WorldWideScience

Sample records for belowground processes limitations

  1. Are patterns in nutrient limitation belowground consistent with those aboveground: Results from a 4 million year chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S.C.; Vitousek, P.M.; Cleveland, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Accurately predicting the effects of global change on net carbon (C) exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere requires a more complete understanding of how nutrient availability regulates both plant growth and heterotrophic soil respiration. Models of soil development suggest that the nature of nutrient limitation changes over the course of ecosystem development, transitioning from nitrogen (N) limitation in 'young' sites to phosphorus (P) limitation in 'old' sites. However, previous research has focused primarily on plant responses to added nutrients, and the applicability of nutrient limitation-soil development models to belowground processes has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we assessed the effects of nutrients on soil C cycling in three different forests that occupy a 4 million year substrate age chronosequence where tree growth is N limited at the youngest site, co-limited by N and P at the intermediate-aged site, and P limited at the oldest site. Our goal was to use short-term laboratory soil C manipulations (using 14C-labeled substrates) and longer-term intact soil core incubations to compare belowground responses to fertilization with aboveground patterns. When nutrients were applied with labile C (sucrose), patterns of microbial nutrient limitation were similar to plant patterns: microbial activity was limited more by N than by P in the young site, and P was more limiting than N in the old site. However, in the absence of C additions, increased respiration of native soil organic matter only occurred with simultaneous additions of N and P. Taken together, these data suggest that altered nutrient inputs into ecosystems could have dissimilar effects on C cycling above- and belowground, that nutrients may differentially affect of the fate of different soil C pools, and that future changes to the net C balance of terrestrial ecosystems will be partially regulated by soil nutrient status. ?? 2010 US Government.

  2. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  3. Aboveground and belowground arthropods experience different relative influences of stochastic versus deterministic community assembly processes following disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Ferrenberg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding patterns of biodiversity is a longstanding challenge in ecology. Similar to other biotic groups, arthropod community structure can be shaped by deterministic and stochastic processes, with limited understanding of what moderates the relative influence of these processes. Disturbances have been noted to alter the relative influence of deterministic and stochastic processes on community assembly in various study systems, implicating ecological disturbances as a potential moderator of these forces. Methods Using a disturbance gradient along a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality in a subalpine forest of the southern Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, we examined changes in community structure and relative influences of deterministic and stochastic processes in the assembly of aboveground (surface and litter-active species and belowground (species active in organic and mineral soil layers arthropod communities. Arthropods were sampled for all years of the chronosequence via pitfall traps (aboveground community and modified Winkler funnels (belowground community and sorted to morphospecies. Community structure of both communities were assessed via comparisons of morphospecies abundance, diversity, and composition. Assembly processes were inferred from a mixture of linear models and matrix correlations testing for community associations with environmental properties, and from null-deviation models comparing observed vs. expected levels of species turnover (Beta diversity among samples. Results Tree mortality altered community structure in both aboveground and belowground arthropod communities, but null models suggested that aboveground communities experienced greater relative influences of deterministic processes, while the relative influence of stochastic processes increased for belowground communities. Additionally, Mantel tests and linear regression models revealed significant associations between the

  4. Aboveground and belowground arthropods experience different relative influences of stochastic versus deterministic community assembly processes following disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alexander S.; Faist, Akasha M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding patterns of biodiversity is a longstanding challenge in ecology. Similar to other biotic groups, arthropod community structure can be shaped by deterministic and stochastic processes, with limited understanding of what moderates the relative influence of these processes. Disturbances have been noted to alter the relative influence of deterministic and stochastic processes on community assembly in various study systems, implicating ecological disturbances as a potential moderator of these forces. Methods Using a disturbance gradient along a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality in a subalpine forest of the southern Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, we examined changes in community structure and relative influences of deterministic and stochastic processes in the assembly of aboveground (surface and litter-active species) and belowground (species active in organic and mineral soil layers) arthropod communities. Arthropods were sampled for all years of the chronosequence via pitfall traps (aboveground community) and modified Winkler funnels (belowground community) and sorted to morphospecies. Community structure of both communities were assessed via comparisons of morphospecies abundance, diversity, and composition. Assembly processes were inferred from a mixture of linear models and matrix correlations testing for community associations with environmental properties, and from null-deviation models comparing observed vs. expected levels of species turnover (Beta diversity) among samples. Results Tree mortality altered community structure in both aboveground and belowground arthropod communities, but null models suggested that aboveground communities experienced greater relative influences of deterministic processes, while the relative influence of stochastic processes increased for belowground communities. Additionally, Mantel tests and linear regression models revealed significant associations between the aboveground arthropod

  5. Imaging spectroscopy links aspen genotype with below-ground processes at landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madritch, Michael D; Kingdon, Clayton C; Singh, Aditya; Mock, Karen E; Lindroth, Richard L; Townsend, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Fine-scale biodiversity is increasingly recognized as important to ecosystem-level processes. Remote sensing technologies have great potential to estimate both biodiversity and ecosystem function over large spatial scales. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of imaging spectroscopy to discriminate among genotypes of Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen), one of the most genetically diverse and widespread forest species in North America. We combine imaging spectroscopy (AVIRIS) data with genetic, phytochemical, microbial and biogeochemical data to determine how intraspecific plant genetic variation influences below-ground processes at landscape scales. We demonstrate that both canopy chemistry and below-ground processes vary over large spatial scales (continental) according to aspen genotype. Imaging spectrometer data distinguish aspen genotypes through variation in canopy spectral signature. In addition, foliar spectral variation correlates well with variation in canopy chemistry, especially condensed tannins. Variation in aspen canopy chemistry, in turn, is correlated with variation in below-ground processes. Variation in spectra also correlates well with variation in soil traits. These findings indicate that forest tree species can create spatial mosaics of ecosystem functioning across large spatial scales and that these patterns can be quantified via remote sensing techniques. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of using optical properties as proxies for fine-scale measurements of biodiversity over large spatial scales.

  6. Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale: An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Brown, Gordon E.; Plata, Charity

    2014-02-21

    As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel meeting held in February 2013, attendees discussed critical biogeochemical processes that regulate carbon cycling in soil. The meeting attendees determined that as a national scientific user facility, EMSL can provide the tools and expertise needed to elucidate the molecular foundation that underlies mechanistic descriptions of biogeochemical processes that control carbon allocation and fluxes at the terrestrial/atmospheric interface in landscape and regional climate models. Consequently, the workshop's goal was to identify the science gaps that hinder either development of mechanistic description of critical processes or their accurate representation in climate models. In part, this report offers recommendations for future EMSL activities in this research area. The workshop was co-chaired by Dr. Nancy Hess (EMSL) and Dr. Gordon Brown (Stanford University).

  7. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of below-ground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, M Luke; Dickie, Ian A; Eissenstat, David M; Fahey, Timothy J; Fernandez, Christopher W; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A; Iversen, Colleen M; Jackson, Robert B; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Norby, Richard J; Phillips, Richard P; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Pritchard, Seth G; Rewald, Boris; Zadworny, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain because of the challenges of consistently measuring and interpreting fine-root systems. Traditionally, fine roots have been defined as all roots ≤ 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. Here, we demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, fine roots are either separated into individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine-root pool. Using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally - a c. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. Future work developing tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi into fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand below-ground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.

  8. Temperature-dependant shifts in a wet tropical Hawaiian forest ecosystem: impact on belowground carbon stocks, dynamics, and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, S. E.; Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    Global patterns suggest a positive correlation between temperature and total belowground carbon (C) flux and partitioning in temperate and tropical regions, but these relationships have yet to be tested within a given ecosystem type. We established a transect of nine permanent forest plots along an elevation gradient (800-1600 m) in native-dominated Metrosideros polymorpha / Acacia koa rainforest developed in volcanic ash soils along the windward slope of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Along the transect parent material, bedrock age, species composition, and plant available water are nearly constant and only mean annual temperature (MAT) varies substantially (13°C-18°C). We hypothesized that warmer temperatures at lower elevations would drive greater C flux and partitioning to belowground, which represents a direct input of C into belowground stocks. Roots are often sources of stabilized soil organic matter, thus we expected that increased belowground flux and partitioning of C at higher MATs would increase soil C stocks within recalcitrant C pools, even if bulk soil C stock decreases overall. In fact, our data suggest non-linear relationships between temperature and the distribution of C among soil pools based on sequential density fractionation at 1.6 and 2.4 g mL-1, and radiocarbon-based estimates of mean residence time. The proportion of C recovered within the mineral-associated heavy fraction (>2.4 g mL-1) was greatest at the highest MAT (nearly 30% of total soil C), initially declined at the mid-MAT plots (~10% of total soil C), but then increased again at the lowest MAT plots (~25%). Although the proportion of soil C within the heavy fraction was lowest at the mid-MAT plots, the mean residence time of heavy fraction C was greatest in these plots (570-663 yr for the mid-MAT plots versus 120-220 yr for the highest MAT plots and 64-308 for the lowest MAT plots), suggesting that the mineral-associated C in the mid-MAT plots was the most stabilized. In contrast, the

  9. Advancing Understanding of the Role of Belowground Processes in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks trhrough Ground-Penetrating Radar. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Frank P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    Coarse roots play a significant role in belowground carbon cycling and will likely play an increasingly crucial role in belowground carbon sequestration as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to rise, yet they are one of the most difficult ecosystem parameters to quantify. Despite promising results with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) as a nondestructive method of quantifying biomass of coarse roots, this application of GPR is in its infancy and neither the complete potential nor limitations of the technology have been fully evaluated. The primary goals and questions of this study fell into four groups: (1) GPR methods: Can GPR detect change in root biomass over time, differentiate live roots from dead roots, differentiate between coarse roots, fine roots bundled together, and a fine root mat, remain effective with varied soil moisture, and detect shadowed roots (roots hidden below larger roots); (2) CO2 enrichment study at Kennedy Space Center in Brevard County, Florida: Are there post-fire legacy effects of CO2 fertilization on plant carbon pools following the end of CO2application ? (3) Disney Wilderness Study: What is the overall coarse root biomass and potential for belowground carbon storage in a restored longleaf pine flatwoods system? Can GPR effectively quantify coarse roots in soils that are wetter than the previous sites and that have a high percentage of saw palmetto rhizomes present? (4) Can GPR accurately represent root architecture in a three-dimensional model? When the user is familiar with the equipment and software in a setting that minimizes unsuitable conditions, GPR is a relatively precise, non-destructive, useful tool for estimating coarse root biomass. However, there are a number of cautions and guidelines that should be followed to minimize inaccuracies or situations that are untenable for GPR use. GPR appears to be precise as it routinely predicts highly similar values for a given area across multiple

  10. Increased belowground C release during initial plant development of Populus deltoides x nigra grown under light and C reserve limited conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Mirjam S.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Schmidt, Michael W. I.; Abiven, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Plants might be a key factor for the long-term stabilisation of carbon (C) in the soil, e.g. through enhanced physical protection of root-derived C against microbial decomposition in soil aggregates. On the other hand C released by the plants into the soil might promote the decomposition of native soil organic matter (SOM) through the stimulation of microbial activity. We measured the C budget of developing plant-soil systems (Populus deltoides x nigra, Cambisol soil) in the laboratory under controlled environmental conditions. In order to distinguish plant-derived from native C in the SOM and the soil CO2 efflux, we labelled the poplar shoots continuously with 13C-CO2 from first emergence of leaves (sprouting from stem cuttings). Throughout the experiment the CO2 fluxes (photosynthetic assimilation, dark respiratory loss, soil CO2 efflux) were measured frequently (every 30 min) and the 13C was traced in the soil CO2 efflux (1-2 times a week). After 10 weeks the plant-soil systems were destructively harvested and the distribution of the 13C distribution was analysed. The plants developed slowly (compared to previous experiments), most likely due to limitation in C reserves (long term cutting storage) and C supply (low light intensities). The amount of 13C recovered in the roots, microbial biomass and soil CO2 efflux was directly correlated with the leaf area of the different plant individuals. After 3-4 weeks of plant development we observed a high peak in the total soil CO2 efflux. During this time the relative belowground C release was increased massively over the basal rate of 17 % of net C assimilated, whereby the variability between the plant individuals was large. The smallest plants, i.e. the plants that were most resource limited, obtained the highest belowground C release accounting at the peak time for up to 57 % of net assimilated C. We hypothesize that the plants released specific compounds, which either directly (enzymatically) or indirectly (priming

  11. Relationships at the aboveground-belowground interface: plants, soil biota and soil processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porazinska, D.L.; Bardgett, R.D.; Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; Hunt, H.W.; Parsons, A.N.; Seastedt, T.R.; Wall, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interactions at the aboveground-below ground interface provide important feedbacks that regulate ecosystem processes. Organisms within soil food webs are involved in processes of decomposition and nutrient mineralization, and their abundance and activity have been linked to plant ecophysiological tr

  12. Short- and longterm impacts of Acacia longifolia invasion on belowground processes of a Mediterranean coastal dune ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchante, Elizabete; Kjøller, Annelise; Struwe, Sten;

    2008-01-01

    Many coastal dune ecosystems in Portugal are invaded by the leguminous tree Acacia longifolia (Andrews) Willd. This exotic species was first introduced over one hundred years ago in an effort to mitigate dune erosion and loss of coastal landscapes. However, since then A. longifolia has spread...... to new areas, displacing the native vegetation. These invaded ecosystems contrast with the native dune ecosystems that are typically dominated by herb and shrub communities. This study characterizes belowground changes to the native environment as a result of recent (20 y...

  13. Issues and prospects of belowground ecology with special reference to global climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jinsheng; WANG Zhengquan; FANG Jingyun

    2004-01-01

    The theory of ecology is based on over 100 a of research and investigation, all centered on aboveground patterns and processes. However, as contemporary ecologists are increasingly acknowledging, belowground structures, functions, and processes are some of the most poorly understood areas in ecology. This lack of understanding of belowground ecological processes seriously restricts the advance of global change research. The interdisciplinary field of belowground ecology began to flourish in the 1990s, along with the expansion of global change research, and quickly gained momentum. Belowground ecology aims to investigate belowground structures, functions, and processes, as well as their relationships with corresponding aboveground features, emphasizing the responses of belowground systems under global change conditions. Key research areas include root ecology,belowground animals, and soil microorganisms. This review summarizes and analyzes the relationships between aboveand belowground ecosystems, root ecology, root biogeography, belowground biodiversity, as well as research areas with particular challenges and progress. This commentary emphasizes certain theoretical issues concerning the responses of belowground processes to global change, and concludes that belowground ecology is a critical research priority in the 21st century.

  14. Linking aboveground and belowground diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, de G.B.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2005-01-01

    Aboveground and belowground species interactions drive ecosystem properties at the local scale, but it is unclear how these relationships scale-up to regional and global scales. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of aboveground and belowground diversity links from a global to a local scale. Glob

  15. Belowground Competition Directs Spatial Patterns of Seedling Growth in Boreal Pine Forests in Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petter Axelsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground competition is often argued to be the main process determining patterns of natural forest regeneration. However, the theory of multiple resource limitation suggests that seedling performance also depends on belowground competition and, thus, that their relative influence is of fundamental importance. Two approaches were used to address the relative importance of above- and below-ground competition on regeneration in a nutrient-poor pine (Pinus sylvestris boreal forest. Firstly, seedling establishment beneath trees stem-girdled 12 years ago show that a substantial proportion of the seedlings were established within two years after girdling, which corresponds to a time when nutrient uptake by tree roots was severely reduced without disrupting water transport to the tree canopy, which consequently was maintained. The establishment during these two years also corresponds to abundances high enough for normal stand replacement. Secondly, surveys of regeneration within forest gaps showed that surrounding forests depressed seedlings, so that satisfactory growth occurred only more than 5 m from forest edges and that higher solar radiation in south facing edges was not enough to mediate these effects. We conclude that disruption of belowground competitive interactions mediates regeneration and, thus, that belowground competition has a strong limiting influence on seedling establishment in these forests.

  16. How can we exploit above-belowground interactions to assist in addressing the challenges of food security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell, Peter; Bennett, Alison E

    2013-10-30

    Can above-belowground interactions help address issues of food security? We address this question in this manuscript, and review the intersection of above-belowground interactions and food security. We propose that above-belowground interactions could address two strategies identified by Godfray etal. (2010): reducing the Yield Gap, and Increasing Production Limits. In particular, to minimize the difference between potential and realized production (The Yield Gap) above-belowground interactions could be manipulated to reduce losses to pests and increase crop growth (and therefore yields). To Increase Production Limits we propose two mechanisms: utilizing intercropping (which uses multiple aspects of above-belowground interactions) and breeding for traits that promote beneficial above-belowground interactions, as well as breeding mutualistic organisms to improve their provided benefit. As a result, if they are managed correctly, there is great potential for above-belowground interactions to contribute to food security.

  17. Belowground carbon cycle of Napier and Guinea grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Y.; Crow, S. E.; Litton, C. M.; Deenik, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) sequestration may partially offset rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) and Guinea grass (Panicum maximum), in particular, are perennial C4 grasses with high capacity to produce large amounts of both aboveground and belowground biomass. Thus, they have a potential to sequester soil C while simultaneously provide aboveground biomass for energy production. In this study, both grasses were ratooned (no-till) to leave belowground biomass intact and facilitate C accumulation through improvement of soil aggregation. The primary objective of the study was to determine if and how these grasses sequester soil C. For 8 selected grass varieties, we: (1) determined the quantity and quality of belowground C input, (2) quantified changes in soil organic C (SOC) during two harvesting cycles (May 2010 to July 2011), and (3) fractionated soil C pools to determine where changes in SOC occurred. Soil-surface CO2 efflux and root biomass were used as measures of the quantity of belowground C input. Root lignin/N ratios and decay constants from litterbag studies were used as measures of the belowground C input quality. We hypothesized that grass varieties with higher quantity and lower quality of belowground C input would sequester more soil C. Root biomass collected on May 2010 ranged from 13 to 302 g m-2 at 15 cm depth, where Local (Napier) and OG05 (Guinea) varieties were significantly greater than the K06 variety (Guinea). However, cumulative soil-surface CO2 efflux showed no significant differences between the three varieties. Root Lignin/N ranged from 16 to 55 and Guinea varieties were significantly higher on average than Napier varieties. Root decay constants were variable among varieties, with OG05 and K06 showing higher resistance to decay compared to Local. Soil C sequestration potentials and factors affecting the process are imperative to determine suitable variety for bioenergy production.

  18. Central Limit Theorem for Nonlinear Hawkes Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Lingjiong

    2012-01-01

    Hawkes process is a self-exciting point process with clustering effect whose jump rate depends on its entire past history. It has wide applications in neuroscience, finance and many other fields. Linear Hawkes process has an immigration-birth representation and can be computed more or less explicitly. It has been extensively studied in the past and the limit theorems are well understood. On the contrary, nonlinear Hawkes process lacks the immigration-birth representation and is much harder to analyze. In this paper, we obtain a functional central limit theorem for nonlinear Hawkes process.

  19. Limit theorems for fragmentation processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we extend two limit theorems which were recently obtained for fragmentation processes to such processes with immigration. More precisely, in the setting with immigration we consider a limit theorem for the process counted with a random characteristic as well as the asymptotic behaviour of an empirical measure associated with the stopping line corresponding to the first blocks, in their respective line of descent, that are smaller than a given size. In addition, we determine the asymptotic decay rate of the size of the largest block in a homogeneous fragmentation process with immigration. The techniques used to proves these results are based on submartingale arguments.

  20. Some Limit Theorems in Geometric Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeh Lam; Yao-hui Zheng; Yuan-lin Zhang

    2003-01-01

    Geometric process (GP) was introduced by Lam[4,5], it is defined as a stochastic process {Xn, n =1, 2,...} for which there exists a real number a > 0, such that {an-1Xn, n = 1, 2,...} forms a renewal process (RP). In this paper, we study some limit theorems in GP. We first derive the Wald equation for GP and then obtain the limit theorems of the age, residual life and the total life at t for a GP. A general limit theorem for Sn with a > 1 is also studied. Furthermore, we make a comparison between GP and RP, including the comparison of their limit distributions of the age, residual life and the total life at t.

  1. Above and belowground connections and species interactions: Controls over ecosystem fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, Amy Marie [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Phillips, Richard [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Stoy, Paul Christopher [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this work was to quantify soil and volatile organic compound fluxes as a function of tree species and associated mycorrhizal associations in an intact forest, but also to describe the physical and biological factors that control these emissions. The results of this research lay the foundation toward an improved mechanistic understanding of carbon pathways, fluxes, and ecosystem function, ultimately improving the representation of forest ecosystems in Earth System models. To this end, a multidisciplinary approach was necessary to fill a critical gap in our understanding of how soil and root processes may influence whole-ecosystem carbon-based volatile fluxes in the face of a rapidly changing climate. We developed a series of novel sampling protocols and coupled a variety of advanced analytical techniques, resulting in findings relevant across disciplines. Furthermore, we leveraged existing infrastructure, research sites, and datasets to design a low-cost exploratory project that links belowground processes, soil volatile emissions, and total ecosystem carbon budgets. Measurements from soil collars installed across a species/mycorrhizal gradient at the DOE-supported Moran Monroe State Forest Ameriflux tower site suggest that leaf litter is the primary source of belowground and forest floor volatile emissions, but the strength of this source is significantly affected not only by leaf litter type, but the strength of the soil as a sink. Results suggest that the strength of the sink is influenced by tree species-specific associated microbial communities that change throughout the season as a function of temperature, soil moisture, leaf litter inputs, and phenology. The magnitude of the observed volatile fluxes from the forest floor is small relative to total aboveground ecosystem flux, but the contribution of these emissions to volatile-mediated ecological interactions and soil processes (e.g. nitrification) varies substantially across the growing

  2. Legacy effects of aboveground-belowground interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenko, Olga; van de Voorde, Tess F J; Mulder, Patrick P J; van der Putten, Wim H; Martijn Bezemer, T

    2012-08-01

    Root herbivory can greatly affect the performance of aboveground insects via changes in plant chemistry. These interactions have been studied extensively in experiments where aboveground and belowground insects were feeding on the same plant. However, little is known about how aboveground and belowground organisms interact when they feed on plant individuals that grow after each other in the same soil. We show that feeding by aboveground and belowground insect herbivores on ragwort (Jacobaea vulgaris) plants exert unique soil legacy effects, via herbivore-induced changes in the composition of soil fungi. These changes in the soil biota induced by aboveground and belowground herbivores of preceding plants greatly influenced the pyrrolizidine alkaloid content, biomass and aboveground multitrophic interactions of succeeding plants. We conclude that plant-mediated interactions between aboveground and belowground insects are also important when they do not feed simultaneously on the same plant.

  3. Processing keyword queries under access limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Calì, Andrea; Martinenghi, D.; Torlone, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Web is constituted by data accessible through Web pages, but not readily indexable by search engines, as they are returned in dynamic pages. In this paper we propose a framework for accessing Deep Web sources, represented as relational tables with so-called access limitations, with keyword-based queries. We formalize the notion of optimal answer and propose methods for query processing. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first systematic approach to keyword search in such cont...

  4. Limit processes of non-equilibrium TASEP

    CERN Document Server

    Corwin, I; Péché, S

    2010-01-01

    We consider the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with two-sided Bernoulli initial condition, i.e., with left density rho_- and right density rho_+. We consider the associated height function, whose discrete gradient is given by the particle occurrences. Macroscopically one has a deterministic limit shape with a shock or a rarefaction fan depending on the values of rho_{+/-}. We characterize the large time scaling limit of the fluctuations as a function of the densities rho_{+/-} and of the different macroscopic regions. Moreover, using a slow decorrelation phenomena, the results are extended from fixed time to the whole space-time, except along the characteristic lines where the problem is still open. On the way to proving the results for TASEP, we obtain the limit processes for the fluctuations in a class of corner growth processes with external sources, of equivalently for the last passage time in a directed percolation model with two-sided boundary conditions. Additionally, we provide an...

  5. Interactions between above- and belowground organisms modified in climate change experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsbak, Karen; Scherber, Christoph; Gladbach, David;

    2012-01-01

    to experimentally increase aboveground herbivory in grass phytometers exposed to all eight combinations of climate change factors for three years. Aboveground herbivory increased the abundance of belowground protozoans, microbial growth and microbial nitrogen availability. Increased CO2 modified these links through......Climate change has been shown to affect ecosystem process rates and community composition, with direct and indirect effects on belowground food webs. In particular, altered rates of herbivory under future climate4 can be expected to influence above–belowground interactions. Here, we use...... a multifactor, field-scale climate change experiment and independently manipulate atmospheric CO2 concentration, air and soil temperature and drought in all combinations since 2005. We show that changes in these factors modify the interaction between above- and belowground organisms.We use an insect herbivore...

  6. Nutrient subsidies to belowground microbes impact aboveground food web interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jes; Megonigal, J Patrick; Denno, Robert F

    2006-06-01

    Historically, terrestrial food web theory has been compartmentalized into interactions among aboveground or belowground communities. In this study we took a more synthetic approach to understanding food web interactions by simultaneously examining four trophic levels and investigating how nutrient (nitrogen and carbon) and detrital subsidies impact the ability of the belowground microbial community to alter the abundance of aboveground arthropods (herbivores and predators) associated with the intertidal cord grass Spartina alterniflora. We manipulated carbon, nitrogen, and detrital resources in a field experiment and measured decomposition rate, soil nitrogen pools, plant biomass and quality, herbivore density, and arthropod predator abundance. Because carbon subsidies impact plant growth only indirectly (microbial pathways), whereas nitrogen additions both directly (plant uptake) and indirectly (microbial pathways) impact plant primary productivity, we were able to assess the effect of both belowground soil microbes and nutrient availability on aboveground herbivores and their predators. Herbivore density in the field was suppressed by carbon supplements. Carbon addition altered soil microbial dynamics (net potential ammonification, litter decomposition rate, DON [dissolved organic N] concentration), which limited inorganic soil nitrogen availability and reduced plant size as well as predator abundance. Nitrogen addition enhanced herbivore density by increasing plant size and quality directly by increasing inorganic soil nitrogen pools, and indirectly by enhancing microbial nitrification. Detritus adversely affected aboveground herbivores mainly by promoting predator aggregation. To date, the effects of carbon and nitrogen subsidies on salt marshes have been examined as isolated effects on either the aboveground or the belowground community. Our results emphasize the importance of directly addressing the soil microbial community as a factor that influences

  7. Color management: printing processes - opportunities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Samuel T.

    2002-06-01

    Digital tools have impacted traditional methods employed to reproduce color images during the past decade. The shift from a purely photomechanical process in color reproduction to colorimetric reproduction offers tremendous opportunity in the graphic arts industry. But good things do not necessarily come to all in the same package. Printing processes possess different reproduction attributes: tone reproduction, gray balance and color correction requirements are as different as the ingredient sets selected for color reproduction. This paper will provide insight toward understanding advantages and limitations offered by the new digital technologies in printing, publishing and packaging. For the past five years the Clemson University Graphic Communications Department has conducted numerous color projects using the new digital colorimetric tools during the previous decade. Several approaches have been used including experimental research and typical production workflows. The use of colorimetric data in color reproduction has given an opportunity to realize real gains in color use, predictability and consistency. Meeting an image's separation and reproduction requirements for a specified printing process can involve disruption of the anticipated workflow. Understanding the printing process requirements and the fit within the specifications of a colorimetric workflow are critical to the successful adoption of a color managed workflow. The paper will also provide an insight into the issues and challenges experienced with a color managed workflow. The printing processes used include offset litho, narrow and wide-web flexography (paper, liner board, corrugated and film), screen printing (paper board and polycarbonates), and digital imaging with toner, ink and inkjet systems. A proposal for technology integration will be the focus of the presentation drawn from documented experiences in over 300 applications of color management tools. Discussion will include the structure of

  8. Interactions between above- and belowground organisms modified in climate change experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevnbak, Karen; Scherber, Christoph; Gladbach, David J.; Beier, Claus; Mikkelsen, Teis N.; Christensen, Søren

    2012-11-01

    Climate change has been shown to affect ecosystem process rates and community composition, with direct and indirect effects on belowground food webs. In particular, altered rates of herbivory under future climate can be expected to influence above-belowground interactions. Here, we use a multifactor, field-scale climate change experiment and independently manipulate atmospheric CO2 concentration, air and soil temperature and drought in all combinations since 2005. We show that changes in these factors modify the interaction between above- and belowground organisms. We use an insect herbivore to experimentally increase aboveground herbivory in grass phytometers exposed to all eight combinations of climate change factors for three years. Aboveground herbivory increased the abundance of belowground protozoans, microbial growth and microbial nitrogen availability. Increased CO2 modified these links through a reduction in herbivory and cascading effects through the soil food web. Interactions between CO2, drought and warming can affect belowground protozoan abundance. Our findings imply that climate change affects aboveground-belowground interactions through changes in nutrient availability.

  9. Limited resources in a driven diffusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackley, Chris A; Romano, M Carmen; Grebogi, Celso; Thiel, Marco

    2010-08-13

    The advance of particles in many driven diffusion systems depends on the availability of resources in the surrounding environment. In the balance between supply and demand of such resources we are confronted with a regime in which, under limited resource availability, the flow is markedly reduced. In the context of mRNA translation this represents the finite availability of amino acid-tRNA molecules. In this limited resources regime a severe depletion of amino acid tRNAs is also observed. These dramatic effects are vital to our understanding of translation, and are likely to also be important for the many other applications of driven diffusion models.

  10. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  11. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  12. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junyi; Qi, Xuan; Souza, Lara; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive research has explored whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in the terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in the plant and litter pools but not in the soil pool, partially supporting one of the basic assumptions in the PNL hypothesis that elevated CO2 results in more N sequestered in organic pools. However, CO2 enrichment significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation and the loss via N2O emission, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth was observed over time up to the longest experiment of 13 years. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions in spite of the increases in plant N sequestration and N2O emission. Moreover, our syntheses indicate that CO2 enrichment increases soil ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3-) ratio. The changed NH4+/NO3- ratio and subsequent biological processes may result in changes in soil microenvironments, above-belowground community structures and associated interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. In addition, our data synthesis suggests that more long-term studies, especially in regions other than temperate ones, are needed for comprehensive assessments of the PNL hypothesis.

  13. Belowground plant development measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: exploiting the potential for non-invasive trait quantification using sugar beet as a proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eMetzner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both structural and functional properties of belowground plant organs are critical for the development and yield of plants but, compared to the shoot, much more difficult to observe due to soil opacity. Many processes concerning the belowground plant performance are not fully understood, in particular spatial and temporal dynamics and their interrelation with environmental factors. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI as a noninvasive method to evaluate which traits can be measured when a complex plant organ is monitored in-vivo while growing in the soil. We chose sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris as a model system. The beet consists mainly of root tissues, is rather complex regarding tissue structure and responses to environmental factors, and thereby a good object to test the applicability of MRI for 3D phenotyping approaches. Over a time period of up to 3 months, traits such as beet morphology or anatomy were followed in the soil and the effect of differently sized pots on beet fresh weight calculated from MRI data was studied. There was a clear positive correlation between the pot size and the increase in fresh weight of a sugar beet over time. Since knowledge of the development of internal beet structures with several concentric cambia, vascular and parenchyma rings is still limited, we consecutively acquired 3D volumetric images on individual plants using the MRI contrast parameter T2 to map the development of rings at the tissue level. This demonstrates that MRI provides versatile protocols to non-invasively measure plant traits in the soil. It opens new avenues to investigate belowground plant performance under adverse environmental conditions such as drought, nutrient shortage or soil compaction to seek for traits of belowground organs making plants more resilient to stress.

  14. A Fluctuation Type Limit Theorem for Jirina Processes with Immigration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qiang LI

    2009-01-01

    It is proved by the theory of semigroup that the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type process with jumps can arise from the fluctuation limit of a sequence of Jirina processes with immigration under suitable moments conditions.

  15. Metabolomics in the Rhizosphere: Tapping into Belowground Chemical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Nicole M; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2016-03-01

    The rhizosphere is densely populated with a variety of organisms. Interactions between roots and rhizosphere community members are mostly achieved via chemical communication. Root exudates contain an array of primary and secondary plant metabolites that can attract, deter, or kill belowground insect herbivores, nematodes, and microbes, and inhibit competing plants. Metabolomics of root exudates can potentially help us to better understand this chemical dialogue. The main limitations are the proper sampling of the exudate, the sensitivity of the metabolomics platforms, and the multivariate data analysis to identify causal relations. Novel technologies may help to generate a spatially explicit metabolome of the root and its exudates at a scale that is relevant for the rhizosphere community.

  16. Is the wash-off process of road-deposited sediment source limited or transport limited?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Chen, Xuefei; Hao, Shaonan; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Jiang; Zou, Changliang; Xie, Wenxia

    2016-09-01

    An in-depth understanding of the road-deposited sediments (RDS) wash-off process is essential to estimation of urban surface runoff pollution load and to designing methods to minimize the adverse impacts on the receiving waters. There are two debatable RDS wash-off views: source limited and transport limited. The RDS build-up and wash-off process was characterized to explore what determines the wash-off process to be source limited or transport limited based on twelve RDS sampling activities on an urban road in Beijing. The results showed that two natural rain events (2.0mm and 23.2mm) reduced the total RDS mass by 30%-40%, and that finer particles (transport limited, but that finer particles tend to be source limited. To further explore and confirm the results of the field experiment, a total of 40 simulated rain events were designed to observe the RDS wash-off with different particle size fractions. The finer particles have a higher wash-off percentage (Fw) than the coarser particles, and the Fw values provide a good view to characterize the wash-off process. The key conclusions drawn from the combined field and simulated experiments data are: (i) Finer and coarser particle wash-off processes tend to be source limited and transport limited, respectively. (ii) The source and transport limited processes occur during the initial period (the first flush) and later periods, respectively. (iii) The smaller and larger rain events tend to be transport limited and source limited, respectively. Overall, the wash-off process is generally a combination of source and transport limited processes.

  17. Some functional limit theorems for compound Cox processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Victor Yu.; Chertok, A. V.; Korchagin, A. Yu.; Kossova, E. V.; Zeifman, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    An improved version of the functional limit theorem is proved establishing weak convergence of random walks generated by compound doubly stochastic Poisson processes (compound Cox processes) to Lévy processes in the Skorokhod space under more realistic moment conditions. As corollaries, theorems are proved on convergence of random walks with jumps having finite variances to Lévy processes with variance-mean mixed normal distributions, in particular, to stable Lévy processes.

  18. Aboveground vs. Belowground Carbon Stocks in African Tropical Lowland Rainforest: Drivers and Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Doetterl

    Full Text Available African tropical rainforests are one of the most important hotspots to look for changes in the upcoming decades when it comes to C storage and release. The focus of studying C dynamics in these systems lies traditionally on living aboveground biomass. Belowground soil organic carbon stocks have received little attention and estimates of the size, controls and distribution of soil organic carbon stocks are highly uncertain. In our study on lowland rainforest in the central Congo basin, we combine both an assessment of the aboveground C stock with an assessment of the belowground C stock and analyze the latter in terms of functional pools and controlling factors.Our study shows that despite similar vegetation, soil and climatic conditions, soil organic carbon stocks in an area with greater tree height (= larger aboveground carbon stock were only half compared to an area with lower tree height (= smaller aboveground carbon stock. This suggests that substantial variability in the aboveground vs. belowground C allocation strategy and/or C turnover in two similar tropical forest systems can lead to significant differences in total soil organic C content and C fractions with important consequences for the assessment of the total C stock of the system.We suggest nutrient limitation, especially potassium, as the driver for aboveground versus belowground C allocation. However, other drivers such as C turnover, tree functional traits or demographic considerations cannot be excluded. We argue that large and unaccounted variability in C stocks is to be expected in African tropical rain-forests. Currently, these differences in aboveground and belowground C stocks are not adequately verified and implemented mechanistically into Earth System Models. This will, hence, introduce additional uncertainty to models and predictions of the response of C storage of the Congo basin forest to climate change and its contribution to the terrestrial C budget.

  19. Effects of canopy tree species on belowground biogeochemistry in a lowland wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Adrienne B.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical rain forests are known for their high biological diversity, but the effects of plant diversity on important ecosystem processes in this biome remain unclear. Interspecies differences in both the demand for nutrients and in foliar and litter nutrient concentrations could drive variations in both the pool sizes and fluxes of important belowground resources, yet our understanding of the effects and importance of aboveground heterogeneity on belowground biogeochemistry is poor, especially in the species-rich forests of the wet tropics. To investigate the effects of individual tree species on belowground biogeochemical processes, we used both field and laboratory studies to examine how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycles vary under nine different canopy tree species – including three legume and six non-legume species – that vary in foliar nutrient concentrations in a wet tropical forest in southwestern Costa Rica. We found significant differences in belowground C, N and P cycling under different canopy tree species: total C, N and P pools in standing litter varied by species, as did total soil and microbial C and N pools. Rates of soil extracellular acid phosphatase activity also varied significantly among species and functional groups, with higher rates of phosphatase activity under legumes. In addition, across all tree species, phosphatase activity was significantly positively correlated with litter N/P ratios, suggesting a tight coupling between relative N and P inputs and resource allocation to P acquisition. Overall, our results suggest the importance of aboveground plant community composition in promoting belowground biogeochemical heterogeneity at relatively small spatial scales.

  20. Limit process of stationary TASEP near the characteristic line

    CERN Document Server

    Baik, Jinho; Péché, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    The totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) on Z with the Bernoulli-rho measure as initial conditions, 0limiting distribution has also been obtained explicitly. In this paper we determine the limiting multi-point distribution of the current fluctuations moving away from the characteristics by the order t^{2/3}. The main tool is the analysis of a related directed last percolation model. We also discuss the process limit in tandem queues in equilibrium.

  1. Plant Host Species and Geographic Distance Affect the Structure of Aboveground Fungal Symbiont Communities, and Environmental Filtering Affects Belowground Communities in a Coastal Dune Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Aaron S; Seabloom, Eric W; May, Georgiana

    2016-05-01

    Microbial symbionts inhabit tissues of all plants and animals. Their community composition depends largely on two ecological processes: (1) filtering by abiotic conditions and host species determining the environments that symbionts are able to colonize and (2) dispersal-limitation determining the pool of symbionts available to colonize a given host and community spatial structure. In plants, the above- and belowground tissues represent such distinct habitats for symbionts that we expect different effects of filtering and spatial structuring on their symbiont communities. In this study, we characterized above- and belowground communities of fungal endophytes--fungi living asymptomatically within plants--to understand the contributions of filtering and spatial structure to endophyte community composition. We used a culture-based approach to characterize endophytes growing in leaves and roots of three species of coastal beachgrasses in dunes of the USA Pacific Northwest. For leaves, endophyte isolation frequency and OTU richness depended primarily on plant host species. In comparison, for roots, both isolation frequency and OTU richness increased from the nutrient-poor front of the dune to the higher-nutrient backdune. Endophyte community composition in leaves exhibited a distance-decay relationship across the region. In a laboratory assay, faster growth rates and lower spore production were more often associated with leaf- than root-inhabiting endophytes. Overall, our results reveal a greater importance of biotic filtering by host species and dispersal-limitation over regional geographic distances for aboveground leaf endophyte communities and stronger effects of abiotic environmental filtering and locally patchy distributions for belowground root endophyte communities.

  2. Testing the growth rate hypothesis in vascular plants with above- and below-ground biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiang; Wu, Honghui; He, Nianpeng; Lü, Xiaotao; Wang, Zhiping; Elser, James J; Wu, Jianguo; Han, Xingguo

    2012-01-01

    The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) proposes that higher growth rate (the rate of change in biomass per unit biomass, μ) is associated with higher P concentration and lower C:P and N:P ratios. However, the applicability of the GRH to vascular plants is not well-studied and few studies have been done on belowground biomass. Here we showed that, for aboveground, belowground and total biomass of three study species, μ was positively correlated with N:C under N limitation and positively correlated with P:C under P limitation. However, the N:P ratio was a unimodal function of μ, increasing for small values of μ, reaching a maximum, and then decreasing. The range of variations in μ was positively correlated with variation in C:N:P stoichiometry. Furthermore, μ and C:N:P ranges for aboveground biomass were negatively correlated with those for belowground. Our results confirm the well-known association of growth rate with tissue concentration of the limiting nutrient and provide empirical support for recent theoretical formulations.

  3. Testing the growth rate hypothesis in vascular plants with above- and below-ground biomass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Yu

    Full Text Available The growth rate hypothesis (GRH proposes that higher growth rate (the rate of change in biomass per unit biomass, μ is associated with higher P concentration and lower C:P and N:P ratios. However, the applicability of the GRH to vascular plants is not well-studied and few studies have been done on belowground biomass. Here we showed that, for aboveground, belowground and total biomass of three study species, μ was positively correlated with N:C under N limitation and positively correlated with P:C under P limitation. However, the N:P ratio was a unimodal function of μ, increasing for small values of μ, reaching a maximum, and then decreasing. The range of variations in μ was positively correlated with variation in C:N:P stoichiometry. Furthermore, μ and C:N:P ranges for aboveground biomass were negatively correlated with those for belowground. Our results confirm the well-known association of growth rate with tissue concentration of the limiting nutrient and provide empirical support for recent theoretical formulations.

  4. FRACTURE LIMIT LOAD OF CONE SHAPE PART IN DRAWING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jisheng; Gao Shiyou

    2005-01-01

    The deformation characters and load status of the blank's potential fracture zone are analyzed at the moment when blank is approaching to punch corner in drawing process of cone shape part. Based on tension instability theory, the formula for calculating fracture limit load of cone shape part in drawing process is derived. Also, the formula is analyzed and verified by experiment.

  5. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W.H. van der Putten,; R.D. Bardgett; P.C. de Ruiter

    2009-01-01

    from an empirical perspective and in specific ecological settings or contexts. Belowground interactions operate at different spatial and temporal scales. Due to the relatively low mobility and high survival of organisms in the soil, plants have longer lasting legacy effects belowground than aboveground...... and environmental settings, we explore where and how they can be supported by theoretical approaches to develop testable predictions and to generalise empirical results. We review four key areas where a combined aboveground-belowground approach offers perspectives for enhancing ecological understanding, namely...

  6. Limit theorems for bifurcating autoregressive processes with missing data

    CERN Document Server

    de Saporta, Benoîte; Marsalle, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the least squares estimators of the unknown parameters of bifurcating autoregressive processes when some of the data are missing. We model the process of observed data with a two-type Galton-Watson process consistent with the binary tree structure of the data. Under independence between the process leading to the missing data and the BAR process and suitable assumptions on the driven noise, we establish the almost sure convergence of our estimators on the set of non-extinction of the Galton-Watson. We also prove a quadratic strong law and a central limit theorem.

  7. Above- and below-ground competition in high and low irradiance: tree seedling responses to a competing liana Byttneria grandifolia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, J.Y.; Bongers, F.; Cao, K.F.; Cai, Z.Q.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: In tropical forests, trees compete not only with other trees, but also with lianas, which may limit tree growth and regeneration. Liana effects may depend on the availability of above- and below-ground resources and differ between tree species. We conducted a shade house experiment to test

  8. Eliciting maize defense pathways aboveground attracts belowground biocontrol agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Pereira, Ramom Vasconcelos; Moino Junior, Alcides; Pareja, Martin; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways mediate multitrophic interactions above and belowground. Understanding the effects of these pathways on pests and natural enemies above and belowground holds great potential for designing effective control strategies. Here we investigate the effects of aboveground stimulation of plant defense pathways on the interactions between corn, the aboveground herbivore adult Diabrotica speciosa, the belowground herbivore larval D. speciosa, and the subterranean ento-mopathogenic nematode natural enemy Heterorhabditis amazonensis. We show that adult D. speciosa recruit to aboveground herbivory and methyl salicylate treatment, that larval D. speciosa are relatively indiscriminate, and that H. amazonensis en-tomopathogenic nematodes recruit to corn fed upon by adult D. speciosa. These results suggest that entomopathogenicnematodes belowground can be highly attuned to changes in the aboveground parts of plants and that biological control can be enhanced with induced plant defense in this and similar systems. PMID:27811992

  9. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  10. Scope and limitations of due process in administrative proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Carvajal Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to explain in a better way the scope of Due Process in Administrative Law as a legal norm whose respect is essential to all government agencies, three points of view (formal, structural and material are proposed. Those items seem useful to understand “Administrative Due Process” in all its dimensions: as a constitutional norm developed by the enactment of laws and decrees; as a principle inspiring some conducts and new norms; and as an objective and subjective fundamental right. On the other hand, it is shown that Administrative Due Process is not an absolute rule because in some cases its full application is subject to normative relativism. Two opposite trends can be perceived at this point: in the first place, government agencies usually do not act the same way judges do, so Administrative Due Process should be distinguished from Judicial Due Process; therefore, it could actually have a more restricted scope. In the second place, some administrative authorities are nowadays playing a role more or less similar to what judges do. This means that new procedural guarantees will be claimed. In any case, admitting valid limitations to Administrative Due Process leads to the quest of the limits of these limitations. The application of the rule of Due Process cannot be totally suppressed; its scope cannot be completely reduced. This is the result of its fundamental nature as a legal norm that ensures justice and equity in all administrative procedures, and proscribes random decisions.

  11. Limit theorems for bifurcating integer-valued autoregressive processes

    CERN Document Server

    Blandin, Vassili

    2012-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the weighted least squares estimators of the unknown parameters of bifurcating integer-valued autoregressive processes. Under suitable assumptions on the immigration, we establish the almost sure convergence of our estimators, together with the quadratic strong law and central limit theorems. All our investigation relies on asymptotic results for vector-valued martingales.

  12. Brownian Motion as a Limit to Physical Measuring Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    and received widespread recognition, but his way of modeling the system was contested by his contemporaries. With the more embracing notion of noise that developed during and after World War II, Ising’s conclusion was reinterpreted as showing that noise puts a limit on physical measurement processes. Hence...

  13. Crop rotational diversity enhances belowground communities and functions in an agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, L K; Grandy, A S; Atkinson, E E; Marin-Spiotta, E; McDaniel, M D

    2015-08-01

    Biodiversity loss, an important consequence of agricultural intensification, can lead to reductions in agroecosystem functions and services. Increasing crop diversity through rotation may alleviate these negative consequences by restoring positive aboveground-belowground interactions. Positive impacts of aboveground biodiversity on belowground communities and processes have primarily been observed in natural systems. Here, we test for the effects of increased diversity in an agroecosystem, where plant diversity is increased over time through crop rotation. As crop diversity increased from one to five species, distinct soil microbial communities were related to increases in soil aggregation, organic carbon, total nitrogen, microbial activity and decreases in the carbon-to-nitrogen acquiring enzyme activity ratio. This study indicates positive biodiversity-function relationships in agroecosystems, driven by interactions between rotational and microbial diversity. By increasing the quantity, quality and chemical diversity of residues, high diversity rotations can sustain soil biological communities, with positive effects on soil organic matter and soil fertility.

  14. Functional State Modelling of Cultivation Processes: Dissolved Oxygen Limitation State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Roeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new functional state, namely dissolved oxygen limitation state for both bacteria Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultivation processes is presented in this study. Functional state modelling approach is applied to cultivation processes in order to overcome the main disadvantages of using global process model, namely complex model structure and a big number of model parameters. Alongwith the newly introduced dissolved oxygen limitation state, second acetate production state and first acetate production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of E. coli, while mixed oxidative state and first ethanol production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of S. cerevisiae. For all mentioned above functional states both structural and parameter identification is here performed based on experimental data of E. coli and S. cerevisiae fed-batch cultivations.

  15. Limitations on post-processing assisted quantum programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki; Tukiainen, Mikko

    2017-03-01

    A quantum multimeter is a programmable device that can implement measurements of different observables depending on the programming quantum state inserted into it. The advantage of this arrangement over a single-purpose device is in its versatility: one can realize various measurements simply by changing the programming state. The classical manipulation of measurement output data is known as post-processing. In this work we study the post-processing assisted quantum programming, which is a protocol where quantum programming and classical post-processing are combined. We provide examples showing that these two processes combined can be more efficient than either of them used separately. Furthermore, we derive an inequality relating the programming resources to their corresponding programmed observables, thereby enabling us to study the limitations on post-processing assisted quantum programming.

  16. Scaling limits for Hawkes processes and application to financial statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Bacry, Emmanuel; Hoffmann, Marc; Muzy, Jean François

    2012-01-01

    We prove a law of large numbers and a functional central limit theorem for multivariate Hawkes processes observed over a time interval $[0,T]$ in the limit $T \\rightarrow \\infty$. We further exhibit the asymptotic behaviour of the covariation of the increments of the components of a multivariate Hawkes process, when the observations are imposed by a discrete scheme with mesh $\\Delta$ over $[0,T]$ up to some further time shift $\\tau$. The behaviour of this functional depends on the relative size of $\\Delta$ and $\\tau$ with respect to $T$ and enables to give a full account of the second-order structure. As an application, we develop our results in the context of financial statistics. We introduced in a previous work a microscopic stochastic model for the variations of a multivariate financial asset, based on Hawkes processes and that is confined to live on a tick grid. We derive and characterise the exact macroscopic diffusion limit of this model and show in particular its ability to reproduce important empiric...

  17. Below-ground carbon transfer among Betula nana may increase with warming in Arctic tundra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslippe, Julie R; Simard, Suzanne W

    2011-11-01

    • Shrubs are expanding in Arctic tundra, but the role of mycorrhizal fungi in this process is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that mycorrhizal networks are involved in interplant carbon (C) transfer within a tundra plant community. • Here, we installed below-ground treatments to control for C transfer pathways and conducted a (13)CO(2)-pulse-chase labelling experiment to examine C transfer among and within plant species. • We showed that mycorrhizal networks exist in tundra, and facilitate below-ground transfer of C among Betula nana individuals, but not between or within the other tundra species examined. Total C transfer among conspecific B. nana pairs was 10.7 ± 2.4% of photosynthesis, with the majority of C transferred through rhizomes or root grafts (5.2 ± 5.3%) and mycorrhizal network pathways (4.1 ± 3.3%) and very little through soil pathways (1.4 ± 0.35%). • Below-ground C transfer was of sufficient magnitude to potentially alter plant interactions in Arctic tundra, increasing the competitive ability and mono-dominance of B. nana. C transfer was significantly positively related to ambient temperatures, suggesting that it may act as a positive feedback to ecosystem change as climate warms.

  18. Failure mechanism and forming limit of tube axial compressive process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-chao; YANG He

    2006-01-01

    Based on minimum energy principle for plastic forming,tearing and buckling failures mechanisms are explored and criteria for them are developed by theoretical analysis and experiment. Combined with finite element software developed forming limit and effects of process parameters on failures are investigated and proper parameters for stable forming are determined. The results show that: 1) The failures and forming limit are mainly determined by geometry and materials parameters of tube blank,fillet radius or half conical angle of die. For the process under fillet die,there exists a maximum fillet radius within which no tearing failure happens,and a maximum radius and a minimum radius range within which no buckling failure happens. For the process under conical die,there exists a maximum and minimum half conical angle range within which no tearing and buckling failures occur. 2) For both forming processes,the higher the value of material strain hardening exponent or the lower the value of relative thickness,the more impossible for tearing and buckling failures to occur,and the larger the ranges of fillet radius and half conical angle. The experiment results verify the reliability and practicability of this research.

  19. Limit cycles, bifurcations, and accuracy of the milling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B. P.; Bayly, P. V.; Davies, M. A.; Halley, J. E.

    2004-10-01

    Time finite element analysis (TFEA) is used to determine the accuracy, stability, and limit cycle behavior of the milling process. Predictions are compared to traditional Euler simulation and experiments. The TFEA method forms an approximate solution by dividing the time in the cut into a finite number of elements. The approximate solution is then matched with the exact solution for free vibration to obtain a discrete linear map. Stability is then determined from the characteristic multipliers of the map. Map fixed points correspond to stable periodic solutions which are used to evaluate surface location error. Bifurcations and limit cycle behavior are predicted from a non-linear TFEA formulation. Experimental cutting tests are used to confirm theoretical predictions.

  20. Hydrodynamic limit of symmetric exclusion processes in inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Faggionato, A

    2010-01-01

    In \\cite{J} M. Jara has presented a method, reducing the proof of the hydrodynamic limit of symmetric exclusion processes to an homogenization problem, as unified approach to recent works on the field as \\cite{N}, \\cite{F1}, \\cite{F2} and \\cite{FJL}. Although not stated in \\cite{J}, the reduction of the hydrodynamic limit to an homogenization problem was already obtained (in a different way) in \\cite{N}, \\cite{F1}. This alternative and very simple relation between the two problems goes back to an idea of K.\\ Nagy \\cite{N}, is stated in \\cite{F1}[Section B] for exclusion processes on $\\bbZ^d$ and, as stressed in \\cite{F2}, is completely general. The above relation has been applied to \\cite{N}, \\cite{F1}, \\cite{F2} and \\cite{FJL} and could be applied to other symmetric exclusion processes, mentioned in \\cite{J}. In this short note we briefly recall this unified approach in a complete general setting. Finally, we recall how the homogenization problem has been solved in the above previous works.

  1. Changes of Limiting Dextrinase in Germinating Process of Malting Barley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiu-mei; LI Fen; WANG Hong-zhen; WANG Xing-zhi

    2002-01-01

    Based on five different species of barley, the foot layer analytic method was used to examine the activity and heat-resistance of the limiting dextrinase. The study was conducted on the dynamic changes of several types of the dextrinase in barley germinating process, the effect of temperature on the dextrinase and the divergence of dextrinase in different barley variety. The probability of the dextrinase that as reference index is used for screening and evaluating beer barley was discussed. The importance of dextrinase in brewing and its significant function was also discussed.

  2. Some distance bounds of branching processes and their diffusion limits

    CERN Document Server

    Kammerer, Niels B

    2010-01-01

    We compute exact values respectively bounds of "distances" - in the sense of (transforms of) power divergences and relative entropy - between two discrete-time Galton-Watson branching processes with immigration GWI for which the offspring as well as the immigration is arbitrarily Poisson-distributed (leading to arbitrary type of criticality). Implications for asymptotic distinguishability behaviour in terms of contiguity and entire separation of the involved GWI are given, too. Furthermore, we determine the corresponding limit quantities for the context in which the two GWI converge to Feller-type branching diffusion processes, as the time-lags between observations tend to zero. Some applications to (static random environment like) Bayesian decision making and Neyman-Pearson testing are presented as well.

  3. New limits on double beta processes in 106-Cd

    CERN Document Server

    Tretyak, V I; Bernabei, R; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Mokina, V M; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Tupitsyna, I A

    2016-01-01

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in 106-Cd to 66%, with mass of 216 g (106-CdWO4) was used in coincidence with four ultra-low background HPGe detectors contained in a single cryostat to search for double beta decay processes in 106-Cd. New improved half-life limits on the double beta processes in 106-Cd have been set on the level of 1e20-1e21 yr after 13085 h of data taking deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (Italy). In particular, the limit on the two neutrino electron capture with positron emission T1/2 >1.1e21 yr, has reached the region of theoretical predictions. The resonant neutrinoless double electron captures to the 2718, 2741 and 2748 keV excited states of 106-Pd are restricted on the level of T1/2 > 8.5e20 - 1.4e21 yr.

  4. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms.

  5. Belowground plant biomass allocation in tundra ecosystems and its relationship with temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peng, Wang; Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Mommer, L.; Ruijven, van J.; Maximov, Trofim C.; Berendse, F.

    2016-01-01

    Climatewarming is known to increase the aboveground productivity of tundra ecosystems.
    Recently, belowground biomass is receiving more attention, but the effects of climate warming on
    belowground productivity remain unclear. Enhanced understanding of the belowground component
    of the tund

  6. Limit Theorems for Competitive Density Dependent Population Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, Todd L

    2010-01-01

    Near the beginning of the century, Wright and Fisher devised an elegant, mathematically tractable model of gene reproduction and replacement that laid the foundation for contemporary population genetics. The Wright-Fisher model and its extensions have given biologists powerful tools of statistical inference that enabled the quantification of genetic drift and selection. Given the utility of these tools, we often forget that their model - for mathematical, and not biological reasons - makes assumptions that are violated in most real-world populations. In this paper, I consider an alternative framework that merges P. A. P. Moran's continuous-time Markov chain model of allele frequency with the density dependent models of ecological competition proposed by Gause, Lotka and Volterra, that, unlike Moran's model allow for a stochastically varying -- but bounded -- population size. I require that allele numbers vary according to a density-dependent population process, for which the limiting law of large numbers is a...

  7. A limit process for partial match queries in random quadtrees

    CERN Document Server

    Broutin, Nicolas; Sulzbach, Henning

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of recovering items matching a partially specified pattern in multidimensional trees (quad trees and k-d trees). We assume the classical model where the data consist of independent and uniform points in the unit square. For this model, in a structure on $n$ points, it is known that the complexity, measured as the number of nodes $C_n(\\xi)$ to visit in order to report the items matching a random query $\\xi$, independent and uniformly distributed on $[0,1]$, satisfies $E{C_n(\\xi)}\\sim \\kappa n^{\\beta}$, where $\\kappa$ and $\\beta$ are explicit constants. We develop an approach based on the analysis of the cost $C_n(s)$ of any fixed query $s\\in [0,1]$, and give precise estimates for the variance and limit distribution. Moreover, a functional limit law for a rescaled version of the process $(C_n(s))_{0\\le s\\le 1}$ is derived in the space of c\\`{a}dl\\`{a}g functions with the Skorokhod topology. For the worst case complexity $\\max_{s\\in [0,1]} C_n(s)$ the order of the expectation as well as a...

  8. Local and global limits on visual processing in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc S Tibber

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia has been linked to impaired performance on a range of visual processing tasks (e.g. detection of coherent motion and contour detection. It has been proposed that this is due to a general inability to integrate visual information at a global level. To test this theory, we assessed the performance of people with schizophrenia on a battery of tasks designed to probe voluntary averaging in different visual domains. Twenty-three outpatients with schizophrenia (mean age: 40±8 years; 3 female and 20 age-matched control participants (mean age 39±9 years; 3 female performed a motion coherence task and three equivalent noise (averaging tasks, the latter allowing independent quantification of local and global limits on visual processing of motion, orientation and size. All performance measures were indistinguishable between the two groups (ps>0.05, one-way ANCOVAs, with one exception: participants with schizophrenia pooled fewer estimates of local orientation than controls when estimating average orientation (p = 0.01, one-way ANCOVA. These data do not support the notion of a generalised visual integration deficit in schizophrenia. Instead, they suggest that distinct visual dimensions are differentially affected in schizophrenia, with a specific impairment in the integration of visual orientation information.

  9. Local and global limits on visual processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S; Anderson, Elaine J; Bobin, Tracy; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Dakin, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been linked to impaired performance on a range of visual processing tasks (e.g. detection of coherent motion and contour detection). It has been proposed that this is due to a general inability to integrate visual information at a global level. To test this theory, we assessed the performance of people with schizophrenia on a battery of tasks designed to probe voluntary averaging in different visual domains. Twenty-three outpatients with schizophrenia (mean age: 40±8 years; 3 female) and 20 age-matched control participants (mean age 39±9 years; 3 female) performed a motion coherence task and three equivalent noise (averaging) tasks, the latter allowing independent quantification of local and global limits on visual processing of motion, orientation and size. All performance measures were indistinguishable between the two groups (ps>0.05, one-way ANCOVAs), with one exception: participants with schizophrenia pooled fewer estimates of local orientation than controls when estimating average orientation (p = 0.01, one-way ANCOVA). These data do not support the notion of a generalised visual integration deficit in schizophrenia. Instead, they suggest that distinct visual dimensions are differentially affected in schizophrenia, with a specific impairment in the integration of visual orientation information.

  10. Designing an Iterative Learning Control Algorithm Based on Process History using limited post process geometrical information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endelt, Benny Ørtoft; Volk, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    preventing successful industrial implementation. Secondly limitation in the current press designs; many of the presses currently used in industry only offer limited opportunities to change the blank-holder force during the punch stroke. Even if the press has the opportunity to change the blank-holder force......, there is a number of obstacles which need to be addressed before an industrial implementation is possible, e.g. the proposed control algorithms are often limited by the ability to sample process data with both sufficient accuracy and robustness - this lack of robust sampling technologies is one of the main barriers......, the reaction speed may be insufficient compared to the production rate in an industrial application. We propose to design an iterative learning control (ILC) algorithm which can control and update the blank-holder force as well as the distribution of the blank-holder force based on limited geometric data from...

  11. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  12. Use of innovative groundcovers in Mediterranean afforestations: aerial and belowground effects in hybrid walnut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Vitone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Forest restoration in the Mediterranean area is particularly limited by water scarcity in summer and by weed competition, especially during the first years after establishment. The negative impact of these factors can be mitigated through environmentally friendly and cost-effective techniques which favour root development. This study describes the results of innovative weeding techniques in a reforestation carried out in a former agricultural field in Solsona, NE Spain, under Continental Mediterranean Sub-humid climate conditions. The tested weeding techniques included both novel groundcovers (based on prototypes built on a new biodegradable biopolymer, jute treated with resin and recycled rubber and reference techniques, i.e. herbicide application and polyethylene and commercial biofilm groundcovers. We studied the response of hybrid walnut (Juglans x intermedia to the application of these techniques during the first vegetative period in terms of survival, aerial growth and aboveground and belowground biomass allocation. The innovative groundcovers resulted generally in similar outcomes as the reference techniques with regard to tree survival and growth, and to better results in the case of belowground and, to a lesser extent, total tree biomass. Although preliminary, our results suggest that the tested novel groundcovers, notably the model based on treated jute, represent a promising alternative to plastic mulching and herbicide application in afforestation of agricultural lands in Mediterranean continental conditions. Besides these promising productive results, the novel groundcovers bring together relevant technical and environmental benefits, related to their use (not requiring removal or being reusable and composition, based on biodegradable or recycled materials.

  13. A landscape-scale assessment of above- and belowground primary production in coastal wetlands: Implications for climate change-induced community shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Snedden, Gregg; Steyer, Gregory D.; Fischenich, Craig J; McComas, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Above- and belowground production in coastal wetlands are important contributors to carbon accumulation and ecosystem sustainability. As sea level rises, we can expect shifts to more salt-tolerant communities, which may alter these ecosystem functions and services. Although the direct influence of salinity on species-level primary production has been documented, we lack an understanding of the landscape-level response of coastal wetlands to increasing salinity. What are the indirect effects of sea-level rise, i.e., how does primary production vary across a landscape gradient of increasing salinity that incorporates changes in wetland type? This is the first study to measure both above- and belowground production in four wetland types that span an entire coastal gradient from fresh to saline wetlands. We hypothesized that increasing salinity would limit rates of primary production, and saline marshes would have lower rates of above- and belowground production than fresher marshes. However, along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast in Louisiana, USA, we found that aboveground production was highest in brackish marshes, compared with fresh, intermediate, and saline marshes, and belowground production was similar among all wetland types along the salinity gradient. Multiple regression analysis indicated that salinity was the only significant predictor of production, and its influence was dependent upon wetland type. We concluded that (1) salinity had a negative effect on production within wetland type, and this relationship was strongest in the fresh marsh (0–2 PSU) and (2) along the overall landscape gradient, production was maintained by mechanisms at the scale of wetland type, which were likely related to plant energetics. Regardless of wetland type, we found that belowground production was significantly greater than aboveground production. Additionally, inter-annual variation, associated with severe drought conditions, was observed exclusively for belowground

  14. Soil microbial nutrient constraints along a tropical forest elevation gradient: a belowground test of a biogeochemical paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Nottingham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground primary productivity is widely considered to be limited by phosphorus (P availability in lowland tropical forests and by nitrogen (N availability in montane tropical forests. However, the extent to which this paradigm applies to belowground processes remains unresolved. We measured indices of soil microbial nutrient status in lowland, sub-montane and montane tropical forests along a natural gradient spanning 3400 m in elevation in the Peruvian Andes. With increasing elevation there were marked increases in soil concentrations of total N, total P, and readily-extractable P, but a decrease in N mineralization determined by in situ resin bags. Microbial carbon (C and N increased with increasing elevation, but microbial C:N:P ratios were relatively constant, suggesting homeostasis. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes, which are rich in N, decreased with increasing elevation, while the ratios of enzymes involved in the acquisition of N and P increased with increasing elevation, further indicating a shift in the relative demand for N and P by microbial biomass. We conclude that soil microorganisms shift investment in nutrient acquisition from P to N between lowland and montane tropical forests, suggesting that different nutrients regulate soil microbial metabolism and the soil carbon balance in these ecosystems.

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compliance with the applicable emission limit for hydrogen chloride. 2. Dry scrubber control Maintain the... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION...

  16. Limit Theorems for some Branching Measure-Valued Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Cloez, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    We consider a particles system, where, the particles move independently according to a Markov process and branching event occurs at an inhomogeneous time. The offspring locations and their number may depend on the position of the mother. Our setting capture, for instance, the processes indexed by Galton-Watson tree. We first determine the asymptotic behaviour of the empirical measure. The proof is based on an expression of the empirical measure using an auxiliary process. This latter is not distributed as a one cell lineage, there is a biased phenomenon. Our model is a microscopic description of a random (discrete) population of individuals. We then obtain a large population approximation as weak solution of a growth- fragmentation equation. We illustrate our result with two examples. The first one is a size-structured population model which describes the mitosis and the second one can model a parasite infection.

  17. Ratio limits and limiting conditional distributions for discrete-time birth-death processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van Erik A.; Schrijner, Pauline

    1995-01-01

    We consider discrete-time birth-death processes with an absorbing state and study the conditional state distribution at time n given that absorption has not occurred by that time but will occur eventually. In particular, we establish conditions for the convergence of these distributions to a proper

  18. 15 CFR 4.6 - Time limits and expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... processing of the request is expected to be completed. If the extension is for more than ten working days... appeal. Subject to paragraph (c)(1) of this section, an initial response shall be made within 20 working... shall be decided within 20 working days of its receipt by the Office of the General Counsel. (c)...

  19. Ergodicity Conditions and Cesaro Limit Results for Marked Point Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, G.

    1996-01-01

    In Palm theory it is very common to consider several distributions to describe the characteristics of the system.To study a stationary marked point process, the time-stationary distribution P and its event-stationary Palm distributions P 0 L with respect to sets L of marks can all be used as startin

  20. Belowground environmental effects of transgenic crops: a soil microbial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Alessandra; Sbrana, Cristiana; Giovannetti, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    Experimental studies investigated the effects of transgenic crops on the structure, function and diversity of soil and rhizosphere microbial communities playing key roles in belowground environments. Here we review available data on direct, indirect and pleiotropic effects of engineered plants on soil microbiota, considering both the technology and the genetic construct utilized. Plants modified to express phytopathogen/phytoparasite resistance, or traits beneficial to food industries and consumers, differentially affected soil microorganisms depending on transformation events, experimental conditions and taxa analyzed. Future studies should address the development of harmonized methodologies by taking into account the complex interactions governing soil life.

  1. Below-ground competitiveness of adult beech and spruce trees

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolova, Petia Simeonova

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the field study was to quantify the below-ground competitiveness of 50 to 60-year-old beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) trees by means of space-related cost/benefit relationships. The study was conducted at the experimental site “Kranzberger Forst” within the framework of the interdisciplinary research program Sonderforschungsbereich 607 (SFB 607; Project B4) “Growth and Parasite Defence – Competition for Resources in Economical Plants from Agronomy and Forestry”. It...

  2. The variable effects of soil nitrogen availability and insect herbivory on aboveground and belowground plant biomass in an old-field ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Jarrod D; Souza, Lara; Classen, Aimée T; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2011-11-01

    Nutrient availability and herbivory can regulate primary production in ecosystems, but little is known about how, or whether, they may interact with one another. Here, we investigate how nitrogen availability and insect herbivory interact to alter aboveground and belowground plant community biomass in an old-field ecosystem. In 2004, we established 36 experimental plots in which we manipulated soil nitrogen (N) availability and insect abundance in a completely randomized plot design. In 2009, after 6 years of treatments, we measured aboveground biomass and assessed root production at peak growth. Overall, we found a significant effect of reduced soil N availability on aboveground biomass and belowground plant biomass production. Specifically, responses of aboveground and belowground community biomass to nutrients were driven by reductions in soil N, but not additions, indicating that soil N may not be limiting primary production in this ecosystem. Insects reduced the aboveground biomass of subdominant plant species and decreased coarse root production. We found no statistical interactions between N availability and insect herbivory for any response variable. Overall, the results of 6 years of nutrient manipulations and insect removals suggest strong bottom-up influences on total plant community productivity but more subtle effects of insect herbivores on aspects of aboveground and belowground production.

  3. Estimated discard limits for plutonium-238 recovery processing in the plutonium processing building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthy, D.F.; Bond, W.H.

    1975-03-26

    This manual is intended as a basis for plutonium-238 recovery costs and as a guide for removal of plutonium-bearing wastes from the gloveboxes to be safely and economically discarded. Waste materials contaminated with plutonium-238 are generated from in-house production, analytical, process development, recovery and receipts from off-site. The contaminated materials include paper, rags, alpha-box gloves, piping, valves, filters, etc. General categories for all types of plutonium waste have been established by the ERDA and are reflected in this manual. There are numerous processes used in plutonium recovery, such as dissolution, ultrasonic cleaning, ion exchange, etc. One or more of these processes are needed to extract the plutonium-238 from waste materials, purify it and convert it to an oxide acceptable for reuse. This manual is presented in two parts: Part I gives a breakdown and brief explanation of the direct costs for plutonium-238 I recovery, derived from budget data. Direct costs include direct labor (operating personnel), operational materials and supplies, health physics direct labor, calorimetry labor, analytical labor, and engineering direct labor (total costs for Method I). Budgeted costs for labor and material were used in the derivation of discard limits. The data presented is then used to calculate the cost per hour for recovery, as it applies to the three different methods of calculating discard limits referred to, in this manual, as Method I (calculation stated above), Method II and Method III. The cost for Method II is derived by adding to the cost of Method I, payroll related expenses. Method III is then calculated by adding over-head expenses to the total cost of Method II.

  4. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  5. Marital processes, arranged marriage, and contraception to limit fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Dirgha J; Axinn, William G

    2013-10-01

    An international transition away from familially arranged marriages toward participation in spouse choice has endured for decades and continues to spread through rural Asia today. Although we know that this transformation has important consequences for childbearing early in marriage, we know much less about longer-term consequences of this marital revolution. Drawing on theories of family and fertility change and a rural Asian panel study designed to measure changes in both marital and childbearing behaviors, this study seeks to investigate these long-term consequences. Controlling for social changes that shape both marital practices and childbearing behaviors, and explicitly considering multiple dimensions of marital processes, we find evidence consistent with an independent, long-standing association of participation in spouse choice with higher rates of contraception to terminate childbearing. These results add a new dimension to the evidence linking revolutions in marital behavior to long-term declines in fertility and suggest that new research should consider a broader range of long-term consequences of changing marital processes.

  6. Evaluation of Process Capability in Gas Carburizing Process to Achieve Quality through Limit Design Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Palaniradja; N. Alagumurthi; V. Soundararajan

    2004-01-01

    Steel is the most important metallic material used in industry. This is because of the versatility of its engineering properties under different conditions. In one condition it can be very mild, soft and suitable for any forming operation. In another condition the same steel can be very hard and strong. This versatility is made possible by the different heat treatments that the steel can be subject to. One such treatment is Gas carburizing. This is the most widely used process for surface hardening of low carbon steels. In this method the surface composition of the steel changes by diffusion of carbon and or nitrogen and result in hard outer surface with good wear resistance properties. A striking feature of Gas Carburizing process is that in this process the original toughness and ductility remains unaffected even after heat treatment. 3% nickel chromium case hardened low carbon steels are widely used for critical automotive and machine applications such as rack and pinion, gears, camshaft, valve rocker shafts and axles which requires high fatigue resistance. Fatigue behaviour of case carburized parts depends to a great extent on the correct combination of Hardness Penetration Depth (HPD) and the magnitude of hardness at the surface and beneath the surface with low size and shape distortion. In order to reduce the manufacturing costs in terms of material consumption and elimination of the number of processing steps, the effect of Gas carburizing parameters on the fatigue behaviour should already be considered in the parameter design stage. Therefore it is of importance to optimize the gas carburizing process variables to attain quality products with respect to hardness and case depth. In the present paper, the evaluation of process capability was carried out through a Limit Design Concept called orthogonal array design of experiment. To optimize the process variables the influence of several parameters (Holding time,Carbon potential, Furnace temperature and Quench

  7. Plant neighbour identity matters to belowground interactions under controlled conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Armas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Root competition is an almost ubiquitous feature of plant communities with profound effects on their structure and composition. Far beyond the traditional view that plants interact mainly through resource depletion (exploitation competition, roots are known to be able to interact with their environment using a large variety of mechanisms that may inhibit or enhance access of other roots to the resource or affect plant growth (contest interactions. However, an extensive analysis on how these contest root interactions may affect species interaction abilities is almost lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a common garden experiment with ten perennial plant species we forced pairs of plants of the same or different species to overlap their roots and analyzed how belowground contest interactions affected plant performance, biomass allocation patterns, and competitive abilities under abundant resource supply. Our results showed that net interaction outcome ranged from negative to positive, affecting total plant mass and allocation patterns. A species could be a strong competitor against one species, weaker against another one, and even facilitator to a third species. This leads to sets of species where competitive hierarchies may be clear but also to groups where such rankings are not, suggesting that intransitive root interactions may be crucial for species coexistence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The outcome of belowground contest interactions is strongly dependent on neighbours' identity. In natural plant communities this conditional outcome may hypothetically help species to interact in non-hierarchical and intransitive networks, which in turn might promote coexistence.

  8. An orthographic effect in phoneme processing, and its limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eCutler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To examine whether lexically stored knowledge about spelling influences phoneme evaluation, we conducted three experiments with a low-level phonetic judgement task: phoneme goodness rating. In each experiment, listeners heard phonetic tokens varying along a continuum centred on /s/, occurring finally in isolated word or nonword tokens. An effect of spelling appeared in Experiment 1: Native English speakers’ goodness ratings for the best /s/ tokens were significantly higher in words spelled with S (e.g., bless than in words spelled with C (e.g., voice. No such difference appeared when nonnative speakers rated the same materials in Experiment 2, indicating that the difference could not be due to acoustic characteristics of the S- versus C-words. In Experiment 3, nonwords with lexical neighbours consistently spelled with S (e.g., pless versus with C (e.g., floice failed to elicit orthographic neighbourhood effects; no significant difference appeared in native English speakers’ ratings for the S-consistent versus the C-consistent sets. Obligatory influence of lexical knowledge on phonemic processing would have predicted such neighbourhood effects; the findings are thus better accommodated by models in which phonemic decisions draw strategically upon lexical information.

  9. Aboveground overyielding in grassland mixtures is associated with reduced biomass partitioning to belowground organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Holger; Temperton, Vicky M; Roscher, Christiane; Buchmann, Nina; Schmid, Bernhard; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Engels, Christof

    2009-06-01

    We investigated effects of plant species richness in experimental grassland plots on annual above- and belowground biomass production estimated from repeated harvests and ingrowth cores, respectively. Aboveground and total biomass production increased with increasing plant species richness while belowground production remained constant. Root to shoot biomass production ratios (R/S) in mixtures were lower than expected from monoculture performance of the species present in the mixtures, showing that interactions among species led to reduced biomass partitioning to belowground organs. This change in partitioning to belowground organs was not confined to mixtures with legumes, but also measured in mixtures without legumes, and correlated with aboveground overyielding in mixtures. It is suggested that species-rich communities invest less in belowground biomass than do monocultures to extract soil resources, thus leading to increased investment into aboveground organs and overyielding.

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing... Area Sources: Asphalt Processing and Asphalt Roofing Manufacturing Other Requirements and Information... of Part 63—Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations For * * * You must meet...

  11. 40 CFR 63.7506 - Do any boilers or process heaters have limited requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Do any boilers or process heaters have limited requirements? 63.7506 Section 63.7506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... or process heaters have limited requirements? (a) New or reconstructed boilers and process heaters...

  12. Early root overproduction not triggered by nutrients decisive for competitive success belowground.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M Padilla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theory predicts that plant species win competition for a shared resource by more quickly preempting the resource in hotspots and by depleting resource levels to lower concentrations than its competitors. Competition in natural grasslands largely occurs belowground, but information regarding root interactions is limited, as molecular methods quantifying species abundance belowground have only recently become available. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In monoculture, the grass Festuca rubra had higher root densities and a faster rate of soil nitrate depletion than Plantago lanceolata, projecting the first as a better competitor for nutrients. However, Festuca lost in competition with Plantago. Plantago not only replaced the lower root mass of its competitor, but strongly overproduced roots: with only half of the plants in mixture than in monoculture, Plantago root densities in mixture were similar or higher than those in its monocultures. These responses occurred equally in a nutrient-rich and nutrient-poor soil layer, and commenced immediately at the start of the experiment when root densities were still low and soil nutrient concentrations high. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that species may achieve competitive superiority for nutrients by root growth stimulation prior to nutrient depletion, induced by the presence of a competitor species, rather than by a better ability to compete for nutrients per se. The root overproduction by which interspecific neighbors are suppressed independent of nutrient acquisition is consistent with predictions from game theory. Our results emphasize that root competition may be driven by other mechanisms than is currently assumed. The long-term consequences of these mechanisms for community dynamics are discussed.

  13. Limit theorems for dilute quantum systems leading to quantum poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Rudnicki, Sławomir; Sadowski, Sławomir

    1993-12-01

    The limit theorems for sums of independent or correlated operators representing observables of dilute quantum systems and leading to quantum Poisson processes are proved. Examples of systems of unstable particles and a Fermi lattice gas are discussed. For the latter, relations between low density limit and central limit are given.

  14. Belowground plant biomass allocation in tundra ecosystems and its relationship with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Heijmans, Monique M. P. D.; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; Maximov, Trofim C.; Berendse, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Climate warming is known to increase the aboveground productivity of tundra ecosystems. Recently, belowground biomass is receiving more attention, but the effects of climate warming on belowground productivity remain unclear. Enhanced understanding of the belowground component of the tundra is important in the context of climate warming, since most carbon is sequestered belowground in these ecosystems. In this study we synthesized published tundra belowground biomass data from 36 field studies spanning a mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from -20 °C to 0 °C across the tundra biome, and determined the relationships between different plant biomass pools and MAT. Our results show that the plant community biomass-temperature relationships are significantly different between above and belowground. Aboveground biomass clearly increased with MAT, whereas total belowground biomass and fine root biomass did not show a significant increase over the broad MAT gradient. Our results suggest that biomass allocation of tundra vegetation shifts towards aboveground in warmer conditions, which could impact on the carbon cycling in tundra ecosystems through altered litter input and distribution in the soil, as well as possible changes in root turnover.

  15. 43 CFR 46.160 - Limitations on actions during the NEPA analysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitations on actions during the NEPA analysis process. 46.160 Section 46.160 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Quality § 46.160 Limitations on actions during the NEPA analysis process. During the preparation of...

  16. Nutrient addition differentially affects ecological processes of Avicennia germinans in nitrogen versus phosphorus limited mangrove ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Ilka C.; Lovelock, C.E.; McKee, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is a major threat to marine environments, but system-specific attributes of coastal ecosystems may result in differences in their sensitivity and susceptibility to eutrophication. We used fertilization experiments in nitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-limited mangrove forests to test the hypothesis that alleviating different kinds of nutrient limitation may have different effects on ecosystem structure and function in natural systems. We compared a broad range of ecological processes to determine if these systems have different thresholds where shifts might occur in nutrient limitation. Growth responses indicated N limitation in Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) forests in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida, and P limitation at Twin Cays, Belize. When nutrient deficiency was relieved, A. germinans grew out of its stunted form by increasing wood relative to leaf biomass and shoot length relative to lateral growth. At the P-limited site, P enrichment (+P) increased specific leaf area, N resorption, and P uptake, but had no effect on P resorption. At the N-limited site, +N increased both N and P resorption, but did not alter biomass allocation. Herbivory was greater at the P-limited site and was unaffected by +P, whereas +N led to increased herbivory at the N-limited site. The responses to nutrient enrichment depended on the ecological process and limiting nutrient and suggested that N- versus P-limited mangroves do have different thresholds. +P had a greater effect on more ecological processes at Twin Cays than did +N at the IRL, which indicated that the P-limited site was more sensitive to nutrient loading. Because of this sensitivity, eutrophication is more likely to cause a shift in nutrient limitation at P-limited Twin Cays than N-limited IRL. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  17. Limit theorems for alternating renewal processes in the infinite mean case

    OpenAIRE

    Mitov, K. V.; Yanev, N. M.

    2001-01-01

    The asymptotic behaviour of an occupation-time process associated with alternating renewal processes is investigated in the infinite mean cycle case. The limit theorems obtained extend some asymptotic results proved by Dynkin (1955), Lamperti (1958) and Erickson (1970) for the classical spent lifetime process. Some new phenomena are also presented.

  18. Limit Distributions for Generalized Ji(r)ina Processes with Immigration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qiang LI

    2011-01-01

    A relationship between continuous state population-size-dependent branching(CSDB)processes with or without immigration and discrete state population-size-dependent branching(DSDB)processes with or without immigration is established via the representation of the former.Based on this relationship,some limiting distributions of CSDB processes with or without immigration are obtained.

  19. EXISTENCE OF UNIQUE LIMITING PROBABILITY VECTORS IN STOCHASTIC PROCESSES WITH MULTIPLE TRANSITION MATRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Mjelde, James W.; Harris, Wesley D.; Conner, J. Richard; Schnitkey, Gary D.; Glover, Michael K.; Garoian, Lee

    1992-01-01

    Concepts associated with stochastic process containing multiple transition matricies are discussed. It is proved that under certain conditions, a process with m transition matrices has m unique limiting probability vectors. This result extends the notion of discrete Markov processes to problems with intrayear and interyear dynamics. An example using a large DP model illustrates the usefulness of the concepts developed to applied problems.

  20. Limit theorems for vertex-reinforced jump processes on regular trees

    CERN Document Server

    Collevecchio, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Consider a vertex-reinforced jump process defined on a regular tree, where each vertex has exactly $b$ children, with $b \\ge 3$. We prove the strong law of large numbers and the central limit theorem for the distance of the process from the root. Notice that it is still unknown if vertex-reinforced jump process is transient on the binary tree.

  1. Evaluation of aboveground and belowground biomass recovery in physically disturbed seagrass beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Giuseppe; Kenworthy, W Judson

    2008-11-01

    Several studies addressed aboveground biomass recovery in tropical and subtropical seagrass systems following physical disturbance. However, there are few studies documenting belowground biomass recovery despite the important functional and ecological role of roots and rhizomes for seagrass ecosystems. In this study, we compared the recovery of biomass (g dry weight m(-2)) as well as the biomass recovery rates in ten severely disturbed multi-species seagrass meadows, after the sediments were excavated and the seagrasses removed. Three sites were located in the tropics (Puerto Rico) and seven in the subtropics (Florida Keys), and all were originally dominated by Thalassia testudinum. Total aboveground biomass reached reference values at four out of ten sites studied, two in the Florida Keys and two in Puerto Rico. Total belowground biomass was lower at the disturbed locations compared to the references at all sites, apart from two sites in the Florida Keys where the compensatory effect of opportunistic species (Syringodium filiforme and Halodule wrightii) was observed. The results revealed large variation among sites in aboveground and belowground biomass for all species, with higher aboveground recovery than belowground for T. testudinum. Recovery rates for T. testudinum were highly variable across sites, but a general trend of faster aboveground than belowground recovery was observed. Equal rates between aboveground and belowground biomass were found for opportunistic species at several sites in the Florida Keys. These results indicate the importance of belowground biomass when assessing seagrass recovery and suggest that the appropriate metric to assess seagrass recovery should address belowground biomass as well as aboveground biomass in order to evaluate the full recovery of ecological services and functions performed by seagrasses. We point out regional differences in species composition and species shifts following severe disturbance events and discuss

  2. Numerical analysis of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission for an extension of the process limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-02-01

    By sheet metal forming processes the forming limits and part characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. In deep drawing processes the maximum deep draw ratios as well as the springback behaviour of the metal parts are depending on the stress distribution in the part material during the forming process. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the forming limit of material is achieved. This contribution deals with numerical investigation of process effect caused by additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Here, the steel material HCT 600X+Z (1.0941) in thickness s 0 = 1.0 mm is analyzed numerically using the anisotropic model Hill48. This model is validated by the means of cup test by Swift. Both, the FEA of conventional and forming process with additional force transmission are carried out. The numerical results are compared with reference geometry of rectangle cup.

  3. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  4. Above- and Belowground Biomass Allocation in Shrub Biomes across the Northeast Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiuqing; Yang, Yuanhe; Yang, Lucun; Zhou, Guoying

    2016-01-01

    Biomass partitioning has been explored across various biomes. However, the strategies of allocation in plants still remain contentious. This study investigated allocation patterns of above- and belowground biomass at the community level, using biomass survey from the Tibetan Plateau. We explored above- and belowground biomass by conducting three consecutive sampling campaigns across shrub biomes on the northeast Tibetan Plateau during 2011-2013. We then documented the above-ground biomass (AGB), below-ground biomass (BGB) and root: shoot ratio (R/S) and the relationships between R/S and environment factors using data from 201 plots surveyed from 67 sites. We further examined relationships between above-ground and below-ground biomass across various shrub types. Our results indicated that the median values of AGB, BGB, and R/S in Tibetan shrub were 1102.55, 874.91 g m-2, and 0.85, respectively. R/S showed significant trend with mean annual precipitation (MAP), while decreased with mean annual temperature (MAT). Reduced major axis analysis indicated that the slope of the log-log relationship between above- and belowground biomass revealed a significant difference from 1.0 over space, supporting the optimal hypothesis. Interestingly, the slopes of the allometric relationship between log AGB and log BGB differed significantly between alpine and desert shrub. Our findings supported the optimal theory of above- and belowground biomass partitioning in Tibetan shrub, while the isometric hypothesis for alpine shrub at the community level.

  5. Intermediate coupling between aboveground and belowground biomass maximises the persistence of grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Simon; Higgins, Steven I

    2013-01-01

    Aboveground and belowground biomass compartments of vegetation fulfil different functions and they are coupled by complex interactions. These compartments exchange water, carbon and nutrients and the belowground biomass compartment has the capacity to buffer vegetation dynamics when aboveground biomass is removed by disturbances such as herbivory or fire. However, despite their importance, root-shoot interactions are often ignored in more heuristic vegetation models. Here, we present a simple two-compartment grassland model that couples aboveground and belowground biomass. In this model, the growth of belowground biomass is influenced by aboveground biomass and the growth of aboveground biomass is influenced by belowground biomass. We used the model to explore how the dynamics of a grassland ecosystem are influenced by fire and grazing. We show that the grassland system is most persistent at intermediate levels of aboveground-belowground coupling. In this situation, the system can sustain more extreme fire or grazing regimes than in the case of strong coupling. In contrast, the productivity of the system is maximised at high levels of coupling. Our analysis suggests that the yield of a grassland ecosystem is maximised when coupling is strong, however, the intensity of disturbance that can be sustained increases dramatically when coupling is intermediate. Hence, the model predicts that intermediate coupling should be selected for as it maximises the chances of persistence in disturbance driven ecosystems.

  6. Depression of belowground respiration rates at simulated high moose population densities in boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Nilsson, Mats B; Pastor, John; Eriksson, Tobias; Bergström, Roger; Danell, Kjell

    2009-10-01

    Large herbivores can affect the carbon cycle in boreal forests by changing productivity and plant species composition, which in turn could ultimately alter litter production, nutrient cycling, and the partitioning between aboveground and belowground allocation of carbon. Here we experimentally tested how moose (Alces alces) at different simulated population densities affected belowground respiration rates (estimated as CO2 flux) in young boreal forest stands situated along a site productivity gradient. At high simulated population density, moose browsing considerably depressed belowground respiration rates (24-56% below that of no-moose controls) except during June, where the difference only was 10%. Moose browsing depressed belowground respiration the most on low-productivity sites. Soil moisture and temperature did not affect respiration rates. Impact of moose on belowground respiration was closely linked to litter production and followed Michaelis-Menten dynamics. The main mechanism by which moose decrease belowground respiration rates is likely their effect on photosynthetic biomass (especially decreased productivity of deciduous trees) and total litter production. An increased productivity of deciduous trees along the site productivity gradient causes an unequal effect of moose along the same gradient. The rapid growth of deciduous trees may offer higher resilience against negative effects of moose browsing on litter production and photosynthate allocation to roots.

  7. Joint Limit Distributions of Exceedances Point Processes and Partial Sums of Gaussian Vector Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Xiang PENG; Jin Jun TONG; Zhi Chao WENG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the joint limit distributions of point processes of exceedances and partial sums of multivariate Gaussian sequences and show that the point processes and partial sums are asymptotically independent under some mild conditions.As a result,for a sequence of standardized stationary Gaussian vectors,we obtain that the point process of exceedances formed by the sequence (centered at the sample mean) converges in distribution to a Poisson process and it is asymptotically independent of the partial sums.The asymptotic joint limit distributions of order statistics and partial sums are also investigated under different conditions.

  8. Are above- and below-ground phenology in sync?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, Rose Z; Finzi, Adrien C

    2015-02-01

    Globally, root production accounts for 33-67% of terrestrial net primary productivity and influences decomposition via root production and turnover, carbon (C) allocation to mycorrhizal fungi and root exudation. As recognized above ground, the timing of phenological events affects terrestrial C balance, yet there is no parallel understanding for below-ground phenology. In this paper we examine the phenology of root production and its relationship to temperature, soil moisture, and above-ground phenology. Synthesizing 87 observations of whole-plant phenology from 40 studies, we found that, on average, root growth occurs 25 ± 8 d after shoot growth but that the offset between the peak in root and shoot growth varies > 200 d across biomes (boreal, temperate, Mediterranean, and subtropical). Root and shoot growth are positively correlated with median monthly temperature and mean monthly precipitation in boreal, temperate, and subtropical biomes. However, a temperature hysteresis in these biomes leads to the hypothesis that internal controls over C allocation to roots are an equally, if not more, important driver of phenology. The specific mechanisms are as yet unclear but they are likely mediated by some combination of photoassimilate supply, hormonal signaling, and growth form.

  9. Untangling above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks in tropical orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J R; Cameron, D D

    2012-10-01

    Orchids typically depend on fungi for establishment from seeds, forming mycorrhizal associations with basidiomycete fungal partners in the polyphyletic group rhizoctonia from early stages of germination, sometimes with very high specificity. This has raised important questions about the roles of plant and fungal phylogenetics, and their habitat preferences, in controlling which fungi associate with which plants. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Martos et al. (2012) report the largest network analysis to date for orchids and their mycorrhizal fungi, sampling a total of over 450 plants from nearly half the 150 tropical orchid species on Reunion Island, encompassing its main terrestrial and epiphytic orchid genera. The authors found a total of 95 operational taxonomic units of mycorrhizal fungi and investigated the architecture and nestedness of their bipartite networks with 73 orchid species. The most striking finding was a major ecological barrier between above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks, despite both epiphytic and terrestrial orchids often associating with closely related taxa across all three major lineages of rhizoctonia fungi. The fungal partnerships of the epiphytes and terrestrial species involved a diversity of fungal taxa in a modular network architecture, with only about one in ten mycorrhizal fungi partnering orchids in both groups. In contrast, plant and fungal phylogenetics had weak or no effects on the network. This highlights the power of recently developed ecological network analyses to give new insights into controls on plant-fungal symbioses and raises exciting new hypotheses about the differences in properties and functioning of mycorrhiza in epiphytic and terrestrial orchids.

  10. Aboveground to belowground herbivore defense signaling in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Torrence; Zhu, Lixue; Lopéz, Lorena; Pechanova, Olga; Shivaji, Renuka; Ankala, Arunkanth; Williams, W. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Insect pests that attempt to feed on the caterpillar-resistant maize genotype Mp708 encounter a potent, multipronged defense system that thwarts their invasion. First, these plants are on “constant alert” due to constitutively elevated levels of the phytohormone jasmonic acid that signals the plant to activate its defenses. The higher jasmonic acid levels trigger the expression of defense genes prior to herbivore attack so the plants are “primed” and respond with a faster and stronger defense. The second defense is the rapid accumulation of a toxic cysteine protease called Mir1-CP in the maize whorl in response to caterpillar feeding. When caterpillars ingest Mir1-CP, it damages the insect's midgut and retards their growth. In this article, we discuss a third possible defense strategy employed by Mp708. We have shown that foliar caterpillar feeding causes Mir1-CP and defense gene transcripts to accumulate in its roots. We propose that caterpillar feeding aboveground sends a signal belowground via the phloem that results in Mir1-CP accumulation in the roots. We also postulate that the roots serve as a reservoir of Mir1-CP that can be mobilized to the whorl in response to caterpillar assault. PMID:21270535

  11. Demonstrating Compliance with Stringent Nitrogen Limits Using a Biological Nutrient Removal Process in California's Central Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Rion; Witzgall, Bob; Yu, William; Ohlinger, Kurt; Ramberg, Steve; De Las Casas, Carla; Henneman, Seppi; Parker, Denny

    2015-12-01

    The Sacramento Regional County Sanitation District (District) must be compliant with stringent nitrogen limits by 2021 that the existing treatment facilities cannot meet. An 11-month pilot study was conducted to confirm that these limits could be met with an air activated sludge biological nutrient removal (BNR) process. The pilot BNR treated an average flow of 946 m(3)/d and demonstrated that it could reliably meet the ammonia limit, but that external carbon addition may be necessary to satisfy the nitrate limit. The BNR process performed well throughout the 11 months of operation with good settleability, minimal nocardioform content, and high quality secondary effluent. The BNR process was operated at a minimum pH of 6.4 with no noticeable impact to nitrification rates. Increased secondary sludge production was observed during rainfall events and is attributed to a change in wastewater influent characteristics.

  12. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  13. Central limit theorems for smoothed extreme value estimates of Poisson point processes boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Girard, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we give sufficient conditions to establish central limit theorems for boundary estimates of Poisson point processes. The considered estimates are obtained by smoothing some bias corrected extreme values of the point process. We show how the smoothing leads Gaussian asymptotic distributions and therefore pointwise confidence intervals. Some new unidimensional and multidimensional examples are provided.

  14. Critical Age-Dependent Branching Markov Processes and their Scaling Limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna B Athreya; Siva R Athreya; Srikanth K Iyer

    2010-06-01

    This paper studies: (i) the long-time behaviour of the empirical distribution of age and normalized position of an age-dependent critical branching Markov process conditioned on non-extinction; and (ii) the super-process limit of a sequence of age-dependent critical branching Brownian motions.

  15. Modeling intermediate product selection under production and storage capacity limitations in food processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur Alper; Akkerman, Renzo; Grunow, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    and processing costs are minimized. However, this product selection process is bound by production and storage capacity limitations, such as the number and size of storage tanks or silos. In this paper, we present a mathematical programming approach that combines decision making on product selection...

  16. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C S McIntosh

    Full Text Available Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR of the forest floor microbial community environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide

  17. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne C S; Macdonald, S Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  18. Short-Term Belowground Responses to Thinning and Burning Treatments in Southwestern Ponderosa Pine Forests of the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T. Overby

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial-mediated decomposition and nutrient mineralization are major drivers of forest productivity. As landscape-scale fuel reduction treatments are being implemented throughout the fire-prone western United States of America, it is important to evaluate operationally how these wildfire mitigation treatments alter belowground processes. We quantified these important belowground components before and after management-applied fuel treatments of thinning alone, thinning combined with prescribed fire, and prescribed fire in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa stands at the Southwest Plateau, Fire and Fire Surrogate site, Arizona. Fuel treatments did not alter pH, total carbon and nitrogen (N concentrations, or base cations of the forest floor (O horizon or mineral soil (0–5 cm during this 2-year study. In situ rates of net N mineralization and nitrification in the surface mineral soil (0–15 cm increased 6 months after thinning with prescribed fire treatments; thinning only resulted in net N immobilization. The rates returned to pre-treatment levels after one year. Based on phospholipid fatty acid composition, microbial communities in treated areas were similar to untreated areas (control in the surface organic horizon and mineral soil (0–5 cm after treatments. Soil potential enzyme activities were not significantly altered by any of the three fuel treatments. Our results suggest that a variety of one-time alternative fuel treatments can reduce fire hazard without degrading soil fertility.

  19. [Effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on elm seedlings growth in Horqin Sandy Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Jiang, De-ming; Chen, Zhuo; Toshio, Oshida

    2011-08-01

    Elm sparse woodland steppe plays an important role in vegetation restoration and landscape protection in Horqin Sandy Land. In this paper, a two-factor and two-level field experiment was conducted to explore the effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on the growth of elm seedlings in the Sandy Land. Five aspects were considered, i.e., seedling biomass, belowground biomass/aboveground biomass, stem height, ratio of root to stem, and leaf number. For the one-year-old elm seedlings, their biomass showed a trend of no competition > aboveground competition > full competition > belowground competition, belowground biomass / aboveground biomass showed a trend of belowground competition > full competition > no competition > aboveground competition, stem height showed a trend of aboveground competition > no competition > full competition > belowground competition, root/stem ratio showed a trend of belowground competition > full competition > no competition > aboveground competition, and leaf number showed a trend of aboveground competition > no competition > belowground competition > full competition. Belowground competition had significant effects on the growth of one-year-old elm seedlings, while aboveground competition did not have. Neither belowground competition nor aboveground competition had significant effects on the growth of two-year-old elm seedlings. It was suggested that in Horqin Sandy Land, grass affected the growth of elm seedlings mainly via below-ground competition, but the belowground competition didn' t affect the resource allocation of elm seedlings. With the age increase of elm seedlings, the effects of grass competition on the growth of elm seedlings became weaker.

  20. Perceptual load effects on processing distractor faces indicate face-specific capacity limits

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Volker; Lavie, Nilli

    2013-01-01

    The claim that face perception is mediated by a specialized ‘face module’ that proceeds automatically, independently of attention (e.g., Kanwisher, 2000) can be reconciled with load theory claims that visual perception has limited capacity (e.g., Lavie, 1995) by hypothesizing that face perception has face-specific capacity limits. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the effects of face and non-face perceptual load on distractor face processing. Participants searched a central array of eith...

  1. Links between plant litter chemistry, species diversity, and below-ground ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Courtney L; Bowman, William D

    2008-12-16

    Decomposition is a critical source of plant nutrients, and drives the largest flux of terrestrial C to the atmosphere. Decomposing soil organic matter typically contains litter from multiple plant species, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of how species diversity influences decomposition processes. Here, we show that soil C and N cycling during decomposition are controlled by the composition and diversity of chemical compounds within plant litter mixtures, rather than by simple metrics of plant species diversity. We amended native soils with litter mixtures containing up to 4 alpine plant species, and we used 9 litter chemical traits to evaluate the chemical composition (i.e., the identity and quantity of compounds) and chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. The chemical composition of the litter mixtures was the strongest predictor of soil respiration, net N mineralization, and microbial biomass N. Soil respiration and net N mineralization rates were also significantly correlated with the chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. In contrast, soil C and N cycling rates were poorly correlated with plant species richness, and there was no relationship between species richness and the chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. These results indicate that the composition and diversity of chemical compounds in litter are potentially important functional traits affecting decomposition, and simple metrics like plant species richness may fail to capture variation in these traits. Litter chemical traits therefore provide a mechanistic link between organisms, species diversity, and key components of below-ground ecosystem function.

  2. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in H-mode on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jernigan, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased non-linearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was {le} 3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density {approximately} 1.5 {times} Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flattop. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks.

  3. A weak limit theorem for numerical approximation of Brownian semi-stationary processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolskij, Mark; Thamrongrat, Nopporn

    In this paper we present a weak limit theorem for a numerical approximation of Brownian semi-stationary processes studied in [14]. In the original work of [14] the authors propose to use Fourier transformation to embed a given one dimensional (Levy) Brownian semi-stationary process into a two......-parameter stochastic field. For the latter they use a simple iteration procedure and study the strong approximation error of the resulting numerical scheme given that the volatility process is fully observed. In this work we present the corresponding weak limit theorem for the setting, where the volatility....../drift process needs to be numerically simulated. In particular, weak approximation errors for smooth test functions can be obtained from our asymptotic theory....

  4. The Strengths and Limitations of Satellite Data for Evaluating Tropospheric Processes in Chemistry-Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    There is now a wealth of satellite data products available with which to evaluate a model fs simulation of tropospheric composition and other model processes. All of these data products have their strengths and limitations that need to be considered for this purpose. For example, uncertainties are introduced into a data product when 1) converting a slant column to a vertical column and 2) estimating the amount of a total column of a trace gas (e.g., ozone, nitrogen dioxide) that resides in the troposphere. Oftentimes, these uncertainties are not well quantified and the satellite data products are not well evaluated against in situ observations. However, these limitations do not preclude us from using these data products to evaluate our model processes if we understand these strengths and limitations when developing diagnostics. I will show several examples of how satellite data products are being used to evaluate particular model processes with a focus on the strengths and limitations of these data products. In addition, I will introduce the goals of a newly formed team to address issues on the topic of "satellite data for improved model evaluation and process studies" that is established in support of the IGAC/SPARC Global Chemistry ]Climate Modeling and Evaluation Workshop.

  5. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  6. Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

    2011-04-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

  7. On the Limit Distributions of Continuous-State Branching Processes with Immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Keller-Ressel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the class of continuous-state branching processes with immigration (CBI-processes), introduced by Kawazu and Watanabe [1971], and give a deterministic characterisation for the convergence of a CBI-process to a limit distribution L, which also turns out to be the stationary distribution of the CBI-process, as time tends to infinity. We give an explicit description of the Levy-Khintchine triplet of L in terms of the characteristic triplets of the Levy subordinator and the spectrally positive Levy process, which arise in the definition of the CBI-process and determine it uniquely. We show that the Levy density of L is given by the generator of the Levy subordinator applied to the scale function of the spectrally positive Levy process. This formula allows us to describe the support of L and characterise the absolute continuity and the asymptotic behavior of the density of L at the boundary of the support. Finally we show that the class of limit distributions of CBI-processes is strictly larger (resp. ...

  8. Assessment of capability index of processes revealing significant asymmetry with respect to tolerance limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bukowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of basic capability indices for production processes, Cp and Cpk, as well as the Cpm index for processes asymmetric with respect to tolerance limits. A method is presented for the estimation of process admissible asymmetry, when anappropriate PPM level of defective products is to be maintained. It is proved that an unbiased capability assessment for asymmetricprocesses is only feasible if the pair of indices Cp and Cpk is included in the assessment. An example is given of an analysis of data on the production of automotive bearings. The computations were performed with use of the KWSPP program.

  9. Determination of in-process limits during parenteral solution manufacturing using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuu, Wei Y; Chilamkurti, Rao

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to utilize Monte Carlo Simulation methodology to determine the in-process limits for the parenteral solution manufacturing process. The Monte Carlo Simulation predicts the distribution of a dependable variable (such as drug concentration) in a naturally occurring process through random value generation considering the variability associated with the depended variable. The propagation of variation in drug concentration from batch to batch is cascading in nature during the following four formulation steps: 1) determination of drug raw material potency (or purity), 2) weighing of drug raw material, 3) measurement of batch volume, and 4) determination of drug concentration in the mix tank. The coefficients of variation for these four steps are denoted as CV1, CV2, CV3, and CV4, respectively. The Monte Carlo Simulation was performed for each of the above four cascading steps. The results of the simulation demonstrate that the in-process limits of the drug can be successfully determined using the Monte Carlo Simulation. Once the specification limits are determined, the Monte Carlo Simulation can be used to study the effect of each variability on the percent out of specification limits (OOL) for the in-process testing. Demonstrations were performed using the acceptance criterion of less than 5% of OOL batches, and the typical values of CV2 and CV3 being equal to 0.03% and 0.5%, respectively. The results show that for the in-process limits of +/- 1%, the values of CV1 and CV4 should not be greater than 0.1%. These assay requirements appear to be difficult to achieve for a given chemical analytical method. By comparison, for the In-process limits of +/- 4%, the requirements are much easier to achieve. The values of CV1 and CV4 should not be greater than 1.38%. In addition, the relationship between the percent OOL versus CV1 or CV4 is nonlinear per se. The number of OOL batches increases rapidly with increasing variability of CV1 or CV4.

  10. Precise limits from lepton flavour violating processes on the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity

    CERN Document Server

    del Águila, F; Jenkins, M D

    2009-01-01

    We recalculate the leading one-loop contributions to mu -> e gamma and mu -> eee in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity. When all the Goldstone interactions are taken into account the result is ultraviolet finite. The present experimental limits on these processes require a somewhat heavy effective scale ~2.5 TeV, or the flavour alignment of the Yukawa couplings of light and heavy leptons at the ~10% level, or the splitting of heavy lepton masses to a similar precision. Present limits on tau decays set no bounds on the corresponding parameters involving the tau lepton.

  11. On the Scaling Limits of Determinantal Point Processes with Kernels Induced by Sturm-Liouville Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann, Folkmar

    2016-08-01

    By applying an idea of Borodin and Olshanski [J. Algebra 313 (2007), 40-60], we study various scaling limits of determinantal point processes with trace class projection kernels given by spectral projections of selfadjoint Sturm-Liouville operators. Instead of studying the convergence of the kernels as functions, the method directly addresses the strong convergence of the induced integral operators. We show that, for this notion of convergence, the Dyson, Airy, and Bessel kernels are universal in the bulk, soft-edge, and hard-edge scaling limits. This result allows us to give a short and unified derivation of the known formulae for the scaling limits of the classical random matrix ensembles with unitary invariance, that is, the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE), the Wishart or Laguerre unitary ensemble (LUE), and the MANOVA (multivariate analysis of variance) or Jacobi unitary ensemble (JUE).

  12. Joint preprocesser-based detector for cooperative networks with limited hardware processing capability

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Abdulrahman I.

    2015-02-01

    In this letter, a joint detector for cooperative communication networks is proposed when the destination has limited hardware processing capability. The transmitter sends its symbols with the help of L relays. As the destination has limited hardware, only U out of L signals are processed and the energy of the remaining relays is lost. To solve this problem, a joint preprocessing based detector is proposed. This joint preprocessor based detector operate on the principles of minimizing the symbol error rate (SER). For a realistic assessment, pilot symbol aided channel estimation is incorporated for this proposed detector. From our simulations, it can be observed that our proposed detector achieves the same SER performance as that of the maximum likelihood (ML) detector with all participating relays. Additionally, our detector outperforms selection combining (SC), channel shortening (CS) scheme and reduced-rank techniques when using the same U. Our proposed scheme has low computational complexity.

  13. Limit theorems for Markov processes indexed by continuous time Galton-Watson trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bansaye, Vincent; Marsalle, Laurence; Tran, Viet Chi

    2009-01-01

    We study the evolution of a particle system whose genealogy is given by a supercritical continuous time Galton-Watson tree. The particles move independently according to a Markov process and when a branching event occurs, the offspring locations depend on the position of the mother and the number of offspring. We prove a law of large numbers for the empirical measure of individuals alive at time $t$. This relies on a probabilistic interpretation of its intensity by mean of an auxiliary process. This latter has the same generator as the Markov process along the branches plus additional branching events, associated with jumps of accelerated rate and biased distribution. This comes from the fact that choosing an individual uniformly at time $t$ favors lineages with more branching events and larger offspring number. The central limit theorem is considered on a special case. Several examples are developed, including applications to splitting diffusions, cellular aging, branching L\\'evy processes and ancestral line...

  14. On Compound Poisson Processes Arising in Change-Point Type Statistical Models as Limiting Likelihood Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Dachian, Serguei

    2010-01-01

    Different change-point type models encountered in statistical inference for stochastic processes give rise to different limiting likelihood ratio processes. In a previous paper of one of the authors it was established that one of these likelihood ratios, which is an exponential functional of a two-sided Poisson process driven by some parameter, can be approximated (for sufficiently small values of the parameter) by another one, which is an exponential functional of a two-sided Brownian motion. In this paper we consider yet another likelihood ratio, which is the exponent of a two-sided compound Poisson process driven by some parameter. We establish, that similarly to the Poisson type one, the compound Poisson type likelihood ratio can be approximated by the Brownian type one for sufficiently small values of the parameter. We equally discuss the asymptotics for large values of the parameter and illustrate the results by numerical simulations.

  15. Forming limits in the hole-flanging process by coupled and uncoupled damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacem, A.; Jégat, A.; Krichen, A.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the limits of the hole-flanging process under different conditions. A 3D finite element model was developed to predict failure in hole-flanging process for sheet aluminium alloys. The Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) coupled damage model and the Bao-Wierzbicki (BW) uncoupled damage model were used. The parameters of both coupled and uncoupled models were identified by inverse analysis based on uniaxial tensile test. Experiments were conducted to analyse the types of failure that appear during the process. Numerical results were compared with experimental datas to check the validity of both models in predicting failure during the hole-flanging process. The comparative study showed that the GTN model predicts more accurately almost all types of failure while fracture occurrence can be only predicted by the BW model.

  16. WEAK LIMITS OF EMPIRICAL MEASURES FOR A FAMILY OF DIFFUSION PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席福宝; 赵丽琴

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers diffusion processes {Xε(t)} on R2, which are perturbations of dynamical system {X(t)} (dX(t) = b(X(t))dt) on R2. By means of weak convergence of probability measures, the authors characterize the limit behavior for empirical measures of {Xε(t)} in a neighborhood domain of saddle point of the dynamical system as the perturbations tend to zero.

  17. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Particulate Matter Emission Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure drop and liquid flow-rate at or above the operating levels established during the performance test... emission limit for particulate matter. 2. Fabric filter control a. Install and operate a bag leak detection system according to § 63.7525 and operate the fabric filter such that the bag leak detection system...

  18. Submerged vegetation complexity modifies benthic infauna communities: the hidden role of the belowground system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González-Ortiz, V.; Gonzalo Egea, L.; Jiménez-Ramos, R.; Moreno-Mar, F; Pérez Lloréns, J.L.; Bouma, T.J; Bruno, F.

    2016-01-01

    Marine plants provide a variety of functions with high economic and ecologicalvalues in ecosystems. The above- (AG) and below-ground (BG) systems increasethe structural complexity of plants, which also enhance faunal abundance anddiversity. The ecological role of the AG compartment in structuring in

  19. NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY ALTERS BELOWGROUND RESPIRATION OF OZONE-EXPOSED PONDEROSE PINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ozone (0-3) and changes in soil fertility influence both the metabolism of plant roots and their interaction with rhizosphere organisms. Because one indication of altered root metabolism is a change in belowground respiratory activity, we used specially designed measu...

  20. Long-term variation in above and belowground plant inputs alters soil organic matter biogeochemistry at the molecular-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M. J.; Pisani, O.; Lin, L.; Lun, O.; Simpson, A.; Lajtha, K.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term fate of soil carbon reserves with global environmental change remains uncertain. Shifts in moisture, altered nutrient cycles, species composition, or rising temperatures may alter the proportions of above and belowground biomass entering soil. However, it is unclear how long-term changes in plant inputs may alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil carbon storage. Advanced molecular techniques were used to assess SOM composition in mineral soil horizons (0-10 cm) after 20 years of Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) at the Harvard Forest. SOM biomarkers (solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation) and both solid-state and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to identify changes in SOM composition and stage of degradation. Microbial activity and community composition were assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Doubling aboveground litter inputs decreased soil carbon content, increased the degradation of labile SOM and enhanced the sequestration of aliphatic compounds in soil. The exclusion of belowground inputs (No roots and No inputs) resulted in a decrease in root-derived components and enhanced the degradation of leaf-derived aliphatic structures (cutin). Cutin-derived SOM has been hypothesized to be recalcitrant but our results show that even this complex biopolymer is susceptible to degradation when inputs entering soil are altered. The PLFA data indicate that changes in soil microbial community structure favored the accelerated processing of specific SOM components with littler manipulation. These results collectively reveal that the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs alters the molecular-level composition of SOM and in some cases, enhances the degradation of recalcitrant SOM. Our study also suggests that increased litterfall is unlikely to enhance soil carbon storage over the long-term in temperate forests.

  1. The roots of defense: plant resistance and tolerance to belowground herbivory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Watts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is conclusive evidence that there are fitness costs of plant defense and that herbivores can drive selection for defense. However, most work has focused on above-ground interactions, even though belowground herbivory may have greater impacts on individual plants than above-ground herbivory. Given the role of belowground plant structures in resource acquisition and storage, research on belowground herbivores has much to contribute to theories on the evolution of plant defense. Pocket gophers (Geomyidae provide an excellent opportunity to study root herbivory. These subterranean rodents spend their entire lives belowground and specialize on consuming belowground plant parts. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the root defenses of native forbs from mainland populations (with a history of gopher herbivory to island populations (free from gophers for up to 500,000 years. Defense includes both resistance against herbivores and tolerance of herbivore damage. We used three approaches to compare these traits in island and mainland populations of two native California forbs: 1 Eschscholzia californica populations were assayed to compare alkaloid deterrents, 2 captive gophers were used to test the palatability of E. californica roots and 3 simulated root herbivory assessed tolerance to root damage in Deinandra fasciculata and E. californica. Mainland forms of E. californica contained 2.5 times greater concentration of alkaloids and were less palatable to gophers than island forms. Mainland forms of D. fasciculata and, to a lesser extent, E. californica were also more tolerant of root damage than island conspecifics. Interestingly, undamaged island individuals of D. fasciculata produced significantly more fruit than either damaged or undamaged mainland individuals. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that mainland plants are effective at deterring and tolerating pocket gopher herbivory. Results also suggest

  2. Shrub encroachment in Arctic tundra: Betula nana effects on above- and below-ground litter decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Jennie R; Buckeridge, Kate M; van de Weg, Martine J; Shaver, Gaius R; Schimel, Joshua P; Gough, Laura

    2017-03-06

    Rapid arctic vegetation change as a result of global warming includes an increase in the cover and biomass of deciduous shrubs. Increases in shrub abundance will result in a proportional increase of shrub litter in the litter community, potentially affecting carbon turnover rates in arctic ecosystems. We investigated the effects of leaf and root litter of a deciduous shrub, Betula nana, on decomposition, by examining species-specific decomposition patterns, as well as effects of Betula litter on the decomposition of other species. We conducted a two-year decomposition experiment in moist acidic tundra in northern Alaska, where we decomposed three tundra species (Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Rhododendron palustre, and Eriophorum vaginatum) alone and in combination with Betula litter. Decomposition patterns for leaf and root litter were determined using three different measures of decomposition (mass loss, respiration, extracellular enzyme activity). We report faster decomposition of Betula leaf litter compared to other species, with support for species differences coming from all three measures of decomposition. Mixing effects were less consistent among the measures, with negative mixing effects shown only for mass loss. In contrast, there were few species differences or mixing effects for root decomposition. Overall, we attribute longer-term litter mass loss patterns in to patterns created by early decomposition processes in the first winter. We note numerous differences for species patterns between leaf and root decomposition, indicating that conclusions from leaf litter experiments should not be extrapolated to below-ground decomposition. The high decomposition rates of Betula leaf litter aboveground, and relatively similar decomposition rates of multiple species below, suggest a potential for increases in turnover in the fast-decomposing carbon pool of leaves and fine roots as the dominance of deciduous shrubs in the Arctic increases, but this outcome may be tempered

  3. Value and limits of μ-CT for nondemineralized bone tissue processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draenert, Miriam Esther; Draenert, Alice Irène; Forriol, Francisco; Cerler, Michael; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz; Hickel, Reinhard; Draenert, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    An experimental approach was performed on 20 giant rabbits to establish the possibilities and limitations of μ-CT for routine processing of nondemineralized bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HA) or β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP) bead implants or a melange of both, microchambered and solid, were implanted into a standardized and precise defect in the patellar groove. The bone-healing phase was chosen for the histology considering 1 or 2 days, and 2, 3, and 6 weeks. Normal X-ray and μ-CT were applied on all specimens; five specimens in the 6-week stage were additionally processed according to the full range of conventional nondemineralized bone processing methods. μ-CT increased the possibilities of nondemineralized histology with respect to bone morphometry and a complete sequence of sections, thus providing a complete analysis of the bone response. μ-CT was limited in differentiating bone quality, cell analyses, and mineralization stages. The investigation based on normal X-rays is limited to defining integration and excluding the fibrous and bony encapsulation of loose implants. μ-CT allows a 3D evaluation of newly formed bone which is clearly marked against the ceramic implant. It does not allow, however, for the differentiation between woven and lamellar bone, the presentation of the canalicular lacunar system, or on the cell level, revealing canaliculi or details of the mineralization process which can be documented by high-resolution microradiography. Titer dynamics of bone formation remains the domain of polychromatic sequential labeling. The complete sequence of μ-CT slices enhances the possibilities for routine histology, tremendously allowing to the focus on detail histology to topographically well-defined cuts, thus providing more precise conclusions which take into consideration the whole implant.

  4. 40 CFR 63.500 - Back-end process provisions-carbon disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... disulfide limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. 63.500 Section 63.500 Protection... limitations for styrene butadiene rubber by emulsion processes. (a) Owners or operators of sources subject to this subpart producing styrene butadiene rubber using an emulsion process shall operate the...

  5. Warming-induced upslope advance of subalpine forest is severely limited by geomorphic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Fauria, Marc; Johnson, Edward A

    2013-05-14

    Forests are expected to expand into alpine areas because of climate warming, causing land-cover change and fragmentation of alpine habitats. However, this expansion will only occur if the present upper treeline is limited by low-growing season temperatures that reduce plant growth. This temperature limitation has not been quantified at a landscape scale. Here, we show that temperature alone cannot realistically explain high-elevation tree cover over a >100-km(2) area in the Canadian Rockies and that geologic/geomorphic processes are fundamental to understanding the heterogeneous landscape distribution of trees. Furthermore, upslope tree advance in a warmer scenario will be severely limited by availability of sites with adequate geomorphic/topographic characteristics. Our results imply that landscape-to-regional scale projections of warming-induced, high-elevation forest advance into alpine areas should not be based solely on temperature-sensitive, site-specific upper-treeline studies but also on geomorphic processes that control tree occurrence at long (centuries/millennia) timescales.

  6. The top 50 commodity chemicals: Impact of catalytic process limitations on energy, environment, and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkovich, A.L.Y.; Gerber, M.A.

    1995-08-01

    The production processes for the top 50 U.S. commodity chemicals waste energy, generate unwanted byproducts, and require more than a stoichiometric amount of feedstocks. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has quantified this impact on energy, environment, and economics for the catalytically produced commodity chemicals. An excess of 0.83 quads of energy per year in combined process and feedstock energy is required. The major component, approximately 54%, results from low per-pass yields and the subsequent separation and recycle of unreacted feedstocks. Furthermore, the production processes, either directly or through downstream waste treatment steps, release more than 20 billion pounds of carbon dioxide per year to the environment. The cost of the wasted feedstock exceeds 2 billion dollars per year. Process limitations resulting from unselective catalysis and unfavorable reaction thermodynamic constraints are the major contributors to this waste. Advanced process concepts that address these problems in an integrated manner are needed to improve process efficiency, which would reduce energy and raw material consumption, and the generation of unwanted byproducts. Many commodity chemicals are used to produce large volume polymer products. Of the energy and feedstock wasted during the production of the commodity chemicals, nearly one-third and one-half, respectively, represents chemicals used as polymer precursors. Approximately 38% of the carbon dioxide emissions are generated producing polymer feedstocks.

  7. Limitations of mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of industrial and laboratory high-pressure processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    High pressures up to several hundreds of MPa are utilised in a wide range of applications in chemical engineering, bioengineering, and food engineering, aiming at selective control of (bio-)chemical reactions. Non-uniformity of process conditions may threaten the safety and quality of the resulting products as the process conditions such as pressure, temperature, and treatment history are crucial for the course of (bio-)chemical reactions. Therefore, thermofluid dynamical phenomena during the high-pressure process have to be examined, and tools to predict process uniformity and to optimise the processes have to be developed. Recently, mathematical models and numerical simulations of laboratory and industrial scale high-pressure processes have been set up and validated by experimental results. This contribution deals with the assumption of the modelling that relevant (bio-)chemical compounds are ideally dissolved or diluted particles in a continuum flow. By considering the definition of the continuum hypothesis regarding the minimum particle population in a distinct volume, limitations of this modelling and simulation are addressed.

  8. Functional limit theorem for moving average processes generated by dependent random variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Let {Xt,t≥1} be a moving average process defined byXt = ∞∑j=0bjξt-j , where {bj,j≥0} is a sequence of real numbers and { ξt, ∞< t <∞ } is a doubly infinite sequence of strictly stationary φ- mixing random variables. Under conditions on { bj, j ≥0 }which entail that { Xt, t ≥ 1 } is either a long memory process or a linear process, we study asymptotics of Sn ( s ) = [ns]∑t=1 Xt (properly normalized). When { Xt, t≥1 } is a long memory process, we establish a functional limit theorem. When { Xt, t≥1 } is a linear process, we not only obtain the multi-dimensional weak convergence for { Xt, t≥1 }, but also weaken the moment condition on { ξt, - ∞< t <∞ } and the restriction on { bj,j≥0}. Finally, we give some applications of our results.

  9. Expected Limits on R-symmetric $\\mu \\to e $ Processes at Project X

    CERN Document Server

    Fok, Ricky

    2012-01-01

    We investigate $\\mu \\to e$ processes in the Minimal R-symmetric Standrad Model (MRSSM) with the expected limits from Project X. It is found that $\\mu \\to e$ conversion provides the tightest bound on the $\\mu \\to e$ mixing parameters at the order of $\\lesssim O(10^{-3})$. Whereas $\\mu \\to eee$ only slightly improves the bound in the region where incoherence among different contributions to $\\mu \\to e$ is significant. No improvements on the bounds are obtained from $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$.

  10. The Limit Theorems for Maxima of Stationary Gaussian Processes with Random Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Quan TAN

    2014-01-01

    Let {X(t), t ≥ 0} be a standard (zero-mean, unit-variance) stationary Gaussian process with correlation function r(·) and continuous sample paths. In this paper, we consider the maxima M (T ) = max{X (t),∀t ∈ [0, T ]} with random index TT , where TT/T converges to a non-degenerate distribution or to a positive random variable in probability, and show that the limit distribution of M (TT ) exists under some additional conditions related to the correlation function r(·).

  11. Figuring out the process of denitrification by stable isotope approaches - Prospects and limitations -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, C. F.; Spott, O.

    2009-04-01

    Improvement in the analysis of stable isotopes, higher measurement capacity and faster and more complex analysis methods allow a more detailed insight into the complexity of N cycling in soils or sediments, in particular in the formation and emission of N2 gas. The knowledge about the site-specific N2 to N2O ratio of denitrification and perhaps other processes is important to develop sustainable land use strategies for reduction of GHG emissions. Adapted stable isotope approaches are an irreplaceable tool for process identification, process quantification and processes separation. In the last years a few of new processes were found (e.g. anammox, codenitrification) and new stable isotope approaches for quantification and processes separation were published (Wrage et al.). Source partitioning of N gas production in soils is inherently challenging, but is vital to better understand controls on the different processes, with a view to develope appropriate management practices for mitigation of harmful N gases (e.g.N2O) (Baggs, 2008). Recently dual-isotope labelling approaches (Wrage et al., 2005) and triplet 15N tracer experiments (TTE) with 15N labelling of different pools (e.g. Müller et al., 2006, Russow et al 2009) have been developed to differentiate between more than two processes. The high number of simultaneously occurring processes during soil N cycling (Hayatsu et al. 2008) limits an easy applicability of isotope approaches (Spott and Stange 2007 ;Wrage et al. 2005; Phillips and Gregg, 2003), and therefore partitioning and process quantification is often afflicted with high uncertainties (Ambus et al., 2006). Especially the heterogeneity of environmental conditions in soils caused by the soil structure is difficult to handle (e.g. homogeneously labelling a soil). Hence, spatially separated processes in combination with high turnover rates (gross production and consumption) can produce different pools of one substrate in the soil (Russow et al. 2009) and

  12. A PREDICTING MODEL OF THE LIMITING FLUX FOR THE CHARGED SOLUTE IN ULTRAFILTRATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ming-liang; GUO Yan; PU Chun-sheng; LU Feng-ji

    2004-01-01

    In the process of ultrafiltration , the occur-rence of the limiting flux is elucidated with the formation of a cake(gel) layer on the membrane surface. Before cake formation, the pressure drop on the concentration polarization layer, as well as the permeate flux, increases with the applied pressure. The pressure drop on the concentration polarization layer, however, will no longer change with the applied pressure after the formation of the cake layer. The limiting flux will be obtained if the hydrodynamic conditions in the filtration channel are not affected by the cake layer. A mathematics model for predicting the limiting flux for the charged solute in ultrafiltration is developed. In this model, a repulsive electric force is taken into account in addition to convection and diffusion when the solute is carrying the same charge as the membrane material. A procedure to correlate the model with experimental ultrafiltration data is also present. The results show that a model in this paper is developed on a more realistic perception of the ultrafiltration system and the predicting data agrees well with experimental data.

  13. Ultrafast and nonlinear optical characterization of optical limiting processes in fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlman, R.; Klimov, V.; Shi, X. [and others

    1997-10-01

    The authors present recent results of broadband femotosecond (fs) transient absorption (TA) and broadband nanosecond (ns) optical limiting (OL) studies of C{sub 60} and derivatized C{sub 60}. Improvements in measurement techniques for fs TA spectra provide sensitivity to 10{sup {minus}5} in differential transmission, allowing detailed comparison of excited-state spectra with established energy level diagrams, as well as comparison of the ratio of triplet to singlet excited-state absorption cross sections from TA spectra with those obtained by modeling time transients at different wavelengths. For derivatized fullerenes, which provide enhanced solubility and a ground-state absorption extended into the infrared compared with C{sub 60} there is no spectral region where the triplet absorption cross section dominates the singlet as strongly as demonstrating broadband limiting in all 6, 6 mono-adducts and neat C{sub 60}. The authors report new approaches to processing sol-gel encapsulated fullerenes to improve the OL performance of solid-state materials to approach the response of solution limiters.

  14. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. O. C. Aragão

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The net primary productivity (NPP of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1 How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2 How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (mean±standard error, at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  15. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. O. C. Aragão

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The net primary productivity (NPP of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1 How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2 How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (mean±standard error, at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  16. Averaging, not internal noise, limits the development of coherent motion processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Manning

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of motion processing is a critical part of visual development, allowing children to interact with moving objects and navigate within a dynamic environment. However, global motion processing, which requires pooling motion information across space, develops late, reaching adult-like levels only by mid-to-late childhood. The reasons underlying this protracted development are not yet fully understood. In this study, we sought to determine whether the development of motion coherence sensitivity is limited by internal noise (i.e., imprecision in estimating the directions of individual elements and/or global pooling across local estimates. To this end, we presented equivalent noise direction discrimination tasks and motion coherence tasks at both slow (1.5°/s and fast (6°/s speeds to children aged 5, 7, 9 and 11 years, and adults. We show that, as children get older, their levels of internal noise reduce, and they are able to average across more local motion estimates. Regression analyses indicated, however, that age-related improvements in coherent motion perception are driven solely by improvements in averaging and not by reductions in internal noise. Our results suggest that the development of coherent motion sensitivity is primarily limited by developmental changes within brain regions involved in integrating motion signals (e.g., MT/V5.

  17. Caustic Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment of Effluent from Cassava Processing Industry: Prospects and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayinka Omotosho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cassava has been described as a major part of diet in most African countries. Its processing usually requires the release of polluted effluent which has been found to be toxic, carcinogenic as well as mutagenic to some extent. In this study, the treatment process comprised of a combination of peroxide oxidation at caustic range and filtration which ensured that the key pollutant, Cyanide was converted to cyanate. Metal and other non-metal pollutants were filtered off with the aid of a graded sand filter after undergoing hydroxide formation and precipitation. Results from the study shows that an optimum dosage of 0.3mg/l was adequate for Cyanide destruction and hydroxide precipitation reactions. A comparison of the effluent from the treatment process with FEPA standards for waste water discharge shows that most of the pollutant parameters were within acceptable limits after the treatment with the exception of PO4 and BOD5. However when compared with Canadian Water Quality Guidelines for Irrigation the only parameter outstanding was the BOD5. As a result of the inadequacy of the process in handling the phosphate and biological load content of the wastewater, It is proposed that an additional treatment method such as sorption using activated carbon or use of a combined baffle flocculation and aeration techniques will be appropriate if the water is to be discharged safely into water courses or even for irrigation purposes.

  18. Limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of naphthenic acids in oil sands process water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weibing; Ewanchuk, Andrea; Perez-Estrada, Leonidas; Sego, Dave; Ulrich, Ania

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectrophotometry has been proposed as a quick screening technique for the measurement of naphthenic acids (NAs). To evaluate the feasibility of this application, the fluorescence emission spectra of NAs extracted from three oil sands process water sources were compared with that of commercial NAs. The NAs resulting from the bitumen extraction process cannot be differentiated because of the similarity of the fluorescence spectra. Separation of the fluorescent species in NAs using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector proved unsuccessful. The acidic fraction of NAs is fluorescent but the basic fraction of NAs is not fluorescent, implying that aromatic acids in NAs give rise to the fluorescent signals. The concentrations of NAs in oil sands process water were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectrophotometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF/MS). Commercial Merichem and Kodak NAs are the best standards to use when measuring NAs concentration with FTIR and fluorescence spectrophotometry. In addition, the NAs concentrations measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry are about 30 times higher than those measured by FTIR and UPLC-TOF/MS. The findings in this study underscore the limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of NAs.

  19. Divergence of above- and belowground C and N pool within predominant plant species along two precipitation gradients in north China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Ye

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of carbon cycle and nutrient cycle drives food web structure and biogeochemistry of an ecosystem. However, across precipitation gradients, there may be a shift in C pool and N pool from above- to belowground because of shifting plant stoichiometry and allocation. Based on previous evidence, biomass allocation to roots should increase with aridity, while leaf [N] should increase. If their effect sizes are equal, they should cancel each other out, and the above- and belowground proportions of the N would remain constant. Here, we present the first study to explicitly compare above- and belowground pool sizes of N and C within predominant plant species along precipitation gradients. Biomass and nutrient concentrations of leaves, stems and roots of three predominant species were measured along two major precipitation gradients in Inner Mongolia, China. Along the two gradients, the effect sizes of the biomass shifts were remarkably consistent among three predominant species. However, the size of the shift in aboveground [N] was not, leading to a species-specific pattern in above- and belowground pool size. In two species (Stipa grandis and Artemisia ordosica the effect sizes of biomass allocation and [N] were equal and the proportion of N of above- and belowground did not change with aridity, but in S. bungeana the increase in leaf [N] with aridity was much weaker than the biomass shift, leading to a decrease in the proportion of N belowground at dry sites. We have found examples of consistent N pool sizes above- and belowground and a shift to a greater proportion of belowground N in drier sites depending on the species. We suggest that precipitation gradients do potentially decouple the C and N pool, but the exact nature of the decoupling depends on the dominant species' capacity for intraspecific variation.

  20. The Effects of N Addition on the Belowground C Cycle in two Temperate Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowinski, N. S.; Trumbore, S.; Fernandez, I.; Magill, A.; Rustad, L.; Szillery, J.

    2004-12-01

    Human activities such as fossil fuel combustion, fertilizer-use, industrial ammonia and biomass burning have roughly doubled the amount of biologically active nitrogen entering ecosystems each year. N is essential for growth and is the limiting nutrient in many ecosystems. Additionally, N availability has been shown to affect plant, root and soil respiration. For several temperate forests, experimental addition of N is associated with a decline in soil CO2 efflux. This decline could be due to either (1) decreased allocation of C to root metabolism and growth because N demand of plants can be met with less energy expended belowground, or (2) decreased rates of organic matter supply or decomposition due to changes in leaf or root tissue chemistry, or to changes in the decomposer community. We use radiocarbon measurements in soil organic matter, heterotrophically respired CO2, and soil respiration to distinguish between these two hypotheses. Atmospheric 14C peaked in the 1960s due to atomic weapons testing and has subsequently been declining. Differences in 14C of soil organic matter and fine roots sampled in control versus N addition plots can be used to determine if turnover differs between these pools by treatment. In temperate forests heterotrophic respiration is distinguishable from autotrophic respiration by its 14C content, so radiocarbon measurements in respired CO2 can be used to estimate the contribution of root respiration to overall CO2 efflux We will report measurements made at two sites: (1) the Bear Brook watershed in eastern Maine, which consists of 2 10ha plots, a reference and another that receives 34 kg N ha-1 yr-1 with sections of hardwood and conifer stands in each plot, and (2) N amendment plots at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts, which consist of 6 0.09ha plots, a control, a plot receiving 50 kg N ha-1 yr-1, and one receiving 150 kg N ha-1 yr-1 in both conifer and hardwood stands. Data on root and litter/soil C dynamics on a series

  1. Above-belowground interactions govern the course and impact of biological invasions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Mette; Rønn, Regin; Ekelund, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    in an evolutionary and ecological context; in the case of invasive plants, we must have a major focus on above-belowground interactions. Thus, we discuss different theories that have been proposed to explain the course of invasions through interactions between plants and soil organisms. Further, a thorough analysis......, declines or its negative impact decreases. If the fundamental ecosystem structure and flows of energy and matter have not been changed, the system will return to a state not principally different from the original....

  2. Limitations Of The Current State Space Modelling Approach In Multistage Machining Processes Due To Operation Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán-Nebot, J. V.; Liu, J.; Romero, F.

    2009-11-01

    The State Space modelling approach has been recently proposed as an engineering-driven technique for part quality prediction in Multistage Machining Processes (MMP). Current State Space models incorporate fixture and datum variations in the multi-stage variation propagation, without explicitly considering common operation variations such as machine-tool thermal distortions, cutting-tool wear, cutting-tool deflections, etc. This paper shows the limitations of the current State Space model through an experimental case study where the effect of the spindle thermal expansion, cutting-tool flank wear and locator errors are introduced. The paper also discusses the extension of the current State Space model to include operation variations and its potential benefits.

  3. Musical experience limits the degradative effects of background noise on the neural processing of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2009-11-11

    Musicians have lifelong experience parsing melodies from background harmonies, which can be considered a process analogous to speech perception in noise. To investigate the effect of musical experience on the neural representation of speech-in-noise, we compared subcortical neurophysiological responses to speech in quiet and noise in a group of highly trained musicians and nonmusician controls. Musicians were found to have a more robust subcortical representation of the acoustic stimulus in the presence of noise. Specifically, musicians demonstrated faster neural timing, enhanced representation of speech harmonics, and less degraded response morphology in noise. Neural measures were associated with better behavioral performance on the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) for which musicians outperformed the nonmusician controls. These findings suggest that musical experience limits the negative effects of competing background noise, thereby providing the first biological evidence for musicians' perceptual advantage for speech-in-noise.

  4. Forming limit prediction of powder forging process by the energy-based elastoplastic damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hung-Yang; Cheng, Jung-Ho; Huang, Cheng-Chao

    2004-06-01

    An energy-based elastoplastic damage model is developed and then applied to predict the deformation and fracture initiation in powder forging processes. The fracture mechanism is investigated by the newly proposed damage model, which is based on the plastic energy dissipation. The developed formulations are implemented into finite element program ABAQUS in order to simulate the complex loading conditions. The forming limits of sintered porous metals under various operational conditions are explored by comparing the relevant experiments with the finite element analyses. The sintered iron-powder preforms of various initial relative densities (RDs) and aspect ratios are compressed until crack initiates. The deformation level of the bulged billets at fracture stroke obtained from compressive fracture tests is utilized to validate the finite element model and then the forming limit diagrams are constructed with the validated model. This model is further verified by the gear blank forging. The fracture site and corresponding deformation level are predicted by the finite element simulations. Meanwhile, the gear forging experiment is performed on the sintered preforms. The predicted results agree well with the experimental observations.

  5. Limits Imposed on Heat Produced during Core Formation by Radiative Transfer Processes and Thermodynamic Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R. E.; Hofmeister, A.

    2010-12-01

    The popular view that Earth is sufficiently hot to still be shedding primordal heat, largely originating in the core, is inconsistent with thermodynamic constraints and recent heat transport studies. Previous work presumes that the large difference in gravitational potential energy (Ug) between a fictious, homogeneous reference state and Earth’s current layered configuration of metallic core and rocky mantle was converted to frictional heat during core formation, greatly increasing temperature (T) inside the Earth. However, heating (ΔT >0) was deduced by assuming that Ug is positive, which is inconsistent with Newton’s law of gravitation. Use of an erroneous sign for ΔUg has prevented recognition that the process is an exothermic transformation. Thermodynamic principles were not considered in previous analyses: neglecting the effect of the change in configuration on entropy and energy contributes greatly to the view that heat is retained. Instead, stringent limits are set on the permissible temperature increase by the rapid rate of ballistic radiative transfer, a process associated with transient events, as well as by the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. In the static, instantaneous model of core formation, configurational entropy (S) of the Earth decreases upon forming the ordered layered state; this entropy decrease is offset by a greater increase in S of the surrounding universe, which can only be accomplished by release of heat to space (the surroundings). Instantaneous dissipation of heat in the static model reasonably approximates radiative processes being superfast. Core formation involves negligible changes in volume and rotational energy, so Helmholtz free energy (=Ug-TS) is conserved, as in atmospheric processes and other graviational-thermodynamic problems. Because S of the universe is immense and heat must flow from hotter to colder bodies, negligible heat from core formation is retained, consistent with the exothermic nature of this transition

  6. Youth researching youth: benefits, limitations and ethical considerations within a participatory research process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia G. Jardine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the benefits, limitations and ethical issues associated with conducting participatory research on tobacco use using youth to research other youth. Study design. Community-based participatory research. Methods. Research on tobacco use was conducted with students in the K’àlemì Dene School and Kaw Tay Whee School in the Northwest Territories, Canada, using PhotoVoice. The Grade 9–12 students acted as researchers. Researcher reflections and observations were assessed using “member checking,” whereby students, teachers and community partners could agree or disagree with the researcher's interpretation. The students and teachers were further asked informally to share their own reflections and observations on this process. Results and conclusions. Using youth to research other youth within a participatory research framework had many benefits for the quality of the research, the youth researchers and the community. The research was perceived by the researchers and participants to be more valid and credible. The approach was more appropriate for the students, and the youth researchers gained valuable research experience and a sense of ownership of both the research process and results. Viewing smoking through their children's eyes was seen by the community to be a powerful and effective means of creating awareness of the community environment. Limitations of the approach were residual response bias of participants, the short period of time to conduct the research and failure to fully explore student motivations to smoke or not to smoke. Ethical considerations included conducting research with minors, difficulties in obtaining written parental consent, decisions on cameras (disposable versus digital and representation of all participants in the final research product.

  7. Experimental quantum key distribution with simulated ground-to-satellite photon losses and processing limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Gigov, Nikolay; Higgins, Brendon L.; Yan, Zhizhong; Meyer-Scott, Evan; Khandani, Amir K.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Jennewein, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has the potential to improve communications security by offering cryptographic keys whose security relies on the fundamental properties of quantum physics. The use of a trusted quantum receiver on an orbiting satellite is the most practical near-term solution to the challenge of achieving long-distance (global-scale) QKD, currently limited to a few hundred kilometers on the ground. This scenario presents unique challenges, such as high photon losses and restricted classical data transmission and processing power due to the limitations of a typical satellite platform. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of such a system by implementing a QKD protocol, with optical transmission and full post-processing, in the high-loss regime using minimized computing hardware at the receiver. Employing weak coherent pulses with decoy states, we demonstrate the production of secure key bits at up to 56.5 dB of photon loss. We further illustrate the feasibility of a satellite uplink by generating a secure key while experimentally emulating the varying losses predicted for realistic low-Earth-orbit satellite passes at 600 km altitude. With a 76 MHz source and including finite-size analysis, we extract 3374 bits of a secure key from the best pass. We also illustrate the potential benefit of combining multiple passes together: while one suboptimal "upper-quartile" pass produces no finite-sized key with our source, the combination of three such passes allows us to extract 165 bits of a secure key. Alternatively, we find that by increasing the signal rate to 300 MHz it would be possible to extract 21 570 bits of a secure finite-sized key in just a single upper-quartile pass.

  8. Above- and belowground herbivory jointly impact defense and seed dispersal traits in Taraxacum officinale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Peña, Eduardo; Bonte, Dries

    2014-08-01

    Plants are able to cope with herbivores by inducing defensive traits or growth responses that allow them to reduce or avoid the impact of herbivores. Since above- and belowground herbivores differ substantially in life-history traits, for example feeding types, and their spatial distribution, it is likely that they induce different responses in plants. Moreover, strong interactive effects on defense and plant growth are expected when above- and belowground herbivores are jointly present. The strengths and directions of these responses have been scarcely addressed in the literature. Using Taraxacum officinale, the root-feeding nematode Meloidogyne hapla and the locust Schistocerca gregaria as a model species, we examined to what degree above- and belowground herbivory affect (1) plant growth responses, (2) the induction of plant defensive traits, that is, leaf trichomes, and (3) changes in dispersal-related seed traits and seed germination. We compared the performance of plants originating from different populations to address whether plant responses are conserved across putative different genotypes. Overall, aboveground herbivory resulted in increased plant biomass. Root herbivory had no effect on plant growth. Plants exposed to the two herbivores showed fewer leaf trichomes than plants challenged only by one herbivore and consequently experienced greater aboveground herbivory. In addition, herbivory had effects that reached beyond the individual plant by modifying seed morphology, producing seeds with longer pappus, and germination success.

  9. Linking belowground and aboveground phenology in two boreal forests in Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Enzai; Fang, Jingyun

    2014-11-01

    The functional equilibrium between roots and shoots suggests an intrinsic linkage between belowground and aboveground phenology. However, much less understanding of belowground phenology hinders integrating belowground and aboveground phenology. We measured root respiration (Ra) as a surrogate for root phenology and integrated it with observed leaf phenology and radial growth in a birch (Betula platyphylla)-aspen (Populus davidiana) forest and an adjacent larch (Larix gmelinii) forest in Northeast China. A log-normal model successfully described the seasonal variations of Ra and indicated the initiation, termination and peak date of root phenology. Both root phenology and leaf phenology were highly specific, with a later onset, earlier termination, and shorter period of growing season for the pioneer tree species (birch and aspen) than the dominant tree species (larch). Root phenology showed later initiation, later peak and later termination dates than leaf phenology. An asynchronous correlation of Ra and radial growth was identified with a time lag of approximately 1 month, indicating aprioritization of shoot growth. Furthermore, we found that Ra was strongly correlated with soil temperature and air temperature, while radial growth was only significantly correlated with air temperature, implying a down-regulating effect of temperature. Our results indicate different phenologies between pioneer and dominant species and support a down-regulation hypothesis of plant phenology which can be helpful in understanding forest dynamics in the context of climate change.

  10. Belowground rhizomes in paleosols: The hidden half of an Early Devonian vascular plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jinzhuang; Deng, Zhenzhen; Huang, Pu; Huang, Kangjun; Benton, Michael J.; Cui, Ying; Wang, Deming; Liu, Jianbo; Shen, Bing; Basinger, James F.; Hao, Shougang

    2016-08-01

    The colonization of terrestrial environments by rooted vascular plants had far-reaching impacts on the Earth system. However, the belowground structures of early vascular plants are rarely documented, and thus the plant-soil interactions in early terrestrial ecosystems are poorly understood. Here we report the earliest rooted paleosols (fossil soils) in Asia from Early Devonian deposits of Yunnan, China. Plant traces are extensive within the soil and occur as complex network-like structures, which are interpreted as representing long-lived, belowground rhizomes of the basal lycopsid Drepanophycus. The rhizomes produced large clones and helped the plant survive frequent sediment burial in well-drained soils within a seasonal wet-dry climate zone. Rhizome networks contributed to the accumulation and pedogenesis of floodplain sediments and increased the soil stabilizing effects of early plants. Predating the appearance of trees with deep roots in the Middle Devonian, plant rhizomes have long functioned in the belowground soil ecosystem. This study presents strong, direct evidence for plant-soil interactions at an early stage of vascular plant radiation. Soil stabilization by complex rhizome systems was apparently widespread, and contributed to landscape modification at an earlier time than had been appreciated.

  11. Aboveground tree growth varies with belowground carbon allocation in a tropical rainforest environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Raich

    Full Text Available Young secondary forests and plantations in the moist tropics often have rapid rates of biomass accumulation and thus sequester large amounts of carbon. Here, we compare results from mature forest and nearby 15-20 year old tree plantations in lowland Costa Rica to evaluate differences in allocation of carbon to aboveground production and root systems. We found that the tree plantations, which had fully developed, closed canopies, allocated more carbon belowground - to their root systems - than did mature forest. This increase in belowground carbon allocation correlated significantly with aboveground tree growth but not with canopy production (i.e., leaf fall or fine litter production. In contrast, there were no correlations between canopy production and either tree growth or belowground carbon allocation. Enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can enhance plant nutrient uptake, providing nutrients beyond those required for the production of short-lived tissues such as leaves and fine roots, and thus enabling biomass accumulation. Our analyses support this deduction at our site, showing that enhanced allocation of carbon to root systems can be an important mechanism promoting biomass accumulation during forest growth in the moist tropics. Identifying factors that control when, where and for how long this occurs would help us to improve models of forest growth and nutrient cycling, and to ascertain the role that young forests play in mitigating increased atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  12. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R

    2013-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed.

  13. Territorial resources, limits and strategies of local development processes and agri-food productions of quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Romano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyse the role that typical products can play in the local development process. Territorial resources involved, limits and strategies for their enhancement are analysed; this analysis will permit both to define the results that have been achieved since nowadays in the local development process and to point out future themes for the research in the field of agricultural economics. The typicality of an agri-food product regards qualitative characteristics that derive from its tie with the territory, this tie becomes a relevant element for the differentiation of the typical product from the others. In this context, the typical product maintains all the specificities associated to its origin, involving also aspects related to the traditions and the culture of the territories, to the collective dimension and to the local knowledge. Consumers tent to look for good which are differentiated and to connect authenticity and local specificity of food with healthiness. Due to the strong socio-economic ties that typical products have with the territory, they play a crucial role in the economy of the local systems and can promote development in lagging areas.

  14. Attentional gain and processing capacity limits predict the propensity to neglect unexpected visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papera, Massimiliano; Richards, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous allocation of attentional resources allows the visual system to encode and maintain representations of stimuli in visual working memory (VWM). However, limits in the processing capacity to allocate resources can prevent unexpected visual stimuli from gaining access to VWM and thereby to consciousness. Using a novel approach to create unbiased stimuli of increasing saliency, we investigated visual processing during a visual search task in individuals who show a high or low propensity to neglect unexpected stimuli. When propensity to inattention is high, ERP recordings show a diminished amplification concomitantly with a decrease in theta band power during the N1 latency, followed by a poor target enhancement during the N2 latency. Furthermore, a later modulation in the P3 latency was also found in individuals showing propensity to visual neglect, suggesting that more effort is required for conscious maintenance of visual information in VWM. Effects during early stages of processing (N80 and P1) were also observed suggesting that sensitivity to contrasts and medium-to-high spatial frequencies may be modulated by low-level saliency (albeit no statistical group differences were found). In accordance with the Global Workplace Model, our data indicate that a lack of resources in low-level processors and visual attention may be responsible for the failure to "ignite" a state of high-level activity spread across several brain areas that is necessary for stimuli to access awareness. These findings may aid in the development of diagnostic tests and intervention to detect/reduce inattention propensity to visual neglect of unexpected stimuli.

  15. Performance of Statistical Control Charts with Bilateral Limits of Probability to Monitor Processes Weibull in Maintenance

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    Quintana Alicia Esther

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing with optimal quality standards is underpinned to the high reliability of its equipment and systems, among other essential pillars. Maintenance Engineering is responsible for planning control and continuous improvement of its critical equipment by any approach, such as Six Sigma. This is nourished by numerous statistical tools highlighting, among them, statistical process control charts. While their first applications were in production, other designs have emerged to adapt to new needs as monitoring equipment and systems in the manufacturing environment. The time between failures usually fits an exponential or Weibull model. The t chart and adjusted t chart, with probabilistic control limits, are suitable alternatives to monitor the mean time between failures. Unfortunately, it is difficult to find publications of them applied to the models Weibull, very useful in contexts such as maintenance. In addition, literature limits the study of their performance to the analysis of the standard metric average run length, thus giving a partial view. The aim of this paper is to explore the performance of the t chart and adjusted t chart using three metrics, two unconventional. To do this, it incorporates the concept of lateral variability, in their forms left and right variability. Major precisions of the behavior of these charts allow to understand the conditions under which are suitable: if the main objective of monitoring lies in detecting deterioration, the t chart with adjustment is recommended. On the other hand, when the priority is to detect improvements, the t chart without adjustment is the best choice. However, the response speed of both charts is very variable from run to run.

  16. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe(WMAP) Observations: Data Processing Methods and Systematic Errors Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, G.; Barnes, C.; Bennett, C. L.; Greason, M. R.; Halpern, M.; Hill, R. S.; Jarosik, N.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the calibration and data processing methods used to generate full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first year of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. Detailed limits on residual systematic errors are assigned based largely on analyses of the flight data supplemented, where necessary, with results from ground tests. The data are calibrated in flight using the dipole modulation of the CMB due to the observatory's motion around the Sun. This constitutes a full-beam calibration source. An iterative algorithm simultaneously fits the time-ordered data to obtain calibration parameters and pixelized sky map temperatures. The noise properties are determined by analyzing the time-ordered data with this sky signal estimate subtracted. Based on this, we apply a pre-whitening filter to the time-ordered data to remove a low level of l/f noise. We infer and correct for a small (approx. 1 %) transmission imbalance between the two sky inputs to each differential radiometer, and we subtract a small sidelobe correction from the 23 GHz (K band) map prior to further analysis. No other systematic error corrections are applied to the data. Calibration and baseline artifacts, including the response to environmental perturbations, are negligible. Systematic uncertainties are comparable to statistical uncertainties in the characterization of the beam response. Both are accounted for in the covariance matrix of the window function and are propagated to uncertainties in the final power spectrum. We characterize the combined upper limits to residual systematic uncertainties through the pixel covariance matrix.

  17. Derivation of the Limits for Control Chart Using the Median Absolute Deviation for Monitoring Non-Normal Process

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    P. I. Azubuike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Shewhart and S control charts, in the literature, were combined to evaluate the stability of a process. These charts were based on the fundamental assumption of normality of the quality characteristics under investigation. Approach: In practice, the normality assumption was often violated by real life data, therefore, use of the Shewhart and S control charts on real life data might leads to misplacement of control limits. There were many alternatives in the literature to handle non-normality of quality characteristics. The Median Absolute Deviation (MAD claimed in the literature to be the best estimate when the data under consideration is non-normal. Thus in this study, we derived the control limits for the-control chart using the median absolute deviation for monitoring process stability when the quality characteristic under investigation was non-normal. Results: The derived control limits were compared with the control limits when the sample standard deviation was used as a measure of controlling the process variability using manufacturing process (real life data. Furthermore, a simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed MAD based control charts on both normal and non-normal process. Conclusion: The obtained results show that the derived control limit is an improvement on the control limit of the Shewhart and that the MAD control charts performed better for non-normal process than for normal process.

  18. Divergence of above- and belowground C and N pool within predominant plant species along two precipitation gradients in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, X. H.; Pan, X.; Cornwell, W. K.; Gao, S. Q.; Dong, M.; Cornelissen, J. H. C.

    2015-01-01

    The coupling of carbon cycle and nitrogen cycle drives the food web structure and biogeochemistry of an ecosystem. However, across precipitation gradients, there may be a shift in C pool and N pool from above- to belowground because of shifting plant stoichiometry and allocation. Based on previous evidence, biomass allocation to roots should increase with aridity, while leaf [N] should increase. If their effect sizes are equal, they should cancel each other out, and the above- and belowground proportions of the N would remain constant. Here, we present the first study to explicitly compare above- and belowground pool sizes of N and C within predominant plant species along precipitation gradients. Biomass and nutrient concentrations of leaves, stems and roots of three predominant species were measured along two major precipitation gradients in Inner Mongolia, China. Along the two gradients, the effect sizes of the biomass shifts were remarkably consistent among three predominant species. However, the size of the shift in aboveground [N] was not, leading to a species-specific pattern in above- and belowground pool size. In two species (Stipa grandis and Artemisia ordosica) the effect sizes of biomass allocation and [N] were equal and the proportion of N of above- and belowground did not change with aridity, but in S. bungeana the increase in leaf [N] with aridity was much weaker than the biomass shift, leading to a decrease in the proportion of N aboveground at dry sites. We have found examples of consistent N pool sizes above- and belowground and a shift to a greater proportion of belowground N in drier sites depending on the species. We suggest that precipitation gradients do potentially decouple the C and N pool, but the exact nature of the decoupling depends on the dominant species' capacity for intraspecific variation.

  19. Performance and limitations of high granularity single photon processing X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tlustos, L

    2005-01-01

    Progress in CMOS technology and in fine pitch bump bonding has made possible the development of single photon counting detectors for X-ray imaging with pixel pitches on the order of 50 µm giving a spatial resolution which is comparable to conventional CCD and flat panel detectors. This thesis studies the interaction of X-ray photons in the energy range of 5 keV to 70 keV with various sensor materials as well as the response of the Medipix2 readout system to both monochromatic and wide spectrum X-ray sources. Single photon processing offers the potential for spectroscopic imaging. However, this thesis demonstrates using simulations and measurements that the charge deposition and collection within the semiconductor sensor impose fundamental limits on the achievable energy resolution. In particular the discussion of charge during collection in the sensor and the generation of fluorescence photons in heavier sensor materials contribute to the appearance of a low energy tail on the detected spectrum of an incomin...

  20. High-throughput process development of chromatography steps: advantages and limitations of different formats used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łącki, Karol M

    2012-10-01

    In the past, development of a chromatographic separation method has been accomplished by performing a series of experiments using either manual or automated chromatography systems. The screening of a vast experimental space became very expensive because all experiments had to be performed in a serial manner, and the chromatography systems used were designed for relatively large columns and, therefore, the experiments required large sample volumes. To address these issues, high-throughput miniaturized methods employing different operating principles and/or formats have been introduced. Herein, a technical review of the most common high-throughput formats used for the development of chromatographic purification steps is presented. The formats considered include minicolumns, prefilled pipette tips, and microtiter filter plates prefilled with chromatography resins. Advantages and limitations of each format are discussed through the prism of chromatographic theory, engineering principles, and known mass-transfer mechanisms. A roadmap for applicability of the different formats for process development purposes and implementation of a Quality by Design initiative for designing/optimization of chromatography steps is also discussed.

  1. Demands, subjectivity and therapeutic process: construction and limitations of Therapeutic Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Felipe Ferro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Psychiatric Reform movement proposed several changes in the field of mental health. Since then, guidelines have been redirecting actions to respond to different demands, associating social inclusion with clinical follow-up. In this context, Therapeutic Accompaniment (TA appears as an important device to compose interventions focused on the demands of individuals with mental disorders. Thus the present work aims to present reflections on the limitations and potentials of TA. This study was based on the practice of TA in the Occupational Therapy Traineeship in Mental Health of the Federal University of Parana - UFPR. Regarding the methodological framework, this paper is structured in a two-way approach: presentation of a case report and exploratory research using unstructured interviews focused on two subjects monitored by TA. Hermeneutic-dialectic analysis was used for data treatment. The results indicate that TA provides significant gains to the process of rehabilitation and construction of citizenship of individuals with mental disorders, enabling actions focused on the demands of the individual, family and community. Nevertheless, there is still the need for continuity of TA interventions, as well as some structural deadlocks that tend to decrease the power of this device.

  2. Pitfalls and Limitations in the Interpretation of Geophysical Images for Hydrologic Properties and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical imaging (e.g., electrical, radar, seismic) can provide valuable information for the characterization of hydrologic properties and monitoring of hydrologic processes, as evidenced in the rapid growth of literature on the subject. Geophysical imaging has been used for monitoring tracer migration and infiltration, mapping zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange, and verifying emplacement of amendments for bioremediation. Despite the enormous potential for extraction of hydrologic information from geophysical images, there also is potential for misinterpretation and over-interpretation. These concerns are particularly relevant when geophysical results are used within quantitative frameworks, e.g., conversion to hydrologic properties through petrophysical relations, geostatistical estimation and simulation conditioned to geophysical inversions, and joint inversion. We review pitfalls to interpretation associated with limited image resolution, spatially variable image resolution, incorrect data weighting, errors in the timing of measurements, temporal smearing resulting from changes during data acquisition, support-volume/scale effects, and incorrect assumptions or approximations involved in modeling geophysical or other jointly inverted data. A series of numerical and field-based examples illustrate these potential problems. Our goal in this talk is to raise awareness of common pitfalls and present strategies for recognizing and avoiding them.

  3. Plants control the seasonal dynamics of microbial N cycling in a beech forest soil by belowground C allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Gorfer, Markus; Stange, Claus F; Kitzler, Barbara; Rasche, Frank; Strauss, Joseph; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Soil microbes in temperate forest ecosystems are able to cycle several hundreds of kilograms of N per hectare per year and are therefore of paramount importance for N retention. Belowground C allocation by trees is an important driver of seasonal microbial dynamics and may thus directly affect N transformation processes over the course of the year. Our study aimed at unraveling plant controls on soil N cycling in a temperate beech forest at a high temporal resolution over a time period of two years, by investigating the effects of tree girdling on microbial N turnover. In both years of the experiment, we discovered (1) a summer N mineralization phase (between July and August) and (2) a winter N immobilization phase (November-February). The summer mineralization phase was characterized by a high N mineralization activity, low microbial N uptake, and a subsequent high N availability in the soil. During the autumn/winter N immobilization phase, gross N mineralization rates were low, and microbial N uptake exceeded microbial N mineralization, which led to high levels of N in the microbial biomass and low N availability in the soil. The observed immobilization phase during the winter may play a crucial role for ecosystem functioning, since it could protect dissolved N that is produced by autumn litter degradation from being lost from the ecosystem during the phase when plants are mostly inactive. The difference between microbial biomass N levels in winter and spring equals 38 kg N/ha and may thus account for almost one-third of the annual plant N demand. Tree girdling strongly affected annual N cycling: the winter N immobilization phase disappeared in girdled plots (microbial N uptake and microbial biomass N were significantly reduced, while the amount of available N in the soil solution was enhanced). This was correlated to a reduced fungal abundance in autumn in girdled plots. By releasing recently fixed photosynthates to the soil, plants may thus actively control the

  4. Inundation and salinity impacts to above- and belowground productivity in Spartina patens and Spartina alterniflora in the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain: implications for using river diversions as restoration tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snedden, Gregg A.; Cretini, Kari Foster; Patton, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Inundation and salinity directly affect plant productivity and processes that regulate vertical accretion in coastal wetlands, and are expected to increase as sea level continues to rise. In the Mississippi River deltaic plain, river diversions, which are being implemented as ecosystem restoration tools, can also strongly increase inundation in coastal wetlands. We used an in situ mesocosm approach to examine how varying salinity (two levels) and inundation rates (six levels) influenced end-of-season above- and belowground biomass of Spartina patens and Spartina alterniflora during the growing season (March–October) in 2011. Above- and belowground biomass was highest in both species at higher elevations when inundation was minimal, and decreased exponentially with decreased elevation and increased flood duration. This negative biomass response to flooding was more pronounced in S. patens than in S. alterniflora, and S. patens also showed stronger biomass reductions at higher salinities. This salinity effect was absent for belowground biomass in S. alterniflora. These findings suggest that even subtle increases in sea level may lead to substantial reductions in productivity and organic accretion, and also illustrate the importance of considering the inundation tolerance of co-dominant species in receiving areas when utilizing river diversions for delta restoration.

  5. Advanced remote sensing to quantify temperate peatland capacity for belowground carbon capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, K. B.; Blanchard, S.; Schile, L. M.; Kolding, S.; Kelly, M.; Windham-Myers, L.; Miller, R.

    2011-12-01

    Temperate peatlands typically dominated by grasses and sedges generate among the greatest annual rates of net primary productivity (NPP, up to 4 kg C m-2) and soil carbon storage (up to 1 kg C m-2) for natural ecosystems. Belowground tissues represent 20-80% of total NPP, thus understanding the controls on belowground NPP (BNPP) in these wetland ecosystems is particularly important to quantifying peatland carbon balances. In addition, there is a growing need to quantify large-scale belowground C sequestration rates in wetlands to better understand marsh resilience to sea level rise and to help define eligibility for carbon offset credits. Since plant productivity influences wetland C budgets, combining field and remote sensing techniques for estimating above and belowground productivity of wetland vegetation over a large spatial extent will help to address these needs. We are working in a USGS long-term experimental wetland restoration site on drained peatland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Using the spatial variability in water depth and residence time across the 7 ha wetland, our goal is to develop practical methods to quantify and map BNPP of emergent marsh vegetation from remotely sensed estimates of aboveground plant characteristics and aboveground NPP. Field data collected on wetland plants hardstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus) and cattail (Typha spp.) were coupled with reflectance data from a field spectrometer (range 350-2500 nm) every two to three weeks during the summer of 2011. We are analyzing reflectance data to develop hyperspectral indices that predict the biophysical characteristics of wetland vegetation - biomass, leaf area index (LAI), and the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) - which may be used to infer belowground biomass and productivity. Soil cores and root in-growth bags were used to calculate root biomass and productivity rates. Existing allometric relationships were used to calculate

  6. Linking above and belowground responses to global change at community and ecosystem scales.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoninka, Anita [Northern Arizona University; Wolf, Julie [Northern Arizona University; Bowker, Matt [Northern Arizona University; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; JohnsonPhD, Dr Nancy C [Northern Arizona University

    2009-01-01

    Cryptic belowground organisms are difficult to observe and their responses to global changes are not well understood. Nevertheless, there is reason to believe that interactions among above- and belowground communities may mediate ecosystem responses to global change. We used grassland mesocosms to manipulate the abundance of one important group of soil organisms, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and to study community and ecosystem responses to CO2 and N enrichment. After two growing seasons, biomass responses of plant communities were recorded, and soil community responses were measured using microscopy, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and community-level physiological profiles (CLPP). Ecosystem responses were examined by measuring net primary production (NPP), evapotranspiration, total soil organic matter (SOM), and extractable mineral N. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the causal relationships among treatments and response variables. We found that while CO2 and N tended to directly impact ecosystem functions (evapotranspiration and NPP, respectively), AM fungi indirectly impacted ecosystem functions by strongly influencing the composition of plant and soil communities. For example, the presence of AM fungi had a strong influence on other root and soil fungi and soil bacteria. We found that the mycotrophic status of the dominant plant species in the mesocosms determined whether the presence of AM fungi increased or decreased NPP. Mycotrophic grasses dominated the mesocosm communities during the first growing season, and thus, the mycorrhizal treatments had the highest NPP. In contrast, non-mycotrophic forbs were dominant during the second growing season and thus, the mycorrhizal treatments had the lowest NPP. The composition of the plant community strongly influenced soil N; and the composition of the soil organisms strongly influenced SOM accumulation in the mesocosms. These results show how linkages between above- and belowground communities

  7. Allometric scaling relationship between above- and below-ground biomass within and across five woody seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongliang; Ma, Yuzhu; Zhong, Quanling; Xu, Weifeng

    2014-10-01

    Allometric biomass allocation theory predicts that leaf biomass (M L ) scaled isometrically with stem (M S ) and root (M R ) biomass, and thus above-ground biomass (leaf and stem) (M A ) and root (M R ) scaled nearly isometrically with below-ground biomass (root) for tree seedlings across a wide diversity of taxa. Furthermore, prior studies also imply that scaling constant should vary with species. However, litter is known about whether such invariant isometric scaling exponents hold for intraspecific biomass allocation, and how variation in scaling constants influences the interspecific scaling relationship between above- and below-ground biomass. Biomass data of seedlings from five evergreen species were examined to test scaling relationships among biomass components across and within species. Model Type II regression was used to compare the numerical values of scaling exponents and constants among leaf, stem, root, and above- to below-ground biomass. The results indicated that M L and M S scaled in an isometric or a nearly isometric manner with M R , as well as M A to M R for five woody species. Significant variation was observed in the Y-intercepts of the biomass scaling curves, resulting in the divergence for intraspecific scaling and interspecific scaling relationships for M L versus M S and M L versus M R , but not for M S versus M R and M A versus M R . We conclude, therefore, that a nearly isometric scaling relationship of M A versus M R holds true within each of the studied woody species and across them irrespective the negative scaling relationship between leaf and stem.

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter above- and below-ground chemical defense expression differentially among Asclepias species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L Vannette

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Belowground symbionts of plants can have substantial influence on plant growth and nutrition. Recent work demonstrates that mycorrhizal fungi can affect plant resistance to herbivory and the performance of above and belowground herbivores. Although these examples emerge from diverse systems, it is unclear if plant species that express similar defensive traits respond similarly to fungal colonization, but comparative work may inform this question. To examine the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on the expression of chemical resistance, we inoculated 8 species of Asclepias (milkweed--which all produce toxic cardenolides--with a community of AMF. We quantified plant biomass, foliar and root cardenolide concentration and composition, and assessed evidence for a growth-defense tradeoff in the presence and absence of AMF. As expected, total foliar and root cardenolide concentration varied among milkweed species. Importantly, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi on total foliar cardenolide concentration also varied among milkweed species, with foliar cardenolides increasing or decreasing, depending on the plant species. We detected a phylogenetic signal to this variation; AMF fungi reduced foliar cardenolide concentrations to a greater extent in the clade including A. curassavica than in the clade including A. syriaca. Moreover, AMF inoculation shifted the composition of cardenolides in above- and below-ground plant tissues in a species-specific fashion. Mycorrhizal inoculation changed the relative distribution of cardenolides between root and shoot tissue in a species-specific fashion, but did not affect cardenolide diversity or polarity. Finally, a tradeoff between plant growth and defense in non-mycorrhizal plants was mitigated completely by AMF inoculation. Overall, we conclude that the effects of AMF inoculation on the expression of chemical resistance can vary among congeneric plant species, and ameliorate tradeoffs between growth and

  9. Limits of Infinite Processes for Liberal Arts Majors: Two Classic Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Theresa A.; Shipman, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents guided classroom activities that showcase two classic problems in which a finite limit exists and where there is a certain charm to engage liberal arts majors. The two scenarios build solely on students' existing knowledge of number systems and harness potential misconceptions about limits and infinity to guide their thinking.…

  10. Invasive plant suppresses the growth of native tree seedlings by disrupting belowground mutualisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A Stinson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of exotic species on native organisms is widely acknowledged, but poorly understood. Very few studies have empirically investigated how invading plants may alter delicate ecological interactions among resident species in the invaded range. We present novel evidence that antifungal phytochemistry of the invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, a European invader of North American forests, suppresses native plant growth by disrupting mutualistic associations between native canopy tree seedlings and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Our results elucidate an indirect mechanism by which invasive plants can impact native flora, and may help explain how this plant successfully invades relatively undisturbed forest habitat.

  11. Linking Above- and Belowground Dynamics in Tropical Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, E. E.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary forests that emerge after a long history of agriculture can have altered plant community composition and relative abundances of different species. These forests can look and behave differently compared to pre-agricultural forests due changes in primary productivity, resource allocation, and phenology, which can significantly affect processes such as carbon accumulation and nutrient availability. Our research explores how alternative successional trajectories following intensive agricultural use affect linkages among the establishment of novel plant communities, soil nutrient availability and turnover, and soil microbial community composition and function. We hypothesize that different plant species composition due to differing land use legacies and successional trajectories would drive changes in soil microbial community structure and function, affecting soil C and N chemistry and turnover. We conducted this research in the subtropical dry forest life zone of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands where island-wide abandonment of sugarcane resulted in a mosaic of sites in different stages of forest succession. We identified replicate sites with the following post-sugarcane trajectories: 1) natural forest regeneration, 2) low intensity pasture use, followed by reforestation with timber plantation, which are no longer being managed, 3) high intensity pasture use and recent natural forest regeneration, and 4) high intensity pasture use and current active grazing. During 2011-2013, we sampled soils seasonally (0-10 cm) and measured tree species composition. The successional trajectories showed distinct tree species composition. The first two trajectories yielded 40-year old mixed-species secondary forest, dominated by the dry forest tree species Melicoccus bijugatas, Guapira fragrans, Maniklara zapota, and Sideroxylon foetidissimum. The tree species Melicoccus bijugatas primarily drove differences between the first two trajectories (natural forest regeneration vs

  12. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on fatty acid molecular and isotope composition of above- and belowground tree biomass and forest soil fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griepentrog, Marco; Eglinton, Timothy I; Hagedorn, Frank; Schmidt, Michael W I; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-derived organic matter (OM) in soils are still under debate and it is not clear how N deposition affects soil OM dynamics. Here, we studied the effects of 4 years of elevated (13C-depleted) CO2 and N deposition in forest ecosystems established in open-top chambers on composition and turnover of fatty acids (FAs) in plants and soils. FAs served as biomarkers for plant- and microbial-derived OM in soil density fractions. We analyzed above- and belowground plant biomass of beech and spruce trees as well as soil density fractions for the total organic C and FA molecular and isotope (δ13C) composition. FAs did not accumulate relative to total organic C in fine mineral fractions, showing that FAs are not effectively stabilized by association with soil minerals. The δ13C values of FAs in plant biomass increased under high N deposition. However, the N effect was only apparent under elevated CO2 suggesting a N limitation of the system. In soil fractions, only isotope compositions of short-chain FAs (C16+18) were affected. Fractions of 'new' (experimental-derived) FAs were calculated using isotope depletion in elevated CO2 plots and decreased from free light to fine mineral fractions. 'New' FAs were higher in short-chain compared to long-chain FAs (C20-30), indicating a faster turnover of short-chain compared to long-chain FAs. Increased N deposition did not significantly affect the quantity of 'new' FAs in soil fractions, but showed a tendency of increased amounts of 'old' (pre-experimental) C suggesting that decomposition of 'old' C is retarded by high N inputs.

  13. Vegetation drives belowground biogeochemical gradients and C accumulation in an ombrotrophic bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Galka, Mariusz; Borken, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Peat decomposition and C accumulation is determined by hydrology and climate and by concomitant changes in vegetation and changes in the quality of carbon inputs. Especially changes from moss dominated to vascular plant dominated vegetation affect belowground biogeochemistry and decomposition, as Sphagnum mosses provide refractory, nutrient poor litter, while vascular plants produce more labile litter and may have aerenchymatic rooting systems. In-site variability in moisture and vegetation, e.g. hummock-hollow structures, lawns, and medium scale surface topography, could thus cause large differences in decomposition and C accumulation within a site. In order to understand within-site variability and to see how C accumulation, common decomposition indices, and major biogeochemical parameters in the pore waters are affected by site specific conditions and vegetation, we investigated a moisture-vegetation gradient along a 800 m transect in an oceanic, ombrotrophic bog in Southern Patagonia. Along the transect, conditions changed from wet, Sphagnum dominated (S. magellanicum), to intermediate drier and wetter with Sphagnum/shrubs mixtures, sedges and rushes to more wind exposed, dominated by cushion plants (mainly Astelia pumila). We hypothesized that under arenchymatic vascular plants, decomposition is enhanced and C accumulation is decreased. Vegetation development was elucidated by plant macrofossils and carbon accumulation was attributed to the respective vegetation. The transect demonstrated a high variability of depth records within the bog. At the two most contrasting sites, the uppermost 1 meter persistently dominated by either Sphagnum magellanicum or Astelia pumila had accumulated over 2400 or 4200 years, respectively. Accordingly, the peat under cushion plants was much more decomposed, with C/N ratios of 20-50 compared to C/N ratios of 40-80 under Sphagnum patches. Mixed sites in between had C/N ratios of 30-90, depending on plant community, and

  14. Restoration and management for plant diversity enhances the rate of belowground ecosystem recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopf, Ryan P; Baer, Sara G; Bach, Elizabeth M; Six, Johan

    2017-03-01

    The positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning has been criticized for its applicability at large scales and in less controlled environments that are relevant to land management. To inform this gap between ecological theory and application, we compared recovery rates of belowground properties using two chronosequences consisting of continuously cultivated and independently restored fields with contrasting diversity management strategies: grasslands restored with high plant richness and managed for diversity with frequent burning (n = 20) and grasslands restored with fewer species that were infrequently burned (n = 15). Restoration and management for plant diversity resulted in 250% higher plant richness. Greater recovery of roots and more predictable recovery of the active microbial biomass across the high diversity management strategy chronosequence corresponded with faster recovery of soil structure. The high diversity grasslands also had greater nutrient conservation indicated by lower available inorganic nitrogen. Thus, mesic grasslands restored with more species and managed for high plant diversity with frequent burning enhances the rate of belowground ecosystem recovery from long-term disturbance at a scale relevant to conservation practices on the landscape.

  15. Above- and belowground biomass in relation to environmental factors in temperate grasslands, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA WenHong; YANG YuanHe; HE JinSheng; ZENG Hui; FANG JingYun

    2008-01-01

    Above- and belowground biomasses of grasslands are important parameters for characterizing regional and global carbon cycles in grassland ecosystems. Compared with the relatively detailed information for aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) Is poorly reported at the regional scales. The present study, based on a total of 113 sampling sites in temperate grassland of the Inner Mongolia, investigated regional distribution patterns of AGB, BGB, vertical distribution of roots,and their relationships with environmental factors. AGB and BGB increased from the southwest to the northeast of the study region. The largest biomass occurred in meadow steppe, with mean AGB and BGB of 196.7 and 1385.2 g/m2, respectively; while the lowest biomass occurred in desert steppe, with an AGB of 56.6 g/m2 and a BGB of 301.0 g/m2. In addition, about 47% of root biomass was distributed in the top 10 cm soil. Further statistical analysis indicated that precipitation was the primary determinant factor in shaping these distribution patterns. Vertical distribution of roots was significantly affected by precipitation, while the effects of soil texture and grassland types were weak.

  16. Soil abiotic factors influence interactions between belowground herbivores and plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Matthias; Lu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Root herbivores are important ecosystem drivers and agricultural pests, and, possibly as a consequence, plants protect their roots using a variety of defensive strategies. One aspect that distinguishes belowground from aboveground plant-insect interactions is that roots are constantly exposed to a set of soil-specific abiotic factors. These factors can profoundly influence root resistance, and, consequently, the outcome of the interaction with belowground feeders. In this review, we synthesize the current literature on the impact of soil moisture, nutrients, and texture on root-herbivore interactions. We show that soil abiotic factors influence the interaction by modulating herbivore abundance and behaviour, root growth and resistance, beneficial microorganisms, as well as natural enemies of the herbivores. We suggest that abiotic heterogeneity may explain the high variability that is often encountered in root-herbivore systems. We also propose that under abiotic stress, the relative fitness value of the roots and the potential negative impact of herbivory increases, which may lead to a higher defensive investment and an increased recruitment of beneficial microorganisms by the plant. At the same time, both root-feeding herbivores and natural enemies are likely to decrease in abundance under extreme environmental conditions, leading to a context- and species-specific impact on plant fitness. Only by using tightly controlled experiments that include soil abiotic heterogeneity will it be possible to understand the impact of root feeders on an ecosystem scale and to develop predictive models for pest occurrence and impact.

  17. Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities respond to liming in three southern Swedish coniferous forest stands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Clemmensen, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently sa...... community composition. We discuss the observed community changes in relation to ectomycorrhizal functionality and biodiversity in limed forests.......In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently...... sampled root tips by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA. Forty, 59 and 51 species were identified in three pine and spruce forests. Within all sites only about 25% of the species overlapped between the limed and the reference areas. However, the most abundant species...

  18. Above- and belowground biomass in relation to envi- ronmental factors in temperate grasslands, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Above- and belowground biomasses of grasslands are important parameters for characterizing re- gional and global carbon cycles in grassland ecosystems. Compared with the relatively detailed in- formation for aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) is poorly reported at the re- gional scales. The present study, based on a total of 113 sampling sites in temperate grassland of the Inner Mongolia, investigated regional distribution patterns of AGB, BGB, vertical distribution of roots, and their relationships with environmental factors. AGB and BGB increased from the southwest to the northeast of the study region. The largest biomass occurred in meadow steppe, with mean AGB and BGB of 196.7 and 1385.2 g/m2, respectively; while the lowest biomass occurred in desert steppe, with an AGB of 56.6 g/m2 and a BGB of 301.0 g/m2. In addition, about 47% of root biomass was distributed in the top 10 cm soil. Further statistical analysis indicated that precipitation was the primary determinant factor in shaping these distribution patterns. Vertical distribution of roots was significantly affected by precipitation, while the effects of soil texture and grassland types were weak.

  19. A new conceptual framework for unifying the heterogeneity of plant-microbe interactions in forests by linking belowground measurements with large-scale modeling and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.; Fisher, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Recognition of the importance of rhizosphere interactions to ecosystem processes has led to efforts to integrate these dynamics into a conceptual framework that can be tested, refined and applied across spatial scales. A new view suggests that a plant's mycorrhizal association represents a "trait integrator" for a suite of aboveground and belowground functional traits involved in coupling C-nutrient cycles, since nearly all plants associate with a single type of mycorrhizal fungi. The MANE framework predicts that tree species that associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi differ from trees that associate with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi in a suite of functional traits, and that such differences contribute to unique "biogeochemical syndromes" in forests with varying abundances of AM- and ECM-associated trees. To date, we have found that relative to AM trees, the leaf litter of ECM trees decomposes nearly 50% more slowly; as such, the nutrient economy of ECM-dominated stands is driven by organic forms of N and P whereas the nutrient economy of AM-dominated stands in driven by inorganic forms of N and P. Moreover, differences in the nutrient economies between AM- and ECM-dominated stands can affect the carbon (C) cost of nutrient acquisition. For example, while ECM trees allocate 2-3-fold more C to fine roots and mycorrhizal fungi, this greater investment results in the enhanced activity of enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from soil organic matter, and ultimately the greater uptake of nutrients by plants. However, this enhanced uptake by ECM trees comes at a cost to soil organic C, which declines as a function of root-accelerated N mineralization. By incorporating these dynamics into a coupled nutrient acquisition-microbial decomposition model, and scaling these processes following development of a map of mycorrhizal associations, we are now quantifying how belowground processes shape ecosystem sensitivity to global changes (e.g., rising CO

  20. Influence of medium parameters on power limiting characteristic in stimulated Brillouin scattering process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaping Gong; Zhiwei Lü; Dianyang Lin; Songjiang Liu

    2007-01-01

    By adopting noise initiation model of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), the influence of phonon lifetime and gain coefficient of medium on power limiting characteristic is numerically investigated. Through using actual parameters of three media, CCl4, acetone, and CS2, the waveforms of transmitted pulses are simulated. The result shows that different media have little effect on the front peak of waveform,while have an obvious effect on the height of power limiting platform. When the medium which has short phonon lifetime and small gain coefficient is used, the height of power limiting platform is comparatively high. In experiment, by focusing 1064-nm, 8-ns, 18-mJ pulses into these three media, the waveforms of transmitted pulses are obtained. The experimental results are in good agreement with conclusions of theoretical simulations.

  1. Central limit approximations for Markov population processes with countably many types

    CERN Document Server

    Barbour, A D

    2012-01-01

    When modelling metapopulation dynamics, the influence of a single patch on the metapopulation depends on the number of individuals in the patch. Since there is usually no obvious natural upper limit on the number of individuals in a patch, this leads to systems in which there are countably infinitely many possible types of entity. Analogous considerations apply in the transmission of parasitic diseases. In this paper, we prove central limit theorems for quite general systems of this kind, together with bounds on the rate of convergence in an appropriately chosen weighted $\\ell_1$ norm.

  2. Statistical Inference for Ergodic Point Processes and Application to Limit Order Book

    OpenAIRE

    Clinet, Simon; Yoshida, Nakahiro

    2015-01-01

    We construct a general procedure for the Quasi Likelihood Analysis applied to a multivariate point process on the real half line in an ergodic framework. More precisely, we assume that the stochastic intensity of the underlying model belongs to a family of processes indexed by a finite dimensional parameter. When a particular family of laws of large numbers applies to those processes, we establish the consistency, the asymptotic normality and the convergence of moments of both the Quasi Maxim...

  3. 78 FR 78954 - Extension of Comment Period for the Alaska Seafood Processing Effluent Limitation Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ...-2013-0652, by one of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov... consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption... Limitations Guidelines Notice of Data Availability in the Federal Register (78 FR 66916). In the notice...

  4. Information-Limited Parallel Processing in Difficult Heterogeneous Covert Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Difficult visual search is often attributed to time-limited serial attention operations, although neural computations in the early visual system are parallel. Using probabilistic search models (Dosher, Han, & Lu, 2004) and a full time-course analysis of the dynamics of covert visual search, we distinguish unlimited capacity parallel versus serial…

  5. Use of Archimedes' Process for Approximating Circle Area as an Introduction to Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgun-Koca, S. Asli

    2007-01-01

    This article offers an introductory activity for the limit concept with a geometrical and historical foundation. A connection among Geometry, Measurement and Calculus is highlighted with the help of technology. The geometrical drawing, measurement and graphing capabilities of both TI-89 and Geometer's Sketchpad make it possible for students to…

  6. Process Writing and Communicative-Task-Based Instruction: Many Common Features, but More Common Limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Process writing and communicative-task-based instruction both assume productive tasks that prompt self-expression to motivate students and as the principal engine for developing L2 proficiency in the language classroom. Besides this, process writing and communicative-task-based instruction have much else in common, despite some obvious…

  7. Codigestion of manure and industrial organic waste at centralized biogas plants: process imbalances and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    The present study focuses on process imbalances in Danish centralized biogas plants treating manure in combination with industrial waste. Collection of process data from various full-scale plants along with a number of interviews showed that imbalances occur frequently. High concentrations...

  8. Strategic environmental assessment and the limits to rationality in decision making processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørnøv, Lone

    The paper focueses on the subject of rationality in decision making processes and the implications for the integration of SEA.......The paper focueses on the subject of rationality in decision making processes and the implications for the integration of SEA....

  9. On the scaling limits of Galton Watson processes in varying environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bansaye, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Renormalized sequences of Galton Watson processes converge to Continuous State Branching Processes (CSBP), characterized by a L\\'evy triplet of two numbers and a measure. This paper investigates the case of Galton Watson processes in varying environment and provides an explicit sufficient condition for finite-dimensional convergence in terms of convergence of a characteristic triplet of measures. We recover then classical results on the convergence of Galton Watson processes and we can add exceptional environments provoking positive or negative jumps at fixed times. We also apply this result to derive new results on the Feller diffusion in varying environment and branching processes in random environment. Our approach relies on the backward differential equation satisfied by the Laplace exponent and provides results about explosion, absorption and extinction. Thus, this paper exhibits a general class of CSBP in varying environment which is characterized by a triplet of measures. This provides a first step tow...

  10. Towards microbiological quality assurance in radiation sterilization processing: a limiting case model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolan, P.T. (Becton Dickinson and Co., Parasmus, NJ (USA)); Dwyer, J.; Fitch, F.R. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Inst. of Science and Technology); Dwyer, V.M. (York Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Halls, N.A. (Becton Dickinson and Co., Dun Laoghaire (Ireland)); Tallentire, A. (Manchester Univ. (UK). Dept. of Pharmacy)

    1985-03-01

    A Limiting Case Model has been developed which describes the dependence on radiation dose of the proportion of items, in a population of items subjected to irradiation, which are contaminated by one or more organisms. This model is independent of the initial distribution of numbers of micro-organisms on items and represents a conservative approach to estimation of the proportions of non-sterile items in an irradiated population of items.

  11. REPRESENTATION OF ADDITIVE FUNCTIONALS AND LOCAL TIMES FOR JUMP MARKOV PROCESSES AND THEIR FUNCTIONAL LIMIT THEOREM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋义文; 刘禄勤

    2003-01-01

    The representation of additive functionals and local times for jump Markovprocesses are obtained. The results of uniformly functional moderate deviation and theirapplications to birth-death processes are also presented.

  12. Above- and belowground responses of Arctic tundra ecosystems to altered soil nutrients and mammalian herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Laura; Moore, John C; Shaver, Gauis R; Simpson, Rodney T; Johnson, David R

    2012-07-01

    Theory and observation indicate that changes in the rate of primary production can alter the balance between the bottom-up influences of plants and resources and the top-down regulation of herbivores and predators on ecosystem structure and function. The exploitation ecosystem hypothesis (EEH) posited that as aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) increases, the additional biomass should support higher trophic levels. We developed an extension of EEH to include the impacts of increases in ANPP on belowground consumers in a similar manner as aboveground, but indirectly through changes in the allocation of photosynthate to roots. We tested our predictions for plants aboveground and for phytophagous nematodes and their predators belowground in two common arctic tundra plant communities subjected to 11 years of increased soil nutrient availability and/or exclusion of mammalian herbivores. The less productive dry heath (DH) community met the predictions of EEH aboveground, with the greatest ANPP and plant biomass in the fertilized plots protected from herbivory. A palatable grass increased in fertilized plots while dwarf evergreen shrubs and lichens declined. Belowground, phytophagous nematodes also responded as predicted, achieving greater biomass in the higher ANPP plots, whereas predator biomass tended to be lower in those same plots (although not significantly). In the higher productivity moist acidic tussock (MAT) community, aboveground responses were quite different. Herbivores stimulated ANPP and biomass in both ambient and enriched soil nutrient plots; maximum ANPP occurred in fertilized plots exposed to herbivory. Fertilized plots became dominated by dwarf birch (a deciduous shrub) and cloudberry (a perennial forb); under ambient conditions these two species coexist with sedges, evergreen dwarf shrubs, and Sphagnum mosses. Phytophagous nematodes did not respond significantly to changes in ANPP, although predator biomass was greatest in control plots. The

  13. Impacts of mangrove density on surface sediment accretion, belowground biomass and biogeochemistry in Puttalam Lagoon, Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D.H.; Kumara, M.P.; Jayatissa, L.P.; Krauss, Ken W.; Huxham, M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effects of seedling density on sediment accretion, biogeochemistry and belowground biomass in mangrove systems can help explain ecological functioning and inform appropriate planting densities during restoration or climate change mitigation programs. The objectives of this study were to examine: 1) impacts of mangrove seedling density on surface sediment accretion, texture, belowground biomass and biogeochemistry, and 2) origins of the carbon (C) supplied to the mangroves in Palakuda, Puttalam Lagoon, Sri Lanka. Rhizophora mucronata propagules were planted at densities of 6.96, 3.26, 1.93 and 0.95 seedlings m−2along with an unplanted control (0 seedlings m−2). The highest seedling density generally had higher sediment accretion rates, finer sediments, higher belowground biomass, greatest number of fine roots and highest concentrations of C and nitrogen (N) (and the lowest C/N ratio). Sediment accretion rates, belowground biomass (over 1370 days), and C and N concentrations differed significantly between seedling densities. Fine roots were significantly greater compared to medium and coarse roots across all plantation densities. Sulphur and carbon stable isotopes did not vary significantly between different density treatments. Isotope signatures suggest surface sediment C (to a depth of 1 cm) is not derived predominantly from the trees, but from seagrass adjacent to the site.

  14. Interactions between above- and belowground biota : importance for small-scale vegetation mosaics in a grassland ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomqvist, M.M.; Olff, H.; Blaauw, M.B.; Bongers, T.; Putten, W.H. van der

    2000-01-01

    Grasslands are often characterised by small-scale mosaics in plant community composition that contribute to their diversity. Although above- and belowground biota can both cause such mosaics, few studies have addressed their interacting effects. We studied multi-trophic interactions between abovegro

  15. Influence of presence and spatial arrangement of belowground insects on host-plant selection of aboveground insects: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler, R.; Schaper, S.V.; Bezemer, T.M.; Cortesero, A.M.; Hoffmeister, T.S.; Putten, van der W.H.; Vet, L.E.M.; Harvey, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    1. Several studies have shown that above- and belowground insects can interact by influencing each others growth, development, and survival when they feed on the same host-plant. In natural systems, however, insects can make choices on which plants to oviposit and feed. A field experiment was carrie

  16. Disentangling above- and belowground neighbor effects on the growth, chemistry and arthropod community on a focal plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, M.; Bukovinszky, T.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Neighboring plants can influence arthropods on a focal plant and this can result in associational resistance or associational susceptibility. These effects can be mediated by above- and belowground interactions between the neighbor and focal plant, but determining the relative contribution of the ab

  17. Visuo-spatialWorking Memory as a Limited Resource of Cognitive Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Hubert D.; Münzer, Stefan; Umla-Runge, Katja

    Working memory is considered a cognitive component that mainly serves two functions. It temporarily maintains information that was either perceived but is no longer present in the environment, or that was internally generated, and it supplies a work space for transforming and manipulating elements of perception and thinking. Both functions are relevant for a successful interaction with the environment and it is therefore not surprising that WM is a central topic of research in the field of general psychology. This interest is further increased by the fact that WM is seen as a limited resource that constrains cognitive performances.

  18. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  19. Limitation of the EIA Process for the assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.L.; Kuhn, R.G. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    1999-12-01

    The Canadian environmental impact assessment process for the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management and Disposal Concept was completed in 1994. Almost four years later, in February 1998, the Review Panel released its report. The viewpoints of those who participated in the assessment process is archived in the thousands of pages of hearing testimony, meeting transcripts and written briefs. One of the most contentious issues raised, and one that continues to plague management in Canada, is the debate surrounding how the problem of NFW waste management should be defined. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the problem frame of the Canadian NFW management disposal concept EIS. This will be accomplished through an analysis of stakeholder participation and views, and through an evaluation of the range and nature of the information considered legitimate or constrained in the Canadian process.

  20. Chiral Phosphinate Degradation by the Fusarium Species: Scope and Limitation of the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezińska-Rodak, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable capacities of fungal strains of Fusarium oxysporum (DSMZ 2018) and Fusarium culmorum (DSMZ 1094) were tested towards racemic mixture of chiral 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl) acetic acid—a compound with two stereogenic centres. The effectiveness of decomposition was dependent on external factors such as temperature and time of the process. Optimal conditions of complete mineralization were established. Both Fusarium species were able to biodegrade every isomer of tested compound at 30°C, but F. culmorum required 10 days and F. oxysporum 11 days to accomplish the process, which was continuously monitored using the 31P NMR technique. PMID:24324893

  1. Chiral Phosphinate Degradation by the Fusarium Species: Scope and Limitation of the Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Kmiecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable capacities of fungal strains of Fusarium oxysporum (DSMZ 2018 and Fusarium culmorum (DSMZ 1094 were tested towards racemic mixture of chiral 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl acetic acid—a compound with two stereogenic centres. The effectiveness of decomposition was dependent on external factors such as temperature and time of the process. Optimal conditions of complete mineralization were established. Both Fusarium species were able to biodegrade every isomer of tested compound at 30°C, but F. culmorum required 10 days and F. oxysporum 11 days to accomplish the process, which was continuously monitored using the 31P NMR technique.

  2. Effects of Radiative and Diffusive Transport Processes on Premixed Flames near Flammability Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; Ronney, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    A study of the mechanisms of flammability limits and the dynamics of flame extinguishment in premixed gas flames is described, a novel feature of which is the use of diluent gases having a wide range of radiative and diffusive transport properties. This feature enables an assessment of the importance of volumetric heat losses and Lewis number effects on these mechanisms. Additionally, effects of flame dynamics and flame front curvature are studied by employing spherically expanding flames obtained in a microgravity environment whereby natural convection is eliminated. New diagnostics include chamber pressure measurements and the first reported species concentration measurements in a microgravity combustion experiment. The limit mechanisms and extinguishment phenomena are found to be strongly influenced by the combined effects of radiant heat loss, Lewis number and flame curvature. Two new and as yet not well understood phenomena are reported: 'double flames' in rich H2-O2-CO2 mixtures and an 'inverse flammability region' in rich C3H8-O2-CO2 mixtures.

  3. Transient kinetics and rate limiting steps for the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Hirosuke, Tatsumi; Robin Ren, Guilin

    2013-01-01

    as substrate. Analysis of the pre-steady state regime allowed delineation rate constants for both fast and slow steps in the enzymatic cycle and assessment of how these constants influenced the rate of hydrolysis at quasi-steady state. Processive movement on the cellulose strand advanced with characteristic...

  4. Herbivore effects on above- and belowground plant production and soil nitrogen availability in the Trans-Himalayan shrub-steppes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Sumanta; Ritchie, Mark E

    2010-12-01

    Large mammalian herbivores may have positive, neutral, or negative effects on annual net aboveground plant production (NAP) in different ecosystems, depending on their indirect effects on availability of key nutrients such as soil N. In comparison, less is known about the corresponding influence of grazers, and nutrient dynamics, over annual net belowground plant production (NBP). In natural multi-species plant communities, it remains uncertain how grazing influences relative allocation in the above- and belowground compartments in relation to its effects on plant nutrients. We evaluated grazer impacts on NAP, NBP, and relative investment in the above- and belowground compartments, alongside their indirect effects on soil N availability in the multiple-use Trans-Himalayan grazing ecosystem with native grazers and livestock. Data show that a prevailing grazing intensity of 51% increases NAP (+61%), but reduces NBP (-35%). Grazing also reduced C:N ratio in shoots (-16%) and litter (-50%), but not in roots, and these changes coincided with increased plant-available inorganic soil N (+23%). Areas used by livestock and native grazers showed qualitatively similar responses since NAP was promoted, and NBP was reduced, in both cases. The preferential investment in the aboveground fraction, at the expense of the belowground fraction, was correlated positively with grazing intensity and with improvement in litter quality. These results are consistent with hypothesized herbivore-mediated positive feedbacks between soil nutrients and relative investment in above- and belowground compartments. Since potentially overlapping mechanisms, such as N mineralization rate, plant N uptake, compositional turnover, and soil microbial activity, may contribute towards these feedbacks, further studies may be able to discern their respective contributions.

  5. Above- and belowground fluxes of CH4 from boreal shrubs and Scots pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-04-01

    Boreal upland forests are considered as an important sink for the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) due to CH4 oxidizing microbes in the soil. However, recent evidence suggests that vegetation can act as a significant source of CH4. Also, preliminary measurements indicate occasional emissions of CH4 above the tree canopies of a boreal forest. Nevertheless, the sources and the mechanisms of the observed CH4 emissions are still mostly unknown. Furthermore, the majority of CH4 flux studies have been conducted with the soil chamber method, thus not considering the role of the vegetation itself. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study separately the above- and belowground CH4 fluxes of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), which were grown in microcosms. The above- and belowground fluxes of the plants were measured separately, and these fluxes were compared to fluxes of microcosms containing only humus soil. In addition to the flux measurements, we analysed the CH4 producing archaea (methanogens) and the CH4 consuming bacteria (methanotrophs) with the qPCR method to discover whether these microbes contribute to the CH4 exchange from the plant material and the soil. The results of the flux measurements indicate that the humus soil with roots of lingonberry, heather, and Scots pine consume CH4 compared to bare humus soil. Simultaneously, the shoots of heather and Scots pine emit small amounts of CH4. We did not find detectable amounts of methanogens from any of the samples, suggesting the produced CH4 could be of non-microbial origin, or produced by very small population of methanogens. Based on the first preliminary results, methanotrophs were present in all the studied plant species, and especially in high amounts in the rooted soils, thus implying that the methanotrophs could be responsible of the CH4 uptake in the root-soil systems.

  6. Cardenolides, induced responses, and interactions between above- and belowground herbivores of milkweed (Asclepias spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmann, Sergio; Agrawal, Anurag A; Cook, Susan C; Erwin, Alexis C

    2009-09-01

    Theory has long predicted allocation patterns for plant defense against herbivory, but only recently have both above- and belowground plant defenses been considered simultaneously. Milkweeds in the genus Asclepias are a classic chemically defended clade of plants with toxic cardenolides (cardiac glycosides) and pressurized latex employed as anti-herbivore weapons. Here we combine a comparative approach to investigate broadscale patterns in allocation to root vs. shoot defenses across species with a species-specific experimental approach to identify the consequences of defense allocational shifts on a specialist herbivore. Our results show phylogenetic conservatism for inducibility of shoot cardenolides by an aboveground herbivore, with only four closely related tropical species showing significant induction; the eight temperate species examined were not inducible. Allocation to root and shoot cardenolides was positively correlated across species, and this relationship was maintained after accounting for phylogenetic nonindependence. In contrast to long-standing theoretical predictions, we found no evidence for a trade-off between constitutive and induced cardenolides; indeed the two were positively correlated across species in both roots and shoots. Finally, specialist root and shoot herbivores of common milkweed (A. syriaca) had opposing effects on latex production, and these effects had consequences for caterpillar growth consistent with latex providing resistance. Although cardenolides were not affected by our treatments, A. syriaca allocated 40% more cardenolides to shoots over roots. We conclude that constitutive and inducible defenses are not trading off across plant species, and shoots of Asclepias are more inducible than roots. Phylogenetic conservatism cannot explain the observed patterns of cardenolide levels across species, but inducibility per se was conserved in a tropical clade. Finally, given that above- and belowground herbivores can systemically

  7. Quantum control, quantum information processing, and quantum-limited metrology with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Wineland, D J; Barrett, M D; Ben-Kish, A; Bergquist, J C; Blakestad, R B; Bollinger, J J; Britton, J L; Chiaverini, J; De Marco, B L; Hume, D; Itano, W M; Jensen, M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Koelemeij, J C J; Langer, C; Oskay, W; Ozeri, R; Reichle, R; Rosenband, T; Schätz, T; Schmidt, P O; Seidelin, S

    2005-01-01

    We briefly discuss recent experiments on quantum information processing using trapped ions at NIST. A central theme of this work has been to increase our capabilities in terms of quantum computing protocols, but we have also applied the same concepts to improved metrology, particularly in the area of frequency standards and atomic clocks. Such work may eventually shed light on more fundamental issues, such as the quantum measurement problem.

  8. Performance Limiting Flow Processes in High-State Loading High-Mach Number Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-13

    quantified. For example, Smith (1993) states that "multistage turbomachines have increased performance when the axial gaps between blade rows are reduced... turbomachines , with a corresponding spectrum of unsteady processes. Assessing information at these three different levels enables us to determine which of these...Mechanisms in Turbomachines - The 1993 IGTI Scholar Lecture," ASME J. Turbomachinery, Vol. 115, pp. 621-656. Drela, M., Youngren, H., 1998, "A User’s

  9. Optoelectronic Workshops (8th). Quantum-Limited Imaging and Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-12

    Signatures Radiological and Nuclear Imaging LU ’tA U.’ ’tA I-A 6 0 0 U. cc I--z Lu inouHStrIal Applications-. r=c. bk’J..t Vol. 960. Dearborn, M3. June 27-28...such as process control, radiological, and nuclear imaging, spectroscopy, robot vision, and vehicle guidance. L 1NWOUCTION Often input scentes contain a...Breda, ’Photon counting Reticon system - desaiption and performance,’ Prc. ShIE 331, 368-375 (1982). 19. J. A. Tyson, ’Low-light-level charge-coupled

  10. Hilbert-space factorization is a limited and expensive information-processing resource

    CERN Document Server

    Fields, Chris

    2014-01-01

    By taking the need for quantum reference frames into account, it is shown that Hilbert-space factorization is a dissipative process requiring on the order of kT to reduce by one bit an observer's uncertainty in the provenance of a classically-recorded observational outcome. This cost is neglected in standard treatments of decoherence that assume that observational outcomes are obtained by interacting with a collection of degrees of freedom identified a priori. Treating this cost explicitly leads to a natural measure of the probability of any particular quantum reference frame.

  11. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  12. Nutrient limitation on ecosystem productivity and processes of mature and old-growth subtropical forests in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enqing Hou

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based in foliage, litter (L layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16-20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors. The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China.

  13. Study of the $W^+ W^- \\gamma$ Process and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Boson Couplings at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Violini, P; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    The process e+e- --> W+ W- \\gamma is studied using the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP. New results, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427.4 pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies from 192~GeV to 207~GeV, are presented. The W+W-\\gamma cross sections are measured to be in agreement with Standard Model expectations. No hints of anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings are observed. Limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived using also the process e+e- --> \

  14. A Stringent Limit on the Mass Production Rate of $r$-Process Elements in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Macias, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    We analyze data from several studies of metal-poor stars in the Milky Way, focusing on both strong (Eu) and weak (Sr) $r$-process elements. Because these elements were injected in an explosion, we calculate the mass swept up when the blast wave first becomes radiative, yielding a lower limit for the dilution of such elements and hence a lower limit on the ejecta mass which is incorporated into the next generation of stars. Our study demonstrates that in order to explain the largest enhancements in [Eu/Fe] observed in stars at low [Fe/H] metallicities, individual $r$-process production events must synthesize a minimum of $10^{-3.5} M_{\\odot}$ of $r$-process material. We also show that if the site of Mg production is the same as that of Eu, individual injection events must synthesize up to $ \\sim 10^{-3} M_{\\odot}$ of $r$-process material. On the other hand, demanding that Sr traces Mg production results in $r$-process masses per event of $\\sim 10^{-5} M_{\\odot}$. This suggests that the astrophysical sites resp...

  15. Berry-Esseen's central limit theorem for non-causal linear processes in Hilbert space

    CERN Document Server

    Machkouri, Mohamed EL

    2010-01-01

    Let $H$ be a real separable Hilbert space and $(a_k)_{k\\in\\mathbb{Z}}$ a sequence of bounded linear operators from $H$ to $H$. We consider the linear process $X$ defined for any $k$ in $\\mathbb{Z}$ by $X_k=\\sum_{j\\in\\mathbb{Z}}a_j(\\varepsilon_{k-j})$ where $(\\varepsilon_k)_{k\\in\\mathbb{Z}}$ is a sequence of i.i.d. centered $H$-valued random variables. We investigate the rate of convergence in the CLT for $X$ and in particular we obtain the usual Berry-Esseen's bound provided that $\\sum_{j\\in\\mathbb{Z}}\\vert j\\vert\\|a_j\\|_{\\mathcal{L}(H)}<+\\infty$ and $\\varepsilon_0$ belongs to $L_H^{\\infty}$.

  16. Some limitations of detailed balance for inverse reaction calculations in the astrophysical p-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-12-05

    p-Process modeling of some rare but stable proton-rich nuclei requires knowledge of a variety of neutron, charged particle, and photonuclear reaction rates at temperatures of 2 to 3 {times} 10{sup 9} {degrees}K. Detailed balance is usually invoked to obtain the stellar photonuclear rates, in spite of a number of well-known constraints. In this work we attempt to calculate directly the stellar rates for ({gamma},n) and ({gamma},{alpha}) reactions on {sup 151}Eu. These are compared with stellar rates obtained from detailed balance, using the same input parameters for the stellar (n,{gamma}) and ({alpha},{gamma}) reactions on {sup 150}Eu and {sup 147}Pm, respectively. The two methods yielded somewhat different results, which will be discussed along with some sensitivity studies. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Conditional limit theorems for intermediately subcritical branching processes in random environment

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasyev, Valeriy; Kersting, Götz; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    For a branching process in random environment it is assumed that the offspring distribution of the individuals varies in a random fashion, independently from one generation to the other. For the subcritical regime a kind of phase transition appears. In this paper we study the intermediately subcritical case, which constitutes the borderline within this phase transition. We study the asymptotic behavior of the survival probability. Next the size of the population and the shape of the random environment conditioned on non-extinction is examined. Finally we show that conditioned on non-extinction periods of small and large population sizes alternate. This kind of 'bottleneck' behavior appears under the annealed approach only in the intermediately subcritical case.

  18. Modifications of alpha processing software to improve calculation of limits for qualitative detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was done for the Bioassay Counting Laboratory (BCL) of the Center of Excellence for Bioassay of the Analytical Services Organization at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. BCL takes urine and fecal samples and tests for alpha radiation. An automated system, supplied by Canberra Industries, counts the activities in the samples and processes the results. The Canberra system includes hardware and software. The managers of BCL want to improve the accuracy of the results they report to their final customers. The desired improvements are of particular interest to the managers of BCL because the levels of alpha-emitting radionuclides in samples measured at BCL are usually so low that a significant fraction of the measured signal is due to background and to the reagent material used to extract the radioactive nuclides from the samples. Also, the background and reagent signals show a significant level of random variation. The customers at BCL requested four major modifications of the software. The requested software changes have been made and tested. The present report is in two parts. The first part describes what the modifications were supposed to accomplish. The second part describes the changes on a line-by-line basis. The second part includes listings of the changed software and discusses possible steps to correct a particular error condition. Last, the second part describes the effect of truncation errors on the standard deviations calculated from samples whose signals are very nearly the same.

  19. A comparison of additional treatment processes to limit particle accumulation and microbial growth during drinking water distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Lut, M C; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-05-15

    Water quality changes, particle accumulation and microbial growth occurring in pilot-scale water distribution systems fed with normally treated and additional treated groundwater were monitored over a period of almost one year. The treatment processes were ranked in the following order: nanofiltration (NF) > (better than) ultrafiltration (UF) > ion exchange (IEX) for limiting particle accumulation. A different order was found for limiting overall microbial growth: NF > IEX > UF. There were strong correlations between particle load and particle accumulation, and between nutrient load and microbial growth. It was concluded that particle accumulation can be controlled by reducing the particle load in water treatment plants; and the microbial growth can be better controlled by limiting organic nutrients rather than removing biomass in water treatment plants. The major focus of this study was on microbial growth. The results demonstrated that growth occurred in all types of treated water, including the phases of bulk water, biofilm and loose deposits. Considering the growth in different phases, similar growth in bulk water was observed for all treatments; NF strongly reduced growth both in loose deposits and in biofilm; UF promoted growth in biofilm, while strongly limiting growth in loose deposits. IEX had good efficiency in between UF and NF, limiting both growths in loose deposits and in biofilm. Significant growth was found in loose deposits, suggesting that loose deposit biomass should be taken into account for growth evaluation and/or prediction. Strong correlations were found between microbial growth and pressure drop in a membrane fouling simulator which proved that a membrane fouling simulator can be a fast growth predictor (within a week). Different results obtained by adenosine triphosphate and flow cytometry cell counts revealed that ATP can accurately describe both suspended and particle-associated biomass, and flow cytometry files of TCC measurements needs

  20. Scaling Solution in the Large Population Limit of the General Asymmetric Stochastic Luria-Delbrück Evolution Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    2015-02-01

    One of the most popular models for quantitatively understanding the emergence of drug resistance both in bacterial colonies and in malignant tumors was introduced long ago by Luria and Delbrück. Here, individual resistant mutants emerge randomly during the birth events of an exponentially growing sensitive population. A most interesting limit of this process occurs when the population size is large and mutation rates are low, but not necessarily small compared to . Here we provide a scaling solution valid in this limit, making contact with the theory of Levy -stable distributions, in particular one discussed long ago by Landau. One consequence of this association is that moments of the distribution are highly misleading as far as characterizing typical behavior. A key insight that enables our solution is that working in the fixed population size ensemble is not the same as working in a fixed time ensemble. Some of our results have been presented previously in abbreviated form [12].

  1. Study of the $e^+ e^- \\to Z \\gamma$ Process at LEP and Limits on Triple Neutral-Gauge-Boson Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    The process e^+e^- --> Z gamma, where the Z boson decays into hadrons or neutrinos, is studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 189 GeV up to 209 GeV. The cross sections are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Limits on triple neutral-gauge-boson couplings, forbidden in the Standard Model at tree level, are derived. Limits on the energy scales at which the anomalous couplings could be manifest are set. They range from 0.3 TeV to 2.3 TeV depending on the new physics effect under consideration.

  2. Above–belowground herbivore interactions in mixed plant communities are influenced by altered precipitation patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Michael William Ryalls

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Root- and shoot-feeding herbivores have the capacity to influence one another by modifying the chemistry of the shared host plant. This can alter rates of nutrient mineralisation and uptake by neighbouring plants and influence plant–plant competition, particularly in mixtures combining grasses and legumes. Root herbivory-induced exudation of nitrogen (N from legume roots, for example, may increase N acquisition by co-occurring grasses, with knock-on effects on grassland community composition. Little is known about how climate change may affect these interactions, but an important and timely question is how will grass–legume mixtures respond in a future with an increasing reliance on legume N mineralisation in terrestrial ecosystems. Using a model grass–legume mixture, this study investigated how simultaneous attack on lucerne (Medicago sativa by belowground weevils (Sitona discoideus and aboveground aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum affected a neighbouring grass (Phalaris aquatica when subjected to drought, ambient and elevated precipitation. Feeding on rhizobial nodules by weevil larvae enhanced soil water retention under ambient and elevated precipitation, but only when aphids were absent. While drought decreased nodulation and root N content in lucerne, grass root and shoot chemistry were unaffected by changes in precipitation. However, plant communities containing weevils but not aphids showed increased grass height and N concentrations, most likely associated with the transfer of N from weevil-attacked lucerne plants containing more nodules and higher root N concentrations compared with insect-free plants. Drought decreased aphid abundance by 54% but increased total and some specific amino acid concentrations (glycine, lysine, methionine, tyrosine, cysteine, histidine, arginine, aspartate and glutamate, suggesting that aphid declines were being driven by other facets of drought (e.g. reduced phloem hydraulics. The presence of weevil larvae

  3. Nitrogen Addition Altered the Effect of Belowground C Allocation on Soil Respiration in a Subtropical Forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongxin He

    Full Text Available The availabilities of carbon (C and nitrogen (N in soil play an important role in soil carbon dioxide (CO2 emission. However, the variation in the soil respiration (Rs and response of microbial community to the combined changes in belowground C and N inputs in forest ecosystems are not yet fully understood. Stem girdling and N addition were performed in this study to evaluate the effects of C supply and N availability on Rs and soil microbial community in a subtropical forest. The trees were girdled on 1 July 2012. Rs was monitored from July 2012 to November 2013, and soil microbial community composition was also examined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs 1 year after girdling. Results showed that Rs decreased by 40.5% with girdling alone, but N addition only did not change Rs. Interestingly, Rs decreased by 62.7% under the girdling with N addition treatment. The reducing effect of girdling and N addition on Rs differed between dormant and growing seasons. Girdling alone reduced Rs by 33.9% in the dormant season and 54.8% in the growing season compared with the control. By contrast, girdling with N addition decreased Rs by 59.5% in the dormant season and 65.4% in the growing season. Girdling and N addition significantly decreased the total and bacterial PLFAs. Moreover, the effect of N addition was greater than girdling. Both girdling and N addition treatments separated the microbial groups on the basis of the first principal component through principal component analysis compared with control. This indicated that girdling and N addition changed the soil microbial community composition. However, the effect of girdling with N addition treatment separated the microbial groups on the basis of the second principal component compared to N addition treatment, which suggested N addition altered the effect of girdling on soil microbial community composition. These results suggest that the increase in soil N availability by N deposition alters the

  4. Extending the process limits of laser polymer welding with high-brilliance beam sources (recent status and prospects of POLYBRIGHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowinsky, A.; Boglea, A.

    2011-03-01

    Plastics play an important role in almost every facet of our lives and constitute a wide variety of products, from everyday products such as food and beverage packaging, over furniture and building materials to high tech products in the automotive, electronics, aerospace, white goods, medical and other sectors [1]. The objective of PolyBright, the European Research project on laser polymer welding, is to provide high speed and flexible laser manufacturing technology and expand the limits of current plastic part assembly. New laser polymer joining processes for optimized thermal management in combination with adapted wavelengths will provide higher quality, high processing speed up to 1 m/s and robust manufacturing processes at lower costs. Key innovations of the PolyBright project are fibre lasers with high powers up to 500 W, high speed scanning and flexible beam manipulation systems for simultaneous welding and high-resolution welding, such as dynamic masks and multi kHz scanning heads. With this initial step, PolyBright will break new paths in processing of advanced plastic products overcoming the quality and speed limitations of conventional plastic part assembly. Completely new concepts for high speed processing, flexibility and quality need to be established in combination with high brilliance lasers and related equipment. PolyBright will thus open new markets for laser systems with a short term potential of over several 100 laser installations per year and a future much larger market share in the still growing plastic market. PolyBright will hence establish a comprehensive and sustainable development activity on new high brilliance lasers that will strengthen the laser system industry.

  5. Relating belowground microbial composition to the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional trait distributions of trees in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberán, Albert; McGuire, Krista L; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Jones, F Andrew; Wright, Stuart Joseph; Turner, Benjamin L; Essene, Adam; Hubbell, Stephen P; Faircloth, Brant C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-12-01

    The complexities of the relationships between plant and soil microbial communities remain unresolved. We determined the associations between plant aboveground and belowground (root) distributions and the communities of soil fungi and bacteria found across a diverse tropical forest plot. Soil microbial community composition was correlated with the taxonomic and phylogenetic structure of the aboveground plant assemblages even after controlling for differences in soil characteristics, but these relationships were stronger for fungi than for bacteria. In contrast to expectations, the species composition of roots in our soil core samples was a poor predictor of microbial community composition perhaps due to the patchy, ephemeral, and highly overlapping nature of fine root distributions. Our ability to predict soil microbial composition was not improved by incorporating information on plant functional traits suggesting that the most commonly measured plant traits are not particularly useful for predicting the plot-level variability in belowground microbial communities.

  6. The relative importance of above- versus belowground competition for tree growth during early succession of a tropical moist forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breugel, Michiel van; van Breugel, Paulo; Jansen, Patrick A.;

    2012-01-01

    Competition between neighboring plants plays a major role in the population dynamics of tree species in the early phases of humid tropical forest succession. We evaluated the relative importance of above-versus below-ground competition during the first years of old-field succession on soil with low...... on the diameter growth of Cecropia saplings and stem slenderness of Trichospermum saplings. We conclude that competition for light was more important than below-ground competition in this initial phase of moist tropical forest successional, despite the low soil fertility....... and Trichospermum mexicanum, two pioneer species that dominate the secondary forests in the study region, varied with the abundance and size of neighboring trees in 1-2 year old secondary vegetation. We found that local neighborhood basal area varied 10-fold (3 to 30 cm(2) m(-2)) and explained most of the variation...

  7. Allometric constraints on, and trade-offs in, belowground carbon allocation and their control of soil respiration across global forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Robinson, David

    2014-05-01

    To fully understand how soil respiration is partitioned among its component fluxes and responds to climate, it is essential to relate it to belowground carbon allocation, the ultimate carbon source for soil respiration. This remains one of the largest gaps in knowledge of terrestrial carbon cycling. Here, we synthesize data on gross and net primary production and their components, and soil respiration and its components, from a global forest database, to determine mechanisms governing belowground carbon allocation and their relationship with soil respiration partitioning and soil respiration responses to climatic factors across global forest ecosystems. Our results revealed that there are three independent mechanisms controlling belowground carbon allocation and which influence soil respiration and its partitioning: an allometric constraint; a fine-root production vs. root respiration trade-off; and an above- vs. belowground trade-off in plant carbon. Global patterns in soil respiration and its partitioning are constrained primarily by the allometric allocation, which explains some of the previously ambiguous results reported in the literature. Responses of soil respiration and its components to mean annual temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition can be mediated by changes in belowground carbon allocation. Soil respiration responds to mean annual temperature overwhelmingly through an increasing belowground carbon input as a result of extending total day length of growing season, but not by temperature-driven acceleration of soil carbon decomposition, which argues against the possibility of a strong positive feedback between global warming and soil carbon loss. Different nitrogen loads can trigger distinct belowground carbon allocation mechanisms, which are responsible for different responses of soil respiration to nitrogen addition that have been observed. These results provide new insights into belowground carbon allocation, partitioning of soil

  8. Plasticity in above- and belowground resource acquisition traits in response to single and multiple environmental factors in three tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Bellingham, Peter J; Lyver, Philip O'B; Bonner, Karen I; Wardle, David A

    2013-04-01

    Functional trait plasticity is a major component of plant adjustment to environmental stresses. Here, we explore how multiple local environmental gradients in resources required by plants (light, water, and nutrients) and soil disturbance together influence the direction and amplitude of intraspecific changes in leaf and fine root traits that facilitate capture of these resources. We measured population-level analogous above- and belowground traits related to resource acquisition, i.e. "specific leaf area"-"specific root length" (SLA-SRL), and leaf and root N, P, and dry matter content (DMC), on three dominant understory tree species with contrasting carbon and nutrient economics across 15 plots in a temperate forest influenced by burrowing seabirds. We observed similar responses of the three species to the same single environmental influences, but partially species-specific responses to combinations of influences. The strength of intraspecific above- and belowground trait responses appeared unrelated to species resource acquisition strategy. Finally, most analogous leaf and root traits (SLA vs. SRL, and leaf versus root P and DMC) were controlled by contrasting environmental influences. The decoupled responses of above- and belowground traits to these multiple environmental factors together with partially species-specific adjustments suggest complex responses of plant communities to environmental changes, and potentially contrasting feedbacks of plant traits with ecosystem properties. We demonstrate that despite the growing evidence for broadly consistent resource-acquisition strategies at the whole plant level among species, plants also show partially decoupled, finely tuned strategies between above- and belowground parts at the intraspecific level in response to their environment. This decoupling within species suggests a need for many species-centred ecological theories on how plants respond to their environments (e.g. competitive/stress-tolerant/ruderal and

  9. A Hybrid Model for Mapping Relative Differences in Belowground Biomass and Root:Shoot Ratios Using Spectral Reflectance, Foliar N and Plant Biophysical Data within Coastal Marsh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. O’Connell

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Broad-scale estimates of belowground biomass are needed to understand wetland resiliency and C and N cycling, but these estimates are difficult to obtain because root:shoot ratios vary considerably both within and between species. We used remotely-sensed estimates of two aboveground plant characteristics, aboveground biomass and % foliar N to explore biomass allocation in low diversity freshwater impounded peatlands (Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, CA, USA. We developed a hybrid modeling approach to relate remotely-sensed estimates of % foliar N (a surrogate for environmental N and plant available nutrients and aboveground biomass to field-measured belowground biomass for species specific and mixed species models. We estimated up to 90% of variation in foliar N concentration using partial least squares (PLS regression of full-spectrum field spectrometer reflectance data. Landsat 7 reflectance data explained up to 70% of % foliar N and 67% of aboveground biomass. Spectrally estimated foliar N or aboveground biomass had negative relationships with belowground biomass and root:shoot ratio in both Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha, consistent with a balanced growth model, which suggests plants only allocate growth belowground when additional nutrients are necessary to support shoot development. Hybrid models explained up to 76% of variation in belowground biomass and 86% of variation in root:shoot ratio. Our modeling approach provides a method for developing maps of spatial variation in wetland belowground biomass.

  10. A hybrid model for mapping relative differences in belowground biomass and root: Shoot ratios using spectral reflectance, foliar N and plant biophysical data within coastal marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica L. O'Connell,; Byrd, Kristin B.; Maggi Kelly,

    2015-01-01

    Broad-scale estimates of belowground biomass are needed to understand wetland resiliency and C and N cycling, but these estimates are difficult to obtain because root:shoot ratios vary considerably both within and between species. We used remotely-sensed estimates of two aboveground plant characteristics, aboveground biomass and % foliar N to explore biomass allocation in low diversity freshwater impounded peatlands (Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, CA, USA). We developed a hybrid modeling approach to relate remotely-sensed estimates of % foliar N (a surrogate for environmental N and plant available nutrients) and aboveground biomass to field-measured belowground biomass for species specific and mixed species models. We estimated up to 90% of variation in foliar N concentration using partial least squares (PLS) regression of full-spectrum field spectrometer reflectance data. Landsat 7 reflectance data explained up to 70% of % foliar N and 67% of aboveground biomass. Spectrally estimated foliar N or aboveground biomass had negative relationships with belowground biomass and root:shoot ratio in both Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha, consistent with a balanced growth model, which suggests plants only allocate growth belowground when additional nutrients are necessary to support shoot development. Hybrid models explained up to 76% of variation in belowground biomass and 86% of variation in root:shoot ratio. Our modeling approach provides a method for developing maps of spatial variation in wetland belowground biomass.

  11. Exact Rates of Convergence of Functional Limit Theorems for Csorgo-Revesz Increments of a Wiener Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Sheng WANG

    2002-01-01

    Let {W(t); t ≥ 0} be a standard Wiener process and S be the Strassen set of functions.We investigate the exact rates of convergence to zero (as T →∞) of the variables suP0≤t≤T-aT inff∈ssuP0≤x≤1 |Yt,T(x) - f(x)| and inf0≤t≤T-aT suP0≤x≤1 |Yt,T(x) - f(x)| for any given f ∈ S, whereYt,T(x) = (W(t + xaT) - W(t))(2aT(logTa-1T1 + loglog T))-1/2.We establish a relation between how small the increments are and the functional limit resultsof Csorgo-Revesz increments for a Wiener process. Similar results for partial sums of i.i.d. randomvariables are also given.

  12. Human olfactory consciousness and cognition: its unusual features may not result from unusual functions but from limited neocortical processing resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Richard J.; Attuquayefio, Tuki

    2013-01-01

    Human and animal olfactory perception is shaped both by functional demands and by various environmental constraints seemingly peculiar to chemical stimuli. These demands and constraints may have generated a sensory system that is cognitively distinct from the major senses. In this article we identify these various functional demands and constraints, and examine whether they can be used to account for olfaction's unique cognitive features on a case-by-case basis. We then use this as grounds to argue that specific conscious processes do have functional value, a finding that naturally emerges when a comparative approach to consciousness across the senses is adopted. More generally, we conclude that certain peculiar features of olfactory cognition may owe more to limited neocortical processing resources, than they do to the challenges faced by perceiving chemical stimuli. PMID:24198808

  13. Observations on the perspectives and limits of the evidence-based approach in the evaluation of gamification processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruni Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As continually greater attention is given to the processes of gamification, the dimension pertaining to evaluation must also be focussed on the purpose of avoiding ineffective forms of banalisation. In reference to the evidence-based approach proposed by Mayer and in highlighting its possibilities and limits, an experiment is herein presented related to teacher training, in which we attempt to unite some traits of the processes of gamification to a first evaluation screen. The data obtained, if they seem on the one hand, indicate an overall positive perception on the part of the attendees, on the other though, they indicate forms of resistance and of saturation with respect to both the excessively competitive mechanisms and the peer evaluation procedures.

  14. Release from belowground enemies and shifts in root traits as interrelated drivers of alien plant invasion success: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Wayne

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the interrelated mechanisms driving plant invasions, such as the interplay between enemy release and resource-acquisition traits, is biased by an aboveground perspective. To address this bias, I hypothesize that plant release from belowground enemies (especially fungal pathogens) will give invasive plant species a fitness advantage in the alien range, via shifts in root traits (e.g., increased specific root length and branching intensity) that increase resource uptake and competitive ability compared to native species in the alien range, and compared to plants of the invader in its native range. Such root-trait changes could be ecological or evolutionary in nature. I explain how shifts in root traits could occur as a consequence of enemy release and contribute to invasion success of alien plants, and how they could be interrelated with other potential belowground drivers of invasion success (allelopathy, mutualist enhancement). Finally, I outline the approaches that could be taken to test whether belowground enemy release results in increased competitive ability and nutrient uptake by invasive alien plants, via changes in root traits in the alien range.

  15. Testing the paradox of enrichment along a land use gradient in a multitrophic aboveground and belowground community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin M Meyer

    Full Text Available In the light of ongoing land use changes, it is important to understand how multitrophic communities perform at different land use intensities. The paradox of enrichment predicts that fertilization leads to destabilization and extinction of predator-prey systems. We tested this prediction for a land use intensity gradient from natural to highly fertilized agricultural ecosystems. We included multiple aboveground and belowground trophic levels and land use-dependent searching efficiencies of insects. To overcome logistic constraints of field experiments, we used a successfully validated simulation model to investigate plant responses to removal of herbivores and their enemies. Consistent with our predictions, instability measured by herbivore-induced plant mortality increased with increasing land use intensity. Simultaneously, the balance between herbivores and natural enemies turned increasingly towards herbivore dominance and natural enemy failure. Under natural conditions, there were more frequently significant effects of belowground herbivores and their natural enemies on plant performance, whereas there were more aboveground effects in agroecosystems. This result was partly due to the "boom-bust" behavior of the shoot herbivore population. Plant responses to herbivore or natural enemy removal were much more abrupt than the imposed smooth land use intensity gradient. This may be due to the presence of multiple trophic levels aboveground and belowground. Our model suggests that destabilization and extinction are more likely to occur in agroecosystems than in natural communities, but the shape of the relationship is nonlinear under the influence of multiple trophic interactions.

  16. Root proliferation and seed yield in response to spatial heterogeneity of below-ground competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Erin E; Gersani, Mordechai; Brown, Joel S

    2005-11-01

    Here, we tested the predictions of a 'tragedy of the commons' model of below-ground plant competition in annual plants that experience spatial heterogeneity in their competitive environment. Under interplant competition, the model predicts that a plant should over-proliferate roots relative to what would maximize the collective yield of the plants. We predict that a plant will tailor its root proliferation to local patch conditions, restraining root production when alone and over-proliferating in the presence of other plants. A series of experiments were conducted using pairs of pea (Pisum sativum) plants occupying two or three pots in which the presence or absence of interplant root competition was varied while nutrient availability per plant was held constant. In two-pot experiments, competing plants produced more root mass and less pod mass per individual than plants grown in isolation. In three-pot experiments, peas modulated this response to conditions at the scale of individual pots. Root proliferation in the shared pot was higher compared with the exclusively occupied pot. Plants appear to display sophisticated nutrient foraging with outcomes that permit insights into interplant competition.

  17. Picturing Adoption of Below-Ground Biodiversity Technologies among Smallholder Farmers around Mabira Forest, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabirye, BE.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with a multitude of soil and water amendment technologies, farmers have the task of choosing the technologies to adopt for ensuring subsistence and income sustainability. In 2008, a study to characterize the farmers was conducted around Mabira Forest, to assess the adoption of soil technologies fostering Belowground Biodiversity (BGBD. Eighty-four households (38 participating and 46 non-participants from four villages were randomly selected and interviewed. Results showed that the adoption pattern was significantly driven by farm size, labor, household size, age and wealth status of the house. Also important were farm location, gender of household head, primary occupation, soil and water conservation technologies training, land tenure, and social capital. For the few current adopters, there was a perceived increase in labor demand but overall productivity was higher, partly resulting from increased crop productivity due to soil fertility enhancement and soil structure modification. It is therefore concluded that, around Mabira forest, BGBD technologies will be adopted by farming households with sufficient land, labor and social capital.

  18. The identity of belowground herbivores, not herbivore diversity, mediates impacts on plant productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, Ivan; Esser, Aaron D.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Crowder, David W.

    2016-12-01

    Across many ecosystems, increases in species biodiversity generally results in greater resource acquisition by consumers. Few studies examining the impacts of consumer diversity on resource capture have focused on terrestrial herbivores, however, especially taxa that feed belowground. Here we conducted field mesocosm experiments to examine the effects of variation in species richness and composition within a community of wireworm herbivores on wheat plant productivity. Our experiments involved wireworm communities consisting of between one and three species, with all possible combinations of species represented. We found that the presence of wireworms reduced plant biomass and seed viability, but wireworm species richness did not impact these plant metrics. Species identity effects were strong, as two species, Limonius californicus and Selatosomus pruininus, had significantly stronger impacts on plants compared to L. infuscatus. Communities with either of the two most impactful species consistently had the greatest impact on wheat plants. The effects of wireworms were thus strongly dependent on the particular species present rather than the overall diversity of the wireworm community. More broadly, our study supports the general finding that the identity of particular consumer species within communities often has greater impacts on ecosystem functioning than species richness.

  19. Consolidating soil carbon turnover models by improved estimates of belowground carbon input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent T.; Glendining, Margaret; Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2016-09-01

    World soil carbon (C) stocks are third only to those in the ocean and earth crust, and represent twice the amount currently present in the atmosphere. Therefore, any small change in the amount of soil organic C (SOC) may affect carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. Dynamic models of SOC help reveal the interaction among soil carbon systems, climate and land management, and they are also frequently used to help assess SOC dynamics. Those models often use allometric functions to calculate soil C inputs in which the amount of C in both above and below ground crop residues are assumed to be proportional to crop harvest yield. Here we argue that simulating changes in SOC stocks based on C input that are proportional to crop yield is not supported by data from long-term experiments with measured SOC changes. Rather, there is evidence that root C inputs are largely independent of crop yield, but crop specific. We discuss implications of applying fixed belowground C input regardless of crop yield on agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation and accounting.

  20. Aboveground to belowground herbivore defense signaling in maize: a two-way street?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthe, Dawn S; Gill, Torrence; Zhu, Lixue; Lopéz, Lorena; Pechanova, Olga; Shivaji, Renuka; Ankala, Arunkanth; Williams, W Paul

    2011-01-01

    Insect pests that attempt to feed on the caterpillar-resistant maize genotype Mp708 encounter a potent, multipronged defense system that thwarts their invasion. First, these plants are on "constant alert" due to constitutively elevated levels of the phytohormone jasmonic acid that signals the plant to activate its defenses. The higher jasmonic acid levels trigger the expression of defense genes prior to herbivore attack so the plants are "primed" and respond with a faster and stronger defense. The second defense is the rapid accumulation of a toxic cysteine protease called Mir1-CP in the maize whorl in response to caterpillar feeding. When caterpillars ingest Mir1-CP, it damages the insect's midgut and retards their growth. In this article, we discuss a third possible defense strategy employed by Mp708. We have shown that foliar caterpillar feeding causes Mir1-CP and defense gene transcripts to accumulate in its roots. We propose that caterpillar feeding aboveground sends a signal belowground via the phloem that results in Mir1-CP accumulation in the roots. We also postulate that the roots serve as a reservoir of Mir1-CP that can be mobilized to the whorl in response to caterpillar assault.

  1. Salinity influences on aboveground and belowground net primary productivity in tidal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierfelice, Kathryn N.; Graeme Lockaby, B.; Krauss, Ken W.; Conner, William H.; Noe, Gregory; Ricker, Matthew C.

    2017-01-01

    Tidal freshwater wetlands are one of the most vulnerable ecosystems to climate change and rising sea levels. However salinification within these systems is poorly understood, therefore, productivity (litterfall, woody biomass, and fine roots) were investigated on three forested tidal wetlands [(1) freshwater, (2) moderately saline, and (3) heavily salt-impacted] and a marsh along the Waccamaw and Turkey Creek in South Carolina. Mean aboveground (litterfall and woody biomass) production on the freshwater, moderately saline, heavily salt-impacted, and marsh, respectively, was 1,061, 492, 79, and 0  g m−2 year−1 versus belowground (fine roots) 860, 490, 620, and 2,128  g m−2 year−1. Litterfall and woody biomass displayed an inverse relationship with salinity. Shifts in productivity across saline sites is of concern because sea level is predicted to continue rising. Results from the research reported in this paper provide baseline data upon which coupled hydrologic/wetland models can be created to quantify future changes in tidal forest functions.

  2. Aboveground endophyte affects root volatile emission and host plant selection of a belowground insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostás, Michael; Cripps, Michael G; Silcock, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Plants emit specific blends of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that serve as multitrophic, multifunctional signals. Fungi colonizing aboveground (AG) or belowground (BG) plant structures can modify VOC patterns, thereby altering the information content for AG insects. Whether AG microbes affect the emission of root volatiles and thus influence soil insect behaviour is unknown. The endophytic fungus Neotyphodium uncinatum colonizes the aerial parts of the grass hybrid Festuca pratensis × Lolium perenne and is responsible for the presence of insect-toxic loline alkaloids in shoots and roots. We investigated whether endophyte symbiosis had an effect on the volatile emission of grass roots and if the root herbivore Costelytra zealandica was able to recognize endophyte-infected plants by olfaction. In BG olfactometer assays, larvae of C. zealandica were more strongly attracted to roots of uninfected than endophyte-harbouring grasses. Combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry revealed that endophyte-infected roots emitted less VOCs and more CO2. Our results demonstrate that symbiotic fungi in plants may influence soil insect distribution by changing their behaviour towards root volatiles. The well-known defensive mutualism between grasses and Neotyphodium endophytes could thus go beyond bioactive alkaloids and also confer protection by being chemically less apparent for soil herbivores.

  3. The Cellular Processing Capacity Limits the Amounts of Chimeric U7 snRNA Available for Antisense Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenfelder, Agathe; Tordo, Julie; Babbs, Arran; Davies, Kay E; Goyenvalle, Aurélie; Danos, Olivier

    2012-06-26

    Many genetic diseases are induced by mutations disturbing the maturation of pre-mRNAs, often affecting splicing. Antisense oligoribonucleotides (AONs) have been used to modulate splicing thereby circumventing the deleterious effects of mutations. Stable delivery of antisense sequences is achieved by linking them to small nuclear RNA (snRNAs) delivered by viral vectors, as illustrated by studies where therapeutic exon skipping was obtained in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Yet, clinical translation of these approaches is limited by the amounts of vector to be administered. In this respect, maximizing the amount of snRNA antisense shuttle delivered by the vector is essential. Here, we have used a muscle- and heart-specific enhancer (MHCK) to drive the expression of U7 snRNA shuttles carrying antisense sequences against the human or murine DMD pre-mRNAs. Although antisense delivery and subsequent exon skipping were improved both in tissue culture and in vivo, we observed the formation of additional U7 snRNA by-products following gene transfer. These included aberrantly 3' processed as well as unprocessed species that may arise because of the saturation of the cellular processing capacity. Future efforts to increase the amounts of functional U7 shuttles delivered into a cell will have to take this limitation into account.

  4. The Impact of Different Physical Processes on the Statistics of Lyman-limit and Damped Lyman-alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Altay, Gabriel; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2013-01-01

    We compute the z = 3 neutral hydrogen column density distribution function f(NHI) for 19 simulations drawn from the OWLS project using a post-processing correction for self-shielding calculated with full radiative transfer of the ionising background radiation. We investigate how different physical processes and parameters affect the abundance of Lyman-limit systems (LLSs) and damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs) including: i) metal-line cooling; ii) the efficiency of feedback from SNe and AGN; iii) the effective equation of state for the ISM; iv) cosmological parameters; v) the assumed star formation law and; vi) the timing of hydrogen reionization . We find that the normalisation and slope, D = d log10 f /d log10 NHI, of f(NHI) in the LLS regime are robust to changes in these physical processes. Among physically plausible models, f(NHI) varies by less than 0.2 dex and D varies by less than 0.18 for LLSs. This is primarily due to the fact that these uncertain physical processes mostly affect star-forming gas w...

  5. Effects of long-term grazing disturbance on the belowground storage of organic carbon in the Patagonian Monte, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larreguy, C; Carrera, A L; Bertiller, M B

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of grazing disturbance on the amount and the spatial distribution (vertical and horizontal) of root biomass and soil organic carbon (SOC) in order to evaluate whether grazing alters the belowground storage of organic carbon (C) in arid rangelands of the Patagonian Monte. We selected three representative sites (3 ha each) with low, moderate and high grazing disturbance located far, mid-distance and near the watering point, respectively, in rangelands submitted to sheep grazing for more than 100 years. We assessed the canopy structure and identified the four most frequent plant patch types at each site. We selected four replications of each patch type and extracted a soil sample (0-30 cm depth) underneath the canopy and in the middle of the nearest inter-patch bare soil area in winter and summer. We assessed the root and soil dry mass and the respective organic C concentration in each sample and then we estimated the total belowground organic C storage at each site. Total plant and perennial grass cover were lower with high than low grazing disturbance while the reverse occurred with dwarf shrub cover. High grazing disturbance led to the increase in total root biomass in the whole soil profile of patch areas and in the upper soil of inter-patch areas. SOC was higher in patch than in inter-patch areas at all sites but at both areas was reduced with high grazing disturbance. This was probably the result of the low total plant cover and the low and recalcitrant contribution of above and below-ground plant litter to soils at sites with high grazing disturbance. Accordingly, these changes did not result in variations in the total belowground organic C storage. We concluded that high grazing disturbance did not affect the total belowground organic C storage but led to changes in the spatial patterning of this organic C storage (i.e shifting from soil to roots).

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Mercury Emission Limits and Boilers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... minimum pressure drop and liquid flow-rate at or above the operating levels established during the... applicable emission limits for mercury and/or total selected metals. 2. Fabric filter control a. Install and operate a bag leak detection system according to § 63.7525 and operate the fabric filter such that the...

  7. Smart cloud system with image processing server in diagnosing brain diseases dedicated for hospitals with limited resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Fahmi; Nasution, Tigor H

    2017-01-19

    The use of medical imaging in diagnosing brain disease is growing. The challenges are related to the big size of data and complexity of the image processing. High standard of hardware and software are demanded, which can only be provided in big hospitals. Our purpose was to provide a smart cloud system to help diagnosing brain diseases for hospital with limited infrastructure. The expertise of neurologists was first implanted in cloud server to conduct an automatic diagnosis in real time using image processing technique developed based on ITK library and web service. Users upload images through website and the result, in this case the size of tumor was sent back immediately. A specific image compression technique was developed for this purpose. The smart cloud system was able to measure the area and location of tumors, with average size of 19.91 ± 2.38 cm2 and an average response time 7.0 ± 0.3 s. The capability of the server decreased when multiple clients accessed the system simultaneously: 14 ± 0 s (5 parallel clients) and 27 ± 0.2 s (10 parallel clients). The cloud system was successfully developed to process and analyze medical images for diagnosing brain diseases in this case for tumor.

  8. Phytolith-occluded organic carbon as a mechanism for long-term carbon sequestration in a typical steppe: The predominant role of belowground productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Limin; Li, Frank Yonghong; Huang, Zhangting; Jiang, Peikun; Baoyin, Taogetao; Wang, Hailong

    2017-01-15

    Phytolith-occluded organic carbon (phytOC) has recently been demonstrated to be an important terrestrial carbon (C) fraction resistant to decomposition and thus has potential for long-term C sequestration. Existing studies show that plant leaves and sheath normally have high phytOC concentration, thus most of phytOC studies are limited to the aboveground plant parts. Grassland communities comprise herbaceous species, especially grasses and sedges which have relatively high concentrations of phytoliths, but the phytOC production from grassland, especially from its belowground part, is unknown. Here we determined the phytOC concentration in different parts of major plant species in a typical steppe grassland on the Mongolian Plateau, and estimated the phytolith C sequestration potential. We found that the phytOC concentration of major steppe species was significantly (psequestration of grasslands may be at least one order of magnitude greater than the previous estimation based on ANPP only. Our results emphasize the need for more research on phytolith and phytOC distribution and flux in both above and below ground plant parts for quantifying the phytolith C sequestration.

  9. Silicon limitation on primary production and its destiny in Jiaozhou Bay, China Ⅵ: The ecological variation process of the phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The combination effect of light, water temperature and nutrients on phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay is studied in this paper. The order of importance of the influence on phytoplankton growth is determined as nutrients, water temperature, and light. The influence of these factors unveiled the mechanism of the influence, and revealed the variation process of the nutrients limiting phytoplankton primary production, and of the water temperature influencing the phytoplankton reproduction capacity, and hence influencing the structure of phytoplankton assemblage. Temporal and spatial quantification shows different stages of the influence by water temperature and nutrients on the phytoplankton growth. Moreover, the authors expatiated the ideal state of the phytoplankton growth and the reason of red tide occurrence. People should consider in their activity the input of nutrient Si first, and then the variation of water temperature, advocating sustainable development manner.

  10. Belowground carbon allocation by trees drives seasonal patterns of extracellular enzyme activities by altering microbial community composition in a beech forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Schnecker, Jörg; Schweiger, Peter; Rasche, Frank; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sessitsch, Angela; Richter, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    *Plant seasonal cycles alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability for soil microbes, which may affect microbial community composition and thus feed back on microbial decomposition of soil organic material and plant N availability. The temporal dynamics of these plant-soil interactions are, however, unclear. *Here, we experimentally manipulated the C and N availability in a beech forest through N fertilization or tree girdling and conducted a detailed analysis of the seasonal pattern of microbial community composition and decomposition processes over 2 yr. *We found a strong relationship between microbial community composition and enzyme activities over the seasonal course. Phenoloxidase and peroxidase activities were highest during late summer, whereas cellulase and protease peaked in late autumn. Girdling, and thus loss of mycorrhiza, resulted in an increase in soil organic matter-degrading enzymes and a decrease in cellulase and protease activity. *Temporal changes in enzyme activities suggest a switch of the main substrate for decomposition between summer (soil organic matter) and autumn (plant litter). Our results indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi are possibly involved in autumn cellulase and protease activity. Our study shows that, through belowground C allocation, trees significantly alter soil microbial communities, which may affect seasonal patterns of decomposition processes.

  11. Limits, discovery and cut optimization for a Poisson process with uncertainty in background and signal efficiency: TRolke 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, J.; Conrad, J.; Rolke, W.; Lopez, A.

    2010-03-01

    A C++ class was written for the calculation of frequentist confidence intervals using the profile likelihood method. Seven combinations of Binomial, Gaussian, Poissonian and Binomial uncertainties are implemented. The package provides routines for the calculation of upper and lower limits, sensitivity and related properties. It also supports hypothesis tests which take uncertainties into account. It can be used in compiled C++ code, in Python or interactively via the ROOT analysis framework. Program summaryProgram title: TRolke version 2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEFT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3431 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 21 789 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: ISO C++. Computer: Unix, GNU/Linux, Mac. Operating system: Linux 2.6 (Scientific Linux 4 and 5, Ubuntu 8.10), Darwin 9.0 (Mac-OS X 10.5.8). RAM:˜20 MB Classification: 14.13. External routines: ROOT ( http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Nature of problem: The problem is to calculate a frequentist confidence interval on the parameter of a Poisson process with statistical or systematic uncertainties in signal efficiency or background. Solution method: Profile likelihood method, Analytical Running time:<10 seconds per extracted limit.

  12. 社会创新过程及其面临的局限%Limitations Encountered in Social Innovation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟天来; 毕宇珠; 胡新萍

    2012-01-01

    识别社会需求、解决社会问题是社会创新过程中的一个重要环节,同时也是社会创新过程面临的陷阱和局限所在。结合社区发展规划的案例以及社会需求和问题表现特征的分析发现,在需求和问题分析过程中,问题标准的不恰当性、问题主体参与不足、忽视需求和问题原因表现出的二重性、参与主体的缺失等会导致社会需求识别出现偏差,同时这些偏差将进一步影响社会创新的低效,以及易使社会创新方案局限在项目的操作层次。%It is an important step in social innovation process to identify social needs and solve social problems, in which the pitfalls and limitations of such process also exist. Focusing on analyzing this step through a casestudy of community development planning and the characteristics of social needs and problems, this paper argues that deviation could be resulted from insuffi- cient participation of stakeholders, inappropriate standards for problem, ignorance of duality of needs and problem causes, and absence of participation of stakeholders, which would result in low effective and efficient social innovation and usually limiting social innovation to operational level.

  13. Mapping Above- and Below-Ground Carbon Pools in Boreal Forests: The Case for Airborne Lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Terje; Næsset, Erik; Ohlson, Mikael; Bolstad, Paul V; Kolka, Randall

    2015-01-01

    A large and growing body of evidence has demonstrated that airborne scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) systems can be an effective tool in measuring and monitoring above-ground forest tree biomass. However, the potential of lidar as an all-round tool for assisting in assessment of carbon (C) stocks in soil and non-tree vegetation components of the forest ecosystem has been given much less attention. Here we combine the use airborne small footprint scanning lidar with fine-scale spatial C data relating to vegetation and the soil surface to describe and contrast the size and spatial distribution of C pools within and among multilayered Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands. Predictor variables from lidar derived metrics delivered precise models of above- and below-ground tree C, which comprised the largest C pool in our study stands. We also found evidence that lidar canopy data correlated well with the variation in field layer C stock, consisting mainly of ericaceous dwarf shrubs and herbaceous plants. However, lidar metrics derived directly from understory echoes did not yield significant models. Furthermore, our results indicate that the variation in both the mosses and soil organic layer C stock plots appears less influenced by differences in stand structure properties than topographical gradients. By using topographical models from lidar ground returns we were able to establish a strong correlation between lidar data and the organic layer C stock at a stand level. Increasing the topographical resolution from plot averages (~2000 m2) towards individual grid cells (1 m2) did not yield consistent models. Our study demonstrates a connection between the size and distribution of different forest C pools and models derived from airborne lidar data, providing a foundation for future research concerning the use of lidar for assessing and monitoring boreal forest C.

  14. Matrix density alters zyxin phosphorylation, which limits peripheral process formation and extension in endothelial cells invading 3D collagen matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Colette A; Bayless, Kayla J

    2014-09-01

    integrate signals from multiple exogenous factors, including changes in matrix density, to accomplish successful sprouting responses. We show here for the first time that zyxin limited the formation and extension of fine peripheral processes used by ECs for matrix interrogation, providing a molecular explanation for altered EC responses to high and low density collagen matrices.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Study on Forming Limit Diagrams of 304 Stainless Steel Tubes in the Hydroforming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibi, Mahdi Falahati; Gerdooei, Mahdi; Jooybari, Mohammad Bakhshi

    2016-12-01

    Tearing as a factor that restricts formability of sheets and tubes is determined by forming limit diagram (FLD). The aim of the current study is to present a novel approach to achieve FLD of a metallic tube using hydroforming process. Here, for 304 stainless steel tubes, various loading conditions, namely free loading, bulging with axial feeding and bulging with closed end, were considered. Along with loading condition, die geometries with different corner radius and deformation width were studied on the strain path and plastic instability. The effects of process parameters on the strain path have been evaluated and simulated using ABAQUS/Explicit. Meshed tubes were bulged under controlled loading, and the FLD was drawn after measuring the major and minor strains close to the tearing location. Finally, the evaluation of the current method has been investigated by using the obtained FLD in the forming of an industrial part (i.e., the cam-shaped tube). The results revealed that the proposed approach has the capability to predict the formability of industrial components.

  16. Multivariate detection limits of on-line NIR model for extraction process of chlorogenic acid from Lonicera japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhisheng; Sui, Chenglin; Xu, Bing; Ai, Lu; Ma, Qun; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2013-04-15

    A methodology is proposed to estimate the multivariate detection limits (MDL) of on-line near-infrared (NIR) model in Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHM) system. In this paper, Lonicera japonica was used as an example, and its extraction process was monitored by on-line NIR spectroscopy. Spectra of on-line NIR could be collected by two fiber optic probes designed to transmit NIR radiation by a 2mm-flange. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used as a reference method to determine the content of chlorogenic acid in the extract solution. Multivariate calibration models were carried out including partial least squares regression (PLS) and interval partial least-squares (iPLS). The result showed improvement of model performance: compared with PLS model, the root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of iPLS model decreased from 0.111mg to 0.068mg, and the R(2) parameter increased from 0.9434 to 0.9801. Furthermore, MDL values were determined by a multivariate method using the type of errors and concentration ranges. The MDL of iPLS model was about 14ppm, which confirmed that on-line NIR spectroscopy had the ability to detect trace amounts of chlorogenic acid in L. japonica. As a result, the application of on-line NIR spectroscopy for monitoring extraction process in CHM could be very encouraging and reliable.

  17. Decoupling of above and belowground C and N pools within predominant plant species Stipa grandis along a precipitation gradient in Chinese steppe zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Ye

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of the carbon and nutrient cycles drives the food web structure and biogeochemistry of ecosystems. However, across precipitation gradients, there may be a shift in C and N pools from above- to belowground because of shifting plant stoichiometry and allocation. Here, we present a study which is the first to explicitly compare above- and belowground pool sizes of N and C within predominant plant species along precipitation gradient. We dissected these pools into biomass allocation and nutrient concentrations. Based on previous evidence, biomass allocation to roots should increase with aridity, while leaf [N] should increase. If their effect sizes are equal, they should cancel each other out, and the above- and belowground proportions of the N would remain constant. Along a precipitation gradient in Chinese steppe zone, the effect sizes of the biomass shifts were remarkably consistent among the predominant species, Stipa grandis. The effect sizes of biomass allocation and [N] were equal and the proportion of N of above- and belowground did not change with aridity, but the shift in leaf [C] with aridity was much weaker than the biomass shift, leading to a decrease in the proportion of C belowground at dry sites. Precipitation gradients do decouple the C and N pool of S. grandis along a precipitation gradient in Chinese steppe zone.

  18. Aboveground Epichloë coenophiala-Grass Associations Do Not Affect Belowground Fungal Symbionts or Associated Plant, Soil Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Lindsey C; McCulley, Rebecca L

    2016-10-01

    Cool season grasses host multiple fungal symbionts, such as aboveground Epichloë endophytes and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSEs). Asexual Epichloë endophytes can influence root colonization by AMF, but the type of interaction-whether antagonistic or beneficial-varies. In Schedonorus arundinaceus (tall fescue), Epichloë coenophiala can negatively affect AMF, which may impact soil properties and ecosystem function. Within field plots of S. arundinaceus that were either E. coenophiala-free (E-), infected with the common, mammal-toxic E. coenophiala strain (CTE+), or infected with one of two novel, non-toxic strains (AR542 NTE+ and AR584 NTE+), we hypothesized that (1) CTE+ would decrease AMF and DSE colonization rates and reduce soil extraradical AMF hyphae compared to E- or NTE+, and (2) this would lead to E- and NTE+ plots having greater water stable soil aggregates and C than CTE+. E. coenophiala presence and strain did not significantly alter AMF or DSE colonization, nor did it affect extraradical AMF hypha length, soil aggregates, or aggregate-associated C and N. Soil extraradical AMF hypha length negatively correlated with root AMF colonization. Our results contrast with previous demonstrations that E. coenophiala symbiosis inhibits belowground AMF communities. In our mesic, relatively nutrient-rich grassland, E. coenophiala symbiosis did not antagonize belowground symbionts, regardless of strain. Manipulating E. coenophiala strains within S. arundinaceus may not significantly alter AMF communities and nutrient cycling, yet we must further explore these relationships under different soils and environmental conditions given that symbiont interactions can be important in determining ecosystem response to global change.

  19. Patterns of above-and belowground biomass allocation in China’s grasslands:Evidence from individual-level observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Above-and belowground biomass allocation not only influences growth of individual plants,but also influences vegetation structures and functions,and consequently impacts soil carbon input as well as terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling.However,due to sampling difficulties,a considerable amount of uncertainty remains about the root:shoot ratio(R/S),a key parameter for models of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling.We investigated biomass allocation patterns across a broad spatial scale.We collected data on individual plant biomass and systematically sampled along a transect across the temperate grasslands in Inner Mongolia as well as in the alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau.Our results indicated that the median of R/S for herbaceous species was 0.78 in China’s grasslands as a whole.R/S was significantly higher in temperate grasslands than in alpine grasslands(0.84 vs.0.65).The slope of the allometric relationship between above-and belowground biomass was steeper for temperate grasslands than for alpine.Our results did not support the hypothesis that aboveground biomass scales isometrically with belowground biomass.The R/S in China’s grasslands was not significantly correlated with mean annual temperature(MAT) or mean annual precipitation(MAP).Moreover,comparisons of our results with previous findings indicated a large difference between R/S data from individual plants and communities.This might be mainly caused by the underestimation of R/S at the individual level as a result of an inevitable loss of fine roots and the overestimation of R/S in community-level surveys due to grazing and difficulties in identifying dead roots.Our findings suggest that root biomass in grasslands tended to have been overestimated in previous reports of R/S.

  20. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, D.; Ngao, J.; Dannoura, M.; Bakker, M. R.; Zeller, B.; Bazot, S.; Bosc, A.; Plain, C.; Lata, J. C.; Priault, P.; Barthes, L.; Loustau, D.

    2011-05-01

    Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine) was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C) of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6-2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season), and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer) that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the patterns of carbon

  1. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the

  2. Processing of single-photon responses in the mammalian On and Off retinal pathways at the sensitivity limit of vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Visually guided behaviour at its sensitivity limit relies on single-photon responses originating in a small number of rod photoreceptors. For decades, researchers have debated the neural mechanisms and noise sources that underlie this striking sensitivity. To address this question, we need to understand the constraints arising from the retinal output signals provided by distinct retinal ganglion cell types. It has recently been shown in the primate retina that On and Off parasol ganglion cells, the cell types likely to underlie light detection at the absolute visual threshold, differ fundamentally not only in response polarity, but also in the way they handle single-photon responses originating in rods. The On pathway provides the brain with a thresholded, low-noise readout and the Off pathway with a noisy, linear readout. We outline the mechanistic basis of these different coding strategies and analyse their implications for detecting the weakest light signals. We show that high-fidelity, nonlinear signal processing in the On pathway comes with costs: more single-photon responses are lost and their propagation is delayed compared with the Off pathway. On the other hand, the responses of On ganglion cells allow better intensity discrimination compared with the Off ganglion cell responses near visual threshold. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Vision in dim light’. PMID:28193818

  3. Aboveground and belowground effects of single-tree removals in New Zealand rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, David A; Wiser, Susan K; Allen, Robert B; Doherty, James E; Bonner, Karen I; Williamson, Wendy M

    2008-05-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in how human-induced species loss affects community and ecosystem properties. These effects are particularly apparent when a commercially valuable species is harvested from an ecosystem, such as occurs through single-tree harvesting or selective logging of desired timber species in natural forests. In New Zealand mixed-species rain forests, single-tree harvesting of the emergent gymnosperm Dacrydium cupressinum, or rimu, has been widespread. This harvesting has been contentious in part because of possible ecological impacts of Dacrydium removal on the remainder of the forest, but many of these effects remain unexplored. We identified an area where an unintended 40-year "removal experiment" had been set up that involved selective extraction of individual Dacrydium trees. We measured aboveground and belowground variables at set distances from both individual live trees and stumps of trees harvested 40 years ago. Live trees had effects both above and below ground by affecting diversity and cover of several components of the vegetation (usually negatively), promoting soil C sequestration, enhancing ratios of soil C:P and N:P, and affecting community structure of soil microflora. These effects extended to 8 m from the tree base and were likely caused by poor-quality litter and humus produced by the trees. Measurements for the stumps revealed strong legacy effects of prior presence of trees on some properties (e.g., cover by understory herbs and ferns, soil C sequestration, soil C:P and N:P ratios), but not others (e.g., soil fungal biomass, soil N concentration). These results suggest that the legacy of prior presence of Dacrydium may remain for several decades or centuries, and certainly well over 40 years. They also demonstrate that, while large Dacrydium individuals (and their removal) may have important effects in their immediate proximity, within a forest, these effects should only be important in localized patches

  4. Costs and Tradeoffs of Resistance and Tolerance to Belowground Herbivory in Potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Maria Fernanda; Bernal, Hugo; Ñustez, Carlos Eduardo; Thaler, Jennifer; Jander, Georg

    2017-01-01

    The success of sustainable crop production depends on our ability to select or create varieties that can allocate resources to both growth and defence. However, breeding efforts have emphasized increases in yields but have partially neglected defence traits against pests. Estimating the costs of multiple defences against tuber herbivores and the tradeoffs among them, as well as understanding the relationship between yield and multiple defences is still unknown but relevant to both basic and applied ecology. Using twenty commercial potato varieties available in Colombia and the tuber herbivore Tecia solanivora, we tested whether high yielding varieties show a reduction in three types of defence: constitutive and induced resistance, as well as tolerance. Specifically, we determined (1) the costs in terms of yield of all three defences, (2) the possible tradeoffs among them, and (3) if oviposition preference was related to the expression of these defences. We detected no costs in terms of yield of constitutive and induced resistance to tuber damage. We did, however, find evidence of costs of being able to tolerate tuber herbivory. While we found no tradeoffs among any of the estimated defences, there was a positive correlation between aboveground compensatory growth and tolerance in terms of tuber production, suggesting that after damage there are no shifts in the allocation of resources from aboveground to belowground biomass. Finally, we found that females laid more eggs on those varieties with the lowest level of constitutive resistance. In conclusion our findings suggest that in potatoes, breeding for higher yields has not caused any reduction in constitutive or induced resistance to tuber damage. This is not the case for tolerance where those varieties with higher yields are also less likely to tolerate tuber damage. Given the high incidence of tuber pests in Colombia, selecting for higher tolerance could allow for high productivity in the presence of herbivores

  5. Drought effects on litterfall, wood production and belowground carbon cycling in an Amazon forest: results of a throughfall reduction experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brando, Paulo M; Nepstad, Daniel C; Davidson, Eric A; Trumbore, Susan E; Ray, David; Camargo, Plínio

    2008-05-27

    The Amazon Basin experiences severe droughts that may become more common in the future. Little is known of the effects of such droughts on Amazon forest productivity and carbon allocation. We tested the prediction that severe drought decreases litterfall and wood production but potentially has multiple cancelling effects on belowground production within a 7-year partial throughfall exclusion experiment. We simulated an approximately 35-41% reduction in effective rainfall from 2000 through 2004 in a 1ha plot and compared forest response with a similar control plot. Wood production was the most sensitive component of above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) to drought, declining by 13% the first year and up to 62% thereafter. Litterfall declined only in the third year of drought, with a maximum difference of 23% below the control plot. Soil CO2 efflux and its 14C signature showed no significant treatment response, suggesting similar amounts and sources of belowground production. ANPP was similar between plots in 2000 and declined to a low of 41% below the control plot during the subsequent treatment years, rebounding to only a 10% difference during the first post-treatment year. Live aboveground carbon declined by 32.5Mgha-1 through the effects of drought on ANPP and tree mortality. Results of this unreplicated, long-term, large-scale ecosystem manipulation experiment demonstrate that multi-year severe drought can substantially reduce Amazon forest carbon stocks.

  6. Belowground neighbor perception in Arabidopsis thaliana studied by transcriptome analysis: roots of Hieracium pilosella cause biotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eSchmid

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Root-root interactions are much more sophisticated than previously thought, yet the mechanisms of belowground neighbor perception remain largely obscure. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses allow detailed insight into plant reactions to environmental cues.A root interaction trial was set up to explore both morphological and whole genome transcriptional responses in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence or absence of an inferior competitor, Hieracium pilosella.Neighbor perception was indicated by Arabidopsis roots predominantly growing away from the neighbor (segregation, while solitary plants placed more roots towards the middle of the pot. Total biomass remained unaffected. Database comparisons in transcriptome analysis revealed considerable similarity between Arabidopsis root reactions to neighbors and reactions to pathogens. Detailed analyses of the functional category ‘biotic stress’ using MapMan tools found the sub-category ‘pathogenesis-related proteins’ highly significantly induced. A comparison to a study on intraspecific competition brought forward a core of genes consistently involved in reactions to neighbor roots.We conclude that beyond resource depletion roots perceive neighboring roots or their associated microorganisms by a relatively uniform mechanism that involves the strong induction of pathogenesis-related proteins. In an ecological context the findings reveal that belowground neighbor detection may occur independently of resource depletion, allowing for a time advantage for the root to prepare for potential interactions.

  7. BACKGROUND TRACK DENSITY REDUCTION OF 50-HZ-HV ECE-PROCESSED THICK POLYCARBONATE DETECTORS TO IMPROVE LOWER DETECTION LIMIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, M; Hakimi, A; Soltani, Z

    2016-12-01

    A recent novel development of 50-Hz-HV ECE of 1-mm-thick and 250-µm-thick polycarbonate track detectors (PCTDs) has proved some promising results for some health physics, dosimetry and ion-beam-related applications. The method while proved having some good characteristics for some applications provided a relatively higher background track density (BGTD) in particular when very high voltages are applied to the PCTDs. In order to decrease the minimum detection limit (MDL) of the PCTDs and to further promote its applications for low dose, the BGTD was reduced by applying a layer removal methodology applying ethylendiamine (EDA). The effects of EDA concentrations (50, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85 and 90 %) in water at room temperature (26°C) and soaking durations up to 100 min at different EDA concentration on BGTD reduction were studied. The thickness of the layer removed from the surface of a PCTD highly depends on the soaking time and EDA concentration; it increases as the EDA concentration increases up to for example 700 µm after 2 h of soaking in the EDA solution. After ∼10 min of soaking duration at any of the above-stated concentrations, the BGTD reaches its minimum value, a value which differs from concentration to concentration. An EDA concentration of 85 % in water provided the lowest BGTD of 64.06 ± 3.12 tracks cm(- 2); ∼6 times lower than that of its original value. It is shown that the layer removal process does not change the registration characteristics of the PCTD and its appearance significantly. The MDL of the PCTDs depends strongly on the BGTD. The MDL values for a desired confidence level were also studied by three calculation methods. The results of the BGTD and the MDL studies under different conditions applied are presented and discussed.

  8. Soil respiration in Tibetan alpine grasslands: belowground biomass and soil moisture, but not soil temperature, best explain the large-scale patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Geng

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau is an essential area to study the potential feedback effects of soils to climate change due to the rapid rise in its air temperature in the past several decades and the large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC stocks, particularly in the permafrost. Yet it is one of the most under-investigated regions in soil respiration (Rs studies. Here, Rs rates were measured at 42 sites in alpine grasslands (including alpine steppes and meadows along a transect across the Tibetan Plateau during the peak growing season of 2006 and 2007 in order to test whether: (1 belowground biomass (BGB is most closely related to spatial variation in Rs due to high root biomass density, and (2 soil temperature significantly influences spatial pattern of Rs owing to metabolic limitation from the low temperature in cold, high-altitude ecosystems. The average daily mean Rs of the alpine grasslands at peak growing season was 3.92 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, ranging from 0.39 to 12.88 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, with average daily mean Rs of 2.01 and 5.49 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1 for steppes and meadows, respectively. By regression tree analysis, BGB, aboveground biomass (AGB, SOC, soil moisture (SM, and vegetation type were selected out of 15 variables examined, as the factors influencing large-scale variation in Rs. With a structural equation modelling approach, we found only BGB and SM had direct effects on Rs, while other factors indirectly affecting Rs through BGB or SM. Most (80% of the variation in Rs could be attributed to the difference in BGB among sites. BGB and SM together accounted for the majority (82% of spatial patterns of Rs. Our results only support the first hypothesis, suggesting that models incorporating BGB and SM can improve Rs estimation at regional scale.

  9. Luxury consumption of soil nutrients: a possible competitive strategy in above-ground and below-ground biomass allocation and root morphology for slow-growing arctic vegetation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.T.; Williams, M.; Gough, L.; Hobbie, S.E.; Shaver, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    1 A field-experiment was used to determine how plant species might retain dominance in an arctic ecosystem receiving added nutrients. We both measured and modelled the above-ground and below-ground biomass allocation and root morphology of non-acidic tussock tundra near Toolik Lake, Alaska, after 4

  10. Integrating Limiting-Factors Analysis with Process-Based Restoration to Improve Recovery of Endangered Salmonids in the Pacific Northwest, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B. Booth

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Two approaches to ecological restoration planning, limiting-factors analysis and process-based restoration, are employed in efforts to recover endangered salmonid species throughout the Pacific Northwest of North America. Limiting-factors analysis seeks to identify physical limitations to fish production that may be addressed by habitat restoration; it is known as the “Field of Dreams” hypothesis (i.e., if you build it, they will come. Process-based restoration, in contrast, assumes that protection and/or restoration of watershed-scale processes will best achieve self-sustaining habitat features that support salmon populations. Two case studies from the Columbia River basin (northwestern USA display current efforts to integrate these two restoration approaches to improve salmonid populations. Although these examples both identify site-specific habitat features to construct, they also recognize the importance of supporting key watershed processes to achieve restoration goals. The challenge in advancing the practice of restoration planning is not in simply acknowledging the conceptual benefits of process-based restoration while maintaining a traditional focus on enumerating site-specific conditions and identifying habitat-construction projects, but rather in following process-based guidance during recovery planning and, ultimately, through implementation of on-the-ground actions. We encourage a realignment of the restoration community to truly embrace a process-based, multi-scalar view of the riverine landscape.

  11. Jiangrun Copper Limited Company Set its Eyes on the Leading Position of Copper Processing Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Jiangrun Copper Limited Company’s total investment volume for projects of stranded copper wire with high strength and high conductivity as well as high-performance copper and copper alloy wire are 500 million yuan and 360 million yuan, respectively. The company plans to introduce 85 units (sets) of high-end

  12. Simulated Sea-Level Rise Effects on the Above and Below-Ground Growth of Two Tidal Marsh Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, L. M.; Callaway, J. C.; Kelly, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sea-level is expected to rise between 55 and 140 cm in the next century and is likely to have significant effects on the distribution and maintenance of tidal wetlands; however, little is known about the effects of increased sea level on Pacific coast tidal marsh vegetation. We initiated a field experiment in March 2011 to examine how increased depth and duration of inundation affect above and below-ground growth of two tidal wetland plant species: Schoenoplectus acutus and S. americanus. PVC planters, referred to as marsh organs, were installed at fixed elevations in channels at two ancient marshes in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: Browns Island and Rush Ranch. Each marsh organ structure is comprised of five rows of three six-inch PVC pipes, with each row 15cm lower than the row above, and was filled with surrounding mudflat sediment. Elevations span 60 cm and were chosen to be lower than the average current elevations of both species at each marsh to reflect projected increases in sea level. Rhizomes were collected from Browns Island, the less-saline site, and were cut to uniform sizes before planting. In every row, each species was grown individually and together. On a monthly basis, plant heights were recorded and pore-water sulfide concentration, salinity, and soil oxidation-reduction potential were measured. Schoenoplectus americanus growth and density significantly decreased with increased inundation at both sites. Schoenoplectus acutus growth was impacted more significantly at lower elevations at Rush Ranch but had little variation in density and growth across elevations at Browns Island. Salinity and sulfide concentrations varied little across elevations within a site but differed between sites. Above and belowground biomass will be collected in September 2011 to measure total annual productivity. The experiment provides basic yet crucial information on the impacts of increased inundation on tidal wetland vegetation and insight into potential changes in

  13. Limits, discovery and cut optimization for a Poisson process with uncertainty in background and signal efficiency: TRolke 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, J; Rolke, W; López, A

    2010-01-01

    A C++ class was written for the calculation of frequentist confidence intervals using the profile likelihood method. Seven combinations of Binomial, Gaussian, Poissonian and Binomial uncertainties are implemented. The package provides routines for the calculation of upper and lower limits, sensitivity and related properties. It also supports hypothesis tests which take uncertainties into account. It can be used in compiled C++ code, in Python or interactively via the ROOT analysis framework.

  14. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  15. Effects of Savanna trees on soil nutrient limitation and carbon-sequestration potential in dry season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Semi-arid savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use changes, especially around populous areas like Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover and aboveground biomass. Both are major regulators for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4), especially in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine spatial trends and changes of soil parameters and trace-gas fluxes and relate their variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca). For each tree, we selected transects with total nine sampling points under and outside the crown. At each sampling point we measured soil and plant biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, δ13C, microbial biomass C and N, soil respiration, available nutrients, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as belowground biomass, soil temperature and soil water content. Contents and stocks of C and N fractions, Ca2+, K+ and total CEC decreased up to 50% outside the crown. This was unaffected by the tree species, tree size or other tree characteristics. Water content was below the permanent wilting point and independent from tree cover. In all cases tree litter inputs had far a closer C:N ratio than C4-grass litter. Microbial C:N ratio and CO2 efflux was about 30% higher in open area and strongly dependent on mineral N availability. This indicates N limitation and low microbial C use efficiency in soil under open area. We conclude that the spatial structure of aboveground biomass in savanna ecosystems leads to a spatial redistribution of nutrient

  16. Materials processing strategies for colloidal quantum dot solar cells: advances, present-day limitations, and pathways to improvement

    KAUST Repository

    Carey, Graham H.

    2013-05-13

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic devices have improved from initial, sub-1% solar power conversion efficiency to current record performance of over 7%. Rapid advances in materials processing and device physics have driven this impressive performance progress. The highest-efficiency approaches rely on a fabrication process that starts with nanocrystals in solution, initially capped with long organic molecules. This solution is deposited and the resultant film is treated using a solution containing a second, shorter capping ligand, leading to a cross-linked, non-redispersible, and dense layer. This procedure is repeated, leading to the widely employed layer-by-layer solid-state ligand exchange. We will review the properties and features of this process, and will also discuss innovative pathways to creating even higher-performing films and photovoltaic devices.

  17. Analysis and treatment of industrial wastewater through chemical coagulation-adsorption process-A case study of Clariant Pakistan limited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Syed Farman; Shah, Abdul Karim; Mehdi, Ahmad; Memon, Aziza Aftab; Harijan, Khanji; Ali, Zeenat M.

    2012-05-01

    Textile dye manufacture processes are known as the most polluting chemical processes of industrial sectors of the world. Colored wastewaters along with many polluting agents are troublesome. They are heavily polluted with dyes, textile auxiliaries and chemicals. Current study applies a coupled technology for wastewater treatment. Combined coagulation-adsorption process was utilized for treatment of complex nature effluents of dyes, binder emulsion, pigments and textile chemicals plants at Clariant Pakistan. Cost effective coagulant and adsorbent was selected by using waste material from a power generation unit of Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Pakistan. The treated effluent could be reused. Alum+ Activated Carbon, Ferrous sulfate+ Activated Carbon, Ferric chloride + Activated Carbon. Almost complete decolourization was achieved along with reduction in COD up to 65%. Pre and post treatment, TDS, COD, Turbidity and suspended solids were improved.

  18. [Logic model of the Franche-Comté Regional Health Project: advantages and limitations for the evaluation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Claude; Sannino, Nadine; Duboudin, Cédric; Baudier, François; Guillin, Caroline; Billondeau, Christine; Mansion, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The French "Hospitals, patients, health and territories" law of July 2009 created the Regional Health Project (PRS) to support regional health policy, and requires evaluation of these projects. The construction of these projects, which includes prevention planning, care planning, and medical and social welfare planning, presents an unprecedented complexity in France, where evaluation programmes are still in their infancy. To support future evaluations, the Franche-Comté Regional Health Agency (ARS FC), assisted by the expertise of EFECT Consultants, decided to reconstruct the PRS logic model. This article analyzes the advantages and limitations of this approach. The resulting logic model allows visualization of the strategy adopted to achieve the Franche-Comté PRS ambitions and expected results. The model highlights four main aspects of structural change to the health system, often poorly visible in PRS presentation documents. This model also establishes links with the usual public policy evaluation issues and facilitates their prioritization. This approach also provides a better understanding of the importance of analysis of the programme construction in order to be effective rather than direct analysis of the effects, which constitutes the natural tendency of current practice. The main controversial limit concerns the retrospective design of the PRS framework, both in terms of the reliability of interpretation and adoption by actors not directly involved in this initiative.

  19. Storage of intact heads prior to processing limits the shelf-life of fresh-cut Lactuca sativa L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkowska, I.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Harvested lettuce heads are usually transported and stored for some period of time under a variety of conditions prior to processing. During storage, especially under suboptimal conditions, nutritional composition of the harvested produce continues to change. The possible impact of prior storage of

  20. Limitations of the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater by ozonation and by the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, N; Miguel, N; Ovelleiro, J L; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of ozonation and the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process for the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater. The most efficient oxidation process is combined with coagulation-flocculation-decantation and lime-soda ash softening pretreatments. The oxidation in aqueous solution and industrial wastewater (at pH 9.5-12.3) by O3 was carried out using a range of concentration of consumed O3 from 10 to 290 mg/L. A molar ratio of H2O2/O3 from 0.1 to 5.2 with different concentrations of O3 constants was used for the H2O2-O3 process. The maximum cyanide removal obtained in coking wastewater was 90% using a mass ratio of O3/CN(-) of 9.5. Using lower concentrations of O3, cyanide is not removed and can even be generated due to the presence of other cyanide precursor organic micropollutants in the industrial matrix. The concentration of O3 is reduced to half for the same cyanide removal efficiency if the pretreatments are applied to reduce the carbonate and bicarbonate ions. The cyanide removal efficiency in coking wastewater is not improved if the O3 is combined with the H2O2. However, the preliminary cyanide removal treatment in aqueous solution showed an increase in the cyanide removal efficiency for the H2O2-O3 process.

  1. RF Tomography for Below-Ground Imaging of Extended Areas and Close-in Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    23:21:03 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply. 498 IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS, VOL. 7, NO. 3, JULY 2010 investigation region D...targets Authorized licensed use limited to: WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES. Downloaded on August 16,2010 at 23:21:03 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions...Authorized licensed use limited to: WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES. Downloaded on August 16,2010 at 23:21:03 UTC from IEEE Xplore . Restrictions apply

  2. Limits on Gravitino Production and New Processes with Large Missing Transverse Energy in $p\\overline{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=1.8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Affolder, T; Akopian, A M; Albrow, Michael G; Amaral, P; Amendolia, S R; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W J; Atac, Muzaffer; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; De Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, B A; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Bergé, J P; Berryhill, J W; Bevensee, B; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C A; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, Arie; Bokhari, W; Bölla, G; Bonushkin, Yu; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S C; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Bruner, N L; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Campbell, M; Carithers, W C; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Cassada, J A; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F S; Christofek, L S; Chu, M L; Cihangir, S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cooper, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R J; Dagenhart, D; De Jongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Done, J; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erdmann, W; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B L; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Galeotti, S; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Geer, S; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gordon, A; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Groer, L S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Günther, M; Guillian, G; Guimarães da Costa, J; Guo, R S; Haber, C; Hafen, E S; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hinrichsen, B; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R J; Holloway, L E; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J E; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jensen, H; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K M; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R D; Khazins, D M; Kikuchi, T; Kirk, M; Kim, B J; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Köngeter, A; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A J; Korytov, A V; Kovács, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lamoureux, J I; Lancaster, M; Latino, G; LeCompte, T J; Lee, A M; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Lockyer, N; Loken, J G; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E A; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Musy, M; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakaya, T; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y P; Nicolaidi, P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pappas, S P; Partos, D S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R K; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ragan, K; Rakitine, A; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Riegler, W; Ribon, A; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R M; Rossin, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S L; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M J; Siegrist, J L; Signorelli, G; Sill, A F; Sinervo, P K; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, Paris; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P D; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Taylor, W; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Theriot, D; Thurman-Keup, R M; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S M; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, Alvin V; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Trocóniz, J F; Tseng, J; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G V; Vidal, R; Vilar, R; Volobuev, I P; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wahl, J; Wallace, N B; Walsh, A M; Wang, C; Wang, C H; Wang, M J; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yagil, A; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yoh, J K; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2000-01-01

    Events collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) with an energetic jet plus large missing transverse energy can be used to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. We see no deviations from the expected background and set upper limits on the production of new processes. We consider in addition the production of light gravitinos within the framework of the Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking models and set a limit at 95onfidence level on the breaking scale sqrt(F) >= 217 GeV, which excludes gravitino masses smaller than 1.1x10^-5 eV/c^2.

  3. Modeling of Critical Blank Holder Force Based on a Gap Limit and Unbending Strain Energy in Deep Drawing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susila Candra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to predict the minimum varying blank holder force (VBHF during the punch stroke, in order to eliminate wrinkle on cup deep drawing product. The slab method was used to develop mathematical modeling of the minimum VBHF base on a gap limit and unbending energy. The mathematical modeling has been validated to FE simulations for the prevention of wrinkling in the same criterion. Steel sheet of SPCD grade with thickness of 0.2 mm is used to generate the cylindrical cupshaped product with 40 mm diameter. Analytical Results of minimum VBHF have a similar trend result compared to FE simulation. However, the minimum VBHF can be quite effective for preventing the occurrence of excessive wrinkle.

  4. Harmonisation of licensing processes for decommissioning. Options and limitations; Genehmigungsverfahren fuer die Stilllegung der deutschen Kernkraftwerke. Konvoi oder Kakophonie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetzke, Christian

    2016-03-15

    The shutdown of eight reactors in Germany in the wake of Fukushima 2011 and the scheduled phase-out of the remaining units in several steps ending 2022 has obviously triggered a wave of applications for decommissioning and dismantling licences. It would seem natural to strive for a harmonised handling of these processes, analogous to the 'convoi' concept which was successfully employed for licensing and construction of the three most recent German NPPs in the 1980s. However, a comparative analysis shows that the motivation of all players is much different from that of earlier times and that harmonisation of licensing processes for dismantling is not as crucial for operators, authorities and technical support organisations as it was for construction.

  5. Activation of response force by self-splitting objects: where are the limits of feedforward Gestalt processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Filipp; Weber, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-08-21

    Most objects can be recognized easily even when they are partly occluded. This also holds when several overlapping objects share the same surface features (self-splitting objects) which is an illustration of the grouping principle of Good Gestalt. We employed outline and filled contour stimuli in a primed flanker task to test whether the processing of self-splitting objects is in accordance with a simple feedforward model. We obtained priming effects in response time and response force for both types of stimuli, even when increasing the number of occluders up to three. The results for outline contours were in full accordance with a feedforward account. This was not the case for the results for filled contours (i.e., for self-splitting objects), especially under conditions of strong occlusion. We conclude that the implementation of the Good Gestalt principle is fast but still based on recurrent processing.

  6. Potentials and limits of the SNCR process. Three case studies; Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen des SNCR-Verfahrens. Drei Fallstudien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villani, Kenneth; Greef, Johan de [Keppel Seghers Belgium NV, Willebroek (Belgium). Technology; Goethals, Joke [Keppel Seghers Belgium NV, Willebroek (Belgium). R and D Engineering; Montauban, Ian; Langenhove, Herman van [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Forschungsgruppe EnVOC

    2013-03-01

    The authors of this contribution report on the potential of the SNCR process (SNCR - selective non-catalytic reduction) in waste incinerators by means of three examples. The first example describes an engaged measuring campaign in the waste incinerator ISVAG (Antwerp, Belgium). Using a step-by-step approach, the emissions of NO{sub x} were reduced on values lower than 100 mg/Nm{sup 3} under monitoring the influence on the reagent consumption and ammonia slip. Furthermore, an ammonia mass balance was developed. The second example investigates the combination of the SNCR process with a recirculation of exhaust gases on the basis of experiences with two plants. The third example - a retrofitting in Scandinavia - shows the importance of a suitable construction and operation of a SNCR plant.

  7. The sky is the limit? 20 years of small-format aerial photography taken from UAS for monitoring geomorphological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolff, Irene

    2014-05-01

    One hundred years after the first publication on aerial photography taken from unmanned aerial platforms (Arthur Batut 1890), small-format aerial photography (SFAP) became a distinct niche within remote sensing during the 1990s. Geographers, plant biologists, archaeologists and other researchers with geospatial interests re-discovered the usefulness of unmanned platforms for taking high-resolution, low-altitude photographs that could then be digitized and analysed with geographical information systems, (softcopy) photogrammetry and image processing techniques originally developed for digital satellite imagery. Even before the ubiquity of digital consumer-grade cameras and 3D analysis software accessible to the photogrammetric layperson, do-it-yourself remote sensing using kites, blimps, drones and micro air vehicles literally enabled the questing researcher to get their own pictures of the world. As a flexible, cost-effective method, SFAP offered images with high spatial and temporal resolutions that could be ideally adapted to the scales of landscapes, forms and distribution patterns to be monitored. During the last five years, this development has been significantly accelerated by the rapid technological advancements of GPS navigation, autopiloting and revolutionary softcopy-photogrammetry techniques. State-of-the-art unmanned aerial systems (UAS) now allow automatic flight planning, autopilot-controlled aerial surveys, ground control-free direct georeferencing and DEM plus orthophoto generation with centimeter accuracy, all within the space of one day. The ease of use of current UAS and processing software for the generation of high-resolution topographic datasets and spectacular visualizations is tempting and has spurred the number of publications on these issues - but which advancements in our knowledge and understanding of geomorphological processes have we seen and can we expect in the future? This presentation traces the development of the last two decades

  8. A three-minute synthesis and purification of ibuprofen: pushing the limits of continuous-flow processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, David R; Jamison, Timothy F

    2015-01-12

    In a total residence time of three minutes, ibuprofen was assembled from its elementary building blocks with an average yield of above 90% for each step. A scale-up of this five-stage process (3 bond-forming steps, one work-up, and one in-line liquid-liquid separation) provided ibuprofen at a rate of 8.09 g h(-1) (equivalent to 70.8 kg y(-1)) using a system with an overall footprint of half the size of a standard laboratory fume hood. Aside from the high throughput, several other aspects of this synthesis expand the capabilities of continuous-flow processing, including a Friedel-Crafts acylation run under neat conditions and promoted by AlCl3, an exothermic in-line quench of high concentrations of precipitation-prone AlCl3, liquid-liquid separations run at or above 200 psi to provide solvent-free product, and the use of highly aggressive oxidants, such as iodine monochloride. The use of simple, inexpensive, and readily available reagents thus affords a practical synthesis of this important generic pharmaceutical.

  9. Process limitations of a whole-cell P450 catalyzed reaction using a CYP153A-CPR fusion construct expressed in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemo, M. T.; Notonier, S.; Striedner, G.;

    2016-01-01

    fatty acids at the terminal position. ω-Hydroxylated fatty acids can be used in the field of high-end polymers and in the cosmetic and fragrance industry. Here, we have identified the limitations for implementation of a whole-cell P450-catalyzed reaction by characterizing the chosen biocatalyst as well......Cytochrome P450s are interesting biocatalysts due to their ability to hydroxylate non-activated hydrocarbons in a selective manner. However, to date only a few P450-catalyzed processes have been implemented in industry due to the difficulty of developing economically feasible processes...

  10. Deformation processes at the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone: The example of Shimanto accretionary complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzin, G.; Raimbourg, H.; Famin, V.; Jolivet, L.; Kusaba, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In order to constrain deformation processes close to the brittle-ductile transition in seismogenic zone, we have carried out a microstructural study in the Shimanto accretionary complex (Japan), the fossil equivalent of modern Nankai accretionary prisms. The Hyuga Tectonic Mélange was sheared along the plate interface at mean temperatures of 245 °C ± 30 °C, as estimated by Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material (RSCM). It contains strongly elongated quartz ribbons, characterized by very high fluid inclusions density, as well as micro-veins of quartz. Both fluid inclusion planes and micro-veins are preferentially developed orthogonal to the stretching direction. Furthermore, crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of quartz c-axes in the ribbons has maxima parallel to the stretching direction. Recrystallization to a small grain size is restricted to rare deformation bands cutting across the ribbons. In such recrystallized quartz domains, CPO of quartz c-axes are orthogonal to foliation plane. The evolution of deformation micro-processes with increasing temperature can be further analyzed using the Foliated Morotsuka, a slightly higher-grade metamorphic unit (342 ± 30 °C by RSCM) from the Shimanto accretionary complex. In this unit, in contrast to Hyuga Tectonic Mélange, recrystallization of quartz veins is penetrative. CPO of quartz c-axes is concentrated perpendicularly to foliation plane. These variations in microstructures and quartz crystallographic fabric reflect a change in the dominant deformation mechanism with increasing temperatures: above ~ 300 °C, dislocation creep is dominant and results in intense quartz dynamic recrystallization. In contrast, below ~ 300 °C, quartz plasticity is not totally activated and pressure solution is the major deformation process responsible for quartz ribbons growth. In addition, the geometry of the quartz ribbons with respect to the phyllosilicate-rich shear zones shows that bulk rheology is controlled by

  11. Availability and temporal heterogeneity of water supply affect the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore and consequently plant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tsunoda

    Full Text Available We examined how the volume and temporal heterogeneity of water supply changed the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore, and consequently affected plant biomass. Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae seedlings were grown at one per pot under different combinations of water volume (large or small volume and heterogeneity (homogeneous water conditions, watered every day; heterogeneous conditions, watered every 4 days in the presence or absence of a larva of the belowground herbivorous insect, Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae. The larva was confined in different vertical distributions to top feeding zone (top treatment, middle feeding zone (middle treatment, or bottom feeding zone (bottom treatment; alternatively no larva was introduced (control treatment or larval movement was not confined (free treatment. Three-way interaction between water volume, heterogeneity, and the herbivore significantly affected plant biomass. With a large water volume, plant biomass was lower in free treatment than in control treatment regardless of heterogeneity. Plant biomass in free treatment was as low as in top treatment. With a small water volume and in free treatment, plant biomass was low (similar to that under top treatment under homogeneous water conditions but high under heterogeneous ones (similar to that under middle or bottom treatment. Therefore, there was little effect of belowground herbivory on plant growth under heterogeneous water conditions. In other watering regimes, herbivores would be distributed in the shallow soil and reduced root biomass. Herbivore mortality was high with homogeneous application of a large volume or heterogeneous application of a small water volume. Under the large water volume, plant biomass was high in pots in which the herbivore had died. Thus, the combinations of water volume and heterogeneity affected plant growth via the change of a belowground herbivore.

  12. A Hybrid Model for Mapping Relative Differences in Belowground Biomass and Root: Shoot Ratios Using Spectral Reflectance, Foliar N and Plant Biophysical Data within Coastal Marsh

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica L. O’Connell; Byrd, Kristin B; Maggi Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Broad-scale estimates of belowground biomass are needed to understand wetland resiliency and C and N cycling, but these estimates are difficult to obtain because root:shoot ratios vary considerably both within and between species. We used remotely-sensed estimates of two aboveground plant characteristics, aboveground biomass and % foliar N to explore biomass allocation in low diversity freshwater impounded peatlands (Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, CA, USA). We developed a hybrid modeling...

  13. Epiphyte-cover on seagrass (Zostera marina L. leaves impedes plant performance and radial O2 loss from the below-ground tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Elgetti Brodersen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The O2 budget of seagrasses is a complex interaction between several sources and sinks, which is strongly regulated by light availability and mass transfer over the diffusive boundary layer (DBL surrounding the plant. Epiphyte growth on leaves may thus strongly affect the O2 availability of the seagrass plant and its capability to aerate its rhizosphere as a defence against plant toxins.We used electrochemical and fiber-optic microsensors to quantify the O2 flux, DBL and light microclimate around leaves with and without filamentous algal epiphytes. We also quantified the below-ground radial O2 loss from roots (~1 mm from the root-apex to elucidate how this below-ground oxic microzone was affected by the presence of epiphytes.Epiphyte-cover on seagrass leaves (~21% areal cover resulted in reduced light quality and quantity for photosynthesis, thus leading to reduced plant fitness. A ~4 times thicker diffusive boundary layer around leaves with epiphyte-cover impeded gas (and nutrient exchange with the surrounding water-column and thus the amount of O2 passively diffusing into the leaves in darkness. During light exposure of the leaves, radial oxygen loss from the below-ground tissue was ~2 times higher from plants without epiphyte-cover. In contrast, no O2 was detectable at the surface of the root-cap tissue of plants with epiphyte-cover during darkness, leaving the plants more susceptible to sulphide intrusion.Epiphyte growth on seagrass leaves thus negatively affects the light climate and O2 uptake in darkness, hampering the plants performance and thereby reducing the oxidation capability of its below-ground tissue.

  14. Below-ground carbon allocation in mature beech and spruce trees following long-term, experimentally enhanced O{sub 3} exposure in Southern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Christian P., E-mail: Andersen.christian@epa.go [US Environmental Protection Agency, Western Ecology Division, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Ritter, Wilma [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Gregg, Jillian [Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Associates, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E.E. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Canopies of adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) were labeled with CO{sub 2} depleted in {sup 13}C to evaluate carbon allocation belowground. One-half the trees were exposed to elevated O{sub 3} for 6 yrs prior to and during the experiment. Soil-gas sampling wells were placed at 8 and 15 cm and soil CO{sub 2} was sampled during labeling in mid-late August, 2006. In beech, {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} at both depths decreased approximately 50 h after labeling, reflecting rapid translocation of fixed C to roots and release through respiration. In spruce, label was detected in fine-root tissue, but there was no evidence of label in {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2}. The results show that C fixed in the canopy rapidly reaches respiratory pools in beech roots, and suggest that spruce may allocate very little of recently-fixed carbon into root respiration during late summer. A change in carbon allocation belowground due to long-term O{sub 3} exposure was not observed. - Below-ground carbon allocation in mature beech and spruce exposed to ozone.

  15. Silicon limitation on primary production and its destiny in Jiaozhou Bay,China V: Silicon deficit process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dongfang; GAO Zhenhui; WANG Peigang; SUN Peiyan; LIU Shuang

    2005-01-01

    Silicon is a necessary nutrient for diatoms, silicon uptake in diatom reproduction decreased seawater silicon content. This paper clarified the characteristics of silicon transferring in the sea, which plays an important role in phytoplankton growth, zooplankton graze and marine ecosystem. Analysis revealed that silicate is supplied by terrestrial sources, through plankton uptake, death, and eventually deposits to the sea bottom, and cannot diffuse upward. This is a general silicon deficit process. Many global marine waters showed the same silicon transfer route: land→silicon biogeochemical process→sea bottom. River flow brings abundant silicate into marine waters, silicate concentration in the waters decreased in the distance away from the river estuaries. In discussion of silicon characteristics and its transfer route, it was considered that the main factor controlling the mechanism of diatom and non-diatom red tides occurrence is silicon, and the changes in silicon source. Human activities, such as sea-route cutting by building embankment and dam, and silicon supplement by the sea, such as sandstorm, rainstorm and storm tide, have largely impaired the earth ecosystem and hugely threatened the human existence. It is suggested in this paper that man should resume the original face of the Si input into the sea to keep natural ecosystem in sustainable pattern.

  16. Limits and failures in hydrology: examples and lessons learned from three decades of process oriented hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    In hydrological sciences there have been rather many attempts to develop new mathematical analysis and modelling tools. Some (or even many?) of them failed or were at least only partially successful. Unfortunately, such nun-successful attempts are hardly reported on, because our common academic recognition is based on reports about success only. With all due respect to successful attempts, the scientific community could benefit a lot from reports of unsuccessful attempts or unexpected results. Therefore, in this contribution, the author presents examples of modelling failures from his own experiences during the last three decades. Emphasis is given on results obtained from process-oriented hydrological models, where the "right answer" was obtained "for the wrong reasons". Such example comprise, for instance, modelling infiltration experiments at the plot scale, modelling runoff generation from hillslope scale and in experimental catchments and modelling runoff from glaciated catchments It is explained how the "wrong reasons" could be identified and what was learned from such failures. It is argued that failures, which causes can be identified by the modeller or anybody else, could significantly contribute to a progress in hydrological system understanding or - at least - to the identification of research needs. Identification of causes of failure may even contribute more to scientific progress then brute force modelling of parameter sensitivity and uncertainty.

  17. Effects of elevated pO3 on carbon cycle between above and belowground organs of trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ping; Rennenberg Heinz; Matyssek Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Translocation of carbohydrate from leaves to roots via phloem and reallocation from roots to leaves via xylem regulate the allocation of carbon (C) between above and belowground organs of trees. To quantitatively analyze effects of elevated ozone concentrations pO3 on the internal cycle of C, juvenile beech and spruce were grown in phytotrons and exposed to ambient and elevated pO3 (i.e. twice-ambient O3 levels, restricted to < 150 ppb) for two growing seasons. The translocation of C in the phloem and xylem was quantitatively studied by investigating the phloem/xylem-loading of sugars, the differentiation of stem conductive tissue and the hourly water flow through the stem. Results in the present study shown, elevated pO3 significantly decreased C translocation from shoot to roots in beech by reducing both sugar concentration in the phloem and conductive phloem area. Elevated pO3 also significantly decreased C reallocation from the roots to the shoot in beech by reducing both of sugar concentration in the xylem and transpiration rate. The adverse effects of elevated pO3 on C translocation in the phloem and xylem, however, were small in spruce.Contrasting to beech, spruce is less sensitive to elevated pO3, regarding to phloem differentiation and sugar concentrations in the phloem and xylem.

  18. Depression of belowground respiration is more pronounced than enhancement of photosynthesis during the first year after nitrogen fertilization of a mature Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Black, T. A.; Jassal, R.; Nesic, Z.; Bruemmer, C.

    2008-05-01

    Nitrogen (N) additions to forest have shown variable effects on both respiration and photosynthesis. With increasing rates of anthropogenic N deposition, there is a strong need to understand the ecosystem response to N inputs. We investigated how N fertilization affects the ecosystem carbon (C) balance of a 57-year-old coast Douglas-fir stand in British Columbia, Canada, based on eddy-covariance (EC) and soil-chamber (fertilized and control plots) measurements and process-based modeling. The stand was fertilized by helicopter with urea at 200 kg N ha-1 in January 2007. A land surface model (Ecosystem Atmosphere Simulation Scheme, EASS) was combined with an ecosystem model (Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator, BEPS) and a coupled C and N subroutine was incorporated into the integrated EASS-BEPS model in this study. This half-hourly time step model was run continuously for the period from 2001 to 2007 in two scenarios: with and without fertilization. Modeled C fluxes without fertilization [net ecosystem productivity (NEP), gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (Re) and belowground respiration (Rs)] agreed well with EC and soil chamber measurements over diurnal, seasonal and annual time scales for 2001 to 2006; while simulated NEP, GPP, Re and Rs with fertilization reasonably followed EC and chamber measurements in 2007 (545 vs. 520, 2163 vs. 2155, 1618 vs. 1635, and 920 vs. 906 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively). Comparison of EC-determined C fluxes in 2007 with model simulations without fertilization suggests that annual Re decreased by 6.7% (1635 vs. 1752 g C m-2), gross primary productivity (GPP) increased by 6.8% (2155 vs. 2017 g C m-2), and annual NEP increased by 96.2% (520 vs. 265 g C m-2) due to fertilization. The modeled reduction in Rs (9.6%, comparing modeled values without and with fertilization: 1008 vs. 920 g C m-2 yr-1) is consistent with that measured using the soil chambers (~11.5%, comparing CO2 effluxes from control and fertilized

  19. Investigation of the physiological response to oxygen limited process conditions of Pichia pastoris Mut(+) strain using a two-compartment scale-down system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorantfy, Bettina; Jazini, Mohammadhadi; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Inhomogeneities in production-scale bioreactors influence microbial growth and product quality due to insufficient mixing and mass transfer. For this reason, lots of efforts are being made to investigate the effects of gradients that impose stress in large-scale reactors in laboratory scale. We have implemented a scale-down model which allows separating a homogeneous part, a stirred tank reactor (STR), and a plug flow reactor (PFR) which mimics the inhomogeneous regimes of the large-scale fermenters. This scale-down model shows solutions to trigger oxygen limited conditions in the PFR part of the scale-down setup for physiological analysis. The goal of the study was to investigate the scale-up relevant physiological responses of Pichia pastoris strain to oxygen limited process conditions in the above mentioned two-compartment bioreactor setup. Experimental results with non-induced cultures show that the specific growth rate significantly decreased with increasing the exposure time to oxygen limitation. In parallel more by-products were produced. Examining physiological scalable key parameters, multivariate data analyses solely using on-line data revealed that different exposures to the oxygen limitation significantly affected the culture performance. This work with the small scale-downs setup reflects new approaches for a valuable process development tool for accelerating strain characterization or for verifying CFD simulations of large-scale bioreactors. As a novel methodological achievement, the combination of the two-compartment scale-down system with the proposed multivariate techniques of solely using on-line data is a valuable tool for recognition of stress effects on the culture performance for physiological bioprocess scale-up issues.

  20. Development of allometric models for above and belowground biomass in swidden cultivation fallows of Northern Laos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNicol, Iain M.; Berry, Nicholas J.; Bruun, Thilde Bech

    2015-01-01

    fields and patches of mature forest. Quantifying tree biomass in these landscapes is limited by the availability of reliable allometric models, hindering accurate carbon stock estimation and thus quantification of GHG emission associated with land use transitions. We therefore developed new allometric...... in this region, which we hypothesised would be a major carbon pool given that resprouting, and associated high root biomass, is a common physiological/morphological trait in regularly disturbed ecosystems. We found that a general model including tree diameter (DBH, cm) and height (H, m) was best for estimating...... of estimates of tree biomass and its distribution among different pools in swidden fallows. This information is crucial in better quantifying carbon stock changes resulting from the conversion of swidden land to other land uses....

  1. Inappropriate Use of the Quasi-Reversible Electrode Kinetic Model in Simulation-Experiment Comparisons of Voltammetric Processes That Approach the Reversible Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Simonov, Alexandr N.

    2014-08-19

    Many electrode processes that approach the "reversible" (infinitely fast) limit under voltammetric conditions have been inappropriately analyzed by comparison of experimental data and theory derived from the "quasi-reversible" model. Simulations based on "reversible" and "quasi-reversible" models have been fitted to an extensive series of a.c. voltammetric experiments undertaken at macrodisk glassy carbon (GC) electrodes for oxidation of ferrocene (Fc0/+) in CH3CN (0.10 M (n-Bu)4NPF6) and reduction of [Ru(NH 3)6]3+ and [Fe(CN)6]3- in 1 M KCl aqueous electrolyte. The confidence with which parameters such as standard formal potential (E0), heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E0 (k0), charge transfer coefficient (α), uncompensated resistance (Ru), and double layer capacitance (CDL) can be reported using the "quasi- reversible" model has been assessed using bootstrapping and parameter sweep (contour plot) techniques. Underparameterization, such as that which occurs when modeling CDL with a potential independent value, results in a less than optimal level of experiment-theory agreement. Overparameterization may improve the agreement but easily results in generation of physically meaningful but incorrect values of the recovered parameters, as is the case with the very fast Fc0/+ and [Ru(NH3)6]3+/2+ processes. In summary, for fast electrode kinetics approaching the "reversible" limit, it is recommended that the "reversible" model be used for theory-experiment comparisons with only E0, R u, and CDL being quantified and a lower limit of k 0 being reported; e.g., k0 ≥ 9 cm s-1 for the Fc0/+ process. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  2. Belowground fungal associations and water interact to influence the compensatory response of Ipomopsis aggregata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsup, Cassandra M; Paige, Ken N

    2016-02-01

    Although the concept that some plants benefit from being eaten is counterintuitive, there is now considerable evidence demonstrating enhanced fitness following herbivory. It has been assumed that plants growing in high resource conditions are the ones best able to compensate for herbivory. However, just the opposite has been found for dicotyledonous plants exhibiting patterns of overcompensation, with most occurring in resource-poor conditions. Long-term studies of the monocarpic biennial, scarlet gilia, Ipomopsis aggregata growing in resource-poor conditions have shown that ungulate herbivory by mule deer and elk can result in a threefold increase in plant fitness over uneaten controls. These observations led us to hypothesize that fungal associations would facilitate the compensatory response most commonly observed in this Arizona population of scarlet gilia; perhaps mutualistic associations with fungi, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, would explain the phenomenon of overcompensation altogether. Fungal removal experiments, using Captan®, a commercially available fungicide, showed that a reduction in fungal abundance altered the compensatory response following ungulate herbivory, particularly in years in which water was limited, increasing fitness compensation from equal compensation to overcompensation. A multifactorial experiment revealed that the interactive effects of water and fungicide maximized fruit production following herbivory. Our results are counter to the “modification of tolerance hypothesis” in which plants associating with mycorrhizal fungi will have higher tolerance to herbivory. It is likely that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and dark septate endophytes compete with plants for photosynthates following herbivory, thereby limiting the magnitude of compensation. Thus, fungi appear to be parasitic on scarlet gilia following ungulate herbivory.

  3. Plant diversity and overyielding: insights from belowground facilitation of intercropping in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long; Tilman, David; Lambers, Hans; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2014-07-01

    Despite increasing evidence that plant diversity in experimental systems may enhance ecosystem productivity, the mechanisms causing this overyielding remain debated. Here, we review studies of overyielding observed in agricultural intercropping systems, and show that a potentially important mechanism underlying such facilitation is the ability of some crop species to chemically mobilize otherwise-unavailable forms of one or more limiting soil nutrients such as phosphorus (P) and micronutrients (iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and manganese (Mn)). Phosphorus-mobilizing crop species improve P nutrition for themselves and neighboring non-P-mobilizing species by releasing acid phosphatases, protons and/or carboxylates into the rhizosphere which increases the concentration of soluble inorganic P in soil. Similarly, on calcareous soils with a very low availability of Fe and Zn, Fe- and Zn-mobilizing species, such as graminaceous monocotyledonous and cluster-rooted species, benefit themselves, and also reduce Fe or Zn deficiency in neighboring species, by releasing chelating substances. Based on this review, we hypothesize that mobilization-based facilitative interactions may be an unsuspected, but potentially important mechanism enhancing productivity in both natural ecosystems and biodiversity experiments. We discuss cases in which nutrient mobilization might be occurring in natural ecosystems, and suggest that the nutrient mobilization hypothesis merits formal testing in natural ecosystems.

  4. Total belowground carbon flux in subalpine forests is related to leaf area index, soil nitrogen, and tree height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Ryan, Michael G.; Bradford, John B.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Birdsey, R.

    2016-01-01

    In forests, total belowground carbon (C) flux (TBCF) is a large component of the C budget and represents a critical pathway for delivery of plant C to soil. Reducing uncertainty around regional estimates of forest C cycling may be aided by incorporating knowledge of controls over soil respiration and TBCF. Photosynthesis, and presumably TBCF, declines with advancing tree size and age, and photosynthesis increases yet C partitioning to TBCF decreases in response to high soil fertility. We hypothesized that these causal relationships would result in predictable patterns of TBCF, and partitioning of C to TBCF, with natural variability in leaf area index (LAI), soil nitrogen (N), and tree height in subalpine forests in the Rocky Mountains, USA. Using three consecutive years of soil respiration data collected from 22 0.38-ha locations across three 1-km2 subalpine forested landscapes, we tested three hypotheses: (1) annual soil respiration and TBCF will show a hump-shaped relationship with LAI; (2) variability in TBCF unexplained by LAI will be related to soil nitrogen (N); and (3) partitioning of C to TBCF (relative to woody growth) will decline with increasing soil N and tree height. We found partial support for Hypothesis 1 and full support for Hypotheses 2 and 3. TBCF, but not soil respiration, was explained by LAI and soil N patterns (r2 = 0.49), and the ratio of annual TBCF to TBCF plus aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) was related to soil N and tree height (r2 = 0.72). Thus, forest C partitioning to TBCF can vary even within the same forest type and region, and approaches that assume a constant fraction of TBCF relative to ANPP may be missing some of this variability. These relationships can aid with estimates of forest soil respiration and TBCF across landscapes, using spatially explicit forest data such as national inventories or remotely sensed data products.

  5. Evaluation of limiting factors affecting photovoltaic performance of low-temperature-processed TiO₂ films in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taek-Yong; Kim, Hui-Seon; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2014-04-14

    Limiting factors affecting photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cell employing low-temperature-processed TiO2 films were investigated. TiO2 films were prepared at a low temperature of 200 °C using the normal alcohol-containing binder-free TiO2 paste (LT200). Their photovoltaic performance was compared to a high-temperature (550 °C) annealed TiO2 film prepared using a polymer binder containing TiO2 paste (HT550). Compared to the proportional increase in conversion efficiency with TiO2 film thickness upto 14 μm for HT550, the increase in efficiency was terminated at relatively smaller thickness of about 8 μm for LT200 mainly due to unaugmented photocurrent. From the transient photocurrent-voltage studies, the electron transport rate was found to be almost identical, while charge recombination was one order of magnitude faster for LT200. Consequently, the electron diffusion length was more than 2-3 times shorter for LT200 than for HT550. Electron diffusion length and electron life time obtained from electrochemical impedance analysis were well consistent with those observed from transient measurement. Density of states (DOS) was evaluated to be shallow and narrow in LT200, which was responsible for limiting photovoltaic performance in the low-temperature processed TiO2 film.

  6. Carbon input belowground is the major C flux contributing to leaf litter mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubino, Mauro; Dungait; Evershed

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning of the quantities of C lost by leaf litter through decomposition into (i) CO2 efflux to the atmosphere and (ii) C input to soil organic matter (SOM) is essential in order to develop a deeper understanding of the litter-soil biogeochemical continuum. However, this is a challenging task...... due to the occurrence of many different processes contributing to litter biomass loss. With the aim of quantifying different fluxes of C lost by leaf litter decomposition, a field experiment was performed at a short rotation coppice poplar plantation in central Italy. Populus nigra leaf litter......, enriched in 13C (d13C +160‰) was placed within collars to decompose in direct contact with the soil (d13C -26‰) for 11 months. CO2 efflux from within the collars and its isotopic composition were determined at monthly intervals. After 11 months, remaining litter and soil profiles (0–20 cm) were sampled...

  7. Connecting plant-microbial interactions above and belowground: a fungal endophyte affects decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Alisha; Clay, Keith; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2005-10-01

    Mutualisms can strongly affect the structure of communities, but their influence on ecosystem processes is not well resolved. Here we show that a plant-microbial mutualism affects the rate of leaf litter decomposition using the widespread interaction between tall fescue grass (Lolium arundinaceum) and the fungal endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum. In grasses, fungal endophytes live symbiotically in the aboveground tissues, where the fungi gain protection and nutrients from their host and often protect host plants from biotic and abiotic stress. In a field experiment, decomposition rate depended on a complex interaction between the litter source (collected from endophyte-infected or endophyte-free plots), the decomposition microenvironment (endophyte-infected or endophyte-free plots), and the presence of mesoinvertebrates (manipulated by the mesh size of litter bags). Over all treatments, decomposition was slower for endophyte-infected fescue litter than for endophyte-free litter. When mesoinvertebrates were excluded using fine mesh and litter was placed in a microenvironment with the endophyte, the difference between endophyte-infected and endophyte-free litter was strongest. In the presence of mesoinvertebrates, endophyte-infected litter decomposed faster in microenvironments with the endophyte than in microenvironments lacking the endophyte, suggesting that plots differ in the detritivore assemblage. Indeed, the presence of the endophyte in plots shifted the composition of Collembola, with more Hypogastruridae in the presence of the endophyte and more Isotomidae in endophyte-free plots. In a separate outdoor pot experiment, we did not find strong effects of the litter source or the soil microbial/microinvertebrate community on decomposition, which may reflect differences between pot and field conditions or other differences in methodology. Our work is among the first to demonstrate an effect of plant-endophyte mutualisms on ecosystem processes under field

  8. Low below-ground organic carbon storage in a subarctic Alpine permafrost environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, M.; Kuhry, P.; Hugelius, G.

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the soil organic carbon (SOC) storage in Tarfala Valley, northern Sweden. Field inventories, upscaled based on land cover, show that this alpine permafrost environment does not store large amounts of SOC, with an estimate mean of 0.9 ± 0.2 kg C m-2 for the upper meter of soil. This is 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than what has been reported for lowland permafrost terrain. The SOC storage varies for different land cover classes and ranges from 0.05 kg C m-2 for stone-dominated to 8.4 kg C m-2 for grass-dominated areas. No signs of organic matter burial through cryoturbation or slope processes were found, and radiocarbon-dated SOC is generally of recent origin (distribution in Tarfala Valley, based on the bottom temperature of snow measurements and a logistic regression model, showed that at an altitude where permafrost is probable the SOC storage is very low. In the high-altitude permafrost zones (above 1500 m), soils store only ca. 0.1 kg C m-2. Under future climate warming, an upward shift of vegetation zones may lead to a net ecosystem C uptake from increased biomass and soil development. As a consequence, alpine permafrost environments could act as a net carbon sink in the future, as there is no loss of older or deeper SOC from thawing permafrost.

  9. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  10. Legacies of Land Use Trajectories on Belowground Dynamics in Post-agricultural Tropical Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, E. E.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2012-12-01

    Complex interactions between microbes, plant and animal residues, and the soil environment limit our understanding of how soil microbial communities contribute to the formation, stabilization, and loss of organic matter from soils. Our research explores how alternative successional trajectories following agricultural abandonment affect the establishment of novel plant communities and how these changes affect soil microbial community composition and function, in particular the stabilization of soil organic matter (SOM). We are conducting this research in the subtropical dry forest life zone of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands where island-wide abandonment of sugarcane has resulted in a mosaic of sites in different stages of forest succession or currently active pasture. We identified replicate sites with the following post-sugarcane trajectories: 1) immediate abandonment and natural forest regeneration, 2) immediate abandonment with low intensity intermediate agricultural use, followed by reforestation with timber plantation, which are no longer being managed, 3) long intermediate pasture use and recent natural forest regeneration, and 4) establishment of pasture which are currently actively grazed. The first two trajectories yielded 40-year old mixed-species secondary forests. The third trajectory yielded young (10-year) secondary forest dominated by 1-2 tree species. We hypothesized that different plant species composition due to differing successional trajectories would drive changes in soil microbial community structure and function and affect soil C chemistry and turnover. We found greater total microbial biomass in the litter layer of the secondary forests, regardless of successional trajectory, compared to currently active pastures. Microbial biomass was also significantly higher in surface soils (0-10 cm) than in deeper soils (30-40 cm). Soil microbial community composition in secondary forests differed with successional trajectories. Active pasture litter

  11. Effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on aboveground-belowground systems: a case study with plants, their mutualistic bacteria and root / shoot herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Michael William Ryalls

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between above- and belowground herbivores have been prominent in the field of aboveground-belowground ecology from the outset, although little is known about how climate change affects these organisms when they share the same plant. Additionally, the interactive effects of multiple factors associated with climate change such as elevated temperature (eT and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2 are untested. We investigated how eT and eCO2 affected larval development of the lucerne weevil (Sitona discoideus and colonisation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum, on three cultivars of a common host plant, lucerne (Medicago sativa. Sitona discoideus larvae feed on root nodules housing N2-fixing rhizobial bacteria, allowing us to test the effects of eT and eCO2 on three trophic levels. Moreover, we assessed the influence of these factors on plant growth. eT increased plant growth rate initially (6, 8 and 10 weeks after sowing, with cultivar ‘Sequel’ achieving the greatest height. Inoculation with aphids, however, reduced plant growth at week 14. eT severely reduced root nodulation by 43%, whereas eCO2 promoted nodulation by 56%, but only at ambient temperatures. Weevil presence increased net root biomass and nodulation, by 31 and 45%, respectively, showing an overcompensatory plant growth response. Effects of eT and eCO2 on root nodulation were mirrored by weevil larval development; eT and eCO2 reduced and increased larval development, respectively. Contrary to expectations, aphid colonisation was unaffected by eT or eCO2, but there was a near-significant 10% reduction in colonisation rates on plants with weevils present belowground. The contrasting effects of eT and eCO2 on weevils potentially occurred through changes in root nodulation patterns.

  12. Interactive effects of belowground organic matter input, increased precipitation and clipping on soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a temperate steppe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Ma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM inputs, increased precipitation and clipping (reducing belowground photosynthates allocation are predicted to affect soil C and N cycling in temperate grassland ecosystems. However, the interactive effects between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil C and N mineralization in temperate steppes are still poorly understood. A field manipulation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of SOM inputs, increased precipitation, clipping and their interactions on soil C and N mineralization in a temperate steppe of northeastern China from 2010 to 2011. The results showed that SOM inputs significantly increased soil C mineralization rate (CMR and net N mineralization rate (NMR. Increased precipitation-induced enhancement of soil CMR essentially ceased after the first year, stimulation of soil NMR and NNR continued into the second year. However, clipping only marginally decreased soil CMR and NMR during the two years. There were significant synergistic interactions between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil CMR and NMR, as SOM inputs (or increased precipitation showed greater effects on soil CMR and NMR under clipped plots than under unclipped plots, which could be explained by the relative shifts in soil microbial community structure because of bacterial biomass increases, and by the relative decreases in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biomass due to the reduction of belowground photosynthates allocation. These results highlight the importance of plants in mediating the responses of soil C and N mineralization to potentially increased SOM and precipitation by controlling belowground photosynthates allocation in the temperate steppe. Thus, the findings have important implications for improving prediction of C and N sequestration potential and its feedbacks to climate change in temperate steppe ecosystems.

  13. Impact of long-term wetting on belowground respiration and methanogenesis in Luther Bog, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Marie; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands play a major role in the global carbon cycle. They store one-third of total world soil carbon, sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) and release CO2 and methane (CH4). Climate and land-use change are predicted to cause either wetter winters and wetter summers or wetter winters and drier summers in the area where northern peatlands are located. Feedback on processes in the peat is poorly understood on the time scale of decades. In this study, we investigated impacts of long-term wetting and long-term fluctuating water table on potential CO2 and CH4 production rates and organic matter quality of the fractions bulk peat, pore water and leachate. Bulk peat potential CO2 production rates of 2.38 to 25.55 μmol g-1 d-1 (aerobic) and 1.53 to 7.33 μmol g-1 d-1 (anaerobic) decreased with depth along with a decrease in organic matter quality. Potential CH4 production rates (0.002 to 2.60 μmol g-1 d-1) increased with anaerobic conditions and a lack of electron acceptors rather than being dependent on the availability of labile organic matter. This pattern was less evident in solute fraction samples where labile compounds in top layers were probably either too labile to be detected or water movement obscured differences between depths. Bulk peat potential anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production increased through long-term wetting. As wetting did not change organic matter quality or aerobic production rates, increased anaerobic production rates likely originate from microorganisms adapted to anaerobic conditions. All indicators of organic matter quality, FTIR ratios, SUVA254, E2:E3, HIX, FI and PARAFAC, provided similar results. Other than expected, wetting did not result in higher organic matter quality in bulk peat and leachate. Drier conditions in summer led to reduced organic matter quality. In pore water, long-term wetter conditions resulted in a higher organic matter quality. Slow-down of decomposition due to anaerobic conditions is unlikely, as this was not the case with

  14. Comparative Metagenomics Reveal Phylum Level Temporal and Spatial Changes in Mycobiome of Belowground Parts of Crocus sativus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Singh, Heikham Russiachand; Gowda, Malali; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Plant-fungal associations have been explored by routine cultivation based approaches and cultivation based approaches cannot catalogue more than 5% of fungal diversity associated with any niche. In the present study, an attempt has been made to catalogue fungal diversity associated with belowground parts i.e. rhizosphere and cormosphere, of Crocus sativus (an economically important herb) during two growth stages, using cultivation independent ITS gene targeted approach, taking bulk soil as reference. The 454 pyrosequencing sequence data analysis suggests that the fungal diversity was niche and growth stage specific. Fungi diversity, in the present case, was not only different between the two organs (roots and corm) but the dominance pattern varies between the cormosphere during two growth stages. Zygomycota was dominant fungal phylum in the rhizosphere whereas Basidiomycota was dominant in cormosphere during flowering stage. However in cormosphere though Basidiomycota was dominant phylum during flowering stage but Zygomycota was dominant during dormant stage. Interestingly, in cormosphere, the phyla which was dominant at dormant stage was rare at flowering stage and vice-versa (Basidiomycota: Flowering = 93.2% Dormant = 0.05% and Zygomycota: Flowering = 0.8% Dormant = 99.7%). At genus level, Rhizopus was dominant in dormant stage but was rare in flowering stage (Rhizopus: Dormant = 99.7% Flowering = 0.55%). This dynamics is not followed by the bulk soil fungi which was dominated by Ascomycota during both stages under study. The genus Fusarium, whose species F. oxysporum causes corm rot in C. sativus, was present during both stages with slightly higher abundance in roots. Interestingly, the abundance of Rhizopus varied a great deal in two stages in cormosphere but the abundance of Fusarium was comparable in two growth stages (Bulk soil Flowering = 0.05%, Rhizosphere Flowering = 1.4%, Cormosphere Flowering = 0.06%, Bulk soil Dormant = 2.47% and cormosphere dormant

  15. Belowground ecology of scarabs feeding on grass roots: current knowledge and future directions for management in Australasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eFrew

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many scarab beetles spend the majority of their lives belowground as larvae, feeding on grass roots. Many of these larvae are significant pests, causing damage to crops and grasslands. Damage by larvae of the greyback cane beetle (Dermolepida albohirtum, for example, can cause financial losses of up to AU$40 million annually to the Australian sugarcane industry. We review the ecology of some scarab larvae in Australasia, focusing on three subfamilies; Dynastinae, Rutelinae and Melolonthinae, containing key pest species. Although considerable research on the control of some scarab pests has been carried out in Australasia, for some species, the basic biology and ecology remains largely unexplored. We synthesize what is known about these scarab larvae and outline key knowledge gaps to highlights future research directions with a view to improve pest management. We do this by presenting an overview of the scarab larval host plants and feeding behavior; the impacts of abiotic (temperature, moisture and fertilization and biotic (pathogens, natural enemies and microbial symbionts factors on scarab larvae and conclude with how abiotic and biotic factors can be applied in agriculture for improved pest management, suggesting future research directions.Several host plant microbial symbionts, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endophytes, can improve plant tolerance to scarabs and reduce larval performance, which have shown promise for use in pest management. In addition to this, several microbial scarab pathogens have been isolated for commercial use in pest management with particularly promising results. The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae caused a 50% reduction in cane beetle larvae while natural enemies such as entomopathogenic nematodes have also shown potential as a biocontrol. Continued research should focus on filling the gaps in the knowledge of the basic ecology and feeding behavior of scarab larval species within Australasia

  16. Above- and belowground controls on water use by trees of different wood types in an eastern US deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Frederick C; Woodruff, David R; Eissenstat, David M; Lin, Henry S; Adams, Thomas S; McCulloh, Katherine A

    2013-04-01

    Stomata control tree transpiration by sensing and integrating environmental signals originating in the atmosphere and soil, and co-occurring species may differ in inherent stomatal sensitivity to these above- and belowground signals and in the types of signals to which they respond. Stomatal responsiveness to environmental signals is likely to differ across species having different types of wood (e.g., ring-porous, diffuse-porous and coniferous) because each wood type differs in the structure, size and spatial distribution of its xylem conduits as well as in the scaling of hydraulic properties with stem diameter. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of variation in soil water availability and atmospheric evaporative demand on stomatal regulation of transpiration in seven co-occurring temperate deciduous forest species representing three wood types. We measured whole-tree sap flux and soil and atmospheric variables in a mixed deciduous forest in central Pennsylvania over the course of a growing season characterized by severe drought and large fluctuations in atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (D). The relative sensitivity of sap flux to soil drying was ∼2.2-2.3 times greater in the diffuse-porous and coniferous species than in the ring-porous species. Stomata of the ring-porous oaks were only about half as responsive to increased D as those of trees of the other two wood types. These differences in responsiveness to changes in the below- and aboveground environment implied that regulation of leaf water potential in the ring-porous oaks was less stringent than that in the diffuse-porous angiosperms or the conifers. The results suggest that increases in the frequency or intensity of summer droughts in the study region could have multiple consequences for forest function, including altered successional time courses or climax species composition and cumulative effects on whole-tree architecture, resulting in a structural and physiological legacy that

  17. Can ectomycorrhizal symbiosis and belowground plant traits be used as ecological tools to mitigate erosion on degraded slopes in the ultramafic soils of New Caledonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenois, Julien; Carriconde, Fabian; Rey, Freddy; Stokes, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    New Caledonia is an archipelago in the South West Pacific located just above the Tropic of Capricorn. The main island is bisected by a continuous mountain chain whose highest peaks reach more than 1 600 m. With mean annual rainfall above 2 000 mm in the South of the main island, frequent downpours and steep slopes, its soils are prone to water erosion. Deforestation, fires and mining activity are the main drivers of water erosion. Stakes are high to mitigate the phenomenon: extraction of nickel from ultramafic substrates (one third of the whole territory) is the main economic activity; New Caledonia is considered as a biodiversity hotspot. Restoration ecology is seen as a key approach for tackling such environmental challenges. Soil microorganisms could play significant roles in biological processes such as plant nutrition and plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Microorganisms could increase soil aggregate stability and thus mitigate soil erodibility. Plant roots increase soil cohesion through exudation and decomposition processes. To date, few studies have collected data on the soil aggregate stability of steep slopes affected by erosion and, to our knowledge, interactions between ectomycorrhizas (ECM), roots and erodibility of ultramafic soils have never been considered. The objective of our study is to assess the influence of ECM symbiosis and plant root traits on the erodibility of ultramafic soils of New Caledonia and answer the following questions: 1/ What is the influence of plant root traits of vegetal communities and ECM fungal diversity on soil erodibility? 2/ What are the belowground plant traits of some mycorrhized endemic species used in ecological restoration? 3/ What is the influence of plant root traits and ECM fungal inoculation on soil erodibility? At the scale of plant communities, five types of vegetation have been chosen in the South of the main island: degraded ligno-herbaceous shrubland, ligno-herbaceous shrubland, degraded humid

  18. Assessment of Current Process Modeling Approaches to Determine Their Limitations, Applicability and Developments Needed for Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2006-11-30

    This report describes the status of the current process modeling approaches to predict the behavior and flow of fiber-filled thermoplastics under injection molding conditions. Previously, models have been developed to simulate the injection molding of short-fiber thermoplastics, and an as-formed composite part or component can then be predicted that contains a microstructure resulting from the constituents’ material properties and characteristics as well as the processing parameters. Our objective is to assess these models in order to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). First, the concentration regimes are summarized to facilitate the understanding of different types of fiber-fiber interaction that can occur for a given fiber volume fraction. After the formulation of the fiber suspension flow problem and the simplification leading to the Hele-Shaw approach, the interaction mechanisms are discussed. Next, the establishment of the rheological constitutive equation is presented that reflects the coupled flow/orientation nature. The decoupled flow/orientation approach is also discussed which constitutes a good simplification for many applications involving flows in thin cavities. Finally, before outlining the necessary developments for LFTs, some applications of the current orientation model and the so-called modified Folgar-Tucker model are illustrated through the fiber orientation predictions for selected LFT samples.

  19. Tricholoma matsutake in a natural Pinus densiflora forest: correspondence between above- and below-ground genets, association with multiple host trees and alteration of existing ectomycorrhizal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Chunlan; Narimatsu, Maki; Nara, Kazuhide; Hogetsu, Taizo

    2006-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake (matsutake) is an ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus that produces economically important mushrooms in Japan. Here, we use microsatellite markers to identify genets of matsutake sporocarps and below-ground ECM tips, as well as associated host genotypes of Pinus densiflora. We also studied ECM fungal community structure inside, beneath and outside the matsutake fairy rings, using morphological and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) polymorphism analysis. Based on sporocarp samples, one to four genets were found within each fairy ring, and no genetic differentiation among six sites was detected. Matsutake ECM tips were only found beneath fairy rings and corresponded with the genotypes of the above-ground sporocarps. We detected nine below-ground matsutake genets, all of which colonized multiple pine trees (three to seven trees per genet). The ECM fungal community beneath fairy rings was species-poor and significantly differed from those inside and outside the fairy rings. We conclude that matsutake genets occasionally establish from basidiospores and expand on the root systems of multiple host trees. Although matsutake mycelia suppress other ECM fungi during expansion, most of them may recover after the passage of the fairy rings.

  20. Contrasting land uses in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral systems generated patchy diversity patterns of vascular plants and below-ground microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagella, Simonetta; Filigheddu, Rossella; Caria, Maria Carmela; Girlanda, Mariangela; Roggero, Pier Paolo

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this paper were (i) to define how contrasting land uses affected plant biodiversity in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral-systems across a gradient of disturbance regimes: cork oak forests, secondary grasslands, hay crops, grass covered vineyards, tilled vineyards; (ii) to determine whether these patterns mirrored those of below-ground microorganisms and whether the components of γ-diversity followed a similar model. The disturbance regimes affected plant assemblage composition. Species richness decreased with increasing land use intensity, the Shannon index showed the highest values in grasslands and hay crops. Plant assemblage composition patterns mirrored those of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. Richness in Basidiomycota, denitrifying bacteria and microbial biomass showed the same trend as that observed for vascular plant richness. The Shannon index pattern of below-ground microorganisms was different from that of plants. The plant γ-diversity component model weakly mirrored those of Ascomycota. Patchy diversity patterns suggest that the maintenance of contrasting land uses associated with different productions typical of agro-silvo-pastoral-systems can guarantee the conservation of biodiversity.

  1. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  2. Long-term Data of the Kolyma Water-balance Station: Results of Upscaling the Process Comprehension to Basins with Limited Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, L.; Semenova, O.

    2011-12-01

    Most basins in permafrost environment possess very limited information available and are indeed a challenge for hydrological modelling. Long-term datasets of detailed process observations are essential for processes comprehension, model conceptualization and parameters assessment, validation of developed approaches. The Kolyma water balance station (KWBS) may be considered as the world oldest research watershed in permafrost environment being established in 1948. It is located in the North-Eastern Russia within the upstreams of the Kolyma River. The station was intended for long-term collection of observations and investigation of runoff, variable states, water balance components, etc. Such, within a territory of 22 km2 about 30 precipitation, 7 runoff gauges, and more than 20 cryopedometers had been operating at the KWBS with records from 3 to 25 years. Active layer depth varies widely from 0.5 to 2 m depending on a landscape and location on the slope. The previous studies have proved that this research watershed is representative for a large territory of the Russian North-East covered by permafrost. The goal of this continuous study is the analysis of the KWBS observational dataset in terms of assessment, development and validation of hydrological concepts and estimation of hydrological model parameters. The Hydrograph, which is a distributed process-based runoff formation model developed in Russia, is applied. The model describes all essential components of land hydrological cycle specific for permafrost environment including snow processes, soil moisture/heat dynamics and phase change processes in thawing and frozen soils. It has been successfully tested in various geographic regions, including temperate and tropical climates but most extensively in snow-dominated basins of Eastern Siberia and Northwestern Canada. Two major types of active layer depth formation were derived. The deepest one, up to the 1.6 m, forms at the rock debris landscape. Minimum depth of

  3. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  4. Limiting Skepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Symons, John

    2011-01-01

    Skeptics argue that the acquisition of knowledge is impossible given the standing possibility of error. We present the limiting convergence strategy for responding to skepticism and discuss the relationship between conceivable error and an agent’s knowledge in the limit. We argue that the skeptic...

  5. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  6. Mycorrhizal associations of Salix repens L. communities in succession of dune ecosystems I Above-ground and below-ground views of ectomycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Vries, de F.W.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) communities in 16 stands of Salix repens L. growing under a variety of environmental conditions was studied by repeated sampling of EcM sporocarps and ectomycorrhizas, to assess the possible correspondence between above- and below-ground views of fungal taxa. A

  7. The release of dipicolinic acid--the rate-limiting step of Bacillus endospore inactivation during the high pressure thermal sterilization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Kai; Schlumbach, Karl; Baier, Daniel; Mathys, Alexander; Knorr, Dietrich

    2013-03-01

    High pressure combined with elevated temperatures can produce low acid, commercially sterile and shelf-stable foods. Depending on the temperature and pressure levels applied, bacterial endospores pass through different pathways, which can lead to a pressure-induced germination or inactivation. Regardless of the pathway, Bacillus endospores first release pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (DPA), which contributes to the low amount of free water in the spore core and is consequently responsible for the spore's high resistance against wet and dry heat. This is therefore the rate-limiting step in the high pressure sterilization process. To evaluate the impact of a broad pressure, temperature and time domain on the DPA release, Bacillus subtilis spores were pressure treated between 0.1 and 900 MPa at between 30 and 80 °C under isothermal isobaric conditions during dwell time. DPA quantification was assessed using HPLC, and samples were taken both immediately and 2 h after the pressure treatment. To obtain a release kinetic for some pressure-temperature conditions, samples were collected between 1s and 60 min after decompression. A multiresponse kinetic model was then used to derive a model covering all kinetic data. The isorate lines modeled for the DPA release in the chosen pressure-temperature landscape enabled the determination of three distinct zones. (I) For pressures 50 °C, a 90% DPA release was achievable in less than 5 min and no difference in the amount of DPA was found immediately 2 h after pressurization. This may indicate irreversible damage to the inner spore membrane or membrane proteins. (II) Above 600 MPa the synergism between pressure and temperature diminished, and the treatment temperature alone dominated DPA release. (III) Pressures pressure-induced physiological like germination with cortex degradation, which continues after pressure release. Furthermore, at 600 MPa and 40 °C, a linear relationship was found for the DPA release rate constants ln

  8. Recommendations to the NRC for review criteria for alternative methods of low-level radioactive waste disposal: Task 2a, Below-ground vaults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denson, R.H.; Bennett, R.D.; Wamsley, R.M.; Bean, D.L.; Ainsworth, D.L.

    1987-12-01

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and the US Army Engineer Division, Huntsville (HNDED) have developed general design criteria and specific design review criteria for the below-ground vault (BGV) alternative method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. A BGV is a reinforced concrete vault (floor, walls, and roof) placed underground below the frost line, and above the water table, surrounded by filter blanket and drainage zones and covered with a low permeability earth layer and top soil with vegetation. Eight major review criteria categories have been developed ranging from the loads imposed on the BGV structure through material quality and durability considerations. Specific design review criteria have been developed in detail for seven of the eight major categories. 59 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Limits on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, D L

    2002-01-01

    A limit on the tau neutrino mass is obtained using all the $Z^{0} \\to \\tau^{+} \\tau^{-}$ data collected at LEP by the DELPHI detector between 1992 and 1995. In this analysis events in which one of the taus decays into one charged particle, while the second $\\tau$ decays into f{}ive charged pions (1-5 topology) have been used. The neutrino mass is determined from a bidimensional \\fit ~on the invariant mass $m^{*}_{5 \\pi}$ and on the energy $E_{5 \\pi}$ of the f{}ive $\\pi^{\\pm}$ system. The result found is $m_{\

  10. Exploring the 'divergence' problem using a simple process-based model of tree growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqi; Harrison, Sandy P.; Prentice, I. Colin

    2016-04-01

    There has been an apparent change in the sensitivity of tree rings to temperature in northern extratropical regions since the 1980s - a phenomenon often referred to as the divergence problem. Several potential explanations have been suggested to explain the decoupling between ring width (or density) and temperature, including exceedance of limiting temperature thresholds with global warming, changes in light availability with global dimming, the increasing importance of soil or atmospheric drought as a limitation to tree growth, or the CO2 'fertilization effect'. Here we use a simple, process-based tree-growth and carbon allocation model to explore these hypotheses. While changes in light availability and drought contribute to explain the declining influence of temperature on tree growth, the most important factor is changes in carbon allocation to roots and mycorrhizae in response to increasing [CO2] and the demand for increased nutrients to support photosynthesis. The magnitude of the increase in below-ground allocation, and hence the relative importance of this mechanism versus climate in controlling tree radial growth, appears to be influenced by nutrient and water availability. The potential importance of changes in carbon allocation challenges the use of statistical models for climate reconstructions from tree rings during intervals when [CO2] was different from historical values.

  11. Isotropic wave turbulence with simplified kernels: Existence, uniqueness, and mean-field limit for a class of instantaneous coagulation-fragmentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Aceituno, Sara

    2016-12-01

    The isotropic 4-wave kinetic equation is considered in its weak formulation using model (simplified) homogeneous kernels. Existence and uniqueness of solutions is proven in a particular setting where the kernels have a rate of growth at most linear. We also consider finite stochastic particle systems undergoing instantaneous coagulation-fragmentation phenomena and give conditions in which this system approximates the solution of the equation (mean-field limit).

  12. Spin observables in the three-body break-up process near the quasi-free limit in deuteron-deuteron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacher, A. D.; Bailey, C. D.; Biegun, A.; Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Gašparić, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Moeini, H.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Stephenson, E. J.; Sworst, R.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied spin observables in the three-body break-up reaction in deuteron-deuteron scattering in the phase-space regime that corresponds to the quasi-free deuteron-proton scattering process with the neutron as spectator. The data are compared to measurements of the elastic deuteron-proton scattering process and state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations. The results for iT11 and T22 for the quasi-free scattering data agree very well with previously published elastic-scattering data. A significant discrepancy is found for T20, which could point to a break-down of the quasi-free assumption.

  13. Spin observables in the three-body break-up process near the quasi-free limit in deuteron-deuteron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A.; Mahjour-Shafiei, M.; Amir-Ahmadi, H. R.; Bacher, A. D.; Bailey, C. D.; Biegun, A.; Eslami-Kalantari, M.; Gasparic, I.; Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; St Kistryn, [No Value; Kozela, A.; Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Moeini, H.; Shende, S. V.; Stephan, E.; Stephenson, E. J.; Sworst, R.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied spin observables in the three-body break-up reaction in deuteron-deuteron scattering in the phase-space regime that corresponds to the quasi-free deuteron-proton scattering process with the neutron as spectator. The data are compared to measurements of the elastic deuteron-proton sca

  14. Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

    2001-03-01

    During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

  15. Positive effects of organic farming on below-ground mutualists: large-scale comparison of mycorrhizal fungal communities in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Erik; Röling, Wilfred F M; Gamper, Hannes A; Kowalchuk, George A; Verhoef, Herman A; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2010-06-01

    *The impact of various agricultural practices on soil biodiversity and, in particular, on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), is still poorly understood, although AMF can provide benefit to plants and ecosystems. Here, we tested whether organic farming enhances AMF diversity and whether AMF communities from organically managed fields are more similar to those of species-rich grasslands or conventionally managed fields. *To address this issue, the AMF community composition was assessed in 26 arable fields (13 pairs of organically and conventionally managed fields) and five semi-natural grasslands, all on sandy soil. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism community fingerprinting was used to characterize AMF community composition. *The average number of AMF taxa was highest in grasslands (8.8), intermediate in organically managed fields (6.4) and significantly lower in conventionally managed fields (3.9). Moreover, AMF richness increased significantly with the time since conversion to organic agriculture. AMF communities of organically managed fields were also more similar to those of natural grasslands when compared with those under conventional management, and were less uniform than their conventional counterparts, as expressed by higher beta-diversity (between-site diversity). *We suggest that organic management in agro-ecosystems contributes to the restoration and maintenance of these important below-ground mutualists.

  16. Consistent proportional increments in responses of belowground net primary productivity to long-term warming and clipping at various soil depths in a tallgrass prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xia; Luo, Yiqi; Shi, Zheng; Zhou, Xuhui; Li, Dejun

    2014-03-01

    Root distribution patterns in soil are critical to understanding the interactions between climate and vegetation. However, it is not clear how climate change and land use practices affect belowground net primary productivity (BNPP) at various soil depths. In order to explore the effects of warming and clipping on root-distribution patterns along soil profile (0-15, 15-30, and 30-45 cm), we conducted a field experiment from 2005 to 2010 in a tallgrass prairie. We used infrared heaters to elevate soil temperature by approximately 2 °C and annual clipping to mimic hay harvest. Results showed that roots were not evenly distributed through the soil profile. On average across treatments and years, 53 and 83% of the BNPP to 45 cm was distributed in the top 15- and 30-cm soil layers, respectively. Warming- and clipping-induced increases in BNPP were distributed to different soil depths at the proportions similar to those of BNPP. The proportional distribution of BNPP at various soil depths to total BNPP (0-45 cm) was little affected by warming, clipping, and their interactions, resulting in non-significant changes in the distribution of BNPP through the soil profile. These findings suggest that the proportionally vertical distribution of BNPP may remain stable even when the amount of BNPP changes simultaneously in response to climate change and land use practices.

  17. Integrated plant phenotypic responses to contrasting above- and below-ground resources: key roles of specific leaf area and root mass fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Swart, Elferra M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-06-01

    Plants adapt phenotypically to different conditions of light and nutrient supply, supposedly in order to achieve colimitation of these resources. Their key variable of adjustment is the ratio of leaf area to root length, which relies on plant biomass allocation and organ morphology. We recorded phenotypic differences in leaf and root mass fractions (LMF, RMF), specific leaf area (SLA) and specific root length (SRL) of 12 herbaceous species grown in factorial combinations of high/low irradiance and fertilization treatments. Leaf area and root length ratios, and their components, were influenced by nonadditive effects between light and nutrient supply, and differences in the strength of plant responses were partly explained by Ellenberg's species values representing ecological optima. Changes in allocation were critical in plant responses to nutrient availability, as the RMF contribution to changes in root length was 2.5× that of the SRL. Contrastingly, morphological adjustments (SLA rather than LMF) made up the bulk of plant response to light availability. Our results suggest largely predictable differences in responses of species and groups of species to environmental change. Nevertheless, they stress the critical need to account for adjustments in below-ground mass allocation to understand the assembly and responses of communities in changing environments.

  18. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c) 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  19. Spin observables in the three-body break-up process near the quasi-free limit in deuteron–deuteron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazani-Moghaddam-Arani, A., E-mail: ramazani@kvi.nl [Faculty of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mahjour-Shafiei, M. [Department of Physics, University of Tehran, Tehran 1439955961 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Amir-Ahmadi, H.R. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bacher, A.D.; Bailey, C.D. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Biegun, A. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Eslami-Kalantari, M. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gašparić, I. [Rudjer Bošković Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Joulaeizadeh, L.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Kistryn, St. [Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Kozela, A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg (Canada); Mardanpour, H.; Messchendorp, J.G. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Micherdzinska, A.M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Krakow (Poland); Moeini, H.; Shende, S.V. [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Stephan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Stephenson, E.J. [Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN (United States); Sworst, R. [Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland)

    2013-10-01

    We have studied spin observables in the three-body break-up reaction in deuteron–deuteron scattering in the phase-space regime that corresponds to the quasi-free deuteron–proton scattering process with the neutron as spectator. The data are compared to measurements of the elastic deuteron–proton scattering process and state-of-the-art Faddeev calculations. The results for iT{sub 11} and T{sub 22} for the quasi-free scattering data agree very well with previously published elastic-scattering data. A significant discrepancy is found for T{sub 20}, which could point to a break-down of the quasi-free assumption.

  20. Inferring the intensity of Poisson processes at the limit of the detector sensitivity (with a case study on gravitational wave burst search)

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P

    1999-01-01

    We consider the issue of reporting the result of search experiment in the most unbiased and efficient way, i.e. in a way which allows an easy interpretation and combination of results and which do not depend on whether the experimenters believe or not to having found the searched-for effect. Since this work uses the language of Bayesian theory, to which most physicists are not used, we find that it could be useful to practitioners to have in a single paper a simple presentation of Bayesian inference, together with an example of application of it in search of rare processes.

  1. Detection Limits for Blood on Fabrics Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy and Derivative Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenyu; DeJong, Stephanie A; Cassidy, Brianna M; Belliveau, Raymond G; Myrick, Michael L; Morgan, Stephen L

    2016-06-27

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) was used to detect blood stains based on signature protein absorption in the mid-IR region, where intensity changes in the spectrum can be related to blood concentration. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was applied for multivariate calibrations of IR spectra of blood dilutions on four types of fabric (acrylic, nylon, polyester, and cotton). Gap derivatives (GDs) were applied as a preprocessing technique to optimize the performance of calibration models. We report a much improved IR detection limit (DL) for blood on cotton (2700× in dilution factor units) and the first IR DL reported for blood on nylon (250×). Due to sample heterogeneity caused by fabric hydrophobicity, acrylic fabric produced variable ATR FT-IR spectra that caused poor DLs in concentration units compared to previous work. Polyester showed a similar problem at low blood concentrations that lead to a relatively poor DL as well. However, the increased surface sensitivity and decreased penetration depth of ATR FT-IR make it an excellent choice for detection of small quantities of blood on the front surface of all fabrics tested (0.0010 µg for cotton, 0.0077 µg for nylon, 0.011 µg for acrylic, and 0.0066 µg for polyester).

  2. Nutrient cycling and Above- and Below-ground Interactions in a Runoff Agroforestry System Applied with Composted Tree Trimmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilani, Talli; Ephrath, Jhonathan; Silberbush, Moshe; Berliner, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    The primary production in arid zones is limited due to shortage of water and nutrients. Conveying flood water and storing it in plots surrounded by embankments allows their cropping. The efficient exploitation of the stored water can be achieved through an agroforestry system, in which two crops are grown simultaneously: annual crops with a shallow root system and trees with a deeper root system. We posit that the long-term productivity of this system can be maintained by intercropping symbiotic N fixing shrubs with annual crops, and applying the pruned and composted shrub leaves to the soil, thus ensuring an adequate nitrogen level (a limiting factor in drylands) in the soil. To test our hypothesis we carried a two year trial in which fast-growing acacia (A. saligna) trees were the woody component and maize (Zea mays L.) the intercrop. Ten treatments were applied over two maize growth seasons to examine the below- and above-ground effects of tree pruning, compost application and interactions. The addition of compost in the first growth season led to an increase of the soil organic matter reservoir, which was the main N source for the maize during the following growth season. In the second growth season the maize yield was significantly higher in the plots to which compost was applied. Pruning the tree's canopies changed the trees spatial and temporal root development, allowing the annual crop to develop between the trees. The roots of pruned trees intercropped with maize penetrated deeper in the soil. The intercropping of maize within pruned trees and implementing compost resulted in a higher water use efficiency of the water stored in the soil when compared to the not composted and monoculture treatments. The results presented suggest that the approach used in this study can be the basis for achieving sustainable agricultural production under arid conditions.

  3. A novel process for preparing low-fat peanuts: Optimization of the oil extraction yield with limited structural and organoleptic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Joelle; Fawaz, Nada; Afif, Charbel; Louka, Nicolas

    2016-04-15

    The main purpose of this study was to extract the maximum amount of oil from peanuts without causing major damage and preserving their organoleptic quality after defatting. Accordingly, a successful, healthy, eco-friendly and economic defatting process for peanuts was implemented using mechanical oil expression, which was optimized by means of Response Surface Methodology. The results demonstrated that maximum extraction yields were obtained at a low initial moisture content (5-7% d.b.). Defatting and deformation ratios were mostly affected by the pressure and water content with high correlation coefficients (98.4% and 97.5%, respectively), and overall acceptability decreased following higher oil extraction yields. It was concluded that the optimum values for the product moisture content, pressure, and pressing duration were 5% d.b., 9.7 MPa and 4 min, respectively, with a defatting ratio of 70.6%. This resulted in an insignificant irreversible deformation ratio (<1%) and an overall acceptability of 7.6 over 10.

  4. Distribution of bog and heath in a Newfoundland blanket bog complex: topographic limits on the hydrological processes governing blanket bog development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Graniero

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This research quantified the role of topography and hydrological processes within and, hence, the development of, blanket bogs. Topographic characteristics were derived from digital elevation models (DEMs developed for the surface and underlying substrate at three blanket bog sites on the southeastern lobe of the Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland. A multinomial logit (MNL model of the probability of bog occurrence was constructed in terms of relevant topographic characteristics. The resulting model was then used to investigate the probabilistic boundary conditions of bog occurrence within the landscape. Under average curvatures for the sites studied, substrate slopes up to 0.065 favoured blanket bog development. However, steeper slopes could, theoretically, be occupied by blanked bog where water is concentrated by convergent curvatures or large contributing areas. Near community boundaries, bog and heath communities both occupied similar topographic conditions. Since these boundary locations are capable of supporting the hydrological conditions necessary for bog development, the heath is likely to be encroached upon by bog.

  5. Egg parasitoid attraction toward induced plant volatiles is disrupted by a non-host herbivore attacking above or belowground plant organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moujahed, Rihem; Frati, Francesca; Cusumano, Antonino; Salerno, Gianandrea; Conti, Eric; Peri, Ezio; Colazza, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Plants respond to insect oviposition by emission of oviposition-induced plant volatiles (OIPVs) which can recruit egg parasitoids of the attacking herbivore. To date, studies demonstrating egg parasitoid attraction to OIPVs have been carried out in tritrophic systems consisting of one species each of plant, herbivore host, and the associated egg parasitoid. Less attention has been given to plants experiencing multiple attacks by host and non-host herbivores that potentially could interfere with the recruitment of egg parasitoids as a result of modifications to the OIPV blend. Egg parasitoid attraction could also be influenced by the temporal dynamics of multiple infestations, when the same non-host herbivore damages different organs of the same plant species. In this scenario we investigated the responses of egg parasitoids to feeding and oviposition damage using a model system consisting of Vicia faba, the above-ground insect herbivore Nezara viridula, the above- and below-ground insect herbivore Sitona lineatus, and Trissolcus basalis, a natural enemy of N. viridula. We demonstrated that the non-host S. lineatus disrupts wasp attraction toward plant volatiles induced by the host N. viridula. Interestingly, V. faba damage inflicted by either adults (i.e., leaf-feeding) or larvae (i.e., root-feeding) of S. lineatus, had a similar disruptive effect on T. basalis host location, suggesting that a common interference mechanism might be involved. Neither naïve wasps or wasps with previous oviposition experience were attracted to plant volatiles induced by N. viridula when V. faba plants were concurrently infested with S. lineatus adults or larvae. Analysis of the volatile blends among healthy plants and above-ground treatments show significant differences in terms of whole volatile emissions. Our results demonstrate that induced plant responses caused by a non-host herbivore can disrupt the attraction of an egg parasitoid to a plant that is also infested with its hosts.

  6. Climatic and biotic extreme events moderate long-term responses of above- and belowground sub-Arctic heathland communities to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhorst, Stef; Phoenix, Gareth K; Berg, Matty P; Callaghan, Terry V; Kirby-Lambert, Christopher; Bjerke, Jarle W

    2015-11-01

    Climate change impacts are not uniform across the Arctic region because interacting factors causes large variations in local ecosystem change. Extreme climatic events and population cycles of herbivores occur simultaneously against a background of gradual climate warming trends and can redirect ecosystem change along routes that are difficult to predict. Here, we present the results from sub-Arctic heath vegetation and its belowground micro-arthropod community in response to the two main drivers of vegetation damage in this region: extreme winter warming events and subsequent outbreaks of the defoliating autumnal moth caterpillar (Epirrita autumnata). Evergreen dwarf shrub biomass decreased (30%) following extreme winter warming events and again by moth caterpillar grazing. Deciduous shrubs that were previously exposed to an extreme winter warming event were not affected by the moth caterpillar grazing, while those that were not exposed to warming events (control plots) showed reduced (23%) biomass from grazing. Cryptogam cover increased irrespective of grazing or winter warming events. Micro-arthropods declined (46%) following winter warming but did not respond to changes in plant community. Extreme winter warming and caterpillar grazing suppressed the CO2 fluxes of the ecosystem. Evergreen dwarf shrubs are disadvantaged in a future sub-Arctic with more stochastic climatic and biotic events. Given that summer warming may further benefit deciduous over evergreen shrubs, event and trend climate change may both act against evergreen shrubs and the ecosystem functions they provide. This is of particular concern given that Arctic heath vegetation is typically dominated by evergreen shrubs. Other components of the vegetation showed variable responses to abiotic and biotic events, and their interaction indicates that sub-Arctic vegetation response to multiple pressures is not easy to predict from single-factor responses. Therefore, while biotic and climatic events may

  7. Egg parasitoid attraction toward induced plant volatiles is disrupted by a non-host herbivore attacking above or belowground plant organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihem eMoujahed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to insect oviposition by emission of oviposition-induced plant volatiles (OIPVs which can recruit egg parasitoids of the attacking herbivore. To date, studies demonstrating egg parasitoid attraction to OIPVs have been carried out in tritrophic systems consisting of one species each of plant, herbivore host, and the associated egg parasitoid. Less attention has been given to plants experiencing multiple attacks by host and non-host herbivores that potentially could interfere with the recruitment of egg parasitoids as a result of modifications to the OIPV blend. Egg parasitoid attraction could also be influenced by the temporal dynamics of multiple infestations, when the same non-host herbivore damages different organs of the same plant species. In this scenario we investigated the responses of egg parasitoids to feeding and oviposition damage using a model system consisting of Vicia faba, the above-ground insect herbivore Nezara viridula, the above- and below-ground insect herbivore Sitona lineatus, and Trissolcus basalis, a natural enemy of N. viridula. We demonstrated that the non-host S. lineatus disrupts wasp attraction toward plant volatiles induced by the host N. viridula. Interestingly, V. faba damage inflicted by either adults (i.e. leaf-feeding or larvae (i.e. root-feeding of S. lineatus, had a similar disruptive effect on T. basalis host location, suggesting that a common interference mechanism might be involved. Neither naïve wasps or wasps with previous oviposition experience were attracted to plant volatiles induced by N. viridula when V. faba plants were concurrently infested with S. lineatus adults or larvae. Analysis of the volatile blends among healthy plants and above-ground treatments show significant differences in terms of whole volatile emissions. Our results demonstrate that induced plant responses caused by a non-host herbivore can disrupt the attraction of an egg parasitoid to a plant that is also infested

  8. Understanding cross-communication between aboveground and belowground tissues via transcriptome analysis of a sucking insect whitefly-infested pepper plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2014-01-03

    Plants have developed defensive machinery to protect themselves against herbivore and pathogen attacks. We previously reported that aboveground whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Genn.) infestation elicited induced resistance in leaves and roots and influenced the modification of the rhizosphere microflora. In this study, to obtain molecular evidence supporting these plant fitness strategies against whitefly infestation, we performed a 300 K pepper microarray analysis using leaf and root tissues of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) applied with whitefly, benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), and the combination of BTH+whitefly. We defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) as genes exhibiting more than 2-fold change (1.0 based on log2 values) in expression in leaves and roots in response to each treatment compared to the control. We identified a total of 16,188 DEGs in leaves and roots. Of these, 6685, 6752, and 4045 DEGs from leaf tissue and 6768, 7705, and 7667 DEGs from root tissue were identified in the BTH, BTH+whitefly, and whitefly treatment groups, respectively. The total number of DEGs was approximately two-times higher in roots than in whitefly-infested leaves subjected to whitefly infestation. Among DEGs, whitefly feeding induced salicylic acid and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent signaling pathways in leaves and roots. Several transporters and auxin-responsive genes were upregulated in roots, which can explain why biomass increase is facilitated. Using transcriptome analysis, our study provides new insights into the molecular basis of whitefly-mediated intercommunication between aboveground and belowground plant tissues and provides molecular evidence that may explain the alteration of rhizosphere microflora and root biomass by whitefly infestation.

  9. A profiling approach of the natural variability of foliar N remobilization at the rosette stage gives clues to understand the limiting processes involved in the low N use efficiency of winter oilseed rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girondé, Alexandra; Poret, Marine; Etienne, Philippe; Trouverie, Jacques; Bouchereau, Alain; Le Cahérec, Françoise; Leport, Laurent; Orsel, Mathilde; Niogret, Marie-Françoise; Deleu, Carole; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2015-05-01

    Oilseed rape, a crop requiring a high level of nitogen (N) fertilizers, is characterized by low N use efficiency. To identify the limiting factors involved in the N use efficiency of winter oilseed rape, the response to low N supply was investigated at the vegetative stage in 10 genotypes by using long-term pulse-chase (15)N labelling and studying the physiological processes of leaf N remobilization. Analysis of growth and components of N use efficiency allowed four profiles to be defined. Group 1 was characterized by an efficient N remobilization under low and high N conditions but by a decrease of leaf growth under N limitation. Group 2 showed a decrease in leaf growth under low N supply that was associated with a low N remobilization efficiency under both N supplies despite a high remobilization of soluble proteins. In response to N limitation, Group 3 is characterized by an increase in N use efficiency and leaf N remobilization compared with high N that is not sufficient to sustain the leaf biomass production at a similar level to non-limited plants. Genotypes of Group 4 subjected to low nitrate were able to maintain leaf growth to the same level as under high N. The profiling approach indicated that enhancement of amino acid export and soluble protein degradation was crucial for N remobilization improvement. At the whole-plant level, N fluxes revealed that Group 4 showed a high N remobilization in source leaves combined with a better N utilization in young leaves. Consequently, an enhanced N remobilization limits N loss in fallen leaves, but this remobilized N needs to be efficiently utilized in young leaves to improve N use efficiency.

  10. The single-process biochemical reaction of Rubisco: a unified theory and model with the effects of irradiance, CO₂ and rate-limiting step on the kinetics of C₃ and C₄ photosynthesis from gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazdaghi, Hadi

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the origin of oxygenic life on the planet, and its models are the core of all models of plant biology, agriculture, environmental quality and global climate change. A theory is presented here, based on single process biochemical reactions of Rubisco, recognizing that: In the light, Rubisco activase helps separate Rubisco from the stored ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), activates Rubisco with carbamylation and addition of Mg²(+), and then produces two products, in two steps: (Step 1) Reaction of Rubisco with RuBP produces a Rubisco-enediol complex, which is the carboxylase-oxygenase enzyme (Enco) and (Step 2) Enco captures CO₂ and/or O₂ and produces intermediate products leading to production and release of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA) and Rubisco. PGA interactively controls (1) the carboxylation-oxygenation, (2) electron transport, and (3) triosephosphate pathway of the Calvin-Benson cycle that leads to the release of glucose and regeneration of RuBP. Initially, the total enzyme participates in the two steps of the reaction transitionally and its rate follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. But, for a continuous steady state, Rubisco must be divided into two concurrently active segments for the two steps. This causes a deviation of the steady state from the transitional rate. Kinetic models are developed that integrate the transitional and the steady state reactions. They are tested and successfully validated with verifiable experimental data. The single-process theory is compared to the widely used two-process theory of Farquhar et al. (1980. Planta 149, 78-90), which assumes that the carboxylation rate is either Rubisco-limited at low CO₂ levels such as CO₂ compensation point, or RuBP regeneration-limited at high CO₂. Since the photosynthesis rate cannot increase beyond the two-process theory's Rubisco limit at the CO₂ compensation point, net photosynthesis cannot increase above zero in daylight, and since there is always respiration at

  11. The Methodological Unboundedness of Limited Discovery Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benjamin Cassel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Though designers must understand systems, designers work differently than scientists in studying systems.  Design engagements do not discover whole systems, but take calculated risks between discovery and intervention. For this reason, design practices must cope with open systems, and unpacking the tacit guidelines behind these practices is instructive to systems methodology. This paper shows that design practice yields a methodology which applies across forms of design.  Design practice teaches us to generate ideas and gather data longer, but stop when the return on design has diminished past its cost.  Fortunately, we can reason about the unknown by understanding the character of the unbounded.  We suppose that there might as well be an infinite number of factors, but we can reason about their concentration without knowing all of them.  We demonstrate this concept on stakeholder systems, showing how design discovery informs systems methodology. Using this result, we can apply the methods of parametric design when the parameters are not yet known by establishing the concentration of every kind of factor, entailing a discovery rate of diminishing returns over discovery activities, allowing the analysis of discovery-based trade-offs.  Here, we extend a framework for providing metrics to parametric design, allowing it to express the importance of discovery.

  12. Diversity and spatial structure of belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in a mixed subtropical forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S

    2014-01-01

    Plant-mycorrhizal fungal interactions are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems. While ectomycorrhizal plants and their fungi generally dominate temperate forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is common in the tropics. In subtropical regions, however, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants co-occur at comparable abundances in single forests, presumably generating complex community structures of root-associated fungi. To reveal root-associated fungal community structure in a mixed forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants, we conducted a massively-parallel pyrosequencing analysis, targeting fungi in the roots of 36 plant species that co-occur in a subtropical forest. In total, 580 fungal operational taxonomic units were detected, of which 132 and 58 were probably ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal, respectively. As expected, the composition of fungal symbionts differed between fagaceous (ectomycorrhizal) and non-fagaceous (possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal) plants. However, non-fagaceous plants were associated with not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also several clades of ectomycorrhizal (e.g., Russula) and root-endophytic ascomycete fungi. Many of the ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi were detected from both fagaceous and non-fagaceous plants in the community. Interestingly, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were concurrently detected from tiny root fragments of non-fagaceous plants. The plant-fungal associations in the forest were spatially structured, and non-fagaceous plant roots hosted ectomycorrhizal fungi more often in the proximity of ectomycorrhizal plant roots. Overall, this study suggests that belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in subtropical forests is complex in that it includes "non-typical" plant-fungal combinations (e.g., ectomycorrhizal fungi on possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants) that do not fall within the conventional classification of mycorrhizal symbioses, and in that

  13. Evaluation of carbon stocks in above- and below-ground biomass in Central Africa: case study of Lesio-louna tropical rainforest of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Ekoungoulou, R.; Loumeto, J. J.; Ifo, S. A.; Bocko, Y. E.; Koula, F. E.

    2014-07-01

    The study was aimed to estimate the carbon stocks of above- and below-ground biomass in Lesio-louna forest of Congo. The methodology of allometric equations was used to measure the carbon stocks of Lesio-louna natural forest. We are based precisely on the model II which is also called non-destructive method or indirect method of measuring carbon stocks. While there has been use of parameters such as the DBH and wood density. The research was done with 22 circular plots each 1256 m2. In the 22 plots studied, 19 plots are in the gallery forest and three plots in the secondary forest. Also, 22 circular plots were distributed in 5 sites studies of Lesio-louna forest, including: Inkou forest island, Iboubikro, Ngoyili, Blue lake and Ngambali. So, there are two forest types (secondary forest and gallery forest) in this forest ecosystem. In the 5 sites studied, we made measurements on a total of 347 trees with 197 trees for the class of 10-30 cm diameter, 131 trees for the class of 30-60 cm diameter and 19 trees in the diameter class > 60 cm. The results show that in the whole forest, average carbon stock for the 22 plots of the study was 168.601 t C ha-1 for AGB, or 81% and 39.551 t C ha-1 for BGB, or 19%. The total carbon stocks in all the biomass was 3395.365 t C for AGB, which is 3.395365 × 10-6 Gt C and 909.689934 t C for BGB, which was 9.09689934 × 10-7 Gt C. In this forest, the carbon stock was more important in AGB compared to BGB with respectively 3395.365 t C against 909.689934 t C. Plot10 (AGB = 363.899 t C ha-1 and BGB = 85.516 t C ha-1) was the most dominant in terms of carbon quantification in Lesio-louna.

  14. Above- and Below-ground Biomass, Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange, and Soil Respiration in a Poplar Populus deltoides Bartr.) stand : Changes after 3 years of Growth under Elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Grieve, K.; Bil, K.; Kudeyarov, V.; Handley, L.; Murthy, R.

    2003-12-01

    Stands of cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) trees were grown as a coppiced system under ambient (40 Pa), twice ambient (80 Pa), and three times ambient (120 Pa) partial pressure CO2 for the past three years in the Intensively-managed Forest Mesocosm (IFM) of the Biosphere 2 Center. Over three years Net Ecosystem CO2 exchange (NECE) was measured continuously and in the third year, nine whole trees were harvested from each CO2 treatment over the growing season. Both above- and below-ground parameters were measured. Three years of growth under elevated CO2 showed the expected stimulation in foliar biomass (8.7, 11.9, and 13.1 kg for the 40, 80, and 120 Pa treatments, respectively). Rates of NECE also followed an expected increase with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, with maximum CO2 uptake rates reaching 10.5, 15.6, and 19.6 μ moles m-2 s-1 in the 40, 80, and 120 Pa treatments, respectively. However, above ground woody biomass and root biomass were not much stimulated beyond 80 Pa CO2. Wood/foliage and above/below ground biomass ratios reflect this decline. Under conditions of non-limiting nutrients and water, we found consistent increases in the above/below ground biomass ratio and wood to foliage biomass ratios in the 80 compared to the 40 Pa pCO2. Woody biomass production and the above/below ground biomass ratio were lower under the 120 Pa than any other treatment. Although biomass production did not change appreciably between 80 and 120 Pa CO2 treatments, both substrate induced and in-situ soil respiration values are also significantly higher in the 120Pa treatment, though no differences were present prior to CO2 treatments (Murthy et al. 2003). The unique closed-system operation of the IFM allowed for measures of soil CO2 efflux to be measured at both the soil collar and stand scales using a box model that takes into account all inputs and outputs from the stand. In-situ soil respiration rates increased significantly with increased atmospheric CO2

  15. Effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on elm seedlings growth in Horqin Sandy Land%地上竞争与地下竞争对科尔沁沙地榆树幼苗生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐毅; 蒋德明; 陈卓; 押田敏雄

    2011-01-01

    榆树疏林草原对科尔沁沙地植被恢复和景观保护有着重要意义.本文采用双因素两水平控制试验,从幼苗生物量、地下/地上生物量、茎高、根茎比、叶片数等方面,研究了草-树地上、地下竞争对科尔沁沙地榆树幼苗生长的影响.结果表明:对于1年生榆树幼苗,单株平均生物量表现为无竞争>地上竞争>全竞争>地下竞争;地下/地上生物量表现为地下竞争>全竞争>无竞争>地上竞争;幼苗高度表现为地上竞争>无竞争>全竞争>地下竞争;根茎比表现为地下竞争>全竞争>无竞争>地上竞争;叶片数表现为地上竞争>无竞争>地下竞争>全竞争.地下竞争对1年生榆树幼苗生长影响显著,而地上竞争对榆树幼苗生长无显著影响.地上竞争与地下竞争对2年生榆树幼苗生长的影响均不显著.科尔沁沙地草本植物对榆树幼苗生长的影响主要通过地下竞争的方式实现,但地下竞争并没有改变榆树幼苗的资源分配方式.随榆树幼苗龄级的增长,草本植物竞争作用的影响逐渐减弱.%Elm sparse woodland steppe plays an important role in vegetation restoration and landscape protection in Horqin Sandy Land. In this paper, a two-factor and two-level field experiment was conducted to explore the effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on the growth of elm seedlings in the Sandy Land. Five aspects were considered, I. E. , seedling biomass, belowground biomass/aboveground biomass, stem height, ratio of root to stem, and leaf number. For the one-year-old elm seedlings, their biomass showed a trend of no competition > aboveground competition > full competition > belowground competition, belowground biomass / aboveground biomass showed a trend of belowground competition > full competition > no competition > aboveground competition, stem height showed a trend of aboveground competition > no competition

  16. 含氧煤层气液化流程爆炸极限分析%Analysis of flammability limits for liquefaction process of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秋英; 王莉; 巨永林

    2011-01-01

    大部分含氧煤层气由于技术限制没有被合理利用,而是直接放空,不仅浪费资源.而且污染大气环境.针对某一典型煤层气气源条件和组分特点,设计了一种新型的液化精馏工艺流程,结合HYSYS软件模拟计算结果以及爆炸极限理论,对该液化精馏工艺流程的爆炸极限进行了分析计算,结果表明煤层气中甲烷浓度在压缩、液化以及节流过程中都高于爆炸上限,操作过程安全性比较高.但在精馏塔顶部甲烷浓度开始低于爆炸上限而导致精馏过程存在安全隐患.首先对原料气进行初步脱氧,然后再通过调整精馏塔塔底采出量来控制塔顶杂质气体中甲烷含量,使得其在整个液化及精馏流程中始终高于爆炸上限.分析结果表明,采取安全措施后整个流程都不存在爆炸危险性,甲烷回收率和产品纯度都较高,而且整个流程能耗也比较低.模拟结果显示,所设计的液化及精馏流程对不同气源具有较好的适用性,分析计算结果为含氧煤层气的杂质分离、操作过程的爆炸极限分析以及安全措施的采取提供了一定的参考.%Most of oxygen-bearing coal-bed methane (CBM) has not been utilized due to the limit in technique for production. The discharged gas leads to not only the waste of resources but also environmental pollution. In this study, a liquefaction process is proposed and designed for the typical CBM. HYSYS software is adopted to simulate the process. The flammability limits are analyzed and calculated based on the flammability limit theory and the simulated results of HYSYS. The results indicate that no flammable hazards exist in the processes of compression, liquefaction and throttling but they may appear at the top of the distillation tower. A method, in which oxygen is first removed from the feed gas with the control of the bottom flowrate (flowrate of the liquid product at column bottom), is adopted to ensure that the methane

  17. Belowground dynamics in mangrove ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen L.

    2004-01-01

    Mangrove ecosystems are tropical/subtropical communities of primarily tree species that grow in the intertidal zone. These tidal communities are important coastal ecosystems that are valued for a variety of ecological and societal goods and services (fig. 1). Mangrove wetlands are important filters of materials moving between the land and sea, trapping sediment, nutrients, and pollutants in runoff from uplands and preventing their direct introduction into sensitive marine ecosystems such as seagrass beds and coral reefs. Mangroves serve as nursery grounds and refuge for a variety of organisms and are consequently vital to the biological productivity of coastal waters. Furthermore, because mangroves are highly resilient to disturbances such as hurricanes, they represent a self-sustaining, protective barrier for human populations living in the coastal zone. Mangrove ecosystems also contribute to shoreline stabilization through consolidation of unstable mineral sediments and peat formation. In order to help conserve mangrove ecoystems, scientists with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) at the National Wetlands Research Center are working to more fully understand the dynamics that impact these vital ecosystems.

  18. Limitations in forensic odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kavitha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of using dental evidence in forensic investigation has kindled so much interest in the recent past that forensic odontology is even suggested as the single positive identification method to solve certain forensic cases. In this process, the shortcomings in forensic odontology though few are overlooked. These discrepancies associated with various methods are to be weighed cautiously to make forensic odontology a more accurate, reliable, and reproducible investigatory science. In this paper, we present our understanding of the limitations in various methods employed in forensic odontology.

  19. Marketing with limited budget

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, Daria

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research-based thesis was to get an idea how managers of two small resembling hotels of a specific region deal with marketing process with a limited budget. In addition, the aim of the thesis was to examine if hotel managers who were interviewed perceive marketing only in the way of ‘promotion’ rather than marketing research, marketing mix and marketing environment theories. It was also found out if hotel managers of those hotels consider marketing as a key to successful h...

  20. YC12系列空压机升程吸气限制器的加工工艺改装%The Refitting of Processing Technic of YC12 Series Air-compressor Lift Air Induction Limiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宗斌; 况齐祁; 余新华

    2012-01-01

    YC12系列空压机限制其转速提高的关键问题之一就是气阀,它是易损坏部件.升程吸气限制器是整套阀组的核心,直接影响压缩机的排气量、功率消耗及运转的可靠性.就生产中采用的刀具和工装进行改进作介绍,提高了气阀加工效率,降低生产成本的一种新技术.%One of the key problems of limiting the improvement of the revolution of YC12 series air-compressor is the air valve,which is apt to damage.Among them,lift air induction limiter is the key part of whole set valve hank,which directly influences the air discharge of compressor,power dissipation and the reliability of operation.This paper intends to introduce a new technology which improved the cutter and frock ,enhanced the efficiency of air valve processing and lowered the production cost.

  1. Limitations of inclusive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A; Wilson, Edward O

    2013-12-10

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed.

  2. Growth potential limits drought morphological plasticity in seedlings from six Eucalyptus provenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Pablo H; Fernández, Roberto J

    2016-02-01

    Water stress modifies plant above- vs belowground biomass allocation, i.e., morphological plasticity. It is known that all species and genotypes reduce their growth rate in response to stress, but in the case of water stress it is unclear whether the magnitude of such reduction is linked to the genotype's growth potential, and whether the reduction can be largely attributed to morphological adjustments such as plant allocation and leaf and root anatomy. We subjected seedlings of six seed sources, three from each of Eucalyptus camaldulensis (potentially fast growing) and E. globulus (inherently slow growing), to three experimental water regimes. Biomass, leaf area and root length were measured in a 6-month glasshouse experiment. We then performed functional growth analysis of relative growth rate (RGR), and aboveground (leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass ratio (LMR)) and belowground (root length ratio (RLR), specific root length (SRL) and root mass ratio (RMR)) morphological components. Total biomass, root biomass and leaf area were reduced for all Eucalyptus provenances according to drought intensity. All populations exhibited drought plasticity, while those of greater growth potential (RGRmax) had a larger reduction in growth (discounting the effect of size). A positive correlation was observed between drought sensitivity and RGRmax. Aboveground, drought reduced LAR and LMR; under severe drought a negative correlation was found between LMR and RGRmax. Belowground, drought reduced SRL but increased RMR, resulting in no change in RLR. Under severe drought, a negative correlation was found between RLR, SRL and RGRmax. Our evidence strongly supports the classic ecophysiological trade-off between growth potential and drought tolerance for woody seedlings. It also suggests that slow growers would have a low capacity to adjust their morphology. For shoots, this constraint on plasticity was best observed in partition (i.e., LMR) whereas for

  3. Impacts of afforestation and silviculture on the soil C balance of tropical tree plantations: belowground C allocation, soil CO2 efflux and C accretion (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epron, D.; Koutika, L.; Mareschal, L.; Nouvellon, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical forest plantations will provide a large part of the global wood supply which is anticipated to increase sharply in the next decades, becoming a valuable source of income in many countries, where they also contribute to land use changes that impact the global carbon (C) cycle. Tropical forest plantations established on previous grasslands are potential C sinks offsetting anthropogenic CO2 emissions. When they are managed on short rotations, the aboveground biomass is frequently removed and transformed into wood products with short lifetimes. The soil is thus the only compartment for durable C sequestration. The soil C budget results from the inputs of C from litterfall, root turnover and residues left at logging stage, balanced by C losses through heterotrophic respiration and leaching of organic C with water flow. Intensive researches have been conducted these last ten years in eucalypt plantations in the Congo on the effects of management options on soil fertility improvement and C sequestration. Our aim is to review important results regarding belowground C allocation, soil CO2 efflux and C accretion in relation to management options. We will specifically address (i) the soil C dynamics after afforestation of a tropical savannah, (ii) the impact of post-harvest residue management, and (iii) the beneficial effect of introducing nitrogen fixing species for C sequestration. Our results on afforestation of previous savannah showed that mechanical soil disturbance for site preparation had no effect on soil CO2 efflux and soil C balance. Soil C increased after afforestation despite a rapid disappearance of the labile savannah-derived C because a large fraction of savannah-derived C is stable and the aboveground litter layer is as the major source of CO2 contributing to soil CO2 efflux. We further demonstrated that the C stock in and on the soil slightly increased after each rotation when large amounts of residues are left at logging stage and that most of

  4. 45 CFR 5.35 - Time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time limits. 5.35 Section 5.35 Public Welfare... Denial of Records § 5.35 Time limits. (a) General. FOIA sets certain time limits for us to decide whether... time limits, but if it appears that processing your request may take longer than we would wish, we...

  5. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved.

  6. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  7. Ultimate physical limits to computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, S

    1999-01-01

    Computers are physical systems: what they can and cannot do is dictated by the laws of physics. In particular, the speed with which a physical device can process information is limited by its energy, and the amount of information that it can process is limited by the number of degrees of freedom it possesses. The way in which it processes information is determined by the forces of nature that the computer has at its disposal. This paper explores the fundamental physical limits of computation as determined by the speed of light c, the quantum scale as given by Planck's constant h, and the gravitational constant G. As an example, quantitative bounds are put to the computational power of an `ultimate laptop' with a mass of one kilogram confined to a volume of one liter.

  8. Limits to growth reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, E E

    1972-01-01

    In their book, ''The Limits of Growth,'' the authors conclude that through pollution, exhaustion of natural resources, and limits to the food supply, the world faces a catastrophic fall in population and in living standards by the middle of the 21st century. The authors fail to state, however, 1 centrally important assumption underlying their results, but which is present through their omission of the contrary assumption. In their model the continuing technical progress that has been a primary feature of the material world for the past 200 years suddenly ceases. The assumptions of the model presented in ''Limits of Growth'' are not the assumptions other analysts make - these are strangely unrealistic. These assumptions require closer examination. The assumption concerning population assumes that the sole determinants of birthrates are the level of industrialization and the food supply. This is not good demography, for demographers have long recognized that it may have been the decrease in death rates, not industrialization or the rise in income, that caused the decrease in birthrates. Furthermore, their theory that many of the natural resources are irreplacable is like the belief that the sun revolves around the earth. It is obvious and false. It neglects that part of technical process which includes invention of new natural resources. Technical advance is needed and the following are some of the problems that technical advance must overcome: 1) a need to discover how to increase food production progressively while preventing the runoff of chemical fertilizers from the soil into waterways, 2) the ''natural'' minerals on which until recently all have depended are ''biodegradable,'' 3) there is a similar problem with radioactive nuclear wastes; 4) energy must dissipate into heat; and 5) there is a need to hasten the decline in birthrates throughout the world. In conclusion, indefinitely continuing growth is not regarded as desirable only as possible.

  9. Universal Limit on Communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    I derive a universal upper bound on the capacity of any communication channel between two distant systems. The Holevo quantity, and hence the mutual information, is at most of order $E \\Delta t / \\hbar$, where $E$ the average energy of the signal, and $\\Delta t$ is the amount of time for which detectors operate. The bound does not depend on the size or mass of the emitting and receiving systems, nor on the nature of the signal. No restrictions on preparing and processing the signal are imposed. As an example, I consider the encoding of information in the transverse or angular position of a signal emitted and received by systems of arbitrarily large cross-section. In the limit of a large message space, quantum effects become important even if individual signals are classical, and the bound is upheld.

  10. Limits to biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays’ use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years’ agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2–6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass in the more optimistic cases.

  11. The role of below-ground competition during early stages of secondary succession: the case of 3-year-old Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings in an abandoned grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Coll, Lluis; Balandier, Philippe

    2006-06-01

    In abandoned or extensively managed grasslands, the mechanisms involved in pioneer tree species success are not fully explained. Resource competition among plants and microclimate modifications have been emphasised as possible mechanisms to explain variation of survivorship and growth. In this study, we evaluated a number of mechanisms that may lead to successful survival and growth of seedlings of a pioneer tree species (Pinus sylvestris) in a grass-dominated grassland. Three-year-old Scots pines were planted in an extensively managed grassland of the French Massif Central and for 2 years were either maintained in bare soil or subjected to aerial and below-ground interactions induced by grass vegetation. Soil temperatures were slightly higher in bare soil than under the grass vegetation, but not to an extent explaining pine growth differences. The tall grass canopy reduced light transmission by 77% at ground level and by 20% in the upper part of Scots pine seedlings. Grass vegetation presence also significantly decreased soil volumetric water content (Hv) and soil nitrate in spring and in summer. In these conditions, the average tree height was reduced by 5% compared to trees grown in bare soil, and plant biomass was reduced by 85%. Scots pine intrinsic water-use efficiency (A/g), measured by leaf gas-exchange, increased when Hv decreased owing to a rapid decline of stomatal conductance (g). This result was also confirmed by delta 13C analyses of needles. A summer 15N labelling of seedlings and grass vegetation confirmed the higher NO3 capture capacity of grass vegetation in comparison with Scots pine seedlings. Our results provide evidence that the seedlings' success was linked to tolerance of below-ground resource depletion (particularly water) induced by grass vegetation based on morphological and physiological plasticity as well as to resource conservation.

  12. Passive immitance limiters

    OpenAIRE

    Filinyuk N. A.; Lischinskaya L. B.; Chekhmestruk R. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents quadripole R, L, C immittance limiters, in which output immittance to the certain value depends on the input immittance. A classification of immittance limiters is given. Basic parameters are considered: low and high levels of output immittance limiters; low and high values of input immittance, corresponding to low and high levels of limitation, accordingly; range of possible values of output immittance; steepness of immittance limiters; time of wearing-out (or delay); high...

  13. Processo de trabalho dos agentes comunitários de saúde: possibilidades e limites Proceso de trabajo de los agentes comunitarios de salud: las posibilidades y los límites Work process of community health agents: possibilities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cocco da Costa

    2012-09-01

    is aimed at getting to know and analyzing the work process of Community Health Agents (CHA from a municipality of the Northeastern region of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, through a qualitative approach. The collection of data was carried out by means of a semi-structured interviewapplied to 23 CHAs. The Thematic Content Analysis was utilized for the data analysis. The results evidenced some possibilities, such as: communication with the participating families, establishing bonds, and recognition of/satisfaction towards the professional agent by the community; and, among some of the limits were: difficulty to perform team work; difficulty to perform collective tasks in the community; low salary/work overload and lack of qualification. Evidence shows the need of reorganizing the work process of these professionals with higher investment in education and instrumentation by adopting a permanent educational policy.

  14. 40 CFR 1501.8 - Time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Time limits. 1501.8 Section 1501.8 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY NEPA AND AGENCY PLANNING § 1501.8 Time limits. Although the Council has decided that prescribed universal time limits for the entire NEPA process are...

  15. 32 CFR 806.22 - Time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Time limits. 806.22 Section 806.22 National... INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.22 Time limits. Any FOIA appeals received after the 60-day time limit are not processed, unless the requester provides adequate justification for failing to comply with the time...

  16. Passive immitance limiters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filinyuk N. A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents quadripole R, L, C immittance limiters, in which output immittance to the certain value depends on the input immittance. A classification of immittance limiters is given. Basic parameters are considered: low and high levels of output immittance limiters; low and high values of input immittance, corresponding to low and high levels of limitation, accordingly; range of possible values of output immittance; steepness of immittance limiters; time of wearing-out (or delay; high and low cutoff frequencies; central working frequency; frequency band; relative range of working frequencies; non-linearity coefficient. The authors have designed passive R-, L-, C-limiters with possibility of limitation from above and from below. The influence of the input parasitic immittances on the immittance transfer characteristic is evaluated. In most cases parasite immittance does not influence the considered devices, including R-limiters «from above» with the input quality factor of QR(Linp=0,1…0,2 and L-limiters «from above» with high-quality input circuits with QL(Rinp>2. The analysis also shows that high-qualitiy circuits with QN(RinpN>3 should be used in C-limiters with input parasitic immittances, while at parasitic immittance of the limiting element low-quality circuits with QN(RiN>0,2 should be selected.

  17. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  18. Responses of Belowground Biomass and Biomass Allocation to Environmental Factors in Central Grassland of Inner Mongolia%内蒙古中部草原地下生物量与生物量分配对环境因子的响应关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴诚; 康慕谊; 纪文瑶; 江源

    2012-01-01

    为探究环境因子对草原地下生物量与生物量分配的影响以及验证功能平衡假说,沿水热变化梯度通过采样获取内蒙古中部草原的生物量,分析了地下生物量的垂直分布及其与地上生物量的关系,采用回归和结构方程模型的方法探讨了地下生物量与地下地上生物量比对环境因子的响应规律.结果表明:地下生物量主要分布在土壤表层,地下与地上生物量成显著正相关;地下生物量对年均降水量、土壤有机碳和全氮为正响应,对年均温和土壤pH值则为负响应;其中,降水量是导致地下生物量差异的主要因子;土壤环境也具有重要的作用.土壤全氮与地下地上生物量比之间的显著正响应关系与功能平衡假说不符.综上所述表明,环境因子对地下地上生物量比产生的影响十分复杂,需要进一步结合植物生理和生态学特性等多方面的综合分析才能得出可靠的结论.%In order to explore the influences of environmental factors on belowground biomass and biomass allocation in grassland ecosystems and to test 'functional equilibrium hypothesis', the vertical distribution of belowground biomass and the relationship of belowground biomass (BGB) with belowground biomass, as well as the patterns of BGB and the response of belowground/aboveground biomass ratio (B/A) to environmental factors were examined in the central Inner Mongolia grassland along with thermal and moist gradients. Results showed that belowground biomass mainly concentrated in topsoil layer and had significant correlation with aboveground biomass. Belowground biomass had positive response to annual mean precipitation, organic carbon and total nitrogen, whereas negative response to annual mean temperature. Precipitation, besides the effect of soil features, was the most prominent factor that influenced the geographic disparity of belowground biomass. Additionally, the effect of total nitrogen on B/A was

  19. Limited Attention and Discourse Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M A

    1995-01-01

    This squib examines the role of limited attention in a theory of discourse structure and proposes a model of attentional state that relates current hierarchical theories of discourse structure to empirical evidence about human discourse processing capabilities. First, I present examples that are not predicted by Grosz and Sidner's stack model of attentional state. Then I consider an alternative model of attentional state, the cache model, which accounts for the examples, and which makes particular processing predictions. Finally I suggest a number of ways that future research could distinguish the predictions of the cache model and the stack model.

  20. Numerical Limit Analysis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Limit State analysis has a long history and many prominent researchers have contributed. The theoretical foundation is based on the upper- and lower-bound theorems which give a very comprehensive and elegant formulation on complicated physical problems. In the pre-computer age Limit State analysis...

  1. Limitations to sharing entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jeong San; Sanders, Barry C

    2011-01-01

    We discuss limitations to sharing entanglement known as monogamy of entanglement. Our pedagogical approach commences with simple examples of limited entanglement sharing for pure three-qubit states and progresses to the more general case of mixed-state monogamy relations with multiple qudits.

  2. Limits to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  3. The Hugoniot Elastic Limit Decay Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The Hugoniot Elastic Limit(HEL) precursor decay in shock loaded solids has been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical investigation. Comparative evidence is presented to show that the elastic precursor wave particle velocity, UPHEL, for certain materials decays asymptotically with propagation distance to the DeBroglie velocity, V1, level. This is demonstrated for the following materials: iron, aluminum alloy 6061-T6, plexiglas(PMMA), nickel alloy(MAR-M200), and lithium flouride(LiF). The DeBroglie velocity, V1, equals h/2md, where h is Planck's Constant, m is the mass of one atom, and d is the closest distance between atoms. Thus a relationship has been established between a microscopically derived velocity, V1, and a macroscopically observed velocity, UPHEL.

  4. Formation of the Unusual Semivolatile Diterpene Rhizathalene by the Arabidopsis Class I Terpene Synthase TPS08 in the Root Stele Is Involved in Defense against Belowground Herbivory[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Martha M.; Wang, Qiang; Webster, Francis X.; Kiemle, Dave; Hong, Young J.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Coates, Robert M.; Wray, Austin T.; Askew, Whitnee; O’Donnell, Christopher; Tokuhisa, James G.; Tholl, Dorothea

    2013-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are major constituents of plant defense against herbivore attack. Relatively little is known about the cell type–specific formation and antiherbivore activities of secondary compounds in roots despite the substantial impact of root herbivory on plant performance and fitness. Here, we describe the constitutive formation of semivolatile diterpenes called rhizathalenes by the class I terpene synthase (TPS) 08 in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. The primary enzymatic product of TPS08, rhizathalene A, which is produced from the substrate all-trans geranylgeranyl diphosphate, represents a so far unidentified class of tricyclic diterpene carbon skeletons with an unusual tricyclic spiro-hydrindane structure. Protein targeting and administration of stable isotope precursors indicate that rhizathalenes are biosynthesized in root leucoplasts. TPS08 expression is largely localized to the root stele, suggesting a centric and gradual release of its diterpene products into the peripheral root cell layers. We demonstrate that roots of Arabidopsis tps08 mutant plants, grown aeroponically and in potting substrate, are more susceptible to herbivory by the opportunistic root herbivore fungus gnat (Bradysia spp) and suffer substantial removal of peripheral tissue at larval feeding sites. Our work provides evidence for the in vivo role of semivolatile diterpene metabolites as local antifeedants in belowground direct defense against root-feeding insects. PMID:23512856

  5. Alternative methods for dispoal of low-level radioactive wastes. Task 1. Description of methods and assessment of criteria. [Alternative methods are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults; earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, augered holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, R.D.; Miller, W.O.; Warriner, J.B.; Malone, P.G.; McAneny, C.C.

    1984-04-01

    The study reported herein contains the results of Task 1 of a four-task study entitled Criteria for Evaluating Engineered Facilities. The overall objective of this study is to ensure that the criteria needed to evaluate five alternative low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal methods are available to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Agreement States. The alternative methods considered are belowground vaults, aboveground vaults, earth mounded concrete bunkers, mined cavities, and augered holes. Each of these alternatives is either being used by other countries for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal or is being considered by other countries or US agencies. In this report the performance requirements are listed, each alternative is described, the experience gained with its use is discussed, and the performance capabilities of each method are addressed. Next, the existing 10 CFR Part 61 Subpart D criteria with respect to paragraphs 61.50 through 61.53, pertaining to site suitability, design, operations and closure, and monitoring are assessed for applicability to evaluation of each alternative. Preliminary conclusions and recommendations are offered on each method's suitability as an LLW disposal alternative, the applicability of the criteria, and the need for supplemental or modified criteria.

  6. HOME Rent Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.252, HUD provides maximum HOME rent limits. The maximum HOME rents are the lesser of: The fair market rent for existing housing for...

  7. HUD Program Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Income limits used to determine the income eligibility of applicants for assistance under three programs authorized by the National Housing Act. These programs are...

  8. Limited Angle Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Cho, Min Kook; Kim, Seong Sik [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In computed tomography (CT), many situations are restricted to obtain enough number of projections or views to avoid artifacts such as streaking and geometrical distortion in the reconstructed images. Speed of motion of an object to be imaged can limit the number of views. Cardiovascular imaging is a representative example. Size of an object can also limit the complete traverse motion or geometrical complexity can obscure to be imaged at certain range of angles. These situations are frequently met in industrial nondestructive testing and evaluation. Dental CT also suffers from similar situation because cervical spine causes less x-ray penetration from some directions such that the available information is not sufficient for standard reconstruction algorithms. The limited angle tomography is now greatly paid attention as a new genre in medical and industrial imaging, popularly known as digital tomosynthesis. In this study, we introduce a modified filtered backprojection method in limited angle tomography and demonstrate its application for the dental imaging.

  9. Limited Income and Resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information for those with limited income and resources (those who may qualify for or already have the Low Income Subsidy to lower their prescription drug coverage...

  10. ACA Federal Upper Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Affordable Care Act Federal Upper Limits (FUL) based on the weighted average of the most recently reported monthly average manufacturer price (AMP) for...

  11. Limited Denial of Participation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Limited Denial of Participation (LDP) is an action taken by a HUD Field Office or the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family (DASSF) or Multifamily (DASMF)...

  12. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  13. Altruism and Reproductive Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey J. Fitzgerald

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined how different types of reproductive limitations — functional (schizoid personality disorder and schizophrenia, physical (malnutrition, and sexual (bisexuality and homosexuality — influenced altruistic intentions toward hypothetical target individuals of differing degrees of relatedness (r = 0, .25, and .50. Participants were 312 undergraduate students who completed a questionnaire on altruism toward hypothetical friends, half-siblings, and siblings with these different types of reproductive limitations. Genetic relatedness and reproductive limitations did not influence altruistic decision-making when the cost of altruism was low but did as the cost of altruism increased, with participants being more likely to help a sibling over a half-sibling and a half-sibling over a friend. Participants also indicated they were more likely to help a healthy (control person over people with a reproductive limitation. Of the three types of reproductive limitations, functional limitations had the strongest effect on altruistic decision-making, indicating that people were less likely to help those who exhibit abnormal social behavior.

  14. 随机环境中的两性Galton-Watson分枝过程的极限行为%The Limit Behavior for the Bisexual Galton-Watson Branching Processes in Random Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马世霞; 李晋枝

    2011-01-01

    考虑了后代概率分布受一个独立同分布环境过程所控制的两性Galton-Watson分枝过程,得到了有关过程渐进增长的若干结果.%A bisexual Galton-Watson branching process is considered,where the offspring probability distribution is controlled by an independent and identically environment process.Some results for the asymptotic growth associated with the process are obtained.

  15. 47 CFR 10.430 - Character limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Character limit. 10.430 Section 10.430 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM Alert Message Requirements § 10.430 Character limit. A CMAS Alert Message processed by a Participating CMS Provider must...

  16. Fundamental Limits of Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, Angel; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation is viewed as a key ingredient for interference management in wireless systems. This paper shows that cooperation has fundamental limitations. The main result is that even full cooperation between transmitters cannot in general change an interference-limited network to a noise-limited network. The key idea is that there exists a spectral efficiency upper bound that is independent of the transmit power. First, a spectral efficiency upper bound is established for systems that rely on pilot-assisted channel estimation; in this framework, cooperation is shown to be possible only within clusters of limited size, which are subject to out-of-cluster interference whose power scales with that of the in-cluster signals. Second, an upper bound is also shown to exist when cooperation is through noncoherent communication; thus, the spectral efficiency limitation is not a by-product of the reliance on pilot-assisted channel estimation. Consequently, existing literature that routinely assumes the high-power spect...

  17. The quantum geometric limit

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This letter analyzes the limits that quantum mechanics imposes on the accuracy to which spacetime geometry can be measured. By applying the fundamental physical bounds to measurement accuracy to ensembles of clocks and signals moving in curved spacetime -- e.g., the global positioning system -- I derive a covariant version of the quantum geometric limit: the total number of ticks of clocks and clicks of detectors that can be contained in a four volume of spacetime of radius r and temporal extent t is less than or equal to rt/\\pi x_P t_P, where x_P, t_P are the Planck length and time. The quantum geometric limit bounds the number of events or `ops' that can take place in a four-volume of spacetime: each event is associated with a Planck-scale area. Conversely, I show that if each quantum event is associated with such an area, then Einstein's equations must hold. The quantum geometric limit is consistent with and complementary to the holographic bound which limits the number of bits that can exist within a spat...

  18. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  19. Measurement limits in flash thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Steven M.; Lhota, James R.; Ahmed, Tasdiq

    2009-05-01

    Although active thermography has traditionally been regarded as a qualitative NDT method, its potential for quantitative measurement of thermophysical properties including wall thickness, flaw size and depth, thermal diffusivity or effusivity has been the subject of numerous investigations. Enabled by improvements in IR camera technology and fast, abundant and inexpensive computing power for advanced signal processing, measurement results have been reported using a variety of excitation and signal processing schemes. Results are often presented as a correlation between thermography data and nominal properties or independent measurements by another "validated" method. However, given the diffusion mechanism that underlies thermography, and the quantization and sampling conditions implicit in using an IR camera as a temperature sensor, there are definite limits to what can be achieved in a thermography measurement. While many benefits can be achieved with improved instrumentation, efficient energy insertion or optimized signal processing, ultimately, the limits imposed by diffusion and instrumentation take precedence, and cannot be circumvented. In this paper, the effects of camera frame rate and sensitivity on measurement of the thickness of a slab are examined, using basic 1-dimensional diffusion approximations.

  20. On noise limited cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Decreusefond, Laurent; Vu, Thanh-Tung

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a general theoretical framework to analyze noise limited networks. More precisely, we consider two homogenous Poisson point processes of base stations and users. General model of radio signal propagation and effect of fading are also considered. The main difference of our model with respect to other existing models is that a user connects to his best servers but not necessarily the closest one. We provide general formula for the outage probability. We study functionals related to the SNR as well as the sum of these functionals over all users per cell. For the latter, the expectation and bounds on the variance are obtained.

  1. Nanofabrication principles, capabilities and limits

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    This second edition of Nanofabrication is one of the most comprehensive introductions on nanofabrication technologies and processes. A practical guide and reference, this book introduces readers to all of the developed technologies that are capable of making structures below 100nm. The principle of each technology is introduced and illustrated with minimum mathematics involved. Also analyzed are the capabilities of each technology in making sub-100nm structures, and the limits of preventing a technology from going further down the dimensional scale. This book provides readers with a toolkit that will help with any of their nanofabrication challenges.

  2. Belowground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L./Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolova, Petia S., E-mail: nikolova@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Andersen, Christian P. [Western Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Blaschke, Helmut; Matyssek, Rainer; Haeberle, Karl-Heinz [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The effects of experimentally elevated O{sub 3} on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and delta{sup 13}C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O{sub 3} under beech and spruce, and was related to O{sub 3}-stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O{sub 3} on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O{sub 3} regime. delta{sup 13}C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing g{sub s} of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O{sub 3} in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O{sub 3} effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests. - Drought has the capacity to override the stimulating ozone effect on soil respiration in adult European beech/Norway spruce forest.

  3. Pushing the Photon Limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Cogdell, Richard; Hulst, van Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas are well-known for their effective role in fluorescence enhancement, both in excitation and emission. Enhancements of 3-4 orders of magnitude have been reported. Yet in practice, the photon emission is limited by saturation due to the time that a molecule spends in singlet and especi

  4. The Limits of Laughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindess, Harvey

    1983-01-01

    Three incidents which elucidate the limits of laughter are described. Most persons enjoy humor as comic relief, but when humor strikes a blow at something they hold dear, they find it very hard to laugh. People are upset by an irreverent attitude toward things they hold in esteem. (RM)

  5. Tightening Home Purchase Limits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    More Chinese cities will limit home purchase to cool the red-hot real estate market In June 2011,the average house price in 100 Chinese cities was 8,856 yuan ($1,373)per square meter.Of these cities,house prices in 75 of them increased

  6. Limitation of Auditors' Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik; Foged-Ladefoged, Lise Kolding

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the question of whether rules on the limitation of auditors’ liability within the perspective of EU law are needed, and if so, which rules can provide an appropriate balance between the potential injured party’s interests and those of the auditing sector, including with respect...

  7. Limits of Software Reuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holenderski, L.

    2006-01-01

    Software reuse is considered one of the main techniques to increasesoftware productivity. We present two simple mathematical argumentsthat show some theoretical limits of reuse. It turns out that the increase of productivity due to internal reuse is at most linear, farfrom the needed exponential gr

  8. Limits to responsible innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoop, E.; Pols, Auke; Romijn, Henny

    2016-01-01

    Responsible Innovation (RI) is a young field of research that has nevertheless had remarkable successes in dissemination within academic and political circles. However, there is relatively little awareness of its limits, blind spots and situations in which it cannot be used for actual innovation tra

  9. Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-18

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 aboveground UNS, and 79 candidate belowground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  10. Engineering Options Assessment Report. Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 above-ground UNS, and 79 candidate below-ground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  11. Mathematical methods for hydrodynamic limits

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Anna

    1991-01-01

    Entropy inequalities, correlation functions, couplings between stochastic processes are powerful techniques which have been extensively used to give arigorous foundation to the theory of complex, many component systems and to its many applications in a variety of fields as physics, biology, population dynamics, economics, ... The purpose of the book is to make theseand other mathematical methods accessible to readers with a limited background in probability and physics by examining in detail a few models where the techniques emerge clearly, while extra difficulties arekept to a minimum. Lanford's method and its extension to the hierarchy of equations for the truncated correlation functions, the v-functions, are presented and applied to prove the validity of macroscopic equations forstochastic particle systems which are perturbations of the independent and of the symmetric simple exclusion processes. Entropy inequalities are discussed in the frame of the Guo-Papanicolaou-Varadhan technique and of theKipnis-Oll...

  12. Limit theorems for solutions of stochastic differential equation problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vom Scheidt

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper linear differential equations with random processes as coefficients and as inhomogeneous term are regarded. Limit theorems are proved for the solutions of these equations if the random processes are weakly correlated processes.

  13. The need to promote behaviour change at the cultural level: one factor explaining the limited impact of the MEMA kwa Vijana adolescent sexual health intervention in rural Tanzania. A process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wight Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few of the many behavioral sexual health interventions in Africa have been rigorously evaluated. Where biological outcomes have been measured, improvements have rarely been found. One of the most rigorous trials was of the multi-component MEMA kwa Vijana adolescent sexual health programme, which showed improvements in knowledge and reported attitudes and behaviour, but none in biological outcomes. This paper attempts to explain these outcomes by reviewing the process evaluation findings, particularly in terms of contextual factors. Methods A large-scale, primarily qualitative process evaluation based mainly on participant observation identified the principal contextual barriers and facilitators of behavioural change. Results The contextual barriers involved four interrelated socio-structural factors: culture (i.e. shared practices and systems of belief, economic circumstances, social status, and gender. At an individual level they appeared to operate through the constructs of the theories underlying MEMA kwa Vijana - Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action – but the intervention was unable to substantially modify these individual-level constructs, apart from knowledge. Conclusion The process evaluation suggests that one important reason for this failure is that the intervention did not operate sufficiently at a structural level, particularly in regard to culture. Recently most structural interventions have focused on gender or/and economics. Complementing these with a cultural approach could address the belief systems that justify and perpetuate gender and economic inequalities, as well as other barriers to behaviour change.

  14. Telescopic limiting magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1990-01-01

    The prediction of the magnitude of the faintest star visible through a telescope by a visual observer is a difficult problem in physiology. Many prediction formulas have been advanced over the years, but most do not even consider the magnification used. Here, the prediction algorithm problem is attacked with two complimentary approaches: (1) First, a theoretical algorithm was developed based on physiological data for the sensitivity of the eye. This algorithm also accounts for the transmission of the atmosphere and the telescope, the brightness of the sky, the color of the star, the age of the observer, the aperture, and the magnification. (2) Second, 314 observed values for the limiting magnitude were collected as a test of the formula. It is found that the formula does accurately predict the average observed limiting magnitudes under all conditions.

  15. Limitations Of Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, John R.

    1983-03-01

    The state of the art of quantitative infrared thermography is addressed. We are asking more and more of thermography in the field of energy conservation. An energy and dollar conscious public wants to know how much heat is being lost and how much money can be saved by retrofit. Many mission oriented approaches have been developed to address these questions. However, many fundamental questions about how thermography works and how far its capabilities can be pushed have not been addressed. In addition, the theoretical and practical limits of doing benefit cost studies with thermography have not been seriously addressed. This paper discusses the limitations of the current technology and describes many unanswered but important questions facing the future use of thermography for quantitative heat loss analysis.

  16. Limits of proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  17. Elastic limit of silicane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing; De, Suvranu

    2014-10-21

    Silicane is a fully hydrogenated silicene-a counterpart of graphene-having promising applications in hydrogen storage with capacities larger than 6 wt%. Knowledge of its elastic limit is critical in its applications as well as tailoring its electronic properties by strain. Here we investigate the mechanical response of silicane to various strains using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. We illustrate that non-linear elastic behavior is prominent in two-dimensional nanomaterials as opposed to bulk materials. The elastic limits defined by ultimate tensile strains are 0.22, 0.28, and 0.25 along armchair, zigzag, and biaxial directions, respectively, an increase of 29%, 33%, and 24% respectively in reference to silicene. The in-plane stiffness and Poisson ratio are reduced by a factor of 16% and 26%, respectively. However, hydrogenation/dehydrogenation has little effect on its ultimate tensile strengths. We obtained high order elastic constants for a rigorous continuum description of the nonlinear elastic response. The limitation of second, third, fourth, and fifth order elastic constants are in the strain range of 0.02, 0.08, and 0.13, and 0.21, respectively. The pressure effect on the second order elastic constants and Poisson's ratio were predicted from the third order elastic constants. Our results could provide a safe guide for promising applications and strain-engineering the functions and properties of silicane monolayers.

  18. Limiting factors of starch hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonna, P; Leloup, V; Buléon, A

    1992-10-01

    Foods appear as complex structures, in which starch may be present in different forms. These, including the molecular characteristics and the crystalline organization, depend on processing conditions and compositions of ingredients. The main changes in starch macro- and microstructures are the increase of surface area to volume ratio in the solid phase, the modification of the crystallinity as affected by gelatinization and gelation, and the depolymerization of amylose and amylopectin. Starch modification may be estimated by different methodologies, which should be selected according to the level of structure considered. When amylose and amylopectin are in solution, rapid and total hydrolysis leads to the formation of a mixture of linear oligosaccharides and branched alpha-limit dextrins. However, starch usually occurs in foods as solid structures. Structural factors of starchy materials influence their enzymic hydrolysis. A better understanding of the enzymatic process enables the identification of the structural factors limiting hydrolysis: diffusion of enzyme molecules, porosity of solid substrates, adsorption of enzymes onto solid substrates, and the catalytic event. A mechanistic modelling should be possible in the future.

  19. Cosmological limits on computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipler, F.J.

    1986-06-01

    A true universal Turing machine can be constructed only if it is possible to actually process and store an infinite number of bits between now and the end of the universe. Conditions on the universe are derived that must hold if such processing and storage is to be possible. In particular, it is shown that it is possible only if the universe is closed and only if its future c-boundary consists of a single point.

  20. Cosmological Limits on Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank J.

    1986-06-01

    A true universal Turing machine can be constructed only if it is possible to actually process and store an infinite number of bits between now and the end of the universe. Conditions on the universe are derived that must hold if such processing and storage is to be possible. In particular, it is shown that it is possible only if the universe is closed and only if its future c-boundary consists of a single point.

  1. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  2. Biotic and Abiotic Factors Controlling Respiration Rates of Above- and Belowground Woody Debris of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayuko Jomura

    Full Text Available As a large, long-term pool and source of carbon and nutrients, woody litter is an important component of forest ecosystems. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the factors that regulate the rate of decomposition of coarse and fine woody debris (CFWD of dominant tree species in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. Respiration rates of dead stems, branches, and coarse and fine roots of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula felled 4 years prior obtained in situ ranged from 20.9 to 500.1 mg CO2 [kg dry wood](-1 h(-1 in a one-time measurement in summer. Respiration rate had a significant negative relationship with diameter; in particular, that of a sample of Q. crispula with a diameter of >15 cm and substantial heartwood was low. It also had a significant positive relationship with moisture content. The explanatory variables diameter, [N], wood density, and moisture content were interrelated. The most parsimonious path model showed 14 significant correlations among 8 factors and respiration. Diameter and [C] had large negative direct effects on CFWD respiration rate, and moisture content and species had medium positive direct effects. [N] and temperature did not have direct or indirect effects, and position and wood density had indirect effects. The model revealed some interrelationships between controlling factors. We discussed the influence of the direct effects of explanatory variables and the influence especially of species and position. We speculate that the small R2 value of the most parsimonious model was probably due to the omission of microbial biomass and activity. These direct and indirect effects and interrelationships between explanatory variables could be used to develop a process-based CFWD decomposition model.

  3. Biotic and Abiotic Factors Controlling Respiration Rates of Above- and Belowground Woody Debris of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomura, Mayuko; Akashi, Yuhei; Itoh, Hiromu; Yuki, Risa; Sakai, Yoshimi; Maruyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    As a large, long-term pool and source of carbon and nutrients, woody litter is an important component of forest ecosystems. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of the factors that regulate the rate of decomposition of coarse and fine woody debris (CFWD) of dominant tree species in a cool-temperate forest in Japan. Respiration rates of dead stems, branches, and coarse and fine roots of Fagus crenata and Quercus crispula felled 4 years prior obtained in situ ranged from 20.9 to 500.1 mg CO2 [kg dry wood](-1) h(-1) in a one-time measurement in summer. Respiration rate had a significant negative relationship with diameter; in particular, that of a sample of Q. crispula with a diameter of >15 cm and substantial heartwood was low. It also had a significant positive relationship with moisture content. The explanatory variables diameter, [N], wood density, and moisture content were interrelated. The most parsimonious path model showed 14 significant correlations among 8 factors and respiration. Diameter and [C] had large negative direct effects on CFWD respiration rate, and moisture content and species had medium positive direct effects. [N] and temperature did not have direct or indirect effects, and position and wood density had indirect effects. The model revealed some interrelationships between controlling factors. We discussed the influence of the direct effects of explanatory variables and the influence especially of species and position. We speculate that the small R2 value of the most parsimonious model was probably due to the omission of microbial biomass and activity. These direct and indirect effects and interrelationships between explanatory variables could be used to develop a process-based CFWD decomposition model.

  4. Drinking to the Limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ellersgaard, Christoph Houman; Larsen, Anton Grau

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse social status differences in alcohol norms and practices seen from the perspective of ‘health governance’. Survey data on 1442 employees in a middle-sized, Danish firm are used to construct a Bourdieu-inspired social space, tied to four forms of capital: econ...... by the Danish National Health Board. Rather, this article identifies a relatively large group of high-positioned respondents balancing at the limits of risky drinking – or transgressing them, if measured by international standards....

  5. Orind Refractories Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mr R. Mishra; Group Manging Director

    2005-01-01

    @@ "Sight can be acquired, Vision cannot". Orind Refractories Limited (ORIND), China was formed with this rare vision. At a time when the world was testing the tepid waters of China; Mr. Ravin Jhunjhunwala, Chairman of ORIND and the management of ORIND India had looked over the Great Wall to begin a journey of success. Incorported on 18th August 1994 with an initial investment of USD 5 million, ORL caters to the ever-demanding needs of the steel industry and beyond. Incidentally ORIND was the first wholly owned India company to set up base in China. Pesently, ORIND China has a 616 strong work force including 23 expatriates.

  6. Smoothness of limit functors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Benedictus Margaux

    2015-05-01

    Let be a scheme. Assume that we are given an action of the one dimensional split torus $\\mathbb{G}_{m,S}$ on a smooth affine -scheme $\\mathfrak{X}$. We consider the limit (also called attractor) subfunctor $\\mathfrak{X}_{}$ consisting of points whose orbit under the given action `admits a limit at 0’. We show that $\\mathfrak{X}_{}$ is representable by a smooth closed subscheme of $\\mathfrak{X}$. This result generalizes a theorem of Conrad et al. (Pseudo-reductive groups (2010) Cambridge Univ. Press) where the case when $\\mathfrak{X}$ is an affine smooth group and $\\mathbb{G}_{m,S}$ acts as a group automorphisms of $\\mathfrak{X}$ is considered. It also occurs as a special case of a recent result by Drinfeld on the action of $\\mathbb{G}_{m,S}$ on algebraic spaces (Proposition 1.4.20 of Drinfeld V, On algebraic spaces with an action of $\\mathfrak{G}_{m}$, preprint 2013) in case is of finite type over a field.

  7. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  8. Sensitivity Limitations for Multivariable Linear Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Weller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines fundamental limitations in performance which apply to linear filtering problems associated with multivariable systems having as many inputs as outputs. The results of this paper quantify unavoidable limitations in the sensitivity of state estimates to process and measurement disturbances, as represented by the maximum singular values of the relevant transfer matrices. These limitations result from interpolation constraints imposed by open right half-plane poles and zeros in the transfer matrices linking process noise and output noise with state estimates. Using the Poisson integral inequality, this paper shows how sensitivity limitations and tradeoffs in multivariable filtering problems are intimately related to the directionality properties of the open right half-plane poles and zeros in these transfer matrices.

  9. Study on size upper limit of grain processed by hydrocyclone micro-bubble flotation column%旋流微泡浮选柱浮选粒度上限研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭柱; 谢广元; 董玉蛟; 许光前

    2011-01-01

    简要介绍了选煤厂存在的浮选入料粒度过粗的问题,分析了旋流微泡浮选柱的分选原理,开创性地采用小于0.7 mm煤泥作为入料,通过浮选试验、正交试验分析了各个因素对粗粒回收效果的影响,为指导旋流微泡浮选柱现场生产应用提供理论支持.%The problem that oversize grain size is fed into the flotation process is introduced, and the separa tion principle of the hydrocyclone micro-bubble notation column is analyzed. The coal slime whose size is less than 0.7 mm is creatively taken to serve as feeding material to carry out flotation tests and orthogonal tests, and the influence of each factor on recovery of coarse grains is analyzed, which offers theoretical support for guid ing the field operation of the hydrocyclone micro-bubble flotation column.

  10. Array Antenna Limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonsson, B L G; Hussain, N

    2013-01-01

    This letter defines a physical bound based array figure of merit that provides a tool to compare the performance of both single and multi-band array antennas with respect to return-loss, thickness of the array over the ground-plane, and scan-range. The result is based on a sum-rule result of Rozanov-type for linear polarization. For single-band antennas it extends an existing limit for a given fixed scan-angle to include the whole scan-range of the array, as well as the unit-cell structure in the bound. The letter ends with an investigation of the array figure of merit for some wideband and/or wide-scan antennas with linear polarization. We find arrays with a figure of merit >0.6 that empirically defines high-performance antennas with respect to this measure.

  11. Clinical limitations of Invisalign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Xiem; Ling, Paul H

    2007-04-01

    Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations. The majority of these patients reject wearing labial fixed appliances and are looking instead to more esthetic treatment options, including lingual orthodontics and Invisalign appliances. Since Align Technology introduced the Invisalign appliance in 1999 in an extensive public campaign, the appliance has gained tremendous attention from adult patients and dental professionals. The transparency of the Invisalign appliance enhances its esthetic appeal for those adult patients who are averse to wearing conventional labial fixed orthodontic appliances. Although guidelines about the types of malocclusions that this technique can treat exist, few clinical studies have assessed the effectiveness of the appliance. A few recent studies have outlined some of the limitations associated with this technique that clinicians should recognize early before choosing treatment options.

  12. The Limits to Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  13. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    products, complex stability constants, and redox potentials for radionuclides in different oxidation states, form the underlying database to be used for those calculations. The potentially low solubilities of many radionuclides in natural waters constitute the first barrier for their migration from the repository into the environment. Evaluation of this effect requires a knowledge of the site-specific water chemistry and the expected spatial and temporal ranges of its variability. Quantitative determinations of radionuclide solubility in waters within the range of chemistry must be made. Speciation and molecular complexation must be ascertained to interpret and apply solubility results. The solubilities thus determined can be used to assess the effectiveness of solubility in limiting radionuclide migration. These solubilities can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of other retardation processes expected to occur once dissolution of the source material and migration begin. Understanding the solubility behavior of radionuclides will assist in designing valuable sorption experiments that must be conducted below the solubility limit since only soluble species participate in surface reactions and sorption processes. The present strategy for radionuclide solubility tasks has been to provide a solubility model from bulk-experiments that attempt to bracket the estimate made for this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) of water conditions on site. The long-term goal must be to develop a thermodynamic database for solution speciation and solid-state determination as a prerequisite for transport calculations and interpretation of empirical solubility data. The model has to be self-consistent and tested against known solubility studies in order to predict radionuclide solubilities over the continuous distribution ranges of potential water compositions for performance assessment of the site. Solubility studies upper limits for radionuclide concentrations in natural waters. The

  14. Kyphoplasty: Chances and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kyphoplasty provides a minimal-invasive surgical technique for the cement augmentation of vertebral bodies following osteoprotic compression fractures or malignant processes. Kyphoplasty has been developed as an advancement of vertebroplasty. Both procedures feature high-success rates in terms of reliable and lasting reduction of pain. Advantages of kyphoplasty over vertebroplasty are to be seen in the possibility of deformity correction as well as in a decreased risk of cement leakage, which represents the most important source for clinical complications. Long-term experiences with the effect of cementing vertebral bodies are sparse. Thus indications and possibilities have to be judged realistically. Conditions, which have to be considered before performing kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty include age of the patient, age of the fracture, degree of deformation and additional degenerative changes of the spine. This article summarizes the present research and literature as well as indications and contraindications and is thought to provide guidelines for the aforementioned decision-making processes.

  15. Boolean process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵应骅; 李忠诚; 赵著行

    1997-01-01

    Boolean algebra successfully describes the logical behavior of a digital circuit, and has been widely used in electronic circuit design and test With the development of high speed VLSIs it is a drawback for Boolean algebra to be unable to describe circuit timing behavior. Therefore a Boolean process is defined as a family of Boolean van ables relevant to the time parameter t. A real-valued sample of a Boolean process is a waveform. Waveform functions can be manipulated formally by using mathematical tools. The distance, difference and limit of a waveform polynomial are defined, and a sufficient and necessary condition of the limit existence is presented. Based on this, the concept of sensitization is redefined precisely to demonstrate the potential and wide application possibility The new definition is very different from the traditional one, and has an impact on determining the sensitizable paths with maximum or minimum length, and false paths, and then designing and testing high performance circuits

  16. Bioenergy: Potentials and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Canadell, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this lecture we explain 1) the biochemical basis for photosynthesis and plant production and 2) the future demands on biomass for human use. Summing all physiological processes, the efficiency of converting solar energy into biomass is bioenergy. We estimate this fraction to be between 3 and 8% of the global energy demand by 2050. The contribution of bioenergy is at the higher end in tropical regions and in the less industrialized parts of the world, but may even be < 3% in industrialized nations.

  17. The limits of subfunctionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergman Aviv

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC model has been proposed as an explanation for the unexpectedly high retention of duplicate genes. The hypothesis proposes that, following gene duplication, the two gene copies degenerate to perform complementary functions that jointly match that of the single ancestral gene, a process also known as subfunctionalization. We distinguish between subfunctionalization at the regulatory level and at the product level (e.g within temporal or spatial expression domains. Results In contrast to what is expected under the DDC model, we use in silico modeling to show that regulatory subfunctionalization is expected to peak and then decrease significantly. At the same time, neofunctionalization (recruitment of novel interactions increases monotonically, eventually affecting the regulatory elements of the majority of genes. Furthermore, since this process occurs under conditions of stabilizing selection, there is no need to invoke positive selection. At the product level, the frequency of subfunctionalization is no higher than would be expected by chance, a finding that was corroborated using yeast microarray time-course data. We also find that product subfunctionalization is not necessarily caused by regulatory subfunctionalization. Conclusion Our results suggest a more complex picture of post-duplication evolution in which subfunctionalization plays only a partial role in conjunction with redundancy and neofunctionalization. We argue that this behavior is a consequence of the high evolutionary plasticity in gene networks.

  18. Resolution-limited statistical image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaum, Marek; Syrkin, Mark

    1993-09-01

    We have examined the performance of a one-layer Perceptron for the detection and classification of small (resolution-limited) targets from their images, which are stochastic realizations of random processes. The processes are governed by non-Gaussian, non-white distributions. Our results show the potential of the Perceptron classifier as an Ideal Observer and suggest image detection and classification problems for which neural networks may be more reliable than human observers.

  19. Limits of noise squeezing in Kerr effect

    CERN Document Server

    Bajer, J; Tanas, R

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that the optical Kerr effect can be a source of highly squeezed light, however the analytical limit of the noise suppression has not been found yet. The process is reconsidered and an analytical estimation of the optimal quadrature noise level is presented. The validity of the new scaling law is checked numerically and analytically.

  20. Limiting Spectral Distribution of Sample Autocovariance Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Anirban; Sen, Sanchayan

    2011-01-01

    The empirical spectral distribution (ESD) of the sample variance covariance matrix of i.i.d. observations under suitable moment conditions converges almost surely as the dimension tends to infinity. The limiting spectral distribution (LSD) is universal and is known in closed form with support [0, 4]. In this article we show that the ESD of the sample autocovariance matrix converges as the dimension increases, when the time series is a linear process with reasonable restriction on the coefficients. This limit does not depend on the distribution of the underlying driving i.i.d. sequence but in contrast to the sample variance covariance matrix, its support is unbounded. The limit moments are certain functions of the autocovariances. This limit is inconsistent in the sense that it does not coincide with the spectral distribution of the theoretical autocovariance matrix. However, if we consider a suitably tapered version of the autocovariance matrix, then its LSD also exists and is consistent. We also discuss the ...

  1. Memory and Processing Limits in Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Stuart T.

    According to the classical working memory perspective, tasks such as command and control decision-making should be performed less effectively if extraneous material must be retained in short-term memory. Only marginal support for this prediction was obtained for a simulation involving scheduling trucking and transportation missions, although…

  2. Topology in Process Calculus (I): Limit Behaviour of Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Mingsheng

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the modifications onactions of a topology on names of actions and the simplest topology onagents induced by a topology on names of actions and shows that the limitbehaviour of some agents is compatible with transitional semantics.

  3. Volcanic edifice weakening via decarbonation: A self-limiting process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Silvio; Heap, Michael J.; Iezzi, Gianluca; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-08-01

    The inherent instability of volcanic edifices, and their resultant propensity for catastrophic collapse, is a constant source of volcanic risk. Structural instability of volcanic edifices may be amplified by the presence of carbonate rocks in the sub-volcanic strata, due to the debilitating response of carbonates to thermally-induced alteration. Nonetheless, decarbonation reactions (the primary weakening mechanism), may stall when the system becomes buffered by rising levels of a reaction product, carbon dioxide. Such thermodynamic stalling might be inferred to serve to circumvent the weakness of volcanic structures. However, the present study shows that, even when decarbonation is halted, rock physical properties continue to degrade due to thermal microcracking. Furthermore, as a result, the pathways for the escape of carbon dioxide are numerous within a volcanic edifice. Therefore, in the case of an edifice with a sub-volcanic sedimentary basement, the generation of carbon dioxide via decarbonation is unlikely to hinder its impact on instability, and thus potentially devastating flank collapse.

  4. 78 FR 66916 - Alaskan Seafood Processing Effluent Limitations Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... included in the original or supplemental petition because the location met the statutory criteria for BPT.... Location-by-Location Analysis 1. Anchorage 2. Cordova 3. Juneau 4. Ketchikan 5. Petersburg VIII... entities likely to be affected by this notice. Other types of entities that do not meet the above...

  5. Memory and Processing Limits in Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    A.D., & Hitch, G. (1974). Working memory. In G. Bower (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation: Advances in research and theory (Vol. 8). New...York: Academic Press. Chase, W.G., & Ericcson, K.A. (1982). Skill and working memory. In G. Bower (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation (Vol

  6. Limits to meritocracy? Gender in academic recruitment and promotion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2015-01-01

    According to the literature, women researchers are sometimes at a disadvantage in academic recruitment due to insufficient network ties and subtle gender biases among evaluators. But how exactly do highly formal recruitment procedures allow space for mobilizing informal, potentially gendered, net...

  7. Stochastic Modeling and Deterministic Limit of Catalytic Surface Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Reichert, Christian; Eiswirth, Markus;

    2007-01-01

    of stochastic origin can be observed in experiments. The models include a new approach to the platinum phase transition, which allows for a unification of existing models for Pt(100) and Pt(110). The rich nonlinear dynamical behavior of the macroscopic reaction kinetics is investigated and shows good agreement......Three levels of modeling, microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic are discussed for the CO oxidation on low-index platinum single crystal surfaces. The introduced models on the microscopic and mesoscopic level are stochastic while the model on the macroscopic level is deterministic. It can...... with low pressure experiments. Furthermore, for intermediate pressures, noise-induced pattern formation, which has not been captured by earlier models, can be reproduced in stochastic simulations with the mesoscopic model....

  8. Charter Halibut Limited Access Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This limited access system limits the number of charter vessels that may participate in the guided sport fishery for halibut in area 2C and 3A. NMFS issues a charter...

  9. CFO of CNOOC Limited Changed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ CNOOC Limited announced on December 24 that Yang Hua, Senior Vice President of CNOOC Limited and President of CNOOC International Limied will succeed Dr.Mark Qiu as Chief Financial Officer effective on January 1,2005.

  10. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    products, complex stability constants, and redox potentials for radionuclides in different oxidation states, form the underlying database to be used for those calculations. The potentially low solubilities of many radionuclides in natural waters constitute the first barrier for their migration from the repository into the environment. Evaluation of this effect requires a knowledge of the site-specific water chemistry and the expected spatial and temporal ranges of its variability. Quantitative determinations of radionuclide solubility in waters within the range of chemistry must be made. Speciation and molecular complexation must be ascertained to interpret and apply solubility results. The solubilities thus determined can be used to assess the effectiveness of solubility in limiting radionuclide migration. These solubilities can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of other retardation processes expected to occur once dissolution of the source material and migration begin. Understanding the solubility behavior of radionuclides will assist in designing valuable sorption experiments that must be conducted below the solubility limit since only soluble species participate in surface reactions and sorption processes. The present strategy for radionuclide solubility tasks has been to provide a solubility model from bulk-experiments that attempt to bracket the estimate made for this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) of water conditions on site. The long-term goal must be to develop a thermodynamic database for solution speciation and solid-state determination as a prerequisite for transport calculations and interpretation of empirical solubility data. The model has to be self-consistent and tested against known solubility studies in order to predict radionuclide solubilities over the continuous distribution ranges of potential water compositions for performance assessment of the site. Solubility studies upper limits for radionuclide concentrations in natural waters. The

  11. Limits to Drift Chamber Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, Werner

    1998-01-01

    ATLAS (A Large Toroidal LHC Apparatus) will be a general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider that will be operational at CERN in the year 2004. The ATLAS muon spectrometer aims for a momentum resolution of 10% for a transverse momentum of pT=1TeV. The precision tracking devices in the muon system will be high pressure drift tubes (MDTs) with a single wire resolution of 1100 chambers covering an area of ≈ 2500m2. The high counting rates in the spectrometer as well as the aim for excellent spatial resolution and high efficiency put severe constraints on the MDT operating parameters. This work describes a detailed study of all the resolution limiting factors in the ATLAS environment. A ’full chain’ simulation of the MDT response to photons and charged particles as well as quantitative comparisons with measurements was performed. The good agreement between simulation and measurements resulted in a profound understanding of the drift chamber processes and the individual contributions to the spat...

  12. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro; Xiao, Sanshui

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors...... and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon...... the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly....

  13. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Asger Mortensen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  14. Material limitations on the detection limit in refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Nunes, Pedro S; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window (λ ≳ 1100 nm) of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because the silicon absorbs strongly.

  15. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger; 10.3390/s91108382

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min{Dn} > eta with n+i*eta being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in a bio-liquid environment, such as a water buffer. In the transparency window of silicon the detection limit becomes almost independent on the filling fraction, while in the visible, the detection limit depends strongly on the filling fraction because silicon absorbs strongly.

  16. Focusing of light beyond the diffraction limit

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, K R

    2009-01-01

    Diffraction limits the behaviour of light in optical systems and sets the smallest achievable line width at half the wavelength. With a novel subwavelength plasmonic lens to reduce the diffraction via an asymmetry and to generate and squeeze the wave functions, an incident light is focused by the aperture to a single-line with its width beyond the limit outside the near zone. The fields focused are radiative and capable of propagating to the far zone. The light focusing process, besides being of academic interest, is expected to open up a wide range of application possibilities.

  17. Material Limitations on the Detection Limit in Refractometry

    OpenAIRE

    Niels Asger Mortensen; Sanshui Xiao; Peder Skafte-Pedersen; Nunes, Pedro S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the detection limit for refractometric sensors relying on high-Q optical cavities and show that the ultimate classical detection limit is given by min {Δn} ≳ η, with n + iη being the complex refractive index of the material under refractometric investigation. Taking finite Q factors and filling fractions into account, the detection limit declines. As an example we discuss the fundamental limits of silicon-based high-Q resonators, such as photonic crystal resonators, for sensing in ...

  18. Macdonald processes

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function...

  19. DISCUSSION ON DECISION LIMIT AND DETECTION LIMIT IN SPECTROSCOPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑仁圻; 余君岳; 等

    1995-01-01

    Based on fundamental arguments,the expressions for the decision limit and the detection limit both in the count domain and in the cout rate domain are derive4d.These expressions are found to be different from those shown in the existing literature.

  20. Welfare Dynamics under Time Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff Grogger; Charles Michalopoulos

    2003-01-01

    Among the most important changes brought about by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) is the imposition of time limits. In this paper, we analyze a simple model in which a potential welfare recipient chooses how to allocate her time-limited endowment of benefits so as to maximize her expected lifetime utility. Not surprisingly, the model reveals that time limits provide an incentive for the consumer to conserve, or bank, her benefits. More inte...

  1. Family caregivers and limitations in social activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B; Montgomery, A

    1990-03-01

    Constriction of social and personal activities is one of the most frequently noted consequences of caring for a frail elder. This study analyzed the correlates of perceived limitations in social activities using data from a national sample of the frail elderly and their caregivers. Two research issues were addressed: 1) What differences in demographic, family, and caregiving attributes are associated with variation in perceived restricted social activities? and, 2) How does the process influencing restriction of social activities vary by family relationship of the caregiver? Higher levels of elder dependency and task demands were characteristic of those who reported social limitations, and daughters and wives were more likely to report such limitations than sons and husbands. Subjective assessment of time and task demands, however, were more important influences than objective caregiving activities for all family caregivers.

  2. Doublet III limiter performance and implications for mechanical design and material selection for future limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabado, M.M.; Marcus, F.B.; Trester, P.W.; Wesley, J.C.

    1979-10-01

    The plasma limiter system for Doublet III is described. Initially, high-Z materials, Ta-10W for the primary limiter and Mo for the backup limiters, were selected as the most attractive metallic candidates from the standpoint of thermal and structural properties. For the purpose of evaluating the effect of material Z on plasma performance, the nonmagnetic, Ni-base alloy Inconel X-750 was selected for a medium-Z limiter material. Graphite, a low-Z material, will likely be the next limiter material for evaluation. Design and material selection criteria for the different Z ranges are presented. The performance of the high-Z limiters in Doublet III is reviewed for an operation period that included approximately 5000 plasma shots. Changes in surface appearance and metallurgical changes are characterized. Discussion is presented on how and to what extent the high-Z elements affected the performance of the plasma based on theory and measurements in Doublet III. The fabrication processes for the Inconel X-750 limiters are summarized, and, last, observations on early performance of the Inconel limiters are described. (MOW)

  3. Fundamental Imaging Limits of Radio Telescope Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnholds, Stefan J; 10.1109/JSTSP.2008.2004216

    2010-01-01

    The fidelity of radio astronomical images is generally assessed by practical experience, i.e. using rules of thumb, although some aspects and cases have been treated rigorously. In this paper we present a mathematical framework capable of describing the fundamental limits of radio astronomical imaging problems. Although the data model assumes a single snapshot observation, i.e. variations in time and frequency are not considered, this framework is sufficiently general to allow extension to synthesis observations. Using tools from statistical signal processing and linear algebra, we discuss the tractability of the imaging and deconvolution problem, the redistribution of noise in the map by the imaging and deconvolution process, the covariance of the image values due to propagation of calibration errors and thermal noise and the upper limit on the number of sources tractable by self calibration. The combination of covariance of the image values and the number of tractable sources determines the effective noise ...

  4. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  5. Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

    2011-11-16

    Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer.

  6. Limit theory for planar Gilbert tessellations

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    A Gilbert tessellation arises by letting linear segments (cracks) in the plane unfold in time with constant speed, starting from a homogeneous Poisson point process of germs in randomly chosen directions. Whenever a growing edge hits an already existing one, it stops growing in this direction. The resulting process tessellates the plane. The purpose of the present paper is to establish law of large numbers, variance asymptotics and a central limit theorem for geometric functionals of such tessellations. The main tool applied is the stabilization theory for geometric functionals.

  7. LimitS - A system for limit state analysis and optimal material layout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars; Krenk, Steen

    1997-01-01

    A system LimitS for limit state analysis and material optimization has been developed and implemented in a PC environment. The program is formulated in a general finite element format with stress-based elements. The solution method is based on the lower-bound theorem, where an optimal stress...... the statics and kinematics of the collapse mode are determined via the dual variables of the LP-problem. In LimitS the following element types are implemented: two- and three-dimensional beam elements; truss elements; triangular slab elements; and shear and stringer elements for plates with in-plane loading....... Examples of all three problem types are given including both limit state analysis and material optimization....

  8. Delving into Limits of Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Beth; Smith, Ken W.

    2011-01-01

    Limits are foundational to the central concepts of calculus. However, the authors' experiences with students and educational research abound with examples of students' misconceptions about limits and infinity. The authors wanted calculus students to understand, appreciate, and enjoy their first introduction to advanced mathematical thought. Thus,…

  9. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  10. Productivity and modifications of ecosystem processes in gaps of a low Macchia in southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Marco

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Disturbance in Mediterranean shrub lands creates gaps that break up the shrub cover and potentially restrict productivity and other ecosystem processes. Gaps make up to about 20% of the low Macchia area at the Castel Volturno nature reserve (southern Italy. The plant community consists mainly of small annual species (legumes, grasses and forbs that germinate in November and die out before the onset of summer drought. The inter-annual variability in productivity and the relative abundance of legumes, grasses and forbs were assessed over 4 yr (2004–2007 to evaluate main potential modifications of ecosystem processes determined by the occurrence of gaps in the shrub cover.

    In the study years, at the peak production, plant mass varied from about 250 to 700 g m−2; biomass belowground allocation varied from 23% in the wettest to 44% in the driest year. Belowground/aboveground biomass ratios were negatively related to rainfall and positively related to the length of the dry period, showing that water availability controls biomass allocation patterns. Legumes were the most abundant fraction (about 60% of the aboveground mass in the wettest year. In the drier years legumes exhibited a shorter life cycle and senesced by mid-spring. Among the three functional groups monitored, legumes were the most sensitive to water shortage and their biomass was positively related to the amount of rainfall and negatively related to the length of the dry period. The higher fraction of legume mass was associated with higher nitrogen content in plant tissues and in the soil. Senesced annual species decomposed more than senescent Phillyrea sp. leaves. The stability of organic carbon pool, evaluated through the endogenous mineralization coefficient (CEM, was lower in gaps than in understorey soils.

  11. Tropical forest carbon balance in a warmer world: a critical review spanning microbial- to ecosystem-scale processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tana E; Cavaleri, Molly A; Reed, Sasha C

    2012-11-01

    , heterotrophic versus autotrophic respiration, thermal acclimation versus substrate limitation of plant and microbial communities, below-ground C allocation, species composition (plant and microbial), and the hydraulic architecture of roots. Whether or not tropical forests will become a source or a sink of C in a warmer world remains highly uncertain. Given the importance of these ecosystems to the global C budget, resolving this uncertainty is a primary research priority.

  12. Tropical forest carbon balance in a warmer world: a critical review spanning microbial- to ecosystem-scale processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tana E.; Cavaleri, Molly A.; Reed, Sasha C.

    2012-01-01

    , heterotrophic versus autotrophic respiration, thermal acclimation versus substrate limitation of plant and microbial communities, below-ground C allocation, species composition (plant and microbial), and the hydraulic architecture of roots. Whether or not tropical forests will become a source or a sink of C in a warmer world remains highly uncertain. Given the importance of these ecosystems to the global C budget, resolving this uncertainty is a primary research priority.

  13. Fundamental Limits of Ultrathin Metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    We present universal theoretical limits on the operation and performance of non-magnetic passive ultrathin metasurfaces. In particular, we prove that their local transmission, reflection, and polarization conversion coefficients are confined to limited regions of the complex plane. As a result, full control over the phase of the light transmitted through such metasurfaces cannot be achieved if the polarization of the light is not to be affected at the same time. We also establish fundamental limits on the maximum polarization conversion efficiency of these metasurfaces, and show that they cannot achieve more than 25% polarization conversion efficiency in transmission.

  14. Physical limits in semiconductor electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, R W

    1977-03-18

    Although the limitations of the methods of lithography in use at a particular time are easily recognized and attract substantial attention, experience shows that technological ingenuity keeps pushing them to ever-smaller dimensions. There seems to be no fundamental reason to expect that lithographic limits will not continue to recede. The limits to the advance of miniaturization are to be found in the ability of materials to withstand high electric fields and in the ability of packaging technology to remove heat from active components and provide for power distribution, signal interconnection, and flexible mechanical assembly.

  15. The Limits to Giving Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade S. Sasser

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this thematic section, authors consider the limitations on giving back that they faced in field research, or saw others face. For some authors, their attempts at giving back were severely limited by the scope of their projects, or their understandings of local cultures or histories. For others, very specific circumstances and historical interventions of foreigners in certain places can limit how and to what extent a researcher is able to have a reciprocal relationship with the participating community. Some authors, by virtue of their lesser positions of power relative to those that they were studying, simply decided not to give back to those communities. In each article it becomes apparent that how and in what ways people give back is unique (and limited both to their personal values and the contexts in which they do research.

  16. Multifamily Tax Subsidy Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Multifamily Tax Subsidy Projects (MTSP) Income Limits were developed to meet the requirements established by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public...

  17. Limits of Kansei - Kansei unlimited

    OpenAIRE

    BONGARD-BLANCHY, Kerstin; Bouchard, Carole; AOUSSAT, Améziane

    2013-01-01

    International audience; This article discusses momentary limitations of the Kansei Engineering methods. There are for example the focus on the evaluation of colour and form factors, as well as the highly time consuming creation of the questionnaires. To overcome these limits we firstly suggest the integration of word lists from related research fields, like sociology and cognitive psychology on product emotions in the Kansei questionnaires. Thereafter we present a study on the wide range of K...

  18. Limit cycle vibrations in turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, S. G.

    1991-01-01

    The focus is on an examination of rotordynamic systems which are simultaneously susceptible to limit cycle instability and subharmonic response. Characteristics of each phenomenon are determined as well as their interrelationship. A normalized, single mass rotor model is examined as well as a complex model of the high pressure fuel turbopump and the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Entrainment of limit cycle instability by subharmonic response is demonstrated for both models. The nonuniqueness of the solution is also demonstrated.

  19. 长江口淡水潮滩芦苇地上与地下部分月生物量变化比较研究%Comparisons of Monthly Biomass Dynamics between Aboveground and Belowground Parts of Phragmites australis in Freshwater Tidal Flat in Yangtze Estuary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张佳蕊; 张海燕; 陆健健

    2013-01-01

    于2010年3月~2011年2月,对长江口淡水潮滩——崇西湿地潮间带芦苇(Phragmites australis)群落的地上与地下部分月生物量及其营养结构变化进行了研究.结果表明,芦苇地上与地下部分生物量的变化可分为3个阶段:此消彼长期(3~5月)、共同增长期(6~9月)和共同降低期(10~11月).除花序外,芦苇地上各构件的生物量自3月开始逐渐增长;8月末,叶和叶鞘的生物量达到最大值,分别为(808.3±30.2) g/m2和(671.9±19.2) g/m2;9月末,茎的生物量达到最大值,为(3 193.0±93.9) g/m2;芦苇花序出现于8月,秋季一直呈现增长态势.芦苇地下部分的根状茎和须根的生物量都呈单峰变化,但须根的生物量变化幅度较小;根状茎的生物量的最小值和最大值分别出现在5月和9月,为(1 933.3-±-93.1) g/m2和(3 679.2±202.7) g/m2;须根生物量的最小值和最大值分别出现在6月和9月,为(695.8±7.2) g/m2和(1 017.2±60.6) g/m2.9月末,芦苇总生物量达到最大值,为(9 351.0-±381.5)g/m2.3~11月,芦苇根冠比变化范围为0.89~19.19,与其他河口、滨海湿地相比,崇西湿地潮间带芦苇地上部分生物量年积累水平较高.%Common reed, Phragmites australis is a cosmopolitan species, which often becomes dominant in swamp, marsh or fen vegetation. Chongxi wetland is located in the southwest area of Chongming Island, which is located in Shanghai in the Yangtze Estuary. The salinity in most days in one year is below 0.5 ‰, even if in dry season it is less than 1.5‰. The mean annual temperature in this area is about 15 ℃. The annual precipitation is 1 049.3 mm, and the annual evaporation is 718.0 mm. All samples used in this paper were collected from Chongxi Wetland Ecological Restoration Base (31°42'-31°44'N, 121°12'-121°16'E). Dynamics of aboveground-belowground biomass and structural characteristics of Phragmites australis were investigated based on data obtained from monthly sampling

  20. Range Safety Flight Elevation Limit Calculation Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    This program was developed to fill a need within the Wallops Flight Facility workflow for automation of the development of vertical plan limit lines used by flight safety officers during the conduct of expendable launch vehicle missions. Vertical plane present-position-based destruct lines have been used by range safety organizations at numerous launch ranges to mitigate launch vehicle risks during the early phase of flight. Various ranges have implemented data submittal and processing workflows to develop these destruct lines. As such, there is significant prior art in this field. The ElLimits program was developed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to automate the process for developing vertical plane limit lines using current computing technologies. The ElLimits program is used to configure launch-phase range safety flight control lines for guided missiles. The name of the program derives itself from the fundamental quantity that is computed - flight elevation limits. The user specifies the extent and resolution of a grid in the vertical plane oriented along the launch azimuth. At each grid point, the program computes the maximum velocity vector flight elevation that can be permitted without endangering a specified back-range location. Vertical plane x-y limit lines that can be utilized on a present position display are derived from the flight elevation limit data by numerically propagating 'streamlines' through the grid. The failure turn and debris propagation simulation technique used by the application is common to all of its analysis options. A simulation is initialized at a vertical plane grid point chosen by the program. A powered flight failure turn is then propagated in the plane for the duration of the so-called RSO reaction time. At the end of the turn, a delta-velocity is imparted, and a ballistic trajectory is propagated to impact. While the program possesses capability for powered flight failure turn modeling, it does not require extensive user