WorldWideScience

Sample records for belowground processes limitations

  1. Are patterns in nutrient limitation belowground consistent with those aboveground: Results from a 4 million year chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S.C.; Vitousek, P.M.; Cleveland, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    Accurately predicting the effects of global change on net carbon (C) exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere requires a more complete understanding of how nutrient availability regulates both plant growth and heterotrophic soil respiration. Models of soil development suggest that the nature of nutrient limitation changes over the course of ecosystem development, transitioning from nitrogen (N) limitation in 'young' sites to phosphorus (P) limitation in 'old' sites. However, previous research has focused primarily on plant responses to added nutrients, and the applicability of nutrient limitation-soil development models to belowground processes has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we assessed the effects of nutrients on soil C cycling in three different forests that occupy a 4 million year substrate age chronosequence where tree growth is N limited at the youngest site, co-limited by N and P at the intermediate-aged site, and P limited at the oldest site. Our goal was to use short-term laboratory soil C manipulations (using 14C-labeled substrates) and longer-term intact soil core incubations to compare belowground responses to fertilization with aboveground patterns. When nutrients were applied with labile C (sucrose), patterns of microbial nutrient limitation were similar to plant patterns: microbial activity was limited more by N than by P in the young site, and P was more limiting than N in the old site. However, in the absence of C additions, increased respiration of native soil organic matter only occurred with simultaneous additions of N and P. Taken together, these data suggest that altered nutrient inputs into ecosystems could have dissimilar effects on C cycling above- and belowground, that nutrients may differentially affect of the fate of different soil C pools, and that future changes to the net C balance of terrestrial ecosystems will be partially regulated by soil nutrient status. ?? 2010 US Government.

  2. Above- and belowground competition from longleaf pine plantations limits performance of reintroduced herbaceous species.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.B. Harrington; C.M. Dagley; M.B. Edwards.

    2003-10-01

    Although overstory trees limit the abundance and species richness of herbaceous vegetation in longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) plantations, the responsible mechanisms are poorly understood because of confounding among limiting factors. In fall 1998, research was initiated to determine the separate effects of above- and belowground competition and needlefall from overstory pines on understory plant performance. Three 13- to 15-yr-old plantations near Aiken, SC, were thinned to 0, 25, 50, or 100% of nonthinned basal area (19.5 m2 ha-1). Combinations of trenching (to eliminate root competition) and needlefall were applied to areas within each plot, and containerized seedlings of 14 perennial herbaceous species and longleaf pine were planted within each. Overstory crown closure ranged from 0 to 81%, and soil water and available nitrogen varied consistently with pine stocking, trenching, or their combination. Cover of planted species decreased an average of 16.5 and 14.1% as a result of above- and below-ground competition, respectively. Depending on species, needlefall effects were positive, negative, or negligible. Results indicate that understory restoration will be most successful when herbaceous species are established within canopy openings (0.1-0.2 ha) managed to minimize negative effects from above- and belowground competition and needlefall.

  3. Aboveground and belowground arthropods experience different relative influences of stochastic versus deterministic community assembly processes following disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alexander S.; Faist, Akasha M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding patterns of biodiversity is a longstanding challenge in ecology. Similar to other biotic groups, arthropod community structure can be shaped by deterministic and stochastic processes, with limited understanding of what moderates the relative influence of these processes. Disturbances have been noted to alter the relative influence of deterministic and stochastic processes on community assembly in various study systems, implicating ecological disturbances as a potential moderator of these forces. Methods Using a disturbance gradient along a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality in a subalpine forest of the southern Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, we examined changes in community structure and relative influences of deterministic and stochastic processes in the assembly of aboveground (surface and litter-active species) and belowground (species active in organic and mineral soil layers) arthropod communities. Arthropods were sampled for all years of the chronosequence via pitfall traps (aboveground community) and modified Winkler funnels (belowground community) and sorted to morphospecies. Community structure of both communities were assessed via comparisons of morphospecies abundance, diversity, and composition. Assembly processes were inferred from a mixture of linear models and matrix correlations testing for community associations with environmental properties, and from null-deviation models comparing observed vs. expected levels of species turnover (Beta diversity) among samples. Results Tree mortality altered community structure in both aboveground and belowground arthropod communities, but null models suggested that aboveground communities experienced greater relative influences of deterministic processes, while the relative influence of stochastic processes increased for belowground communities. Additionally, Mantel tests and linear regression models revealed significant associations between the aboveground arthropod

  4. Imaging spectroscopy links aspen genotype with below-ground processes at landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madritch, Michael D; Kingdon, Clayton C; Singh, Aditya; Mock, Karen E; Lindroth, Richard L; Townsend, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Fine-scale biodiversity is increasingly recognized as important to ecosystem-level processes. Remote sensing technologies have great potential to estimate both biodiversity and ecosystem function over large spatial scales. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of imaging spectroscopy to discriminate among genotypes of Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen), one of the most genetically diverse and widespread forest species in North America. We combine imaging spectroscopy (AVIRIS) data with genetic, phytochemical, microbial and biogeochemical data to determine how intraspecific plant genetic variation influences below-ground processes at landscape scales. We demonstrate that both canopy chemistry and below-ground processes vary over large spatial scales (continental) according to aspen genotype. Imaging spectrometer data distinguish aspen genotypes through variation in canopy spectral signature. In addition, foliar spectral variation correlates well with variation in canopy chemistry, especially condensed tannins. Variation in aspen canopy chemistry, in turn, is correlated with variation in below-ground processes. Variation in spectra also correlates well with variation in soil traits. These findings indicate that forest tree species can create spatial mosaics of ecosystem functioning across large spatial scales and that these patterns can be quantified via remote sensing techniques. Moreover, they demonstrate the utility of using optical properties as proxies for fine-scale measurements of biodiversity over large spatial scales.

  5. Below-ground herbivory limits induction of extrafloral nectar by above-ground herbivores

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Carrillo, Juli; Ding, Jianqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Many plants produce extrafloral nectar (EFN), and increase production following above-ground herbivory, presumably to attract natural enemies of the herbivores. Below-ground herbivores, alone or in combination with those above ground, may also alter EFN production depending on the specificity of this defence response and the interactions among herbivores mediated through plant defences. To date, however, a lack of manipulative experiments investigating EFN production induc...

  6. Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale: An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Brown, Gordon E.; Plata, Charity

    2014-02-21

    As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel meeting held in February 2013, attendees discussed critical biogeochemical processes that regulate carbon cycling in soil. The meeting attendees determined that as a national scientific user facility, EMSL can provide the tools and expertise needed to elucidate the molecular foundation that underlies mechanistic descriptions of biogeochemical processes that control carbon allocation and fluxes at the terrestrial/atmospheric interface in landscape and regional climate models. Consequently, the workshop's goal was to identify the science gaps that hinder either development of mechanistic description of critical processes or their accurate representation in climate models. In part, this report offers recommendations for future EMSL activities in this research area. The workshop was co-chaired by Dr. Nancy Hess (EMSL) and Dr. Gordon Brown (Stanford University).

  7. Above- and below-ground responses of Calamagrostis purpurea to UV-B radiation and elevated CO{sub 2} under phosphorus limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussell, J.S.; Gwynn-Jones, D.; Griffith, G.W.; Scullion, J. (Aberystwyth Univ., IBERS, Wales (United Kingdom))

    2012-08-15

    UV-B radiation and elevated CO{sub 2} may impact rhizosphere processes through altered below-ground plant resource allocation and root exudation, changes that may have implications for nutrient acquisition. As nutrients limit plant growth in many habitats, their supply may dictate plant response under elevated CO{sub 2}. This study investigated UV-B exposure and elevated CO{sub 2} effects, including interactions, on plant growth, tissue chemistry and rooting responses relating to P acquisition. The sub-arctic grass Calamagrostis purpurea was subjected to UV-B (0 or 3.04 kJ m-2day-1) and CO{sub 2} (ambient 380 or 650 ppmv) treatments in a factorial glasshouse experiment, with sparingly soluble P (0 or 0.152 mg P per plant as FePO{sub 4}) a further factor. It was hypothesized that UV-B exposure and elevated CO{sub 2} would change plant resource allocation, with CO{sub 2} mitigating adverse responses to UV-B exposure and aiding P uptake. Plant biomass and morphology, tissue composition and rhizosphere leachate properties were measured. UV-B directly affected chemical composition of shoots and interacted with CO{sub 2} to give a greater root biomass. Elevated CO{sub 2} altered the composition of both shoots and roots and increased shoot biomass and secondary root length, while leachate pH decreased. Below-ground responses to CO{sub 2} did not affect P acquisition although P limitation progressively reduced leachate pH and increased secondary root length. Although direct plant growth, foliar composition and below-ground nutrient acquisition responses were dominated by CO{sub 2} treatments, UV-B modified these CO{sub 2} responses significantly. These interactions have implications for plant responses to future atmospheric conditions. (Author)

  8. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of below-ground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, M Luke; Dickie, Ian A; Eissenstat, David M; Fahey, Timothy J; Fernandez, Christopher W; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A; Iversen, Colleen M; Jackson, Robert B; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Norby, Richard J; Phillips, Richard P; Pregitzer, Kurt S; Pritchard, Seth G; Rewald, Boris; Zadworny, Marcin

    2015-08-01

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain because of the challenges of consistently measuring and interpreting fine-root systems. Traditionally, fine roots have been defined as all roots ≤ 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. Here, we demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, fine roots are either separated into individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine-root pool. Using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally - a c. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. Future work developing tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi into fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand below-ground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.

  9. Dynamic belowground ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W. F.; Santantonio, D.; McGinty, D.

    1979-01-01

    Roots comprise the primary interface between plant and soil for uptake of water and nutrients. Much is known about the biochemistry, cell physiology and membrane physics associated with these important processes. In this paper we discuss the role of the belowground ecosystem, especially the autotrophic root component, in the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Beyond recognizing roles of anchoring terrestrial plants and uptake of water and nutrients, this component of the forest has been largely neglected in an ecosystem context. In order to focus discussion on the properties of the belowground ecosystem, we use the term rhizosphere to include roots, mycorrhizae, microbes, and rhizophagus invertebrates.

  10. Temperature-dependant shifts in a wet tropical Hawaiian forest ecosystem: impact on belowground carbon stocks, dynamics, and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, S. E.; Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    Global patterns suggest a positive correlation between temperature and total belowground carbon (C) flux and partitioning in temperate and tropical regions, but these relationships have yet to be tested within a given ecosystem type. We established a transect of nine permanent forest plots along an elevation gradient (800-1600 m) in native-dominated Metrosideros polymorpha / Acacia koa rainforest developed in volcanic ash soils along the windward slope of Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Along the transect parent material, bedrock age, species composition, and plant available water are nearly constant and only mean annual temperature (MAT) varies substantially (13°C-18°C). We hypothesized that warmer temperatures at lower elevations would drive greater C flux and partitioning to belowground, which represents a direct input of C into belowground stocks. Roots are often sources of stabilized soil organic matter, thus we expected that increased belowground flux and partitioning of C at higher MATs would increase soil C stocks within recalcitrant C pools, even if bulk soil C stock decreases overall. In fact, our data suggest non-linear relationships between temperature and the distribution of C among soil pools based on sequential density fractionation at 1.6 and 2.4 g mL-1, and radiocarbon-based estimates of mean residence time. The proportion of C recovered within the mineral-associated heavy fraction (>2.4 g mL-1) was greatest at the highest MAT (nearly 30% of total soil C), initially declined at the mid-MAT plots (~10% of total soil C), but then increased again at the lowest MAT plots (~25%). Although the proportion of soil C within the heavy fraction was lowest at the mid-MAT plots, the mean residence time of heavy fraction C was greatest in these plots (570-663 yr for the mid-MAT plots versus 120-220 yr for the highest MAT plots and 64-308 for the lowest MAT plots), suggesting that the mineral-associated C in the mid-MAT plots was the most stabilized. In contrast, the

  11. Advancing Understanding of the Role of Belowground Processes in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks trhrough Ground-Penetrating Radar. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Frank P. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-02-06

    Coarse roots play a significant role in belowground carbon cycling and will likely play an increasingly crucial role in belowground carbon sequestration as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to rise, yet they are one of the most difficult ecosystem parameters to quantify. Despite promising results with ground-penetrating radar (GPR) as a nondestructive method of quantifying biomass of coarse roots, this application of GPR is in its infancy and neither the complete potential nor limitations of the technology have been fully evaluated. The primary goals and questions of this study fell into four groups: (1) GPR methods: Can GPR detect change in root biomass over time, differentiate live roots from dead roots, differentiate between coarse roots, fine roots bundled together, and a fine root mat, remain effective with varied soil moisture, and detect shadowed roots (roots hidden below larger roots); (2) CO2 enrichment study at Kennedy Space Center in Brevard County, Florida: Are there post-fire legacy effects of CO2 fertilization on plant carbon pools following the end of CO2application ? (3) Disney Wilderness Study: What is the overall coarse root biomass and potential for belowground carbon storage in a restored longleaf pine flatwoods system? Can GPR effectively quantify coarse roots in soils that are wetter than the previous sites and that have a high percentage of saw palmetto rhizomes present? (4) Can GPR accurately represent root architecture in a three-dimensional model? When the user is familiar with the equipment and software in a setting that minimizes unsuitable conditions, GPR is a relatively precise, non-destructive, useful tool for estimating coarse root biomass. However, there are a number of cautions and guidelines that should be followed to minimize inaccuracies or situations that are untenable for GPR use. GPR appears to be precise as it routinely predicts highly similar values for a given area across multiple

  12. Relationships at the aboveground-belowground interface: plants, soil biota and soil processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porazinska, D.L.; Bardgett, R.D.; Postma-Blaauw, M.B.; Hunt, H.W.; Parsons, A.N.; Seastedt, T.R.; Wall, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Interactions at the aboveground-below ground interface provide important feedbacks that regulate ecosystem processes. Organisms within soil food webs are involved in processes of decomposition and nutrient mineralization, and their abundance and activity have been linked to plant ecophysiological tr

  13. Belowground biodiversity and ecosystem functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardgett, R.D.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that the immense diversity of microorganisms and animals that live belowground contributes significantly to shaping aboveground biodiversity and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. Our understanding of how this belowground biodiversity is distributed, and how it regulates

  14. Limitations of Agile Software Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Dan; France, Robert; Rumpe, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Software developers and project managers are struggling to assess the appropriateness of agile processes to their development environments. This paper identifies limitations that apply to many of the published agile processes in terms of the types of projects in which their application may be problematic.

  15. Issues and prospects of belowground ecology with special reference to global climate change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jinsheng; WANG Zhengquan; FANG Jingyun

    2004-01-01

    The theory of ecology is based on over 100 a of research and investigation, all centered on aboveground patterns and processes. However, as contemporary ecologists are increasingly acknowledging, belowground structures, functions, and processes are some of the most poorly understood areas in ecology. This lack of understanding of belowground ecological processes seriously restricts the advance of global change research. The interdisciplinary field of belowground ecology began to flourish in the 1990s, along with the expansion of global change research, and quickly gained momentum. Belowground ecology aims to investigate belowground structures, functions, and processes, as well as their relationships with corresponding aboveground features, emphasizing the responses of belowground systems under global change conditions. Key research areas include root ecology,belowground animals, and soil microorganisms. This review summarizes and analyzes the relationships between aboveand belowground ecosystems, root ecology, root biogeography, belowground biodiversity, as well as research areas with particular challenges and progress. This commentary emphasizes certain theoretical issues concerning the responses of belowground processes to global change, and concludes that belowground ecology is a critical research priority in the 21st century.

  16. Linking aboveground and belowground diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, de G.B.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2005-01-01

    Aboveground and belowground species interactions drive ecosystem properties at the local scale, but it is unclear how these relationships scale-up to regional and global scales. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of aboveground and belowground diversity links from a global to a local scale. Glob

  17. Belowground Competition Directs Spatial Patterns of Seedling Growth in Boreal Pine Forests in Fennoscandia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Petter Axelsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground competition is often argued to be the main process determining patterns of natural forest regeneration. However, the theory of multiple resource limitation suggests that seedling performance also depends on belowground competition and, thus, that their relative influence is of fundamental importance. Two approaches were used to address the relative importance of above- and below-ground competition on regeneration in a nutrient-poor pine (Pinus sylvestris boreal forest. Firstly, seedling establishment beneath trees stem-girdled 12 years ago show that a substantial proportion of the seedlings were established within two years after girdling, which corresponds to a time when nutrient uptake by tree roots was severely reduced without disrupting water transport to the tree canopy, which consequently was maintained. The establishment during these two years also corresponds to abundances high enough for normal stand replacement. Secondly, surveys of regeneration within forest gaps showed that surrounding forests depressed seedlings, so that satisfactory growth occurred only more than 5 m from forest edges and that higher solar radiation in south facing edges was not enough to mediate these effects. We conclude that disruption of belowground competitive interactions mediates regeneration and, thus, that belowground competition has a strong limiting influence on seedling establishment in these forests.

  18. How can we exploit above-belowground interactions to assist in addressing the challenges of food security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell, Peter; Bennett, Alison E

    2013-10-30

    Can above-belowground interactions help address issues of food security? We address this question in this manuscript, and review the intersection of above-belowground interactions and food security. We propose that above-belowground interactions could address two strategies identified by Godfray etal. (2010): reducing the Yield Gap, and Increasing Production Limits. In particular, to minimize the difference between potential and realized production (The Yield Gap) above-belowground interactions could be manipulated to reduce losses to pests and increase crop growth (and therefore yields). To Increase Production Limits we propose two mechanisms: utilizing intercropping (which uses multiple aspects of above-belowground interactions) and breeding for traits that promote beneficial above-belowground interactions, as well as breeding mutualistic organisms to improve their provided benefit. As a result, if they are managed correctly, there is great potential for above-belowground interactions to contribute to food security.

  19. Impacts of farming practice within organic farming systems on below-ground ecology and ecosystem function

    OpenAIRE

    Stockdale, E A; Phillips, L; Watson, C. A.

    2006-01-01

    Maintaining ecosystem function is a key issue for sustainable farming systems which contribute broadly to global ecosystem health. A focus simply on the diversity of belowground organisms is not sufficient and there is a need to consider the contribution of below-ground biological processes to the maintenance and enhancement of soil function and ecosystem services. A critical literature review on the impacts of land management practices on below-ground ecology and function shows that farm man...

  20. Physical limits on information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S D H

    2006-01-01

    We derive a fundamental upper bound on the rate at which a device can process information (i.e., the number of logical operations per unit time), arising from quantum mechanics and general relativity. In Planck units a device of volume V can execute no more than the cube root of V operations per unit time. We compare this to the rate of information processing performed by nature in the evolution of physical systems, and find a connection to black hole entropy and the holographic principle.

  1. Physical limits on information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We derive a fundamental upper bound on the rate at which a device can process information (i.e., the number of logical operations per unit time), arising from quantum mechanics and general relativity. In Planck units a device of volume V can execute no more than the cube root of V operations per unit time. We compare this to the rate of information processing performed by nature in the evolution of physical systems, and find a connection to black hole entropy and the holographic principle

  2. Central Limit Theorem for Nonlinear Hawkes Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Lingjiong

    2012-01-01

    Hawkes process is a self-exciting point process with clustering effect whose jump rate depends on its entire past history. It has wide applications in neuroscience, finance and many other fields. Linear Hawkes process has an immigration-birth representation and can be computed more or less explicitly. It has been extensively studied in the past and the limit theorems are well understood. On the contrary, nonlinear Hawkes process lacks the immigration-birth representation and is much harder to analyze. In this paper, we obtain a functional central limit theorem for nonlinear Hawkes process.

  3. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground–belowground ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; de Ruiter, P.C.; Hol, W.H.G.; Meyer, K.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Bradford, M.A.; Christensen, S.; Eppinga, M.B.; Fukami, T.; Hemerik, L.; Molofsky, J.; Schädler, M.; Scherber, C.; Strauss, S.Y.; Vos, M.; Wardle, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that aboveground and belowground communities and processes are intrinsically linked, and that feedbacks between these subsystems have important implications for community structure and ecosystem functioning. Almost all studies on this topic have been carried out from

  4. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, van der W.H.; Bardgett, R.D.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Hol, W.H.G.; Meyer, K.M.; Bezemer, T.M.; Bradford, M.A.; Christensen, S.; Eppinga, M.B.; Fukami, T.; Hemerik, L.; Molofsky, J.; Schädler, M.; Scherber, C.; Strauss, S.Y.; Vos, M.; Wardle, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that aboveground and belowground communities and processes are intrinsically linked, and that feedbacks between these subsystems have important implications for community structure and ecosystem functioning. Almost all studies on this topic have been carried out from

  5. Limit theorems for fragmentation processes with immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we extend two limit theorems which were recently obtained for fragmentation processes to such processes with immigration. More precisely, in the setting with immigration we consider a limit theorem for the process counted with a random characteristic as well as the asymptotic behaviour of an empirical measure associated with the stopping line corresponding to the first blocks, in their respective line of descent, that are smaller than a given size. In addition, we determine the asymptotic decay rate of the size of the largest block in a homogeneous fragmentation process with immigration. The techniques used to proves these results are based on submartingale arguments.

  6. Some Limit Theorems in Geometric Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeh Lam; Yao-hui Zheng; Yuan-lin Zhang

    2003-01-01

    Geometric process (GP) was introduced by Lam[4,5], it is defined as a stochastic process {Xn, n =1, 2,...} for which there exists a real number a > 0, such that {an-1Xn, n = 1, 2,...} forms a renewal process (RP). In this paper, we study some limit theorems in GP. We first derive the Wald equation for GP and then obtain the limit theorems of the age, residual life and the total life at t for a GP. A general limit theorem for Sn with a > 1 is also studied. Furthermore, we make a comparison between GP and RP, including the comparison of their limit distributions of the age, residual life and the total life at t.

  7. Nutrient subsidies to belowground microbes impact aboveground food web interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Jes; Megonigal, J Patrick; Denno, Robert F

    2006-06-01

    Historically, terrestrial food web theory has been compartmentalized into interactions among aboveground or belowground communities. In this study we took a more synthetic approach to understanding food web interactions by simultaneously examining four trophic levels and investigating how nutrient (nitrogen and carbon) and detrital subsidies impact the ability of the belowground microbial community to alter the abundance of aboveground arthropods (herbivores and predators) associated with the intertidal cord grass Spartina alterniflora. We manipulated carbon, nitrogen, and detrital resources in a field experiment and measured decomposition rate, soil nitrogen pools, plant biomass and quality, herbivore density, and arthropod predator abundance. Because carbon subsidies impact plant growth only indirectly (microbial pathways), whereas nitrogen additions both directly (plant uptake) and indirectly (microbial pathways) impact plant primary productivity, we were able to assess the effect of both belowground soil microbes and nutrient availability on aboveground herbivores and their predators. Herbivore density in the field was suppressed by carbon supplements. Carbon addition altered soil microbial dynamics (net potential ammonification, litter decomposition rate, DON [dissolved organic N] concentration), which limited inorganic soil nitrogen availability and reduced plant size as well as predator abundance. Nitrogen addition enhanced herbivore density by increasing plant size and quality directly by increasing inorganic soil nitrogen pools, and indirectly by enhancing microbial nitrification. Detritus adversely affected aboveground herbivores mainly by promoting predator aggregation. To date, the effects of carbon and nitrogen subsidies on salt marshes have been examined as isolated effects on either the aboveground or the belowground community. Our results emphasize the importance of directly addressing the soil microbial community as a factor that influences

  8. Color management: printing processes - opportunities and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Samuel T.

    2002-06-01

    Digital tools have impacted traditional methods employed to reproduce color images during the past decade. The shift from a purely photomechanical process in color reproduction to colorimetric reproduction offers tremendous opportunity in the graphic arts industry. But good things do not necessarily come to all in the same package. Printing processes possess different reproduction attributes: tone reproduction, gray balance and color correction requirements are as different as the ingredient sets selected for color reproduction. This paper will provide insight toward understanding advantages and limitations offered by the new digital technologies in printing, publishing and packaging. For the past five years the Clemson University Graphic Communications Department has conducted numerous color projects using the new digital colorimetric tools during the previous decade. Several approaches have been used including experimental research and typical production workflows. The use of colorimetric data in color reproduction has given an opportunity to realize real gains in color use, predictability and consistency. Meeting an image's separation and reproduction requirements for a specified printing process can involve disruption of the anticipated workflow. Understanding the printing process requirements and the fit within the specifications of a colorimetric workflow are critical to the successful adoption of a color managed workflow. The paper will also provide an insight into the issues and challenges experienced with a color managed workflow. The printing processes used include offset litho, narrow and wide-web flexography (paper, liner board, corrugated and film), screen printing (paper board and polycarbonates), and digital imaging with toner, ink and inkjet systems. A proposal for technology integration will be the focus of the presentation drawn from documented experiences in over 300 applications of color management tools. Discussion will include the structure of

  9. Belowground Biomass Sampling to Estimate Fine Root Mass across NEON Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. J.; Meier, C. L.; Abercrombie, H.; Everhart, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Production of belowground biomass is an important and relatively uncharacterized component of the net primary productivity (NPP) of ecosystems. Fine root productivity makes up a significant portion of total belowground production because fine roots turn over rapidly, and therefore contribute disproportionately to annual estimates of belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). One of the major goals of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is to quantify above- and below-ground NPP at 60 sites within 20 different eco-climactic regions. NEON's Terrestrial Observation System will carry out belowground biomass sampling throughout the life of the observatory to estimate fine root production. However, belowground biomass sampling during NEON operations will be constrained to a maximum depth of 50cm. This limited depth range leaves the question of what proportion of total fine root mass is being collected and how to optimally characterize belowground biomass given sampling depth limitations. During the construction period, NEON is characterizing fine root biomass distribution at depth down to 2m at each site, as well as physical and chemical properties in each soil horizon. Each sampling unit is a pit (2m deep and approximately 1.5m wide), dug in the site's dominant vegetation type where fine root biomass sampling will also occur during Operations. To sample fine root biomass in each pit, soil samples of a known volume are taken from three vertical profiles down the face of the pit. Samples are then wet sieved to extract fine root mass, and roots are dried at 65°C for 48 hours and then weighed. The soil pit data are used to estimate the proportion of total fine root biomass from each site as a function of depth. Non-linear curves are fitted to the data to calculate total fine root mass at depth and to provide estimates of the proportion of the total fine root mass that is sampled at each site during NEON's 30 year operational sampling. The belowground

  10. Stability of above-ground and below-ground processes to extreme drought in model grassland ecosystems: Interactions with plant species diversity and soil nitrogen availability.

    OpenAIRE

    Bloor, Juliette; Bardgett, R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme drought events have the potential to cause dramatic changes in ecosystem structure and function, but the controls upon ecosystem stability to drought remain poorly understood. Here we used model systems of two commonly occurring, temperate grassland communities to investigate the shortterm interactive effects of a simulated 100-year summer drought event, soil nitrogen (N) availability and plant species diversity (low/high) on key ecosystem processes related to carbon (C) and N cycling...

  11. The importance of aboveground-belowground interactions on the evolution and maintenance of variation in plant defence traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniek evan Geem

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades a growing body of empirical research has shown that many ecological processes are mediated by a complex array of indirect interactions occurring between rhizosphere-inhabiting organisms and those found on aboveground plant parts. Aboveground - belowground studies have thus far focused on elucidating processes and underlying mechanisms that mediate the behavior and performance of invertebrates in opposite compartments. Less is known about genetic variation in plant traits as this applies to an above- belowground framework. For instance, although the field of genetic variation in aboveground plant traits on community-level interactions is well developed, most studies have ignored genetic variation in plant traits – such as defence - that may have evolved in response to pressures from the combined effects of above- and below ground interactions from antagonists and mutualists. Here, we discuss gaps in our understanding of genetic variation in plant- and consumer-related traits as they relate to aboveground and belowground multitrophic interactions. When metabolic resources are limiting, then multiple attack by antagonists in both domains may lead to trade-offs in where these resources are optimally invested. In nature, these trade-offs may critically depend upon their effects on plant fitness. Natural enemies of herbivores may also influence selection for different traits via top-down control. At larger scales these interactions may generate evolutionary ‘hotspots’ where the expression of various plant traits is the result of strong reciprocal selection via direct and indirect interactions. The role of abiotic factors in driving genetic variation in plant traits is also discussed.

  12. Limiting liability via high resolution image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwade, L.E.; Overlin, T.K.

    1996-12-31

    The utilization of high resolution image processing allows forensic analysts and visualization scientists to assist detectives by enhancing field photographs, and by providing the tools and training to increase the quality and usability of field photos. Through the use of digitized photographs and computerized enhancement software, field evidence can be obtained and processed as `evidence ready`, even in poor lighting and shadowed conditions or darkened rooms. These images, which are most often unusable when taken with standard camera equipment, can be shot in the worst of photographic condition and be processed as usable evidence. Visualization scientists have taken the use of digital photographic image processing and moved the process of crime scene photos into the technology age. The use of high resolution technology will assist law enforcement in making better use of crime scene photography and positive identification of prints. Valuable court room and investigation time can be saved and better served by this accurate, performance based process. Inconclusive evidence does not lead to convictions. Enhancement of the photographic capability helps solve one major problem with crime scene photos, that if taken with standard equipment and without the benefit of enhancement software would be inconclusive, thus allowing guilty parties to be set free due to lack of evidence.

  13. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing. PMID:11567193

  14. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  15. Processes regulating progressive nitrogen limitation under elevated carbon dioxide: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junyi; Qi, Xuan; Souza, Lara; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-05-01

    The nitrogen (N) cycle has the potential to regulate climate change through its influence on carbon (C) sequestration. Although extensive research has explored whether or not progressive N limitation (PNL) occurs under CO2 enrichment, a comprehensive assessment of the processes that regulate PNL is still lacking. Here, we quantitatively synthesized the responses of all major processes and pools in the terrestrial N cycle with meta-analysis of CO2 experimental data available in the literature. The results showed that CO2 enrichment significantly increased N sequestration in the plant and litter pools but not in the soil pool, partially supporting one of the basic assumptions in the PNL hypothesis that elevated CO2 results in more N sequestered in organic pools. However, CO2 enrichment significantly increased the N influx via biological N fixation and the loss via N2O emission, but decreased the N efflux via leaching. In addition, no general diminished CO2 fertilization effect on plant growth was observed over time up to the longest experiment of 13 years. Overall, our analyses suggest that the extra N supply by the increased biological N fixation and decreased leaching may potentially alleviate PNL under elevated CO2 conditions in spite of the increases in plant N sequestration and N2O emission. Moreover, our syntheses indicate that CO2 enrichment increases soil ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3-) ratio. The changed NH4+/NO3- ratio and subsequent biological processes may result in changes in soil microenvironments, above-belowground community structures and associated interactions, which could potentially affect the terrestrial biogeochemical cycles. In addition, our data synthesis suggests that more long-term studies, especially in regions other than temperate ones, are needed for comprehensive assessments of the PNL hypothesis.

  16. Belowground plant development measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: exploiting the potential for non-invasive trait quantification using sugar beet as a proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eMetzner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both structural and functional properties of belowground plant organs are critical for the development and yield of plants but, compared to the shoot, much more difficult to observe due to soil opacity. Many processes concerning the belowground plant performance are not fully understood, in particular spatial and temporal dynamics and their interrelation with environmental factors. We used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI as a noninvasive method to evaluate which traits can be measured when a complex plant organ is monitored in-vivo while growing in the soil. We chose sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris as a model system. The beet consists mainly of root tissues, is rather complex regarding tissue structure and responses to environmental factors, and thereby a good object to test the applicability of MRI for 3D phenotyping approaches. Over a time period of up to 3 months, traits such as beet morphology or anatomy were followed in the soil and the effect of differently sized pots on beet fresh weight calculated from MRI data was studied. There was a clear positive correlation between the pot size and the increase in fresh weight of a sugar beet over time. Since knowledge of the development of internal beet structures with several concentric cambia, vascular and parenchyma rings is still limited, we consecutively acquired 3D volumetric images on individual plants using the MRI contrast parameter T2 to map the development of rings at the tissue level. This demonstrates that MRI provides versatile protocols to non-invasively measure plant traits in the soil. It opens new avenues to investigate belowground plant performance under adverse environmental conditions such as drought, nutrient shortage or soil compaction to seek for traits of belowground organs making plants more resilient to stress.

  17. Above-ground and below-ground plant responses to fertilization in two subarctic ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, G.F.; Sundqvist, Maja K.; Metcalfe, D.; Wilson, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Soil nutrient supply is likely to change in the Arctic due to altered process rates associated with climate change. Here, we compare the responses of herbaceous tundra and birch forest understory to fertilization, considering both above- and below-ground responses. We added nitrogen and phosphorus t

  18. Links between belowground and aboveground resource-related traits reveal species growth strategies that promote invasive advantages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Smith

    Full Text Available Belowground processes are rarely considered in comparison studies of native verses invasive species. We examined relationships between belowground fine root production and lifespan, leaf phenology, and seasonal nitrogen dynamics of Lonicera japonica (non-native versus L. sempervirens (native and Frangula alnus (non-native versus Rhamnus alnifolia (native, over time. First and second order fine roots were monitored from 2010 to 2012 using minirhizotron technology and rhizotron windows. 15N uptake of fine roots was measured across spring and fall seasons. Significant differences in fine root production across seasons were seen between Lonicera species, but not between Frangula and Rhamnus, with both groups having notable asynchrony in regards to the timing of leaf production. Root order and the number of root neighbors at the time of root death were the strongest predictors of root lifespan of both species pairs. Seasonal 15N uptake was higher in spring than in the fall, which did not support the need for higher root activity to correspond with extended leaf phenology. We found higher spring 15N uptake in non-native L. japonica compared to native L. sempervirens, although there was no difference in 15N uptake between Frangula and Rhamnus species. Our findings indicate the potential for fast-growing non-native Lonicera japonica and Frangula alnus to outcompete native counterparts through differences in biomass allocation, root turnover, and nitrogen uptake, however evidence that this is a general strategy of invader dominance is limited.

  19. A Fluctuation Type Limit Theorem for Jirina Processes with Immigration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qiang LI

    2009-01-01

    It is proved by the theory of semigroup that the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type process with jumps can arise from the fluctuation limit of a sequence of Jirina processes with immigration under suitable moments conditions.

  20. Metabolomics in the Rhizosphere: Tapping into Belowground Chemical Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Nicole M; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2016-03-01

    The rhizosphere is densely populated with a variety of organisms. Interactions between roots and rhizosphere community members are mostly achieved via chemical communication. Root exudates contain an array of primary and secondary plant metabolites that can attract, deter, or kill belowground insect herbivores, nematodes, and microbes, and inhibit competing plants. Metabolomics of root exudates can potentially help us to better understand this chemical dialogue. The main limitations are the proper sampling of the exudate, the sensitivity of the metabolomics platforms, and the multivariate data analysis to identify causal relations. Novel technologies may help to generate a spatially explicit metabolome of the root and its exudates at a scale that is relevant for the rhizosphere community.

  1. Is the wash-off process of road-deposited sediment source limited or transport limited?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongtao; Chen, Xuefei; Hao, Shaonan; Jiang, Yan; Zhao, Jiang; Zou, Changliang; Xie, Wenxia

    2016-09-01

    An in-depth understanding of the road-deposited sediments (RDS) wash-off process is essential to estimation of urban surface runoff pollution load and to designing methods to minimize the adverse impacts on the receiving waters. There are two debatable RDS wash-off views: source limited and transport limited. The RDS build-up and wash-off process was characterized to explore what determines the wash-off process to be source limited or transport limited based on twelve RDS sampling activities on an urban road in Beijing. The results showed that two natural rain events (2.0mm and 23.2mm) reduced the total RDS mass by 30%-40%, and that finer particles (wash-off load. Both single- and multi-rain events caused the RDS particle grain size to become coarser, while dry days made the RDS particle grain size finer. These findings indicated that the bulk RDS particles wash-off tends to be transport limited, but that finer particles tend to be source limited. To further explore and confirm the results of the field experiment, a total of 40 simulated rain events were designed to observe the RDS wash-off with different particle size fractions. The finer particles have a higher wash-off percentage (Fw) than the coarser particles, and the Fw values provide a good view to characterize the wash-off process. The key conclusions drawn from the combined field and simulated experiments data are: (i) Finer and coarser particle wash-off processes tend to be source limited and transport limited, respectively. (ii) The source and transport limited processes occur during the initial period (the first flush) and later periods, respectively. (iii) The smaller and larger rain events tend to be transport limited and source limited, respectively. Overall, the wash-off process is generally a combination of source and transport limited processes. PMID:27135567

  2. Above- and belowground insect herbivores differentially affect soil nematode communities in species-rich plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deyn, de G.B.; Ruijven, van J.; Raaijmakers, C.E.; Ruiter, de P.C.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between above- and belowground invertebrate herbivores alter plant diversity, however, little is known on how these effects may influence higher trophic level organisms belowground. Here we explore whether above- and belowground invertebrate herbivores which alter plant community divers

  3. Above- and below-ground impacts of introduced predators in seabird-dominated island ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukami, Tadashi; Wardle, David A; Bellingham, Peter J; Mulder, Christa P H; Towns, David R; Yeates, Gregor W; Bonner, Karen I; Durrett, Melody S; Grant-Hoffman, Madeline N; Williamson, Wendy M

    2006-12-01

    Predators often exert multi-trophic cascading effects in terrestrial ecosystems. However, how such predation may indirectly impact interactions between above- and below-ground biota is poorly understood, despite the functional importance of these interactions. Comparison of rat-free and rat-invaded offshore islands in New Zealand revealed that predation of seabirds by introduced rats reduced forest soil fertility by disrupting sea-to-land nutrient transport by seabirds, and that fertility reduction in turn led to wide-ranging cascading effects on belowground organisms and the ecosystem processes they drive. Our data further suggest that some effects on the belowground food web were attributable to changes in aboveground plant nutrients and biomass, which were themselves related to reduced soil disturbance and fertility on invaded islands. These results demonstrate that, by disrupting across-ecosystem nutrient subsidies, predators can indirectly induce strong shifts in both above- and below-ground biota via multiple pathways, and in doing so, act as major ecosystem drivers. PMID:17118004

  4. Some functional limit theorems for compound Cox processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Victor Yu.; Chertok, A. V.; Korchagin, A. Yu.; Kossova, E. V.; Zeifman, Alexander I.

    2016-06-01

    An improved version of the functional limit theorem is proved establishing weak convergence of random walks generated by compound doubly stochastic Poisson processes (compound Cox processes) to Lévy processes in the Skorokhod space under more realistic moment conditions. As corollaries, theorems are proved on convergence of random walks with jumps having finite variances to Lévy processes with variance-mean mixed normal distributions, in particular, to stable Lévy processes.

  5. Effects of canopy tree species on belowground biogeochemistry in a lowland wet tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Adrienne B.; Reed, Sasha C.; Townsend, Alan R.; Cleveland, Cory C.

    2013-01-01

    Tropical rain forests are known for their high biological diversity, but the effects of plant diversity on important ecosystem processes in this biome remain unclear. Interspecies differences in both the demand for nutrients and in foliar and litter nutrient concentrations could drive variations in both the pool sizes and fluxes of important belowground resources, yet our understanding of the effects and importance of aboveground heterogeneity on belowground biogeochemistry is poor, especially in the species-rich forests of the wet tropics. To investigate the effects of individual tree species on belowground biogeochemical processes, we used both field and laboratory studies to examine how carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) cycles vary under nine different canopy tree species – including three legume and six non-legume species – that vary in foliar nutrient concentrations in a wet tropical forest in southwestern Costa Rica. We found significant differences in belowground C, N and P cycling under different canopy tree species: total C, N and P pools in standing litter varied by species, as did total soil and microbial C and N pools. Rates of soil extracellular acid phosphatase activity also varied significantly among species and functional groups, with higher rates of phosphatase activity under legumes. In addition, across all tree species, phosphatase activity was significantly positively correlated with litter N/P ratios, suggesting a tight coupling between relative N and P inputs and resource allocation to P acquisition. Overall, our results suggest the importance of aboveground plant community composition in promoting belowground biogeochemical heterogeneity at relatively small spatial scales.

  6. Scaling Limits of Coalescent Processes Near Time Zero

    OpenAIRE

    Sengul, Bati

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we obtain scaling limits of $\\Lambda$-coalescents near time zero under a regularly varying assumption. In particular this covers the case of Kingman's coalescent and beta coalescents. The limiting processes are coalescents with infinite mass, obtained geometrically as tangent cones of Evans metric space associated with the coalescent. In the case of Kingman's coalescent we are able to obtain a simple construction of the limiting space using a two-sided Brownian motion.

  7. How generalist herbivores exploit belowground plant diversity in temperate grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinger, Corinna; Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Juen, Anita; Traugott, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Belowground herbivores impact plant performance, thereby inducing changes in plant community composition, which potentially leads to cascading effects onto higher trophic levels and ecosystem processes and productivity. Among soil-living insects, external root-chewing generalist herbivores have the strongest impact on plants. However, the lack of knowledge on their feeding behaviour under field conditions considerably hampers achieving a comprehensive understanding of how they affect plant communities. Here, we address this gap of knowledge by investigating the feeding behaviour of Agriotes click beetle larvae, which are common generalist external root-chewers in temperate grassland soils. Utilizing diagnostic multiplex PCR to assess the larval diet, we examined the seasonal patterns in feeding activity, putative preferences for specific plant taxa, and whether species identity and larval instar affect food choices of the herbivores. Contrary to our hypothesis, most of the larvae were feeding-active throughout the entire vegetation period, indicating that the grassland plants are subjected to constant belowground feeding pressure. Feeding was selective, with members of Plantaginaceae and Asteraceae being preferred; Apiaceae were avoided. Poaceae, although assumed to be most preferred, had an intermediate position. The food preferences exhibited seasonal changes, indicating a fluctuation in plant traits important for wireworm feeding choice. Species- and instar-specific differences in dietary choice of the Agriotes larvae were small, suggesting that species and larval instars occupy the same trophic niche. According to the current findings, the food choice of these larvae is primarily driven by plant identity, exhibiting seasonal changes. This needs to be considered when analysing soil herbivore-plant interactions. PMID:24188592

  8. Aboveground and belowground competition between willow Salix caprea its understory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudrák, Ondřej; Hermová, Markéta; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The effects of aboveground and belowground competition with the willow S. caprea on its understory plant community were studied in unreclaimed post-mining sites. Belowground competition was evaluated by comparing (i) frames inserted into the soil that excluded woody roots (frame treatment), (ii) frames that initially excluded woody root growth but then allowed regrowth of the roots (open-frame treatment), and (iii) undisturbed soil (no-frame treatment). These treatments were combined with S. caprea thinning to assess the effect of aboveground competition. Three years after the start of the experiment, aboveground competition from S. caprea (as modified by thinning of the S. caprea canopy) had not affected understory biomass or species number but had affected species composition. In contrast, belowground competition significantly affected both the aboveground and belowground biomass of the understory. The aboveground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame treatment (which excluded woody roots) than in the other two treatments. The belowground biomass of the understory was greater in the frame than in the open-frame treatment. Unlike aboveground competition (light availability), belowground competition did not affect understory species composition. Our results suggest that S. caprea is an important component during plant succession on post-mining sites because it considerably modifies its understory plant community. Belowground competition is a major reason for the low cover and biomass of the herbaceous understory in S. caprea stands on post-mining sites.

  9. FRACTURE LIMIT LOAD OF CONE SHAPE PART IN DRAWING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jisheng; Gao Shiyou

    2005-01-01

    The deformation characters and load status of the blank's potential fracture zone are analyzed at the moment when blank is approaching to punch corner in drawing process of cone shape part. Based on tension instability theory, the formula for calculating fracture limit load of cone shape part in drawing process is derived. Also, the formula is analyzed and verified by experiment.

  10. Empirical and theoretical challenges in aboveground-belowground ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W.H. van der Putten,; R.D. Bardgett; P.C. de Ruiter;

    2009-01-01

    from an empirical perspective and in specific ecological settings or contexts. Belowground interactions operate at different spatial and temporal scales. Due to the relatively low mobility and high survival of organisms in the soil, plants have longer lasting legacy effects belowground than aboveground...... and environmental settings, we explore where and how they can be supported by theoretical approaches to develop testable predictions and to generalise empirical results. We review four key areas where a combined aboveground-belowground approach offers perspectives for enhancing ecological understanding, namely...

  11. Belowground heathland responses after 2 years of combined warming, elevated CO2 and summer drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Ambus, Per;

    2010-01-01

    significantly to the treatments. In the combined temperature and CO2 treatment the dissolved organic nitrogen concentration decreased and the ammonium concentration increased, but this release of nutrients was not mirrored by plant parameters. Microbial biomass carbon and microbial enrichment with 13C and 15N...... (1 year after 13C215N-glycine was injected into the soil) increased in warmed plots and in elevated CO2 plots, but not when these treatments were combined. Furthermore, drought led to an increase in Calluna biomass and total plant nitrogen pool. The full combination of warming, elevated CO2...... belowground sequestration of labile carbohydrates due to elevated CO2 in combination with temperature increased process rates. Together, these changes might increase microbial activity and availability of plant nutrients. Two years after the start of the experiment, belowground processes responded...

  12. Kohnen's limit process for real-analytic Siegel modular forms

    OpenAIRE

    Bringmann, Kathrin; Raum, Martin; Richter, Olav K.

    2012-01-01

    Kohnen introduced a limit process for Siegel modular forms that produces Jacobi forms. He asked if there is a space of real-analytic Siegel modular forms such that skew-holomorphic Jacobi forms arise via this limit process. In this paper, we initiate the study of harmonic skew-Maass-Jacobi forms and harmonic Siegel-Maass forms. We improve a result of Maass on the Fourier coefficients of harmonic Siegel-Maass forms, which allows us to establish a connection to harmonic skew-Maass-Jacobi forms....

  13. Belowground consequences of vegetation change and their treatment in models

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, R.B.; Schenk, H J; Jobbagy, E G; Canadell, J.; Colello, G D; Dickinson, R E; Dunne, T.; Field, C.B.; Friedlingstein, P.; Heimann, M.; Hibbard, K.; Kicklighter, D W; A. Kleidon; R. P. Neilson; Parton, W.J.

    2000-01-01

    The extent and consequences of global land-cover and land-use change are increasingly apparent. One consequence not so apparent is the altered structure of plants belowground. This paper examines such belowground changes, emphasizing the interaction of altered root distributions with other factors and their treatment in models. Shifts of woody and herbaceous vegetation with deforestation, afforestation, and woody plant encroachment typically alter the depth and distribution of plant rests, in...

  14. Aboveground-belowground biodiversity linkages differ in early and late successional temperate forests

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Li; Xugao Wang; Chao Liang; Zhanqing Hao; Lisha Zhou; Sam Ma; Xiaobin Li; Shan Yang; Fei Yao; Yong Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ecological linkages between above- and below-ground biota is critical for deepening our knowledge on the maintenance and stability of ecosystem processes. Nevertheless, direct comparisons of plant-microbe diversity at the community level remain scarce due to the knowledge gap between microbial ecology and plant ecology. We compared the α- and β- diversities of plant and soil bacterial communities in two temperate forests that represented early and late successional stages. We do...

  15. Scope and limitations of due process in administrative proceedings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Carvajal Sánchez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to explain in a better way the scope of Due Process in Administrative Law as a legal norm whose respect is essential to all government agencies, three points of view (formal, structural and material are proposed. Those items seem useful to understand “Administrative Due Process” in all its dimensions: as a constitutional norm developed by the enactment of laws and decrees; as a principle inspiring some conducts and new norms; and as an objective and subjective fundamental right. On the other hand, it is shown that Administrative Due Process is not an absolute rule because in some cases its full application is subject to normative relativism. Two opposite trends can be perceived at this point: in the first place, government agencies usually do not act the same way judges do, so Administrative Due Process should be distinguished from Judicial Due Process; therefore, it could actually have a more restricted scope. In the second place, some administrative authorities are nowadays playing a role more or less similar to what judges do. This means that new procedural guarantees will be claimed. In any case, admitting valid limitations to Administrative Due Process leads to the quest of the limits of these limitations. The application of the rule of Due Process cannot be totally suppressed; its scope cannot be completely reduced. This is the result of its fundamental nature as a legal norm that ensures justice and equity in all administrative procedures, and proscribes random decisions.

  16. Limit theorems for bifurcating integer-valued autoregressive processes

    CERN Document Server

    Blandin, Vassili

    2012-01-01

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the weighted least squares estimators of the unknown parameters of bifurcating integer-valued autoregressive processes. Under suitable assumptions on the immigration, we establish the almost sure convergence of our estimators, together with the quadratic strong law and central limit theorems. All our investigation relies on asymptotic results for vector-valued martingales.

  17. Brownian Motion as a Limit to Physical Measuring Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    and received widespread recognition, but his way of modeling the system was contested by his contemporaries. With the more embracing notion of noise that developed during and after World War II, Ising’s conclusion was reinterpreted as showing that noise puts a limit on physical measurement processes. Hence...

  18. Crop rotational diversity enhances belowground communities and functions in an agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann, L K; Grandy, A S; Atkinson, E E; Marin-Spiotta, E; McDaniel, M D

    2015-08-01

    Biodiversity loss, an important consequence of agricultural intensification, can lead to reductions in agroecosystem functions and services. Increasing crop diversity through rotation may alleviate these negative consequences by restoring positive aboveground-belowground interactions. Positive impacts of aboveground biodiversity on belowground communities and processes have primarily been observed in natural systems. Here, we test for the effects of increased diversity in an agroecosystem, where plant diversity is increased over time through crop rotation. As crop diversity increased from one to five species, distinct soil microbial communities were related to increases in soil aggregation, organic carbon, total nitrogen, microbial activity and decreases in the carbon-to-nitrogen acquiring enzyme activity ratio. This study indicates positive biodiversity-function relationships in agroecosystems, driven by interactions between rotational and microbial diversity. By increasing the quantity, quality and chemical diversity of residues, high diversity rotations can sustain soil biological communities, with positive effects on soil organic matter and soil fertility.

  19. Functional State Modelling of Cultivation Processes: Dissolved Oxygen Limitation State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Roeva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new functional state, namely dissolved oxygen limitation state for both bacteria Escherichia coli and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch cultivation processes is presented in this study. Functional state modelling approach is applied to cultivation processes in order to overcome the main disadvantages of using global process model, namely complex model structure and a big number of model parameters. Alongwith the newly introduced dissolved oxygen limitation state, second acetate production state and first acetate production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of E. coli, while mixed oxidative state and first ethanol production state are recognized during the fed-batch cultivation of S. cerevisiae. For all mentioned above functional states both structural and parameter identification is here performed based on experimental data of E. coli and S. cerevisiae fed-batch cultivations.

  20. Above and belowground controls on litter decomposition in semiarid ecosystems: effects of solar radiation, water availability and litter quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, A. T.; Araujo, P. I.; Leva, P. E.; Ballare, C. L.

    2008-12-01

    The integrated controls on soil organic matter formation in arid and semiarid ecosystems are not well understood and appear to stem from a number of interacting controls affecting above- and belowground carbon turnover. While solar radiation has recently been shown to have an important direct effect on carbon loss in semiarid ecosystems as a result of photochemical mineralization of aboveground plant material, the mechanistic basis for photodegradative losses is poorly understood. In addition, there are large potential differences in major controls on above- and belowground decomposition in low rainfall ecosystems. We report on a mesocosm and field study designed to examine the relative importance of different wavelengths of solar radiation, water availability, position of senescent material above- and belowground and the importance of carbon litter quality in determining rates of abiotic and biotic decomposition. In a factorial experiment of mesocosms, we incubated leaf and root litter simultaneously above- and belowground and manipulated water availability with large and small pulses. Significant interactions between position-litter type and position-pulse sizes demonstrated interactive controls on organic mass loss. Aboveground decomposition showed no response to pulse size or litter type, as roots and leaves decomposed equally rapidly under all circumstances. In contrast, belowground decomposition was significantly altered by litter type and water pulses, with roots decomposing significantly slower and small water pulses reducing belowground decomposition. In the field site, using plastic filters which attenuated different wavelengths of natural solar radiation, we found a highly significant effect of radiation exclusion on mass loss and demonstrated that both UV-A and short-wave visible light can have important impacts on photodegradative carbon losses. The combination of position and litter quality effects on litter decomposition appear to be critical for the

  1. Scaling limits for Hawkes processes and application to financial statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Bacry, Emmanuel; Hoffmann, Marc; Muzy, Jean François

    2012-01-01

    We prove a law of large numbers and a functional central limit theorem for multivariate Hawkes processes observed over a time interval $[0,T]$ in the limit $T \\rightarrow \\infty$. We further exhibit the asymptotic behaviour of the covariation of the increments of the components of a multivariate Hawkes process, when the observations are imposed by a discrete scheme with mesh $\\Delta$ over $[0,T]$ up to some further time shift $\\tau$. The behaviour of this functional depends on the relative size of $\\Delta$ and $\\tau$ with respect to $T$ and enables to give a full account of the second-order structure. As an application, we develop our results in the context of financial statistics. We introduced in a previous work a microscopic stochastic model for the variations of a multivariate financial asset, based on Hawkes processes and that is confined to live on a tick grid. We derive and characterise the exact macroscopic diffusion limit of this model and show in particular its ability to reproduce important empiric...

  2. Responses of belowground carbon allocation dynamics to extended shading in mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Michael; Lattanzi, Fernando A.; Hasibeder, Roland; Wild, Birgit; Koranda, Marianne; Danese, Valentina; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Schmitt, Michael; Siegwolf, Rolf; Richter, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. Using in situ 13CO2 pulse labeling, we studied the effects of one week of shading on the transfer of recent photoassimilates between sugars and starch of above- and belowground plant organs and to soil microbial communities of a mountain meadow. C allocation to roots and microbial communities was rapid. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots, but not roots, and affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots, but not roots: recent C was slowly incorporated into root starch irrespective of the shading treatment. Shading reduced leaf respiration more strongly than root respiration. It caused no reduction in the amount of 13C incorporated into fungi and gram-negative bacteria, but increased its residence time. These findings suggest that, under interrupted C supply, belowground C allocation (as reflected by the amount of tracer allocated to root starch, soil microbial communities and belowground respiration) was maintained at the expense of aboveground C status, and that C source strength may affect the turnover of recent plant-derived C in soil microbial communities. (Reference: Bahn et al. 2013. New Phytologist 198:116-126)

  3. Failure mechanism and forming limit of tube axial compressive process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhi-chao; YANG He

    2006-01-01

    Based on minimum energy principle for plastic forming,tearing and buckling failures mechanisms are explored and criteria for them are developed by theoretical analysis and experiment. Combined with finite element software developed forming limit and effects of process parameters on failures are investigated and proper parameters for stable forming are determined. The results show that: 1) The failures and forming limit are mainly determined by geometry and materials parameters of tube blank,fillet radius or half conical angle of die. For the process under fillet die,there exists a maximum fillet radius within which no tearing failure happens,and a maximum radius and a minimum radius range within which no buckling failure happens. For the process under conical die,there exists a maximum and minimum half conical angle range within which no tearing and buckling failures occur. 2) For both forming processes,the higher the value of material strain hardening exponent or the lower the value of relative thickness,the more impossible for tearing and buckling failures to occur,and the larger the ranges of fillet radius and half conical angle. The experiment results verify the reliability and practicability of this research.

  4. Hydrodynamic limit of symmetric exclusion processes in inhomogeneous media

    CERN Document Server

    Faggionato, A

    2010-01-01

    In \\cite{J} M. Jara has presented a method, reducing the proof of the hydrodynamic limit of symmetric exclusion processes to an homogenization problem, as unified approach to recent works on the field as \\cite{N}, \\cite{F1}, \\cite{F2} and \\cite{FJL}. Although not stated in \\cite{J}, the reduction of the hydrodynamic limit to an homogenization problem was already obtained (in a different way) in \\cite{N}, \\cite{F1}. This alternative and very simple relation between the two problems goes back to an idea of K.\\ Nagy \\cite{N}, is stated in \\cite{F1}[Section B] for exclusion processes on $\\bbZ^d$ and, as stressed in \\cite{F2}, is completely general. The above relation has been applied to \\cite{N}, \\cite{F1}, \\cite{F2} and \\cite{FJL} and could be applied to other symmetric exclusion processes, mentioned in \\cite{J}. In this short note we briefly recall this unified approach in a complete general setting. Finally, we recall how the homogenization problem has been solved in the above previous works.

  5. Changes of Limiting Dextrinase in Germinating Process of Malting Barley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiu-mei; LI Fen; WANG Hong-zhen; WANG Xing-zhi

    2002-01-01

    Based on five different species of barley, the foot layer analytic method was used to examine the activity and heat-resistance of the limiting dextrinase. The study was conducted on the dynamic changes of several types of the dextrinase in barley germinating process, the effect of temperature on the dextrinase and the divergence of dextrinase in different barley variety. The probability of the dextrinase that as reference index is used for screening and evaluating beer barley was discussed. The importance of dextrinase in brewing and its significant function was also discussed.

  6. The rate-limiting process of hydrogen transport in Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkoshi, Keishiro; Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Bandourko, V.; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen isotope transport characteristics of Mo, whose refractory properties are considered to be suitable as plasma facing material, was investigated by applying 3 keV D{sub 2}{sup +} beam to the membrane specimen. The Arrhenius plot of deuterium permeation probability showed linear increase against the reciprocal temperature and its apparent activation energy was determined as 41.5 kJ/mol. The simultaneous irradiation of 3 keV Ar{sup +} onto backside surface of specimen had little effect on the deuterium permeation rate. According to these results, the rate-limiting process of deuterium transport in Mo was determined. (author)

  7. Some distance bounds of branching processes and their diffusion limits

    CERN Document Server

    Kammerer, Niels B

    2010-01-01

    We compute exact values respectively bounds of "distances" - in the sense of (transforms of) power divergences and relative entropy - between two discrete-time Galton-Watson branching processes with immigration GWI for which the offspring as well as the immigration is arbitrarily Poisson-distributed (leading to arbitrary type of criticality). Implications for asymptotic distinguishability behaviour in terms of contiguity and entire separation of the involved GWI are given, too. Furthermore, we determine the corresponding limit quantities for the context in which the two GWI converge to Feller-type branching diffusion processes, as the time-lags between observations tend to zero. Some applications to (static random environment like) Bayesian decision making and Neyman-Pearson testing are presented as well.

  8. New limits on double beta processes in 106-Cd

    CERN Document Server

    Tretyak, V I; Bernabei, R; Brudanin, V B; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Chernyak, D M; Danevich, F A; d'Angelo, S; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Laubenstein, M; Mokina, V M; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Tupitsyna, I A

    2016-01-01

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in 106-Cd to 66%, with mass of 216 g (106-CdWO4) was used in coincidence with four ultra-low background HPGe detectors contained in a single cryostat to search for double beta decay processes in 106-Cd. New improved half-life limits on the double beta processes in 106-Cd have been set on the level of 1e20-1e21 yr after 13085 h of data taking deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (Italy). In particular, the limit on the two neutrino electron capture with positron emission T1/2 >1.1e21 yr, has reached the region of theoretical predictions. The resonant neutrinoless double electron captures to the 2718, 2741 and 2748 keV excited states of 106-Pd are restricted on the level of T1/2 > 8.5e20 - 1.4e21 yr.

  9. Development of allometric models for above and belowground biomass in swidden cultivation fallows of Northern Laos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNicol, Iain M.; Berry, Nicholas J.; Bruun, Thilde Bech;

    2015-01-01

    fields and patches of mature forest. Quantifying tree biomass in these landscapes is limited by the availability of reliable allometric models, hindering accurate carbon stock estimation and thus quantification of GHG emission associated with land use transitions. We therefore developed new allometric...... models for the prediction of both above- and below-ground woody biomass in swidden systems based on a destructive harvest of 150 trees in Luang Prabang Province, Laos People's Democratic Republic (PDR). This study is the first to develop allometric models of root biomass for swidden landscapes...

  10. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms. PMID:27197388

  11. Belowground interactions with aboveground consequences: Invasive earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Shishir; Longcore, Travis; MacDonald, Beau; McCormick, Melissa K; Szlavecz, Katalin; Wilson, Gail W T; Loss, Scot R

    2016-03-01

    A mounting body of research suggests that invasive nonnative earthworms substantially alter microbial communities, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These changes to AMF can cascade to affect plant communities and vertebrate populations. Despite these research advances, relatively little is known about (1) the mechanisms behind earthworms' effects on AMF and (2) the factors that determine the outcomes of earthworm-AMF interactions (i.e., whether AMF abundance is increased or decreased and subsequent effects on plants). We predict that AMF-mediated effects of nonnative earthworms on ecosystems are nearly universal because (1) AMF are important components of most terrestrial ecosystems, (2) nonnative earthworms have become established in nearly every type of terrestrial ecosystem, and (3) nonnative earthworms, due to their burrowing and feeding behavior, greatly affect AMF with potentially profound concomitant effects on plant communities. We highlight the multiple direct and indirect effects of nonnative earthworms on plants and review what is currently known about the interaction between earthworms and AMF. We also illustrate how the effects of nonnative earthworms on plant-AMF mutualisms can alter the structure and stability of aboveground plant communities, as well as the vertebrate communities relying on these habitats. Integrative studies that assess the interactive effects of earthworms and AMF can provide new insights into the role that belowground ecosystem engineers play in altering aboveground ecological processes. Understanding these processes may improve our ability to predict the structure of plant and animal communities in earthworm-invaded regions and to develop management strategies that limit the numerous undesired impacts of earthworms.

  12. Limit Theorems for Competitive Density Dependent Population Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, Todd L

    2010-01-01

    Near the beginning of the century, Wright and Fisher devised an elegant, mathematically tractable model of gene reproduction and replacement that laid the foundation for contemporary population genetics. The Wright-Fisher model and its extensions have given biologists powerful tools of statistical inference that enabled the quantification of genetic drift and selection. Given the utility of these tools, we often forget that their model - for mathematical, and not biological reasons - makes assumptions that are violated in most real-world populations. In this paper, I consider an alternative framework that merges P. A. P. Moran's continuous-time Markov chain model of allele frequency with the density dependent models of ecological competition proposed by Gause, Lotka and Volterra, that, unlike Moran's model allow for a stochastically varying -- but bounded -- population size. I require that allele numbers vary according to a density-dependent population process, for which the limiting law of large numbers is a...

  13. A limit process for partial match queries in random quadtrees

    CERN Document Server

    Broutin, Nicolas; Sulzbach, Henning

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of recovering items matching a partially specified pattern in multidimensional trees (quad trees and k-d trees). We assume the classical model where the data consist of independent and uniform points in the unit square. For this model, in a structure on $n$ points, it is known that the complexity, measured as the number of nodes $C_n(\\xi)$ to visit in order to report the items matching a random query $\\xi$, independent and uniformly distributed on $[0,1]$, satisfies $E{C_n(\\xi)}\\sim \\kappa n^{\\beta}$, where $\\kappa$ and $\\beta$ are explicit constants. We develop an approach based on the analysis of the cost $C_n(s)$ of any fixed query $s\\in [0,1]$, and give precise estimates for the variance and limit distribution. Moreover, a functional limit law for a rescaled version of the process $(C_n(s))_{0\\le s\\le 1}$ is derived in the space of c\\`{a}dl\\`{a}g functions with the Skorokhod topology. For the worst case complexity $\\max_{s\\in [0,1]} C_n(s)$ the order of the expectation as well as a...

  14. Identifying qualitative effects of different grazing types on below-ground communities and function in a long-term field experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macdonald, Catriona A.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wright, Denis J.;

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory is an important modulator of plant biodiversity and productivity in grasslands, but our understanding of herbivore-induced changes on below-ground processes and communities is limited. Using a long-term (17 years) experimental site, we evaluated impacts of rabbit and invertebrate grazers...... between different taxa) were more strongly affected by invertebrate grazers than rabbits. Furthermore, our results suggest that exclusion of invertebrate grazers decreases both microbial biomass and abundance of genes associated with key biogeochemical cycles, and could thus have long-term consequences...... on some soil functions involved in carbon cycling, microbial diversity, structure and functional composition. Both rabbit and invertebrate grazing impacted soil functions and microbial community structure. All functional community measures (functions, biogeochemical cycling genes, network association...

  15. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits 4 Table 4 to Subpart DDDDD of Part 63 Protection of... Heaters With Hydrogen Chloride Emission Limits As stated in § 63.7500, you must comply with the following applicable operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable hydrogen chloride emission...

  16. The Limited Impact of Exposure Duration on Holistic Word Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changming; Abbasi, Najam ul Hasan; Song, Shuang; Chen, Jie; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The current study explored the impact of stimuli exposure duration on holistic word processing measured by the complete composite paradigm (CPc paradigm). The participants were asked to match the cued target parts of two characters which were presented for either a long (600 ms) or a short duration (170 ms). They were also tested by two popular versions of the CPc paradigm: the “early-fixed” task where the attention cue was visible from the beginning of each trial at a fixed position, and the “delayed-random” task where the cue showed up after the study character at random locations. The holistic word effect, as indexed by the alignment × congruency interaction, was identified in both tasks and was unaffected by the stimuli duration in both tasks. Meanwhile, the “delayed-random” task did not bring about larger holistic word effect than the “early-fixed” task. These results suggest the exposure duration (from around 150 to 600 ms) has a limited impact on the holistic word effect, and have methodological implications for experiment designs in this field. PMID:27375504

  17. A landscape-scale assessment of above- and belowground primary production in coastal wetlands: Implications for climate change-induced community shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Camille L.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Snedden, Gregg; Steyer, Gregory D.; Fischenich, Craig J; McComas, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground production in coastal wetlands are important contributors to carbon accumulation and ecosystem sustainability. As sea level rises, we can expect shifts to more salt-tolerant communities, which may alter these ecosystem functions and services. Although the direct influence of salinity on species-level primary production has been documented, we lack an understanding of the landscape-level response of coastal wetlands to increasing salinity. What are the indirect effects of sea-level rise, i.e., how does primary production vary across a landscape gradient of increasing salinity that incorporates changes in wetland type? This is the first study to measure both above- and belowground production in four wetland types that span an entire coastal gradient from fresh to saline wetlands. We hypothesized that increasing salinity would limit rates of primary production, and saline marshes would have lower rates of above- and belowground production than fresher marshes. However, along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast in Louisiana, USA, we found that aboveground production was highest in brackish marshes, compared with fresh, intermediate, and saline marshes, and belowground production was similar among all wetland types along the salinity gradient. Multiple regression analysis indicated that salinity was the only significant predictor of production, and its influence was dependent upon wetland type. We concluded that (1) salinity had a negative effect on production within wetland type, and this relationship was strongest in the fresh marsh (0–2 PSU) and (2) along the overall landscape gradient, production was maintained by mechanisms at the scale of wetland type, which were likely related to plant energetics. Regardless of wetland type, we found that belowground production was significantly greater than aboveground production. Additionally, inter-annual variation, associated with severe drought conditions, was observed exclusively for belowground

  18. Soil microbial nutrient constraints along a tropical forest elevation gradient: a belowground test of a biogeochemical paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Nottingham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aboveground primary productivity is widely considered to be limited by phosphorus (P availability in lowland tropical forests and by nitrogen (N availability in montane tropical forests. However, the extent to which this paradigm applies to belowground processes remains unresolved. We measured indices of soil microbial nutrient status in lowland, sub-montane and montane tropical forests along a natural gradient spanning 3400 m in elevation in the Peruvian Andes. With increasing elevation there were marked increases in soil concentrations of total N, total P, and readily-extractable P, but a decrease in N mineralization determined by in situ resin bags. Microbial carbon (C and N increased with increasing elevation, but microbial C:N:P ratios were relatively constant, suggesting homeostasis. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes, which are rich in N, decreased with increasing elevation, while the ratios of enzymes involved in the acquisition of N and P increased with increasing elevation, further indicating a shift in the relative demand for N and P by microbial biomass. We conclude that soil microorganisms shift investment in nutrient acquisition from P to N between lowland and montane tropical forests, suggesting that different nutrients regulate soil microbial metabolism and the soil carbon balance in these ecosystems.

  19. When CO2 kills: effects of magmatic CO2 flux on belowground biota at Mammoth Mountain, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, J.; Waldrop, M. P.; Mangan, M.

    2011-12-01

    The biomass, composition, and activity of the soil microbial community is tightly linked to the composition of the aboveground plant community. Microorganisms in aerobic surface soils, both free-living and plant-associated are largely structured by the availability of growth limiting carbon (C) substrates derived from plant inputs. When C availability declines following a catastrophic event such as the death of large swaths of trees, the number and composition of microorganisms in soil would be expected to decline and/or shift to unique microorganisms that have better survival strategies under starvation conditions. High concentrations of volcanic cold CO2 emanating from Mammoth Mountain near Horseshoe Lake on the southwestern edge of Long Valley Caldera, CA has resulted in a large kill zone of tree species, and associated soil microbial species. In July 2010, we assessed belowground microbial community structure in response to disturbance of the plant community along a gradient of soil CO2 concentrations grading from 80% (no plant life). We employed a microbial community fingerprinting technique (automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to determine changes in overall community composition for three broad functional groups: fungi, bacteria, and archaea. To evaluate changes in ectomycorrhizal fungal associates along the CO2 gradient, we harvested root tips from lodgepole pine seedlings collected in unaffected forest as well as at the leading edge of colonization into the kill zone. We also measured soil C fractions (dissolved organic C, microbial biomass C, and non-extractable C) at 10 and 30 cm depth, as well as NH4+. Not surprisingly, our results indicate a precipitous decline in soil C, and microbial C with increasing soil CO2; phospholipid fatty acid analysis in conjunction with community fingerprinting indicate both a loss of fungal diversity as well as a dramatic decrease in biomass as one proceeds further into the kill zone. This observation was

  20. Stochastic Modeling and Deterministic Limit of Catalytic Surface Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Jens; Reichert, Christian; Eiswirth, Markus;

    2007-01-01

    be derived rigorously for low-pressure conditions from the microscopic model, which is characterized as a moderately interacting many-particle system, in the limit as the particle number tends to infinity. Also the mesoscopic model is given by a many-particle system. However, the particles move on a lattice......, such that in contrast to the microscopic model the spatial resolution is reduced. The derivation of deterministic limit equations is in correspondence with the successful description of experiments under low-pressure conditions by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations while for intermediate pressures phenomena...

  1. Belowground carbon balance and carbon accumulation rate in the successional series of monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The balance, accumulation rate and temporal dynamics of belowground carbon in the successional series of monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest are obtained in this paper, based on long-term observations to the soil organic matter, input and standing biomass of litter and coarse woody debris, and dissolved organic carbon carried in the hydrological process of subtropical climax forest ecosystem-monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest, and its two successional forests of natural restoration-coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest and Pinus massoniana forest, as well as data of root biomass obtained once every five years and respiration measurement of soil, litter and coarse woody debris respiration for 1 year. The major results include: the belowground carbon pools of monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest, coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest, and Pinus massoniana forest are 23191 ± 2538 g·m?2, 16889 ± 1936 g·m?2 and 12680 ± 1854 g·m?2, respectively, in 2002. Mean annual carbon accumulation rates of the three forest types during the 24a from 1978 to 2002 are 383 ± 97 g·m?2·a?1, 193 ± 85 g·m?2·a?1 and 213 ± 86 g·m?2·a?1, respectively. The belowground carbon pools in the three forest types keep increasing during the observation period, suggesting that belowground carbon pools are carbon sinks to the atmosphere. There are seasonal variations, namely, they are strong carbon sources from April to June, weak carbon sources from July to September; while they are strong carbon sinks from October to November, weak carbon sinks from December to March.

  2. Ratio limits and limiting conditional distributions for discrete-time birth-death processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van Erik A.; Schrijner, Pauline

    1995-01-01

    We consider discrete-time birth-death processes with an absorbing state and study the conditional state distribution at time n given that absorption has not occurred by that time but will occur eventually. In particular, we establish conditions for the convergence of these distributions to a proper

  3. Limit Theorems for some Branching Measure-Valued Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Cloez, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    We consider a particles system, where, the particles move independently according to a Markov process and branching event occurs at an inhomogeneous time. The offspring locations and their number may depend on the position of the mother. Our setting capture, for instance, the processes indexed by Galton-Watson tree. We first determine the asymptotic behaviour of the empirical measure. The proof is based on an expression of the empirical measure using an auxiliary process. This latter is not distributed as a one cell lineage, there is a biased phenomenon. Our model is a microscopic description of a random (discrete) population of individuals. We then obtain a large population approximation as weak solution of a growth- fragmentation equation. We illustrate our result with two examples. The first one is a size-structured population model which describes the mitosis and the second one can model a parasite infection.

  4. Harmonisation of licensing processes for decommissioning. Options and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shutdown of eight reactors in Germany in the wake of Fukushima 2011 and the scheduled phase-out of the remaining units in several steps ending 2022 has obviously triggered a wave of applications for decommissioning and dismantling licences. It would seem natural to strive for a harmonised handling of these processes, analogous to the 'convoi' concept which was successfully employed for licensing and construction of the three most recent German NPPs in the 1980s. However, a comparative analysis shows that the motivation of all players is much different from that of earlier times and that harmonisation of licensing processes for dismantling is not as crucial for operators, authorities and technical support organisations as it was for construction.

  5. Two ARCH Models and Their Limitations as Diffusion Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨海波; 叶俊

    2002-01-01

    Two typical ARCH models: the ASDARCH model and the APARCH model are analyzed. Let Yk and σ2k denote the log returns and the volatility. When the time interval h goes to zero, (Yk,σ2k), as a discrete time Markov chain system, weakly converges to a continuous time diffusion process. The continuous time approximation of the ASDARCH model is done using two different methods. With some transformation, these two results are equivalent to high frequency data. The continuous time approximation of the APARCH model is obtained by a different procedure.

  6. Estimated discard limits for plutonium-238 recovery processing in the plutonium processing building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthy, D.F.; Bond, W.H.

    1975-03-26

    This manual is intended as a basis for plutonium-238 recovery costs and as a guide for removal of plutonium-bearing wastes from the gloveboxes to be safely and economically discarded. Waste materials contaminated with plutonium-238 are generated from in-house production, analytical, process development, recovery and receipts from off-site. The contaminated materials include paper, rags, alpha-box gloves, piping, valves, filters, etc. General categories for all types of plutonium waste have been established by the ERDA and are reflected in this manual. There are numerous processes used in plutonium recovery, such as dissolution, ultrasonic cleaning, ion exchange, etc. One or more of these processes are needed to extract the plutonium-238 from waste materials, purify it and convert it to an oxide acceptable for reuse. This manual is presented in two parts: Part I gives a breakdown and brief explanation of the direct costs for plutonium-238 I recovery, derived from budget data. Direct costs include direct labor (operating personnel), operational materials and supplies, health physics direct labor, calorimetry labor, analytical labor, and engineering direct labor (total costs for Method I). Budgeted costs for labor and material were used in the derivation of discard limits. The data presented is then used to calculate the cost per hour for recovery, as it applies to the three different methods of calculating discard limits referred to, in this manual, as Method I (calculation stated above), Method II and Method III. The cost for Method II is derived by adding to the cost of Method I, payroll related expenses. Method III is then calculated by adding over-head expenses to the total cost of Method II.

  7. Detection limit for rate fluctuations in inhomogeneous Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Toshiaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-04-01

    Estimations of an underlying rate from data points are inevitably disturbed by the irregular occurrence of events. Proper estimation methods are designed to avoid overfitting by discounting the irregular occurrence of data, and to determine a constant rate from irregular data derived from a constant probability distribution. However, it can occur that rapid or small fluctuations in the underlying density are undetectable when the data are sparse. For an estimation method, the maximum degree of undetectable rate fluctuations is uniquely determined as a phase transition, when considering an infinitely long series of events drawn from a fluctuating density. In this study, we analytically examine an optimized histogram and a Bayesian rate estimator with respect to their detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether their detectable-undetectable phase transition points are given by an identical formula defining a degree of fluctuation in an underlying rate. In addition, we numerically examine the variational Bayes hidden Markov model in its detectability of rate fluctuation, and determine whether the numerically obtained transition point is comparable to those of the other two methods. Such consistency among these three principled methods suggests the presence of a theoretical limit for detecting rate fluctuations.

  8. Marital processes, arranged marriage, and contraception to limit fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Dirgha J; Axinn, William G

    2013-10-01

    An international transition away from familially arranged marriages toward participation in spouse choice has endured for decades and continues to spread through rural Asia today. Although we know that this transformation has important consequences for childbearing early in marriage, we know much less about longer-term consequences of this marital revolution. Drawing on theories of family and fertility change and a rural Asian panel study designed to measure changes in both marital and childbearing behaviors, this study seeks to investigate these long-term consequences. Controlling for social changes that shape both marital practices and childbearing behaviors, and explicitly considering multiple dimensions of marital processes, we find evidence consistent with an independent, long-standing association of participation in spouse choice with higher rates of contraception to terminate childbearing. These results add a new dimension to the evidence linking revolutions in marital behavior to long-term declines in fertility and suggest that new research should consider a broader range of long-term consequences of changing marital processes.

  9. Evaluation of Process Capability in Gas Carburizing Process to Achieve Quality through Limit Design Concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Palaniradja; N. Alagumurthi; V. Soundararajan

    2004-01-01

    Steel is the most important metallic material used in industry. This is because of the versatility of its engineering properties under different conditions. In one condition it can be very mild, soft and suitable for any forming operation. In another condition the same steel can be very hard and strong. This versatility is made possible by the different heat treatments that the steel can be subject to. One such treatment is Gas carburizing. This is the most widely used process for surface hardening of low carbon steels. In this method the surface composition of the steel changes by diffusion of carbon and or nitrogen and result in hard outer surface with good wear resistance properties. A striking feature of Gas Carburizing process is that in this process the original toughness and ductility remains unaffected even after heat treatment. 3% nickel chromium case hardened low carbon steels are widely used for critical automotive and machine applications such as rack and pinion, gears, camshaft, valve rocker shafts and axles which requires high fatigue resistance. Fatigue behaviour of case carburized parts depends to a great extent on the correct combination of Hardness Penetration Depth (HPD) and the magnitude of hardness at the surface and beneath the surface with low size and shape distortion. In order to reduce the manufacturing costs in terms of material consumption and elimination of the number of processing steps, the effect of Gas carburizing parameters on the fatigue behaviour should already be considered in the parameter design stage. Therefore it is of importance to optimize the gas carburizing process variables to attain quality products with respect to hardness and case depth. In the present paper, the evaluation of process capability was carried out through a Limit Design Concept called orthogonal array design of experiment. To optimize the process variables the influence of several parameters (Holding time,Carbon potential, Furnace temperature and Quench

  10. General limitations on trajectories suitable for super-Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavskii, O B

    2015-01-01

    Collisions of particles near a rotating black hole can lead to unbound energies E_{c.m.} in their centre of mass frame. There are indications that the Killing energy of debris at infinity can also be unbound for some scenarios of collisions near the extremal black hole horizon (so-called super-Penrose process). They include participation of a particle that (i) has generic (not fine-tuned) parameters and (ii) moves away from a black hole after collision. We show that for any finite particle's mass, such a particle cannot be obtained as a result of preceding collision. However, this can be done if one of initial infalling particles has the mass of the order $N^{-2}$ that generalizes previous observation made in literature for radial infall in the Kerr background.

  11. An orthographic effect in phoneme processing, and its limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eCutler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To examine whether lexically stored knowledge about spelling influences phoneme evaluation, we conducted three experiments with a low-level phonetic judgement task: phoneme goodness rating. In each experiment, listeners heard phonetic tokens varying along a continuum centred on /s/, occurring finally in isolated word or nonword tokens. An effect of spelling appeared in Experiment 1: Native English speakers’ goodness ratings for the best /s/ tokens were significantly higher in words spelled with S (e.g., bless than in words spelled with C (e.g., voice. No such difference appeared when nonnative speakers rated the same materials in Experiment 2, indicating that the difference could not be due to acoustic characteristics of the S- versus C-words. In Experiment 3, nonwords with lexical neighbours consistently spelled with S (e.g., pless versus with C (e.g., floice failed to elicit orthographic neighbourhood effects; no significant difference appeared in native English speakers’ ratings for the S-consistent versus the C-consistent sets. Obligatory influence of lexical knowledge on phonemic processing would have predicted such neighbourhood effects; the findings are thus better accommodated by models in which phonemic decisions draw strategically upon lexical information.

  12. A Fluctuation Limit Theorem of Branching Processes with Immigration and Statistical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Chunhua

    2009-01-01

    We prove a general fluctuation limit theorem for Galton-Watson branching processes with immigration. The limit is a time-inhomogeneous OU type process driven by a spectrally positive Levy process. As applications of this result, we obtain some asymptotic estimates for the conditional least-squares estimator of the offspring mean.

  13. 40 CFR 63.7506 - Do any boilers or process heaters have limited requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Do any boilers or process heaters have limited requirements? 63.7506 Section 63.7506 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... or process heaters have limited requirements? (a) New or reconstructed boilers and process heaters...

  14. Early root overproduction not triggered by nutrients decisive for competitive success belowground.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco M Padilla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theory predicts that plant species win competition for a shared resource by more quickly preempting the resource in hotspots and by depleting resource levels to lower concentrations than its competitors. Competition in natural grasslands largely occurs belowground, but information regarding root interactions is limited, as molecular methods quantifying species abundance belowground have only recently become available. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In monoculture, the grass Festuca rubra had higher root densities and a faster rate of soil nitrate depletion than Plantago lanceolata, projecting the first as a better competitor for nutrients. However, Festuca lost in competition with Plantago. Plantago not only replaced the lower root mass of its competitor, but strongly overproduced roots: with only half of the plants in mixture than in monoculture, Plantago root densities in mixture were similar or higher than those in its monocultures. These responses occurred equally in a nutrient-rich and nutrient-poor soil layer, and commenced immediately at the start of the experiment when root densities were still low and soil nutrient concentrations high. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that species may achieve competitive superiority for nutrients by root growth stimulation prior to nutrient depletion, induced by the presence of a competitor species, rather than by a better ability to compete for nutrients per se. The root overproduction by which interspecific neighbors are suppressed independent of nutrient acquisition is consistent with predictions from game theory. Our results emphasize that root competition may be driven by other mechanisms than is currently assumed. The long-term consequences of these mechanisms for community dynamics are discussed.

  15. Limit theorems for dilute quantum systems leading to quantum poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Rudnicki, Sławomir; Sadowski, Sławomir

    1993-12-01

    The limit theorems for sums of independent or correlated operators representing observables of dilute quantum systems and leading to quantum Poisson processes are proved. Examples of systems of unstable particles and a Fermi lattice gas are discussed. For the latter, relations between low density limit and central limit are given.

  16. Belowground plant biomass allocation in tundra ecosystems and its relationship with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Heijmans, Monique M. P. D.; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; Maximov, Trofim C.; Berendse, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Climate warming is known to increase the aboveground productivity of tundra ecosystems. Recently, belowground biomass is receiving more attention, but the effects of climate warming on belowground productivity remain unclear. Enhanced understanding of the belowground component of the tundra is important in the context of climate warming, since most carbon is sequestered belowground in these ecosystems. In this study we synthesized published tundra belowground biomass data from 36 field studies spanning a mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from -20 °C to 0 °C across the tundra biome, and determined the relationships between different plant biomass pools and MAT. Our results show that the plant community biomass-temperature relationships are significantly different between above and belowground. Aboveground biomass clearly increased with MAT, whereas total belowground biomass and fine root biomass did not show a significant increase over the broad MAT gradient. Our results suggest that biomass allocation of tundra vegetation shifts towards aboveground in warmer conditions, which could impact on the carbon cycling in tundra ecosystems through altered litter input and distribution in the soil, as well as possible changes in root turnover.

  17. Belowground plant biomass allocation in tundra ecosystems and its relationship with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Heijmans, Monique M. P. D.; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; Maximov, Trofim C.; Berendse, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Climate warming is known to increase the aboveground productivity of tundra ecosystems. Recently, belowground biomass is receiving more attention, but the effects of climate warming on belowground productivity remain unclear. Enhanced understanding of the belowground component of the tundra is important in the context of climate warming, since most carbon is sequestered belowground in these ecosystems. In this study we synthesized published tundra belowground biomass data from 36 field studies spanning a mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient from ‑20 °C to 0 °C across the tundra biome, and determined the relationships between different plant biomass pools and MAT. Our results show that the plant community biomass–temperature relationships are significantly different between above and belowground. Aboveground biomass clearly increased with MAT, whereas total belowground biomass and fine root biomass did not show a significant increase over the broad MAT gradient. Our results suggest that biomass allocation of tundra vegetation shifts towards aboveground in warmer conditions, which could impact on the carbon cycling in tundra ecosystems through altered litter input and distribution in the soil, as well as possible changes in root turnover.

  18. Simulations and a conditional limit theorem for intermediately subcritical branching processes in random environment

    OpenAIRE

    Böinghoff, Christian; Kersting, Götz

    2012-01-01

    Intermediately subcritical branching processes in random environment are at the borderline between two subcritical regimes and exhibit a particularly rich behavior. In this paper, we prove a functional limit theorem for these processes. It is discussed together with two other recently proved limit theorems for the intermediately subcritical case and illustrated by several computer simulations.

  19. A RANDOM FUNCTIONAL CENTRAL LIMIT THEOREM FOR PROCESSES OF PRODUCT SUMS OF LINEAR PROCESSES GENERATED BY MARTINGALE DIFFERENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YUEBAO; YANG YANG; ZHOU HAIYANG

    2003-01-01

    A random functional central limit theorem is obtained for processes of partial sums andproduct sums of linear processes generated by non-stationary martingale differences. It devel-ops and improves some corresponding results on processes of partial sums of linear processesgenerated by strictly stationary martingale differences, which can be found in [5].

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ddddd of... - Operating Limits for Boilers and Process Heaters With Mercury Emission Limits and Boilers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Process Heaters With Mercury Emission Limits and Boilers and Process Heaters That Choose To Comply With... Heaters With Mercury Emission Limits and Boilers and Process Heaters That Choose To Comply With the... operating limits: If you demonstrate compliance with applicable mercury and/or total selected...

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Continuous Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Continuous Process Vents 3 Table 3 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Continuous Process Vents As required in § 63.11496, you must comply with the requirements for continuous process vents as shown in...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Batch Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Batch Process Vents 2 Table 2 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Batch Process Vents As required in § 63.11496, you must comply with the requirements for batch process vents as shown in the following...

  3. Agora: A proposal to overcome the limitations of the current knowledge creation process

    OpenAIRE

    ScientistFive

    2015-01-01

    Agora: A proposal to overcome the limitations of the current knowledge creation process ======================================================================================= By Scientistsfive () Abstract: The knowledge creation process is broken and can be improved by a combination of currently emerging tools. The rationale for this proposal is the notion that the current scientific process is not optimal: * Artificially staged competitions (g...

  4. EXISTENCE OF UNIQUE LIMITING PROBABILITY VECTORS IN STOCHASTIC PROCESSES WITH MULTIPLE TRANSITION MATRICES

    OpenAIRE

    Mjelde, James W.; Harris, Wesley D.; Conner, J. Richard; Schnitkey, Gary D.; Glover, Michael K.; Garoian, Lee

    1992-01-01

    Concepts associated with stochastic process containing multiple transition matricies are discussed. It is proved that under certain conditions, a process with m transition matrices has m unique limiting probability vectors. This result extends the notion of discrete Markov processes to problems with intrayear and interyear dynamics. An example using a large DP model illustrates the usefulness of the concepts developed to applied problems.

  5. Above- and belowground herbivory jointly impact defense and seed dispersal traits in Taraxacum officinale

    OpenAIRE

    de la Pena, Eduardo; Bonte, Dries

    2014-01-01

    Plants are able to cope with herbivores by inducing defensive traits or growth responses that allow them to reduce or avoid the impact of herbivores. Since above- and belowground herbivores differ substantially in life-history traits, for example feeding types, and their spatial distribution, it is likely that they induce different responses in plants. Moreover, strong interactive effects on defense and plant growth are expected when above- and belowground herbivores are jointly present. The ...

  6. Below-ground herbivory in natural communities: a review emphasizing fossorial animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    1987-01-01

    Roots, bulbs, corms, and other below-ground organs are almost universally present in communities containing vascular plants. A large and taxonomically diverse group of herbivores uses these below-ground plant parts as its sole or primary source of food. Important within this group are plant-parasitic nematodes and several fossorial taxa that affect plants through their soil-disturbing activities as well as by consuming plant tissue. The fossorial taxa are probably best exemplified by fossorial rodents, which are distributed on all continents except Australia. All other fossorial herbivores are insects. The impact of below-groud herbivory on individual plant fitness will depend upon the extent to which, and under what circumstances, the consumption of plant tissue disrupts one or more of the six functions of below-ground plant parts. Below-ground herbivory is probably more often chronic than acute. Indirect evidence suggests that plants have responded evolutionarily to herbivory by enhancing the functional capacities of below-ground organs, thus developing a degree of tolerance, and by producing compounds that serve as feeding deterrents. Many plant species respond to the removal of root tissues by increasing the growth rate of the remaining roots and initiating new roots. Soil movement and mixing by fossorial rodents infleuce the environment of other below-ground herbivores as well as that of plants and plant propagules. The relationships among the various groups of below-ground herbivores, and between below-ground herbivores and plants, are at best poorly known, yet they appear to have major roles in determining the structure and regulating the functioning of natural communities.

  7. Uncertainty in below-ground carbon biomass for major land covers in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, Jia Qi; Ziegler, Alan D.; Edward L Webb; Ryan, Casey M.

    2013-01-01

    Owing to difficulties associated with measuring root biomass accurately in space and time, below-ground root biomass is often calculated indirectly from above-ground biomass measurements via general allometric equations. Of concern is that general equations may not provide accurate site-specific calculations for accurate carbon stock assessments. This review comparing more than 100 root-related studies conducted in SE Asia shows highly variable and uncertain below-ground woody carbon (BGC) bi...

  8. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Anne C. S.; Ellen Macdonald, S.; Sylvie A Quideau

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and f...

  9. Designing an Iterative Learning Control Algorithm Based on Process History using limited post process geometrical information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endelt, Benny Ørtoft; Volk, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    , the reaction speed may be insufficient compared to the production rate in an industrial application. We propose to design an iterative learning control (ILC) algorithm which can control and update the blank-holder force as well as the distribution of the blank-holder force based on limited geometric data from...

  10. Untangling above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks in tropical orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J R; Cameron, D D

    2012-10-01

    Orchids typically depend on fungi for establishment from seeds, forming mycorrhizal associations with basidiomycete fungal partners in the polyphyletic group rhizoctonia from early stages of germination, sometimes with very high specificity. This has raised important questions about the roles of plant and fungal phylogenetics, and their habitat preferences, in controlling which fungi associate with which plants. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Martos et al. (2012) report the largest network analysis to date for orchids and their mycorrhizal fungi, sampling a total of over 450 plants from nearly half the 150 tropical orchid species on Reunion Island, encompassing its main terrestrial and epiphytic orchid genera. The authors found a total of 95 operational taxonomic units of mycorrhizal fungi and investigated the architecture and nestedness of their bipartite networks with 73 orchid species. The most striking finding was a major ecological barrier between above- and belowground mycorrhizal fungal networks, despite both epiphytic and terrestrial orchids often associating with closely related taxa across all three major lineages of rhizoctonia fungi. The fungal partnerships of the epiphytes and terrestrial species involved a diversity of fungal taxa in a modular network architecture, with only about one in ten mycorrhizal fungi partnering orchids in both groups. In contrast, plant and fungal phylogenetics had weak or no effects on the network. This highlights the power of recently developed ecological network analyses to give new insights into controls on plant-fungal symbioses and raises exciting new hypotheses about the differences in properties and functioning of mycorrhiza in epiphytic and terrestrial orchids.

  11. Aboveground to belowground herbivore defense signaling in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Torrence; Zhu, Lixue; Lopéz, Lorena; Pechanova, Olga; Shivaji, Renuka; Ankala, Arunkanth; Williams, W. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Insect pests that attempt to feed on the caterpillar-resistant maize genotype Mp708 encounter a potent, multipronged defense system that thwarts their invasion. First, these plants are on “constant alert” due to constitutively elevated levels of the phytohormone jasmonic acid that signals the plant to activate its defenses. The higher jasmonic acid levels trigger the expression of defense genes prior to herbivore attack so the plants are “primed” and respond with a faster and stronger defense. The second defense is the rapid accumulation of a toxic cysteine protease called Mir1-CP in the maize whorl in response to caterpillar feeding. When caterpillars ingest Mir1-CP, it damages the insect's midgut and retards their growth. In this article, we discuss a third possible defense strategy employed by Mp708. We have shown that foliar caterpillar feeding causes Mir1-CP and defense gene transcripts to accumulate in its roots. We propose that caterpillar feeding aboveground sends a signal belowground via the phloem that results in Mir1-CP accumulation in the roots. We also postulate that the roots serve as a reservoir of Mir1-CP that can be mobilized to the whorl in response to caterpillar assault. PMID:21270535

  12. Joint Limit Distributions of Exceedances Point Processes and Partial Sums of Gaussian Vector Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo Xiang PENG; Jin Jun TONG; Zhi Chao WENG

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the joint limit distributions of point processes of exceedances and partial sums of multivariate Gaussian sequences and show that the point processes and partial sums are asymptotically independent under some mild conditions.As a result,for a sequence of standardized stationary Gaussian vectors,we obtain that the point process of exceedances formed by the sequence (centered at the sample mean) converges in distribution to a Poisson process and it is asymptotically independent of the partial sums.The asymptotic joint limit distributions of order statistics and partial sums are also investigated under different conditions.

  13. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  14. LIMIT THEOREMS FOR WEIGHTED NONLINEAR TRANSFORMATIONS OF GAUSSIAN STATIONARY PROCESSES WITH SINGULAR SPECTRA

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Leonenko, Nikolai; Ruiz-Medina, María D.; Savich, Irina N.

    2013-01-01

    The limit Gaussian distribution of multivariate weighted functionals of nonlinear transformations of Gaussian stationary processes, having multiple singular spectra, is derived, under very general conditions on the weight function. This paper is motivated by its potential applications in nonlinear regression, and asymptotic inference on nonlinear functionals of Gaussian stationary processes with singular spectra.

  15. 43 CFR 46.160 - Limitations on actions during the NEPA analysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... analysis process. 46.160 Section 46.160 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior... Quality § 46.160 Limitations on actions during the NEPA analysis process. During the preparation of a... accordance with 40 CFR 1506.1 when that action is within the scope of, and analyzed in, an existing...

  16. Central limit theorems for smoothed extreme value estimates of Poisson point processes boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Stéphane; Menneteau, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we give sufficient conditions to establish central limit theorems for boundary estimates of Poisson point processes. The considered estimates are obtained by smoothing some bias corrected extreme values of the point process. We show how the smoothing leads Gaussian asymptotic distributions and therefore pointwise confidence intervals. Some new unidimensional and multidimensional examples are provided.

  17. Central limit theorems for smoothed extreme value estimates of point processes boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Girard, Stéphane; Menneteau, Ludovic

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we give sufficient conditions to establish central limit theorems for boundary estimates of Poisson point processes. The considered estimates are obtained by smoothing some bias corrected extreme values of the point process. We show how the smoothing leads Gaussian asymptotic distributions and therefore pointwise confidence intervals. Some new unidimensional and multidimensional examples are provided.

  18. Critical Age-Dependent Branching Markov Processes and their Scaling Limits

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Krishna B Athreya; Siva R Athreya; Srikanth K Iyer

    2010-06-01

    This paper studies: (i) the long-time behaviour of the empirical distribution of age and normalized position of an age-dependent critical branching Markov process conditioned on non-extinction; and (ii) the super-process limit of a sequence of age-dependent critical branching Brownian motions.

  19. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C S McIntosh

    Full Text Available Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR of the forest floor microbial community environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide

  20. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne C S; Macdonald, S Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  1. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta) Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Anne C S; Macdonald, S Ellen; Quideau, Sylvie A

    2016-01-01

    Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand) scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover) and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR) of the forest floor microbial community) environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis) showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover) and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs) properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide novel insights

  2. Short-Term Belowground Responses to Thinning and Burning Treatments in Southwestern Ponderosa Pine Forests of the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T. Overby

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial-mediated decomposition and nutrient mineralization are major drivers of forest productivity. As landscape-scale fuel reduction treatments are being implemented throughout the fire-prone western United States of America, it is important to evaluate operationally how these wildfire mitigation treatments alter belowground processes. We quantified these important belowground components before and after management-applied fuel treatments of thinning alone, thinning combined with prescribed fire, and prescribed fire in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa stands at the Southwest Plateau, Fire and Fire Surrogate site, Arizona. Fuel treatments did not alter pH, total carbon and nitrogen (N concentrations, or base cations of the forest floor (O horizon or mineral soil (0–5 cm during this 2-year study. In situ rates of net N mineralization and nitrification in the surface mineral soil (0–15 cm increased 6 months after thinning with prescribed fire treatments; thinning only resulted in net N immobilization. The rates returned to pre-treatment levels after one year. Based on phospholipid fatty acid composition, microbial communities in treated areas were similar to untreated areas (control in the surface organic horizon and mineral soil (0–5 cm after treatments. Soil potential enzyme activities were not significantly altered by any of the three fuel treatments. Our results suggest that a variety of one-time alternative fuel treatments can reduce fire hazard without degrading soil fertility.

  3. Plastic limit analysis with non linear kinematic strain hardening for metalworking processes applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaaba, Ali; Aboussaleh, Mohamed [Moulay Ismail University National Higher School of Engineering, Meknes (Morocco); Bousshine, Lahbib [National Higher School of Electricity and Mechanics, Casablanca (Morocco); Boudaia, El Hassan [Faculty of Sciences and Technologies, Mghrila, Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2011-11-15

    Limit analysis approaches are widely used to deal with metalworking processes analysis; however, they are applied only for perfectly plastic materials and recently for isotropic hardening ones excluding any kind of kinematic hardening. In the present work, using Implicit Standard Materials concept, sequential limit analysis approach and the finite element method, our objective consists in extending the limit analysis application for including linear and non linear kinematic strain hardenings. Because this plastic flow rule is non associative, the Implicit Standard Materials concept is adopted as a framework of non standard plasticity modeling. The sequential limit analysis procedure which considers the plastic behavior with non linear kinematic strain hardening as a succession of perfectly plastic behavior with yielding surfaces updated after each sequence of limit analysis and geometry updating is applied. Standard kinematic finite element method together with a regularization approach is used for performing two large compression cases (cold forging) in plane strain and axisymmetric conditions.

  4. Limit theorems for infinite-dimensional piecewise deterministic processes and applications to stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Riedler, Martin G; Wainrib, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper we present limit theorems for a sequence of Piecewise Deterministic Markov Processes taking values in Hilbert spaces. This class of processes provides a rigorous framework for stochastic spatial models in which discrete random events are globally coupled with continuous space-dependent variables solving partial differential equations, e.g., stochastic hybrid models of excitable membranes. We derive a law of large numbers which establishes a connection to deterministic macroscopic models and a martingale central limit theorem which connects the stochastic fluctuations to diffusion processes. As a prerequisite we carry out a thorough discussion of Hilbert space valued martingales associated to the PDMPs. Furthermore, these limit theorems provide the basis for a general Langevin approximation to PDMPs, i.e., certain stochastic partial differential equations that are expected to be similar in their dynamics to PDMPs. We apply these results to compartmental-type models of spatially extended ne...

  5. Links between plant litter chemistry, species diversity, and below-ground ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Courtney L; Bowman, William D

    2008-12-16

    Decomposition is a critical source of plant nutrients, and drives the largest flux of terrestrial C to the atmosphere. Decomposing soil organic matter typically contains litter from multiple plant species, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of how species diversity influences decomposition processes. Here, we show that soil C and N cycling during decomposition are controlled by the composition and diversity of chemical compounds within plant litter mixtures, rather than by simple metrics of plant species diversity. We amended native soils with litter mixtures containing up to 4 alpine plant species, and we used 9 litter chemical traits to evaluate the chemical composition (i.e., the identity and quantity of compounds) and chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. The chemical composition of the litter mixtures was the strongest predictor of soil respiration, net N mineralization, and microbial biomass N. Soil respiration and net N mineralization rates were also significantly correlated with the chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. In contrast, soil C and N cycling rates were poorly correlated with plant species richness, and there was no relationship between species richness and the chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. These results indicate that the composition and diversity of chemical compounds in litter are potentially important functional traits affecting decomposition, and simple metrics like plant species richness may fail to capture variation in these traits. Litter chemical traits therefore provide a mechanistic link between organisms, species diversity, and key components of below-ground ecosystem function.

  6. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in H-mode on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased non-linearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was ≤ 3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density ∼ 1.5 x Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flattop. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks

  7. A weak limit theorem for numerical approximation of Brownian semi-stationary processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podolskij, Mark; Thamrongrat, Nopporn

    In this paper we present a weak limit theorem for a numerical approximation of Brownian semi-stationary processes studied in [14]. In the original work of [14] the authors propose to use Fourier transformation to embed a given one dimensional (Levy) Brownian semi-stationary process into a two......-parameter stochastic field. For the latter they use a simple iteration procedure and study the strong approximation error of the resulting numerical scheme given that the volatility process is fully observed. In this work we present the corresponding weak limit theorem for the setting, where the volatility....../drift process needs to be numerically simulated. In particular, weak approximation errors for smooth test functions can be obtained from our asymptotic theory....

  8. Territorial resources, limits and strategies of local development processes and agri-food productions of quality

    OpenAIRE

    Severino Romano; Francesco Marangon; Roberto Polidori

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse the role that typical products can play in the local development process. Territorial resources involved, limits and strategies for their enhancement are analysed; this analysis will permit both to define the results that have been achieved since nowadays in the local development process and to point out future themes for the research in the field of agricultural economics. The typicality of an agri-food product regards qualitative characteristics that deriv...

  9. Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

    2011-04-15

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

  10. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers using commercial multi-user MUMPs process: capability and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jessica; Oakley, Clyde; Shandas, Robin

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this work is to construct capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (cMUTs) using multi-user microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processess (MUMPs) and to analyze the capability of this process relative to the customized processes commonly in use. The MUMPs process has the advantages of low cost and accessibility to general users since it is not necessary to have access to customized fabrication capability such as wafer-bonding and sacrificial release processes. While other researchers have reported fabricating cMUTs using the MUMPs process none has reported the limitations in the process that arise due to the use of standard design rules that place limitations on the material thicknesses, gap thicknesses, and materials that may be used. In this paper we explain these limitations, and analyze the capabilities using 1D modeling, Finite Element Analysis, and experimental devices. We show that one of the limitations is that collapse voltage and center frequency can not be controlled independently. However, center frequencies up to 9 MHz can be achieved with collapse voltages of less than 200 V making such devices suitable for medical and non-destructive evaluation imaging applications. Since the membrane and base electrodes are made of polysilicon, there is a larger series resistance than that resulting from processes that use metal electrodes. We show that the series resistance is not a significant problem. The conductive polysilicon can also destroy the cMUT if the top membrane is pulled in the bottom. As a solution we propose the application of an additional dielectric layer. Finally we demonstrate a device built with a novel beam construction that produces transmitted pressure pulse into air with 6% bandwidth and agrees reasonably well with the 1D model. We conclude that cMUTs made with MUMPs process have some limitations that are not present in customized processes. However, these limitations may be overcome with the proper design

  11. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  12. 40 CFR 65.117 - Alternative means of emission limitation: Batch processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative means of emission limitation: Batch processes. 65.117 Section 65.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... is visible, audible, or olfactory evidence of fluid loss. (ii) For pressure tests using a liquid,...

  13. On the Limit Distributions of Continuous-State Branching Processes with Immigration

    CERN Document Server

    Keller-Ressel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the class of continuous-state branching processes with immigration (CBI-processes), introduced by Kawazu and Watanabe [1971], and give a deterministic characterisation for the convergence of a CBI-process to a limit distribution L, which also turns out to be the stationary distribution of the CBI-process, as time tends to infinity. We give an explicit description of the Levy-Khintchine triplet of L in terms of the characteristic triplets of the Levy subordinator and the spectrally positive Levy process, which arise in the definition of the CBI-process and determine it uniquely. We show that the Levy density of L is given by the generator of the Levy subordinator applied to the scale function of the spectrally positive Levy process. This formula allows us to describe the support of L and characterise the absolute continuity and the asymptotic behavior of the density of L at the boundary of the support. Finally we show that the class of limit distributions of CBI-processes is strictly larger (resp. ...

  14. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Jiménez, E.; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; Salinas, N.; Phillips, O. L.; Anderson, L. O.; Alvarez, E.; Baker, T. R.; Goncalvez, P. H.; Huamán-Ovalle, J.; Mamani-Solórzano, M.; Meir, P.; Monteagudo, A.; Patiño, S.; Peñuela, M. C.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Rozas-Dávila, A.; Rudas, A.; Silva, J. A., Jr.; Vásquez, R.

    2009-12-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1) How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2) How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (mean±standard error), at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  15. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured competition between two coexisting grass species that respond differently to nitrogen deposition: Dactylis glomerata L., which is competitively favoured by nitrogen addition, and Festuca rubra L., which is competitively favoured on nitrogen-poor soils. We predicted: (1) that aboveground herbivory would reduce competitive asymmetry at high soil nitrogen by reducing the competitive advantage of D. glomerata; and (2), that belowground herbivory would relax competition at low soil nitrogen, by reducing the competitive advantage of F. rubra. Aboveground herbivory caused a 46% decrease in the competitive ability of F. rubra, and a 23% increase in that of D. glomerata, thus increasing competitive asymmetry, independently of soil nitrogen level. Belowground herbivory did not affect competitive symmetry, but the combined influence of above- and belowground herbivory was weaker than predicted from their individual effects. Belowground herbivory thus mitigated the increased competitive asymmetry caused by aboveground herbivory. D. glomerata remained competitively dominant after the cessation of aboveground herbivory, showing that the influence of herbivory continued beyond the feeding period. We showed that insect herbivory can strongly influence plant competitive interactions. In our experimental plant community, aboveground insect herbivory increased the risk of competitive exclusion of F. rubra. Belowground herbivory appeared to mitigate the influence of

  16. Assessment of capability index of processes revealing significant asymmetry with respect to tolerance limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bukowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of basic capability indices for production processes, Cp and Cpk, as well as the Cpm index for processes asymmetric with respect to tolerance limits. A method is presented for the estimation of process admissible asymmetry, when anappropriate PPM level of defective products is to be maintained. It is proved that an unbiased capability assessment for asymmetricprocesses is only feasible if the pair of indices Cp and Cpk is included in the assessment. An example is given of an analysis of data on the production of automotive bearings. The computations were performed with use of the KWSPP program.

  17. Relative contributions of rhizosphere and microbial respiration to belowground and total ecosystem respiration in arctic tussock tundra: results of a 13C pulse-chase experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, A. D.; Sullivan, P.; Weintraub, M. N.; Darrouzet-Nardi, A.; Steltzer, H.

    2011-12-01

    Many arctic ecosystems that have historically been strong carbon (C) sinks are becoming sources of C to the atmosphere. Although ecosystem respiration is the largest C flux out of ecosystems, our ability to model respiration lags considerably behind our ability to model photosynthesis in the Arctic. Understanding the controls on respiration is especially important for an ecosystem which appears to be experiencing the greatest climate warming and also contains large stores of soil C. Partitioning respiration into its component fluxes and identifying factors controlling respiration of each component is a critical first step towards improving our ability to model changes in respiration. However, partitioning belowground constituents has proven to be challenging in most ecosystems. Therefore, to accurately estimate rhizosphere respiration and bulk soil microbial respiration in moist acidic tussock tundra, we selected an isotopic method that results in minimal disturbance of belowground processes. In mid July of 2011, we introduced a 13CO2 label into a clear ecosystem CO2 flux chamber, allowed the vegetation to incorporate the label through photosynthesis and returned 2 days and 4 days after labeling to follow the movement of the 13C signal. A smaller CO2 flux chamber was used to chase the label separately in tussock and inter-tussock areas. All above ground plant tissue was clipped immediately before the chase measurements and soil cores were taken immediately after chasing the label. Syringe samples (n=5 or 6) were collected from the small flux chamber at regular intervals as CO2 concentrations were allowed to build, and Keeling plots were used to estimate δ13C of belowground respiration. After completing the field measurements, the soil cores were sorted into live roots and root free soil. Samples of each were incubated in mason jars placed in a 10°C water bath. The jars were scrubbed free of CO2 and syringe samples were collected from each jar after CO2

  18. Joint preprocesser-based detector for cooperative networks with limited hardware processing capability

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Abdulrahman I.

    2015-02-01

    In this letter, a joint detector for cooperative communication networks is proposed when the destination has limited hardware processing capability. The transmitter sends its symbols with the help of L relays. As the destination has limited hardware, only U out of L signals are processed and the energy of the remaining relays is lost. To solve this problem, a joint preprocessing based detector is proposed. This joint preprocessor based detector operate on the principles of minimizing the symbol error rate (SER). For a realistic assessment, pilot symbol aided channel estimation is incorporated for this proposed detector. From our simulations, it can be observed that our proposed detector achieves the same SER performance as that of the maximum likelihood (ML) detector with all participating relays. Additionally, our detector outperforms selection combining (SC), channel shortening (CS) scheme and reduced-rank techniques when using the same U. Our proposed scheme has low computational complexity.

  19. On Compound Poisson Processes Arising in Change-Point Type Statistical Models as Limiting Likelihood Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Dachian, Serguei

    2010-01-01

    Different change-point type models encountered in statistical inference for stochastic processes give rise to different limiting likelihood ratio processes. In a previous paper of one of the authors it was established that one of these likelihood ratios, which is an exponential functional of a two-sided Poisson process driven by some parameter, can be approximated (for sufficiently small values of the parameter) by another one, which is an exponential functional of a two-sided Brownian motion. In this paper we consider yet another likelihood ratio, which is the exponent of a two-sided compound Poisson process driven by some parameter. We establish, that similarly to the Poisson type one, the compound Poisson type likelihood ratio can be approximated by the Brownian type one for sufficiently small values of the parameter. We equally discuss the asymptotics for large values of the parameter and illustrate the results by numerical simulations.

  20. Forming limits in the hole-flanging process by coupled and uncoupled damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacem, A.; Jégat, A.; Krichen, A.; Manach, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work is to identify the limits of the hole-flanging process under different conditions. A 3D finite element model was developed to predict failure in hole-flanging process for sheet aluminium alloys. The Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) coupled damage model and the Bao-Wierzbicki (BW) uncoupled damage model were used. The parameters of both coupled and uncoupled models were identified by inverse analysis based on uniaxial tensile test. Experiments were conducted to analyse the types of failure that appear during the process. Numerical results were compared with experimental datas to check the validity of both models in predicting failure during the hole-flanging process. The comparative study showed that the GTN model predicts more accurately almost all types of failure while fracture occurrence can be only predicted by the BW model.

  1. Limit theorems for Markov processes indexed by continuous time Galton-Watson trees

    CERN Document Server

    Bansaye, Vincent; Marsalle, Laurence; Tran, Viet Chi

    2009-01-01

    We study the evolution of a particle system whose genealogy is given by a supercritical continuous time Galton-Watson tree. The particles move independently according to a Markov process and when a branching event occurs, the offspring locations depend on the position of the mother and the number of offspring. We prove a law of large numbers for the empirical measure of individuals alive at time $t$. This relies on a probabilistic interpretation of its intensity by mean of an auxiliary process. This latter has the same generator as the Markov process along the branches plus additional branching events, associated with jumps of accelerated rate and biased distribution. This comes from the fact that choosing an individual uniformly at time $t$ favors lineages with more branching events and larger offspring number. The central limit theorem is considered on a special case. Several examples are developed, including applications to splitting diffusions, cellular aging, branching L\\'evy processes and ancestral line...

  2. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    OpenAIRE

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied natu...

  3. Cellular automata simulations on nanocrystallization processes: From instantaneous growth approximation to limited growth

    OpenAIRE

    Blázquez, J.S.; Conde, C. F.; Conde, A.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular automata simulations have been performed to simulate the crystallization process under a limited growth approximation. This approximation resembles several characteristics exhibited by nanocrystalline microstructures and nanocrystallization kinetics. Avrami exponent decreases from a value n = 4 indicating interface controlled growth and constant nucleation rate to a value n ~ 1 indicating absence of growth. A continuous change of the growth contribution to the Avrami exponent from ze...

  4. Do Species Mixtures Increase Above- and Belowground Resource Capture in Woody and Herbaceous Tropical Legumes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathumbi, S.M.; Ndufa, J.K.; Giller, K.E.; Cadisch, G.

    2002-01-01

    The rotation of crops with planted, N2-fixing legumes is a promising agroforestry innovation for replenishing soil fertility in the tropics. We postulated that woody and herbaceous legumes with different growth and rooting patterns could be mixed to optimize above- and belowground resource capture.

  5. Interactive effects of above- and belowground herbivory and plant competition on plant growth and defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Jingying; Raaijmakers, Ciska; Kostenko, Olga; Kos, Martine; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Competition and herbivory are two major factors that can influence plant growth and plant defence. Although these two factors are often studied separately, they do not operate independently. We examined how aboveground herbivory by beet armyworm larvae (Spodoptera exigua) and belowground herbivory b

  6. Interactions between above- and belowground organisms modified in climate change experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevnsbak, Karen; Scherber, Christoph; Gladbach, David;

    2012-01-01

    a multifactor, field-scale climate change experiment and independently manipulate atmospheric CO2 concentration, air and soil temperature and drought in all combinations since 2005. We show that changes in these factors modify the interaction between above- and belowground organisms.We use an insect herbivore...

  7. Adopted levels and derived limits for Ra-226 and the decision making processes concerning TENORM releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fraction of a primary dose limit can be, in general, agreed upon as a dose related level to be adopted in decision-making processes. In the case of TENORM releases, fractions of primary dose levels for 226Ra, 228Ra, and 210Po may be of particular importance to establish adopted levels and derived limits to guide decision making processes. Thus, for example, a registration level for 226Ra could be adopted at the highest portion of the natural background variation. Above such level, intervention and remedial action levels could also be adopted. All those levels would be fractions of the primary level, but translated in terms of derived limits expressed in practical units. Derived limits would then be calculated by using environmental models. In such approach 'critical groups' would have to be carefully defined and identified. In addition, the size of a critical group would be chosen to be used in environmental modeling. Site specific environmental models and parameters are desirable, though unavailable, or very difficult to obtain, in most cases. Thus, mathematical models and parameters of more generic nature are often used. A sensitive parametric analysis can make a ranking of the parameters used in a model, allowing one to choose how important each parameter will be for the model output. The paper will point out that when using the adopted levels and derived limits, as suggested above, the uncertainties and importance of the parameters entering an environmental model can make the difference for decision makers to take the right or wrong decision, as far as radiological protection is concerned. (author)

  8. Long-term variation in above and belowground plant inputs alters soil organic matter biogeochemistry at the molecular-level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, M. J.; Pisani, O.; Lin, L.; Lun, O.; Simpson, A.; Lajtha, K.; Nadelhoffer, K. J.

    2015-12-01

    The long-term fate of soil carbon reserves with global environmental change remains uncertain. Shifts in moisture, altered nutrient cycles, species composition, or rising temperatures may alter the proportions of above and belowground biomass entering soil. However, it is unclear how long-term changes in plant inputs may alter the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) and soil carbon storage. Advanced molecular techniques were used to assess SOM composition in mineral soil horizons (0-10 cm) after 20 years of Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) at the Harvard Forest. SOM biomarkers (solvent extraction, base hydrolysis and cupric (II) oxide oxidation) and both solid-state and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to identify changes in SOM composition and stage of degradation. Microbial activity and community composition were assessed using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Doubling aboveground litter inputs decreased soil carbon content, increased the degradation of labile SOM and enhanced the sequestration of aliphatic compounds in soil. The exclusion of belowground inputs (No roots and No inputs) resulted in a decrease in root-derived components and enhanced the degradation of leaf-derived aliphatic structures (cutin). Cutin-derived SOM has been hypothesized to be recalcitrant but our results show that even this complex biopolymer is susceptible to degradation when inputs entering soil are altered. The PLFA data indicate that changes in soil microbial community structure favored the accelerated processing of specific SOM components with littler manipulation. These results collectively reveal that the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs alters the molecular-level composition of SOM and in some cases, enhances the degradation of recalcitrant SOM. Our study also suggests that increased litterfall is unlikely to enhance soil carbon storage over the long-term in temperate forests.

  9. The roots of defense: plant resistance and tolerance to belowground herbivory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Watts

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is conclusive evidence that there are fitness costs of plant defense and that herbivores can drive selection for defense. However, most work has focused on above-ground interactions, even though belowground herbivory may have greater impacts on individual plants than above-ground herbivory. Given the role of belowground plant structures in resource acquisition and storage, research on belowground herbivores has much to contribute to theories on the evolution of plant defense. Pocket gophers (Geomyidae provide an excellent opportunity to study root herbivory. These subterranean rodents spend their entire lives belowground and specialize on consuming belowground plant parts. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the root defenses of native forbs from mainland populations (with a history of gopher herbivory to island populations (free from gophers for up to 500,000 years. Defense includes both resistance against herbivores and tolerance of herbivore damage. We used three approaches to compare these traits in island and mainland populations of two native California forbs: 1 Eschscholzia californica populations were assayed to compare alkaloid deterrents, 2 captive gophers were used to test the palatability of E. californica roots and 3 simulated root herbivory assessed tolerance to root damage in Deinandra fasciculata and E. californica. Mainland forms of E. californica contained 2.5 times greater concentration of alkaloids and were less palatable to gophers than island forms. Mainland forms of D. fasciculata and, to a lesser extent, E. californica were also more tolerant of root damage than island conspecifics. Interestingly, undamaged island individuals of D. fasciculata produced significantly more fruit than either damaged or undamaged mainland individuals. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that mainland plants are effective at deterring and tolerating pocket gopher herbivory. Results also suggest

  10. Value and limits of μ-CT for nondemineralized bone tissue processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draenert, Miriam Esther; Draenert, Alice Irène; Forriol, Francisco; Cerler, Michael; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz; Hickel, Reinhard; Draenert, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    An experimental approach was performed on 20 giant rabbits to establish the possibilities and limitations of μ-CT for routine processing of nondemineralized bone tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HA) or β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP) bead implants or a melange of both, microchambered and solid, were implanted into a standardized and precise defect in the patellar groove. The bone-healing phase was chosen for the histology considering 1 or 2 days, and 2, 3, and 6 weeks. Normal X-ray and μ-CT were applied on all specimens; five specimens in the 6-week stage were additionally processed according to the full range of conventional nondemineralized bone processing methods. μ-CT increased the possibilities of nondemineralized histology with respect to bone morphometry and a complete sequence of sections, thus providing a complete analysis of the bone response. μ-CT was limited in differentiating bone quality, cell analyses, and mineralization stages. The investigation based on normal X-rays is limited to defining integration and excluding the fibrous and bony encapsulation of loose implants. μ-CT allows a 3D evaluation of newly formed bone which is clearly marked against the ceramic implant. It does not allow, however, for the differentiation between woven and lamellar bone, the presentation of the canalicular lacunar system, or on the cell level, revealing canaliculi or details of the mineralization process which can be documented by high-resolution microradiography. Titer dynamics of bone formation remains the domain of polychromatic sequential labeling. The complete sequence of μ-CT slices enhances the possibilities for routine histology, tremendously allowing to the focus on detail histology to topographically well-defined cuts, thus providing more precise conclusions which take into consideration the whole implant.

  11. Adopted levels and derived limits for Ra-226 and the decision making processes concerning TENORM releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fraction of a primary dose limit can be, in general, agreed upon as a dose related level to be adopted in decision-making processes. In the case of TENORM releases, fractions of primary dose levels for 226Ra, 228Ra, and 210Po may be of particular importance to establish adopted levels for 226Ra could be adopted at the highest portion of the natural background variation. Above such level, intervention and remedial action levels could also be adopted. All those levels would be fractions of the primary level, but translated in terms of derived limits expressed in practical units. Derived limits would then be calculated by using environmental models. In such approach 'critical groups' would have to be carefully defined and identified. In addition, the size of a critical group would be chosen to be used in environmental modeling. Site specific environmental models and parameters are desirable, though unavailable, or very difficult to obtain, in most cases. Thus, mathematical models and parameters of more generic nature are often used. A sensitive parametric analysis can make a ranking of the parameters used in a model, allowing one to choose how important each parameter will be for the model output. The paper will point out that when using the adopted levels and derived limits, as suggested above, the uncertainties and importance of the parameters entering an environmental model can make the difference for decision makers to take the right or wrong decision, as far as radiological protection is concerned. (author)

  12. Limitations of mathematical modelling and numerical simulation of industrial and laboratory high-pressure processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, Cornelia; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    High pressures up to several hundreds of MPa are utilised in a wide range of applications in chemical engineering, bioengineering, and food engineering, aiming at selective control of (bio-)chemical reactions. Non-uniformity of process conditions may threaten the safety and quality of the resulting products as the process conditions such as pressure, temperature, and treatment history are crucial for the course of (bio-)chemical reactions. Therefore, thermofluid dynamical phenomena during the high-pressure process have to be examined, and tools to predict process uniformity and to optimise the processes have to be developed. Recently, mathematical models and numerical simulations of laboratory and industrial scale high-pressure processes have been set up and validated by experimental results. This contribution deals with the assumption of the modelling that relevant (bio-)chemical compounds are ideally dissolved or diluted particles in a continuum flow. By considering the definition of the continuum hypothesis regarding the minimum particle population in a distinct volume, limitations of this modelling and simulation are addressed.

  13. Band-Limited Coronagraphs using a Halftone-dot process: design guidelines, manufacturing, and laboratory results

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, P; Kasper, M

    2009-01-01

    The Exo-Planet Imaging Camera and Spectrograph (EPICS) for the future 42-meter European-Extremely Large Telescope, will enable direct images, and spectra for both young and old Jupiter-mass planets in the infrared. To achieve the required contrast, several coronagraphic concepts -- to remove starlight -- are under investigation: conventional pupil apodization (CPA), apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph (APLC), dual-zone coronagraph (DZC), four-quadrants phase mask (FQPM), multi-stages FQPM, annular groove phase mask (AGPM), high order optical vortex (OVC), and band-limited coronagraph (BLC). Recent experiment demonstrated the interest of an halftone-dot process -- namely microdots technique -- to generate the adequate transmission profile of pupil apodizers for CPA, APLC, and DZC concepts. Here, we examine the use of this technique to produce band-limited focal plane masks, and present guidelines for the design. Additionally, we present the first near-IR laboratory results with BLCs that confirm the microdots appr...

  14. Modeling intermediate product selection under production and storage capacity limitations in food processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur Alper; Akkerman, Renzo; Grunow, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    In the food industry products are usually characterized by their recipes, which are specified by various quality attributes. For end products, this is given by customer requirements, but for intermediate products, the recipes can be chosen in such a way that raw material procurement costs and pro...... with production and inventory planning, thereby considering the production and storage capacity limitations. The resulting model can be used to solve an important practical problem typical for many food processing industries.......In the food industry products are usually characterized by their recipes, which are specified by various quality attributes. For end products, this is given by customer requirements, but for intermediate products, the recipes can be chosen in such a way that raw material procurement costs...... and processing costs are minimized. However, this product selection process is bound by production and storage capacity limitations, such as the number and size of storage tanks or silos. In this paper, we present a mathematical programming approach that combines decision making on product selection...

  15. The Limit Theorems for Maxima of Stationary Gaussian Processes with Random Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Quan TAN

    2014-01-01

    Let {X(t), t ≥ 0} be a standard (zero-mean, unit-variance) stationary Gaussian process with correlation function r(·) and continuous sample paths. In this paper, we consider the maxima M (T ) = max{X (t),∀t ∈ [0, T ]} with random index TT , where TT/T converges to a non-degenerate distribution or to a positive random variable in probability, and show that the limit distribution of M (TT ) exists under some additional conditions related to the correlation function r(·).

  16. Applications and limitations of very large-scale integration in SAR azimuth processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhler, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    The major limitation of a convolution processor designed with CCD memory chips is the inability to operate in real time except for slow aircraft speeds or coarse resolutions. Two methods of summing the products were evaluated with respect to speed, power, and space requirements. A convolution processor was designed, and the number of chips as well as the power and volume requirements were determined using 4, 6, and 8 bit data words. The processor is flexible because range samples may be traded for additional azimuth samples by altering the control signals. The processor is also modular, and additional range or azimuth may be processed by adding more cards.

  17. Functional limit theorem for moving average processes generated by dependent random variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Let {Xt,t≥1} be a moving average process defined byXt = ∞∑j=0bjξt-j , where {bj,j≥0} is a sequence of real numbers and { ξt, ∞< t <∞ } is a doubly infinite sequence of strictly stationary φ- mixing random variables. Under conditions on { bj, j ≥0 }which entail that { Xt, t ≥ 1 } is either a long memory process or a linear process, we study asymptotics of Sn ( s ) = [ns]∑t=1 Xt (properly normalized). When { Xt, t≥1 } is a long memory process, we establish a functional limit theorem. When { Xt, t≥1 } is a linear process, we not only obtain the multi-dimensional weak convergence for { Xt, t≥1 }, but also weaken the moment condition on { ξt, - ∞< t <∞ } and the restriction on { bj,j≥0}. Finally, we give some applications of our results.

  18. Figuring out the process of denitrification by stable isotope approaches - Prospects and limitations -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, C. F.; Spott, O.

    2009-04-01

    Improvement in the analysis of stable isotopes, higher measurement capacity and faster and more complex analysis methods allow a more detailed insight into the complexity of N cycling in soils or sediments, in particular in the formation and emission of N2 gas. The knowledge about the site-specific N2 to N2O ratio of denitrification and perhaps other processes is important to develop sustainable land use strategies for reduction of GHG emissions. Adapted stable isotope approaches are an irreplaceable tool for process identification, process quantification and processes separation. In the last years a few of new processes were found (e.g. anammox, codenitrification) and new stable isotope approaches for quantification and processes separation were published (Wrage et al.). Source partitioning of N gas production in soils is inherently challenging, but is vital to better understand controls on the different processes, with a view to develope appropriate management practices for mitigation of harmful N gases (e.g.N2O) (Baggs, 2008). Recently dual-isotope labelling approaches (Wrage et al., 2005) and triplet 15N tracer experiments (TTE) with 15N labelling of different pools (e.g. Müller et al., 2006, Russow et al 2009) have been developed to differentiate between more than two processes. The high number of simultaneously occurring processes during soil N cycling (Hayatsu et al. 2008) limits an easy applicability of isotope approaches (Spott and Stange 2007 ;Wrage et al. 2005; Phillips and Gregg, 2003), and therefore partitioning and process quantification is often afflicted with high uncertainties (Ambus et al., 2006). Especially the heterogeneity of environmental conditions in soils caused by the soil structure is difficult to handle (e.g. homogeneously labelling a soil). Hence, spatially separated processes in combination with high turnover rates (gross production and consumption) can produce different pools of one substrate in the soil (Russow et al. 2009) and

  19. Limitations on the Activity Concentration of Mineral Processing Residues Used as Building Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of mineral processing residue as a building material accounts for a significant proportion of the various uses of such material. The activity concentrations of radionuclides of natural origin in the material can be significantly elevated, resulting in enhanced exposure of occupants of the buildings concerned unless some restriction is placed on the radioactivity content. Accordingly, in order to comply with the dose limitation requirements of the relevant laws and standards, the activity concentration in the material has to be restricted. The use of mineral processing residues in building material is controlled in three categories according to a parameter known as the equivalent concentration, which can guide the product specification of the building material and control the dose received by a building occupant. (author)

  20. A PREDICTING MODEL OF THE LIMITING FLUX FOR THE CHARGED SOLUTE IN ULTRAFILTRATION PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Ming-liang; GUO Yan; PU Chun-sheng; LU Feng-ji

    2004-01-01

    In the process of ultrafiltration , the occur-rence of the limiting flux is elucidated with the formation of a cake(gel) layer on the membrane surface. Before cake formation, the pressure drop on the concentration polarization layer, as well as the permeate flux, increases with the applied pressure. The pressure drop on the concentration polarization layer, however, will no longer change with the applied pressure after the formation of the cake layer. The limiting flux will be obtained if the hydrodynamic conditions in the filtration channel are not affected by the cake layer. A mathematics model for predicting the limiting flux for the charged solute in ultrafiltration is developed. In this model, a repulsive electric force is taken into account in addition to convection and diffusion when the solute is carrying the same charge as the membrane material. A procedure to correlate the model with experimental ultrafiltration data is also present. The results show that a model in this paper is developed on a more realistic perception of the ultrafiltration system and the predicting data agrees well with experimental data.

  1. Ultrafast and nonlinear optical characterization of optical limiting processes in fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlman, R.; Klimov, V.; Shi, X. [and others

    1997-10-01

    The authors present recent results of broadband femotosecond (fs) transient absorption (TA) and broadband nanosecond (ns) optical limiting (OL) studies of C{sub 60} and derivatized C{sub 60}. Improvements in measurement techniques for fs TA spectra provide sensitivity to 10{sup {minus}5} in differential transmission, allowing detailed comparison of excited-state spectra with established energy level diagrams, as well as comparison of the ratio of triplet to singlet excited-state absorption cross sections from TA spectra with those obtained by modeling time transients at different wavelengths. For derivatized fullerenes, which provide enhanced solubility and a ground-state absorption extended into the infrared compared with C{sub 60} there is no spectral region where the triplet absorption cross section dominates the singlet as strongly as demonstrating broadband limiting in all 6, 6 mono-adducts and neat C{sub 60}. The authors report new approaches to processing sol-gel encapsulated fullerenes to improve the OL performance of solid-state materials to approach the response of solution limiters.

  2. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. O. C. Aragão

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The net primary productivity (NPP of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1 How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2 How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (mean±standard error, at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  3. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. O. C. Aragão

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The net primary productivity (NPP of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1 How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2 How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 (mean±standard error, at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha−1 yr−1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  4. Averaging, not internal noise, limits the development of coherent motion processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Manning

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of motion processing is a critical part of visual development, allowing children to interact with moving objects and navigate within a dynamic environment. However, global motion processing, which requires pooling motion information across space, develops late, reaching adult-like levels only by mid-to-late childhood. The reasons underlying this protracted development are not yet fully understood. In this study, we sought to determine whether the development of motion coherence sensitivity is limited by internal noise (i.e., imprecision in estimating the directions of individual elements and/or global pooling across local estimates. To this end, we presented equivalent noise direction discrimination tasks and motion coherence tasks at both slow (1.5°/s and fast (6°/s speeds to children aged 5, 7, 9 and 11 years, and adults. We show that, as children get older, their levels of internal noise reduce, and they are able to average across more local motion estimates. Regression analyses indicated, however, that age-related improvements in coherent motion perception are driven solely by improvements in averaging and not by reductions in internal noise. Our results suggest that the development of coherent motion sensitivity is primarily limited by developmental changes within brain regions involved in integrating motion signals (e.g., MT/V5.

  5. Extension of the Limiting Quality Indexed Single Acceptance Sampling Plans for Attributes in High Precision Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Theresa Gomez

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the extension of existing single acceptance sampling plans indexed by lot tolerance percent defective (LTPD or limiting quality (LQ with respect to their applicability to high precision processes. LTPD/LQ indexed sampling plans were extended to cover the very low fraction defective levels of high precision processes. Plans based on the ISO 2859-2 LQ indexed plans, Dodge-Romig LTPD indexed plans, and lot sensitive plans (LSP were used as bases for the extensions. Target levels for LTPD/LQ were set at defective parts per million levels ranging from 20 ppm to 5000 ppm. The performance of the extended plans was evaluated using measures relating to level of protection afforded by the plans and efficiency in terms of amount of required inspection. The extended Dodge-Romig LTPD plans showed best performance among the three plans generated. Three selected plans from the extended Dodge-Romig LTPD sampling scheme were then subjected to simulation studies. Comparison of the theoretical and simulation data indicated that the plans behave more strictly than expected from theoretical calculations. The specific demands of high precision processes for appropriate sampling inspection plans that cover lower fraction defective levels, and at the same time satisfy the requirement for economy and efficiency of inspection were shown to be provided by this plan. These results contributed significantly to the manufacturing industry as it continuously strives to improve process yields and decreases fraction defective levels to respond to customer demands of better quality and improved performance.

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Batch Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Batch Process Vents 2 Table 2 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63 Protection of Environment...—Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Batch Process Vents As required in § 63.2460, you must meet... process vents: For each . . . Then you must . . . And you must . . . 1. Process with Group 1 batch...

  7. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    OpenAIRE

    L. E. O. C. Aragão; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D.B; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; E. Jiménez; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; N. Salinas; O. L. Phillips; L. O. Anderson; Alvarez, E.; T. R. Baker; P. H. Goncalvez; J. Huamán-Ovalle

    2009-01-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quanti...

  8. Aboveground insect herbivory increases plant competitive asymmetry, while belowground herbivory mitigates the effect

    OpenAIRE

    Borgström, Pernilla; Strengbom, Joachim; Viketoft, Maria; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Insect herbivores can shift the composition of a plant community, but the mechanism underlying such shifts remains largely unexplored. A possibility is that insects alter the competitive symmetry between plant species. The effect of herbivory on competition likely depends on whether the plants are subjected to aboveground or belowground herbivory or both, and also depends on soil nitrogen levels. It is unclear how these biotic and abiotic factors interactively affect competition. In a greenho...

  9. Cascading effects of belowground predators on plant communities are density-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Madhav Prakash; Herrmann, Martina; Steinauer, Katja; Rennoch, Saskia; Cesarz, Simone; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-01

    Soil food webs comprise a multitude of trophic interactions that can affect the composition and productivity of plant communities. Belowground predators feeding on microbial grazers like Collembola could decelerate nutrient mineralization by reducing microbial turnover in the soil, which in turn could negatively influence plant growth. However, empirical evidences for the ecological significance of belowground predators on nutrient cycling and plant communities are scarce. Here, we manipulated predator density (Hypoaspis aculeifer: predatory mite) with equal densities of three Collembola species as a prey in four functionally dissimilar plant communities in experimental microcosms: grass monoculture (Poa pratensis), herb monoculture (Rumex acetosa), legume monoculture (Trifolium pratense), and all three species as a mixed plant community. Density manipulation of predators allowed us to test for density-mediated effects of belowground predators on Collembola and lower trophic groups. We hypothesized that predator density will reduce Collembola population causing a decrease in nutrient mineralization and hence detrimentally affect plant growth. First, we found a density-dependent population change in predators, that is, an increase in low-density treatments, but a decrease in high-density treatments. Second, prey suppression was lower at high predator density, which caused a shift in the soil microbial community by increasing the fungal: bacterial biomass ratio, and an increase of nitrification rates, particularly in legume monocultures. Despite the increase in nutrient mineralization, legume monocultures performed worse at high predator density. Further, individual grass shoot biomass decreased in monocultures, while it increased in mixed plant communities with increasing predator density, which coincided with elevated soil N uptake by grasses. As a consequence, high predator density significantly increased plant complementarity effects indicating a decrease in

  10. Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities at fagus stands in differently polluted forest research plots

    OpenAIRE

    Al Sayegh-Petkovšek, Samar

    2005-01-01

    Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities at fagus stands were analysed. Eectomycorrhiza types were identified in soil cores from differently polluted beech forest research plots in the 1998 - 2001 period by mycobioindication method. Forest research plots were situated in the vicinity of thermal power plants (polluted plots: Zavodnje - Prednji vrh and Zasavje - Dobovec) and in unpolluted areas (in the vicinity of Kočevska Reka: Preža and Moravške gredice). Eighty-eight different ectomyco...

  11. Signal signature of aboveground-induced resistance upon belowground herbivory in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Erb, Matthias; Flors, Victor; Karlen, Danielle; De Lange, Elvira S.; Planchamp, Chantal; D’Alessandro, Marco; Turlings, Ted C. J.; Ton, Jurriaan

    2012-01-01

    Plants activate local and systemic defence mechanisms upon exposure to stress. This innate immune response is partially regulated by plant hormones, and involves the accumulation of defensive metabolites. Although local defence reactions to herbivores are well studied, less is known about the impact of root herbivory on shoot defence. Here, we examined the effects of belowground infestation by the western corn rootworm Diabrotica virgifera virgifera on aboveground resistance in maize. Belowgr...

  12. Musical experience limits the degradative effects of background noise on the neural processing of sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; Skoe, Erika; Kraus, Nina

    2009-11-11

    Musicians have lifelong experience parsing melodies from background harmonies, which can be considered a process analogous to speech perception in noise. To investigate the effect of musical experience on the neural representation of speech-in-noise, we compared subcortical neurophysiological responses to speech in quiet and noise in a group of highly trained musicians and nonmusician controls. Musicians were found to have a more robust subcortical representation of the acoustic stimulus in the presence of noise. Specifically, musicians demonstrated faster neural timing, enhanced representation of speech harmonics, and less degraded response morphology in noise. Neural measures were associated with better behavioral performance on the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) for which musicians outperformed the nonmusician controls. These findings suggest that musical experience limits the negative effects of competing background noise, thereby providing the first biological evidence for musicians' perceptual advantage for speech-in-noise.

  13. Belowground rhizomes in paleosols: The hidden half of an Early Devonian vascular plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jinzhuang; Deng, Zhenzhen; Huang, Pu; Huang, Kangjun; Benton, Michael J; Cui, Ying; Wang, Deming; Liu, Jianbo; Shen, Bing; Basinger, James F; Hao, Shougang

    2016-08-23

    The colonization of terrestrial environments by rooted vascular plants had far-reaching impacts on the Earth system. However, the belowground structures of early vascular plants are rarely documented, and thus the plant-soil interactions in early terrestrial ecosystems are poorly understood. Here we report the earliest rooted paleosols (fossil soils) in Asia from Early Devonian deposits of Yunnan, China. Plant traces are extensive within the soil and occur as complex network-like structures, which are interpreted as representing long-lived, belowground rhizomes of the basal lycopsid Drepanophycus The rhizomes produced large clones and helped the plant survive frequent sediment burial in well-drained soils within a seasonal wet-dry climate zone. Rhizome networks contributed to the accumulation and pedogenesis of floodplain sediments and increased the soil stabilizing effects of early plants. Predating the appearance of trees with deep roots in the Middle Devonian, plant rhizomes have long functioned in the belowground soil ecosystem. This study presents strong, direct evidence for plant-soil interactions at an early stage of vascular plant radiation. Soil stabilization by complex rhizome systems was apparently widespread, and contributed to landscape modification at an earlier time than had been appreciated. PMID:27503883

  14. Limits Imposed on Heat Produced during Core Formation by Radiative Transfer Processes and Thermodynamic Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R. E.; Hofmeister, A.

    2010-12-01

    The popular view that Earth is sufficiently hot to still be shedding primordal heat, largely originating in the core, is inconsistent with thermodynamic constraints and recent heat transport studies. Previous work presumes that the large difference in gravitational potential energy (Ug) between a fictious, homogeneous reference state and Earth’s current layered configuration of metallic core and rocky mantle was converted to frictional heat during core formation, greatly increasing temperature (T) inside the Earth. However, heating (ΔT >0) was deduced by assuming that Ug is positive, which is inconsistent with Newton’s law of gravitation. Use of an erroneous sign for ΔUg has prevented recognition that the process is an exothermic transformation. Thermodynamic principles were not considered in previous analyses: neglecting the effect of the change in configuration on entropy and energy contributes greatly to the view that heat is retained. Instead, stringent limits are set on the permissible temperature increase by the rapid rate of ballistic radiative transfer, a process associated with transient events, as well as by the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. In the static, instantaneous model of core formation, configurational entropy (S) of the Earth decreases upon forming the ordered layered state; this entropy decrease is offset by a greater increase in S of the surrounding universe, which can only be accomplished by release of heat to space (the surroundings). Instantaneous dissipation of heat in the static model reasonably approximates radiative processes being superfast. Core formation involves negligible changes in volume and rotational energy, so Helmholtz free energy (=Ug-TS) is conserved, as in atmospheric processes and other graviational-thermodynamic problems. Because S of the universe is immense and heat must flow from hotter to colder bodies, negligible heat from core formation is retained, consistent with the exothermic nature of this transition

  15. Youth researching youth: benefits, limitations and ethical considerations within a participatory research process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia G. Jardine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the benefits, limitations and ethical issues associated with conducting participatory research on tobacco use using youth to research other youth. Study design. Community-based participatory research. Methods. Research on tobacco use was conducted with students in the K’àlemì Dene School and Kaw Tay Whee School in the Northwest Territories, Canada, using PhotoVoice. The Grade 9–12 students acted as researchers. Researcher reflections and observations were assessed using “member checking,” whereby students, teachers and community partners could agree or disagree with the researcher's interpretation. The students and teachers were further asked informally to share their own reflections and observations on this process. Results and conclusions. Using youth to research other youth within a participatory research framework had many benefits for the quality of the research, the youth researchers and the community. The research was perceived by the researchers and participants to be more valid and credible. The approach was more appropriate for the students, and the youth researchers gained valuable research experience and a sense of ownership of both the research process and results. Viewing smoking through their children's eyes was seen by the community to be a powerful and effective means of creating awareness of the community environment. Limitations of the approach were residual response bias of participants, the short period of time to conduct the research and failure to fully explore student motivations to smoke or not to smoke. Ethical considerations included conducting research with minors, difficulties in obtaining written parental consent, decisions on cameras (disposable versus digital and representation of all participants in the final research product.

  16. Understanding climate processes in the Murray-Darling Basin: utility and limitations for natural resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. E. Gallant

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ocean-atmosphere processes causing variations in the climate of Australia's Murray-Darling Basin (MDB occur on time scales from days to centuries, all are important, and none are likely to act in isolation. Instead, interactions between all hydroclimatic drivers, on multiple time scales, are likely to have caused the variations observed in MDB instrumental records. The source and relative importance of each climate driver varies due to the geographic spread of the Basin from the subtropics to the middle latitudes. Such differences were highlighted during the period from 1997–2010 when the southern MDB experienced prolonged and severe dry conditions, while decadal-scale rainfall in the northern MDB remained close to normal. Although recent studies have provided insights into possible mechanisms, the cause of this recent drying is still uncertain. To this end, this paper addresses the current state of knowledge about the processes causing climate variations in the MDB and the utility and limitations of this knowledge for natural resources management.

  17. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Ali; Forouzan, Mohammad R

    2013-01-01

    Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed.

  18. Optimization of cold rolling process parameters in order to increasing rolling speed limited by chatter vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Heidari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chatter has been recognized as major restriction for the increase in productivity of cold rolling processes, limiting the rolling speed for thin steel strips. It is shown that chatter has close relation with rolling conditions. So the main aim of this paper is to attain the optimum set points of rolling to achieve maximum rolling speed, preventing chatter to occur. Two combination methods were used for optimization. First method is done in four steps: providing a simulation program for chatter analysis, preparing data from simulation program based on central composite design of experiment, developing a statistical model to relate system tendency to chatter and rolling parameters by response surface methodology, and finally optimizing the process by genetic algorithm. Second method has analogous stages. But central composite design of experiment is replaced by Taguchi method and response surface methodology is replaced by neural network method. Also a study on the influence of the rolling parameters on system stability has been carried out. By using these combination methods, new set points were determined and significant improvement achieved in rolling speed.

  19. Territorial resources, limits and strategies of local development processes and agri-food productions of quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Romano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to analyse the role that typical products can play in the local development process. Territorial resources involved, limits and strategies for their enhancement are analysed; this analysis will permit both to define the results that have been achieved since nowadays in the local development process and to point out future themes for the research in the field of agricultural economics. The typicality of an agri-food product regards qualitative characteristics that derive from its tie with the territory, this tie becomes a relevant element for the differentiation of the typical product from the others. In this context, the typical product maintains all the specificities associated to its origin, involving also aspects related to the traditions and the culture of the territories, to the collective dimension and to the local knowledge. Consumers tent to look for good which are differentiated and to connect authenticity and local specificity of food with healthiness. Due to the strong socio-economic ties that typical products have with the territory, they play a crucial role in the economy of the local systems and can promote development in lagging areas.

  20. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  1. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-01-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/− 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 104 and 108 CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection. PMID:27231636

  2. Attentional gain and processing capacity limits predict the propensity to neglect unexpected visual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papera, Massimiliano; Richards, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Exogenous allocation of attentional resources allows the visual system to encode and maintain representations of stimuli in visual working memory (VWM). However, limits in the processing capacity to allocate resources can prevent unexpected visual stimuli from gaining access to VWM and thereby to consciousness. Using a novel approach to create unbiased stimuli of increasing saliency, we investigated visual processing during a visual search task in individuals who show a high or low propensity to neglect unexpected stimuli. When propensity to inattention is high, ERP recordings show a diminished amplification concomitantly with a decrease in theta band power during the N1 latency, followed by a poor target enhancement during the N2 latency. Furthermore, a later modulation in the P3 latency was also found in individuals showing propensity to visual neglect, suggesting that more effort is required for conscious maintenance of visual information in VWM. Effects during early stages of processing (N80 and P1) were also observed suggesting that sensitivity to contrasts and medium-to-high spatial frequencies may be modulated by low-level saliency (albeit no statistical group differences were found). In accordance with the Global Workplace Model, our data indicate that a lack of resources in low-level processors and visual attention may be responsible for the failure to "ignite" a state of high-level activity spread across several brain areas that is necessary for stimuli to access awareness. These findings may aid in the development of diagnostic tests and intervention to detect/reduce inattention propensity to visual neglect of unexpected stimuli.

  3. Solar-thermal complex sample processing for nucleic acid based diagnostics in limited resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Abdurrahman; Ahsan, Syed; Dogan, Belgin; Jiang, Li; Snodgrass, Ryan; Gardner, Andrea; Lu, Zhengda; Simpson, Kenneth; Erickson, David

    2016-05-01

    The use of point-of-care (POC) devices in limited resource settings where access to commonly used infrastructure, such as water and electricity, can be restricted represents simultaneously one of the best application fits for POC systems as well as one of the most challenging places to deploy them. Of the many challenges involved in these systems, the preparation and processing of complex samples like stool, vomit, and biopsies are particularly difficult due to the high number and varied nature of mechanical and chemical interferents present in the sample. Previously we have demonstrated the ability to use solar-thermal energy to perform PCR based nucleic acid amplifications. In this work demonstrate how the technique, using similar infrastructure, can also be used to perform solar-thermal based sample processing system for extracting and isolating Vibrio Cholerae nucleic acids from fecal samples. The use of opto-thermal energy enables the use of sunlight to drive thermal lysing reactions in large volumes without the need for external electrical power. Using the system demonstrate the ability to reach a 95°C threshold in less than 5 minutes and maintain a stable sample temperature of +/- 2°C following the ramp up. The system is demonstrated to provide linear results between 10(4) and 10(8) CFU/mL when the released nucleic acids were quantified via traditional means. Additionally, we couple the sample processing unit with our previously demonstrated solar-thermal PCR and tablet based detection system to demonstrate very low power sample-in-answer-out detection.

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ffff of... - Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Continuous Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Continuous Process Vents 1 Table 1 to Subpart FFFF of Part 63 Protection of Environment...—Emission Limits and Work Practice Standards for Continuous Process Vents As required in § 63.2455, you must... continuous process vents: For each . . . For which . . . Then you must . . . 1. Group 1 continuous...

  5. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvvvv... - Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... of Part 63—Emission Limits and Compliance Requirements for Metal HAP Process Vents As required in § 63.11496(f), you must comply with the requirements for metal HAP process vents as shown in...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7890 - What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for process vents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... practice standards must I meet for process vents? 63.7890 Section 63.7890 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Site Remediation Process Vents § 63.7890 What emissions limitations and work practice standards must I meet for process vents? (a) You must control HAP emissions from each new and existing...

  7. Performance of Statistical Control Charts with Bilateral Limits of Probability to Monitor Processes Weibull in Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintana Alicia Esther

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing with optimal quality standards is underpinned to the high reliability of its equipment and systems, among other essential pillars. Maintenance Engineering is responsible for planning control and continuous improvement of its critical equipment by any approach, such as Six Sigma. This is nourished by numerous statistical tools highlighting, among them, statistical process control charts. While their first applications were in production, other designs have emerged to adapt to new needs as monitoring equipment and systems in the manufacturing environment. The time between failures usually fits an exponential or Weibull model. The t chart and adjusted t chart, with probabilistic control limits, are suitable alternatives to monitor the mean time between failures. Unfortunately, it is difficult to find publications of them applied to the models Weibull, very useful in contexts such as maintenance. In addition, literature limits the study of their performance to the analysis of the standard metric average run length, thus giving a partial view. The aim of this paper is to explore the performance of the t chart and adjusted t chart using three metrics, two unconventional. To do this, it incorporates the concept of lateral variability, in their forms left and right variability. Major precisions of the behavior of these charts allow to understand the conditions under which are suitable: if the main objective of monitoring lies in detecting deterioration, the t chart with adjustment is recommended. On the other hand, when the priority is to detect improvements, the t chart without adjustment is the best choice. However, the response speed of both charts is very variable from run to run.

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 of Subpart Aaaaaaa... - Emission Limits for Asphalt Processing (Refining) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... following emission limits * * * 1. Blowing stills a. Limit PAH emissions to 0.003 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills;or b. Limit PM emissions to 1.2 lb/ton of asphalt charged to the blowing stills....

  9. Internationalization Process of Thai Office Furniture Company in India: A case study of Rockworth Public Company Limited

    OpenAIRE

    netwong, weeraya; trakarnthai, priyawat

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the internationalization process by investigate how Rockworth Public Company Limited manage internationalization in Indian market efficiently. Additionally, we aim to improve our understanding and knowledge in international business comprehensively.

  10. Demands, subjectivity and therapeutic process: construction and limitations of Therapeutic Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Felipe Ferro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Psychiatric Reform movement proposed several changes in the field of mental health. Since then, guidelines have been redirecting actions to respond to different demands, associating social inclusion with clinical follow-up. In this context, Therapeutic Accompaniment (TA appears as an important device to compose interventions focused on the demands of individuals with mental disorders. Thus the present work aims to present reflections on the limitations and potentials of TA. This study was based on the practice of TA in the Occupational Therapy Traineeship in Mental Health of the Federal University of Parana - UFPR. Regarding the methodological framework, this paper is structured in a two-way approach: presentation of a case report and exploratory research using unstructured interviews focused on two subjects monitored by TA. Hermeneutic-dialectic analysis was used for data treatment. The results indicate that TA provides significant gains to the process of rehabilitation and construction of citizenship of individuals with mental disorders, enabling actions focused on the demands of the individual, family and community. Nevertheless, there is still the need for continuity of TA interventions, as well as some structural deadlocks that tend to decrease the power of this device.

  11. Processing of metals and dielectric materials with ps-laserpulses: results, strategies, limitations and needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Beat; Bucher, Guido F.; Nussbaum, Christian; Joss, Benjamin; Muralt, Martin; Hunziker, Urs W.; Schuetz, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Ultra short (ps, fs) laser pulses are used, when high requirements concerning accuracy, surface roughness, heat affected zone etc. are demanded for surface structuring. Ps-laser systems that are suited to be operated in industrial environments are of great interest for many practical applications. Here results in the field of 3-d structuring (metals and transparent materials), induced processes and structuring of flexible solar cells will be presented. Beside the pulse duration, which is given by the laser system, the user has a wide variety of optimization parameters such as fluence, repetition rate and wavelength. Based on a simple model it will be shown, that there exist optimum laser parameters to achieve maximum volume ablation rates at a given average power. To take benefit of these optimum parameters and to prevent harmful effects like plasma shielding and surface melting, adapted structuring strategies, depending on the requirements, have to be used. Today's ultra short pulsed systems have average powers from a few W up to a few 10W at high repetition rates. The actual available beam guiding systems are limited and can often not fulfill the requirements needed for high throughput structuring with optimized parameters. Based on the achieved results, the needs for future beam guiding systems will be discussed.

  12. High-throughput process development of chromatography steps: advantages and limitations of different formats used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łącki, Karol M

    2012-10-01

    In the past, development of a chromatographic separation method has been accomplished by performing a series of experiments using either manual or automated chromatography systems. The screening of a vast experimental space became very expensive because all experiments had to be performed in a serial manner, and the chromatography systems used were designed for relatively large columns and, therefore, the experiments required large sample volumes. To address these issues, high-throughput miniaturized methods employing different operating principles and/or formats have been introduced. Herein, a technical review of the most common high-throughput formats used for the development of chromatographic purification steps is presented. The formats considered include minicolumns, prefilled pipette tips, and microtiter filter plates prefilled with chromatography resins. Advantages and limitations of each format are discussed through the prism of chromatographic theory, engineering principles, and known mass-transfer mechanisms. A roadmap for applicability of the different formats for process development purposes and implementation of a Quality by Design initiative for designing/optimization of chromatography steps is also discussed.

  13. Plants control the seasonal dynamics of microbial N cycling in a beech forest soil by belowground C allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Koranda, Marianne; Gorfer, Markus; Stange, Claus F; Kitzler, Barbara; Rasche, Frank; Strauss, Joseph; Sessitsch, Angela; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    Soil microbes in temperate forest ecosystems are able to cycle several hundreds of kilograms of N per hectare per year and are therefore of paramount importance for N retention. Belowground C allocation by trees is an important driver of seasonal microbial dynamics and may thus directly affect N transformation processes over the course of the year. Our study aimed at unraveling plant controls on soil N cycling in a temperate beech forest at a high temporal resolution over a time period of two years, by investigating the effects of tree girdling on microbial N turnover. In both years of the experiment, we discovered (1) a summer N mineralization phase (between July and August) and (2) a winter N immobilization phase (November-February). The summer mineralization phase was characterized by a high N mineralization activity, low microbial N uptake, and a subsequent high N availability in the soil. During the autumn/winter N immobilization phase, gross N mineralization rates were low, and microbial N uptake exceeded microbial N mineralization, which led to high levels of N in the microbial biomass and low N availability in the soil. The observed immobilization phase during the winter may play a crucial role for ecosystem functioning, since it could protect dissolved N that is produced by autumn litter degradation from being lost from the ecosystem during the phase when plants are mostly inactive. The difference between microbial biomass N levels in winter and spring equals 38 kg N/ha and may thus account for almost one-third of the annual plant N demand. Tree girdling strongly affected annual N cycling: the winter N immobilization phase disappeared in girdled plots (microbial N uptake and microbial biomass N were significantly reduced, while the amount of available N in the soil solution was enhanced). This was correlated to a reduced fungal abundance in autumn in girdled plots. By releasing recently fixed photosynthates to the soil, plants may thus actively control the

  14. Belowground responses to elevation in a changing cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looby, Caitlin I; Maltz, Mia R; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have investigated how soil fungal communities respond to elevation, especially within TMCF (tropical montane cloud forests). We used an elevation gradient in a TMCF in Costa Rica to determine how soil properties, processes, and community composition of fungi change in response to elevation and across seasons. As elevation increased, soil temperature and soil pH decreased, while soil moisture and soil C:N ratios increased with elevation. Responses of these properties varied seasonally. Fungal abundance increased with elevation during wet and dry seasons. Fungal community composition shifted in response to elevation, and to a lesser extent by season. These shifts were accompanied by varying responses of important fungal functional groups during the wet season and the relative abundance of certain fungal phyla. We suggest that elevation and the responses of certain fungal functional groups may be structuring fungal communities along this elevation gradient. TMCF are ecosystems that are rapidly changing due to climate change. Our study suggests that these changes may affect how fungal communities are structured. PMID:27066220

  15. Linking Above- and Belowground Dynamics in Tropical Urban Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, E. E.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary forests that emerge after a long history of agriculture can have altered plant community composition and relative abundances of different species. These forests can look and behave differently compared to pre-agricultural forests due changes in primary productivity, resource allocation, and phenology, which can significantly affect processes such as carbon accumulation and nutrient availability. Our research explores how alternative successional trajectories following intensive agricultural use affect linkages among the establishment of novel plant communities, soil nutrient availability and turnover, and soil microbial community composition and function. We hypothesize that different plant species composition due to differing land use legacies and successional trajectories would drive changes in soil microbial community structure and function, affecting soil C and N chemistry and turnover. We conducted this research in the subtropical dry forest life zone of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands where island-wide abandonment of sugarcane resulted in a mosaic of sites in different stages of forest succession. We identified replicate sites with the following post-sugarcane trajectories: 1) natural forest regeneration, 2) low intensity pasture use, followed by reforestation with timber plantation, which are no longer being managed, 3) high intensity pasture use and recent natural forest regeneration, and 4) high intensity pasture use and current active grazing. During 2011-2013, we sampled soils seasonally (0-10 cm) and measured tree species composition. The successional trajectories showed distinct tree species composition. The first two trajectories yielded 40-year old mixed-species secondary forest, dominated by the dry forest tree species Melicoccus bijugatas, Guapira fragrans, Maniklara zapota, and Sideroxylon foetidissimum. The tree species Melicoccus bijugatas primarily drove differences between the first two trajectories (natural forest regeneration vs

  16. Invasive plant suppresses the growth of native tree seedlings by disrupting belowground mutualisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A Stinson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of exotic species on native organisms is widely acknowledged, but poorly understood. Very few studies have empirically investigated how invading plants may alter delicate ecological interactions among resident species in the invaded range. We present novel evidence that antifungal phytochemistry of the invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, a European invader of North American forests, suppresses native plant growth by disrupting mutualistic associations between native canopy tree seedlings and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Our results elucidate an indirect mechanism by which invasive plants can impact native flora, and may help explain how this plant successfully invades relatively undisturbed forest habitat.

  17. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

    2012-04-18

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  18. Vegetation drives belowground biogeochemical gradients and C accumulation in an ombrotrophic bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Galka, Mariusz; Borken, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Peat decomposition and C accumulation is determined by hydrology and climate and by concomitant changes in vegetation and changes in the quality of carbon inputs. Especially changes from moss dominated to vascular plant dominated vegetation affect belowground biogeochemistry and decomposition, as Sphagnum mosses provide refractory, nutrient poor litter, while vascular plants produce more labile litter and may have aerenchymatic rooting systems. In-site variability in moisture and vegetation, e.g. hummock-hollow structures, lawns, and medium scale surface topography, could thus cause large differences in decomposition and C accumulation within a site. In order to understand within-site variability and to see how C accumulation, common decomposition indices, and major biogeochemical parameters in the pore waters are affected by site specific conditions and vegetation, we investigated a moisture-vegetation gradient along a 800 m transect in an oceanic, ombrotrophic bog in Southern Patagonia. Along the transect, conditions changed from wet, Sphagnum dominated (S. magellanicum), to intermediate drier and wetter with Sphagnum/shrubs mixtures, sedges and rushes to more wind exposed, dominated by cushion plants (mainly Astelia pumila). We hypothesized that under arenchymatic vascular plants, decomposition is enhanced and C accumulation is decreased. Vegetation development was elucidated by plant macrofossils and carbon accumulation was attributed to the respective vegetation. The transect demonstrated a high variability of depth records within the bog. At the two most contrasting sites, the uppermost 1 meter persistently dominated by either Sphagnum magellanicum or Astelia pumila had accumulated over 2400 or 4200 years, respectively. Accordingly, the peat under cushion plants was much more decomposed, with C/N ratios of 20-50 compared to C/N ratios of 40-80 under Sphagnum patches. Mixed sites in between had C/N ratios of 30-90, depending on plant community, and

  19. Above- and belowground biomass in relation to envi- ronmental factors in temperate grasslands, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Above- and belowground biomasses of grasslands are important parameters for characterizing re- gional and global carbon cycles in grassland ecosystems. Compared with the relatively detailed in- formation for aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) is poorly reported at the re- gional scales. The present study, based on a total of 113 sampling sites in temperate grassland of the Inner Mongolia, investigated regional distribution patterns of AGB, BGB, vertical distribution of roots, and their relationships with environmental factors. AGB and BGB increased from the southwest to the northeast of the study region. The largest biomass occurred in meadow steppe, with mean AGB and BGB of 196.7 and 1385.2 g/m2, respectively; while the lowest biomass occurred in desert steppe, with an AGB of 56.6 g/m2 and a BGB of 301.0 g/m2. In addition, about 47% of root biomass was distributed in the top 10 cm soil. Further statistical analysis indicated that precipitation was the primary determinant factor in shaping these distribution patterns. Vertical distribution of roots was significantly affected by precipitation, while the effects of soil texture and grassland types were weak.

  20. Above- and belowground biomass in relation to environmental factors in temperate grasslands, Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA WenHong; YANG YuanHe; HE JinSheng; ZENG Hui; FANG JingYun

    2008-01-01

    Above- and belowground biomasses of grasslands are important parameters for characterizing regional and global carbon cycles in grassland ecosystems. Compared with the relatively detailed information for aboveground biomass (AGB), belowground biomass (BGB) Is poorly reported at the regional scales. The present study, based on a total of 113 sampling sites in temperate grassland of the Inner Mongolia, investigated regional distribution patterns of AGB, BGB, vertical distribution of roots,and their relationships with environmental factors. AGB and BGB increased from the southwest to the northeast of the study region. The largest biomass occurred in meadow steppe, with mean AGB and BGB of 196.7 and 1385.2 g/m2, respectively; while the lowest biomass occurred in desert steppe, with an AGB of 56.6 g/m2 and a BGB of 301.0 g/m2. In addition, about 47% of root biomass was distributed in the top 10 cm soil. Further statistical analysis indicated that precipitation was the primary determinant factor in shaping these distribution patterns. Vertical distribution of roots was significantly affected by precipitation, while the effects of soil texture and grassland types were weak.

  1. Soil abiotic factors influence interactions between belowground herbivores and plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Matthias; Lu, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Root herbivores are important ecosystem drivers and agricultural pests, and, possibly as a consequence, plants protect their roots using a variety of defensive strategies. One aspect that distinguishes belowground from aboveground plant-insect interactions is that roots are constantly exposed to a set of soil-specific abiotic factors. These factors can profoundly influence root resistance, and, consequently, the outcome of the interaction with belowground feeders. In this review, we synthesize the current literature on the impact of soil moisture, nutrients, and texture on root-herbivore interactions. We show that soil abiotic factors influence the interaction by modulating herbivore abundance and behaviour, root growth and resistance, beneficial microorganisms, as well as natural enemies of the herbivores. We suggest that abiotic heterogeneity may explain the high variability that is often encountered in root-herbivore systems. We also propose that under abiotic stress, the relative fitness value of the roots and the potential negative impact of herbivory increases, which may lead to a higher defensive investment and an increased recruitment of beneficial microorganisms by the plant. At the same time, both root-feeding herbivores and natural enemies are likely to decrease in abundance under extreme environmental conditions, leading to a context- and species-specific impact on plant fitness. Only by using tightly controlled experiments that include soil abiotic heterogeneity will it be possible to understand the impact of root feeders on an ecosystem scale and to develop predictive models for pest occurrence and impact.

  2. Belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities respond to liming in three southern Swedish coniferous forest stands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Clemmensen, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently sa...... community composition. We discuss the observed community changes in relation to ectomycorrhizal functionality and biodiversity in limed forests.......In this study we report on changes in the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal communities in southern Swedish coniferous forests as a consequence of liming with 3-7 ton limestone per hectare 16 years prior to the study. A total of 107 ectomycorrhizal fungi were identified from 969 independently...... sampled root tips by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA. Forty, 59 and 51 species were identified in three pine and spruce forests. Within all sites only about 25% of the species overlapped between the limed and the reference areas. However, the most abundant species...

  3. The fungal endophyte Chaetomium globosum negatively affects both above- and belowground herbivores in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqing; Starr, James L; Krumm, Janice L; Sword, Gregory A

    2016-10-01

    Mutualistic plant-endophyte symbioses can benefit plants by increasing host fitness through reductions in herbivory. The fungus, Chaetomium globosum strain TAMU 520, was previously isolated as an endophyte from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and can be re-inoculated to systemically colonize cotton plants via seed treatment. We evaluated the potential impacts of the endophyte in cotton on plant parasitic nematodes belowground, along with piercing-sucking and chewing insects aboveground. Endophytic C. globosum inhibited root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) infection and reduced female reproduction belowground. To confirm the endophytic effect of C. globosum on root-knot nematode, a contact fungicide was applied to remove soil-borne and epiphytic C. globosum Consistent inhibition of nematode activity was observed post-fungicide treatment, with positive C. globosum colonization confirmed within plant tissues. Aboveground, endophytic C. globosum also negatively affected the fecundity of both cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii) and beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua). Faster development rates and smaller head capsule of beet armyworm larvae were observed when fed Chaetomium-colonized plants. However, no larval weight difference was found between Chaetomium-colonized and control plants. No consistent effect on plant performance was found across experiments. Our findings illustrate how a single facultative fungal endophyte can increase plant systemic resistance against a range of invertebrate herbivores in a major crop. PMID:27451418

  4. A new conceptual framework for unifying the heterogeneity of plant-microbe interactions in forests by linking belowground measurements with large-scale modeling and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Phillips, R.; Fisher, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Recognition of the importance of rhizosphere interactions to ecosystem processes has led to efforts to integrate these dynamics into a conceptual framework that can be tested, refined and applied across spatial scales. A new view suggests that a plant's mycorrhizal association represents a "trait integrator" for a suite of aboveground and belowground functional traits involved in coupling C-nutrient cycles, since nearly all plants associate with a single type of mycorrhizal fungi. The MANE framework predicts that tree species that associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi differ from trees that associate with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi in a suite of functional traits, and that such differences contribute to unique "biogeochemical syndromes" in forests with varying abundances of AM- and ECM-associated trees. To date, we have found that relative to AM trees, the leaf litter of ECM trees decomposes nearly 50% more slowly; as such, the nutrient economy of ECM-dominated stands is driven by organic forms of N and P whereas the nutrient economy of AM-dominated stands in driven by inorganic forms of N and P. Moreover, differences in the nutrient economies between AM- and ECM-dominated stands can affect the carbon (C) cost of nutrient acquisition. For example, while ECM trees allocate 2-3-fold more C to fine roots and mycorrhizal fungi, this greater investment results in the enhanced activity of enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) from soil organic matter, and ultimately the greater uptake of nutrients by plants. However, this enhanced uptake by ECM trees comes at a cost to soil organic C, which declines as a function of root-accelerated N mineralization. By incorporating these dynamics into a coupled nutrient acquisition-microbial decomposition model, and scaling these processes following development of a map of mycorrhizal associations, we are now quantifying how belowground processes shape ecosystem sensitivity to global changes (e.g., rising CO

  5. Central limit approximations for Markov population processes with countably many types

    CERN Document Server

    Barbour, A D

    2012-01-01

    When modelling metapopulation dynamics, the influence of a single patch on the metapopulation depends on the number of individuals in the patch. Since there is usually no obvious natural upper limit on the number of individuals in a patch, this leads to systems in which there are countably infinitely many possible types of entity. Analogous considerations apply in the transmission of parasitic diseases. In this paper, we prove central limit theorems for quite general systems of this kind, together with bounds on the rate of convergence in an appropriately chosen weighted $\\ell_1$ norm.

  6. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NOx control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NOx removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNOx operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  7. 25 CFR 700.245 - Time limits on processing of initial requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public holidays) after receipt of a request. This determination shall be communicated immediately to the..., but in no case may the time limit be extended for more than ten (10) working days: (1) The need to... of the running of the twenty (20) working-day appeal period set out in § 700.247. If a...

  8. 78 FR 78954 - Extension of Comment Period for the Alaska Seafood Processing Effluent Limitation Guidelines...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ...-2013-0652, by one of the following methods: Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov... consider your comment. Electronic files should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption... Limitations Guidelines Notice of Data Availability in the Federal Register (78 FR 66916). In the notice...

  9. Information-Limited Parallel Processing in Difficult Heterogeneous Covert Visual Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Difficult visual search is often attributed to time-limited serial attention operations, although neural computations in the early visual system are parallel. Using probabilistic search models (Dosher, Han, & Lu, 2004) and a full time-course analysis of the dynamics of covert visual search, we distinguish unlimited capacity parallel versus serial…

  10. Strategic environmental assessment and the limits to rationality in decision making processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørnøv, Lone

    The paper focueses on the subject of rationality in decision making processes and the implications for the integration of SEA.......The paper focueses on the subject of rationality in decision making processes and the implications for the integration of SEA....

  11. Moderate deviations and functional limits for random processes with stationary and independent increments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Fuqing

    2006-01-01

    We first give a functional moderate deviation principle for random processes with stationary and independent increments under the Ledoux's condition.Then we apply the result to laws of the iterated logarithm.

  12. REPRESENTATION OF ADDITIVE FUNCTIONALS AND LOCAL TIMES FOR JUMP MARKOV PROCESSES AND THEIR FUNCTIONAL LIMIT THEOREM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋义文; 刘禄勤

    2003-01-01

    The representation of additive functionals and local times for jump Markovprocesses are obtained. The results of uniformly functional moderate deviation and theirapplications to birth-death processes are also presented.

  13. Interactions between above- and belowground biota: importance for small-scale vegetation mosaics in a grassland ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blomqvist, M.M.; Olff, H.; Blaauw, M.B.; Bongers, T.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    Grasslands are often characterised by small-scale mosaics in plant community composition that contribute to their diversity. Although above- and belowground biota can both cause such mosaics, few studies have addressed their interacting effects. We studied multi-trophic interactions between abovegro

  14. Large graph limit for an SIR process in random network with heterogeneous connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Decreusefond, Laurent; Moyal, Pascal; Tran, Viet Chi

    2010-01-01

    We consider an SIR epidemic model propagating on a Configuration Model network, where the degree distribution of the vertices is given and where the edges are randomly matched. The evolution of the epidemic is summed up into three measure-valued equations that describe the degrees of the susceptible individuals and the number of edges from an infectious or removed individual to the set of susceptibles. These three degree distributions are sufficient to describe the course of the disease. The limit in large population is investigated. As a corollary, this provides a rigorous proof of the equations obtained by Volz (2008).

  15. Limitation of the EIA Process for the assessment of nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, B.L.; Kuhn, R.G. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Geography

    1999-12-01

    The Canadian environmental impact assessment process for the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management and Disposal Concept was completed in 1994. Almost four years later, in February 1998, the Review Panel released its report. The viewpoints of those who participated in the assessment process is archived in the thousands of pages of hearing testimony, meeting transcripts and written briefs. One of the most contentious issues raised, and one that continues to plague management in Canada, is the debate surrounding how the problem of NFW waste management should be defined. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the problem frame of the Canadian NFW management disposal concept EIS. This will be accomplished through an analysis of stakeholder participation and views, and through an evaluation of the range and nature of the information considered legitimate or constrained in the Canadian process.

  16. Chiral Phosphinate Degradation by the Fusarium Species: Scope and Limitation of the Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Kmiecik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable capacities of fungal strains of Fusarium oxysporum (DSMZ 2018 and Fusarium culmorum (DSMZ 1094 were tested towards racemic mixture of chiral 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl acetic acid—a compound with two stereogenic centres. The effectiveness of decomposition was dependent on external factors such as temperature and time of the process. Optimal conditions of complete mineralization were established. Both Fusarium species were able to biodegrade every isomer of tested compound at 30°C, but F. culmorum required 10 days and F. oxysporum 11 days to accomplish the process, which was continuously monitored using the 31P NMR technique.

  17. Chiral Phosphinate Degradation by the Fusarium Species: Scope and Limitation of the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezińska-Rodak, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable capacities of fungal strains of Fusarium oxysporum (DSMZ 2018) and Fusarium culmorum (DSMZ 1094) were tested towards racemic mixture of chiral 2-hydroxy-2-(ethoxyphenylphosphinyl) acetic acid—a compound with two stereogenic centres. The effectiveness of decomposition was dependent on external factors such as temperature and time of the process. Optimal conditions of complete mineralization were established. Both Fusarium species were able to biodegrade every isomer of tested compound at 30°C, but F. culmorum required 10 days and F. oxysporum 11 days to accomplish the process, which was continuously monitored using the 31P NMR technique. PMID:24324893

  18. Plant-Mediated Systemic Interactions Between Pathogens, Parasitic Nematodes, and Herbivores Above- and Belowground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biere, Arjen; Goverse, Aska

    2016-08-01

    Plants are important mediators of interactions between aboveground (AG) and belowground (BG) pathogens, arthropod herbivores, and nematodes (phytophages). We highlight recent progress in our understanding of within- and cross-compartment plant responses to these groups of phytophages in terms of altered resource dynamics and defense signaling and activation. We review studies documenting the outcome of cross-compartment interactions between these phytophage groups and show patterns of cross-compartment facilitation as well as cross-compartment induced resistance. Studies involving soilborne pathogens and foliar nematodes are scant. We further highlight the important role of defense signaling loops between shoots and roots to activate a full resistance complement. Moreover, manipulation of such loops by phytophages affects systemic interactions with other plant feeders. Finally, cross-compartment-induced changes in root defenses and root exudates extend systemic defense loops into the rhizosphere, enhancing or reducing recruitment of microbes that induce systemic resistance but also affecting interactions with root-feeding phytophages. PMID:27359367

  19. Above-belowground interactions govern the course and impact of biological invasions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Mette; Rønn, Regin; Ekelund, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    in an evolutionary and ecological context; in the case of invasive plants, we must have a major focus on above-belowground interactions. Thus, we discuss different theories that have been proposed to explain the course of invasions through interactions between plants and soil organisms. Further, a thorough analysis......Introduction of exotic organisms that subsequently become invasive is considered a serious threat to global biodiversity, and both scientists and nature-conservationists attempt to find explanations and means to meet this challenge. This requires a thorough analysis of the invasion phenomenon...... of invasion must include a temporal context. Invasions will typically include an initial acute phase, where the invader expands its territory and a later chronic phase where equilibrium is re-established. Many studies fail to make this distinction, which is unfortunate as it makes it impossible to thoroughly...

  20. Codigestion of manure and industrial organic waste at centralized biogas plants: process imbalances and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsø Nielsen, Henrik; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    conditions) and high fractions of industrial waste in the feedstock was also observed. The process imbalances and suboptimal conditions are mainly allowed to occur due to 1) inadequate knowledge about the waste composition, 2) inadequate knowledge about the waste degradation characteristics, 3) inadequate...

  1. Pre-processing SAR image stream to facilitate compression for transport on bandwidth-limited-link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Bobby G.; Riley, Robert

    2015-09-29

    Pre-processing is applied to a raw VideoSAR (or similar near-video rate) product to transform the image frame sequence into a product that resembles more closely the type of product for which conventional video codecs are designed, while sufficiently maintaining utility and visual quality of the product delivered by the codec.

  2. Am/Cm melter processing limitations evaluation for product loading extremes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six vitrification runs were conducted in the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM5) to evaluate the system's ability to process potential product loading extremes that may be encountered during Am/Cm vitrification in the F-Canyon MPPF. This evaluation demonstrates the CIM5 system's ability to vitrify feed streams of the specified extremes

  3. Quantifying planetary limits of Earth system processes relevant to human activity using a thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Food, water, and energy play, obviously, a central role in maintaining human activity. In this contribution, I derive estimates for the fundamental limits on the rates by which these resources are provided by Earth system processes and the levels at which these can be used sustainably. The key idea here is that these resources are, directly or indirectly, generated out of the energy associated with the absorption of sunlight, and that the energy conversions from sunlight to other forms ultimately limit the generation of these resources. In order to derive these conversion limits, we need to trace the links between the processes that generate food, water and energy to the absorption of sunlight. The resource "food" results from biomass production by photosynthesis, which requires light and a sufficient magnitude of gas exchange of carbon dioxide at the surface, which is maintained by atmospheric motion which in turn is generated out of differential radiative heating and cooling. The resource "water" is linked to hydrologic cycling, with its magnitude being linked to the latent heat flux of the surface energy balance and water vapor transport in the atmosphere which is also driven by differential radiative heating and cooling. The availability of (renewable) energy is directly related to the generation of different forms of energy of climate system processes, such as the kinetic energy of atmospheric motion, which, again, relates to radiative heating differences. I use thermodynamics and its limits as a basis to establish the planetary limits of these processes and use a simple model to derive first-order estimates. These estimates compare quite well with observations, suggesting that this thermodynamic view of the whole Earth system provides an objective, physical basis to define and quantify planetary boundaries as well as the factors that shape these boundaries.

  4. Above- and belowground fluxes of CH4 from boreal shrubs and Scots pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmeenmäki, Elisa; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Santalahti, Minna; Putkinen, Anuliina; Fritze, Hannu; Pihlatie, Mari

    2016-04-01

    Boreal upland forests are considered as an important sink for the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) due to CH4 oxidizing microbes in the soil. However, recent evidence suggests that vegetation can act as a significant source of CH4. Also, preliminary measurements indicate occasional emissions of CH4 above the tree canopies of a boreal forest. Nevertheless, the sources and the mechanisms of the observed CH4 emissions are still mostly unknown. Furthermore, the majority of CH4 flux studies have been conducted with the soil chamber method, thus not considering the role of the vegetation itself. We conducted a laboratory experiment to study separately the above- and belowground CH4 fluxes of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea), heather (Calluna vulgaris), and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), which were grown in microcosms. The above- and belowground fluxes of the plants were measured separately, and these fluxes were compared to fluxes of microcosms containing only humus soil. In addition to the flux measurements, we analysed the CH4 producing archaea (methanogens) and the CH4 consuming bacteria (methanotrophs) with the qPCR method to discover whether these microbes contribute to the CH4 exchange from the plant material and the soil. The results of the flux measurements indicate that the humus soil with roots of lingonberry, heather, and Scots pine consume CH4 compared to bare humus soil. Simultaneously, the shoots of heather and Scots pine emit small amounts of CH4. We did not find detectable amounts of methanogens from any of the samples, suggesting the produced CH4 could be of non-microbial origin, or produced by very small population of methanogens. Based on the first preliminary results, methanotrophs were present in all the studied plant species, and especially in high amounts in the rooted soils, thus implying that the methanotrophs could be responsible of the CH4 uptake in the root-soil systems.

  5. Transient kinetics and rate limiting steps for the processive cellobiohydrolase Cel7A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Hirosuke, Tatsumi; Robin Ren, Guilin;

    2013-01-01

    times of 0.15 - 0.7 s per step at 25 °C, and the rate was highest on amorphous substrate. The cellulose binding module (CBM) was found to raise this rate on crystalline, but not on amorphous substrate. The rapid processive movement signified high intrinsic reactivity, but this parameter had marginal...... mechanistic and regulatory aspects of their heterogeneous catalysis remain poorly understood. Here we address this by applying a deterministic model to real-time kinetic data with high temporal resolution. We used two variants of the cellobiohydrolase Cel7A from H. jecorina, and three types of cellulose...... as substrate. Analysis of the pre-steady state regime allowed delineation rate constants for both fast and slow steps in the enzymatic cycle and assessment of how these constants influenced the rate of hydrolysis at quasi-steady state. Processive movement on the cellulose strand advanced with characteristic...

  6. Psychophysical Estimates of Frequency Discrimination: More than Just Limitations of Auditory Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Beate Sabisch; Benjamin Weiss; Barry, Johanna G.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient auditory processing is hypothesized to support language and literacy development. However, behavioral tasks used to assess this hypothesis need to be robust to non-auditory specific individual differences. This study compared frequency discrimination abilities in a heterogeneous sample of adults using two different psychoacoustic task designs, referred to here as: 2I_6A_X and 3I_2AFC designs. The role of individual differences in nonverbal IQ (NVIQ), socioeconomic status (SES) and m...

  7. Kappa Distribution in a Homogeneous Medium: Adiabatic Limit of a Super-diffusive Process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, I.

    2015-12-01

    The classical statistical theory predicts that an ergodic, weakly interacting system like charged particles in the presence of electromagnetic fields, performing Brownian motions (characterized by small range deviations in phase space and short-term microscopic memory), converges into the Gibbs-Boltzmann statistics. Observation of distributions with a kappa-power-law tails in homogeneous systems contradicts this prediction and necessitates a renewed analysis of the basic axioms of the diffusion process: characteristics of the transition probability density function (pdf) for a single interaction, with a possibility of non-Markovian process and non-local interaction. The non-local, Levy walk deviation is related to the non-extensive statistical framework. Particles bouncing along (solar) magnetic field with evolving pitch angles, phases and velocities, as they interact resonantly with waves, undergo energy changes at undetermined time intervals, satisfying these postulates. The dynamic evolution of a general continuous time random walk is determined by pdf of jumps and waiting times resulting in a fractional Fokker-Planck equation with non-integer derivatives whose solution is given by a Fox H-function. The resulting procedure involves the known, although not frequently used in physics fractional calculus, while the local, Markovian process recasts the evolution into the standard Fokker-Planck equation. Solution of the fractional Fokker-Planck equation with the help of Mellin transform and evaluation of its residues at the poles of its Gamma functions results in a slowly converging sum with power laws. It is suggested that these tails form the Kappa function. Gradual vs impulsive solar electron distributions serve as prototypes of this description.

  8. Conversion of organic micropollutants with limited bromate formation during the Peroxone process in drinking water treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Knol, A.H.; Lekkerkerker-Teunissen, K.; C. J. Houtman; Scheideler, J.; Ried, A.; Van Dijk, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced oxidation with O3/H2O2 (peroxone) is conducted on pilot plant scale on pre-treated Meuse river water to investigate the conversion of organic micropollutants (OMPs) and the formation of bromate. Fourteen selected model compounds are dosed to the pre-treated river water on a regular basis to assess the efficiency of the peroxone process and to establish the influence of the water matrix. The height of the ozone dose is the main factor in the conversion of t...

  9. Minkowski space is locally the Noldus limit of Poisson process causets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, Jan

    2016-09-01

    A Poisson process {P}λ on {{{R}}}d with causal structure inherited from the the usual Minkowski metric on {{{R}}}d has a normalised discrete causal distance {D}λ (x,y) given by the height of the longest causal chain normalised by {λ }1/d{c}d. We prove that {P}λ restricted to a compact set Q converges in probability in the sense of Noldus (2004 Class. Quantum Grav. 21 839–50) to Q with the Minkowski metric.

  10. Hilbert-space factorization is a limited and expensive information-processing resource

    CERN Document Server

    Fields, Chris

    2014-01-01

    By taking the need for quantum reference frames into account, it is shown that Hilbert-space factorization is a dissipative process requiring on the order of kT to reduce by one bit an observer's uncertainty in the provenance of a classically-recorded observational outcome. This cost is neglected in standard treatments of decoherence that assume that observational outcomes are obtained by interacting with a collection of degrees of freedom identified a priori. Treating this cost explicitly leads to a natural measure of the probability of any particular quantum reference frame.

  11. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  12. Nutrient limitation on ecosystem productivity and processes of mature and old-growth subtropical forests in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enqing Hou

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is considered the dominant limiting nutrient in temperate regions, while phosphorus (P limitation frequently occurs in tropical regions, but in subtropical regions nutrient limitation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated N and P contents and N:P ratios of foliage, forest floors, fine roots and mineral soils, and their relationships with community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate, and microbial processes in eight mature and old-growth subtropical forests (stand age >80 yr at Dinghushan Biosphere Reserve, China. Average N:P ratios (mass based in foliage, litter (L layer and mixture of fermentation and humus (F/H layer, and fine roots were 28.3, 42.3, 32.0 and 32.7, respectively. These values are higher than the critical N:P ratios for P limitation proposed (16-20 for foliage, ca. 25 for forest floors. The markedly high N:P ratios were mainly attributed to the high N concentrations of these plant materials. Community biomass, litterfall C, N and P productions, forest floor turnover rate and microbial properties were more strongly related to measures of P than N and frequently negatively related to the N:P ratios, suggesting a significant role of P availability in determining ecosystem production and productivity and nutrient cycling at all the study sites except for one prescribed disturbed site where N availability may also be important. We propose that N enrichment is probably a significant driver of the potential P limitation in the study area. Low P parent material may also contribute to the potential P limitation. In general, our results provided strong evidence supporting a significant role for P availability, rather than N availability, in determining ecosystem primary productivity and ecosystem processes in subtropical forests of China.

  13. Quasi-Resonant Nonlinear Absorption for Optical Power Limiting: solgel-Processed Er(3+)-Doped Multicomponent Silica Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, G S; Biswas, A; Friend, C S; Prasad, P N

    2000-05-20

    We demonstrate optical power limiting by what we believe to be a new mechanism of nonlinear absorption, which involves a quasi-resonant ground-state absorption that is either phonon assisted or assisted by the presence of defect sites (tail absorption). Such a mechanism provides high transmittance at low intensity yet optical limiting under cw conditions. The sample used was a novel solgel-processed Er(3+)-doped multicomponent silica glass. In this system the nonlinear absorption process is achieved because the resonant excited-state ((4)I(13/2) ? (4)S(3/2)) absorption cross section is larger than the quasi-resonant ground-state ((4)I(15/2) ? (4)I(9/2)) absorption cross section. PMID:18345156

  14. Psychophysical Estimates of Frequency Discrimination: More than Just Limitations of Auditory Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Sabisch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Efficient auditory processing is hypothesized to support language and literacy development. However, behavioral tasks used to assess this hypothesis need to be robust to non-auditory specific individual differences. This study compared frequency discrimination abilities in a heterogeneous sample of adults using two different psychoacoustic task designs, referred to here as: 2I_6A_X and 3I_2AFC designs. The role of individual differences in nonverbal IQ (NVIQ, socioeconomic status (SES and musical experience in predicting frequency discrimination thresholds on each task were assessed using multiple regression analyses. The 2I_6A_X task was more cognitively demanding and hence more susceptible to differences specifically in SES and musical training. Performance on this task did not, however, relate to nonword repetition ability (a measure of language learning capacity. The 3I_2AFC task, by contrast, was only susceptible to musical training. Moreover, thresholds measured using it predicted some variance in nonword repetition performance. This design thus seems suitable for use in studies addressing questions regarding the role of auditory processing in supporting language and literacy development.

  15. Possibilities and limitations of digital speckle pattern interferometry in the analysis of corrosion processes in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) has been applied to evaluate corrosion levels in the surface of a copper electrode while immersed in a 0.1M CuSO4 solution. The corrosion process has been induced by applying an electrical current between two such metallic Cu electrodes. The corrosion process can induce changes not only in the electrode surface but also in the solution refractive index. Different DSPI experimental setups have been proposed for evaluating both contributions and removing the refractive index contribution. Surface changes on the electrode as measured by DSPI have been compared with topography data obtained by confocal microscopy. Confocal microscopy data have shown that the corrosion process occurs at small scales. The possibilities and limitations of DSPI for measuring such non-uniform corrosion processes have been analyzed. (paper)

  16. Study of the $W^+ W^- \\gamma$ Process and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Boson Couplings at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Violini, P; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    The process e+e- --> W+ W- \\gamma is studied using the data collected by the L3 detector at LEP. New results, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427.4 pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies from 192~GeV to 207~GeV, are presented. The W+W-\\gamma cross sections are measured to be in agreement with Standard Model expectations. No hints of anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings are observed. Limits at 95\\% confidence level are derived using also the process e+e- --> \

  17. A Stringent Limit on the Mass Production Rate of $r$-Process Elements in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Macias, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    We analyze data from several studies of metal-poor stars in the Milky Way, focusing on both strong (Eu) and weak (Sr) $r$-process elements. Because these elements were injected in an explosion, we calculate the mass swept up when the blast wave first becomes radiative, yielding a lower limit for the dilution of such elements and hence a lower limit on the ejecta mass which is incorporated into the next generation of stars. Our study demonstrates that in order to explain the largest enhancements in [Eu/Fe] observed in stars at low [Fe/H] metallicities, individual $r$-process production events must synthesize a minimum of $10^{-3.5} M_{\\odot}$ of $r$-process material. We also show that if the site of Mg production is the same as that of Eu, individual injection events must synthesize up to $ \\sim 10^{-3} M_{\\odot}$ of $r$-process material. On the other hand, demanding that Sr traces Mg production results in $r$-process masses per event of $\\sim 10^{-5} M_{\\odot}$. This suggests that the astrophysical sites resp...

  18. Some limitations of detailed balance for inverse reaction calculations in the astrophysical p-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1990-12-05

    p-Process modeling of some rare but stable proton-rich nuclei requires knowledge of a variety of neutron, charged particle, and photonuclear reaction rates at temperatures of 2 to 3 {times} 10{sup 9} {degrees}K. Detailed balance is usually invoked to obtain the stellar photonuclear rates, in spite of a number of well-known constraints. In this work we attempt to calculate directly the stellar rates for ({gamma},n) and ({gamma},{alpha}) reactions on {sup 151}Eu. These are compared with stellar rates obtained from detailed balance, using the same input parameters for the stellar (n,{gamma}) and ({alpha},{gamma}) reactions on {sup 150}Eu and {sup 147}Pm, respectively. The two methods yielded somewhat different results, which will be discussed along with some sensitivity studies. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Berry-Esseen's central limit theorem for non-causal linear processes in Hilbert space

    CERN Document Server

    Machkouri, Mohamed EL

    2010-01-01

    Let $H$ be a real separable Hilbert space and $(a_k)_{k\\in\\mathbb{Z}}$ a sequence of bounded linear operators from $H$ to $H$. We consider the linear process $X$ defined for any $k$ in $\\mathbb{Z}$ by $X_k=\\sum_{j\\in\\mathbb{Z}}a_j(\\varepsilon_{k-j})$ where $(\\varepsilon_k)_{k\\in\\mathbb{Z}}$ is a sequence of i.i.d. centered $H$-valued random variables. We investigate the rate of convergence in the CLT for $X$ and in particular we obtain the usual Berry-Esseen's bound provided that $\\sum_{j\\in\\mathbb{Z}}\\vert j\\vert\\|a_j\\|_{\\mathcal{L}(H)}<+\\infty$ and $\\varepsilon_0$ belongs to $L_H^{\\infty}$.

  20. Conditional limit theorems for intermediately subcritical branching processes in random environment

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasyev, Valeriy; Kersting, Götz; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    For a branching process in random environment it is assumed that the offspring distribution of the individuals varies in a random fashion, independently from one generation to the other. For the subcritical regime a kind of phase transition appears. In this paper we study the intermediately subcritical case, which constitutes the borderline within this phase transition. We study the asymptotic behavior of the survival probability. Next the size of the population and the shape of the random environment conditioned on non-extinction is examined. Finally we show that conditioned on non-extinction periods of small and large population sizes alternate. This kind of 'bottleneck' behavior appears under the annealed approach only in the intermediately subcritical case.

  1. Copper accumulation in vineyard soils: Rhizosphere processes and agronomic practices to limit its toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetto, Gustavo; Bastos de Melo, George Wellington; Terzano, Roberto; Del Buono, Daniele; Astolfi, Stefania; Tomasi, Nicola; Pii, Youry; Mimmo, Tanja; Cesco, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Viticulture represents an important agricultural practice in many countries worldwide. Yet, the continuous use of fungicides has caused copper (Cu) accumulation in soils, which represent a major environmental and toxicological concern. Despite being an important micronutrient, Cu can be a potential toxicant at high concentrations since it may cause morphological, anatomical and physiological changes in plants, decreasing both food productivity and quality. Rhizosphere processes can, however, actively control the uptake and translocation of Cu in plants. In particular, root exudates affecting the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of the rhizosphere, might reduce the availability of Cu in the soil and hence its absorption. In addition, this review will aim at discussing the advantages and disadvantages of agronomic practices, such as liming, the use of pesticides, the application of organic matter, biochar and coal fly ashes, the inoculation with bacteria and/or mycorrhizal fungi and the intercropping, in alleviating Cu toxicity symptoms. PMID:27513550

  2. Modifications of alpha processing software to improve calculation of limits for qualitative detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The work described in this report was done for the Bioassay Counting Laboratory (BCL) of the Center of Excellence for Bioassay of the Analytical Services Organization at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. BCL takes urine and fecal samples and tests for alpha radiation. An automated system, supplied by Canberra Industries, counts the activities in the samples and processes the results. The Canberra system includes hardware and software. The managers of BCL want to improve the accuracy of the results they report to their final customers. The desired improvements are of particular interest to the managers of BCL because the levels of alpha-emitting radionuclides in samples measured at BCL are usually so low that a significant fraction of the measured signal is due to background and to the reagent material used to extract the radioactive nuclides from the samples. Also, the background and reagent signals show a significant level of random variation. The customers at BCL requested four major modifications of the software. The requested software changes have been made and tested. The present report is in two parts. The first part describes what the modifications were supposed to accomplish. The second part describes the changes on a line-by-line basis. The second part includes listings of the changed software and discusses possible steps to correct a particular error condition. Last, the second part describes the effect of truncation errors on the standard deviations calculated from samples whose signals are very nearly the same.

  3. Silicon limitation on primary production and its destiny in Jiaozhou Bay, China. V: Silicon deficit process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongfang; Gao, Zhenhui; Wang, Peigang; Sun, Peiyan; Liu, Shuang

    2005-06-01

    Silicon is a necessary nutrient for diatoms, silicon uptake in diatom reproduction decreased seawater silicon content. This paper clarified the characteristics of silicon transferring in the sea, which plays an important role in phytoplankton growth, zooplankton graze and marine ecosystem. Analysis revealed that silicate is supplied by terrestrial sources, through plankton uptake, death, and eventually deposits to the sea bottom, and cannot diffuse upward. This is a general silicon deficit process. Many global marine waters showed the same silicon transfer route: land→silicon biogeochemical process→sea bottom. River flow brings abundant silicate into marine waters, silicate concentration in the waters decreased in the distance away from the river estuaries. In discussion of silicon characteristics and its transfer route, it was considred that the main factor controlling the mechanism of diatom and non-diatom red tides occurrence is silicon, and the changes in silicon source. Human activities, such as sea-route cutting by building embankment and dam, and silicon supplement by the sea, such as sandstorm, rainstorm and storm tide, have largely impaired the earth ecosystem and hugely threatened the human existence. It is suggested in this paper that man should resume the original face of the Si input into the sea to keep natural ecosystem in sustainable pattern.

  4. Scaling Solution in the Large Population Limit of the General Asymmetric Stochastic Luria-Delbrück Evolution Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    2015-02-01

    One of the most popular models for quantitatively understanding the emergence of drug resistance both in bacterial colonies and in malignant tumors was introduced long ago by Luria and Delbrück. Here, individual resistant mutants emerge randomly during the birth events of an exponentially growing sensitive population. A most interesting limit of this process occurs when the population size is large and mutation rates are low, but not necessarily small compared to . Here we provide a scaling solution valid in this limit, making contact with the theory of Levy -stable distributions, in particular one discussed long ago by Landau. One consequence of this association is that moments of the distribution are highly misleading as far as characterizing typical behavior. A key insight that enables our solution is that working in the fixed population size ensemble is not the same as working in a fixed time ensemble. Some of our results have been presented previously in abbreviated form [12].

  5. Study of the $e^+ e^- \\to Z \\gamma$ Process at LEP and Limits on Triple Neutral-Gauge-Boson Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    The process e^+e^- --> Z gamma, where the Z boson decays into hadrons or neutrinos, is studied with data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 189 GeV up to 209 GeV. The cross sections are measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Limits on triple neutral-gauge-boson couplings, forbidden in the Standard Model at tree level, are derived. Limits on the energy scales at which the anomalous couplings could be manifest are set. They range from 0.3 TeV to 2.3 TeV depending on the new physics effect under consideration.

  6. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We quantify above- and below-ground CH4 fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. ► We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH4 loading from the waste body. ► Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. ► Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH4 emissions. ► Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH4 loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). However, much of the CH4 produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH4 fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH4 ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH4 into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH4 concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH4 fluxes and CH4 loading were estimated from soil–gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push–pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH4 oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH4 emissions from the test section (daily mean up to ∼91,500 μmol m−2 d−1), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH4 concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 (uptake up to −380 μmol m−2 d−1) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH4 loading over short distances in the cover soil, while

  7. Differences in volatile profiles of turnip plants subjected to single and dual herbivory above- and belowground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Prisca S; Jansen, Jeroen J; Hordijk, Cornelis A; van Dam, Nicole M; Cortesero, Anne-Marie; Dugravot, Sébastien

    2011-04-01

    Plants attacked by herbivorous insects emit volatile organic compounds that are used by natural enemies to locate their host or prey. The composition of the blend is often complex and specific. It may vary qualitatively and quantitatively according to plant and herbivore species, thus providing specific information for carnivorous arthropods. Most studies have focused on simple interactions that involve one species per trophic level, and typically have investigated the aboveground parts of plants. These investigations need to be extended to more complex networks that involve multiple herbivory above- and belowground. A previous study examined whether the presence of the leaf herbivore Pieris brassicae on turnip plants (Brassica rapa subsp. rapa) influences the response of Trybliographa rapae, a specialist parasitoid of the root feeder Delia radicum. It showed that the parasitoid was not attracted by volatiles emitted by plants under simultaneous attack. Here, we analyzed differences in the herbivore induced plant volatile (HIPV) mixtures that emanate from such infested plants by using Orthogonal Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA). This multivariate model focuses on the differences between odor blends, and highlights the relative importance of each compound in an HIPV blend. Dual infestation resulted in several HIPVs that were present in both isolated infestation types. However, HIPVs collected from simultaneously infested plants were not the simple combination of volatiles from isolated forms of above- and belowground herbivory. Only a few specific compounds characterized the odor blend of each type of damaged plant. Indeed, some compounds were specifically induced by root herbivory (4-methyltridecane and salicylaldehyde) or shoot herbivory (methylsalicylate), whereas hexylacetate, a green leaf volatile, was specifically induced after dual herbivory. It remains to be determined whether or not these minor quantitative variations, within the

  8. Nitrogen Addition Altered the Effect of Belowground C Allocation on Soil Respiration in a Subtropical Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tongxin; Wang, Qingkui; Wang, Silong; Zhang, Fangyue

    2016-01-01

    The availabilities of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil play an important role in soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. However, the variation in the soil respiration (Rs) and response of microbial community to the combined changes in belowground C and N inputs in forest ecosystems are not yet fully understood. Stem girdling and N addition were performed in this study to evaluate the effects of C supply and N availability on Rs and soil microbial community in a subtropical forest. The trees were girdled on 1 July 2012. Rs was monitored from July 2012 to November 2013, and soil microbial community composition was also examined by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) 1 year after girdling. Results showed that Rs decreased by 40.5% with girdling alone, but N addition only did not change Rs. Interestingly, Rs decreased by 62.7% under the girdling with N addition treatment. The reducing effect of girdling and N addition on Rs differed between dormant and growing seasons. Girdling alone reduced Rs by 33.9% in the dormant season and 54.8% in the growing season compared with the control. By contrast, girdling with N addition decreased Rs by 59.5% in the dormant season and 65.4% in the growing season. Girdling and N addition significantly decreased the total and bacterial PLFAs. Moreover, the effect of N addition was greater than girdling. Both girdling and N addition treatments separated the microbial groups on the basis of the first principal component through principal component analysis compared with control. This indicated that girdling and N addition changed the soil microbial community composition. However, the effect of girdling with N addition treatment separated the microbial groups on the basis of the second principal component compared to N addition treatment, which suggested N addition altered the effect of girdling on soil microbial community composition. These results suggest that the increase in soil N availability by N deposition alters the effect of

  9. Carbon allocation belowground in Pinus pinaster using stable carbon isotope pulse labeling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannoura, M.; Bosc, A.; Chipeaux, C.; Sartore, M.; Lambrot, C.; Trichet, P.; Bakker, M.; Loustau, D.; Epron, D.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon allocation belowground competes with aboveground growth and biomass production. In the other hand, it contributes to resource acquisition such as nutrient, water and carbon sequestration in soil. Thus, a better characterization of carbon flow from plant to soil and its residence time within each compartment is an important issue for understanding and modeling forest ecosystem carbon budget. 13C pulse labeling of whole crown was conducted at 4 seasons to study the fate of assimilated carbon by photosynthesis into the root on 12 year old Pinus pinaster planted in the INRA domain of Pierroton. Maritime pine is the most widely planted species in South-West Europe. Stem, root and soil CO2 effluxes and their isotope composition were measured continuously by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with a trace gas analyzer (TGA 100A; Campbell Scientific) coupled to flow-through chambers. 13CO2 recovery and peak were observed in respiration of each compartment after labeling. It appeared sequentially from top of stem to bottom, and to coarse root. The maximum velocity of carbon transfer was calculated as the difference in time lag of recovery between two positions on the trunk or on the root. It ranged between 0.08-0.2 m h-1 in stem and between 0.04-0.12 m h-1 in coarse root. This velocity was higher in warmer season, and the difference between time lag of recovery and peak increased after first frost. Photosynthates arrived underground 1.5 to 5 days after labeling, at similar time in soil CO2 effluxes and coarse root respiration. 0.08-1.4 g of carbon was respired per tree during first 20 days following labeling. It presented 0.6 -10% of 13C used for labeling and it is strongly related to seasons. The isotope signal was detected in fine root organs and microbial biomass by periodical core sampling. The peak was observed 6 days after labeling in early summer while it was delayed more than 10 days in autumn and winter with less amount of carbon allocated

  10. The relative importance of above- versus belowground competition for tree growth during early succession of a tropical moist forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breugel, Michiel van; van Breugel, Paulo; Jansen, Patrick A.;

    2012-01-01

    Competition between neighboring plants plays a major role in the population dynamics of tree species in the early phases of humid tropical forest succession. We evaluated the relative importance of above-versus below-ground competition during the first years of old-field succession on soil with low...... and Trichospermum mexicanum, two pioneer species that dominate the secondary forests in the study region, varied with the abundance and size of neighboring trees in 1-2 year old secondary vegetation. We found that local neighborhood basal area varied 10-fold (3 to 30 cm(2) m(-2)) and explained most of the variation...... on the diameter growth of Cecropia saplings and stem slenderness of Trichospermum saplings. We conclude that competition for light was more important than below-ground competition in this initial phase of moist tropical forest successional, despite the low soil fertility....

  11. Relating belowground microbial composition to the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional trait distributions of trees in a tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberán, Albert; McGuire, Krista L; Wolf, Jeffrey A; Jones, F Andrew; Wright, Stuart Joseph; Turner, Benjamin L; Essene, Adam; Hubbell, Stephen P; Faircloth, Brant C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-12-01

    The complexities of the relationships between plant and soil microbial communities remain unresolved. We determined the associations between plant aboveground and belowground (root) distributions and the communities of soil fungi and bacteria found across a diverse tropical forest plot. Soil microbial community composition was correlated with the taxonomic and phylogenetic structure of the aboveground plant assemblages even after controlling for differences in soil characteristics, but these relationships were stronger for fungi than for bacteria. In contrast to expectations, the species composition of roots in our soil core samples was a poor predictor of microbial community composition perhaps due to the patchy, ephemeral, and highly overlapping nature of fine root distributions. Our ability to predict soil microbial composition was not improved by incorporating information on plant functional traits suggesting that the most commonly measured plant traits are not particularly useful for predicting the plot-level variability in belowground microbial communities.

  12. Extending the process limits of laser polymer welding with high-brilliance beam sources (recent status and prospects of POLYBRIGHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowinsky, A.; Boglea, A.

    2011-03-01

    Plastics play an important role in almost every facet of our lives and constitute a wide variety of products, from everyday products such as food and beverage packaging, over furniture and building materials to high tech products in the automotive, electronics, aerospace, white goods, medical and other sectors [1]. The objective of PolyBright, the European Research project on laser polymer welding, is to provide high speed and flexible laser manufacturing technology and expand the limits of current plastic part assembly. New laser polymer joining processes for optimized thermal management in combination with adapted wavelengths will provide higher quality, high processing speed up to 1 m/s and robust manufacturing processes at lower costs. Key innovations of the PolyBright project are fibre lasers with high powers up to 500 W, high speed scanning and flexible beam manipulation systems for simultaneous welding and high-resolution welding, such as dynamic masks and multi kHz scanning heads. With this initial step, PolyBright will break new paths in processing of advanced plastic products overcoming the quality and speed limitations of conventional plastic part assembly. Completely new concepts for high speed processing, flexibility and quality need to be established in combination with high brilliance lasers and related equipment. PolyBright will thus open new markets for laser systems with a short term potential of over several 100 laser installations per year and a future much larger market share in the still growing plastic market. PolyBright will hence establish a comprehensive and sustainable development activity on new high brilliance lasers that will strengthen the laser system industry.

  13. Allometric constraints on, and trade-offs in, belowground carbon allocation and their control of soil respiration across global forest ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangshui; Yang, Yusheng; Robinson, David

    2014-05-01

    To fully understand how soil respiration is partitioned among its component fluxes and responds to climate, it is essential to relate it to belowground carbon allocation, the ultimate carbon source for soil respiration. This remains one of the largest gaps in knowledge of terrestrial carbon cycling. Here, we synthesize data on gross and net primary production and their components, and soil respiration and its components, from a global forest database, to determine mechanisms governing belowground carbon allocation and their relationship with soil respiration partitioning and soil respiration responses to climatic factors across global forest ecosystems. Our results revealed that there are three independent mechanisms controlling belowground carbon allocation and which influence soil respiration and its partitioning: an allometric constraint; a fine-root production vs. root respiration trade-off; and an above- vs. belowground trade-off in plant carbon. Global patterns in soil respiration and its partitioning are constrained primarily by the allometric allocation, which explains some of the previously ambiguous results reported in the literature. Responses of soil respiration and its components to mean annual temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen deposition can be mediated by changes in belowground carbon allocation. Soil respiration responds to mean annual temperature overwhelmingly through an increasing belowground carbon input as a result of extending total day length of growing season, but not by temperature-driven acceleration of soil carbon decomposition, which argues against the possibility of a strong positive feedback between global warming and soil carbon loss. Different nitrogen loads can trigger distinct belowground carbon allocation mechanisms, which are responsible for different responses of soil respiration to nitrogen addition that have been observed. These results provide new insights into belowground carbon allocation, partitioning of soil

  14. Influence of transplant size on the above- and below-ground performance of four contrasting field-grown lettuce cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Kerbiriou, P.J.; Stomph, T.J.; Lammerts van Bueren, E.T.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Modern lettuce cultivars underperform under conditions of variable temporal and spatial resource availability, common in organic or low-input production systems. Information is scarce on the impact of below-ground traits on such resource acquisition and performance of field-grown lettuce; exploring genetic variation in such traits might contribute to strategies to select for robust cultivars, i.e., cultivars that perform well in the field, even under stress. Methods: To i...

  15. Plasticity in above- and belowground resource acquisition traits in response to single and multiple environmental factors in three tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Bellingham, Peter J; Lyver, Philip O'B; Bonner, Karen I; Wardle, David A

    2013-04-01

    Functional trait plasticity is a major component of plant adjustment to environmental stresses. Here, we explore how multiple local environmental gradients in resources required by plants (light, water, and nutrients) and soil disturbance together influence the direction and amplitude of intraspecific changes in leaf and fine root traits that facilitate capture of these resources. We measured population-level analogous above- and belowground traits related to resource acquisition, i.e. "specific leaf area"-"specific root length" (SLA-SRL), and leaf and root N, P, and dry matter content (DMC), on three dominant understory tree species with contrasting carbon and nutrient economics across 15 plots in a temperate forest influenced by burrowing seabirds. We observed similar responses of the three species to the same single environmental influences, but partially species-specific responses to combinations of influences. The strength of intraspecific above- and belowground trait responses appeared unrelated to species resource acquisition strategy. Finally, most analogous leaf and root traits (SLA vs. SRL, and leaf versus root P and DMC) were controlled by contrasting environmental influences. The decoupled responses of above- and belowground traits to these multiple environmental factors together with partially species-specific adjustments suggest complex responses of plant communities to environmental changes, and potentially contrasting feedbacks of plant traits with ecosystem properties. We demonstrate that despite the growing evidence for broadly consistent resource-acquisition strategies at the whole plant level among species, plants also show partially decoupled, finely tuned strategies between above- and belowground parts at the intraspecific level in response to their environment. This decoupling within species suggests a need for many species-centred ecological theories on how plants respond to their environments (e.g. competitive/stress-tolerant/ruderal and

  16. Effects of Manipulated Above- and Belowground Organic Matter Input on Soil Respiration in a Chinese Pine Plantation

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Fan; Jinsong Wang; Bo Zhao; Lianhai Wu; Chunyu Zhang; Xiuhai Zhao; Gadow, Klaus V.

    2015-01-01

    Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT), only litter removal (LR), control (CK), only root trenching (RT) and litter a...

  17. Impacts of Jatropha-based biodiesel production on above and below-ground carbon stocks: A case study from Mozambique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to mitigate climate change makes production of liquid biofuels a high priority. Substituting fossil fuels by biodiesel produced from Jatropha curcas has gained widespread attention as Jatropha cultivation is claimed to offer green house gas emission reductions. Farmers respond worldwide to this increasing demand by converting forests into Jatropha, but whether Jatropha-based biodiesel offers carbon savings depends on the carbon emissions that occur when land use is changed to Jatropha. This paper provides an impact assessment of a small-scale Jatropha project in Cabo Delgado, Mozambique. The paper outlines the estimated impacts on above and below-ground carbon stocks when land use is changed to increase Jatropha production. The results show that expansion of Jatropha production will most likely lead to the conversion of miombo forest areas to Jatropha, which implies a reduction in above and below-ground carbon stocks. The carbon debts created by the land use change can be repaid by replacing fossil fuels with Jatropha-based biodiesel. A repayment time of almost two centuries is found with optimistic estimates of the carbon debt, while the use of pessimistic values results in a repayment time that approaches the millennium. - Highlights: ► Demands for biofuels make production of Jatropha-based biodiesel a priority. ► Farmers in Northern Mozambique are likely to convert un-logged miombo to Jatropha. ► Converting miombo to Jatropha creates reductions in above and below-ground carbon. ► It takes 187–966 years to repay emissions from above and below-ground carbon stocks.

  18. Release from belowground enemies and shifts in root traits as interrelated drivers of alien plant invasion success: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Wayne

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of the interrelated mechanisms driving plant invasions, such as the interplay between enemy release and resource-acquisition traits, is biased by an aboveground perspective. To address this bias, I hypothesize that plant release from belowground enemies (especially fungal pathogens) will give invasive plant species a fitness advantage in the alien range, via shifts in root traits (e.g., increased specific root length and branching intensity) that increase resource uptake and competitive ability compared to native species in the alien range, and compared to plants of the invader in its native range. Such root-trait changes could be ecological or evolutionary in nature. I explain how shifts in root traits could occur as a consequence of enemy release and contribute to invasion success of alien plants, and how they could be interrelated with other potential belowground drivers of invasion success (allelopathy, mutualist enhancement). Finally, I outline the approaches that could be taken to test whether belowground enemy release results in increased competitive ability and nutrient uptake by invasive alien plants, via changes in root traits in the alien range.

  19. A hybrid model for mapping relative differences in belowground biomass and root: Shoot ratios using spectral reflectance, foliar N and plant biophysical data within coastal marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica L. O'Connell,; Byrd, Kristin B.; Maggi Kelly,

    2015-01-01

    Broad-scale estimates of belowground biomass are needed to understand wetland resiliency and C and N cycling, but these estimates are difficult to obtain because root:shoot ratios vary considerably both within and between species. We used remotely-sensed estimates of two aboveground plant characteristics, aboveground biomass and % foliar N to explore biomass allocation in low diversity freshwater impounded peatlands (Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, CA, USA). We developed a hybrid modeling approach to relate remotely-sensed estimates of % foliar N (a surrogate for environmental N and plant available nutrients) and aboveground biomass to field-measured belowground biomass for species specific and mixed species models. We estimated up to 90% of variation in foliar N concentration using partial least squares (PLS) regression of full-spectrum field spectrometer reflectance data. Landsat 7 reflectance data explained up to 70% of % foliar N and 67% of aboveground biomass. Spectrally estimated foliar N or aboveground biomass had negative relationships with belowground biomass and root:shoot ratio in both Schoenoplectus acutus and Typha, consistent with a balanced growth model, which suggests plants only allocate growth belowground when additional nutrients are necessary to support shoot development. Hybrid models explained up to 76% of variation in belowground biomass and 86% of variation in root:shoot ratio. Our modeling approach provides a method for developing maps of spatial variation in wetland belowground biomass.

  20. Observations on the perspectives and limits of the evidence-based approach in the evaluation of gamification processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruni Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As continually greater attention is given to the processes of gamification, the dimension pertaining to evaluation must also be focussed on the purpose of avoiding ineffective forms of banalisation. In reference to the evidence-based approach proposed by Mayer and in highlighting its possibilities and limits, an experiment is herein presented related to teacher training, in which we attempt to unite some traits of the processes of gamification to a first evaluation screen. The data obtained, if they seem on the one hand, indicate an overall positive perception on the part of the attendees, on the other though, they indicate forms of resistance and of saturation with respect to both the excessively competitive mechanisms and the peer evaluation procedures.

  1. Exact Rates of Convergence of Functional Limit Theorems for Csorgo-Revesz Increments of a Wiener Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Sheng WANG

    2002-01-01

    Let {W(t); t ≥ 0} be a standard Wiener process and S be the Strassen set of functions.We investigate the exact rates of convergence to zero (as T →∞) of the variables suP0≤t≤T-aT inff∈ssuP0≤x≤1 |Yt,T(x) - f(x)| and inf0≤t≤T-aT suP0≤x≤1 |Yt,T(x) - f(x)| for any given f ∈ S, whereYt,T(x) = (W(t + xaT) - W(t))(2aT(logTa-1T1 + loglog T))-1/2.We establish a relation between how small the increments are and the functional limit resultsof Csorgo-Revesz increments for a Wiener process. Similar results for partial sums of i.i.d. randomvariables are also given.

  2. Plant species distribution along environmental gradient: do belowground interactions with fungi matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc ePellissier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of plants along environmental gradients is constrained by abiotic and biotic factors. Cumulative evidence attests of the impact of abiotic factors on plant distributions, but only few studies discuss the role of belowground communities. Soil fungi, in particular, are thought to play an important role in how plant species assemble locally into communities. We first review existing evidence, and then test the effect of the number of soil fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs on plant species distributions using a recently collected dataset of plant and metagenomic information on soil fungi in the Western Swiss Alps. Using species distribution models, we investigated whether the distribution of individual plant species is correlated to the number of OTUs of two important soil fungal classes known to interact with plants: the Glomeromycetes, that are obligatory symbionts of plants, and the Agaricomycetes, that may be facultative plant symbionts, pathogens, or wood decayers. We show that including the fungal richness information in the models of plant species distributions improves predictive accuracy. Number of fungal OTUs is especially correlated to the distribution of high elevation plant species. We suggest that high elevation soil show greater variation in fungal assemblages that may in turn impact plant turnover among communities. We finally discuss how to move beyond correlative analyses, through the design of field experiments manipulating plant and fungal communities along environmental gradients.

  3. Above- and Belowground Biomass Models for Trees in the Miombo Woodlands of Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud J. Kachamba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present general (multiple tree species from several sites above- and belowground biomass models for trees in the miombo woodlands of Malawi. Such models are currently lacking in the country. The modelling was based on 74 trees comprising 33 different species with diameters at breast height (dbh and total tree height (ht ranging from 5.3 to 2 cm and from 3.0 to 25.0 m, respectively. Trees were collected from four silvicultural zones covering a wide range of conditions. We tested different models including dbh, ht and wood specific gravity ( ρ as independent variables. We evaluated model performance using pseudo-R2, root mean square error (RMSE, a covariance matrix for the parameter estimates, mean prediction error (MPE and relative mean prediction error (MPE%. Computation of MPE% was based on leave-one-out cross-validation. Values of pseudo-R2 and MPE% ranged 0.82–0.97 and 0.9%–2.8%, respectively. Model performance indicated that the models can be used over a wide range of geographical and ecological conditions in Malawi.

  4. Consolidating soil carbon turnover models by improved estimates of belowground carbon input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent T; Glendining, Margaret; Olesen, Jørgen E

    2016-01-01

    World soil carbon (C) stocks are third only to those in the ocean and earth crust, and represent twice the amount currently present in the atmosphere. Therefore, any small change in the amount of soil organic C (SOC) may affect carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. Dynamic models of SOC help reveal the interaction among soil carbon systems, climate and land management, and they are also frequently used to help assess SOC dynamics. Those models often use allometric functions to calculate soil C inputs in which the amount of C in both above and below ground crop residues are assumed to be proportional to crop harvest yield. Here we argue that simulating changes in SOC stocks based on C input that are proportional to crop yield is not supported by data from long-term experiments with measured SOC changes. Rather, there is evidence that root C inputs are largely independent of crop yield, but crop specific. We discuss implications of applying fixed belowground C input regardless of crop yield on agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation and accounting. PMID:27580672

  5. Consolidating soil carbon turnover models by improved estimates of belowground carbon input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent T.; Glendining, Margaret; Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2016-01-01

    World soil carbon (C) stocks are third only to those in the ocean and earth crust, and represent twice the amount currently present in the atmosphere. Therefore, any small change in the amount of soil organic C (SOC) may affect carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. Dynamic models of SOC help reveal the interaction among soil carbon systems, climate and land management, and they are also frequently used to help assess SOC dynamics. Those models often use allometric functions to calculate soil C inputs in which the amount of C in both above and below ground crop residues are assumed to be proportional to crop harvest yield. Here we argue that simulating changes in SOC stocks based on C input that are proportional to crop yield is not supported by data from long-term experiments with measured SOC changes. Rather, there is evidence that root C inputs are largely independent of crop yield, but crop specific. We discuss implications of applying fixed belowground C input regardless of crop yield on agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation and accounting. PMID:27580672

  6. Root proliferation and seed yield in response to spatial heterogeneity of below-ground competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Erin E; Gersani, Mordechai; Brown, Joel S

    2005-11-01

    Here, we tested the predictions of a 'tragedy of the commons' model of below-ground plant competition in annual plants that experience spatial heterogeneity in their competitive environment. Under interplant competition, the model predicts that a plant should over-proliferate roots relative to what would maximize the collective yield of the plants. We predict that a plant will tailor its root proliferation to local patch conditions, restraining root production when alone and over-proliferating in the presence of other plants. A series of experiments were conducted using pairs of pea (Pisum sativum) plants occupying two or three pots in which the presence or absence of interplant root competition was varied while nutrient availability per plant was held constant. In two-pot experiments, competing plants produced more root mass and less pod mass per individual than plants grown in isolation. In three-pot experiments, peas modulated this response to conditions at the scale of individual pots. Root proliferation in the shared pot was higher compared with the exclusively occupied pot. Plants appear to display sophisticated nutrient foraging with outcomes that permit insights into interplant competition.

  7. Consolidating soil carbon turnover models by improved estimates of belowground carbon input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Christensen, Bent T.; Glendining, Margaret; Olesen, Jørgen E.

    2016-09-01

    World soil carbon (C) stocks are third only to those in the ocean and earth crust, and represent twice the amount currently present in the atmosphere. Therefore, any small change in the amount of soil organic C (SOC) may affect carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in the atmosphere. Dynamic models of SOC help reveal the interaction among soil carbon systems, climate and land management, and they are also frequently used to help assess SOC dynamics. Those models often use allometric functions to calculate soil C inputs in which the amount of C in both above and below ground crop residues are assumed to be proportional to crop harvest yield. Here we argue that simulating changes in SOC stocks based on C input that are proportional to crop yield is not supported by data from long-term experiments with measured SOC changes. Rather, there is evidence that root C inputs are largely independent of crop yield, but crop specific. We discuss implications of applying fixed belowground C input regardless of crop yield on agricultural greenhouse gas mitigation and accounting.

  8. Picturing Adoption of Below-Ground Biodiversity Technologies among Smallholder Farmers around Mabira Forest, Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabirye, BE.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with a multitude of soil and water amendment technologies, farmers have the task of choosing the technologies to adopt for ensuring subsistence and income sustainability. In 2008, a study to characterize the farmers was conducted around Mabira Forest, to assess the adoption of soil technologies fostering Belowground Biodiversity (BGBD. Eighty-four households (38 participating and 46 non-participants from four villages were randomly selected and interviewed. Results showed that the adoption pattern was significantly driven by farm size, labor, household size, age and wealth status of the house. Also important were farm location, gender of household head, primary occupation, soil and water conservation technologies training, land tenure, and social capital. For the few current adopters, there was a perceived increase in labor demand but overall productivity was higher, partly resulting from increased crop productivity due to soil fertility enhancement and soil structure modification. It is therefore concluded that, around Mabira forest, BGBD technologies will be adopted by farming households with sufficient land, labor and social capital.

  9. Aboveground to belowground herbivore defense signaling in maize: a two-way street?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthe, Dawn S; Gill, Torrence; Zhu, Lixue; Lopéz, Lorena; Pechanova, Olga; Shivaji, Renuka; Ankala, Arunkanth; Williams, W Paul

    2011-01-01

    Insect pests that attempt to feed on the caterpillar-resistant maize genotype Mp708 encounter a potent, multipronged defense system that thwarts their invasion. First, these plants are on "constant alert" due to constitutively elevated levels of the phytohormone jasmonic acid that signals the plant to activate its defenses. The higher jasmonic acid levels trigger the expression of defense genes prior to herbivore attack so the plants are "primed" and respond with a faster and stronger defense. The second defense is the rapid accumulation of a toxic cysteine protease called Mir1-CP in the maize whorl in response to caterpillar feeding. When caterpillars ingest Mir1-CP, it damages the insect's midgut and retards their growth. In this article, we discuss a third possible defense strategy employed by Mp708. We have shown that foliar caterpillar feeding causes Mir1-CP and defense gene transcripts to accumulate in its roots. We propose that caterpillar feeding aboveground sends a signal belowground via the phloem that results in Mir1-CP accumulation in the roots. We also postulate that the roots serve as a reservoir of Mir1-CP that can be mobilized to the whorl in response to caterpillar assault.

  10. Roots in space: a spatially explicit model for below-ground competition in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Erin E; Brown, Joel S; Moll, Jason D

    2007-04-01

    Game theory provides an untapped framework for predicting how below-ground competition will influence root proliferation in a spatially explicit environment. We model root competition for space as an evolutionary game. In response to nutrient competition between plants, an individual's optimal strategy (the spatial distribution of root proliferation) depends on the rooting strategies of neighbouring plants. The model defines and predicts the fundamental (in the absence of competition) and realized (in the presence of competition) root space of an individual plant. Overlapping fundamental root spaces guarantee smaller, yet still overlapping, realized root spaces as individuals concede some but not all space to a neighbour's roots. Root overlap becomes an intentional consequence of the neighbouring plants playing a nutrient foraging game. Root proliferation and regions of root overlap should increase with soil fertility, decline with the distance cost of root production (e.g. soil compactness) and shift with competitive asymmetries. Seemingly erratic patterns of root proliferation and root overlap become the expected outcome of nutrient foraging games played in soils with small-scale heterogeneities in nutrient availability. PMID:17251098

  11. Quantifying below-ground nitrogen of legumes: Optimizing procedures for 15N shoot-labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantifying below-ground nitrogen (N) of legumes is fundamental to understanding their effects on soil mineral N fertility and on the N economies of following or companion crops in legume-based rotations. Methodologies based on 15N-labelling of whole plants with subsequent measurement of 15N in recovered plant parts and in the root-zone soil have proved promising. We report four glasshouse experiments with objectives to develop appropriate protocols for in situ 15N labelling of four pulses, faba bean (Vicia faba), chickpea (Cicer arietinum), mung bean (Vigna radiata) and pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan). Treatments included 15N-urea concentration, feeding technique, leaflet/petiole position, and frequency of feeding. Nitrogen-15-labelling via the leaf-flap was best for faba bean, mung and pigeon pea, whilst petiole feeding was best for chickpea, in all cases using 0.2-mL volumes of 0.5% urea (98 atom% 15N excess). The implications of uneven enrichment of the nodulated roots because of effects of the 15N-depleted nodules when calculating root-derived N in soil are discussed. (author)

  12. The Impact of Different Physical Processes on the Statistics of Lyman-limit and Damped Lyman-alpha Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Altay, Gabriel; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2013-01-01

    We compute the z = 3 neutral hydrogen column density distribution function f(NHI) for 19 simulations drawn from the OWLS project using a post-processing correction for self-shielding calculated with full radiative transfer of the ionising background radiation. We investigate how different physical processes and parameters affect the abundance of Lyman-limit systems (LLSs) and damped Lyman-alpha absorbers (DLAs) including: i) metal-line cooling; ii) the efficiency of feedback from SNe and AGN; iii) the effective equation of state for the ISM; iv) cosmological parameters; v) the assumed star formation law and; vi) the timing of hydrogen reionization . We find that the normalisation and slope, D = d log10 f /d log10 NHI, of f(NHI) in the LLS regime are robust to changes in these physical processes. Among physically plausible models, f(NHI) varies by less than 0.2 dex and D varies by less than 0.18 for LLSs. This is primarily due to the fact that these uncertain physical processes mostly affect star-forming gas w...

  13. Effects of long-term grazing disturbance on the belowground storage of organic carbon in the Patagonian Monte, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larreguy, C; Carrera, A L; Bertiller, M B

    2014-02-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of grazing disturbance on the amount and the spatial distribution (vertical and horizontal) of root biomass and soil organic carbon (SOC) in order to evaluate whether grazing alters the belowground storage of organic carbon (C) in arid rangelands of the Patagonian Monte. We selected three representative sites (3 ha each) with low, moderate and high grazing disturbance located far, mid-distance and near the watering point, respectively, in rangelands submitted to sheep grazing for more than 100 years. We assessed the canopy structure and identified the four most frequent plant patch types at each site. We selected four replications of each patch type and extracted a soil sample (0-30 cm depth) underneath the canopy and in the middle of the nearest inter-patch bare soil area in winter and summer. We assessed the root and soil dry mass and the respective organic C concentration in each sample and then we estimated the total belowground organic C storage at each site. Total plant and perennial grass cover were lower with high than low grazing disturbance while the reverse occurred with dwarf shrub cover. High grazing disturbance led to the increase in total root biomass in the whole soil profile of patch areas and in the upper soil of inter-patch areas. SOC was higher in patch than in inter-patch areas at all sites but at both areas was reduced with high grazing disturbance. This was probably the result of the low total plant cover and the low and recalcitrant contribution of above and below-ground plant litter to soils at sites with high grazing disturbance. Accordingly, these changes did not result in variations in the total belowground organic C storage. We concluded that high grazing disturbance did not affect the total belowground organic C storage but led to changes in the spatial patterning of this organic C storage (i.e shifting from soil to roots).

  14. Parameter estimation and long-term process simulation of a biogas reactor operated under trace elements limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Estimation of ADM1 parameter uncertainty by nonlinear, correlated parameter analysis. • Unbounded confidence regions were obtained for single hydrolysis rate constants. • ADM1 carbohydrates were divided into a slowly and readily degradable part. • Bioavailability of trace metals explained discrepancies between modeled and measured data. - Abstract: The Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was modified to describe the long-term process stability of a two-stage agricultural biogas system operated for 494 days with a mono-substrate. The ADM1 model fraction for carbohydrates was divided into a slowly and readily degradable part. Significant different hydrolysis rate constants were found for proteins and single fractions of carbohydrates in batch experiments. Degradation of starch, xylan (hemicellulose), cellulose and zein (protein) were modeled with first order hydrolysis rate coefficients of 1.20 d−1, 0.70 d−1, 0.18 d−1 and 0.30 d−1, respectively. While the hydrolysis rate coefficients found in batch experiments could be used for predicting continuous process data, the statistically calculated confidence regions (nonlinear parameter estimation) showed that the upper limits were unbounded. Single discrepancies between measured and modeled process data of the two-stage pilot system could be explained by the lack of bioavailability of trace elements. Addition of iron, as Fe(III)Cl3, allowed stable process conditions for an organic loading rate (OLR) up to 2.5 gVS L−1 d−1. Additional supplement of trace elements was necessary for process operation at OLRs above 2.5 gVS L−1 d−1

  15. Ecohydrological optimization of pattern and processes in water-limited ecosystems: A trade-off-based hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, Kelly K.; Scanlon, Todd M.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2009-08-01

    The complex interactions between plants, soils, and climates in semiarid ecosystems make it difficult to define specific ecohydrological optimization mechanisms that underlie observed spatiotemporal patterns of vegetation structure. There remains a clear need to develop conceptual models that are capable of interpreting and predicting spatial pattern formation in savannas (and similar dry woodland ecosystems), as well as metrics for assessing optimization or organization of patterns, as one scales from individual canopies to landscapes and beyond. In this article, we propose a unifying hypothesis regarding ecohydrological optimization of pattern and processes, namely, that vegetation patterns in water-limited environments are constrained in their ability to maximize water use by a need to simultaneously minimize water stress. We use this trade-off-based hypothesis to infer the function of dryland ecosystems under a wide range of scales and applications. Specifically, we examine spatial and temporal aspects of ecohydrological organization of vegetation patterns for three different cases: (1) patterns of regional-scale temporal organization across a regional climate gradient, (2) patterns of landscape-scale spatial organization within a semiarid drainage basin, and (3) patterns of individual-scale structural organization across varying soil textures. Although the insight gained from each of these examples is derived from specific modeling approaches, each of which contains its own unique set of assumptions and limitations, they are unified by our proposed ecohydrological trade-off approach that simultaneously considers both plant water deficit and plant water use as a diagnostic tool for assessing vegetation patterns in water-limited environments. It is our hope that the ongoing development of coupled ecological and hydrological models capable of assessing a diversity of interactions between plants, soils, and climates will lead to the emergence of more generalized

  16. Belowground carbon allocation by trees drives seasonal patterns of extracellular enzyme activities by altering microbial community composition in a beech forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Christina; Koranda, Marianne; Kitzler, Barbara; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Schnecker, Jörg; Schweiger, Peter; Rasche, Frank; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Sessitsch, Angela; Richter, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    *Plant seasonal cycles alter carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) availability for soil microbes, which may affect microbial community composition and thus feed back on microbial decomposition of soil organic material and plant N availability. The temporal dynamics of these plant-soil interactions are, however, unclear. *Here, we experimentally manipulated the C and N availability in a beech forest through N fertilization or tree girdling and conducted a detailed analysis of the seasonal pattern of microbial community composition and decomposition processes over 2 yr. *We found a strong relationship between microbial community composition and enzyme activities over the seasonal course. Phenoloxidase and peroxidase activities were highest during late summer, whereas cellulase and protease peaked in late autumn. Girdling, and thus loss of mycorrhiza, resulted in an increase in soil organic matter-degrading enzymes and a decrease in cellulase and protease activity. *Temporal changes in enzyme activities suggest a switch of the main substrate for decomposition between summer (soil organic matter) and autumn (plant litter). Our results indicate that ectomycorrhizal fungi are possibly involved in autumn cellulase and protease activity. Our study shows that, through belowground C allocation, trees significantly alter soil microbial communities, which may affect seasonal patterns of decomposition processes.

  17. Materials and process limitations for thermoplastic composite materials for wind turbine blades - preform of prepregs and commingled yarns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, R.T.D.

    2011-07-01

    Wind turbine blades are produced based on the current thermoset resin technology, but thermoplastics can offer better potential to become the future blade materials. One of the most important goals when designing larger blade systems is to keep the blade weight under control. Thermoplastic materials offer weight saving similar to thermosets, apart from many other benefits like design flexibility, durability, cost, weight saving, and performance advantageous to the wind industry. In the current research study a detailed discussion on material and process limitations such as thermoplastic prepreg tapes and commingled yams are presented in terms of their properties and available forms in the current markets. A critical review of thermoplastics discussed in the context of turbine blades applications. (Author)

  18. Silicon limitation on primary production and its destiny in Jiaozhou Bay, China Ⅵ: The ecological variation process of the phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The combination effect of light, water temperature and nutrients on phytoplankton growth in Jiaozhou Bay is studied in this paper. The order of importance of the influence on phytoplankton growth is determined as nutrients, water temperature, and light. The influence of these factors unveiled the mechanism of the influence, and revealed the variation process of the nutrients limiting phytoplankton primary production, and of the water temperature influencing the phytoplankton reproduction capacity, and hence influencing the structure of phytoplankton assemblage. Temporal and spatial quantification shows different stages of the influence by water temperature and nutrients on the phytoplankton growth. Moreover, the authors expatiated the ideal state of the phytoplankton growth and the reason of red tide occurrence. People should consider in their activity the input of nutrient Si first, and then the variation of water temperature, advocating sustainable development manner.

  19. Limits, discovery and cut optimization for a Poisson process with uncertainty in background and signal efficiency: TRolke 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, J.; Conrad, J.; Rolke, W.; Lopez, A.

    2010-03-01

    A C++ class was written for the calculation of frequentist confidence intervals using the profile likelihood method. Seven combinations of Binomial, Gaussian, Poissonian and Binomial uncertainties are implemented. The package provides routines for the calculation of upper and lower limits, sensitivity and related properties. It also supports hypothesis tests which take uncertainties into account. It can be used in compiled C++ code, in Python or interactively via the ROOT analysis framework. Program summaryProgram title: TRolke version 2.0 Catalogue identifier: AEFT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: MIT license No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3431 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 21 789 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: ISO C++. Computer: Unix, GNU/Linux, Mac. Operating system: Linux 2.6 (Scientific Linux 4 and 5, Ubuntu 8.10), Darwin 9.0 (Mac-OS X 10.5.8). RAM:˜20 MB Classification: 14.13. External routines: ROOT ( http://root.cern.ch/drupal/) Nature of problem: The problem is to calculate a frequentist confidence interval on the parameter of a Poisson process with statistical or systematic uncertainties in signal efficiency or background. Solution method: Profile likelihood method, Analytical Running time:<10 seconds per extracted limit.

  20. 社会创新过程及其面临的局限%Limitations Encountered in Social Innovation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苟天来; 毕宇珠; 胡新萍

    2012-01-01

    识别社会需求、解决社会问题是社会创新过程中的一个重要环节,同时也是社会创新过程面临的陷阱和局限所在。结合社区发展规划的案例以及社会需求和问题表现特征的分析发现,在需求和问题分析过程中,问题标准的不恰当性、问题主体参与不足、忽视需求和问题原因表现出的二重性、参与主体的缺失等会导致社会需求识别出现偏差,同时这些偏差将进一步影响社会创新的低效,以及易使社会创新方案局限在项目的操作层次。%It is an important step in social innovation process to identify social needs and solve social problems, in which the pitfalls and limitations of such process also exist. Focusing on analyzing this step through a casestudy of community development planning and the characteristics of social needs and problems, this paper argues that deviation could be resulted from insuffi- cient participation of stakeholders, inappropriate standards for problem, ignorance of duality of needs and problem causes, and absence of participation of stakeholders, which would result in low effective and efficient social innovation and usually limiting social innovation to operational level.

  1. Above-belowground interactions govern the course and impact of biological invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergård, Mette; Rønn, Regin; Ekelund, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of exotic organisms that subsequently become invasive is considered a serious threat to global biodiversity, and both scientists and nature-conservationists attempt to find explanations and means to meet this challenge. This requires a thorough analysis of the invasion phenomenon in an evolutionary and ecological context; in the case of invasive plants, we must have a major focus on above-belowground interactions. Thus, we discuss different theories that have been proposed to explain the course of invasions through interactions between plants and soil organisms. Further, a thorough analysis of invasion must include a temporal context. Invasions will typically include an initial acute phase, where the invader expands its territory and a later chronic phase where equilibrium is re-established. Many studies fail to make this distinction, which is unfortunate as it makes it impossible to thoroughly understand the invasion of focus. Thus, we claim that invasions fall into two broad categories. Some invasions irreversibly change pools and pathways of matter and energy in the invaded system; even if the abundance of the invader is reduced or it is completely removed, the system will not return to its former state. We use earthworm invasion in North America as a particular conspicuous example of invasive species that irreversibly change ecosystems. However, invasions may also be reversible, where the exotic organism dominates the system for a period, but in the longer term it either disappears, declines or its negative impact decreases. If the fundamental ecosystem structure and flows of energy and matter have not been changed, the system will return to a state not principally different from the original. PMID:25854693

  2. Patterns of above-and belowground biomass allocation in China’s grasslands:Evidence from individual-level observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Above-and belowground biomass allocation not only influences growth of individual plants,but also influences vegetation structures and functions,and consequently impacts soil carbon input as well as terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling.However,due to sampling difficulties,a considerable amount of uncertainty remains about the root:shoot ratio(R/S),a key parameter for models of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling.We investigated biomass allocation patterns across a broad spatial scale.We collected data on individual plant biomass and systematically sampled along a transect across the temperate grasslands in Inner Mongolia as well as in the alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau.Our results indicated that the median of R/S for herbaceous species was 0.78 in China’s grasslands as a whole.R/S was significantly higher in temperate grasslands than in alpine grasslands(0.84 vs.0.65).The slope of the allometric relationship between above-and belowground biomass was steeper for temperate grasslands than for alpine.Our results did not support the hypothesis that aboveground biomass scales isometrically with belowground biomass.The R/S in China’s grasslands was not significantly correlated with mean annual temperature(MAT) or mean annual precipitation(MAP).Moreover,comparisons of our results with previous findings indicated a large difference between R/S data from individual plants and communities.This might be mainly caused by the underestimation of R/S at the individual level as a result of an inevitable loss of fine roots and the overestimation of R/S in community-level surveys due to grazing and difficulties in identifying dead roots.Our findings suggest that root biomass in grasslands tended to have been overestimated in previous reports of R/S.

  3. Aboveground Epichloë coenophiala-Grass Associations Do Not Affect Belowground Fungal Symbionts or Associated Plant, Soil Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Lindsey C; McCulley, Rebecca L

    2016-10-01

    Cool season grasses host multiple fungal symbionts, such as aboveground Epichloë endophytes and belowground arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and dark septate endophytes (DSEs). Asexual Epichloë endophytes can influence root colonization by AMF, but the type of interaction-whether antagonistic or beneficial-varies. In Schedonorus arundinaceus (tall fescue), Epichloë coenophiala can negatively affect AMF, which may impact soil properties and ecosystem function. Within field plots of S. arundinaceus that were either E. coenophiala-free (E-), infected with the common, mammal-toxic E. coenophiala strain (CTE+), or infected with one of two novel, non-toxic strains (AR542 NTE+ and AR584 NTE+), we hypothesized that (1) CTE+ would decrease AMF and DSE colonization rates and reduce soil extraradical AMF hyphae compared to E- or NTE+, and (2) this would lead to E- and NTE+ plots having greater water stable soil aggregates and C than CTE+. E. coenophiala presence and strain did not significantly alter AMF or DSE colonization, nor did it affect extraradical AMF hypha length, soil aggregates, or aggregate-associated C and N. Soil extraradical AMF hypha length negatively correlated with root AMF colonization. Our results contrast with previous demonstrations that E. coenophiala symbiosis inhibits belowground AMF communities. In our mesic, relatively nutrient-rich grassland, E. coenophiala symbiosis did not antagonize belowground symbionts, regardless of strain. Manipulating E. coenophiala strains within S. arundinaceus may not significantly alter AMF communities and nutrient cycling, yet we must further explore these relationships under different soils and environmental conditions given that symbiont interactions can be important in determining ecosystem response to global change. PMID:27502203

  4. Beyond the futility argument: the fair process approach and time-limited trials for managing dialysis conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Futility is an ancient concept arising from Greek mythology that was resurrected for its medical application in the 1980s with the proliferation of many lifesaving technologies, including dialysis and renal transplantation. By that time, the domineering medical paternalism that characterized the pre-1960s physician-patient relationship morphed into assertive patient autonomy, and some patients began to claim the right to demand aggressive, high-technology interventions, despite physician disapproval. To counter this power struggle, the establishment of a precise definition of futility offered hope for a futility policy that would allow physicians to justify withholding or withdrawing treatment, despite patient and family objections. This article reviews the various attempts made to define medical futility and describes their limited applicability to dialysis. When futility concerns arise, physicians should recognize the opportunity to address conflict, using best practice communication skills. Physicians would also benefit from understanding the ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and professional integrity that underlie medical decision-making. Also reviewed is the use of a fair process approach or time-limited trial when conflict resolution cannot be achieved. These topics are addressed in the Renal Physician Association's clinical practice guideline Shared Decision-Making in the Appropriate Initiation and Withdrawal from Dialysis, with which nephrologists should be well versed. A case presentation of intractable calciphylaxis in a new dialysis patient illustrates the pitfalls of physicians not fully appreciating the ethics of medical decision-making and failing to use effective conflict management approaches in the clinical practice guideline. PMID:23868900

  5. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the

  6. The variable effects of soil nitrogen availability and insect herbivory on aboveground and belowground plant biomass in an old-field ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blue, Jarrod D.; Souza, Lara; Classen, Aimée T.;

    2011-01-01

    in an old-field ecosystem. In 2004, we established 36 experimental plots in which we manipulated soil nitrogen (N) availability and insect abundance in a completely randomized plot design. In 2009, after 6 years of treatments, we measured aboveground biomass and assessed root production at peak growth......Nutrient availability and herbivory can regulate primary production in ecosystems, but little is known about how, or whether, they may interact with one another. Here, we investigate how nitrogen availability and insect herbivory interact to alter aboveground and belowground plant community biomass....... Overall, we found a significant effect of reduced soil N availability on aboveground biomass and belowground plant biomass production. Specifically, responses of aboveground and belowground community biomass to nutrients were driven by reductions in soil N, but not additions, indicating that soil N may...

  7. Beyond roots alone: Novel methodologies for analyzing complex soil and minirhizotron imagery using image processing and GIS tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Justina A.

    Quantifying belowground dynamics is critical to our understanding of plant and ecosystem function and belowground carbon cycling, yet currently available tools for complex belowground image analyses are insufficient. We introduce novel techniques combining digital image processing tools and geographic information systems (GIS) analysis to permit semi-automated analysis of complex root and soil dynamics. We illustrate methodologies with imagery from microcosms, minirhizotrons, and a rhizotron, in upland and peatland soils. We provide guidelines for correct image capture, a method that automatically stitches together numerous minirhizotron images into one seamless image, and image analysis using image segmentation and classification in SPRING or change analysis in ArcMap. These methods facilitate spatial and temporal root and soil interaction studies, providing a framework to expand a more comprehensive understanding of belowground dynamics.

  8. Functional Limit Theorems for C-R Increments of lp-Valued Wiener Processes in the H(o)lder Norm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Cai WEI

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, based on accurately large deviation formulae established in strong topology generated by the H(o)lder norm for l2-valued Wiener processes, we obtain the functional limit theorems for C-R increments of lp-valued Wiener processes in the H(o)lder norm.

  9. Soil respiration in Tibetan alpine grasslands: belowground biomass and soil moisture, but not soil temperature, best explain the large-scale patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Geng

    Full Text Available The Tibetan Plateau is an essential area to study the potential feedback effects of soils to climate change due to the rapid rise in its air temperature in the past several decades and the large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC stocks, particularly in the permafrost. Yet it is one of the most under-investigated regions in soil respiration (Rs studies. Here, Rs rates were measured at 42 sites in alpine grasslands (including alpine steppes and meadows along a transect across the Tibetan Plateau during the peak growing season of 2006 and 2007 in order to test whether: (1 belowground biomass (BGB is most closely related to spatial variation in Rs due to high root biomass density, and (2 soil temperature significantly influences spatial pattern of Rs owing to metabolic limitation from the low temperature in cold, high-altitude ecosystems. The average daily mean Rs of the alpine grasslands at peak growing season was 3.92 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, ranging from 0.39 to 12.88 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1, with average daily mean Rs of 2.01 and 5.49 µmol CO(2 m(-2 s(-1 for steppes and meadows, respectively. By regression tree analysis, BGB, aboveground biomass (AGB, SOC, soil moisture (SM, and vegetation type were selected out of 15 variables examined, as the factors influencing large-scale variation in Rs. With a structural equation modelling approach, we found only BGB and SM had direct effects on Rs, while other factors indirectly affecting Rs through BGB or SM. Most (80% of the variation in Rs could be attributed to the difference in BGB among sites. BGB and SM together accounted for the majority (82% of spatial patterns of Rs. Our results only support the first hypothesis, suggesting that models incorporating BGB and SM can improve Rs estimation at regional scale.

  10. Aboveground and belowground legacies of native Sami land use on boreal forest in northern Sweden 100 years after abandonment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Ostlund, Lars; Kichenin, Emilie; Wardle, David A

    2014-04-01

    Human activities that involve land-use change often cause major transformations to community and ecosystem properties both aboveground and belowground, and when land use is abandoned, these modifications can persist for extended periods. However, the mechanisms responsible for rapid recovery vs. long-term maintenance of ecosystem changes following abandonment remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the long-term ecological effects of two remote former settlements, regularly visited for -300 years by reindeer-herding Sami and abandoned -100 years ago, within an old-growth boreal forest that is considered one of the most pristine regions in northern Scandinavia. These human legacies were assessed through measurements of abiotic and biotic soil properties and vegetation characteristics at the settlement sites and at varying distances from them. Low-intensity land use by Sami is characterized by the transfer of organic matter towards the settlements by humans and reindeer herds, compaction of soil through trampling, disappearance of understory vegetation, and selective cutting of pine trees for fuel and construction. As a consequence, we found a shift towards early successional plant species and a threefold increase in soil microbial activity and nutrient availability close to the settlements relative to away from them. These changes in soil fertility and vegetation contributed to 83% greater total vegetation productivity, 35% greater plant biomass, and 23% and 16% greater concentrations of foliar N and P nearer the settlements, leading to a greater quantity and quality of litter inputs. Because decomposer activity was also 40% greater towards the settlements, soil organic matter cycling and nutrient availability were further increased, leading to likely positive feedbacks between the aboveground and belowground components resulting from historic land use. Although not all of the activities typical of Sami have left visible residual traces on the ecosystem after

  11. Sources of Below-Ground Respired Carbon in a Northern Minnesota Ombrotrophic Spruce Bog and the Influence of Heating Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilderson, T. P.; McFarlane, K. J.; McNicol, G.; Hanson, P. J.; Chanton, J.; Wilson, R.; Bosworth, R.; Singleton, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    A significant uncertainty in future land-surface carbon budgets is the response of wetlands to climate change. A related question is the future net climate (radiative) forcing impact due to ecosystem and environmental change in wetlands. Active wetlands emit both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. CH4 is, over a few decades, a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2 whereas as a consequence of a much longer atmospheric lifetime, CO2 has a longer 'tail' to its influence. Whether wetlands are a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon under future climate change will depend on the response of the ecosystem to rising temperatures and elevated CO2. The largest uncertainty in future wetland budgets, and its climate forcing, is the stability of the large belowground carbon stocks, often in the form of peat, and the partitioning of CO2 and CH4released via ecosystem respiration. We have characterized the isotopic signatures (14,13C of CO2 and CH4, D-CH4) of the respired carbon used for the production of CO2 and CH4 from the DOE Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) site in the Marcell Experimental Forest, which contains replicated mesocosm manipulations including above/below ground warming and elevated CO2. Deep warming (1-2 m) was initiated in July of 2014 and above ground heating will be initiated in July 2015. Comparison of the respired CO2 and CH4with recently fixed photosynthate, below-ground peat (up to 11,000 years old), and dissolved organic carbon allow us to determine the primary substrates used by the microbial community. Control and pre-perturbed plots are characterized by the consumption and respiration of recently fixed photosynthate and recent (few years to 15 yr) carbon. Although CH4 fluxes have begun to respond to deep-heating, the source of carbon remains similar in the control and perturbed plots. Respired CO2 remains consistent with being sourced from carbon only a few years old. We will present additional data

  12. Application of Computer-Aided Tomography (CT) Technology to Visually Compare Belowground Components of Salt Marshes in Jamaica Bay and Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using CT imaging, we found that rapidly deteriorating marshes in Jamaica Bay had significantly less belowground mass and abundance of coarse roots and rhizomes at depth (< 10 cm) compared to more stable areas in the Jamaica Bay Estuary. In addition, the rhizome diameters and pea...

  13. Below-ground plant parts emit herbivore-induced volatiles: olfactory responses of a predatory mite to tulip bulbs infested by rust mites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.S. Aratchige; I. Lesna; M.W. Sabelis

    2004-01-01

    Although odour-mediated interactions among plants, spider mites and predatory mites have been extensively studied above-ground, belowground studies are in their infancy. In this paper, we investigate whether feeding by rust mites (Aceria tulipae) cause tulip bulbs to produce odours that attract pred

  14. Simulated Sea-Level Rise Effects on the Above and Below-Ground Growth of Two Tidal Marsh Plant Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, L. M.; Callaway, J. C.; Kelly, M.

    2011-12-01

    Sea-level is expected to rise between 55 and 140 cm in the next century and is likely to have significant effects on the distribution and maintenance of tidal wetlands; however, little is known about the effects of increased sea level on Pacific coast tidal marsh vegetation. We initiated a field experiment in March 2011 to examine how increased depth and duration of inundation affect above and below-ground growth of two tidal wetland plant species: Schoenoplectus acutus and S. americanus. PVC planters, referred to as marsh organs, were installed at fixed elevations in channels at two ancient marshes in the San Francisco Bay Estuary: Browns Island and Rush Ranch. Each marsh organ structure is comprised of five rows of three six-inch PVC pipes, with each row 15cm lower than the row above, and was filled with surrounding mudflat sediment. Elevations span 60 cm and were chosen to be lower than the average current elevations of both species at each marsh to reflect projected increases in sea level. Rhizomes were collected from Browns Island, the less-saline site, and were cut to uniform sizes before planting. In every row, each species was grown individually and together. On a monthly basis, plant heights were recorded and pore-water sulfide concentration, salinity, and soil oxidation-reduction potential were measured. Schoenoplectus americanus growth and density significantly decreased with increased inundation at both sites. Schoenoplectus acutus growth was impacted more significantly at lower elevations at Rush Ranch but had little variation in density and growth across elevations at Browns Island. Salinity and sulfide concentrations varied little across elevations within a site but differed between sites. Above and belowground biomass will be collected in September 2011 to measure total annual productivity. The experiment provides basic yet crucial information on the impacts of increased inundation on tidal wetland vegetation and insight into potential changes in

  15. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Priault

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objectives of our study were to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. Seasonal patterns of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak.

  16. Impacts of an invasive non-native annual weed, Impatiens glandulifera, on above- and below-ground invertebrate communities in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Robert A; Varia, Sonal; Eschen, René; Wood, Suzy; Murphy, Sean T; Gange, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation community composition and the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities are linked intrinsically, though few studies have assessed the impact of non-native plants on both these parts of the community together. We evaluated the differences in the above- (foliage- and ground-dwelling) and below-ground invertebrate communities in nine uninvaded plots and nine plots invaded by the annual invasive species Impatiens glandulifera, in the UK during 2007 and 2008. Over 139,000 invertebrates were identified into distinct taxa and categorised into functional feeding groups. The impact of I. glandulifera on the vegetation and invertebrate community composition was evaluated using multivariate statistics including principal response curves (PRC) and redundancy analysis (RDA). In the foliage-dwelling community, all functional feeding groups were less abundant in the invaded plots, and the species richness of Coleoptera and Heteroptera was significantly reduced. In the ground-dwelling community, herbivores, detritivores, and predators were all significantly less abundant in the invaded plots. In contrast, these functional groups in the below-ground community appeared to be largely unaffected, and even positively associated with the presence of I. glandulifera. Although the cover of I. glandulifera decreased in the invaded plots in the second year of the study, only the below-ground invertebrate community showed a significant response. These results indicate that the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities respond differently to the presence of I. glandulifera, and these community shifts can potentially lead to a habitat less biologically diverse than surrounding native communities; which could have negative impacts on higher trophic levels and ecosystem functioning. PMID:23840648

  17. Impacts of an invasive non-native annual weed, Impatiens glandulifera, on above- and below-ground invertebrate communities in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Tanner

    Full Text Available Vegetation community composition and the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities are linked intrinsically, though few studies have assessed the impact of non-native plants on both these parts of the community together. We evaluated the differences in the above- (foliage- and ground-dwelling and below-ground invertebrate communities in nine uninvaded plots and nine plots invaded by the annual invasive species Impatiens glandulifera, in the UK during 2007 and 2008. Over 139,000 invertebrates were identified into distinct taxa and categorised into functional feeding groups. The impact of I. glandulifera on the vegetation and invertebrate community composition was evaluated using multivariate statistics including principal response curves (PRC and redundancy analysis (RDA. In the foliage-dwelling community, all functional feeding groups were less abundant in the invaded plots, and the species richness of Coleoptera and Heteroptera was significantly reduced. In the ground-dwelling community, herbivores, detritivores, and predators were all significantly less abundant in the invaded plots. In contrast, these functional groups in the below-ground community appeared to be largely unaffected, and even positively associated with the presence of I. glandulifera. Although the cover of I. glandulifera decreased in the invaded plots in the second year of the study, only the below-ground invertebrate community showed a significant response. These results indicate that the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities respond differently to the presence of I. glandulifera, and these community shifts can potentially lead to a habitat less biologically diverse than surrounding native communities; which could have negative impacts on higher trophic levels and ecosystem functioning.

  18. Design and performance of combined infrared canopy and belowground warming in the B4WarmED (Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger) experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Roy L; Stefanski, Artur; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Hobbie, Sarah E; Kimball, Bruce A; Reich, Peter B

    2015-06-01

    Conducting manipulative climate change experiments in complex vegetation is challenging, given considerable temporal and spatial heterogeneity. One specific challenge involves warming of both plants and soils to depth. We describe the design and performance of an open-air warming experiment called Boreal Forest Warming at an Ecotone in Danger (B4WarmED) that addresses the potential for projected climate warming to alter tree function, species composition, and ecosystem processes at the boreal-temperate ecotone. The experiment includes two forested sites in northern Minnesota, USA, with plots in both open (recently clear-cut) and closed canopy habitats, where seedlings of 11 tree species were planted into native ground vegetation. Treatments include three target levels of plant canopy and soil warming (ambient, +1.7°C, +3.4°C). Warming was achieved by independent feedback control of voltage input to aboveground infrared heaters and belowground buried resistance heating cables in each of 72-7.0 m(2) plots. The treatments emulated patterns of observed diurnal, seasonal, and annual temperatures but with superimposed warming. For the 2009 to 2011 field seasons, we achieved temperature elevations near our targets with growing season overall mean differences (∆Tbelow ) of +1.84°C and +3.66°C at 10 cm soil depth and (∆T(above) ) of +1.82°C and +3.45°C for the plant canopies. We also achieved measured soil warming to at least 1 m depth. Aboveground treatment stability and control were better during nighttime than daytime and in closed vs. open canopy sites in part due to calmer conditions. Heating efficacy in open canopy areas was reduced with increasing canopy complexity and size. Results of this study suggest the warming approach is scalable: it should work well in small-statured vegetation such as grasslands, desert, agricultural crops, and tree saplings (<5 m tall). PMID:25640748

  19. Jiangrun Copper Limited Company Set its Eyes on the Leading Position of Copper Processing Industry in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>Jiangrun Copper Limited Company’s total investment volume for projects of stranded copper wire with high strength and high conductivity as well as high-performance copper and copper alloy wire are 500 million yuan and 360 million yuan, respectively. The company plans to introduce 85 units (sets) of high-end

  20. Forming Limit Diagrams of Zircaloy-4 and Zirlo Sheets for Stamping Process of Spacer Grids of Nuclear Fuel Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yunmi; Hyun, Hong Chul; Lee, Hyungyil; Kim, Naksoo

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the theoretical forming limit models for Zircaloy-4 and Zirlo used for spacer grid of nuclear fuel rods. Tensile tests were performed to obtain stress-strain curves and anisotropic coefficients, such as r-values. The experimental forming limit diagrams (FLD) for two materials were obtained by dome stretching tests following the specification of NUMISHEET 96. Theoretical FLD depends on forming limit model and yield criterion. To obtain the right hand side of FLD, we applied the forming limit models (Swift's diffuse necking, Marciniak-Kuczynski damage defect, Storen-Rice's vertex theory) to Zircaloy-4 and Zirlo sheets. Hill's local necking theory was adopted for the left side of FLD. To consider the anisotropy of sheets, the yield criteria of Hill (1948) and Hosford (1979) were applied. Comparing the predicted curves with the experimental data, we found that the FLD for Zircaloy-4 can be described by the Swift model with the Hill 48 yield criterion, while the FLD for Zirlo can be explained by the Storen-Rice model and the Hosford yield criterion (a = 8).

  1. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 419 - Processes Included in the Determination of BAT Effluent Limitations for Total Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., and Phenolic Compounds (4AAP) Crude Processes 1. Atmospheric Crude Distillation 2. Crude Desalting 3. Vacuum Crude Distillation Cracking and Coking Processes 4. Visbreaking 5. Thermal Cracking 6. Fluid.... Lube Vac Twr, Oil Fractionation, Batch Still (Naphtha Strip), Bright Stock Treating 26. Centrifuge...

  2. Limits, discovery and cut optimization for a Poisson process with uncertainty in background and signal efficiency: TRolke 2.0

    OpenAIRE

    Lundberg, J.; Conrad, J.; Rolke, W.; Lopez, A

    2009-01-01

    A C++ class was written for the calculation of frequentist confidence intervals using the profile likelihood method. Seven combinations of Binomial, Gaussian, Poissonian and Binomial uncertainties are implemented. The package provides routines for the calculation of upper and lower limits, sensitivity and related properties. It also supports hypothesis tests which take uncertainties into account. It can be used in compiled C++ code, in Python or interactively via the ROOT analysis framework.

  3. Limits, discovery and cut optimization for a Poisson process with uncertainty in background and signal efficiency: TRolke 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Lundberg, J; Rolke, W; López, A

    2010-01-01

    A C++ class was written for the calculation of frequentist confidence intervals using the profile likelihood method. Seven combinations of Binomial, Gaussian, Poissonian and Binomial uncertainties are implemented. The package provides routines for the calculation of upper and lower limits, sensitivity and related properties. It also supports hypothesis tests which take uncertainties into account. It can be used in compiled C++ code, in Python or interactively via the ROOT analysis framework.

  4. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  5. Materials processing strategies for colloidal quantum dot solar cells: advances, present-day limitations, and pathways to improvement

    KAUST Repository

    Carey, Graham H.

    2013-05-13

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic devices have improved from initial, sub-1% solar power conversion efficiency to current record performance of over 7%. Rapid advances in materials processing and device physics have driven this impressive performance progress. The highest-efficiency approaches rely on a fabrication process that starts with nanocrystals in solution, initially capped with long organic molecules. This solution is deposited and the resultant film is treated using a solution containing a second, shorter capping ligand, leading to a cross-linked, non-redispersible, and dense layer. This procedure is repeated, leading to the widely employed layer-by-layer solid-state ligand exchange. We will review the properties and features of this process, and will also discuss innovative pathways to creating even higher-performing films and photovoltaic devices.

  6. Analysis and treatment of industrial wastewater through chemical coagulation-adsorption process-A case study of Clariant Pakistan limited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Syed Farman; Shah, Abdul Karim; Mehdi, Ahmad; Memon, Aziza Aftab; Harijan, Khanji; Ali, Zeenat M.

    2012-05-01

    Textile dye manufacture processes are known as the most polluting chemical processes of industrial sectors of the world. Colored wastewaters along with many polluting agents are troublesome. They are heavily polluted with dyes, textile auxiliaries and chemicals. Current study applies a coupled technology for wastewater treatment. Combined coagulation-adsorption process was utilized for treatment of complex nature effluents of dyes, binder emulsion, pigments and textile chemicals plants at Clariant Pakistan. Cost effective coagulant and adsorbent was selected by using waste material from a power generation unit of Water and Power Development Authority (WAPDA), Pakistan. The treated effluent could be reused. Alum+ Activated Carbon, Ferrous sulfate+ Activated Carbon, Ferric chloride + Activated Carbon. Almost complete decolourization was achieved along with reduction in COD up to 65%. Pre and post treatment, TDS, COD, Turbidity and suspended solids were improved.

  7. Mesophilic co-digestion of dairy manure and lipid rich solid slaughterhouse wastes: process efficiency, limitations and floating granules formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitk, Peep; Palatsi, Jordi; Kaparaju, Prasad; Fernández, Belén; Vilu, Raivo

    2014-08-01

    Lipid and protein rich solid slaughterhouse wastes are attractive co-substrates to increase volumetric biogas production in co-digestion with dairy manure. Addition of decanter sludge (DS), containing 42.2% of lipids and 35.8% of proteins (total solids basis), up to 5% of feed mixture resulted in a stable process without any indication of long chain fatty acids (LCFA) or free ammonia (NH3) inhibition and in 3.5-fold increase of volumetric biogas production. Contrary, only lipids addition as technical fat (TF) at over 2% of feed mixture resulted in formation of floating granules (FG) and process efficiency decrease. Formed FG had low biodegradability and its organic part was composed of lipids and calcium salts of LCFAs. Anaerobic digestion process intentionally directed to FG formation, could be a viable option for mitigation and control of lipids overload and derived LCFA inhibition. PMID:24907576

  8. Effects of Savanna trees on soil nutrient limitation and carbon-sequestration potential in dry season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Semi-arid savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use changes, especially around populous areas like Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover and aboveground biomass. Both are major regulators for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4), especially in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine spatial trends and changes of soil parameters and trace-gas fluxes and relate their variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca). For each tree, we selected transects with total nine sampling points under and outside the crown. At each sampling point we measured soil and plant biomass carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, δ13C, microbial biomass C and N, soil respiration, available nutrients, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) as well as belowground biomass, soil temperature and soil water content. Contents and stocks of C and N fractions, Ca2+, K+ and total CEC decreased up to 50% outside the crown. This was unaffected by the tree species, tree size or other tree characteristics. Water content was below the permanent wilting point and independent from tree cover. In all cases tree litter inputs had far a closer C:N ratio than C4-grass litter. Microbial C:N ratio and CO2 efflux was about 30% higher in open area and strongly dependent on mineral N availability. This indicates N limitation and low microbial C use efficiency in soil under open area. We conclude that the spatial structure of aboveground biomass in savanna ecosystems leads to a spatial redistribution of nutrient

  9. Limitations of the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater by ozonation and by the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, N; Miguel, N; Ovelleiro, J L; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of ozonation and the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process for the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater. The most efficient oxidation process is combined with coagulation-flocculation-decantation and lime-soda ash softening pretreatments. The oxidation in aqueous solution and industrial wastewater (at pH 9.5-12.3) by O3 was carried out using a range of concentration of consumed O3 from 10 to 290 mg/L. A molar ratio of H2O2/O3 from 0.1 to 5.2 with different concentrations of O3 constants was used for the H2O2-O3 process. The maximum cyanide removal obtained in coking wastewater was 90% using a mass ratio of O3/CN(-) of 9.5. Using lower concentrations of O3, cyanide is not removed and can even be generated due to the presence of other cyanide precursor organic micropollutants in the industrial matrix. The concentration of O3 is reduced to half for the same cyanide removal efficiency if the pretreatments are applied to reduce the carbonate and bicarbonate ions. The cyanide removal efficiency in coking wastewater is not improved if the O3 is combined with the H2O2. However, the preliminary cyanide removal treatment in aqueous solution showed an increase in the cyanide removal efficiency for the H2O2-O3 process.

  10. Limitations of the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater by ozonation and by the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, N; Miguel, N; Ovelleiro, J L; Ormad, M P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of ozonation and the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process for the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater. The most efficient oxidation process is combined with coagulation-flocculation-decantation and lime-soda ash softening pretreatments. The oxidation in aqueous solution and industrial wastewater (at pH 9.5-12.3) by O3 was carried out using a range of concentration of consumed O3 from 10 to 290 mg/L. A molar ratio of H2O2/O3 from 0.1 to 5.2 with different concentrations of O3 constants was used for the H2O2-O3 process. The maximum cyanide removal obtained in coking wastewater was 90% using a mass ratio of O3/CN(-) of 9.5. Using lower concentrations of O3, cyanide is not removed and can even be generated due to the presence of other cyanide precursor organic micropollutants in the industrial matrix. The concentration of O3 is reduced to half for the same cyanide removal efficiency if the pretreatments are applied to reduce the carbonate and bicarbonate ions. The cyanide removal efficiency in coking wastewater is not improved if the O3 is combined with the H2O2. However, the preliminary cyanide removal treatment in aqueous solution showed an increase in the cyanide removal efficiency for the H2O2-O3 process. PMID:27438254

  11. Storage of intact heads prior to processing limits the shelf-life of fresh-cut Lactuca sativa L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkowska, I.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    Harvested lettuce heads are usually transported and stored for some period of time under a variety of conditions prior to processing. During storage, especially under suboptimal conditions, nutritional composition of the harvested produce continues to change. The possible impact of prior storage of

  12. Limits on Gravitino Production and New Processes with Large Missing Transverse Energy in $p\\overline{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=1.8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Affolder, T; Akopian, A M; Albrow, Michael G; Amaral, P; Amendolia, S R; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W J; Atac, Muzaffer; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; De Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, B A; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Bergé, J P; Berryhill, J W; Bevensee, B; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C A; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, Arie; Bokhari, W; Bölla, G; Bonushkin, Yu; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S C; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Bruner, N L; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Campbell, M; Carithers, W C; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Cassada, J A; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F S; Christofek, L S; Chu, M L; Cihangir, S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cooper, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R J; Dagenhart, D; De Jongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Done, J; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erdmann, W; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B L; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Galeotti, S; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Geer, S; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gordon, A; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Groer, L S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Günther, M; Guillian, G; Guimarães da Costa, J; Guo, R S; Haber, C; Hafen, E S; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hinrichsen, B; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R J; Holloway, L E; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J E; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jensen, H; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K M; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R D; Khazins, D M; Kikuchi, T; Kirk, M; Kim, B J; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Köngeter, A; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A J; Korytov, A V; Kovács, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lamoureux, J I; Lancaster, M; Latino, G; LeCompte, T J; Lee, A M; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Lockyer, N; Loken, J G; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E A; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Musy, M; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakaya, T; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y P; Nicolaidi, P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pappas, S P; Partos, D S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pitts, K T; Plunkett, R K; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Popovic, M; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ragan, K; Rakitine, A; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Riegler, W; Ribon, A; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robinson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R M; Rossin, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sato, H; Savard, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Segler, S L; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M J; Siegrist, J L; Signorelli, G; Sill, A F; Sinervo, P K; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, C; Snider, F D; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Sphicas, Paris; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P D; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Taylor, W; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Theriot, D; Thurman-Keup, R M; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S M; Tollefson, K; Tollestrup, Alvin V; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Trocóniz, J F; Tseng, J; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Vejcik, S; Velev, G V; Vidal, R; Vilar, R; Volobuev, I P; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wahl, J; Wallace, N B; Walsh, A M; Wang, C; Wang, C H; Wang, M J; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Webb, R; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Worm, S; Wu, X; Wyss, J; Yagil, A; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yoh, J K; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2000-01-01

    Events collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) with an energetic jet plus large missing transverse energy can be used to search for physics beyond the Standard Model. We see no deviations from the expected background and set upper limits on the production of new processes. We consider in addition the production of light gravitinos within the framework of the Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking models and set a limit at 95onfidence level on the breaking scale sqrt(F) >= 217 GeV, which excludes gravitino masses smaller than 1.1x10^-5 eV/c^2.

  13. Harmonisation of licensing processes for decommissioning. Options and limitations; Genehmigungsverfahren fuer die Stilllegung der deutschen Kernkraftwerke. Konvoi oder Kakophonie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raetzke, Christian

    2016-03-15

    The shutdown of eight reactors in Germany in the wake of Fukushima 2011 and the scheduled phase-out of the remaining units in several steps ending 2022 has obviously triggered a wave of applications for decommissioning and dismantling licences. It would seem natural to strive for a harmonised handling of these processes, analogous to the 'convoi' concept which was successfully employed for licensing and construction of the three most recent German NPPs in the 1980s. However, a comparative analysis shows that the motivation of all players is much different from that of earlier times and that harmonisation of licensing processes for dismantling is not as crucial for operators, authorities and technical support organisations as it was for construction.

  14. Potentials and limits of the SNCR process. Three case studies; Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen des SNCR-Verfahrens. Drei Fallstudien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villani, Kenneth; Greef, Johan de [Keppel Seghers Belgium NV, Willebroek (Belgium). Technology; Goethals, Joke [Keppel Seghers Belgium NV, Willebroek (Belgium). R and D Engineering; Montauban, Ian; Langenhove, Herman van [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Forschungsgruppe EnVOC

    2013-03-01

    The authors of this contribution report on the potential of the SNCR process (SNCR - selective non-catalytic reduction) in waste incinerators by means of three examples. The first example describes an engaged measuring campaign in the waste incinerator ISVAG (Antwerp, Belgium). Using a step-by-step approach, the emissions of NO{sub x} were reduced on values lower than 100 mg/Nm{sup 3} under monitoring the influence on the reagent consumption and ammonia slip. Furthermore, an ammonia mass balance was developed. The second example investigates the combination of the SNCR process with a recirculation of exhaust gases on the basis of experiences with two plants. The third example - a retrofitting in Scandinavia - shows the importance of a suitable construction and operation of a SNCR plant.

  15. Activation of response force by self-splitting objects: where are the limits of feedforward Gestalt processing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Filipp; Weber, Andreas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2014-08-21

    Most objects can be recognized easily even when they are partly occluded. This also holds when several overlapping objects share the same surface features (self-splitting objects) which is an illustration of the grouping principle of Good Gestalt. We employed outline and filled contour stimuli in a primed flanker task to test whether the processing of self-splitting objects is in accordance with a simple feedforward model. We obtained priming effects in response time and response force for both types of stimuli, even when increasing the number of occluders up to three. The results for outline contours were in full accordance with a feedforward account. This was not the case for the results for filled contours (i.e., for self-splitting objects), especially under conditions of strong occlusion. We conclude that the implementation of the Good Gestalt principle is fast but still based on recurrent processing.

  16. Porthole Extrusion Process Design for Magnesium-Alloy Bumper Back Beam by Using FE Analysis and Extrusion Limit Diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sung-Yun; Ko, Dae-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Kon; Lee, In-Kyu; Joeng, Myeong-Sik; Kim, Da Hye; Cho, Yong-Jae

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies with focus on developing state-of-the-art manufacturing technologies have been conducted to produce light vehicles by employing parts made of light materials such as aluminum and magnesium. Of such materials, magnesium has been found to pose numerous issues, because it cannot be deformed (plastic deformation) easily at low temperatures. Furthermore, oxidation on the surface of manganese occurs at high temperatures. This study analyzes the extrusion process for...

  17. The sky is the limit? 20 years of small-format aerial photography taken from UAS for monitoring geomorphological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolff, Irene

    2014-05-01

    One hundred years after the first publication on aerial photography taken from unmanned aerial platforms (Arthur Batut 1890), small-format aerial photography (SFAP) became a distinct niche within remote sensing during the 1990s. Geographers, plant biologists, archaeologists and other researchers with geospatial interests re-discovered the usefulness of unmanned platforms for taking high-resolution, low-altitude photographs that could then be digitized and analysed with geographical information systems, (softcopy) photogrammetry and image processing techniques originally developed for digital satellite imagery. Even before the ubiquity of digital consumer-grade cameras and 3D analysis software accessible to the photogrammetric layperson, do-it-yourself remote sensing using kites, blimps, drones and micro air vehicles literally enabled the questing researcher to get their own pictures of the world. As a flexible, cost-effective method, SFAP offered images with high spatial and temporal resolutions that could be ideally adapted to the scales of landscapes, forms and distribution patterns to be monitored. During the last five years, this development has been significantly accelerated by the rapid technological advancements of GPS navigation, autopiloting and revolutionary softcopy-photogrammetry techniques. State-of-the-art unmanned aerial systems (UAS) now allow automatic flight planning, autopilot-controlled aerial surveys, ground control-free direct georeferencing and DEM plus orthophoto generation with centimeter accuracy, all within the space of one day. The ease of use of current UAS and processing software for the generation of high-resolution topographic datasets and spectacular visualizations is tempting and has spurred the number of publications on these issues - but which advancements in our knowledge and understanding of geomorphological processes have we seen and can we expect in the future? This presentation traces the development of the last two decades

  18. Involving private persons and corporations in the planning process according to paragraph 9b German nuclear law - practicability and limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 4th Amendment to the German Nuclear Law has procured the legal base for the disposal of radioactive waste in the German Federal Republic. The Nuclear Law states that the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig is responsible for the disposal of radioactive waste. The PTB can be assisted in its responsibilities by persons and institutions of private character. Involving private persons and corporations in the licensing process figures a legal problem, and there has been a seminar in the PTB discussing such problems. The present contribution gives a brief summary of the opinions stated by the various legal experts taking part in this seminar. (orig./HP)

  19. Allometry and partitioning of above- and below-ground biomass in farmed eucalyptus species dominant in Western Kenyan agricultural landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmers in developing countries are one of the world's largest and most efficient producers of sequestered carbon. However, measuring, monitoring and verifying how much carbon trees in smallholder farms are removing from the atmosphere has remained a great challenge in developing nations. Devising a reliable way for measuring carbon associated with trees in agricultural landscapes is essential for helping smallholder farmers benefit from emerging carbon markets. This study aimed to develop biomass equations specific to dominant eucalyptus species found in agricultural landscapes in Western Kenya. Allometric relationships were developed by regressing diameter at breast height (DBH) alone or DBH in combination with height, wood density or crown area against the biomass of 48 trees destructively sampled from a 100 km2 site. DBH alone was a significant predictor variable and estimated aboveground biomass (AGB) with over 95% accuracy. The stems, branches and leaves formed up to 74, 22 and 4% of AGB, respectively, while belowground biomass (BGB) of the harvested trees accounted for 21% of the total tree biomass, yielding an overall root-to-shoot ratio (RS) of 0.27, which varied across tree size. Total tree biomass held in live Eucalyptus trees was estimated to be 24.4 ± 0.01 Mg ha−1, equivalent to 11.7 ± 0.01 Mg of carbon per hectare. The equations presented provide useful tools for estimating tree carbon stocks of Eucalyptus in agricultural landscapes for bio-energy and carbon accounting. These equations can be applied to Eucalyptus in most agricultural systems with similar agro-ecological settings where tree growth parameters would fall within ranges comparable to the sampled population. -- Highlights: ► Equation with DBH alone estimated aboveground biomass with about 95% accuracy. ► Local generic equations overestimated above- and below-ground biomass by 10 and 48%. ► Height, wood density and crown area data did not improve model accuracy. ► Stems, roots

  20. Nitrogen Addition and Warming Independently Influence the Belowground Micro-Food Web in a Temperate Steppe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Q.; Bai, H.; Liang, W.; Xia, J.; Wan, S.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition are known to influence ecosystem structure and functioning. However, our understanding of the interactive effect of these global changes on ecosystem functioning is relatively limited, especially when it concerns the responses of soils and soil

  1. Participation of Electron Transfer Process in Rate-Limiting Step of Aromatic Hydroxylation Reactions by Compound I Models of Heme Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaka, Maaya; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxylation reactions of aromatic rings are key reactions in various biological and chemical processes. In spite of their significance, no consensus mechanism has been established. Here we performed Marcus plot analysis for aromatic hydroxylation reactions with oxoiron(IV) porphyrin π-cation radical complexes (compound I). Although many recent studies support the mechanism involving direct electrophilic attack of compound I, the slopes of the Marcus plots indicate a significant contribution of an electron transfer process in the rate-limiting step, leading us to propose a new reaction mechanism in which the electron transfer process between an aromatic compound and compound I is in equilibrium in a solvent cage and coupled with the subsequent bond formation process. PMID:27327623

  2. Deformation processes at the down-dip limit of the seismogenic zone: The example of Shimanto accretionary complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzin, G.; Raimbourg, H.; Famin, V.; Jolivet, L.; Kusaba, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In order to constrain deformation processes close to the brittle-ductile transition in seismogenic zone, we have carried out a microstructural study in the Shimanto accretionary complex (Japan), the fossil equivalent of modern Nankai accretionary prisms. The Hyuga Tectonic Mélange was sheared along the plate interface at mean temperatures of 245 °C ± 30 °C, as estimated by Raman spectroscopy of carbonaceous material (RSCM). It contains strongly elongated quartz ribbons, characterized by very high fluid inclusions density, as well as micro-veins of quartz. Both fluid inclusion planes and micro-veins are preferentially developed orthogonal to the stretching direction. Furthermore, crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of quartz c-axes in the ribbons has maxima parallel to the stretching direction. Recrystallization to a small grain size is restricted to rare deformation bands cutting across the ribbons. In such recrystallized quartz domains, CPO of quartz c-axes are orthogonal to foliation plane. The evolution of deformation micro-processes with increasing temperature can be further analyzed using the Foliated Morotsuka, a slightly higher-grade metamorphic unit (342 ± 30 °C by RSCM) from the Shimanto accretionary complex. In this unit, in contrast to Hyuga Tectonic Mélange, recrystallization of quartz veins is penetrative. CPO of quartz c-axes is concentrated perpendicularly to foliation plane. These variations in microstructures and quartz crystallographic fabric reflect a change in the dominant deformation mechanism with increasing temperatures: above ~ 300 °C, dislocation creep is dominant and results in intense quartz dynamic recrystallization. In contrast, below ~ 300 °C, quartz plasticity is not totally activated and pressure solution is the major deformation process responsible for quartz ribbons growth. In addition, the geometry of the quartz ribbons with respect to the phyllosilicate-rich shear zones shows that bulk rheology is controlled by

  3. Tracing hidden herbivores: Time-resolved non-invasive analysis of belowground volatiles by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, H.; Samudrala, D.; Cristescu, S M; Van Dam, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Root herbivores are notoriously difficult to study, as they feed hidden in the soil. However, root herbivores may be traced by analyzing specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are produced by damaged roots. These VOCs not only support parasitoids in the localization of their host, but also may help scientists study belowground plant-herbivore interactions. Herbivore-induced VOCs are usually analyzed by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS), but with this off-line method, the g...

  4. Epiphyte-cover on seagrass (Zostera marina L. leaves impedes plant performance and radial O2 loss from the below-ground tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Elgetti Brodersen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The O2 budget of seagrasses is a complex interaction between several sources and sinks, which is strongly regulated by light availability and mass transfer over the diffusive boundary layer (DBL surrounding the plant. Epiphyte growth on leaves may thus strongly affect the O2 availability of the seagrass plant and its capability to aerate its rhizosphere as a defence against plant toxins.We used electrochemical and fiber-optic microsensors to quantify the O2 flux, DBL and light microclimate around leaves with and without filamentous algal epiphytes. We also quantified the below-ground radial O2 loss from roots (~1 mm from the root-apex to elucidate how this below-ground oxic microzone was affected by the presence of epiphytes.Epiphyte-cover on seagrass leaves (~21% areal cover resulted in reduced light quality and quantity for photosynthesis, thus leading to reduced plant fitness. A ~4 times thicker diffusive boundary layer around leaves with epiphyte-cover impeded gas (and nutrient exchange with the surrounding water-column and thus the amount of O2 passively diffusing into the leaves in darkness. During light exposure of the leaves, radial oxygen loss from the below-ground tissue was ~2 times higher from plants without epiphyte-cover. In contrast, no O2 was detectable at the surface of the root-cap tissue of plants with epiphyte-cover during darkness, leaving the plants more susceptible to sulphide intrusion.Epiphyte growth on seagrass leaves thus negatively affects the light climate and O2 uptake in darkness, hampering the plants performance and thereby reducing the oxidation capability of its below-ground tissue.

  5. Availability and temporal heterogeneity of water supply affect the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore and consequently plant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tsunoda

    Full Text Available We examined how the volume and temporal heterogeneity of water supply changed the vertical distribution and mortality of a belowground herbivore, and consequently affected plant biomass. Plantago lanceolata (Plantaginaceae seedlings were grown at one per pot under different combinations of water volume (large or small volume and heterogeneity (homogeneous water conditions, watered every day; heterogeneous conditions, watered every 4 days in the presence or absence of a larva of the belowground herbivorous insect, Anomala cuprea (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae. The larva was confined in different vertical distributions to top feeding zone (top treatment, middle feeding zone (middle treatment, or bottom feeding zone (bottom treatment; alternatively no larva was introduced (control treatment or larval movement was not confined (free treatment. Three-way interaction between water volume, heterogeneity, and the herbivore significantly affected plant biomass. With a large water volume, plant biomass was lower in free treatment than in control treatment regardless of heterogeneity. Plant biomass in free treatment was as low as in top treatment. With a small water volume and in free treatment, plant biomass was low (similar to that under top treatment under homogeneous water conditions but high under heterogeneous ones (similar to that under middle or bottom treatment. Therefore, there was little effect of belowground herbivory on plant growth under heterogeneous water conditions. In other watering regimes, herbivores would be distributed in the shallow soil and reduced root biomass. Herbivore mortality was high with homogeneous application of a large volume or heterogeneous application of a small water volume. Under the large water volume, plant biomass was high in pots in which the herbivore had died. Thus, the combinations of water volume and heterogeneity affected plant growth via the change of a belowground herbivore.

  6. Silicon limitation on primary production and its destiny in Jiaozhou Bay,China V: Silicon deficit process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Dongfang; GAO Zhenhui; WANG Peigang; SUN Peiyan; LIU Shuang

    2005-01-01

    Silicon is a necessary nutrient for diatoms, silicon uptake in diatom reproduction decreased seawater silicon content. This paper clarified the characteristics of silicon transferring in the sea, which plays an important role in phytoplankton growth, zooplankton graze and marine ecosystem. Analysis revealed that silicate is supplied by terrestrial sources, through plankton uptake, death, and eventually deposits to the sea bottom, and cannot diffuse upward. This is a general silicon deficit process. Many global marine waters showed the same silicon transfer route: land→silicon biogeochemical process→sea bottom. River flow brings abundant silicate into marine waters, silicate concentration in the waters decreased in the distance away from the river estuaries. In discussion of silicon characteristics and its transfer route, it was considered that the main factor controlling the mechanism of diatom and non-diatom red tides occurrence is silicon, and the changes in silicon source. Human activities, such as sea-route cutting by building embankment and dam, and silicon supplement by the sea, such as sandstorm, rainstorm and storm tide, have largely impaired the earth ecosystem and hugely threatened the human existence. It is suggested in this paper that man should resume the original face of the Si input into the sea to keep natural ecosystem in sustainable pattern.

  7. Limits and failures in hydrology: examples and lessons learned from three decades of process oriented hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstert, Axel

    2016-04-01

    In hydrological sciences there have been rather many attempts to develop new mathematical analysis and modelling tools. Some (or even many?) of them failed or were at least only partially successful. Unfortunately, such nun-successful attempts are hardly reported on, because our common academic recognition is based on reports about success only. With all due respect to successful attempts, the scientific community could benefit a lot from reports of unsuccessful attempts or unexpected results. Therefore, in this contribution, the author presents examples of modelling failures from his own experiences during the last three decades. Emphasis is given on results obtained from process-oriented hydrological models, where the "right answer" was obtained "for the wrong reasons". Such example comprise, for instance, modelling infiltration experiments at the plot scale, modelling runoff generation from hillslope scale and in experimental catchments and modelling runoff from glaciated catchments It is explained how the "wrong reasons" could be identified and what was learned from such failures. It is argued that failures, which causes can be identified by the modeller or anybody else, could significantly contribute to a progress in hydrological system understanding or - at least - to the identification of research needs. Identification of causes of failure may even contribute more to scientific progress then brute force modelling of parameter sensitivity and uncertainty.

  8. Effects of elevated pO3 on carbon cycle between above and belowground organs of trees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ping; Rennenberg Heinz; Matyssek Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Translocation of carbohydrate from leaves to roots via phloem and reallocation from roots to leaves via xylem regulate the allocation of carbon (C) between above and belowground organs of trees. To quantitatively analyze effects of elevated ozone concentrations pO3 on the internal cycle of C, juvenile beech and spruce were grown in phytotrons and exposed to ambient and elevated pO3 (i.e. twice-ambient O3 levels, restricted to < 150 ppb) for two growing seasons. The translocation of C in the phloem and xylem was quantitatively studied by investigating the phloem/xylem-loading of sugars, the differentiation of stem conductive tissue and the hourly water flow through the stem. Results in the present study shown, elevated pO3 significantly decreased C translocation from shoot to roots in beech by reducing both sugar concentration in the phloem and conductive phloem area. Elevated pO3 also significantly decreased C reallocation from the roots to the shoot in beech by reducing both of sugar concentration in the xylem and transpiration rate. The adverse effects of elevated pO3 on C translocation in the phloem and xylem, however, were small in spruce.Contrasting to beech, spruce is less sensitive to elevated pO3, regarding to phloem differentiation and sugar concentrations in the phloem and xylem.

  9. Belowground carbon pools and dynamics in China's warm temperate and sub-tropical deciduous forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the first estimates of pools and dynamics of microbes, roots, plant litter and soil organic carbon (SOC in three dominant types of China's vast deciduous forest area: Betula platyphylla, Quercus liaotungensis, and Quercus aliena varacuteserrata. Organic matter degradation rates overshadowed litter inputs as the main determinant of the soil carbon stocks. Across the three forests, rates of litter decomposition were also indicative for turnover rates of SOC. Litter and SOC decay was faster in the sub-tropical than in the warm-temperate forests. Among the latter, SOC turnover was highest in the forest producing the higher-quality litter. Microbial biomass was, as expected, correlated with SOC content. Microbial activity, in contrast, was highest at the sub-tropical forest, despite the lower SOC availability, lower fraction of labile SOC, and lower soil microbial biomass. These results may contribute to increased understanding of controls over belowground carbon cycling in deciduous forests.

  10. A Limit Theorem for Multi-Type Subcritical Age-Dependent Branching Processes with two Types of Immigration

    OpenAIRE

    Slavtchova-Bojkova, Maroussia

    2011-01-01

    Марусия Н. Славчова-Божкова - В настоящата работа се обобщава една гранична теорема за докритичен многомерен разклоняващ се процес, зависещ от възрастта на частиците с два типа имиграция. Целта е да се обобщи аналогичен резултат в едномерния случай като се прилагат “coupling” метода, теория на възстановяването и регенериращи процеси. This work continues the study of the classical subcritical age-dependent branching process and the effect of the following two-type immigration pattern in...

  11. Carbon input belowground is the major C flux contributing to leaf litter mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubino, Mauro; Dungait; Evershed;

    2010-01-01

    due to the occurrence of many different processes contributing to litter biomass loss. With the aim of quantifying different fluxes of C lost by leaf litter decomposition, a field experiment was performed at a short rotation coppice poplar plantation in central Italy. Populus nigra leaf litter...

  12. Above- and below-ground effects of plant diversity depend on species origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuebbing, Sara E.; Classen, Aimee Taylor; Sanders, Nate;

    2015-01-01

    Although many plant communities are invaded by multiple nonnative species, we have limited information on how a species' origin affects ecosystem function. We tested how differences in species richness and origin affect productivity and seedling establishment. We created phylogenetically paired...... native and nonnative plant communities in a glasshouse experiment to test diversity-productivity relationships and responsible mechanisms (i.e. selection or complementarity effects). Additionally, we tested how productivity and associated mechanisms influenced seedling establishment. We used diversity......-interaction models to describe how species' interactions influenced diversity-productivity relationships. Communities with more species had higher total biomass than did monoculture communities, but native and nonnative communities diverged in root : shoot ratios and the mechanism responsible for increased...

  13. Inappropriate Use of the Quasi-Reversible Electrode Kinetic Model in Simulation-Experiment Comparisons of Voltammetric Processes That Approach the Reversible Limit

    KAUST Repository

    Simonov, Alexandr N.

    2014-08-19

    Many electrode processes that approach the "reversible" (infinitely fast) limit under voltammetric conditions have been inappropriately analyzed by comparison of experimental data and theory derived from the "quasi-reversible" model. Simulations based on "reversible" and "quasi-reversible" models have been fitted to an extensive series of a.c. voltammetric experiments undertaken at macrodisk glassy carbon (GC) electrodes for oxidation of ferrocene (Fc0/+) in CH3CN (0.10 M (n-Bu)4NPF6) and reduction of [Ru(NH 3)6]3+ and [Fe(CN)6]3- in 1 M KCl aqueous electrolyte. The confidence with which parameters such as standard formal potential (E0), heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant at E0 (k0), charge transfer coefficient (α), uncompensated resistance (Ru), and double layer capacitance (CDL) can be reported using the "quasi- reversible" model has been assessed using bootstrapping and parameter sweep (contour plot) techniques. Underparameterization, such as that which occurs when modeling CDL with a potential independent value, results in a less than optimal level of experiment-theory agreement. Overparameterization may improve the agreement but easily results in generation of physically meaningful but incorrect values of the recovered parameters, as is the case with the very fast Fc0/+ and [Ru(NH3)6]3+/2+ processes. In summary, for fast electrode kinetics approaching the "reversible" limit, it is recommended that the "reversible" model be used for theory-experiment comparisons with only E0, R u, and CDL being quantified and a lower limit of k 0 being reported; e.g., k0 ≥ 9 cm s-1 for the Fc0/+ process. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  14. Nitrogen addition and warming independently influence the belowground micro-food web in a temperate steppe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    Full Text Available Climate warming and atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition are known to influence ecosystem structure and functioning. However, our understanding of the interactive effect of these global changes on ecosystem functioning is relatively limited, especially when it concerns the responses of soils and soil organisms. We conducted a field experiment to study the interactive effects of warming and N addition on soil food web. The experiment was established in 2006 in a temperate steppe in northern China. After three to four years (2009-2010, we found that N addition positively affected microbial biomass and negatively influenced trophic group and ecological indices of soil nematodes. However, the warming effects were less obvious, only fungal PLFA showed a decreasing trend under warming. Interestingly, the influence of N addition did not depend on warming. Structural equation modeling analysis suggested that the direct pathway between N addition and soil food web components were more important than the indirect connections through alterations in soil abiotic characters or plant growth. Nitrogen enrichment also affected the soil nematode community indirectly through changes in soil pH and PLFA. We conclude that experimental warming influenced soil food web components of the temperate steppe less than N addition, and there was little influence of warming on N addition effects under these experimental conditions.

  15. Aboveground and Belowground Herbivores Synergistically Induce Volatile Organic Sulfur Compound Emissions from Shoots but Not from Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Holger; Brown, Phil; Cator, Eric A; Harren, Frans J M; van Dam, Nicole M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2015-07-01

    Studies on aboveground (AG) plant organs have shown that volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions differ between simultaneous attack by herbivores and single herbivore attack. There is growing evidence that interactive effects of simultaneous herbivory also occur across the root-shoot interface. In our study, Brassica rapa roots were infested with root fly larvae (Delia radicum) and the shoots infested with Pieris brassicae, either singly or simultaneously, to study these root-shoot interactions. As an analytical platform, we used Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) to investigate VOCs over a 3 day time period. Our set-up allowed us to monitor root and shoot emissions concurrently on the same plant. Focus was placed on the sulfur-containing compounds; methanethiol, dimethylsulfide (DMS), and dimethyldisulfide (DMDS), because these compounds previously have been shown to be biologically active in the interactions of Brassica plants, herbivores, parasitoids, and predators, yet have received relatively little attention. The shoots of plants simultaneously infested with AG and belowground (BG) herbivores emitted higher levels of sulfur-containing compounds than plants with a single herbivore species present. In contrast, the emission of sulfur VOCs from the plant roots increased as a consequence of root herbivory, independent of the presence of an AG herbivore. The onset of root emissions was more rapid after damage than the onset of shoot emissions. The shoots of double infested plants also emitted higher levels of methanol. Thus, interactive effects of root and shoot herbivores exhibit more strongly in the VOC emissions from the shoots than from the roots, implying the involvement of specific signaling interactions.

  16. Belowground Ecology of Scarabs Feeding on Grass Roots: Current Knowledge and Future Directions for Management in Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Adam; Barnett, Kirk; Nielsen, Uffe N; Riegler, Markus; Johnson, Scott N

    2016-01-01

    Many scarab beetles spend the majority of their lives belowground as larvae, feeding on grass roots. Many of these larvae are significant pests, causing damage to crops and grasslands. Damage by larvae of the greyback cane beetle (Dermolepida albohirtum), for example, can cause financial losses of up to AU$40 million annually to the Australian sugarcane industry. We review the ecology of some scarab larvae in Australasia, focusing on three subfamilies; Dynastinae, Rutelinae, and Melolonthinae, containing key pest species. Although considerable research on the control of some scarab pests has been carried out in Australasia, for some species, the basic biology and ecology remains largely unexplored. We synthesize what is known about these scarab larvae and outline key knowledge gaps to highlight future research directions with a view to improve pest management. We do this by presenting an overview of the scarab larval host plants and feeding behavior; the impacts of abiotic (temperature, moisture, and fertilization) and biotic (pathogens, natural enemies, and microbial symbionts) factors on scarab larvae and conclude with how abiotic and biotic factors can be applied in agriculture for improved pest management, suggesting future research directions. Several host plant microbial symbionts, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endophytes, can improve plant tolerance to scarabs and reduce larval performance, which have shown promise for use in pest management. In addition to this, several microbial scarab pathogens have been isolated for commercial use in pest management with particularly promising results. The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae caused a 50% reduction in cane beetle larvae while natural enemies such as entomopathogenic nematodes have also shown potential as a biocontrol. Key abiotic factors, such as soil water, play an important role in affecting both scarab larvae and these control agents and should therefore feature in future multi

  17. Effects of manipulated above- and belowground organic matter input on soil respiration in a Chinese pine plantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Fan

    Full Text Available Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT, only litter removal (LR, control (CK, only root trenching (RT and litter addition (LA. We found that either aboveground litter removal or root trenching decreased soil respiration. On average, soil respiration rate was significantly decreased in the LRRT treatment, by about 38.93% ± 2.01% compared to the control. Soil respiration rate in the LR treatment was 30.65% ± 1.87% and in the RT treatment 17.65% ± 1.95% lower than in the control. Litter addition significantly increased soil respiration rate by about 25.82% ± 2.44% compared to the control. Soil temperature and soil moisture were the main factors affecting seasonal variation in soil respiration. Up to the 59.7% to 82.9% seasonal variation in soil respiration is explained by integrating soil temperature and soil moisture within each of the various organic matter treatments. The temperature sensitivity parameter, Q10, was higher in the RT (2.72 and LA (3.19 treatments relative to the control (2.51, but lower in the LRRT (1.52 and LR treatments (1.36. Our data suggest that manipulation of soil organic matter input can not only alter soil CO2 efflux, but also have profound effect on the temperature sensitivity of organic carbon decomposition in a temperate pine forest.

  18. Aboveground and belowground biomass allocation in native Prosopis caldenia Burkart secondaries woodlands in the semi-arid Argentinean pampas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The woodlands in the south-west of the Argentinean pampas are dominated by Prosopis Caldenia Burkart (calden). The current deforestation rate of this woodlands is 0.82% per year. Different compensation initiatives have begun that recognize the role of forests as environmental service providers. The financial incentives they offer make it necessary to quantify the amount of carbon stored in the forest biomass. A model for estimating calden biomass was developed. Thirty-eight trees were selected, felled and divided into sections. An equation system was fitted using joint generalized regression to ensure the additivity property. A weighted regression was used to avoid heteroscedasticity. In these woodlands fire is the main disturbance and it can modify tree allometry, due this all models included the area of the base of the stem and tree height as independent variables since it indirectly collects this variability. Total biomass and the stem fraction had the highest R2Adj. values (0.75), while branches with a diameter less than 7 cm had the lowest (0.58). Tree biomass was also analyzed by partitioning into the basic fractions of stem, crown, roots, and the root/shoot ratio. Biomass allocation was greatest in the crown fraction and the mean root/shoot ratio was 0.58. The carbon stock of the caldenales considering only calden tree biomass is 20.2 Mg ha−1. While the overall carbon balance of the region is negative (deforestation and biomass burning, the remnant forested area has increased their calden density and in an indirect way his carbon sequestration capacity could also be increased. - Highlights: • A model for estimating aboveground and belowground Prosopis caldenia biomass was developed. • Biomass allocation into the tree and the root/shoot ratio were analyzed. • The equation systems presented had made it possible to more accurately estimate the biomass stored in calden woodlands

  19. Effects of manipulated above- and belowground organic matter input on soil respiration in a Chinese pine plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Juan; Wang, Jinsong; Zhao, Bo; Wu, Lianhai; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhao, Xiuhai; Gadow, Klaus V

    2015-01-01

    Alteration in the amount of soil organic matter input can have profound effect on carbon dynamics in forest soils. The objective of our research was to determine the response in soil respiration to above- and belowground organic matter manipulation in a Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) plantation. Five organic matter treatments were applied during a 2-year experiment: both litter removal and root trenching (LRRT), only litter removal (LR), control (CK), only root trenching (RT) and litter addition (LA). We found that either aboveground litter removal or root trenching decreased soil respiration. On average, soil respiration rate was significantly decreased in the LRRT treatment, by about 38.93% ± 2.01% compared to the control. Soil respiration rate in the LR treatment was 30.65% ± 1.87% and in the RT treatment 17.65% ± 1.95% lower than in the control. Litter addition significantly increased soil respiration rate by about 25.82% ± 2.44% compared to the control. Soil temperature and soil moisture were the main factors affecting seasonal variation in soil respiration. Up to the 59.7% to 82.9% seasonal variation in soil respiration is explained by integrating soil temperature and soil moisture within each of the various organic matter treatments. The temperature sensitivity parameter, Q10, was higher in the RT (2.72) and LA (3.19) treatments relative to the control (2.51), but lower in the LRRT (1.52) and LR treatments (1.36). Our data suggest that manipulation of soil organic matter input can not only alter soil CO2 efflux, but also have profound effect on the temperature sensitivity of organic carbon decomposition in a temperate pine forest. PMID:25970791

  20. Total belowground carbon flux in subalpine forests is related to leaf area index, soil nitrogen, and tree height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Ryan, Michael G.; Bradford, John B.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Birdsey, R.

    2016-01-01

    In forests, total belowground carbon (C) flux (TBCF) is a large component of the C budget and represents a critical pathway for delivery of plant C to soil. Reducing uncertainty around regional estimates of forest C cycling may be aided by incorporating knowledge of controls over soil respiration and TBCF. Photosynthesis, and presumably TBCF, declines with advancing tree size and age, and photosynthesis increases yet C partitioning to TBCF decreases in response to high soil fertility. We hypothesized that these causal relationships would result in predictable patterns of TBCF, and partitioning of C to TBCF, with natural variability in leaf area index (LAI), soil nitrogen (N), and tree height in subalpine forests in the Rocky Mountains, USA. Using three consecutive years of soil respiration data collected from 22 0.38-ha locations across three 1-km2 subalpine forested landscapes, we tested three hypotheses: (1) annual soil respiration and TBCF will show a hump-shaped relationship with LAI; (2) variability in TBCF unexplained by LAI will be related to soil nitrogen (N); and (3) partitioning of C to TBCF (relative to woody growth) will decline with increasing soil N and tree height. We found partial support for Hypothesis 1 and full support for Hypotheses 2 and 3. TBCF, but not soil respiration, was explained by LAI and soil N patterns (r2 = 0.49), and the ratio of annual TBCF to TBCF plus aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) was related to soil N and tree height (r2 = 0.72). Thus, forest C partitioning to TBCF can vary even within the same forest type and region, and approaches that assume a constant fraction of TBCF relative to ANPP may be missing some of this variability. These relationships can aid with estimates of forest soil respiration and TBCF across landscapes, using spatially explicit forest data such as national inventories or remotely sensed data products.

  1. Trace gas and particle emissions from fires in large diameter and belowground biomass fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschi, Isaac; Yokelson, Robert J.; Ward, Darold E.; Babbitt, Ron E.; Susott, Ronald A.; Goode, Jon G.; Hao, Wei Min

    2003-07-01

    We adopt a working definition of residual smoldering combustion (RSC) as biomass combustion that produces emissions that are not lofted by strong fire-induced convection. RSC emissions can be produced for up to several weeks after the passage of a flame front and they are mostly unaffected by flames. Fuels prone to RSC include downed logs, duff, and organic soils. Limited observations in the tropics and the boreal forest suggest that RSC is a globally significant source of emissions to the troposphere. This source was previously uncharacterized. We measured the first emission factors (EF) for RSC in a series of laboratory fires and in a wooded savanna in Zambia, Africa. We report EFRSC for both particles with diameter cyanide. We show that a model used to predict trace gas EF for fires in a wide variety of aboveground fine fuels fails to predict EF for RSC. For many compounds, our EF for RSC-prone fuels from the boreal forest and wooded savanna are very different from the EF for the same compounds measured in fire convection columns above these ecosystems. We couple our newly measured EFRSC with estimates of fuel consumption by RSC to refine emission estimates for fires in the boreal forest and wooded savanna. We find some large changes in estimates of biomass fire emissions with the inclusion of RSC. For instance, the wooded savanna methane EF increases by a factor of 2.5 even when RSC accounts for only 10% of fuel consumption. This shows that many more measurements of fuel consumption and EF for RSC are needed to improve estimates of biomass burning emissions.

  2. 设计阶段的限额设计应用研究%The Design Process of Investment Control Based on Design Limits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文杰; 张哲奇; 李洪砚

    2014-01-01

    In the investment control, construction units pay more attention to the construction aspects and less to the design aspects, which will lead to inefficient use of funds and show the "three excesses" phenomenon. This paper discusses an effective method for investment control at the design stage: using the limits design in the design process to control the design investment in the plan investment degree of construction project, achieve the investment limits not exceeded, and reach the purpose of investment control. Finally the paper reflects the features of limits design.%建设单位在投资控制中过度重视施工环节而轻视设计环节,将导致资金的利用效率低下,出现“三超”现象。本文探讨了在设计阶段实现投资控制的一条有效方法:在设计过程中使用限额设计的方法,将设计投资控制在建设项目的计划投资内,实现投资限额不被突破,达到投资控制的目的。最后针对限额设计的特点,表明了一些思考。

  3. Effects of elevated temperature and CO2 on aboveground-belowground systems: a case study with plants, their mutualistic bacteria and root / shoot herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Michael William Ryalls

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between above- and belowground herbivores have been prominent in the field of aboveground-belowground ecology from the outset, although little is known about how climate change affects these organisms when they share the same plant. Additionally, the interactive effects of multiple factors associated with climate change such as elevated temperature (eT and elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (eCO2 are untested. We investigated how eT and eCO2 affected larval development of the lucerne weevil (Sitona discoideus and colonisation by the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum, on three cultivars of a common host plant, lucerne (Medicago sativa. Sitona discoideus larvae feed on root nodules housing N2-fixing rhizobial bacteria, allowing us to test the effects of eT and eCO2 on three trophic levels. Moreover, we assessed the influence of these factors on plant growth. eT increased plant growth rate initially (6, 8 and 10 weeks after sowing, with cultivar ‘Sequel’ achieving the greatest height. Inoculation with aphids, however, reduced plant growth at week 14. eT severely reduced root nodulation by 43%, whereas eCO2 promoted nodulation by 56%, but only at ambient temperatures. Weevil presence increased net root biomass and nodulation, by 31 and 45%, respectively, showing an overcompensatory plant growth response. Effects of eT and eCO2 on root nodulation were mirrored by weevil larval development; eT and eCO2 reduced and increased larval development, respectively. Contrary to expectations, aphid colonisation was unaffected by eT or eCO2, but there was a near-significant 10% reduction in colonisation rates on plants with weevils present belowground. The contrasting effects of eT and eCO2 on weevils potentially occurred through changes in root nodulation patterns.

  4. Interactive effects of belowground organic matter input, increased precipitation and clipping on soil carbon and nitrogen mineralization in a temperate steppe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Ma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil organic matter (SOM inputs, increased precipitation and clipping (reducing belowground photosynthates allocation are predicted to affect soil C and N cycling in temperate grassland ecosystems. However, the interactive effects between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil C and N mineralization in temperate steppes are still poorly understood. A field manipulation experiment was conducted to quantify the effects of SOM inputs, increased precipitation, clipping and their interactions on soil C and N mineralization in a temperate steppe of northeastern China from 2010 to 2011. The results showed that SOM inputs significantly increased soil C mineralization rate (CMR and net N mineralization rate (NMR. Increased precipitation-induced enhancement of soil CMR essentially ceased after the first year, stimulation of soil NMR and NNR continued into the second year. However, clipping only marginally decreased soil CMR and NMR during the two years. There were significant synergistic interactions between SOM inputs (or increased precipitation and clipping on soil CMR and NMR, as SOM inputs (or increased precipitation showed greater effects on soil CMR and NMR under clipped plots than under unclipped plots, which could be explained by the relative shifts in soil microbial community structure because of bacterial biomass increases, and by the relative decreases in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi biomass due to the reduction of belowground photosynthates allocation. These results highlight the importance of plants in mediating the responses of soil C and N mineralization to potentially increased SOM and precipitation by controlling belowground photosynthates allocation in the temperate steppe. Thus, the findings have important implications for improving prediction of C and N sequestration potential and its feedbacks to climate change in temperate steppe ecosystems.

  5. Impact of long-term wetting on belowground respiration and methanogenesis in Luther Bog, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Marie; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands play a major role in the global carbon cycle. They store one-third of total world soil carbon, sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) and release CO2 and methane (CH4). Climate and land-use change are predicted to cause either wetter winters and wetter summers or wetter winters and drier summers in the area where northern peatlands are located. Feedback on processes in the peat is poorly understood on the time scale of decades. In this study, we investigated impacts of long-term wetting and long-term fluctuating water table on potential CO2 and CH4 production rates and organic matter quality of the fractions bulk peat, pore water and leachate. Bulk peat potential CO2 production rates of 2.38 to 25.55 μmol g-1 d-1 (aerobic) and 1.53 to 7.33 μmol g-1 d-1 (anaerobic) decreased with depth along with a decrease in organic matter quality. Potential CH4 production rates (0.002 to 2.60 μmol g-1 d-1) increased with anaerobic conditions and a lack of electron acceptors rather than being dependent on the availability of labile organic matter. This pattern was less evident in solute fraction samples where labile compounds in top layers were probably either too labile to be detected or water movement obscured differences between depths. Bulk peat potential anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production increased through long-term wetting. As wetting did not change organic matter quality or aerobic production rates, increased anaerobic production rates likely originate from microorganisms adapted to anaerobic conditions. All indicators of organic matter quality, FTIR ratios, SUVA254, E2:E3, HIX, FI and PARAFAC, provided similar results. Other than expected, wetting did not result in higher organic matter quality in bulk peat and leachate. Drier conditions in summer led to reduced organic matter quality. In pore water, long-term wetter conditions resulted in a higher organic matter quality. Slow-down of decomposition due to anaerobic conditions is unlikely, as this was not the case with

  6. Impact of long-term wetting on belowground respiration and methanogenesis in Luther Bog, Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Marie; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands play a major role in the global carbon cycle. They store one-third of total world soil carbon, sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) and release CO2 and methane (CH4). Climate and land-use change are predicted to cause either wetter winters and wetter summers or wetter winters and drier summers in the area where northern peatlands are located. Feedback on processes in the peat is poorly understood on the time scale of decades. In this study, we investigated impacts of long-term wetting and long-term fluctuating water table on potential CO2 and CH4 production rates and organic matter quality of the fractions bulk peat, pore water and leachate. Bulk peat potential CO2 production rates of 2.38 to 25.55 μmol g‑1 d‑1 (aerobic) and 1.53 to 7.33 μmol g‑1 d‑1 (anaerobic) decreased with depth along with a decrease in organic matter quality. Potential CH4 production rates (0.002 to 2.60 μmol g‑1 d‑1) increased with anaerobic conditions and a lack of electron acceptors rather than being dependent on the availability of labile organic matter. This pattern was less evident in solute fraction samples where labile compounds in top layers were probably either too labile to be detected or water movement obscured differences between depths. Bulk peat potential anaerobic CO2 and CH4 production increased through long-term wetting. As wetting did not change organic matter quality or aerobic production rates, increased anaerobic production rates likely originate from microorganisms adapted to anaerobic conditions. All indicators of organic matter quality, FTIR ratios, SUVA254, E2:E3, HIX, FI and PARAFAC, provided similar results. Other than expected, wetting did not result in higher organic matter quality in bulk peat and leachate. Drier conditions in summer led to reduced organic matter quality. In pore water, long-term wetter conditions resulted in a higher organic matter quality. Slow-down of decomposition due to anaerobic conditions is unlikely, as this was not the

  7. The Limit Properties of the Bisexual Branching Process with Two Kinds of Immigration%双移民两性分支过程的极限性质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宣

    2015-01-01

    考虑同时带个体移民和配对单元移民的两性分支过程,称为双移民两性分支过程。本文首先介绍这种两性分支过程模型,然后讨论过程的状态性质,在一定的条件下得到过程的正常返性,最后研究第n代每个配对单元平均增长率的极限行为并利用马氏链的相关结论给出过程的极限性质。%In this paper,we consider a bisexual branching process with individual immigration and unit immigration called two types of immigration.First we introduce this bisexual Galton-Watson branching processes, then discuss the properties of its state space and ob-tained positive recurrent in some conditions.Finally thelimit behaviour of the mean growth rate per mating unit is studied and the limit properties for the process is investigated by using relevant conclusions of Markovchain.

  8. Direct measurement of acylenzyme hydrolysis demonstrates rate-limiting deacylation in cleavage of physiological sequences by the processing protease Kex2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, N C; Fuller, R S

    2001-03-27

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kex2 protease is the prototype for the family of eukaryotic proprotein convertases that includes furin, PC1/3, and PC2. These enzymes belong to the subtilase superfamily of serine proteases and are distinguished from degradative subtilisins by structural features and by their much more stringent substrate specificity. Pre-steady-state studies have shown that both Kex2 and furin exhibit an initial burst of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin release in cleavage of peptidyl methylcoumarinamide substrates that are based on physiological cleavage sites. Thus, in cleavage of such substrates, formation of the acylenzyme intermediate is fast relative to some later step (deacylation or N-terminal product release). This behavior is significant, because Kex2 also exhibits burst kinetics in cleavage of peptide bonds. k(cat) for cleavage of a tetrapeptidyl methylcoumarinamide substrate based on the physiological yeast substrate pro-alpha-factor exhibits a weak solvent isotope effect, but neither this isotope effect nor temperature dependence studies with this substrate conclusively identify the rate-limiting step for Kex2 cleavage of this substrate. We therefore developed an assay to measure deacylation directly by pulse-chase incorporation of H(2)(18)O in a rapid-quenched-flow mixer followed by mass spectrometric quantitation. The results given by this assay rule out rate-limiting product release for cleavage of this substrate by Kex2. These experiments demonstrate that cleavage of the acylenzyme ester bond, as opposed to either the initial attack on the amide bond or product release, is rate-limiting for the action of Kex2 at physiological sequences. This work demonstrates a fundamental difference in the catalytic strategy of proprotein processing enzymes and degradative subtilisins. PMID:11297433

  9. Above- and belowground controls on water use by trees of different wood types in an eastern US deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Frederick C; Woodruff, David R; Eissenstat, David M; Lin, Henry S; Adams, Thomas S; McCulloh, Katherine A

    2013-04-01

    Stomata control tree transpiration by sensing and integrating environmental signals originating in the atmosphere and soil, and co-occurring species may differ in inherent stomatal sensitivity to these above- and belowground signals and in the types of signals to which they respond. Stomatal responsiveness to environmental signals is likely to differ across species having different types of wood (e.g., ring-porous, diffuse-porous and coniferous) because each wood type differs in the structure, size and spatial distribution of its xylem conduits as well as in the scaling of hydraulic properties with stem diameter. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of variation in soil water availability and atmospheric evaporative demand on stomatal regulation of transpiration in seven co-occurring temperate deciduous forest species representing three wood types. We measured whole-tree sap flux and soil and atmospheric variables in a mixed deciduous forest in central Pennsylvania over the course of a growing season characterized by severe drought and large fluctuations in atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (D). The relative sensitivity of sap flux to soil drying was ∼2.2-2.3 times greater in the diffuse-porous and coniferous species than in the ring-porous species. Stomata of the ring-porous oaks were only about half as responsive to increased D as those of trees of the other two wood types. These differences in responsiveness to changes in the below- and aboveground environment implied that regulation of leaf water potential in the ring-porous oaks was less stringent than that in the diffuse-porous angiosperms or the conifers. The results suggest that increases in the frequency or intensity of summer droughts in the study region could have multiple consequences for forest function, including altered successional time courses or climax species composition and cumulative effects on whole-tree architecture, resulting in a structural and physiological legacy that

  10. Belowground ecology of scarabs feeding on grass roots: current knowledge and future directions for management in Australasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eFrew

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many scarab beetles spend the majority of their lives belowground as larvae, feeding on grass roots. Many of these larvae are significant pests, causing damage to crops and grasslands. Damage by larvae of the greyback cane beetle (Dermolepida albohirtum, for example, can cause financial losses of up to AU$40 million annually to the Australian sugarcane industry. We review the ecology of some scarab larvae in Australasia, focusing on three subfamilies; Dynastinae, Rutelinae and Melolonthinae, containing key pest species. Although considerable research on the control of some scarab pests has been carried out in Australasia, for some species, the basic biology and ecology remains largely unexplored. We synthesize what is known about these scarab larvae and outline key knowledge gaps to highlights future research directions with a view to improve pest management. We do this by presenting an overview of the scarab larval host plants and feeding behavior; the impacts of abiotic (temperature, moisture and fertilization and biotic (pathogens, natural enemies and microbial symbionts factors on scarab larvae and conclude with how abiotic and biotic factors can be applied in agriculture for improved pest management, suggesting future research directions.Several host plant microbial symbionts, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endophytes, can improve plant tolerance to scarabs and reduce larval performance, which have shown promise for use in pest management. In addition to this, several microbial scarab pathogens have been isolated for commercial use in pest management with particularly promising results. The entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae caused a 50% reduction in cane beetle larvae while natural enemies such as entomopathogenic nematodes have also shown potential as a biocontrol. Continued research should focus on filling the gaps in the knowledge of the basic ecology and feeding behavior of scarab larval species within Australasia

  11. Comparative Metagenomics Reveal Phylum Level Temporal and Spatial Changes in Mycobiome of Belowground Parts of Crocus sativus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardar, Sheetal; Singh, Heikham Russiachand; Gowda, Malali; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Plant-fungal associations have been explored by routine cultivation based approaches and cultivation based approaches cannot catalogue more than 5% of fungal diversity associated with any niche. In the present study, an attempt has been made to catalogue fungal diversity associated with belowground parts i.e. rhizosphere and cormosphere, of Crocus sativus (an economically important herb) during two growth stages, using cultivation independent ITS gene targeted approach, taking bulk soil as reference. The 454 pyrosequencing sequence data analysis suggests that the fungal diversity was niche and growth stage specific. Fungi diversity, in the present case, was not only different between the two organs (roots and corm) but the dominance pattern varies between the cormosphere during two growth stages. Zygomycota was dominant fungal phylum in the rhizosphere whereas Basidiomycota was dominant in cormosphere during flowering stage. However in cormosphere though Basidiomycota was dominant phylum during flowering stage but Zygomycota was dominant during dormant stage. Interestingly, in cormosphere, the phyla which was dominant at dormant stage was rare at flowering stage and vice-versa (Basidiomycota: Flowering = 93.2% Dormant = 0.05% and Zygomycota: Flowering = 0.8% Dormant = 99.7%). At genus level, Rhizopus was dominant in dormant stage but was rare in flowering stage (Rhizopus: Dormant = 99.7% Flowering = 0.55%). This dynamics is not followed by the bulk soil fungi which was dominated by Ascomycota during both stages under study. The genus Fusarium, whose species F. oxysporum causes corm rot in C. sativus, was present during both stages with slightly higher abundance in roots. Interestingly, the abundance of Rhizopus varied a great deal in two stages in cormosphere but the abundance of Fusarium was comparable in two growth stages (Bulk soil Flowering = 0.05%, Rhizosphere Flowering = 1.4%, Cormosphere Flowering = 0.06%, Bulk soil Dormant = 2.47% and cormosphere dormant

  12. Maxwell's demon and the physical limits on information processing%麦克斯韦妖与信息处理的物理极限

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙昌璞; 全海涛

    2013-01-01

    文章系统地评述了麦克斯韦妖佯谬相关的热力学基本观念的发端、历史沿革以及当前正在发展的科学前沿问题。文章作者从以下两个方面详细地阐述了为什么信息处理过程本质上是一个与麦克斯韦妖观念相“纠缠”的物理过程:(1)信息认知和提取可以辅助物理系统更有效地做功;(2)物理定律会对信息处理过程施加一个不可逾越的物理极限。这些分析与概念的澄清将有助于正确理解计算过程和热力学之间的关系。%We review the origin and historical evolution of the fundamental concepts regard-ing Maxwell’s demon as well as the latest developments at the frontiers of scientific research derived from the paradox. It is demonstrated from two complementary aspects that information processing is a process that is in essence“entangled”with the concept of Maxwell’s demon:(1) A physical system can work more efficiently by acquiring information, and (2) physical laws impose an ultimate limit on the energy dissipation during information processing. Our analysis and clarification of these concepts should promote our understanding of the intrinsic relation between computation processes and the the-ory of thermodynamics.

  13. Can ectomycorrhizal symbiosis and belowground plant traits be used as ecological tools to mitigate erosion on degraded slopes in the ultramafic soils of New Caledonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenois, Julien; Carriconde, Fabian; Rey, Freddy; Stokes, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    New Caledonia is an archipelago in the South West Pacific located just above the Tropic of Capricorn. The main island is bisected by a continuous mountain chain whose highest peaks reach more than 1 600 m. With mean annual rainfall above 2 000 mm in the South of the main island, frequent downpours and steep slopes, its soils are prone to water erosion. Deforestation, fires and mining activity are the main drivers of water erosion. Stakes are high to mitigate the phenomenon: extraction of nickel from ultramafic substrates (one third of the whole territory) is the main economic activity; New Caledonia is considered as a biodiversity hotspot. Restoration ecology is seen as a key approach for tackling such environmental challenges. Soil microorganisms could play significant roles in biological processes such as plant nutrition and plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Microorganisms could increase soil aggregate stability and thus mitigate soil erodibility. Plant roots increase soil cohesion through exudation and decomposition processes. To date, few studies have collected data on the soil aggregate stability of steep slopes affected by erosion and, to our knowledge, interactions between ectomycorrhizas (ECM), roots and erodibility of ultramafic soils have never been considered. The objective of our study is to assess the influence of ECM symbiosis and plant root traits on the erodibility of ultramafic soils of New Caledonia and answer the following questions: 1/ What is the influence of plant root traits of vegetal communities and ECM fungal diversity on soil erodibility? 2/ What are the belowground plant traits of some mycorrhized endemic species used in ecological restoration? 3/ What is the influence of plant root traits and ECM fungal inoculation on soil erodibility? At the scale of plant communities, five types of vegetation have been chosen in the South of the main island: degraded ligno-herbaceous shrubland, ligno-herbaceous shrubland, degraded humid

  14. Assessment of Current Process Modeling Approaches to Determine Their Limitations, Applicability and Developments Needed for Long-Fiber Thermoplastic Injection Molded Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Holbery, Jim; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.

    2006-11-30

    This report describes the status of the current process modeling approaches to predict the behavior and flow of fiber-filled thermoplastics under injection molding conditions. Previously, models have been developed to simulate the injection molding of short-fiber thermoplastics, and an as-formed composite part or component can then be predicted that contains a microstructure resulting from the constituents’ material properties and characteristics as well as the processing parameters. Our objective is to assess these models in order to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for long-fiber injection-molded thermoplastics (LFTs). First, the concentration regimes are summarized to facilitate the understanding of different types of fiber-fiber interaction that can occur for a given fiber volume fraction. After the formulation of the fiber suspension flow problem and the simplification leading to the Hele-Shaw approach, the interaction mechanisms are discussed. Next, the establishment of the rheological constitutive equation is presented that reflects the coupled flow/orientation nature. The decoupled flow/orientation approach is also discussed which constitutes a good simplification for many applications involving flows in thin cavities. Finally, before outlining the necessary developments for LFTs, some applications of the current orientation model and the so-called modified Folgar-Tucker model are illustrated through the fiber orientation predictions for selected LFT samples.

  15. Contrasting land uses in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral systems generated patchy diversity patterns of vascular plants and below-ground microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagella, Simonetta; Filigheddu, Rossella; Caria, Maria Carmela; Girlanda, Mariangela; Roggero, Pier Paolo

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this paper were (i) to define how contrasting land uses affected plant biodiversity in Mediterranean agro-silvo-pastoral-systems across a gradient of disturbance regimes: cork oak forests, secondary grasslands, hay crops, grass covered vineyards, tilled vineyards; (ii) to determine whether these patterns mirrored those of below-ground microorganisms and whether the components of γ-diversity followed a similar model. The disturbance regimes affected plant assemblage composition. Species richness decreased with increasing land use intensity, the Shannon index showed the highest values in grasslands and hay crops. Plant assemblage composition patterns mirrored those of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota. Richness in Basidiomycota, denitrifying bacteria and microbial biomass showed the same trend as that observed for vascular plant richness. The Shannon index pattern of below-ground microorganisms was different from that of plants. The plant γ-diversity component model weakly mirrored those of Ascomycota. Patchy diversity patterns suggest that the maintenance of contrasting land uses associated with different productions typical of agro-silvo-pastoral-systems can guarantee the conservation of biodiversity.

  16. On limit and limit setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorney, J E

    1994-01-01

    This article investigates the role of limit and limit setting within the psychoanalytic situation. Limit is understood to be a boundary between self and others, established as an interactional dimension of experience. Disorders of limit are here understood within the context of Winnicott's conception of the "anti-social tendency." Limit setting is proposed as a necessary and authentic response to the patient's acting out via holding and empathic responsiveness, viewed here as a form of boundary delineation. It is proposed that the patient attempts to repair his or her boundary problem through a seeking of secure limits within the analyst. The setting of secure and appropriate limits must arise from a working through of the analyst's own countertransference response to the patient. It is critical that this response be evoked by, and arise from, the immediate therapeutic interaction so that the patient can experience limit setting as simultaneously personal and authentic. PMID:7972580

  17. Determination of a limit on the branching ratio of the rare process b → s γ with the L3 detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is dedicated to the determination of a limit on the branching ratio of the rare process b -> Sγ, from Z -> bb-bar events collected at LEP with the L3 detector during collisions at √S ∼ MZ, MZ ± 2 GeV. The rare decay of the b quark, b -> sγ, is forbidden at tree level and occurs, in the Standard Model, through one loop diagram (called penguin diagram) which makes it sensitive to contributions of new particles such as charged Higgs bosons or supersymmetric particles. The theoretical branching ratio is given in Standard Model by Br(b->Sγ) (2.55 ± 0.58) x 10-4. The aim of this study was to observe, in the inclusive mode, a possible excess of the rate of the b -> sγ transition, compare to the expected value. The selection of b hadrons from Z hadronic decays is achieved by the use of both an algorithm based on a multidimensional analysis of the event shape and an algorithm based on the impact parameter of the tracks. The energetic photon is selected by using a π0/γ discriminator based on the transverse shape of its electromagnetic shower. The s-jet reconstruction is achieved by the use of an iterative method with search of the minimum invariant mass. It allows the determination of the b hadron rest frame, which picks near 2.5 GeV, is used in a new method of signal events simulation. No excess of event is observed in the data after the analysis of 1.5 million of Z decays. The limit obtained, when the systematic errors are included, is: Br(b -> sγ) ≤9.2 x 104 at 90% confidence level. This result is consistent with the Standard Model expectation. (author)

  18. Quench limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With thirteen beam induced quenches and numerous Machine Development tests, the current knowledge of LHC magnets quench limits still contains a lot of unknowns. Various approaches to determine the quench limits are reviewed and results of the tests are presented. Attempt to reconstruct a coherent picture emerging from these results is taken. The available methods of computation of the quench levels are presented together with dedicated particle shower simulations which are necessary to understand the tests. The future experiments, needed to reach better understanding of quench limits as well as limits for the machine operation are investigated. The possible strategies to set BLM (Beam Loss Monitor) thresholds are discussed. (author)

  19. Universal Limits on Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, L M

    2004-01-01

    The physical limits to computation have been under active scrutiny over the past decade or two, as theoretical investigations of the possible impact of quantum mechanical processes on computing have begun to make contact with realizable experimental configurations. We demonstrate here that the observed acceleration of the Universe can produce a universal limit on the total amount of information that can be stored and processed in the future, putting an ultimate limit on future technology for any civilization, including a time-limit on Moore's Law. The limits we derive are stringent, and include the possibilities that the computing performed is either distributed or local. A careful consideration of the effect of horizons on information processing is necessary for this analysis, which suggests that the total amount of information that can be processed by any observer is significantly less than the Hawking-Beckenstein entropy associated with the existence of an event horizon in an accelerating universe.

  20. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  1. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  2. Nitridation of organo-silicate glass: A self-limiting process for PVD Ta1+xN/Ta barrier formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial reactions of sputter-deposited Ta with a low dielectric constant Si-O-C-H material (SiCOH), and with surface-nitrided SiCOH (N-SiCOH) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The studies were carried out in a system containing a processing chamber attached to an XPS analysis chamber so that sample transport between deposition and analysis environments occurred under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Ta sputter deposition on unmodified SiCOH yielded an interfacial phase ∼3 nm thick composed of Ta oxide/carbide (Ta-O-C), which is known to interact only weakly with Cu. Bombardment of the vicinal SiCOH surface by 500 eV Ar+ in the presence of NH3 resulted in carbon depletion and the self-limiting nitridation of the surface, with N attachment primarily at Si sites. Subsequent Ta sputter deposition yielded reduced Ta oxide and carbide formation, and formation of a Ta-rich nitride layer of 10 A average thickness. Subsequent deposition resulted in metallic Ta formation.

  3. Three-dimensional spectrum mapping of bright emission centers: Investigating the brightness-limiting process in Eu-doped GaN red light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulse-driven emission-spectroscopy mapping technique is used to investigate the bright emission centers in Eu-doped GaN (GaN:Eu) red light emitting diodes (LED). The LEDs are operated in pulse-driven mode, and the emission spectra are acquired for a range of pulse frequencies. This ensemble of emission spectral data yields a three-dimensional mapping that allows the origin of emission lines to be identified by visual inspection. The identification was achieved even for a weak 5D0 → 7F3 transition in conventional photoluminescence measurements. A peculiar split is observed in the 5D0 → 7F3 transition for the bright emission center referred to as OMVPE 8. Despite the unique transition at this emission center, the emission efficiencies for the 5D0 → 7F3 and 5D0 → 7F2 transitions were identical. This finding indicates that the excitation of the emission centers, rather than the radiative transitions, is the limiting process that determines the GaN:Eu red LED brightness

  4. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  5. Evidence that acidification-induced declines in plant diversity and productivity are mediated by changes in below-ground communities and soil properties in a semi-arid steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dima; Lan, Zhichun; Bai, Xue; Grace, James B.; Bai, Yongfei

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic acid deposition–induced soil acidification is one of the major threats to biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and services. Few studies, however, have explored in detail how above-ground changes in plant species richness and productivity resulting from soil acidification are mediated by effects on below-ground biota and soil properties.

  6. Limiting Skepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Symons, John

    2011-01-01

    Skeptics argue that the acquisition of knowledge is impossible given the standing possibility of error. We present the limiting convergence strategy for responding to skepticism and discuss the relationship between conceivable error and an agent’s knowledge in the limit. We argue that the skeptic...... must demonstrate that agents are operating with a bad method or are in an epistemically cursed world. Such demonstration involves a significant step beyond conceivability and commits the skeptic to potentially convergent inquiry...

  7. Limit analysis via creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper it is presented a variational method for the limit analysis of an ideal plastic solid. This method has been denominated as Modified Secundary Creep and enables to find the collapse loads through a minimization of a functional and a limit process. Given an ideal plastic material it is shown how to determinate the associated secundary creep constitutive equation. Finally, as an application, it is found the limit load in an pressurized von Mises rigid plastic sphere. (Author)

  8. Recommendations to the NRC for review criteria for alternative methods of low-level radioactive waste disposal: Task 2a, Below-ground vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) and the US Army Engineer Division, Huntsville (HNDED) have developed general design criteria and specific design review criteria for the below-ground vault (BGV) alternative method of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal. A BGV is a reinforced concrete vault (floor, walls, and roof) placed underground below the frost line, and above the water table, surrounded by filter blanket and drainage zones and covered with a low permeability earth layer and top soil with vegetation. Eight major review criteria categories have been developed ranging from the loads imposed on the BGV structure through material quality and durability considerations. Specific design review criteria have been developed in detail for seven of the eight major categories. 59 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Do elevations in temperature, CO2, and nutrient availability modify belowground carbon gain and root morphology in artificially defoliated silver birch seedlings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Liisa; Saravesi, Karita; Markkola, Annamari; Niemelä, Pekka

    2013-09-01

    Climate warming increases the risk of insect defoliation in boreal forests. Losses in photosynthetically active surfaces cause reduction in net primary productivity and often compromise carbon reserves of trees. The concurrent effects of climate change and removal of foliage on root growth responses and carbohydrate dynamics are poorly understood, especially in tree seedlings. We investigated if exposures to different combinations of elevated temperature, CO2, and nutrient availability modify belowground carbon gain and root morphology in artificially defoliated 1-year-old silver birches (Betula pendula). We quantified nonstructural carbohydrates (insoluble starch as a storage compound; soluble sucrose, fructose, and glucose) singly and in combination in fine roots of plants under winter dormancy. Also the total mass, fine root proportion, water content, and length of roots were defined. We hypothesized that the measured properties are lower in defoliated birch seedlings that grow with ample resources than with scarce resources. On average, fertilization markedly decreased both the proportion and the carbohydrate concentrations of fine roots in all seedlings, whereas the effect of fertilization on root water content and dry mass was the opposite. However, defoliation mitigated the effect of fertilization on the root water content, as well as on the proportion of fine roots and their carbohydrate concentrations by reversing the outcomes. Elevation in temperature decreased and elevation in CO2 increased the absolute contents of total nonstructural carbohydrates, whereas fertilization alleviated both these effects. Also the root length and mass increased by CO2 elevation. This confirms that surplus carbon in birch tissues is used as a substrate for storage compounds and for cell wall synthesis. To conclude, our results indicate that some, but not all elements of climate change alter belowground carbon gain and root morphology in defoliated silver birch seedlings.

  10. Geophysical Processes - PRE-WISCONSIN_GLACIAL_LIMIT_IN: Southern extent of glaciation in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Line Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — PRE-WISCONSIN_GLACIAL_LIMIT_IN.shp is a line shapefile that shows the extent of glaciation in Indiana as delineated by mapped glacial deposits of various types and...

  11. Limits on the Dipole Moments of the $\\tau$-Lepton via the Process $e^{+}e^{-}\\to \\tau^+ \\tau^- \\gamma in a Left-Right Symmetric Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A; Noriega, L N Luis

    2004-01-01

    Limits on the anomalous magnetic moment and the electric dipole moment of the $\\tau$ lepton are calculated through the reaction $e^{+}e^{-}\\to \\tau^+ \\tau^- \\gamma$ at the $Z_1$-pole and in the framework of a left-right symmetric model. The results are based on the recent data reported by the L3 Collaboration at CERN LEP. Due to the stringent limit of the model mixing angle $\\phi$, the effect of this angle on the dipole moments is quite small.

  12. Apports et limites du traitement de texte dans une tâche de rédaction en L2 Benefits and limits of word processing in a writing task in L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Catroux

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available L’expérimentation décrite dans cet article a été conduite auprès de jeunes apprenants d’anglais afin de déterminer les effets de l’utilisation du traitement de texte sur la conduite d’une tâche collaborative de production écrite. L’objet de cette recherche était d’analyser les stades de planification, mise en mots et révision opérés par les élèves. Les verbalisations pendant le travail, les phases rédactionnelles et les performances du groupe travaillant avec le traitement de texte ont été comparées à celles du groupe travaillant sur support papier. L’analyse des variations a permis d’estimer le degré de la surcharge cognitive liée à la manipulation de l’ordinateur et les apports du traitement de texte.The experiment described in the article has been carried out with young learners of English so as to determine the effects of word processing on a collaborative writing task. The purpose of this research was to analyse the stages of planning, translating and reviewing implemented by the learners. The verbalizations during their work, the writing phases and the performance of the group working with a word-processor have been compared to those of the group working with pen and paper. The analysis of the variations made it possible to estimate the degree of cognitive overload in relation to the use of the computer and the benefits of word processing.

  13. Limits on the dipole moments of the $\\tau$-lepton via the process $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}\\gamma$ in a left-right symmetric model

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A; Noriega, Luis; 10.1142/S0217732304014689

    2004-01-01

    Limits on the anomalous magnetic moment and the electric dipole moment of the tau lepton are calculated through the reaction e/sup + /e/sup -/ to tau /sup +/ tau /sup -/ gamma at the Z/sub 1/-pole and in the framework of a left-right symmetric model. The results are based on the recent data reported by the L3 collaboration at CERN LEP. Due to the stringent limit of the model mixing angle phi , the effect of this angle on the dipole moments is quite small.

  14. Process limitations of a whole-cell P450 catalyzed reaction using a CYP153A-CPR fusion construct expressed in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundemo, M. T.; Notonier, S.; Striedner, G.;

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450s are interesting biocatalysts due to their ability to hydroxylate non-activated hydrocarbons in a selective manner. However, to date only a few P450-catalyzed processes have been implemented in industry due to the difficulty of developing economically feasible processes. In this s...

  15. Exploring the 'divergence' problem using a simple process-based model of tree growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqi; Harrison, Sandy P.; Prentice, I. Colin

    2016-04-01

    There has been an apparent change in the sensitivity of tree rings to temperature in northern extratropical regions since the 1980s - a phenomenon often referred to as the divergence problem. Several potential explanations have been suggested to explain the decoupling between ring width (or density) and temperature, including exceedance of limiting temperature thresholds with global warming, changes in light availability with global dimming, the increasing importance of soil or atmospheric drought as a limitation to tree growth, or the CO2 'fertilization effect'. Here we use a simple, process-based tree-growth and carbon allocation model to explore these hypotheses. While changes in light availability and drought contribute to explain the declining influence of temperature on tree growth, the most important factor is changes in carbon allocation to roots and mycorrhizae in response to increasing [CO2] and the demand for increased nutrients to support photosynthesis. The magnitude of the increase in below-ground allocation, and hence the relative importance of this mechanism versus climate in controlling tree radial growth, appears to be influenced by nutrient and water availability. The potential importance of changes in carbon allocation challenges the use of statistical models for climate reconstructions from tree rings during intervals when [CO2] was different from historical values.

  16. "I have surly passed a limit, it is simply too much" : women's and men's experiences of stress and wellbeing when living within a process of housework resignation

    OpenAIRE

    Harryson, Lisa; Aléx, Lena; Hammarström, Anne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gender inequality within paid and unpaid work exposes women and men to different environments and responsibilities. These gender patterns shape living conditions for women and men, either negatively or positively, by affecting the prospect of good health. Most public health studies of gender and housework are quantitative, and knowledge about the relationship between housework experiences and health for women and men is limited. The aim of this study was to explore the housework e...

  17. Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

    2001-03-01

    During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

  18. Integrated plant phenotypic responses to contrasting above- and below-ground resources: key roles of specific leaf area and root mass fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschet, Grégoire T; Swart, Elferra M; Cornelissen, Johannes H C

    2015-06-01

    Plants adapt phenotypically to different conditions of light and nutrient supply, supposedly in order to achieve colimitation of these resources. Their key variable of adjustment is the ratio of leaf area to root length, which relies on plant biomass allocation and organ morphology. We recorded phenotypic differences in leaf and root mass fractions (LMF, RMF), specific leaf area (SLA) and specific root length (SRL) of 12 herbaceous species grown in factorial combinations of high/low irradiance and fertilization treatments. Leaf area and root length ratios, and their components, were influenced by nonadditive effects between light and nutrient supply, and differences in the strength of plant responses were partly explained by Ellenberg's species values representing ecological optima. Changes in allocation were critical in plant responses to nutrient availability, as the RMF contribution to changes in root length was 2.5× that of the SRL. Contrastingly, morphological adjustments (SLA rather than LMF) made up the bulk of plant response to light availability. Our results suggest largely predictable differences in responses of species and groups of species to environmental change. Nevertheless, they stress the critical need to account for adjustments in below-ground mass allocation to understand the assembly and responses of communities in changing environments.

  19. Multiple independent constraints help resolve net ecosystem carbon exchange under nutrient limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, P. E.; Metcalfe, D.; Oren, R.; Ricciuto, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude, spatial distribution, and variability of land net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) are important determinants of the trajectory of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Independent observational constraints provide important clues regarding NEE and its component fluxes, with information available at multiple spatial scales: from cells, to leaves, to entire organisms and collections of organisms, to complex landscapes and up to continental and global scales. Experimental manipulations, ecosystem observations, and process modeling all suggest that the components of NEE (photosynthetic gains, and respiration and other losses) are controlled in part by the availability of mineral nutrients, and that nutrient limitation is a common condition in many biomes. Experimental and observational constraints at different spatial scales provide a complex and sometimes puzzling picture of the nature and degree of influence of nutrient availability on carbon cycle processes. Photosynthetic rates assessed at the cellular and leaf scales are often higher than the observed accumulation of carbon in plant and soil pools would suggest. We infer that a down-regulation process intervenes between carbon uptake and plant growth under conditions of nutrient limitation, and several down-regulation mechanisms have been hypothesized and tested. A recent evaluation of two alternative hypotheses for down-regulation in the light of whole-plant level flux estimates indicates that some plants take up and store extra carbon, releasing it to the environment again on short time scales. The mechanism of release, either as additional autotrophic respiration or as exudation belowground is unclear, but has important consequences for long-term ecosystem state and response to climate change signals. Global-scale constraints from atmospheric concentration and isotopic composition data help to resolve this question, ultimately focusing attention on land use fluxes as the most uncertain

  20. Elevated atmospheric CO sub 2 effects on belowground processes in C sub 3 and C sub 4 estuarine marsh communities. [S. Spartina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, P.S.; Balduman, L.M.; Drake, B.G.; Whigham, D.F. (Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Belowgound carbon allocation is a major component of a plant's carbon budget, yet relatively little is known about the response of roots to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. We have exposed three brackish marsh communities dominated by perennial macrophytes to twice ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations for two full growing seasons using open top chambers. One community was dominated by the C{sub 3} sedge Scirpus olneyi, one was dominated by the C{sub 4} grass Spartina patens, and one was a mixture of S. olneyi, S. patens, and Distichlis spicata, a C{sub 4} grass. Root and rhizome growth were studied in the 2nd yr of exposure by measuring growth into peat cores previously excavated and refilled with sphagnum peat devoid of roots. Growth under elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in an 83% increase in root dry mass per core in the Scirpus community. Those roots were also significantly lower in percentage of nitrogen than roots from ambient-grown plants. There was no effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on root growth or nitrogen content in the Spartina community or in the C{sub 4} component of the Mixed community.

  1. Seasonal Belowground Ecosystem and Eco-enzymatic Responses to Soil pH and Phosphorus Availability in Temperate Hardwood Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smemo, K. A.; Deforest, J. L.; Petersen, S. L.; Burke, D.; Hewins, C.; Kluber, L. A.; Kyker, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric acid deposition can increase phosphorus (P) limitation in temperate hardwood forests by increasing N availability, and therefore P demand, and/or by decreasing pH and occluding inorganic P. However, only recently have studies demonstrated that P limitation can occur in temperate forests and very little is known about the temporal aspects of P dynamics in acidic forest soils and how seasonal shifts in nutrient availability and demand influence microbial investment in extracellular enzymes. The objectives of this study were to investigate how P availability and soil pH influence seasonal patterns of nutrient cycling and soil microbial activity in hardwood forests that experience chronic acid deposition. We experimentally manipulated soil pH, P, or both for three years and examined soil treatment responses in fall, winter, spring, early summer, and late summer. We found that site (glaciated versus unglaciated) and treatment had the most significant influence on nutrient pools and cycling. In general, nutrient pools were higher in glaciated soils than unglaciated for measured nutrients, including total C and N (2-3 times higher), extractable inorganic nitrogen, and readily available P. Treatment had no impact on total C and N pools in either region, but did affect other measured nutrients such as ammonium, which was greatest in the elevated pH treatment for both sites. As expected, readily available P pools were highest in the elevated P treatments (3 fold increase in both sites), but raising pH decreased available P pools in the glaciated site. Raising soil pH increased both net N mineralization rates and net P mineralization rates, regardless of site. Nitrification responses were complex, but we observed an overall significant nitrification increase under elevated pH, particularly in the growing season. Extracellular enzyme activity showed more seasonal patterns than site and treatment effects, exhibiting significant growing season activity reductions for

  2. In vivo photosystem I reduction in thermophilic and mesophilic cyanobacteria: The thermal resistance of the process is limited by factors other than the unfolding of the partners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photosystem I reduction by plastocyanin and cytochrome c 6 in cyanobacteria has been extensively studied in vitro, but much less information is provided on this process inside the cell. Here, we report an analysis of the electron transfer from both plastocyanin and cytochrome c 6 to photosystem I in intact cells of several cyanobacterial species, including a comparative study of the temperature effect in mesophilic and thermophilic organisms. Our data show that cytochrome c 6 reduces photosystem I by following a reaction mechanism involving complex formation, whereas the copper-protein follows a simpler collisional mechanism. These results contrast with previous kinetic studies in vitro. The effect of temperature on photosystem I reduction leads us to conclude that the thermal resistance of this process is determined by factors other than the proper stability of the protein partners

  3. Inferring the intensity of Poisson processes at the limit of the detector sensitivity (with a case study on gravitational wave burst search)

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P

    1999-01-01

    We consider the issue of reporting the result of search experiment in the most unbiased and efficient way, i.e. in a way which allows an easy interpretation and combination of results and which do not depend on whether the experimenters believe or not to having found the searched-for effect. Since this work uses the language of Bayesian theory, to which most physicists are not used, we find that it could be useful to practitioners to have in a single paper a simple presentation of Bayesian inference, together with an example of application of it in search of rare processes.

  4. Linking physiological processes with mangrove forest structure: phosphorus deficiency limits canopy development, hydraulic conductivity and photosynthetic carbon gain in dwarf Rhizophora mangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E; Ball, Marilyn C; Choat, Brendan; Engelbrecht, Bettina M J; Holbrook, N Michelle; Feller, Ilka C

    2006-05-01

    Spatial gradients in mangrove tree height in barrier islands of Belize are associated with nutrient deficiency and sustained flooding in the absence of a salinity gradient. While nutrient deficiency is likely to affect many parameters, here we show that addition of phosphorus (P) to dwarf mangroves stimulated increases in diameters of xylem vessels, area of conductive xylem tissue and leaf area index (LAI) of the canopy. These changes in structure were consistent with related changes in function, as addition of P also increased hydraulic conductivity (Ks), stomatal conductance and photosynthetic assimilation rates to the same levels measured in taller trees fringing the seaward margin of the mangrove. Increased xylem vessel size and corresponding enhancements in stem hydraulic conductivity in P fertilized dwarf trees came at the cost of enhanced mid-day loss of hydraulic conductivity and was associated with decreased assimilation rates in the afternoon. Analysis of trait plasticity identifies hydraulic properties of trees as more plastic than those of leaf structural and physiological characteristics, implying that hydraulic properties are key in controlling growth in mangroves. Alleviation of P deficiency, which released trees from hydraulic limitations, reduced the structural and functional distinctions between dwarf and taller fringing tree forms of Rhizophora mangle. PMID:17087463

  5. Nutrient cycling and Above- and Below-ground Interactions in a Runoff Agroforestry System Applied with Composted Tree Trimmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilani, Talli; Ephrath, Jhonathan; Silberbush, Moshe; Berliner, Pedro

    2014-05-01

    The primary production in arid zones is limited due to shortage of water and nutrients. Conveying flood water and storing it in plots surrounded by embankments allows their cropping. The efficient exploitation of the stored water can be achieved through an agroforestry system, in which two crops are grown simultaneously: annual crops with a shallow root system and trees with a deeper root system. We posit that the long-term productivity of this system can be maintained by intercropping symbiotic N fixing shrubs with annual crops, and applying the pruned and composted shrub leaves to the soil, thus ensuring an adequate nitrogen level (a limiting factor in drylands) in the soil. To test our hypothesis we carried a two year trial in which fast-growing acacia (A. saligna) trees were the woody component and maize (Zea mays L.) the intercrop. Ten treatments were applied over two maize growth seasons to examine the below- and above-ground effects of tree pruning, compost application and interactions. The addition of compost in the first growth season led to an increase of the soil organic matter reservoir, which was the main N source for the maize during the following growth season. In the second growth season the maize yield was significantly higher in the plots to which compost was applied. Pruning the tree's canopies changed the trees spatial and temporal root development, allowing the annual crop to develop between the trees. The roots of pruned trees intercropped with maize penetrated deeper in the soil. The intercropping of maize within pruned trees and implementing compost resulted in a higher water use efficiency of the water stored in the soil when compared to the not composted and monoculture treatments. The results presented suggest that the approach used in this study can be the basis for achieving sustainable agricultural production under arid conditions.

  6. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c) 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  7. Modeling the Seasonality of Carbon, Evapotranspiration and Heat Processes for Cold Climate Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Sihong

    2010-01-01

    The productivity of agricultural and forest ecosystems in regions at higher latitudes is to a large extent governed by low temperature and moisture conditions. Environmental conditions are acting both above- and below-ground and regulating carbon fluxes and evapotranspiration. However, the understanding of various feedbacks between vegetation and environmental conditions is still unclear. In this thesis, two studies were conducted to understand the physical and biological processes. In the fi...

  8. A novel process for preparing low-fat peanuts: Optimization of the oil extraction yield with limited structural and organoleptic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Joelle; Fawaz, Nada; Afif, Charbel; Louka, Nicolas

    2016-04-15

    The main purpose of this study was to extract the maximum amount of oil from peanuts without causing major damage and preserving their organoleptic quality after defatting. Accordingly, a successful, healthy, eco-friendly and economic defatting process for peanuts was implemented using mechanical oil expression, which was optimized by means of Response Surface Methodology. The results demonstrated that maximum extraction yields were obtained at a low initial moisture content (5-7% d.b.). Defatting and deformation ratios were mostly affected by the pressure and water content with high correlation coefficients (98.4% and 97.5%, respectively), and overall acceptability decreased following higher oil extraction yields. It was concluded that the optimum values for the product moisture content, pressure, and pressing duration were 5% d.b., 9.7 MPa and 4 min, respectively, with a defatting ratio of 70.6%. This resulted in an insignificant irreversible deformation ratio (<1%) and an overall acceptability of 7.6 over 10.

  9. Distribution of bog and heath in a Newfoundland blanket bog complex: topographic limits on the hydrological processes governing blanket bog development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Graniero

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This research quantified the role of topography and hydrological processes within and, hence, the development of, blanket bogs. Topographic characteristics were derived from digital elevation models (DEMs developed for the surface and underlying substrate at three blanket bog sites on the southeastern lobe of the Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland. A multinomial logit (MNL model of the probability of bog occurrence was constructed in terms of relevant topographic characteristics. The resulting model was then used to investigate the probabilistic boundary conditions of bog occurrence within the landscape. Under average curvatures for the sites studied, substrate slopes up to 0.065 favoured blanket bog development. However, steeper slopes could, theoretically, be occupied by blanked bog where water is concentrated by convergent curvatures or large contributing areas. Near community boundaries, bog and heath communities both occupied similar topographic conditions. Since these boundary locations are capable of supporting the hydrological conditions necessary for bog development, the heath is likely to be encroached upon by bog.

  10. Egg parasitoid attraction toward induced plant volatiles is disrupted by a non-host herbivore attacking above or belowground plant organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihem eMoujahed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to insect oviposition by emission of oviposition-induced plant volatiles (OIPVs which can recruit egg parasitoids of the attacking herbivore. To date, studies demonstrating egg parasitoid attraction to OIPVs have been carried out in tritrophic systems consisting of one species each of plant, herbivore host, and the associated egg parasitoid. Less attention has been given to plants experiencing multiple attacks by host and non-host herbivores that potentially could interfere with the recruitment of egg parasitoids as a result of modifications to the OIPV blend. Egg parasitoid attraction could also be influenced by the temporal dynamics of multiple infestations, when the same non-host herbivore damages different organs of the same plant species. In this scenario we investigated the responses of egg parasitoids to feeding and oviposition damage using a model system consisting of Vicia faba, the above-ground insect herbivore Nezara viridula, the above- and below-ground insect herbivore Sitona lineatus, and Trissolcus basalis, a natural enemy of N. viridula. We demonstrated that the non-host S. lineatus disrupts wasp attraction toward plant volatiles induced by the host N. viridula. Interestingly, V. faba damage inflicted by either adults (i.e. leaf-feeding or larvae (i.e. root-feeding of S. lineatus, had a similar disruptive effect on T. basalis host location, suggesting that a common interference mechanism might be involved. Neither naïve wasps or wasps with previous oviposition experience were attracted to plant volatiles induced by N. viridula when V. faba plants were concurrently infested with S. lineatus adults or larvae. Analysis of the volatile blends among healthy plants and above-ground treatments show significant differences in terms of whole volatile emissions. Our results demonstrate that induced plant responses caused by a non-host herbivore can disrupt the attraction of an egg parasitoid to a plant that is also infested

  11. Climatic and biotic extreme events moderate long-term responses of above- and belowground sub-Arctic heathland communities to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhorst, Stef; Phoenix, Gareth K; Berg, Matty P; Callaghan, Terry V; Kirby-Lambert, Christopher; Bjerke, Jarle W

    2015-11-01

    Climate change impacts are not uniform across the Arctic region because interacting factors causes large variations in local ecosystem change. Extreme climatic events and population cycles of herbivores occur simultaneously against a background of gradual climate warming trends and can redirect ecosystem change along routes that are difficult to predict. Here, we present the results from sub-Arctic heath vegetation and its belowground micro-arthropod community in response to the two main drivers of vegetation damage in this region: extreme winter warming events and subsequent outbreaks of the defoliating autumnal moth caterpillar (Epirrita autumnata). Evergreen dwarf shrub biomass decreased (30%) following extreme winter warming events and again by moth caterpillar grazing. Deciduous shrubs that were previously exposed to an extreme winter warming event were not affected by the moth caterpillar grazing, while those that were not exposed to warming events (control plots) showed reduced (23%) biomass from grazing. Cryptogam cover increased irrespective of grazing or winter warming events. Micro-arthropods declined (46%) following winter warming but did not respond to changes in plant community. Extreme winter warming and caterpillar grazing suppressed the CO2 fluxes of the ecosystem. Evergreen dwarf shrubs are disadvantaged in a future sub-Arctic with more stochastic climatic and biotic events. Given that summer warming may further benefit deciduous over evergreen shrubs, event and trend climate change may both act against evergreen shrubs and the ecosystem functions they provide. This is of particular concern given that Arctic heath vegetation is typically dominated by evergreen shrubs. Other components of the vegetation showed variable responses to abiotic and biotic events, and their interaction indicates that sub-Arctic vegetation response to multiple pressures is not easy to predict from single-factor responses. Therefore, while biotic and climatic events may

  12. Application for approval of derived authorized limits for the release of the 190-C trenches and 105-C process water tunnels at the Hanford Site: Volume 2 - Source term development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of environmental restoration activities at the Hanford Site, Bechtel Hanford, Inc. (BHI) is conducting a series of evaluations to determine appropriate release conditions for specific facilities following the completion of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects. The release conditions, with respect to the residual volumetric radioactive contamination, are termed authorized limits. This two volume report provides the necessary evaluations for the 290-C trenches and 105-C process water tunnels, and is intended to serve as the technical basis for a request for approval of authorized limits of residual radioactive contamination levels associated with these facilities. Volume 2 contains the Source Term Determination. This volume contains the radiological characterization data, spreadsheet analyses, and results of efforts to determine the radiological source terms. The source terms characterize the radionuclides and activity concentration levels for the facilities, and serves as input to the various radiation exposure pathways and scenarios used to estimate the individual radiation doses that could result from release of these facilities. Based on the results of these evaluations, it is determined that the application of the proposed authorized limits for the 190-C trenches and the 105-C process water tunnels represents a safe and cost-effective approach to their final disposition

  13. The Methodological Unboundedness of Limited Discovery Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Benjamin Cassel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Though designers must understand systems, designers work differently than scientists in studying systems.  Design engagements do not discover whole systems, but take calculated risks between discovery and intervention. For this reason, design practices must cope with open systems, and unpacking the tacit guidelines behind these practices is instructive to systems methodology. This paper shows that design practice yields a methodology which applies across forms of design.  Design practice teaches us to generate ideas and gather data longer, but stop when the return on design has diminished past its cost.  Fortunately, we can reason about the unknown by understanding the character of the unbounded.  We suppose that there might as well be an infinite number of factors, but we can reason about their concentration without knowing all of them.  We demonstrate this concept on stakeholder systems, showing how design discovery informs systems methodology. Using this result, we can apply the methods of parametric design when the parameters are not yet known by establishing the concentration of every kind of factor, entailing a discovery rate of diminishing returns over discovery activities, allowing the analysis of discovery-based trade-offs.  Here, we extend a framework for providing metrics to parametric design, allowing it to express the importance of discovery.

  14. Hydrodynamic Limit For An Active Exclusion Process

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Erignoux

    2016-01-01

    Collective dynamics can be observed among many animal species, and have given rise in the last decades to an active and interdisciplinary field of study. Such behaviors are often modeled by active matter, in which each individual is self-driven and tends to update its velocity depending on the one of its neighbors. In a classical model introduced by Vicsek \\and al., as well as in numerous related active matter models, a phase transition between chaotic behavior at high temperature and global ...

  15. Diversity and spatial structure of belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in a mixed subtropical forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Toju

    Full Text Available Plant-mycorrhizal fungal interactions are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems. While ectomycorrhizal plants and their fungi generally dominate temperate forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is common in the tropics. In subtropical regions, however, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants co-occur at comparable abundances in single forests, presumably generating complex community structures of root-associated fungi. To reveal root-associated fungal community structure in a mixed forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants, we conducted a massively-parallel pyrosequencing analysis, targeting fungi in the roots of 36 plant species that co-occur in a subtropical forest. In total, 580 fungal operational taxonomic units were detected, of which 132 and 58 were probably ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal, respectively. As expected, the composition of fungal symbionts differed between fagaceous (ectomycorrhizal and non-fagaceous (possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants. However, non-fagaceous plants were associated with not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also several clades of ectomycorrhizal (e.g., Russula and root-endophytic ascomycete fungi. Many of the ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi were detected from both fagaceous and non-fagaceous plants in the community. Interestingly, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were concurrently detected from tiny root fragments of non-fagaceous plants. The plant-fungal associations in the forest were spatially structured, and non-fagaceous plant roots hosted ectomycorrhizal fungi more often in the proximity of ectomycorrhizal plant roots. Overall, this study suggests that belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in subtropical forests is complex in that it includes "non-typical" plant-fungal combinations (e.g., ectomycorrhizal fungi on possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants that do not fall within the conventional classification of mycorrhizal symbioses, and in

  16. Evaluation of carbon stocks in above- and below-ground biomass in Central Africa: case study of Lesio-louna tropical rainforest of Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Ekoungoulou, R.; Loumeto, J. J.; Ifo, S. A.; Bocko, Y. E.; Koula, F. E.

    2014-07-01

    The study was aimed to estimate the carbon stocks of above- and below-ground biomass in Lesio-louna forest of Congo. The methodology of allometric equations was used to measure the carbon stocks of Lesio-louna natural forest. We are based precisely on the model II which is also called non-destructive method or indirect method of measuring carbon stocks. While there has been use of parameters such as the DBH and wood density. The research was done with 22 circular plots each 1256 m2. In the 22 plots studied, 19 plots are in the gallery forest and three plots in the secondary forest. Also, 22 circular plots were distributed in 5 sites studies of Lesio-louna forest, including: Inkou forest island, Iboubikro, Ngoyili, Blue lake and Ngambali. So, there are two forest types (secondary forest and gallery forest) in this forest ecosystem. In the 5 sites studied, we made measurements on a total of 347 trees with 197 trees for the class of 10-30 cm diameter, 131 trees for the class of 30-60 cm diameter and 19 trees in the diameter class > 60 cm. The results show that in the whole forest, average carbon stock for the 22 plots of the study was 168.601 t C ha-1 for AGB, or 81% and 39.551 t C ha-1 for BGB, or 19%. The total carbon stocks in all the biomass was 3395.365 t C for AGB, which is 3.395365 × 10-6 Gt C and 909.689934 t C for BGB, which was 9.09689934 × 10-7 Gt C. In this forest, the carbon stock was more important in AGB compared to BGB with respectively 3395.365 t C against 909.689934 t C. Plot10 (AGB = 363.899 t C ha-1 and BGB = 85.516 t C ha-1) was the most dominant in terms of carbon quantification in Lesio-louna.

  17. Evaluation of carbon stocks in above- and below-ground biomass in Central Africa: case study of Lesio-louna tropical rainforest of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to estimate the carbon stocks of above- and below-ground biomass in Lesio-louna forest of Congo. The methodology of allometric equations was used to measure the carbon stocks of Lesio-louna natural forest. We are based precisely on the model II which is also called non-destructive method or indirect method of measuring carbon stocks. While there has been use of parameters such as the DBH and wood density. The research was done with 22 circular plots each 1256 m2. In the 22 plots studied, 19 plots are in the gallery forest and three plots in the secondary forest. Also, 22 circular plots were distributed in 5 sites studies of Lesio-louna forest, including: Inkou forest island, Iboubikro, Ngoyili, Blue lake and Ngambali. So, there are two forest types (secondary forest and gallery forest in this forest ecosystem. In the 5 sites studied, we made measurements on a total of 347 trees with 197 trees for the class of 10–30 cm diameter, 131 trees for the class of 30–60 cm diameter and 19 trees in the diameter class > 60 cm. The results show that in the whole forest, average carbon stock for the 22 plots of the study was 168.601 t C ha−1 for AGB, or 81% and 39.551 t C ha−1 for BGB, or 19%. The total carbon stocks in all the biomass was 3395.365 t C for AGB, which is 3.395365 × 10–6 Gt C and 909.689934 t C for BGB, which was 9.09689934 × 10–7 Gt C. In this forest, the carbon stock was more important in AGB compared to BGB with respectively 3395.365 t C against 909.689934 t C. Plot10 (AGB = 363.899 t C ha−1 and BGB = 85.516 t C ha−1 was the most dominant in terms of carbon quantification in Lesio-louna.

  18. Diversity and spatial structure of belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in a mixed subtropical forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sato, Hirotoshi; Tanabe, Akifumi S

    2014-01-01

    Plant-mycorrhizal fungal interactions are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems. While ectomycorrhizal plants and their fungi generally dominate temperate forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is common in the tropics. In subtropical regions, however, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants co-occur at comparable abundances in single forests, presumably generating complex community structures of root-associated fungi. To reveal root-associated fungal community structure in a mixed forest of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants, we conducted a massively-parallel pyrosequencing analysis, targeting fungi in the roots of 36 plant species that co-occur in a subtropical forest. In total, 580 fungal operational taxonomic units were detected, of which 132 and 58 were probably ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal, respectively. As expected, the composition of fungal symbionts differed between fagaceous (ectomycorrhizal) and non-fagaceous (possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal) plants. However, non-fagaceous plants were associated with not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also several clades of ectomycorrhizal (e.g., Russula) and root-endophytic ascomycete fungi. Many of the ectomycorrhizal and root-endophytic fungi were detected from both fagaceous and non-fagaceous plants in the community. Interestingly, ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were concurrently detected from tiny root fragments of non-fagaceous plants. The plant-fungal associations in the forest were spatially structured, and non-fagaceous plant roots hosted ectomycorrhizal fungi more often in the proximity of ectomycorrhizal plant roots. Overall, this study suggests that belowground plant-fungal symbiosis in subtropical forests is complex in that it includes "non-typical" plant-fungal combinations (e.g., ectomycorrhizal fungi on possibly arbuscular mycorrhizal plants) that do not fall within the conventional classification of mycorrhizal symbioses, and in that

  19. Wrinkling limit prediction of rotary-draw bending process for thin-walled rectangular aluminum alloy tube%铝合金薄壁矩形管绕弯成形起皱极限的预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘郁丽; 李佳佳; 赵刚要; 杨合

    2011-01-01

    Wrinkling is one of main forming defects of the rotary-draw bending process for thin-walled rectangular aluminium alloy tube, which severely restricts the improvement of the forming quality and forming limit. Therefore, a regression prediction model of the wrinkling wave height is built based on finite element(FE) simulation combined with orthogonal regression analysis, and its reliability is validated by experiments. Then the analytical model of forming limit without the occurrence of wrinkling is derived. The laws of the core number, the clearance between mandrel and tube and the clearance between wiper die and tube affecting wrinkling limit are obtained, and the wrinkling limit diagram for the rotary-draw process of thin-walled rectangular tube is obtained. This research provides basis and guidance for improving forming quality of the rotary-draw bending process for the rectangular tubes in production.%失稳起皱是铝合金薄壁矩形波导管绕弯成形过程中的主要缺陷之一,严重制约着薄壁矩形管绕弯成形极限的提高.笔者采用有限元数值模拟结合正交回归分析的方法,建立了薄壁矩形管绕弯成形起皱波纹度回归预测模型,并通过实验验证了该模型的可靠性;在此基础上推导出了基于失稳起皱成形极限的解析模型.研究获得了芯头个数、防皱块与管坯间隙及芯模与管坯间隙对起皱极限的影响规律,并获得了铝合金薄壁矩形管绕弯成形起皱极限图.该研究为提高实际生产中薄壁矩形管绕弯成形质量提供了依据和指导.

  20. Effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on elm seedlings growth in Horqin Sandy Land%地上竞争与地下竞争对科尔沁沙地榆树幼苗生长的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐毅; 蒋德明; 陈卓; 押田敏雄

    2011-01-01

    榆树疏林草原对科尔沁沙地植被恢复和景观保护有着重要意义.本文采用双因素两水平控制试验,从幼苗生物量、地下/地上生物量、茎高、根茎比、叶片数等方面,研究了草-树地上、地下竞争对科尔沁沙地榆树幼苗生长的影响.结果表明:对于1年生榆树幼苗,单株平均生物量表现为无竞争>地上竞争>全竞争>地下竞争;地下/地上生物量表现为地下竞争>全竞争>无竞争>地上竞争;幼苗高度表现为地上竞争>无竞争>全竞争>地下竞争;根茎比表现为地下竞争>全竞争>无竞争>地上竞争;叶片数表现为地上竞争>无竞争>地下竞争>全竞争.地下竞争对1年生榆树幼苗生长影响显著,而地上竞争对榆树幼苗生长无显著影响.地上竞争与地下竞争对2年生榆树幼苗生长的影响均不显著.科尔沁沙地草本植物对榆树幼苗生长的影响主要通过地下竞争的方式实现,但地下竞争并没有改变榆树幼苗的资源分配方式.随榆树幼苗龄级的增长,草本植物竞争作用的影响逐渐减弱.%Elm sparse woodland steppe plays an important role in vegetation restoration and landscape protection in Horqin Sandy Land. In this paper, a two-factor and two-level field experiment was conducted to explore the effects of aboveground and belowground competition between grass and tree on the growth of elm seedlings in the Sandy Land. Five aspects were considered, I. E. , seedling biomass, belowground biomass/aboveground biomass, stem height, ratio of root to stem, and leaf number. For the one-year-old elm seedlings, their biomass showed a trend of no competition > aboveground competition > full competition > belowground competition, belowground biomass / aboveground biomass showed a trend of belowground competition > full competition > no competition > aboveground competition, stem height showed a trend of aboveground competition > no competition

  1. M-type multiple capacity process transfer function standard form with none overshoot and none order limit characteristics%无超调不限阶数的M型次多容惯性标准传递函数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨平; 陈式跃

    2013-01-01

    A general multiple capacity process transfer function standard form with none overshoot and none order limit characteristics was built up. The Af-type of the system defined by the capacity process transfer function standard form was proofed. The step response and ramp response performance of the multiple capacity process transfer function standard form were analyzed. The design method of the controller with the multiple capacity process transfer function standard form was discussed.%提出一种通用的多容惯性标准传递函数,具有无超调和不限系统阶数的特点.论证所提出的多容惯性标准传递函数的型次为M,分析多容惯性标准传递函数系统的阶跃响应和斜坡响应特性,并讨论应用多容惯性标准传递函数设计控制器的方法问题.

  2. Physical limits to biochemical signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Bialek, W

    2003-01-01

    Many crucial biological processes operate with surprisingly small numbers of molecules, and there is renewed interest in analyzing the impact of noise associated with these small numbers. Twenty--five years ago, Berg and Purcell showed that bacterial chemotaxis, where a single celled organism must respond to small changes in concentration of chemicals outside the cell, is limited directly by molecule counting noise, and that aspects of the bacteria's behavioral and computational strategies must be chosen to minimize the effects of this noise. Here we revisit and generalize their arguments to estimate the physical limits to signaling processes within the cell, and argue that recent experiments are consistent with performance approaching these limits.

  3. Limitations in forensic odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kavitha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of using dental evidence in forensic investigation has kindled so much interest in the recent past that forensic odontology is even suggested as the single positive identification method to solve certain forensic cases. In this process, the shortcomings in forensic odontology though few are overlooked. These discrepancies associated with various methods are to be weighed cautiously to make forensic odontology a more accurate, reliable, and reproducible investigatory science. In this paper, we present our understanding of the limitations in various methods employed in forensic odontology.

  4. A review of belowground interspecific interactions and allelopathy in silvopasture systems%林草复合系统地下部分种间互作关系与化感作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦树高; 吴斌; 张宇清

    2011-01-01

    Silvopasture (forest-pasture complex), a sustainable land-use/management strategy, has been widely practised and increasingly researched worldwide against a background of global population explosion, exorbitant resource consumption and deterioration of eco-environments. In silvopasture systems, interspecific interaction relationships is one of the most important research foci. It directly relates to the results of this land-use/management strategy and research has progressively shown that the belowground interspecific interactions, and allelopathy play a more important role than aboveground interspecific interactions in system stability. This paper reviews and summarizes existing research on belowground interspecific interactions and allelopathy in silvopasture systems, and offers some suggestions for design and management of systems, for optimizing system structures and resource utility patterns, thereby reducing interspecific negative effects, and resulting in maximal comprehensive harvesting benefits. It is suggested that future research on belowground interspecific interactions and allelopathy, in silvopasture systems, focus on: the association among allelopathy, belowground and aboveground interspecific interactions, the water & nutrition coupling utilization effect of woody plants and herbage, the separate mechanisms of woody and herbaceous roots centralized layers, finding and collating appropriate hydraulic life trees in systems, the response of belowground interspecific interaction between woody plants and herbage to global climate change, researching allelopathy for optimization of systems species structure and in ecological management of silvopasture systems.%林草复合系统作为一种具有可持续发展特点的土地利用方式,已在全球范围内得到了广泛的应用和研究,其经营的成败通常是由各生物组分之间的相互作用关系所决定.目前,林草复合系统的经营者比较重视对系统地上部分种间互

  5. Limites do cuidado: representações e processos inconscientes sobre a população na porta de entrada de um hospital de emergência Health care limits: representations and unconscious processes related to the population at the hospital emergency entrance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilene de Castilho Sá

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta parte dos resultados de uma investigação voltada para a análise dos limites e possibilidades que os processos intersubjetivos e inconscientes presentes nos serviços de saúde estabelecem para o exercício da solidariedade, para a cooperação e para a produção do cuidado com a vida. Elegeu-se como estudo de caso um hospital público de emergência, situado no Município do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A Psicossociologia francesa, de inspiração clínica psicanalítica, a teoria psicanalítica sobre os processos intersubjetivos e grupais e a Psicodinâmica do Trabalho são os referenciais centrais que orientaram o desenho da investigação e a análise do material empírico. As representações psíquicas e os processos inconscientes relativos à população e suas demandas, produzidos pelos trabalhadores de saúde do hospital estudado, foram analisados, discutindo-se suas conseqüências sobre a produção do cuidado. Algumas imagens se destacaram, como a "carência", utilizada como uma categoria encobridora da diversidade da demanda, num processo inconsciente de múltiplas reduções: da negação do sofrimento social à negação da condição de humanidade dos pacientes.This article presents some results from a study aimed at analyzing the limits and possibilities defined by inter-subjective and unconscious processes of solidarity, cooperation, and life care production in health services. A public hospital with an emergency department in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, was selected as a case study. The French school of psychosociology, oriented by the psychoanalytical clinical approach, the psychoanalytical theory on inter-subjective and group processes, and work psychodynamics provided the basis for the study's methodological strategies and analysis of the results. The study analyzed health professionals' psychological representations and unconscious processes related to emergency department users and their

  6. YC12系列空压机升程吸气限制器的加工工艺改装%The Refitting of Processing Technic of YC12 Series Air-compressor Lift Air Induction Limiter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宗斌; 况齐祁; 余新华

    2012-01-01

    YC12系列空压机限制其转速提高的关键问题之一就是气阀,它是易损坏部件.升程吸气限制器是整套阀组的核心,直接影响压缩机的排气量、功率消耗及运转的可靠性.就生产中采用的刀具和工装进行改进作介绍,提高了气阀加工效率,降低生产成本的一种新技术.%One of the key problems of limiting the improvement of the revolution of YC12 series air-compressor is the air valve,which is apt to damage.Among them,lift air induction limiter is the key part of whole set valve hank,which directly influences the air discharge of compressor,power dissipation and the reliability of operation.This paper intends to introduce a new technology which improved the cutter and frock ,enhanced the efficiency of air valve processing and lowered the production cost.

  7. Limitations of inclusive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A; Wilson, Edward O

    2013-12-10

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed.

  8. Growth potential limits drought morphological plasticity in seedlings from six Eucalyptus provenances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Pablo H; Fernández, Roberto J

    2016-02-01

    Water stress modifies plant above- vs belowground biomass allocation, i.e., morphological plasticity. It is known that all species and genotypes reduce their growth rate in response to stress, but in the case of water stress it is unclear whether the magnitude of such reduction is linked to the genotype's growth potential, and whether the reduction can be largely attributed to morphological adjustments such as plant allocation and leaf and root anatomy. We subjected seedlings of six seed sources, three from each of Eucalyptus camaldulensis (potentially fast growing) and E. globulus (inherently slow growing), to three experimental water regimes. Biomass, leaf area and root length were measured in a 6-month glasshouse experiment. We then performed functional growth analysis of relative growth rate (RGR), and aboveground (leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf mass ratio (LMR)) and belowground (root length ratio (RLR), specific root length (SRL) and root mass ratio (RMR)) morphological components. Total biomass, root biomass and leaf area were reduced for all Eucalyptus provenances according to drought intensity. All populations exhibited drought plasticity, while those of greater growth potential (RGRmax) had a larger reduction in growth (discounting the effect of size). A positive correlation was observed between drought sensitivity and RGRmax. Aboveground, drought reduced LAR and LMR; under severe drought a negative correlation was found between LMR and RGRmax. Belowground, drought reduced SRL but increased RMR, resulting in no change in RLR. Under severe drought, a negative correlation was found between RLR, SRL and RGRmax. Our evidence strongly supports the classic ecophysiological trade-off between growth potential and drought tolerance for woody seedlings. It also suggests that slow growers would have a low capacity to adjust their morphology. For shoots, this constraint on plasticity was best observed in partition (i.e., LMR) whereas for

  9. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on...

  10. Ultimate physical limits to computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, S

    1999-01-01

    Computers are physical systems: what they can and cannot do is dictated by the laws of physics. In particular, the speed with which a physical device can process information is limited by its energy, and the amount of information that it can process is limited by the number of degrees of freedom it possesses. The way in which it processes information is determined by the forces of nature that the computer has at its disposal. This paper explores the fundamental physical limits of computation as determined by the speed of light c, the quantum scale as given by Planck's constant h, and the gravitational constant G. As an example, quantitative bounds are put to the computational power of an `ultimate laptop' with a mass of one kilogram confined to a volume of one liter.

  11. Limits to biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson S.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofuel production is dependent upon agriculture and forestry systems, and the expectations of future biofuel potential are high. A study of the global food production and biofuel production from edible crops implies that biofuel produced from edible parts of crops lead to a global deficit of food. This is rather well known, which is why there is a strong urge to develop biofuel systems that make use of residues or products from forest to eliminate competition with food production. However, biofuel from agro-residues still depend upon the crop production system, and there are many parameters to deal with in order to investigate the sustainability of biofuel production. There is a theoretical limit to how much biofuel can be achieved globally from agro-residues and this amounts to approximately one third of todays’ use of fossil fuels in the transport sector. In reality this theoretical potential may be eliminated by the energy use in the biomass-conversion technologies and production systems, depending on what type of assessment method is used. By surveying existing studies on biofuel conversion the theoretical limit of biofuels from 2010 years’ agricultural production was found to be either non-existent due to energy consumption in the conversion process, or up to 2–6000TWh (biogas from residues and waste and ethanol from woody biomass in the more optimistic cases.

  12. The Limits of Vertical Accretion in Sediment-Poor Microtidal Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    A meta-analysis of sediment bulk density and loss-on-ignition (LOI) data from marshes in thirteen estuaries on the U.S. Pacific, Gulf, and East Coasts consisting of over 2400 samples shows that dry bulk density can be predicted very well as a function of LOI (r2=0.8) using a conservative mixing model. The estimated bulk densities of pure organic and mineral matter were 0.08 and 1.9 g/cm3, respectively, as determined by a best fit of the mixing model. The composite bulk density and LOI of a mixture are best explained as the result of a conservative mix of these two end members. These bulk densities are useful in establishing limits on the vertical accretion in tidal wetlands. For example, if we assume a maximum belowground production of 2.5 kg/m2 and that 10% of this is preserved, then the maximum vertical accretion from this amount of belowground production is 3 mm/yr (0.1 x 2500 g m-2 y-1 × m2/1000 cm2 ÷ 0.08 g/cm3 = 0.3 cm/y). For a sediment-poor estuary with a suspended inorganic sediment concentration in flood water of 20 mg/L, flooding a marsh surface twice daily to an average depth of 12.5 cm, the vertical accretion rate would be no greater than about 1 mm/yr. This assumes that the surface captures 100% of the sediment load. The maximum vertical accretion is the sum of the two components, and in a sediment-poor, microtidal estuary (typical of many on the Gulf Coast) this should be no more than about 4 mm/y.

  13. 棘突间有限植骨融合治疗腰椎间盘突出症%Limited bone grafting surgery between spinous processes for lumbar disc herniation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋超; 刘祖德; 钟贵彬; 李新锋; 劳立峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect and feasibility of the surgery with limited bone grafting surgery between spinous processes for lumbar disc herniation. Methods 11 posterior decompressive laminectomy and allogenic bone grafting surgery between spinous processes were used to treat for patients suffering backleg pain because of lumbar disc herniation. The fusion rate of implanted bone and JOA score were analyzed. Results All patients were followed up for 12 ~ 18 ( 15 ± 1. 22 ) months without wound infection, dura tear, nerve root injury and other complications. The preoperative JOA score was ( 8. 56 ± 1. 45 ), the 3rd postoperative day JOA score was ( 12. 94 ± 1. 55 ), the score was( 13. 15 ±1.21 ) 12 months after operation. Compared with the preoperative JOA score, the difference had statistical significance(P <0. 05 ). The JOA score improvement rates were over 50% . The allograft bones were found absorbed partly or entirely through CT scanning and did not reach the bone fusion. Conclusions It is difficult to achieve bone fusion between the limited allograft bone and spinous processes. Further research need to be done such as the choice of materials,the way to fix etc.%目的 探讨棘突间有限植骨融合治疗腰椎间盘突出症的疗效及可行性.方法 采用后路椎板开窗减压+棘突间同种异体骨有限植入术治疗11例腰椎间盘突出症导致的腰腿痛患者.对植骨融合率、JOA评分进行临床分析.结果 患者均获随访,时间12~18(15±1.22)个月.无切口感染、硬膜囊撕裂、神经根损伤等并发症.术前JOA评分为(8.56±1.45)分,术后3 d为(12.94±1.55)分、12个月为(13.15±1.21)分,与术前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).JOA评分改善率均>50%.CT扫描证实棘突间植骨均不同程度被吸收,均未达到骨性融合.结论 单纯在棘突间植入有限的同种异体骨很难达到骨性融合,在材料选择和固定方式等方面须做进一步研究.

  14. Statistical limitations on molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid I

    2002-06-01

    Complexity of functions evolving in an evolution process are expected to be limited by the time length of an evolution process among other factors. This paper outlines a general method of deriving function-complexity limitations based on mathematical statistics and independent from details of a biological or genetic mechanism of the evolution of the function. Limitations on the emergence of life are derived, these limitations indicate a possibility of a very fast evolution and are consistent with "RNA world" hypothesis. The discussed method is general and can be used to characterize evolution of more specific biological organism functions and relate functions to genetic structures. The derived general limitations indicate that a co-evolution of multiple functions and species could be a slow process, whereas an evolution of a specific function might proceed very fast, so that no trace of intermediate forms (species) is preserved in fossil records of phenotype or DNA structure; this is consistent with a picture of "punctuated equilibrium". PMID:12023805

  15. Limits to adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Kirstin; Berkhout, Frans; Preston, Benjamin L.; Klein, Richard J. T.; Midgley, Guy; Shaw, M. Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    An actor-centered, risk-based approach to defining limits to social adaptation provides a useful analytic framing for identifying and anticipating these limits and informing debates over society's responses to climate change.

  16. An Adaptive TVD Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Yih Nen; Payne, Uon Jan

    1995-05-01

    An adaptive TVD limiter, based on a limiter approximating the upper boundary of the TVD range and that of the third-order upwind TVD scheme, is developed in this work. The limiter switches to the comprressive limiter near a discontinuity, to the third-order TVD scheme's limiter in the smooth region, and to a weighted averaged scheme in the transition region between smooth and high gradient solutions. Numerical experiments show that the proposed scheme works very well for one-dimensional scalar equation problems but becomes less effective in one- and two-dimensional Euler equation problems. Further study is required for the two-dimensional scalar equation problems.

  17. Summary of Dissolved Concentration Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yueting Chen

    2001-06-11

    According to the Technical Work Plan titled Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR (CRWMS M&O 2000a), the purpose of this study is to perform abstractions on solubility limits of radioactive elements based on the process-level information and thermodynamic databases provided by Natural Environment Program Operations (NEPO) and Waste Package Operations (WPO). The scope of this analysis is to produce solubility limits as functions, distributions, or constants for all transported radioactive elements identified by the Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) radioisotope screening. Results from an expert elicitation for solubility limits of most radioactive elements were used in the previous Total System Performance Assessments (TSPAs). However, the elicitation conducted in 1993 does not meet the criteria set forth by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) due to lack of documentation and traceability (Kotra et al. 1996, Section 3). Therefore, at the Waste Form Abstraction Workshop held on February 2-4, 1999, at Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) decided to develop geochemical models to study solubility for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. WPO/NEPO is to develop process-level solubility models, including review and compilation of relevant thermodynamic data. PAO's responsibility is to perform abstractions based on the process models and chemical conditions and to produce solubility distributions or response surfaces applicable to the proposed repository. The results of this analysis and conceptual model will feed the performance assessment for Total System Performance Assessment--Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) and Total System Performance Assessment--License Application (TSPA-LA), and to the Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report section on concentration limits.

  18. Limits on the Dipole Moments of the $\\tau$-Lepton via the Process $e^{+}e^{-}\\to \\tau^+ \\tau^- \\gamma$ in a Left-Right Symmetric Model in a Left-Right Symmetric Model

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A; Noriega, L N Luis

    2004-01-01

    Limits on the anomalous magnetic moment and the electric dipole moment of the $\\tau$ lepton are calculated through the reaction $e^{+}e^{-}\\to \\tau^+ \\tau^- \\gamma$ at the $Z_1$-pole and in the framework of a left-right symmetric model. The results are based on the recent data reported by the L3 Collaboration at CERN LEP. Due to the stringent limit of the model mixing angle $\\phi$, the effect of this angle on the dipole moments is quite small.

  19. Limit loads in nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The static method for the evaluation of the limit loads of a perfectly elasto-plastic structure is presented. Using the static theorem of Limit Analysis and the Finite Element Method, a lower bound for the colapso load can be obtained through a linear programming problem. This formulation if then applied to symmetrically loaded shells of revolution and some numerical results of limit loads in nozzles are also presented. (Author)

  20. Friction Generated Limit Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Åström, Karl Johan

    2001-01-01

    This paper treats limit cycles caused by friction. The goal has been to explain phenomena that have been observed experimentally in mechatronic systems. Experiments have shown that oscillations of qualitatively different types can be obtained simply by changing controller specifications. Stiction is important in some cases but not in others. Necessary conditions for limit cycle are given for the case where stiction is important. Conditions for local stability of the limit cycles are also pres...

  1. Responses of Belowground Biomass and Biomass Allocation to Environmental Factors in Central Grassland of Inner Mongolia%内蒙古中部草原地下生物量与生物量分配对环境因子的响应关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴诚; 康慕谊; 纪文瑶; 江源

    2012-01-01

    为探究环境因子对草原地下生物量与生物量分配的影响以及验证功能平衡假说,沿水热变化梯度通过采样获取内蒙古中部草原的生物量,分析了地下生物量的垂直分布及其与地上生物量的关系,采用回归和结构方程模型的方法探讨了地下生物量与地下地上生物量比对环境因子的响应规律.结果表明:地下生物量主要分布在土壤表层,地下与地上生物量成显著正相关;地下生物量对年均降水量、土壤有机碳和全氮为正响应,对年均温和土壤pH值则为负响应;其中,降水量是导致地下生物量差异的主要因子;土壤环境也具有重要的作用.土壤全氮与地下地上生物量比之间的显著正响应关系与功能平衡假说不符.综上所述表明,环境因子对地下地上生物量比产生的影响十分复杂,需要进一步结合植物生理和生态学特性等多方面的综合分析才能得出可靠的结论.%In order to explore the influences of environmental factors on belowground biomass and biomass allocation in grassland ecosystems and to test 'functional equilibrium hypothesis', the vertical distribution of belowground biomass and the relationship of belowground biomass (BGB) with belowground biomass, as well as the patterns of BGB and the response of belowground/aboveground biomass ratio (B/A) to environmental factors were examined in the central Inner Mongolia grassland along with thermal and moist gradients. Results showed that belowground biomass mainly concentrated in topsoil layer and had significant correlation with aboveground biomass. Belowground biomass had positive response to annual mean precipitation, organic carbon and total nitrogen, whereas negative response to annual mean temperature. Precipitation, besides the effect of soil features, was the most prominent factor that influenced the geographic disparity of belowground biomass. Additionally, the effect of total nitrogen on B/A was

  2. Limited Attention and Discourse Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M A

    1995-01-01

    This squib examines the role of limited attention in a theory of discourse structure and proposes a model of attentional state that relates current hierarchical theories of discourse structure to empirical evidence about human discourse processing capabilities. First, I present examples that are not predicted by Grosz and Sidner's stack model of attentional state. Then I consider an alternative model of attentional state, the cache model, which accounts for the examples, and which makes particular processing predictions. Finally I suggest a number of ways that future research could distinguish the predictions of the cache model and the stack model.

  3. Limitations to sharing entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jeong San; Sanders, Barry C

    2011-01-01

    We discuss limitations to sharing entanglement known as monogamy of entanglement. Our pedagogical approach commences with simple examples of limited entanglement sharing for pure three-qubit states and progresses to the more general case of mixed-state monogamy relations with multiple qudits.

  4. Limits to Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janne Hedegaard

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I will argue that a theoretical identification of the limit to inclusion is needed in the conceptual identification of inclusion. On the one hand, inclusion is formulated as a vision that is, in principle, limitless. On the other hand, there seems to be an agreement that inclusion has a limit in the pedagogical practice. However,…

  5. Numerical Limit Analysis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkilde, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Limit State analysis has a long history and many prominent researchers have contributed. The theoretical foundation is based on the upper- and lower-bound theorems which give a very comprehensive and elegant formulation on complicated physical problems. In the pre-computer age Limit State analysi...

  6. The Hugoniot Elastic Limit Decay Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The Hugoniot Elastic Limit(HEL) precursor decay in shock loaded solids has been the subject of considerable experimental and theoretical investigation. Comparative evidence is presented to show that the elastic precursor wave particle velocity, UPHEL, for certain materials decays asymptotically with propagation distance to the DeBroglie velocity, V1, level. This is demonstrated for the following materials: iron, aluminum alloy 6061-T6, plexiglas(PMMA), nickel alloy(MAR-M200), and lithium flouride(LiF). The DeBroglie velocity, V1, equals h/2md, where h is Planck's Constant, m is the mass of one atom, and d is the closest distance between atoms. Thus a relationship has been established between a microscopically derived velocity, V1, and a macroscopically observed velocity, UPHEL.

  7. Formation of the Unusual Semivolatile Diterpene Rhizathalene by the Arabidopsis Class I Terpene Synthase TPS08 in the Root Stele Is Involved in Defense against Belowground Herbivory[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Martha M.; Wang, Qiang; Webster, Francis X.; Kiemle, Dave; Hong, Young J.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Coates, Robert M.; Wray, Austin T.; Askew, Whitnee; O’Donnell, Christopher; Tokuhisa, James G.; Tholl, Dorothea

    2013-01-01

    Secondary metabolites are major constituents of plant defense against herbivore attack. Relatively little is known about the cell type–specific formation and antiherbivore activities of secondary compounds in roots despite the substantial impact of root herbivory on plant performance and fitness. Here, we describe the constitutive formation of semivolatile diterpenes called rhizathalenes by the class I terpene synthase (TPS) 08 in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. The primary enzymatic product of TPS08, rhizathalene A, which is produced from the substrate all-trans geranylgeranyl diphosphate, represents a so far unidentified class of tricyclic diterpene carbon skeletons with an unusual tricyclic spiro-hydrindane structure. Protein targeting and administration of stable isotope precursors indicate that rhizathalenes are biosynthesized in root leucoplasts. TPS08 expression is largely localized to the root stele, suggesting a centric and gradual release of its diterpene products into the peripheral root cell layers. We demonstrate that roots of Arabidopsis tps08 mutant plants, grown aeroponically and in potting substrate, are more susceptible to herbivory by the opportunistic root herbivore fungus gnat (Bradysia spp) and suffer substantial removal of peripheral tissue at larval feeding sites. Our work provides evidence for the in vivo role of semivolatile diterpene metabolites as local antifeedants in belowground direct defense against root-feeding insects. PMID:23512856

  8. Tokamak pump limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experiments with a scoop limiter without active internal pumping have been carried out in the PDX tokamak with up to 6MW of auxiliary neutral beam heating. Experiments have also been done with a rotating head pump limiter in the PLT tokamak in conjunction with RF plasma heating. Extensive experiments have been done in the ISX-B tokamak and first experiments have been completed with the ALT-I limiter in TEXTOR. The pump limiter modules in these latter two machines have internal getter pumping. Experiments in ISX-B are with ohmic and auxiliary neutral beam heating. The results in ISX-B and TEXTOR show that active density control and particle removal is achieved with pump limiters. In ISX-B, the boundary layer (or scape-off layer) plasma partially screens the core plasma from gas injection. In both ISX-B and TEXTOR, the pressure internal to the module scales linearly with plasma density but in ISX-B, with neutral beam injection, a nonlinear increase is observed at the highest densities studied. Plasma plugging is the suspected cause. Results from PDX suggest that a region may exist in which core plasma energy confinement improves using a pump limiter during neutral beam injection. Asymmetric radial profiles and an increased edge electron temperature are observed in discharges with improved confinement. The injection of small amounts of neon into ISX-B has more clearly shown an improved electron core energy confinement during neutral beam injection. While carried out with a regular limiter, this Z-mode of operation is ideal for use with pump limiters and should be a way to achieve energy confinement times similar to values for H-mode tokamak plasmas. The implication of all these results for the design of a reactor pump limiter is described

  9. Novel limiter pump topologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of limiter pumps as the principle plasma exhaust system of a magnetic confinement fusion device promises significant simplification, when compared to previously investigating divertor based systems. Further simplifications, such as the integration of the exhaust system with a radio frequency heating system and with the main reactor shield and structure are investigated below. The integrity of limiters in a reactor environment is threatened by many mechanisms, the most severe of which may be erosion by sputtering. Two novel topolgies are suggested which allow high erosion without limiter failure.

  10. HOME Rent Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.252, HUD provides maximum HOME rent limits. The maximum HOME rents are the lesser of: The fair market rent for existing housing...

  11. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  12. Limited Denial of Participation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Limited Denial of Participation (LDP) is an action taken by a HUD Field Office or the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family (DASSF) or Multifamily (DASMF)...

  13. Limited Income and Resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Information for those with limited income and resources (those who may qualify for or already have the Low Income Subsidy to lower their prescription drug coverage...

  14. HUD Program Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Income limits used to determine the income eligibility of applicants for assistance under three programs authorized by the National Housing Act. These programs are...

  15. Trace elements in NaWaRo biogas plants for balancing substrate limited deficiency symptoms and stabilizing the fermentation process; Spurenelemente in NawaRo-Biogasanlagen zum Ausgleich substratbedingter Mangelerscheinungen und zur Stabilisierung des Gaerprozesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas [Hohenheim Univ., Stuttgart (Germany). Landesanstalt fuer Agrartechnik und Bioenergie; Preissler, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on trace elements in renewable resource biogas plants in order to compensate for substrate induced deficiency symptoms and to stabilize the fermentation process. The analysis of biological connections in biogas processes showed, that an optimal supply of the microorganisms with trace elements is essential for the course of the four stages of decomposition of the biogas process. Trace elements significantly are involved in the structure of coenzymes or cofactors, reduce the sulfide toxicity and stimulate the growth of methanogens. If the individual items are missing, the biogas process can be disrupted. This can result in a cut-off of the fermenter and in a stopping of the biogas production.

  16. The quantum geometric limit

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Seth

    2012-01-01

    This letter analyzes the limits that quantum mechanics imposes on the accuracy to which spacetime geometry can be measured. By applying the fundamental physical bounds to measurement accuracy to ensembles of clocks and signals moving in curved spacetime -- e.g., the global positioning system -- I derive a covariant version of the quantum geometric limit: the total number of ticks of clocks and clicks of detectors that can be contained in a four volume of spacetime of radius r and temporal extent t is less than or equal to rt/\\pi x_P t_P, where x_P, t_P are the Planck length and time. The quantum geometric limit bounds the number of events or `ops' that can take place in a four-volume of spacetime: each event is associated with a Planck-scale area. Conversely, I show that if each quantum event is associated with such an area, then Einstein's equations must hold. The quantum geometric limit is consistent with and complementary to the holographic bound which limits the number of bits that can exist within a spat...

  17. Quantum Diffusion-Limited Aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, David B

    2011-01-01

    Though classical random walks have been studied for many years, research concerning their quantum analogues, quantum random walks, has only come about recently. Numerous simulations of both types of walks have been run and analyzed, and are generally well-understood. Research pertaining to one of the more important properties of classical random walks, namely, their ability to build fractal structures in diffusion-limited aggregation, has been particularly noteworthy. However, only now has research begun in this area in regards to quantum random motion. The study of random walks and the structures they build has various applications in materials science. Since all processes are quantum in nature, it is important to consider the quantum variant of diffusion-limited aggregation. Recognizing that Schr\\"odinger equation and a classical random walk are both diffusion equations, it is possible to connect and compare them. Using similar parameters for both equations, we ran various simulations aggregating particles....

  18. Containing Internal Diffusion Limited Aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Duminil-Copin, Hugo; Yadin, Ariel; Yehudayoff, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Internal Diffusion Limited Aggregation (IDLA) is a model that describes the growth of a random aggregate of particles from the inside out. Shellef proved that IDLA processes on supercritical percolation clusters of integer-lattices fill Euclidean balls, with high probability. In this article, we complete the picture and prove a limit-shape theorem for IDLA on such percolation clusters, by providing the corresponding upper bound. The technique to prove upper bounds is new and robust: it only requires the existence of a "good" lower bound. Specifically, this way of proving upper bounds on IDLA clusters is more suitable for random environments than previous ways, since it does not harness harmonic measure estimates.

  19. Force Limit System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Ralph; Krause, David; Bremenour, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The Force Limit System (FLS) was developed to protect test specimens from inadvertent overload. The load limit value is fully adjustable by the operator and works independently of the test system control as a mechanical (non-electrical) device. When a test specimen is loaded via an electromechanical or hydraulic test system, a chance of an overload condition exists. An overload applied to a specimen could result in irreparable damage to the specimen and/or fixturing. The FLS restricts the maximum load that an actuator can apply to a test specimen. When testing limited-run test articles or using very expensive fixtures, the use of such a device is highly recommended. Test setups typically use electronic peak protection, which can be the source of overload due to malfunctioning components or the inability to react quickly enough to load spikes. The FLS works independently of the electronic overload protection.

  20. Measurement limits in flash thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Steven M.; Lhota, James R.; Ahmed, Tasdiq

    2009-05-01

    Although active thermography has traditionally been regarded as a qualitative NDT method, its potential for quantitative measurement of thermophysical properties including wall thickness, flaw size and depth, thermal diffusivity or effusivity has been the subject of numerous investigations. Enabled by improvements in IR camera technology and fast, abundant and inexpensive computing power for advanced signal processing, measurement results have been reported using a variety of excitation and signal processing schemes. Results are often presented as a correlation between thermography data and nominal properties or independent measurements by another "validated" method. However, given the diffusion mechanism that underlies thermography, and the quantization and sampling conditions implicit in using an IR camera as a temperature sensor, there are definite limits to what can be achieved in a thermography measurement. While many benefits can be achieved with improved instrumentation, efficient energy insertion or optimized signal processing, ultimately, the limits imposed by diffusion and instrumentation take precedence, and cannot be circumvented. In this paper, the effects of camera frame rate and sensitivity on measurement of the thickness of a slab are examined, using basic 1-dimensional diffusion approximations.

  1. Limits on nonlinear electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouché, M.; Battesti, R.; Rizzo, C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we set a framework in which experiments whose goal is to test QED predictions can be used in a more general way to test nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED) which contains low-energy QED as a special case. We review some of these experiments and we establish limits on the different free parameters by generalizing QED predictions in the framework of NLED. We finally discuss the implications of these limits on bound systems and isolated charged particles for which QED has been widely and successfully tested.

  2. Inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Robin Blumberg; Nittmann, Johann; Stanley, H. E.

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that inhomogeneous diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model can be used to simulate viscous fingering in a medium with inhomogeneous permeability and homogeneous porosity. The medium consists of a pipe-pore square-lattice network in which all pores have equal volume and the pipes have negligible volume. It is shown that fluctuations in a DLA-based growth process may be tuned by noise reduction, and that fluctuations in the velocity of the moving interface are multiplicative in form.

  3. Food irradiation, profits and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utility of the irradiation to overcome diverse problems of lost nutritious, it has been demonstrated in multiple investigation works, that its have confirmed the value and the inoculation of the irradiated foods. The quantity of energy applied to each food, is in function of the wanted effect. In this document a guide with respect to the practical application and the utility of the irradiation process in different foods, as well as the suggested dose average is shown. Among the limitations of the use of this technology, its are the costs and not being able to apply it to some fresh foods. (Author)

  4. The Limits of Laughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindess, Harvey

    1983-01-01

    Three incidents which elucidate the limits of laughter are described. Most persons enjoy humor as comic relief, but when humor strikes a blow at something they hold dear, they find it very hard to laugh. People are upset by an irreverent attitude toward things they hold in esteem. (RM)

  5. Tightening Home Purchase Limits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    More Chinese cities will limit home purchase to cool the red-hot real estate market In June 2011,the average house price in 100 Chinese cities was 8,856 yuan ($1,373)per square meter.Of these cities,house prices in 75 of them increased

  6. Occupational dose equivalent limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper considers methods of limiting individual radiation risks by recognizing the variation of risk with age at exposure, taking into account both somatic and genetic risks and proposes a simple formula for controlling individual cumulative exposure and hence risk. (Author)

  7. Pushing the Photon Limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, Emilie; Renger, Jan; Cogdell, Richard; Hulst, van Niek F.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas are well-known for their effective role in fluorescence enhancement, both in excitation and emission. Enhancements of 3-4 orders of magnitude have been reported. Yet in practice, the photon emission is limited by saturation due to the time that a molecule spends in singlet and especi

  8. Mathematical methods for hydrodynamic limits

    CERN Document Server

    Masi, Anna

    1991-01-01

    Entropy inequalities, correlation functions, couplings between stochastic processes are powerful techniques which have been extensively used to give arigorous foundation to the theory of complex, many component systems and to its many applications in a variety of fields as physics, biology, population dynamics, economics, ... The purpose of the book is to make theseand other mathematical methods accessible to readers with a limited background in probability and physics by examining in detail a few models where the techniques emerge clearly, while extra difficulties arekept to a minimum. Lanford's method and its extension to the hierarchy of equations for the truncated correlation functions, the v-functions, are presented and applied to prove the validity of macroscopic equations forstochastic particle systems which are perturbations of the independent and of the symmetric simple exclusion processes. Entropy inequalities are discussed in the frame of the Guo-Papanicolaou-Varadhan technique and of theKipnis-Oll...

  9. Proposition Algebra with Projective Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Bergstra, J A

    2008-01-01

    Sequential logic deviates from propositional logic by taking into account that atomic propositions yield different Boolean values at different times during the sequential evaluation of a single proposition. Reactive valuations capture this dynamics of a proposition's environment. This logic is phrased as an equationally specified algebra rather than in the form of proof rules. It is strictly more general than Boolean algebra to the extent that the classical connectives fail to be expressively complete in the sequential case. The proposition algebra PRA is developed in a fashion similar to the process algebra ACP and the program algebra PGA via an algebraic specification which has a meaningful initial algebra for which a range of courser congruences are considered important as well. In addition infinite objects (that is propositions, processes and programs respectively) are preferably dealt with by means of an inverse limit construction which allows the transfer of knowledge concerning finite objects to facts ...

  10. Regulating the introduction of new chemicals under section 5 of TSCA: improving the efficiency of the process and reducing potential injury in the workplace through the use of operational MSDS and exposure limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, I; Jayjock, M A; Keener, R L; Plamondon, J E

    1991-10-01

    The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) authorizes the EPA to take appropriate actions to ensure that new and existing chemicals do not pose "unreasonable risk" to health or the environment. Section 2(b)(3) of the Act directs the Agency to accomplish this objective in a manner that does "not impede unduly or create unnecessary economic barriers to technological innovation." In recent years, critics have felt that the EPA has failed to achieve these primary goals of TSCA. This paper considers some of the reasons for this criticism and advocates an alternate approach of exposure limits and operationally sufficient controls to assist in achieving these goals. An illustration of how this alternate approach might work under practical conditions is presented, using as an example a new chemical substance from the class of acrylate monomers. These concepts and risk assessments provide data for a better design of future studies according to good laboratory practice and quality assurance. PMID:1669965

  11. 营养限制对厌氧序批操作反应器的影响及其恢复重建过程%Effect of nutrients limitation on performance of anaerobic sequencing batch reactor and recovery process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛旭东; 彭党聪

    2012-01-01

    研究了在厌氧条件下以葡萄糖为基质的序批操作反应器(ASBR)中营养物浓度限制对基质吸收和储存的影响及其恢复重建过程。结果表明,营养物限制条件下,发酵细菌表现为过量吸收基质并储存为糖原,形成隐性增殖以维持其细胞的正常结构和代谢功能;而甲烷菌由于无储存能力,其表现为活性逐渐降低。短期营养限制条件下(1个周期),基质中无磷时,储存量增加29%;基质中无氮时,储存量增加90%;基质中既无氮也无磷时,储存量增加26%。长期(31个周期)营养限制(基质中氮磷含量减小50%)下,胞内储存糖原量可高达正常状态下的4.8倍,但甲烷活性减少为正常状态下的17.78%。营养物限制对发酵细菌影响较小,对甲烷菌影响较大。将氮磷浓度恢复正常后,反应器的产甲烷能力恢复较快,出水COD经31周期后恢复正常,而胞内糖原在85周期后恢复正常。%Effect of nutrient limitation in a glucose-fed anaerobic sequencing batch reactor(ASBR) and recovery was investigated.The results show that fermentative bacteria excessively absorbed substrate as glycogen and became recessivity multiplication to hold the normal structure and metabolism under nutrients limitation,and the activity of methanogen without store ability decreased.The storage glycogen increased by 29% under non-phosphorus condition,90% under non-nitrogen condition and 26% without phosphorus and nitrogen.In long term(31 cycles) nutrient limitation,glycogen storage was 4.8 times of normal condition,SMA reduced to 17.78%.Nutrient limitation had less impact on fermentative bacteria and great on methanogen.After the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus adjusted to normal condition,COD in effluent decreased to normal level after 31cycles,and glycogen storage decreased to normal level after 85 cycles.

  12. Limits of Lubrication in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, David Dam

    of temperature and contact pressure. The numerical models have been calibrated regarding friction and thermal contact resistance based on experimental results from actual testing conditions. It has been found that predictions of limits of lubrication are possible by numerical means and that the FE...... by strategic surfaces in comparison to normal stainless steel surfaces implying a larger extent of bi-axial stretching. Numerical simulations have been applied in order to evaluate limits of lubrication in the simulative strip reduction based on predictions of critical parameters appearing in terms......-models corresponds well to experimental results in terms of lubricant film breakdown and subsequently pick-up development. Punching and blanking have been investigated regarding tribological conditions in case of using stainless steel workpiece materials. However, this has called for development of a new test method...

  13. Engineering Options Assessment Report. Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 above-ground UNS, and 79 candidate below-ground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  14. Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-18

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 aboveground UNS, and 79 candidate belowground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  15. Engineering Options Assessment Report. Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 above-ground UNS, and 79 candidate below-ground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  16. Auctions with Limited Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Qingmin Liu; Konrad Mierendorff; Xianwen Shi

    2013-01-01

    We study auction design in the standard symmetric independent private values environment, where the seller lacks the commitment power to withhold an unsold object off the market. The seller has a single object and can conduct an infinite sequence of standard auctions with reserve prices to maximize her expected profit. In each period, the seller can commit to a reserve price for the current period but cannot commit to future reserve prices. We analyze the problem with limited commitment throu...

  17. Limits of proton conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  18. Limiting Similarity Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Szabo, P; Meszena, G.

    2005-01-01

    We reinvestigate the validity of the limiting similarity principle via numerical simulations of the Lotka-Volterra model. A Gaussian competition kernel is employed to describe decreasing competition with increasing difference in a one-dimensional phenotype variable. The simulations are initiated by a large number of species, evenly distributed along the phenotype axis. Exceptionally, the Gaussian carrying capacity supports coexistence of all species, initially present. In case of any other, d...

  19. The need to promote behaviour change at the cultural level: one factor explaining the limited impact of the MEMA kwa Vijana adolescent sexual health intervention in rural Tanzania. A process evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wight Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few of the many behavioral sexual health interventions in Africa have been rigorously evaluated. Where biological outcomes have been measured, improvements have rarely been found. One of the most rigorous trials was of the multi-component MEMA kwa Vijana adolescent sexual health programme, which showed improvements in knowledge and reported attitudes and behaviour, but none in biological outcomes. This paper attempts to explain these outcomes by reviewing the process evaluation findings, particularly in terms of contextual factors. Methods A large-scale, primarily qualitative process evaluation based mainly on participant observation identified the principal contextual barriers and facilitators of behavioural change. Results The contextual barriers involved four interrelated socio-structural factors: culture (i.e. shared practices and systems of belief, economic circumstances, social status, and gender. At an individual level they appeared to operate through the constructs of the theories underlying MEMA kwa Vijana - Social Cognitive Theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action – but the intervention was unable to substantially modify these individual-level constructs, apart from knowledge. Conclusion The process evaluation suggests that one important reason for this failure is that the intervention did not operate sufficiently at a structural level, particularly in regard to culture. Recently most structural interventions have focused on gender or/and economics. Complementing these with a cultural approach could address the belief systems that justify and perpetuate gender and economic inequalities, as well as other barriers to behaviour change.

  20. Limitation of Auditors' Liability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik; Foged-Ladefoged, Lise Kolding

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the question of whether rules on the limitation of auditors’ liability within the perspective of EU law are needed, and if so, which rules can provide an appropriate balance between the potential injured party’s interests and those of the auditing sector, including with respect...... to the fact that the insurance premiums associated with an unlimited liability must of course make the auditor’s tasks more expensive. Relevant EU recommendations and a comparative glance at other EU countries’ proposed solutions to the problem are included....

  1. Orind Refractories Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mr R. Mishra; Group Manging Director

    2005-01-01

    @@ "Sight can be acquired, Vision cannot". Orind Refractories Limited (ORIND), China was formed with this rare vision. At a time when the world was testing the tepid waters of China; Mr. Ravin Jhunjhunwala, Chairman of ORIND and the management of ORIND India had looked over the Great Wall to begin a journey of success. Incorported on 18th August 1994 with an initial investment of USD 5 million, ORL caters to the ever-demanding needs of the steel industry and beyond. Incidentally ORIND was the first wholly owned India company to set up base in China. Pesently, ORIND China has a 616 strong work force including 23 expatriates.

  2. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  3. Smoothness of limit functors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Benedictus Margaux

    2015-05-01

    Let be a scheme. Assume that we are given an action of the one dimensional split torus $\\mathbb{G}_{m,S}$ on a smooth affine -scheme $\\mathfrak{X}$. We consider the limit (also called attractor) subfunctor $\\mathfrak{X}_{}$ consisting of points whose orbit under the given action `admits a limit at 0’. We show that $\\mathfrak{X}_{}$ is representable by a smooth closed subscheme of $\\mathfrak{X}$. This result generalizes a theorem of Conrad et al. (Pseudo-reductive groups (2010) Cambridge Univ. Press) where the case when $\\mathfrak{X}$ is an affine smooth group and $\\mathbb{G}_{m,S}$ acts as a group automorphisms of $\\mathfrak{X}$ is considered. It also occurs as a special case of a recent result by Drinfeld on the action of $\\mathbb{G}_{m,S}$ on algebraic spaces (Proposition 1.4.20 of Drinfeld V, On algebraic spaces with an action of $\\mathfrak{G}_{m}$, preprint 2013) in case is of finite type over a field.

  4. Sensitivity Limitations for Multivariable Linear Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Weller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines fundamental limitations in performance which apply to linear filtering problems associated with multivariable systems having as many inputs as outputs. The results of this paper quantify unavoidable limitations in the sensitivity of state estimates to process and measurement disturbances, as represented by the maximum singular values of the relevant transfer matrices. These limitations result from interpolation constraints imposed by open right half-plane poles and zeros in the transfer matrices linking process noise and output noise with state estimates. Using the Poisson integral inequality, this paper shows how sensitivity limitations and tradeoffs in multivariable filtering problems are intimately related to the directionality properties of the open right half-plane poles and zeros in these transfer matrices.

  5. Exploring life's limits: Deep geobiochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    N-dimensional chemical space on Earth and beyond produces diverse habitats for microbial activity. Hydrothermal environments cover a wide range of habitable space up to and including life's known limits and provide a window into deep geological, geochemical, and biological processes. Hydrothermal water compositions, as sampled from and measured in terrestrial hot springs on Earth's surface, vary in chemical constituent speciation and concentrations over orders of magnitude in a plethora of geochemical parameters with biological significance, including hydronium ion, sulfide, iron, zinc, magnesium, manganese, and molybdenum. Proteins provide a link between geochemistry and microbial activity by catalyzing chemical reactions. Proteins extracted and identified by tandem mass spectrometry from 13 hot spring sediments and biofilms - covering pH values from 2-9 and diverse geochemical compositions - function as efflux transporters, permeases, electron transporters, and others, suggesting that these processes were present in the environment and occurring at the time of sampling. Metalloenzymes have been identified, including the iron protein rubrerythrin, thought to be involved in oxidative stress protection in anaerobic bacteria and archaea, as well as proteins involved in macronutrient processing (carbon, phosphorus, nitrogen, and sulfur). The melding of biochemistry with geochemistry shows potential for quantifying microbial activity in deep environments by demonstrating the presence - and as techniques improve, relative abundances - of reaction-catalyzing enzymes. Moreover, using hot spring sources and their outflow channels as chemical and biological models of geologic time helps decipher the origin and co-evolution of life and geochemistry.

  6. Speed Limits for Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We show that in any relativistic system, entanglement entropy obeys a speed limit set by the entanglement in thermal equilibrium. The bound is derived from inequalities on relative entropy with respect to a thermal reference state. Thus the thermal state constrains far-from-equilibrium entanglement dynamics whether or not the system actually equilibrates, in a manner reminiscent of fluctuation theorems in classical statistical mechanics. A similar shape-dependent bound constrains the full nonlinear time evolution, supporting a simple physical picture for entanglement propagation that has previously been motivated by holographic calculations in conformal field theory. We discuss general quantum field theories in any spacetime dimension, but also derive some results of independent interest for thermal relative entropy in 1+1d CFT.

  7. Physical limits to magnetogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This is an analysis of how magnetic fields affect biological molecules and cells. It was prompted by a series of prominent reports regarding magnetism in biological systems. The first claims to have identified a protein complex that acts like a compass needle to guide magnetic orientation in animals (Qin et al., 2016). Two other articles report magnetic control of membrane conductance by attaching ferritin to an ion channel protein and then tugging the ferritin or heating it with a magnetic field (Stanley et al., 2015; Wheeler et al., 2016). Here I argue that these claims conflict with basic laws of physics. The discrepancies are large: from 5 to 10 log units. If the reported phenomena do in fact occur, they must have causes entirely different from the ones proposed by the authors. The paramagnetic nature of protein complexes is found to seriously limit their utility for engineering magnetically sensitive cells. PMID:27529126

  8. 极限%Limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛振邦

    2012-01-01

    Limit is the theoretical basis of higher mathematics. It defines the basic concept of differential and integral calculus. Therefore,it is the indispensible step to learn higher mathematics.%极限是高等数学的理论基础,用它定义了微积分的基本概念,因此说极限是步入高等数学殿堂的门槛.从中学到大学,很多学生都感到学习高等数学的不适应性.欲尽快适应,需认识数学的特点和极限的本质,同时要解决两个问题:一是学习方法的转变,二是思维方式的转变.

  9. Clinical limitations of Invisalign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Xiem; Ling, Paul H

    2007-04-01

    Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations. The majority of these patients reject wearing labial fixed appliances and are looking instead to more esthetic treatment options, including lingual orthodontics and Invisalign appliances. Since Align Technology introduced the Invisalign appliance in 1999 in an extensive public campaign, the appliance has gained tremendous attention from adult patients and dental professionals. The transparency of the Invisalign appliance enhances its esthetic appeal for those adult patients who are averse to wearing conventional labial fixed orthodontic appliances. Although guidelines about the types of malocclusions that this technique can treat exist, few clinical studies have assessed the effectiveness of the appliance. A few recent studies have outlined some of the limitations associated with this technique that clinicians should recognize early before choosing treatment options.

  10. FY 1999 cold demonstration of the Multi-Point Injection (MPI) process for stabilizing contaminated sludge in buried horizontal tanks with limited access at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major problem faced by the U.S. Department of Energy is the remediation of buried tank waste. Exhumation of the sludge is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation does not typically remove all the contaminated material from the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and uniformly mixed with the sludge. Ground Environmental Services, Inc., has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity, jet-delivery system, which is termed Multi-Point-Injection (MPItrademark). This robust jet-delivery system has been used to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow-buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in a cylindrical test tank (FY 1998). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process was able to successfully form a 32-ton uniform monolith in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of a zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within the 40-inch-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies of Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAATs) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily mixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing

  11. The Limits to Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averill, M.; Briggle, A.

    2006-12-01

    Science policy and knowledge production lately have taken a pragmatic turn. Funding agencies increasingly are requiring scientists to explain the relevance of their work to society. This stems in part from mounting critiques of the "linear model" of knowledge production in which scientists operating according to their own interests or disciplinary standards are presumed to automatically produce knowledge that is of relevance outside of their narrow communities. Many contend that funded scientific research should be linked more directly to societal goals, which implies a shift in the kind of research that will be funded. While both authors support the concept of useful science, we question the exact meaning of "relevance" and the wisdom of allowing it to control research agendas. We hope to contribute to the conversation by thinking more critically about the meaning and limits of the term "relevance" and the trade-offs implicit in a narrow utilitarian approach. The paper will consider which interests tend to be privileged by an emphasis on relevance and address issues such as whose goals ought to be pursued and why, and who gets to decide. We will consider how relevance, narrowly construed, may actually limit the ultimate utility of scientific research. The paper also will reflect on the worthiness of research goals themselves and their relationship to a broader view of what it means to be human and to live in society. Just as there is more to being human than the pragmatic demands of daily life, there is more at issue with knowledge production than finding the most efficient ways to satisfy consumer preferences or fix near-term policy problems. We will conclude by calling for a balanced approach to funding research that addresses society's most pressing needs but also supports innovative research with less immediately apparent application.

  12. Kyphoplasty: Chances and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mueller Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kyphoplasty provides a minimal-invasive surgical technique for the cement augmentation of vertebral bodies following osteoprotic compression fractures or malignant processes. Kyphoplasty has been developed as an advancement of vertebroplasty. Both procedures feature high-success rates in terms of reliable and lasting reduction of pain. Advantages of kyphoplasty over vertebroplasty are to be seen in the possibility of deformity correction as well as in a decreased risk of cement leakage, which represents the most important source for clinical complications. Long-term experiences with the effect of cementing vertebral bodies are sparse. Thus indications and possibilities have to be judged realistically. Conditions, which have to be considered before performing kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty include age of the patient, age of the fracture, degree of deformation and additional degenerative changes of the spine. This article summarizes the present research and literature as well as indications and contraindications and is thought to provide guidelines for the aforementioned decision-making processes.

  13. Limitations in forensic odontology

    OpenAIRE

    B. KAVITHA; A Einstein; Sivapathasundharam, B.; T R Saraswathi

    2009-01-01

    The concept of using dental evidence in forensic investigation has kindled so much interest in the recent past that forensic odontology is even suggested as the single positive identification method to solve certain forensic cases. In this process, the shortcomings in forensic odontology though few are overlooked. These discrepancies associated with various methods are to be weighed cautiously to make forensic odontology a more accurate, reliable, and reproducible investigatory science. In th...

  14. Elevated carbon dioxide increases soil nitrogen and phosphorus availability in a phosphorus-limited Eucalyptus woodland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Shun; Macdonald, Catriona A; Power, Sally A

    2016-04-01

    Free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments have demonstrated increased plant productivity in response to elevated (e)CO2, with the magnitude of responses related to soil nutrient status. Whilst understanding nutrient constraints on productivity responses to eCO2 is crucial for predicting carbon uptake and storage, very little is known about how eCO2 affects nutrient cycling in phosphorus (P)-limited ecosystems. Our study investigates eCO2 effects on soil N and P dynamics at the EucFACE experiment in Western Sydney over an 18-month period. Three ambient and three eCO2 (+150 ppm) FACE rings were installed in a P-limited, mature Cumberland Plain Eucalyptus woodland. Levels of plant accessible nutrients, evaluated using ion exchange resins, were increased under eCO2, compared to ambient, for nitrate (+93%), ammonium (+12%) and phosphate (+54%). There was a strong seasonality to responses, particularly for phosphate, resulting in a relatively greater stimulation in available P, compared to N, under eCO2 in spring and summer. eCO2 was also associated with faster nutrient turnover rates in the first six months of the experiment, with higher N (+175%) and P (+211%) mineralization rates compared to ambient rings, although this difference did not persist. Seasonally dependant effects of eCO2 were seen for concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in soil solution (+31%), and there was also a reduction in bulk soil pH (-0.18 units) observed under eCO2. These results demonstrate that CO2 fertilization increases nutrient availability - particularly for phosphate - in P-limited soils, likely via increased plant belowground investment in labile carbon and associated enhancement of microbial turnover of organic matter and mobilization of chemically bound P. Early evidence suggests that there is the potential for the observed increases in P availability to support increased ecosystem C-accumulation under future predicted CO2 concentrations. PMID:26546164

  15. LIMITED LIABILITY DALAM LIMITED LIABILITY PADA KONSTRUKSI PERUSAHAAN KELOMPOK PIRAMIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Sulistiowati

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Applicability of limited liability in corporate groups with pyramid construction creates a legal loophole in the form of a limited liability within a limited liability. To prevent moral hazard, it is necessary to stipulate new law that limits the number of levels in a corporate group. Berlakunya limited liability pada perusahaan kelompok dengan konstruksi piramida menciptakan celah hukum berupa limited liability dalam limited liability. Untuk mencegah munculnya moral hazard dari pemegang akhir atau induk perbuatan, perlu dilakukan terobosan hukum pembatasan jumlah lapisan anak perusahaan dalam konstruksi perusahaan kelompok.

  16. Belowground carbon trade among tall forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf; Koerner, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Just imagine one tree could hand over large quantities of carbon to another tree. How would that change our thinking about carbon relations of forests, the single biggest biological C reservoir on earth? If such a tree-to-tree C shuttle would exist, it required a demand-supply gradient and a pipeline. Here we show that exactly this unthinkable does occur in overlapping root spheres of tall trees in a mixed temperate forest. Using canopy scale stable carbon isotope labelling applied from a construction crane, we demonstrate that carbon assimilated by spruce is traded over to neighbouring beech, larch, and pine in amounts so large that fine roots almost equilibrate the carbon source signature. The isotope mixing ratio indicated that the interspecific transfer accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon, which is ca. 280 kg ha-1 a-1. This is the first forest scale evidence of a large flux of carbon among mature trees from evolutionary distant taxa. Carbon transfer most likely occurred through common ectomycorrhiza networks, which also exhibited the labelled carbon signal. These observations indicate that while competition for resources (e.g. light, water, nutrients) is often considered the dominant tree-tree interaction in a forest, trees actually interact in more complex pathways including a massive carbon exchange.

  17. Bioenergy: Potentials and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, E.-D.; Canadell, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this lecture we explain 1) the biochemical basis for photosynthesis and plant production and 2) the future demands on biomass for human use. Summing all physiological processes, the efficiency of converting solar energy into biomass is bioenergy. We estimate this fraction to be between 3 and 8% of the global energy demand by 2050. The contribution of bioenergy is at the higher end in tropical regions and in the less industrialized parts of the world, but may even be < 3% in industrialized nations.

  18. Boolean process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵应骅; 李忠诚; 赵著行

    1997-01-01

    Boolean algebra successfully describes the logical behavior of a digital circuit, and has been widely used in electronic circuit design and test With the development of high speed VLSIs it is a drawback for Boolean algebra to be unable to describe circuit timing behavior. Therefore a Boolean process is defined as a family of Boolean van ables relevant to the time parameter t. A real-valued sample of a Boolean process is a waveform. Waveform functions can be manipulated formally by using mathematical tools. The distance, difference and limit of a waveform polynomial are defined, and a sufficient and necessary condition of the limit existence is presented. Based on this, the concept of sensitization is redefined precisely to demonstrate the potential and wide application possibility The new definition is very different from the traditional one, and has an impact on determining the sensitizable paths with maximum or minimum length, and false paths, and then designing and testing high performance circuits

  19. One-dimensional long-range diffusion-limited aggregation III -- The limit aggregate

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, Gideon

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the structure of the limit aggregate (the union of all finite-time aggregates) of the one-dimensional long range diffusion limited aggregation process defined in [arXiv:0910.4416] . We show (under some regularity conditions) that for walks with finite third moment the limit aggregate has renewal structure and positive density, while for walks with finite variance the renewal structure no longer exists and the limit aggregate has 0 density. We define a tree structure on the aggregates and show some results on the degrees and number of ends of these random trees.

  20. The limits of deterrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this contribution is to propose a better insight of the validity of the theory of deterrence, and of related doctrines in more complex and more various situations than in the past: emergence of powers like China and India, of new nuclear States like North Korea and Pakistan, of countries planning to acquire nuclear weapons like Iran, and possibility of a new wave of nuclear proliferation in Middle-East and north-eastern Asia. It also aims at providing arguments in the debates on the struggle against nuclear proliferation and on the future of deterrence. The author first presents and comments the principles of deterrence, and illustrates them by more or less recent historical situations (Iran during the war with Iraq, USA after Pearl Harbour, Arab-Israeli wars, Iraq, and so on). He notably outlines that the notion of deterrence is present in Islamic culture, and that Iran has well integrated it in its defence strategy. Examples of statements and behaviours of other Arab leaders are discussed. The author also briefly indicates how the deterrence strategy is present in the official doctrines of Russia, India, Pakistan, and North Korea. In a second part, based on various examples, the author analyses the practical limitations of deterrence by distinguishing the psychological dimension (bounded rationality, political leaders suffering from various psychological problems, importance of the ideological and spiritual dimension, values prevailing on interests, the case of Iran), and the strategic dimension (good understanding of the enemy, sensitivity of the threat of massive damages, existence of a single decision centre and of an efficient communication). The author finally proposes seven recommendations for better deterrence efficiency

  1. Limits to Tidal Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, C.

    2008-12-01

    Ocean tides have been proposed as a source of renewable energy, though the maximum available power may be shown to be only a fraction of the present dissipation rate of 3.5 TW, which is small compared with global insolation (nearly 105 TW), wind dissipation (103 TW), and even human power usage of 15 TW. Nonetheless, tidal power could be a useful contributor in some locations. Traditional use of tidal power, involving the trapping of water behind a barrage at high tide, can produce an average power proportional to the area of the headpond and the square of the tidal range; the power density is approximately 6 W per square meter for a tidal range of 10 m. Capital costs and fears of environmental damage have put barrage schemes in disfavor, with interest turning to the exploitation of strong tidal currents, using turbines in a manner similar to wind turbines. There is a limit to the available power, however, as adding turbines reduces the flow, ultimately reducing the power. For sinusoidal forcing of flow in a channel connecting two large open basins, the maximum available power may be shown to be given approximately by 0.2ρ g a Q_max, where ρ is the water density, g gravity, a the amplitude of the tidal sea level difference along the channel, and Q_max is the maximum volume flux in the natural state. The same formula applies if the channel is the entrance to a semi-enclosed basin, with a now the amplitude of the external tide. A flow reduction of approximately 40% is typically associated with the maximum power extraction. The power would be reduced if only smaller environmental changes are acceptable, and reduced further by drag on supporting structures, dissipation in turbine wakes, and internal inefficiencies. It can be suggested that the best use of strong, cold, tidal currents is to provide cooling water for nuclear reactors.

  2. Limitations in dual-task performance

    OpenAIRE

    Pannebakker, Merel Mathilde

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the effect of information-processing overload on working-memory dependent information processing was examined using dual-task paradigms. The experiments described strengthen the importance of a functional explanation for dual-task limitations. First, it showed evidence for a unified coding medium (as put forward in the theory of event coding; Hommel, Müsseler, Aschersleben, & Prinz, 2001) in which features, operations and responses are available and can influence each other. A...

  3. Process automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs

  4. Diffusion limited growth in laminar flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M.H. Merks; A.G. Hoekstra; J.A. Kaandorp; P.M.A. Sloot

    2003-01-01

    In the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model, pioneered by Witten and Sander (Phys. Rev. Lett.47, 1400 (1981)), diffusing particles irreversibly attach to a growing cluster which is initiated with a single solid seed. This process generates clusters with a branched morphology. Advectiondiffusion

  5. Limits of noise squeezing in Kerr effect

    CERN Document Server

    Bajer, J; Tanas, R

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that the optical Kerr effect can be a source of highly squeezed light, however the analytical limit of the noise suppression has not been found yet. The process is reconsidered and an analytical estimation of the optimal quadrature noise level is presented. The validity of the new scaling law is checked numerically and analytically.

  6. Collider limits on leptophilic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguila, Francisco del; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro [Granada Univ. (Spain). CAFPE; Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos; Chala, Mikael [Granada Univ. (Spain). CAFPE; Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Santiago, Jose [Granada Univ. (Spain). CAFPE; Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos; European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    In order to observe leptophilic interactions at the LHC we must require at least four leptons, which may be in particular neutrinos, in the final state. If they are mediated by a resonance in the di-leptonic channel, this must be of spin 1 to be produced through a renormalizable coupling. We study the LHC reach for such a vector boson allowing for arbitrary couplings, what in practice means for arbitrary couplings to muons because lepton flavor violating couplings are constrained by rare processes, couplings to electrons by LEP and LHC is not sensitive to final states involving taus in this case. This makes the ILC complementary as it will provide the best limits on Z' couplings to tau leptons. A prominent example is the case of the anomaly-free Z' coupling to the muon minus tau lepton number L{sub μ}-L{sub τ}. If no departure from the Standard Model is observed at the LHC, the most stringent bounds on this vector boson are provided from events with only three charged leptons plus missing energy. Masses of the order of 1 TeV can be probed at the high-luminosity phase of the LHC for Z' couplings of order one. Generic four-lepton operators parametrizing leptophilic interactions can be also restricted using three and four (or two at the ILC) charged lepton samples, but the corresponding limits are marginal, if meaningful, because the resonant behavior appears to be essential for the signal to be significant.

  7. Limiting Spectral Distribution of Sample Autocovariance Matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Anirban; Sen, Sanchayan

    2011-01-01

    The empirical spectral distribution (ESD) of the sample variance covariance matrix of i.i.d. observations under suitable moment conditions converges almost surely as the dimension tends to infinity. The limiting spectral distribution (LSD) is universal and is known in closed form with support [0, 4]. In this article we show that the ESD of the sample autocovariance matrix converges as the dimension increases, when the time series is a linear process with reasonable restriction on the coefficients. This limit does not depend on the distribution of the underlying driving i.i.d. sequence but in contrast to the sample variance covariance matrix, its support is unbounded. The limit moments are certain functions of the autocovariances. This limit is inconsistent in the sense that it does not coincide with the spectral distribution of the theoretical autocovariance matrix. However, if we consider a suitably tapered version of the autocovariance matrix, then its LSD also exists and is consistent. We also discuss the ...

  8. Limitations of skin protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schliemann, Sibylle

    2007-01-01

    Skin protection products and gloves are essential constituents of personal protective equipment at workplaces, which can be used in a complementary way, each offering particular benefits and disadvantages. In many workplace situations, both measures are being used either in an alternating or in a combined manner, typically in professions with exposures to mild irritants and a high wet-work load, such as hairdressers, healthcare workers or employees in the food-processing industry. Skin protection creams can be used to reduce unnecessarily long glove usage in order to reduce occlusion-related effects on the skin barrier. Whenever rotating machines are used, these products are the only option due to safety regulations. However, some particular requirements can be postulated for skin-protective products claimed especially to be used in combination with gloves. Reduction of glove-induced perspiration, of stratum corneum swelling, and postocclusive barrier impairment are intended attributes of such products, which have been already successfully implemented in some commercially available products. On the other hand it has to be proven that the ingredients do not interfere with the glove material, neither in the way of degrading the material, thus making it permeable for harmful substances, nor by enhancing the potential release of rubber allergens. Examples out of the literature are reviewed showing that skin products can exhibit unpredictable effects on the allergen release of rubber materials, if not thoroughly tested for this purpose beforehand. Some raw materials should be avoided in protection products, though they are of established value when used in afterwork emollients to accelerate barrier recovery. Usage of moisturizers, in contrast to special barrier products, at the workplace together or even under gloves is therefore judged critically, although selected products showed beneficial effects in particular experimental settings. Another future option is the

  9. 5 CFR 2411.8 - Time limits for processing requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays), established in this section, shall commence on the date on... Director of the Panel, or the IG, as appropriate, shall, within twenty (20) working days following...

  10. 15 CFR 4.6 - Time limits and expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... appeal. Subject to paragraph (c)(1) of this section, an initial response shall be made within 20 working days (i.e., excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) of the receipt of a request for a... shall be decided within 20 working days of its receipt by the Office of the General Counsel. (c)...

  11. 37 CFR 102.6 - Time limits and expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) of this section, an initial response shall be made within 20 working days (i.e., excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays) of the receipt of a request for a record under this part by the proper FOIA Officer identified in accordance with § 102.5(a), and an appeal shall be decided within 20...

  12. 78 FR 66916 - Alaskan Seafood Processing Effluent Limitations Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... treatment and waste solids disposal and maximize the utilization of valuable natural resources. Furthermore... cost of waste disposal. See 46 FR 2545-2546 (January 9, 1981) for additional details on the contents of... fish wastes and by- product recovery, and that the costs associated with screening and solids...

  13. An orthographic effect in phoneme processing, and its limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Davis, C.

    2012-01-01

    In three phoneme goodness rating experiments, listeners heard phonetic tokens varying along a continuum centered on /s/, occurring finally in isolated word or non-word tokens. An effect of spelling appeared in Experiment 1: native English-speakers’ goodness ratings for the best /s/ tokens were signi

  14. Volcanic edifice weakening via decarbonation: A self-limiting process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Silvio; Heap, Michael J.; Iezzi, Gianluca; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-08-01

    The inherent instability of volcanic edifices, and their resultant propensity for catastrophic collapse, is a constant source of volcanic risk. Structural instability of volcanic edifices may be amplified by the presence of carbonate rocks in the sub-volcanic strata, due to the debilitating response of carbonates to thermally-induced alteration. Nonetheless, decarbonation reactions (the primary weakening mechanism), may stall when the system becomes buffered by rising levels of a reaction product, carbon dioxide. Such thermodynamic stalling might be inferred to serve to circumvent the weakness of volcanic structures. However, the present study shows that, even when decarbonation is halted, rock physical properties continue to degrade due to thermal microcracking. Furthermore, as a result, the pathways for the escape of carbon dioxide are numerous within a volcanic edifice. Therefore, in the case of an edifice with a sub-volcanic sedimentary basement, the generation of carbon dioxide via decarbonation is unlikely to hinder its impact on instability, and thus potentially devastating flank collapse.

  15. Traffic with an FBM limit: convergence of the workload process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debicki, K.G.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2002-01-01

    Highly-aggregated traffic in communication networks is often modeled as fractional Brownian motion (fBm). This is justified by the theoretical result that the sum of a large number of on-off inputs, with either on-times or off-times having a heavy-tailed distribution with infinite variance, converge

  16. Limits to meritocracy? Gender in academic recruitment and promotion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mathias Wullum

    2015-01-01

    According to the literature, women researchers are sometimes at a disadvantage in academic recruitment due to insufficient network ties and subtle gender biases among evaluators. But how exactly do highly formal recruitment procedures allow space for mobilizing informal, potentially gendered...... beliefs among managers in the meritocracy and the de facto functioning of the recruitment procedures. Of the vacancies for associate- and full professorships, 40% have one applicant, and 19% are announced under closed procedures with clear implications for gender stratification. The interviews reveal...

  17. Topology in Process Calculus (I): Limit Behaviour of Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Mingsheng

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the modifications onactions of a topology on names of actions and the simplest topology onagents induced by a topology on names of actions and shows that the limitbehaviour of some agents is compatible with transitional semantics.

  18. Charter Halibut Limited Access Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This limited access system limits the number of charter vessels that may participate in the guided sport fishery for halibut in area 2C and 3A. NMFS issues a...

  19. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stockman

    2001-01-26

    products, complex stability constants, and redox potentials for radionuclides in different oxidation states, form the underlying database to be used for those calculations. The potentially low solubilities of many radionuclides in natural waters constitute the first barrier for their migration from the repository into the environment. Evaluation of this effect requires a knowledge of the site-specific water chemistry and the expected spatial and temporal ranges of its variability. Quantitative determinations of radionuclide solubility in waters within the range of chemistry must be made. Speciation and molecular complexation must be ascertained to interpret and apply solubility results. The solubilities thus determined can be used to assess the effectiveness of solubility in limiting radionuclide migration. These solubilities can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of other retardation processes expected to occur once dissolution of the source material and migration begin. Understanding the solubility behavior of radionuclides will assist in designing valuable sorption experiments that must be conducted below the solubility limit since only soluble species participate in surface reactions and sorption processes. The present strategy for radionuclide solubility tasks has been to provide a solubility model from bulk-experiments that attempt to bracket the estimate made for this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) of water conditions on site. The long-term goal must be to develop a thermodynamic database for solution speciation and solid-state determination as a prerequisite for transport calculations and interpretation of empirical solubility data. The model has to be self-consistent and tested against known solubility studies in order to predict radionuclide solubilities over the continuous distribution ranges of potential water compositions for performance assessment of the site. Solubility studies upper limits for radionuclide concentrations in natural waters. The

  20. Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , complex stability constants, and redox potentials for radionuclides in different oxidation states, form the underlying database to be used for those calculations. The potentially low solubilities of many radionuclides in natural waters constitute the first barrier for their migration from the repository into the environment. Evaluation of this effect requires a knowledge of the site-specific water chemistry and the expected spatial and temporal ranges of its variability. Quantitative determinations of radionuclide solubility in waters within the range of chemistry must be made. Speciation and molecular complexation must be ascertained to interpret and apply solubility results. The solubilities thus determined can be used to assess the effectiveness of solubility in limiting radionuclide migration. These solubilities can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of other retardation processes expected to occur once dissolution of the source material and migration begin. Understanding the solubility behavior of radionuclides will assist in designing valuable sorption experiments that must be conducted below the solubility limit since only soluble species participate in surface reactions and sorption processes. The present strategy for radionuclide solubility tasks has been to provide a solubility model from bulk-experiments that attempt to bracket the estimate made for this Analysis and Modeling Report (AMR) of water conditions on site. The long-term goal must be to develop a thermodynamic database for solution speciation and solid-state determination as a prerequisite for transport calculations and interpretation of empirical solubility data. The model has to be self-consistent and tested against known solubility studies in order to predict radionuclide solubilities over the continuous distribution ranges of potential water compositions for performance assessment of the site. Solubility studies upper limits for radionuclide concentrations in natural waters. The