing of Dolosse to Destruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    1981-01-01

    . The set up and the procedure of the tests, which simulate the impact from rocking of the units and from concrete pieces that are thrown against the units, are designed to make a comparison between the behaviour of units of different sizes possible. The test method is described and proposed as a standard...... exists. Different ways of improving the strength of the units are discussed on the basis of the results from tests with different types of concrete. The tests included an investigation of the influence of reinforcement, and of different types of concrete and surface cracks on the strength of the units....

  7. Facilitating the Interpretation of English Language Proficiency Scores: Combining Scale Anchoring and Test Score Mapping Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald; Schedl, Mary; Papageorgiou, Spiros

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop, for the benefit of both test takers and test score users, enhanced "TOEFL ITP"® test score reports that go beyond the simple numerical scores that are currently reported. To do so, we applied traditional scale anchoring (proficiency scaling) to item difficulty data in order to develop performance…

  8. Monitoring of a Full-Scale Wing Fatigue Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Jaap; Hwang, Joong Sun

    2014-01-01

    A wing of a decommissioned aircraft of the Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) was fatigue tested to more than two times the design life. Part of the test was the evaluation of load monitoring and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques. For load monitoring the data of conventional resistance

  9. Crash Testing of Helicopter Airframe Fittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Charles W.; Townsend, William; Boitnott, Richard

    2004-01-01

    As part of the Rotary Wing Structures Technology Demonstration (RWSTD) program, a surrogate RAH-66 seat attachment fitting was dynamically tested to assess its response to transient, crash impact loads. The dynamic response of this composite material fitting was compared to the performance of an identical fitting subjected to quasi-static loads of similar magnitude. Static and dynamic tests were conducted of both smaller bench level and larger full-scale test articles. At the bench level, the seat fitting was supported in a steel fixture, and in the full-scale tests, the fitting was integrated into a surrogate RAH-66 forward fuselage. Based upon the lessons learned, an improved method to design, analyze, and test similar composite material fittings is proposed.

  10. Imposed work of breathing during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation : a bench study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heerde, Marc; van Genderingen, Huib R.; Leenhoven, Tom; Roubik, Karel; Ploetz, Frans B.; Markhorst, Dick G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The ventilator and the endotracheal tube impose additional workload in mechanically ventilated patients breathing spontaneously. The total work of breathing (WOB) includes elastic and resistive work. In a bench test we assessed the imposed WOB using 3100 A/3100 B SensorMedics

  11. A simple analytical scaling method for a scaled-down test facility simulating SB-LOCA in a passive PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang II; No, Hee Cheon

    1992-01-01

    A simple analytical scaling method is developed for a scaled-down test facility simulating SB-LOCAs in a passive PWR. In this method, the whole scenario of a SB-LOCA is divided into two phases on the basis of the pressure trend ; depressurization phase and pot-boiling phase. The pressure and the core mixture level are selected as the most critical parameters to be preserved between the prototype and the scaled-down model. In each phase, the high important phenomena having the influence on the critical parameters are identified and the scaling parameters governing the high important phenomena are generated by the present method. To validate the model used in the derivation of the scaling parameters, Marviken CFT and 336 rod bundle are simulated. In order to validate whether the scaled-down model well represents the important phenomena, we simulate the nondimensional pressure response of a 4-inch break transient for AP-600 and the scaled-down model. The results of the present method are in excellent agreement with those of AP-600. It can be concluded that the present method is suitable for scaling the test facility simulating SB-LOCAs in a passive PWR

  12. Consensus on Intermediate Scale Salt Field Test Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L; Mills, Melissa Marie; Matteo, Edward N

    2017-03-01

    This report summarizes the first stage in a collaborative effort by Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories to design a small-diameter borehole heater test in salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE). The intention is to complete test design during the remainder of fiscal year 2017 (FY17), and the implementation of the test will begin in FY18. This document is the result of regular meetings between the three national labs and the DOE-NE, and is intended to represent a consensus of these meetings and discussions.

  13. In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-4 Product Characterization Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.R.; Stoots, P.R.

    1990-06-01

    In 1987, the Buried Waste Program (BWP) was established within EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., the prime contractor at INEL. Following the Environmental Restoration guidelines of the Buried Waste Program, the In Situ Vitrification Program is participating in a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for permanent disposal of INEL waste, in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study was requested and is being funded by the Office of Technology Development of the Idaho Operations Office of DOE (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an in situ vitrification (ISV) scoping study on the treatability of mixed low-level and mixed transuranic-contaminated waste is being performed to determine the applicability of ISV to remediation of waste at SDA. In examination of the ISV process for applicability to SDA waste, this In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-4 Product Characterization Test Plan identifies the following: sampling and analysis strategy; sampling procedures; methods to conduct analyses; equipment; and procedures to ensure data quality. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  15. submitter Unified Scaling Law for flux pinning in practical superconductors: II. Parameter testing, scaling constants, and the Extrapolative Scaling Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Ekin, Jack W; Goodrich, Loren; Splett, Jolene; Bordini, Bernardo; Richter, David

    2016-01-01

    A scaling study of several thousand Nb3Sn critical-current $(I_c)$ measurements is used to derive the Extrapolative Scaling Expression (ESE), a relation that can quickly and accurately extrapolate limited datasets to obtain full three-dimensional dependences of I c on magnetic field (B), temperature (T), and mechanical strain (ε). The relation has the advantage of being easy to implement, and offers significant savings in sample characterization time and a useful tool for magnet design. Thorough data-based analysis of the general parameterization of the Unified Scaling Law (USL) shows the existence of three universal scaling constants for practical Nb3Sn conductors. The study also identifies the scaling parameters that are conductor specific and need to be fitted to each conductor. This investigation includes two new, rare, and very large I c(B,T,ε) datasets (each with nearly a thousand I c measurements spanning magnetic fields from 1 to 16 T, temperatures from ~2.26 to 14 K, and intrinsic strains from –...

  16. Rating scale for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: scale development and clinimetric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Vittoria; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Condino, Francesca; Mauvais, Hélène Somma; Farnarier, Guy; Labate, Angelo; Latella, Maria Adele; Gasparini, Sara; Branca, Damiano; Pucci, Franco; Vazzana, Francesco; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2011-06-01

    Our aim was to develop a clinimetric scale evaluating motor phenomena, associated features, and severity of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Sixty video/EEG-recorded PNES induced by suggestion maneuvers were evaluated. We examined the relationship between results from this scale and results from the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale to validate this technique. Interrater reliabilities of the PNES scale for three raters were analyzed using the AC1 statistic, Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The relationship between the CGI and PNES scales was evaluated with Spearman correlations. The AC1 statistic demonstrated good interrater reliability for each phenomenon analyzed (tremor/oscillation, tonic; clonic/jerking, hypermotor/agitation, atonic/akinetic, automatisms, associated features). KCC and the ICC showed moderate interrater agreement for phenomenology, associated phenomena, and total PNES scores. Spearman's correlation of mean CGI score with mean total PNES score was 0.69 (Pscale described here accurately evaluates the phenomenology of PNES and could be used to assess and compare subgroups of patients with PNES. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Scaled Technology on Radiation Testing and Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of some of the radiation challenges facing emerging scaled digital technologies with implications on using consumer grade electronics and next generation hardening schemes. Commercial semiconductor manufacturers are recognizing some of these issues as issues for terrestrial performance. Looking at means of dealing with soft errors. The thinned oxide has indicated improved TID tolerance of commercial products hardened by "serendipity" which does not guarantee hardness or say if the trend will continue. This presentation also focuses one reliability implications of thinned oxides.

  18. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot

  19. Virus removal retention challenge tests performed at lab scale and pilot scale during operation of membrane units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, H; Machinal, C; Labaye, Ivan; Schrotter, J C

    2011-01-01

    The determination of the virus retention capabilities of UF units during operation is essential for the operators of drinking water treatment facilities in order to guarantee an efficient and stable removal of viruses through time. In previous studies, an effective method (MS2-phage challenge tests) was developed by the Water Research Center of Veolia Environnement for the measurement of the virus retention rates (Log Removal Rate, LRV) of commercially available hollow fiber membranes at lab scale. In the present work, the protocol for monitoring membrane performance was transferred from lab scale to pilot scale. Membrane performances were evaluated during pilot trial and compared to the results obtained at lab scale with fibers taken from the pilot plant modules. PFU culture method was compared to RT-PCR method for the calculation of LRV in both cases. Preliminary tests at lab scale showed that both methods can be used interchangeably. For tests conducted on virgin membrane, a good consistency was observed between lab and pilot scale results with the two analytical methods used. This work intends to show that a reliable determination of the membranes performances based on RT-PCR analytical method can be achieved during the operation of the UF units.

  20. A simple analytical scaling method for a scaled-down test facility simulating SB-LOCAs in a passive PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Il

    1992-02-01

    A Simple analytical scaling method is developed for a scaled-down test facility simulating SB-LOCAs in a passive PWR. The whole scenario of a SB-LOCA is divided into two phases on the basis of the pressure trend ; depressurization phase and pot-boiling phase. The pressure and the core mixture level are selected as the most critical parameters to be preserved between the prototype and the scaled-down model. In each phase the high important phenomena having the influence on the critical parameters are identified and the scaling parameters governing the high important phenomena are generated by the present method. To validate the model used, Marviken CFT and 336 rod bundle experiment are simulated. The models overpredict both the pressure and two phase mixture level, but it shows agreement at least qualitatively with experimental results. In order to validate whether the scaled-down model well represents the important phenomena, we simulate the nondimensional pressure response of a cold-leg 4-inch break transient for AP-600 and the scaled-down model. The results of the present method are in excellent agreement with those of AP-600. It can be concluded that the present method is suitable for scaling the test facility simulating SB-LOCAs in a passive PWR

  1. Full Scale Alternative Catalyst Testing for Bosch Reactor Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Katherine; Abney, Morgan B.

    2011-01-01

    Current air revitalization technology onboard the International Space Station (ISS) cannot provide complete closure of the oxygen and hydrogen loops. This makes re-supply necessary, which is possible for missions in low Earth orbit (LEO) like the ISS, but unviable for long term space missions outside LEO. In comparison, Bosch technology reduces carbon dioxide with hydrogen, traditionally over a steel wool catalyst, to create water and solid carbon. The Bosch product water can then be fed to the oxygen generation assembly to produce oxygen for crew members and hydrogen necessary to reduce more carbon dioxide. Bosch technology can achieve complete oxygen loop closure, but has many undesirable factors that result in a high energy, mass, and volume system. Finding a different catalyst with an equal reaction rate at lower temperatures with less catalyst mass and longer lifespan would make a Bosch flight system more feasible. Developmental testing of alternative catalysts for the Bosch has been performed using the Horizontal Bosch Test Stand. Nickel foam, nickel shavings, and cobalt shavings were tested at 500 C and compared to the original catalyst, steel wool. This paper presents data and analysis on the performance of each catalyst tested at comparable temperatures and recycle flow rates.

  2. Data for pilot-scale low level hydrogen peroxide tests using humidifiers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Dataset includes data from each experiment conducted in the pilot-scale testing. Each sheet of the Excel file pertains to each test. A data dictionary is included in...

  3. Drag coefficients of lattice masts from full-scale wind-tunnel tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos; Støttrup-Andersen, Ulrik; Johnsen, Marie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the drag coefficients obtained from a series of full-scale section model wind-tunnel tests of several lattice mast configurations are presented and compared to those provided in Eurocode 3 and ESDU. The drag coefficients provided in Eurocode are conservative interpretations of 1......:5 scale section model tests performed at the National Physics Laboratory and the National Maritime Institute in the UK in the 1970´s. ESDU provides velocity-dependent drag coefficients equivalent to those obtained from the same series of tests. In all cases, the mast legs and diagonals are comprised...... primarily of circular hollow sections, putting into question the validity of the scaled tests from the 70’s. The results of the full-scale tests show that the drag coefficients of the masts have lower values than those obtained from the scaled tests for turbulent wind and higher for winds with low...

  4. Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Marcello [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Baldauf, T. [Inst. of Advanced Studies, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bond, J. Richard [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dalal, N. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Putter, R. D. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Dore, O. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Green, Daniel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hirata, Chris [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huang, Zhiqi [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Huterer, Dragan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jeong, Donghui [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew C. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada); Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, ON (Canada); Krause, Elisabeth [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Loverde, Marilena [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Meyers, Joel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Meeburg, Daniel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Shandera, Sarah [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, Kendrick [Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zaldarriaga, Matias [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Assassi, Valentin [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom); Braden, Jonathan [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Hajian, Amir [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Kobayashi, Takeshi [Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, Toronto, ON (Canada); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Stein, George [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Engelen, Alexander van [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large-scale structure is, however, from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude f$loc\\atop{NL}$ (f$eq\\atop{NL}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are Δf$loc, eq\\atop{NL}$ ≃ 1. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

  5. Study of influence of an experiment scale on cylinder test results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar A. Trzciński

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the work, influence of a scale of experiment on the results of cylindrical test used todetermine the acceleration capabilities of explosives was analyzed. Explosives used in ammunition(TNT, hexogen and explosives for civil purpose (ammonals were selected for testing. Copper tubeswith different diameters and wall thickness were used. Conclusions are drawn regarding the advisabilityof increasing or decreasing the scale of the cylinder test.[b]Keywords[/b]: explosives, acceleration ability, cylinder test

  6. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  7. In-core fuel motion detection for large scale tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Dupree, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to test the feasibility of making and unfolding in-core measurements of fuel motion has been initiated at Sandia. The experiment calls for instrumenting a 37-pin fuel bundle and exposing it to neutron pulses in the Sandia Pulsed Reactor SPR-III. Fuel motion will be simulated by mechanically adjusting the fuel pins to create voids within the center of the bundle. A preliminary design of the experiment has been completed and analyses have been conducted on the application of 238 U and 235 U fission couple detectors to the experiment. Formulation of the unfolding problem has pointed out the necessity of carefully instrumenting the experiment to maximize the resolution of the mass measurement. Ultimately a measurement resolution of 100-200 g of fuel should be possible for this experiment. The experiment will provide a realistic test bed for obtaining practical experience in detector design and data reduction

  8. Full-scale tornado-missile impact tests. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, A.E.

    1976-04-01

    Seven completed initial tests are described with 4 types of hypothetical tornado-borne missiles (impacting reinforced concrete panels that are typical of walls in nuclear power facilities). The missiles were rocket propelled to velocities currently postulated as being attainable by debris in tornadoes. (1500-pound 35-foot long utility pole; 8-pound 1-inch Grade 60 reinforcing bar; 78-pound 3-inch Schedule 40 pipe; and 743-pound 12-inch Schedule 40 pipe;) The results show that a minimum thickness of 24 inches is sufficient to prevent backface scabbing from normal impacts of currently postulated tornado missiles and that existing power plant walls are adequate for the most severe conditions currently postulated by regulatory agencies. This report gives selected detailed data on the tests completed thus far, including strain, panel velocity, and reaction histories

  9. Using Large Scale Test Results for Pedagogical Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens

    2012-01-01

    , and the teachers’ and students’ use of this information for pedagogical purposes in the classroom. We know well how the policy makers interpret and use the outcomes of such tests, but we know less about how teachers make use of LSTs to inform their pedagogical practice. An important question is whether...... there is a contradiction between the political system’s use of LST and teachers’ (possible) pedagogical use of LST. And if yes: What is a contradiction based on? This presentation will give some results from a systematic review on how tests have influenced the pedagogical practice. The research revealed many of the fatal...... system and the different theoretical foundations of PISA and most teachers’ pedagogically oriented, formative assessment, thus explaining the teacher resentment towards LSTs. Finally, some principles for linking LSTs to teachers’ pedagogical practice will be presented....

  10. Scaling reward value with demand curves versus preference tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lindsay P; Silberberg, Alan; Casey, Anna H; Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    In Experiment 1, six capuchins lifted a weight during a 10-min session to receive a food piece. Across conditions, the weight was increased across six different amounts for three different food types. The number of food pieces obtained as a function of the weight lifted was fitted by a demand equation that is hypothesized to quantify food value. For most subjects, this analysis showed that the three food types differed little in value. In Experiment 2, these monkeys were given pairwise choices among these food types. In 13 of 18 comparisons, preferences at least equaled a 3-to-1 ratio; in seven comparisons, preference was absolute. There was no relation between values based on degree of preference versus values based on the demand equation. When choices in the present report were compared to similar data with these subjects from another study, between-study lability in preference emerged. This outcome contrasts with the finding in demand analysis that test-retest reliability is high. We attribute the unreliability and extreme assignment of value based on preference tests to high substitutability between foods. We suggest use of demand analysis instead of preference tests for studies that compare the values of different foods. A better strategy might be to avoid manipulating value by using different foods. Where possible, value should be manipulated by varying amounts of a single food type because, over an appropriate range, more food is consistently more valuable than less. Such an approach would be immune to problems in between-food substitutability.