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Sample records for behcet disease imaging

  1. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Ehara, Shigeru; Hitachi, Shin; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuro-Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Fukutake, Toshio; Hirayama, Keizo; Iwamoto, Itsuo

    1987-01-01

    In four patients with neuro-Behcet's disease, the findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated in comparison with the results of X-ray computed tomography (CT), especially for brainstem lesions. MRI was able to reveal brainstem lesions in three patients, in addition to lesions of basal ganglia, internal capsule and thalamus in the same patients. In contrast, X-ray CT demonstrated lesions of basal ganglia and internal capsule in only one patient, and it did not detect any brainstem lesions. Non-specific findings, including cerebral and brainstem atrophy, were revealed more clearly in inversion recovery images than in X-ray CT. Spin echo images were superior to inversion recovery images for detecting the lesions of demyelination, necrosis, gliosis and so on in neuro-Behcet's disease. The brainstem lesions visualized by MRI were situated in the regions of the basis pontis, cerebral peduncle and tectum of the midbrain. In neuro-Behcet's disease, the main pathological lesions are known occur in the ventral parts of the brainstem, but X-ray CT cannot always reveale these brainstem lesions because it produces bone artifacts. For this reason, the X-ray CT findings of neuro-Behcet's disease reported previously have been nonspecific cerebral or brainstem atrophy and decreased attenuations in the basal ganglia or subcortical white matter. Thus it is generally difficult to differentiate neuro-Behcet's disease from other intracranial lesions on the basis of the supratentorial X-ray CT findings. However, the above mentioned brainstem lesions visualized by MRI are consistent with the pathologically preferential site in neuro-Behcet's disease, and MRI can assist in the clinical diagnosis of neuro-Behcet's disease by demonstrating the brainstem lesions clearly, even when neurological involvement precedes the typical dermatologic and ophthalmologic manifestations. (author)

  3. Neuro-Behcet's disease: diagnostic usefulness of MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Song Soo; Song, Chang June; Lee, Ae Young; Pak, Chung Ho

    2000-01-01

    To suggest the characteristic MR features and to evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging for the diagnosis of neuro-Behcet's disease. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of clinically confirmed neuro-Behcet's disease in eight patients (M:F =3D 7:1) ranging in age from 28 to 47 (average, 36) years. The findings were analyzed in terms of the most frequently occurring sites, signal intensities, contrast enhancement, and the changing patterns seen on follow-up MR examination. Seven of the eight patients had parenchymal brain lesions and the other had dural sinus thrombosis without brain parenchymal brain abnormality. In descending order of frequency, lesions involved the pons, midbrain, medulla oblongata, internal capsule, basal ganglia, thalamus, temporal lobe, and corpus callosum. The brain stem was involved in six patients, five of whom showed extensive involvement of the entire stem. In five patients, brain stem lesions showed supratentorial involvement, and in one, involvement of this region only was noted. Signal intensities of the lesions were poorly defined and extensive, especially in the brain stem, usually showed prolongation of both T1 and T2 relaxation time. Three patients underwent follow-up examination, and this showed that while most lesions had disappeared in time, some had become small and cavitary. Initial MR examination showed that three patients had newly developed lesions as well as cavitary foci, suggesting the recurrence of disease. Contrast enhancement was noted in five of seven patients (71%), and various types, including nodular, linear, marginal, and ring. The MR features of neuro-Behcet's disease were fairly characteristic, and in clinically unsuspicious patients might be diagnostically useful. (author)

  4. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbs, Alana Y.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Massey, Brandon Z.; Graham, Anna R.; Friend, Christopher J.; Walsh, Joshua A.

    2008-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an inflammatory disease of unknown cause characterized by intermittent episodes of acute inflammation manifested by oral aphthous ulcers, genital ulcers, uveitis, and skin lesions. We report a rare case of myonecrosis associated with Behcet's disease. Myonecrosis of Behcet's disease can mimic soft tissue abscess and therefore awareness of this entity in the appropriate clinical setting is important for initiation of appropriate and timely treatment. (orig.)

  5. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

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    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  6. Behcet's Disease

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    ... this research; and the dissemination of information on research progress in these diseases. Contact Us NIAMS Archive Viewers and Players Social Media Moderation Policy FOIA Privacy Statement Accessibility Disclaimer Digital Strategy ...

  7. Behcet's Disease

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    ... organs and affect the central nervous system, causing memory loss and impaired speech, balance, and movement. The effects of the disease may include blindness, stroke, swelling of the spinal cord, and intestinal ...

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of neuro-Behcet's disease: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatashi, Akio; Moritani, Toshio; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Westesson, Per-Lennart; Garber, Todd

    2003-01-01

    We present a serial study of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in a patient with neuro-Behcet's disease. Initial T2-weighted magnetic resonance images showed a hyperintense lesion in the brain stem. The lesion was slightly hyperintense on DWI and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was slightly increased. Ten months later, DWI showed an improvement in the abnormal signal intensity and the region of increased ADC had increased in size, especially on the left side. DWI is useful for differentiating an acute exacerbation of neuro-Behcet's disease from acute infarction. (orig.)

  9. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of neuro-Behcet's disease: initial and follow-up studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Suk Hee; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Heung Joong; Chang, Nam Gyu; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Jeong Gwang Woo; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2005-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the initial and follow-up studies of patients with neuro-Behcet's disease. Six patients diagnosed with neuro-Behcet's disease were the subjects of this study. Initial and follow-up MR imaging were obtained in all six patients. Initial and follow-up DWI were also obtained is four of the six patients, with only an initial DWI in the other two. The DWI were obtained using multi-shot echo planar imaging, on a 1.5T MR unit, with two gradient steps (b values of 0, 1000 sec/mm 2 ). The ADC value and ADC maps were obtained using commercial software. The locations and signal intensities of the lesions were analyzed on conventional MRI and DWI, respectively. The ADC values of the lesions were calculated on the initial and follow-up DWI, and compared those of lesions in the normal contralateral regions. The initial DWI showed iso-signal intensities in four of the six patients, with high signal intensities in the other two. In five of the six patients, including three of the four that showed isosignal intensities and the two that showed high signal intensities on the initial DWI, the ADC values of the involved lesions were higher than those of the normal contralateral regions. In three of four that showed isosignal intensities, the ADC values of the lesions were decreased and normalized on the follow-up DWI. Obtaining DWI and ADC values in patients with neuro-Behcet's disease may be helpful in the understanding of pathophysiology and differential diagnosis of this disease

  10. MRI in neuro-Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E.T.; Atilla, S.; Keskin, T.; Simonson, T.; Isik, S.; Yuh, W.T.C.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to characterise specific MRI findings and to determine their value in neuro-Behcet's disease. We examined 17 patients (14 men, 3 women) with neuro-Behcet's disease using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images and contrast-enhanced images at 0.5 T. There were 13 patients (76.5 %) who had single or multiple lesions. Most of these were in the basal ganglia, brain stem or deep white matter region, giving high signal on T2-weighted images and isointense or low signal on T1-weighted images. In 3 cases (17.6 %) there was linear high signal along the posterior limb of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. This was considered as a potential differentiating feature of neuro-Behcet's disease. Contrast-enhancement was seen in 17 lesions in 7 patients. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Neuro-Behcet's disease: initial and follow-up MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Sung; Choi, Sun Seob; Lee, Ha Jong; Ha, Dong Ho; Lee, Yong Il

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate initial and follow-up MR imaging(MRI) findings of neuro-Behcet's disease. MRI of seven clinically diagnosed cases of neuro-Behcet's disease were retrospectively analysed in terms of involved site, pattern, signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern and changes seen on follow-up. Using a 0.35T or 1.0T unit T2-and T1-weighted spin-echocontrast-enhanced images were obtained in six patients. Follow-up MRI after steroid therapy lastion between two weeks and 16 months was performed in six patients. Lesions involved the midbrain(6/7), pons(5/7), thalamus(4/7), medulla oblongata(3/7), tegmentum(3/7), internal capsule(3/7), middle cerebellar peduncle(2/7), dentate nucleus(1/7), basal ganglia(1/7) and temporal lobe(1/7). They were 1-3cm in size, and their shape was ill-defined and patchy. Inhomogeneous high and low signal-intensity was seen on T2-weighted and T1-weighted images, respectively. In two of six cases there was focal mild patchy enhancement. Euring follow-up lasting for between two weeks and 16 months after steroid therapy, the lesions decreased in extent(n=3D5) or disappeared(n=3D1), and in the brainstem, focal brain atrophy occurred in three cases. Although MRI findings of neuro-Behcet's disease are nonspecific, common involvement of the brainstem, tegmentum and internal capsule, as well as improvement on follow-up MRI, may be helpful diagnostic indicators of this condition.=20

  12. Symptom management in Behcets disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozel, Filiz; Tureyen, Aynur Esen; Aykar, Fisun Senuzun

    2018-01-01

    To determine the symptoms experienced by patients diagnosed with Behcet's Disease and how they cope with them. The qualitative study was conducted from September 2013 to March 2014 at Ege University Medical Faculty Hospital, Turkey, comprising patients having all symptoms of Behcet's Disease. Data was collected through semi-structured focus-group interview form. The findings were assessed using Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms and Symptom Management Theory. SPSS 20 and Nvivo 10 were used for data analysis. Of the 35 patients, 16(45.8%) were female and 19(54.2%) were male. The symptoms affected patients' lives, and the patients used either positive or negative symptom management strategies, leading to either positive or negative results during symptom management. Behcet's Disease patients needed effective symptom management.

  13. Behcet's disease involving the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleto, Maria Jesus; Marcos, Lourdes

    2002-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown origin that was traditionally defined by oral and genital ulcers and uveitis. We describe a case of a patient with a diagnosis of Behcet's syndrome who presented a palpable lesion in the right breast with inflammatory signs. X-ray findings posed a differential diagnosis between tumoral and inflammatory pathology. The pathological findings confirmed a small-vessel vasculitis. We found two reports of breast involvement by this disease in the literature. Our patient was studied by mammogram and sonogram which together with clinical history are important to prevent delay in diagnosis and unnecessary therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  14. Delayed habituation in Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulturk, Sefa; Akyol, Melih; Kececi, Hulusi; Ozcelik, Sedat; Cinar, Ziynet; Demirkazik, Ayse

    2008-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system in Behcet's patients may be affected due to various reasons. This entity may be detected with the measurement of the electrodermal activities, heart rate variability and pupillometric methods. Habituation is one of the implicit forms of learning and memory and the loss of habituation can reveal pathological changes in the synaptic regions. To determine whether there is a functional decrease in the synaptic effectiveness (habituation) of the pathways to sympathetic neurons that had been repeatedly activated in Behcet's. Twelve patients with Behcet's disease and 12 healthy controls were included in the study. Sympathetic skin potential (SSP) records were taken at normal room temperature in a quiet place within a Faraday cage. Sixteen square wave single shock impulses (duration: 1200 ms, strength: 5 mA) were applied on each case. After the 1st stimulus, the SSP amplitudes were lower in the patients compared to the controls (P0.05). Whereas there was no significant differences among the SSP amplitudes after the 9th impulse in the controls (P>0.05). The habituation rate of the SSP after consecutive impulses was slowest in the patients compared to controls (P<0.001, t value=12.39). There is a delayed habituation in Behcet's disease and that may due to pathologic changes with vasculitis through their peripheral nerves.

  15. Behcet's disease with cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scardamaglia, L.; Desmond, P.M.; Gonzales, M.F.; Bendrups, A.; Brodtmann, A.

    2001-01-01

    The case presented illustrates the diagnostic dilemma off neurological involvement in Behcet's disease and other inflammatory diseases. 'Psychiatric' symptoms were present for 2 years without abnormalities on SPECT or MRI and without CSF pleocytosis. Even at the time of fitting, no CSF abnormalities were observed. The preceding psychiatric presentations may have been due to cerebral vasculitis that was exacerbated by withdrawal of steroids. Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most sensitive imaging modality. Lesions are usually in the brainstem, cerebellum, basal ganglia region or periventricular white matter, and the pons and the mesencephalon are commonly affected. In our patient there was no diencephalic or brainstem involvement. The inflammatory process can appear as a very large lesion, with gadolinium enhancement and significant mass effect, as in our patient. Brain magnetic resonance imaging. Postgadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, axial image shows two large lesions in the right frontal lobe, with the larger, posterior lesion demonstrating vivid ring enhancement. A central nodule is isodense, with the cerebral white matter within the larger lesion. Surrounding low T 1 signal involves the hemispheric white matter without cortical extension and is consistent with vasogenic oedema. Minor mass effect is demonstrated with bowing of the anterior falx cerebri to the left. Biopsy shows prominent fibrinoid necrosis in small calibre postcapillary venules and cerebral white matter. There are surrounding acute and chronic inflammatory cells and nuclear debris, consistent with vasculitis

  16. Radiologically- detectable sacroiliac involvement in behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadji, A.; Shabani, M.; Jamshidi, A.; Shahram, F.; Davatchi, F.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The association of Behcet's disease and ankylosing spondylitis is still a matter of debate. Objective: As the presence of sacroiliac joint involvement is an essential criterion in diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis . We decided to determined the prevalence of sacroiliac joint involvement in Behcet's disease and compare it with that of a control group. Patients and Methods: We randomly selected two groups of 199 Behcet's disease patients and 168 non- Behcet's disease cases (the controls). All cases were over 20 years of ages. Standard anteroposterior radiographs of the sacroiliac joint were obtained and interpreted by two rheumatologists and a radiologists blinded to the diagnosis. To determined the severity of the condition, the following 5-point scale was employed: Normal (O), pseudo-widening (1), sclerosis (2), erosion (3), and bony fusion (4). The eliminate any doubt, only grades 3 and 4 were considered as sacroiliitis. Both group were separately evaluated for age (≤ 30, and ≥ 30), and gender. Results were compared using Chi square test. Results: The groups were matched for age and sex: There were 98 (49.2%) females in Behcet's disease vs. 91 (54.2%) in the control group (p=O.35). The mean ±SD age was 35±8.3 years in Behcet's disease and 35 ±10 in control group (p=1). The sacroiliac joint was involved in 9 (4.6%) patients in Behcet's disease and 7 (4.2%) patients in control group (p=O.93). Comparisons between the results of the unisexual cohorts revealed to significance either (p=O.68 for males, and p=O.64 for females). The age subdivisions (under- and over-30) again showed no significant difference (p=O.96 and p=O.69 for under- and over -30 patients, respectively). Conclusion: The presence of radiographic signs of sacroiliac joint involvement is not mandatory for the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis

  17. Colonic localization of indium-111 labeled leukocytes in active Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harre, R.G.; Conrad, G.R.; Seabold, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    A patient with known Behcet's disease demonstrated intense colonic localization of In-111 labeled leukocytes. Gastrointestinal involvement had not been previously manifested, but extensive colonic inflammation was documented by endoscopy. This case illustrates the utility of In-111 labeled leukocyte imaging for detecting active bowel disease in a debilitated patient with documented Behcet's vasculitis

  18. Renal involvement in behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Noshad, Hamid; Sadreddini, Shahram; Ebrahimi, Aliasghar; Molaeefard, Mahsheed; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Shoja, Mohammadali Mohajel

    2009-01-01

    There are conflicting reports about the renal involvement in Behcet's disease (BD). In this study we aimed to study the frequency and type of renal involvement in a group of patients with BD in Azerbaijan province that is one of the prevalent areas of BD in Iran. All cases of BD were prospectively followed between June 2004 and January 2007, and evaluated for renal dys-function (serum creatinine > 1.7 mg/dL), glomerular hematuria and proteinuria. Those patients with proteinuria > 500 mg/day and serum creatinine level > 2 mg/dL, underwent renal biopsy. From a total number of 100 patients, six patients (6%) had obvious renal involvements. Four patients had glomerular hematuria and proteinuria. Renal biopsy in two of them revealed measangial proliferative glumerulonephritis with IgA deposit in one of them and membranoproliferative glumerolonephritis in another one. Two remaining patients had serum creatinine > 2 mg/dL without any hematuria or proteinuria. Serologic study for viral agents and collagen vascular disease were negative in all patients with renal involvements. In conclusion, renal involvement in BD is not infrequent, although in most cases it is mild in nature and may be missed. (author)

  19. Dramatic Vascular Course of Behcet's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsharawy, Mohamed A.; Hassan, Khairi A.; Al-Awami, Majed; Al-Mulhim, Fatma A.

    2004-01-01

    Vascular involvement in Behcet's disease is rare (approximately 14% venous and 1.6% arterial), serious and recurrent. We report a case of Behcet's disease with deep venous thrombosis and right iliac pseudoaneurysm which was repaired with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft. The patient received warfarin, aspirin, clopidogrel, immunosupressive and corticosteroids. Two months later the patient developed manifestations of superior vena cava thrombosis and the graft was blocked. Three months later, ischemia of the right foot deteriorated and left femoral artery crossover (PTFE) graft was performed. (author)

  20. Brain MRI in 17 patients with ocular Behcet`s disease; Risonanza Magnetica dell`encefalo in 17 pazienti affetti da malattia di Behcet oculare

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    Accorinti, Massimo; Pivetti Pezzi, Paola [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Oftalmologia; Di Biasi, Claudio; Trasimeni, Guido; Melone, Antonio; Gualdi, Gianfranco [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Unita` TC-RM I Clinica Medica

    1997-04-01

    Behcet`s disease is a chronic relapsing disorder of unknown etiology characterized by oral aphthous ulcerations, uveitis, genital ulcerations and bone lesions. A variety of other signs including polyarthritis, vascular conditions (blood vessel occlusions and aneurysms), epididymitis, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and heart lesions may also occur. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is reported in 10-49 % of cases and it is the first symptom of the disease in 5 % of subjects. The neuro-Behcet`s syndrome may appear as a brainstem syndrome, and an organic confusional syndrome or dementia. cranial hypertension, mostly related to cerebral venus thrombosis, is also present in neuro-Behcet`s disease and its incidence is reported in up to 10 % of Behcet`s patients. MRI is reportedly the most sensitive neuroradiological approach to detect the focal lesions related to neuro-Behcet disease and several single cases or series of Behcet`s patients with neurologic sings have been examined with MRI. They used MRI to investigate CNS involvement in Behcet`s disease patients with and without previous neurologic sings. MRI was carried out on 17 patients with ocular Behcet`s disease without neurological symptoms to assess the possible subclinical involvement of the CNS. PD and T2-weighted hypersignal foci were demonstrated in parietal, frontal, subcortical and periventricular white matter in 6 subjects. Neuroradiological abnormalities were found only in patients with complete disease and with the disease diagnosed more than 10 years earlier. Even though the pathogenesis of these neuroradiological abnormalities and their correlation with Behcet`s disease remain to be clarified, their study suggests the possibility of subclinical CNS involvement in these patients, which may affect the therapeutic approach and their prognosis.

  1. The Evaluation of Solid Phase Gastric Emptying in Patients with Behcet%u2019s Disease

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    Asena Cigdem Dogramaci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Behcet%u2019s disease is a multisystemic disease that includes the mucocutaneous, ocular, cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, joint and central nervous system involvement. Gastrointestinal system involvement is rare in Behcet%u2019s disease. Current study was planned to investigate the rate of gastric emptying in patients with Behcet%u2019s disease by using gastric emptying scintigraphy. Material and Method: In order to determine gastric emptying rate of solids, 14 patients with Behcet%u2019s disease and 14 healthy controls were studied scintigraphically. After an overnight fast, all subjects ingested a Tc- 99m DTPA labeled solid meal consisted of an egg and toasted white bread. Immediately after ingestion of the meal, subjects were positioned supine under the gamma camera and serial images were recorded continuously for 90 minutes. Half empyting time (t 1/2 and percentage of radioactive material remaining in the stomach at 60 min. were calculated. Results: The mean ages of Behcet%u2019s patients was 41.00±10.25 years and 40.57±10.05 years in control group. T ½ of Behcet%u2019s patients was found 85± 61 min. and 63±22 min. in control cases (p=0.122. Percentage of radioactive material remaining in the stomach at 60 min. was 69.3± 14.0 % and 54.6± 22.0 % in Behcet%u2019s patients and controls, respectively (p=0.035. Discussion: Although there was not a significant difference between half gastric emptying times, we determined that percentage of radioactive material remaining in the stomach at 60 min. was significantly greater in Behcet%u2019s patients than that in controls. As a result, gastric stasis could be seen in Behcet%u2019s patients due to multisystemic involvement.

  2. Meningeal involvement in Behcet's disease: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guma, A.; Aguilera, C.; Pons, L.; Acebes, J.; Arruga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease that involves the central nervous system up to half of cases. Presentation with neurologic symptoms occurs in 5 % of cases and cerebral venous thrombosis is one of its major manifestations. A feature not previously reported is progressive meningeal thickening with involvement of both optic nerves. We report a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis, meningeal thickening and contrast enhancement on MRI. This patient had two other unusual features: positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and later development of central diabetes insipidus. (orig.)

  3. Behcet's disease in acquired immune deficiency syndrome

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    Beenish Siddiqui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV/AIDS patients often present with orogenital ulcers. In the immunocompromised patient diagnosis of these ulcers pose a challenge, as there is a myriad of etiologies. We present a case of an HIV/AIDS patient with recurrent orogenital aphthosis that was confirmed to have concomitant diagnosis of Behcet's disease. Proper awareness of the causes of these ulcers is essential for prompt and effective treatment. While rare causes may be at the bottom of a differential list in an immunocompetent host, when HIV/AIDS is involved these rare causes often percolate to the top.

  4. Brain MRI in 17 patients with ocular Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accorinti, Massimo; Pivetti Pezzi, Paola; Di Biasi, Claudio; Trasimeni, Guido; Melone, Antonio; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    1997-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a chronic relapsing disorder of unknown etiology characterized by oral aphthous ulcerations, uveitis, genital ulcerations and bone lesions. A variety of other signs including polyarthritis, vascular conditions (blood vessel occlusions and aneurysms), epididymitis, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and heart lesions may also occur. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is reported in 10-49 % of cases and it is the first symptom of the disease in 5 % of subjects. The neuro-Behcet's syndrome may appear as a brainstem syndrome, and an organic confusional syndrome or dementia. cranial hypertension, mostly related to cerebral venus thrombosis, is also present in neuro-Behcet's disease and its incidence is reported in up to 10 % of Behcet's patients. MRI is reportedly the most sensitive neuroradiological approach to detect the focal lesions related to neuro-Behcet disease and several single cases or series of Behcet's patients with neurologic sings have been examined with MRI. They used MRI to investigate CNS involvement in Behcet's disease patients with and without previous neurologic sings. MRI was carried out on 17 patients with ocular Behcet's disease without neurological symptoms to assess the possible subclinical involvement of the CNS. PD and T2-weighted hypersignal foci were demonstrated in parietal, frontal, subcortical and periventricular white matter in 6 subjects. Neuroradiological abnormalities were found only in patients with complete disease and with the disease diagnosed more than 10 years earlier. Even though the pathogenesis of these neuroradiological abnormalities and their correlation with Behcet's disease remain to be clarified, their study suggests the possibility of subclinical CNS involvement in these patients, which may affect the therapeutic approach and their prognosis

  5. A brain mass in a patient with Behcet's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfedaghi, Ahmad S; Masters, Y; Mourou, M; Eshak, O

    2015-09-30

    This case report describes an uncommon presentation of Behcet's disease which manifested as neuro-Behcet's disease. Although it is not the first reported case in the medical literature, it is a possible differential in a patient presenting with a brain tumor. Since the diagnosis of neuro-Behcet's disease depends largely on the clinical picture and medical history, it should be considered prior to opting for invasive diagnostic methods. Our patient is a 36-year-old white man from Kuwait. He presented with acute onset of headache, vomiting, and right-sided weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of his brain showed a mass in the brain stem. He then revealed that he had a history of recurrent painful oral and genital ulcers for the past 10 years, which suggested a diagnosis of Behcet's disease. A brain biopsy was recommended by a neurosurgeon at the time, but the patient refused the procedure. After initiating steroid therapy, the mass began to regress and, eventually, was undetectable on subsequent imaging of his brain. This case of neuro-Behcet's disease reflects the need to consider this diagnosis in a patient of less than 40 years of age presenting with a suspected brain tumor. This may delay the need for invasive diagnostic methods, especially if such methods are not desired by the patient. In the management of suspected neuro-Behcet's disease, initiating steroid therapy and measuring the response is a reasonable option before seeking a definitive diagnosis via brain biopsy. If the response to steroids is minimal then a brain biopsy should be performed.

  6. Behcet's disease involving the breast

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    Soleto, Maria Jesus; Marcos, Lourdes [Department of Radiology, Hospital de la Princesa, Universidad Autonoma, Diego de Leon 62, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown origin that was traditionally defined by oral and genital ulcers and uveitis. We describe a case of a patient with a diagnosis of Behcet's syndrome who presented a palpable lesion in the right breast with inflammatory signs. X-ray findings posed a differential diagnosis between tumoral and inflammatory pathology. The pathological findings confirmed a small-vessel vasculitis. We found two reports of breast involvement by this disease in the literature. Our patient was studied by mammogram and sonogram which together with clinical history are important to prevent delay in diagnosis and unnecessary therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  7. Radiological aspects in pulmonary involvement of Behcet disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Im, Jung Gi; Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Hyung

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the pulmonary manifestations of Behcet disease, authors reviewed the chest radiographs of 130 cases of Behcet disease diagnosed at Seoul National University Hospital from January 1980 to December 1987 retrospectively. Of the 130 cases, 6 cases (4.6%) showed pulmonary abnormalities that were considered as a manifestation of Behcet disease. Two cases showed round masses near the hila on chest radiographs which were confirmed as pulmonary artery aneurysms on angiographies. Two cases showed pulmonary infiltrates due to pulmonary infarcts. Others were a case of unilateral pulmonary edema due to compression og the contralateral pulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a compulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a complication of esophageal ulcer. Though its occurrence is rare, nodular and/or infiltrative pulmonary lesions in patients with Behcet disease should be suspected as a vascular involvement of the disease itself until proven otherwise.

  8. Radiological aspects in pulmonary involvement of Behcet disease

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    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Im, Jung Gi; Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    To evaluate the pulmonary manifestations of Behcet disease, authors reviewed the chest radiographs of 130 cases of Behcet disease diagnosed at Seoul National University Hospital from January 1980 to December 1987 retrospectively. Of the 130 cases, 6 cases (4.6%) showed pulmonary abnormalities that were considered as a manifestation of Behcet disease. Two cases showed round masses near the hila on chest radiographs which were confirmed as pulmonary artery aneurysms on angiographies. Two cases showed pulmonary infiltrates due to pulmonary infarcts. Others were a case of unilateral pulmonary edema due to compression og the contralateral pulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a compulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a complication of esophageal ulcer. Though its occurrence is rare, nodular and/or infiltrative pulmonary lesions in patients with Behcet disease should be suspected as a vascular involvement of the disease itself until proven otherwise.

  9. Neurological Manifestation of Behcet's Disease: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Behcet's disease causes inflammation of blood vessels but it is of unknown aetiology. When it involves the nervous system, it may present with benign headaches, aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, cranial nerve palsies, seizures, personality changes, and cerebral venous thrombosis. We present the case of A.G is a ...

  10. Exudative pleural effusion associated with Behcet's disease | Ikuabe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Behcet's disease is a rare immune mediated small vessel systemic vasculitis in which diagnosis is mainly clinical and requires the presence of recurrent oral ulcers and at least two additional criteria that includes recurrent mouth and genital ulcers, skin lesions, eye inflammation (uveitis) and a positive pathergy ...

  11. Sequential gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI studies in neuro-Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazui, S.; Naritomi, H.; Ogawa, M.; Sawada, T.; Imakita, S.; Yamada, N.

    1991-01-01

    Sequential gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) enhanced MR images were obtained before and after steroid therapy in a case of neuro-Behcet's disease. Multiple scattered lesions, which could not be detected on pre- and post-contrast CT, were demonstrated mainly in the white matter of the pons and/or the cerebrum with both T1- and T2-weighted images. Some of these lesions, however, were not enhanced at all by infusion of Gd-DTPA. The Gd-DTPA infusion study demonstrated marked enhancement in the white matter of the pons and cerebrum. Some lesions not seen with T2-weighted images were also strongly enhanced by Gd-DTPA infusion at the acute stage. After steroid therapy, the symptoms and abnormal laboratory findings were resolved. The pontine and cerebral lesions on plain MR images remained unchanged even after resolution of the symptoms, suggesting that they were inactive old foci. On the other hand, the lesions detected in the enhancement study before steroid therapy disappeared with the repeat Gd-DTPA enhanced MR images which were performed after resolution of the symptoms. Some active inflammatory lesions in neuro-Behcet's disease may be demonstrated only on Gd-DTPA enhanced MR images. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging appears to be potentially useful for detecting active inflammatory lesions in neuro-Behcet's disease and for evaluating the efficacy of treatment. (orig.)

  12. Diffusion-weighted imaging in chronic Behcet patients with and without neurological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baysal, T.; Dogan, M.; Bulut, T.; Sarac, K.; Karlidag, R.; Ozisik, H.I.; Baysal, O.

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether neurological impairment in chronic Behcet's disease (BD) patients with normal appearing brain can be assessed by means of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The averaged apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in 22 different radiologically normal appearing brain regions in 32 patients with and without neurological findings and 20 control subjects. The ADC values in bilateral frontal, temporal and occipital normal appearing white matter were significantly higher in the patient groups compared with the control subjects (p<0.05). In these brain regions, DWI revealed differences in the ADC values between patients with neurological findings (including symptomatic and neuro-Behcet patients) and the asymptomatic patient group. The similarity of the ADC values of patients without symptoms to those of the control group allowed clear discrimination between patients with and without neurological findings. DWI may serve to assess subclinical neurological involvement in BD, even when structural changes are absent. (orig.)

  13. Colitis of Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, D.J.; Courtney, J.V.; Riddell, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Three patients with Behcet's syndrome and colitis are described. The radiologic and histologic appearances of the colitis are discussed. The similarities of Behcet's colitis to Crohn's disease are outlined. The cases demonstrate the necessity to consider Behcet's syndrome in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. (orig.) [de

  14. Aortitis With Severe Aortic Regurgitation in Behcet's Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Chiu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's aortitis is a rare, but one of the most severe complications of Behcet's disease. We report a 24-year-old woman who was noted initially to have aortitis and severe aortic regurgitation caused by Behcet's disease. After receiving aortic valve replacement, aortoplasty and immunosuppressant therapy, her condition became stationary. As far as we are aware, she is the youngest case that has undergone surgery. The early onset of hemodynamic decompensation is considered to be related to delay in diagnosis and lack of steroid treatment.

  15. Progressive atlanto-axial subluxation in Behcet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-hyuk [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Jeonju City, Jeonbuk (Korea); Eoh, Whan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-03-15

    Behcet's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition involving several organs, such as the skin, mucous membranes, eyes, joints, intestines, lungs and central nervous system. It rarely affects the spinal column. We describe a case of progressive atlanto-axial subluxation in a 44-year-old woman with Behcet's disease. The patient started complaining of posterior neck pain 10 years after the diagnosis of her Behcet's disease. Initial radiographs showed no abnormal finding, but follow-up radiographs 6 month later demonstrated atlanto-axial subluxation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the worldwide literature of an atlanto-axial instability in a patient with Behcet's disease. (orig.)

  16. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI in central nervous system Behcet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, E. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Carlier, R. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Idir, A.B.C. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Masnou, P.O. (Dept. of Neurology, Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Moulonguet, A. (Dept. of Neurology, Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Adams, D. (Dept. of Neurology, Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France)); Doyon, D. (Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Hopital de Bicetre, Paris-Sud Univ. (France))

    1993-02-01

    Two cases of central nervous system Behcet's disease, studied by gadolinium-enhanced MRI, are presented. In one patient, whose clinical picture was dominated by a brain stem syndrome, the gadolinium enhancement resolved with clinical improvement, although the hyperintense areas in the mesencephalon on T2-weighted images persisted. In the second, who had a pseudobulbar palsy and a mild right hemiparesis, there were many abnormal areas, but an enhancing focus in the posterior limb of the left internal capsule was probably the lesion responsible for the hemiparesis. (orig.)

  17. Efficacy of infliximab in refractory posterior uveitis in Behcet's disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman K. El Garf; Amira A. Shahin; Sherif A. Shawky; Mohammed A. Azim; Dina A. Effat; Sherry K. Abdelrahman

    2018-01-01

    Aim of the work: Ocular manifestations are the main cause of morbidity in Behcet's disease (BD). Infliximab (IFX), a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor-alpha, may be efficient in refractory uveitis due to BD. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of IFX in the treatment of patients with BD-associated refractory posterior uveitis (PU). Patient and Methods: Twenty patients with refractory Behcet's PU received IFX therapy as intravenous infu...

  18. MR findings of neuro-Behcet's disease: initial and follow-up changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Beom; Chang, Ki Hyun; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Moon Hee; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo; Yu, In Kyu; Seong, Su Ok; Kim, Hyung Seok

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of neuro B ehcet's disease, and changes occurring during follow up. Brain MR imaging was performed in 19 patients in whom neuro-Behcet's disease had been clinically diagnosed. After treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents, 23 follow-up MR images were obtained in 12 patients, and a total of 42 MR images were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists. Of the 19 patients, 17 (89%) had parenchymal lesions, and the other two had dural venous sinus thrombosis. Among the 17 patients with parenchymal lesions, three showed leptomeningeal enhancement. A total of 72 parenchymal lesions were detected on initial MR images; 55 (76%) were patchy or nodular in shape and the lesion of the internal capsule appeared linear. Seventeen lesions (24%) in 12 patients were confluent. In order of frequency, the involved sites were the pons, midbrain, thalamus, basal ganglia, internal capsule, and frontal lobe. Thirteen lesions of 39 lesions detected on postcontrast images were enhanced, and a mass effect was seen in the area of 16 parenchymal lesions. Associated findings were microhemorrhage of the brain in two patients and spinal cord involvement in one. On short-term follow-up images obtained 1 week to 2 months after intensive treatment during the acute stage of the illness, the leptomeningeal enhancement seen in three patients had decreased and most parenchymal lesions showed improvement. Long-term follow-up images obtained 3 months to 3 years late showed that parenchymal lesions had relapsed in five patients, and brainstem atrophy had developed or progressed in five others. The most characteristic MR finding of neuro-Behcet's disease is multiple non-hemorrhagic lesions involving the brainstem. Leptomeningeal enhancement and dural venous sinus thrombosis may also be noted. On follow-up MR, the lesions may show either improvement or aggravation, and brainstem atrophy is not uncommon. (author)

  19. Genetic Association of , and - with Behcet's Disease in Saudi Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahda Al-Okaily

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background HLA-B*51 has been universally associated with Behcet's disease (BD susceptibility, while different alleles of HLA-A have also been identified as independent BD susceptibility loci in various ethnic populations. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of HLA-A and - B alleles with BD in Saudi patients. Materials and Methods Genotyping for HLA-A and HLA-B was performed using HLA genotyping kit (Lab type (R SSO in 120 Saudi subjects, including 60 BD patients and 60 matched healthy controls. Results Our results revealed that frequencies of HLA-A*26, -A*31 , and - B*51 were significantly higher in BD patients than in controls, suggesting that HLA-A*26, -A*31 , and - B*51 are associated with BD. The frequency of HLA-B*15 was significantly lower in BD patients than in controls. Stratification of genotyping results into active and nonactive forms of BD revealed that the frequency of HLA-A*31 was significantly higher in the nonactive form than in the active form of BD, while there was no significant difference in the distribution of other alleles between the two forms of BD. Conclusion This study suggests that HLA-A*26, -A*31 , and - B*51 are associated with susceptibility risk to BD, while HLA-B*15 may be protective in Saudi patients. However, larger scale studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  20. Non-dipping blood pressure patterns and arterial stiffness parameters in patients with Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Gulperi; Yilmaz, Sema; Ergulu Esmen, Serpil

    2015-12-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis involving veins and arteries of various sizes. Non-dipping status, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity are important determinants of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. We investigated the non-dipping status and arterial stiffness in patients with Behcet's disease. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the vascular parameters of 96 patients with Behcet's disease (53% female) and 60 age- and sex-matched control subjects. The non-dipping status and arterial distensibility were assessed using a Mobil-O-Graph Arteriograph, an automatic oscillometric device. In total, 65.6% of 96 patients were systolic non-dippers, and 34.4% exhibited high augmentation indices. Ten percent of the control subjects were systolic non-dippers, and 11.7% exhibited high augmentation indices. Nocturnal decreases in systolic blood pressure correlated with central systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, as well as nocturnal decreases in diastolic blood pressure. Furthermore, non-dipper patients with Behcet's disease exhibited higher nocturnal cardiac outputs than did dipper patients with Behcet's disease. Augmentation index correlated negatively with C-reactive protein and correlated positively with both 24 h and nocturnal peripheral resistance, as well as 24 h pulse wave velocity. The patients with high augmentation indices exhibited lower creatinine clearance, as well as lower nocturnal cardiac outputs, higher 24 h peripheral resistance and higher 24 h pulse wave velocities. Non-dipping status and arterial stiffness may exacerbate the harmful cardiovascular effects of the other. In addition to conventional risk factors, non-dipping status and arterial stiffness should be examined during the follow-up evaluations of patients with Behcet's disease.

  1. Fibrosing mediastinitis and thrombosis of superior vena cava associated with Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, Mustafa; Sayarlioglu, Mehmet; Arslan, Halil; Ayakta, Hayati; Harman, Ece

    2003-01-01

    We present CT, MRI and venography findings in 13-year boy with mediastinal fibrosis and superior vena cava (SVC) thrombosis associated with Behcet's disease. Fibrosing mediastinitis is an excessive fibrotic reaction that occurs in the mediastinum and may lead to compression of mediastinal structures (especially vascular). This condition is usually idiopathic, though many (and perhaps most) cases in the USA are thought to be caused by an abnormal immunologic response to Histoplasma capsulatum infection. SVC syndrome secondary to extrinsic compression by mediastinal fibrosis combined with Behcet's disease has rarely been described. Radiological investigations of this syndrome are necessary to avoid a useless anticoagulant therapy

  2. Could be serum uric acid a risk factor for thrombosis and/or uveitis in Behcet's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atıl, Avcı; Deniz, Avcı

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Serum uric acid level increases in many inflammatory conditions. Uric acid triggers the vascular inflammation and artery damage, which causes to an increased risk of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. It is not clear in the literature whether uric acid contributes to uveitis by similar mechanisms. We investigated whether uric acid level increases in Behcet's disease patients with thrombosis or anterior uveitis. Patients and methods We reviewed the medical records of 914 Behcet's disease. After screening for exclusion criteria, there were 50 Behcet's disease patients with thrombotic complication and as the control group 202 BD patients without any vascular complication were included to the study. In the Anterior uveitis group, there were 53 Behcet's disease patients. The Control group consisted of 39 Behçet's disease patients without eye findings. Results Mean uric acid value was 4.96 ± 1.06 mg/dl in Behcet's disease patients with thrombosis whereas 4.08 ± 0.94 mg/dl in controls, indicating a significant difference ( p uric acid level was greater in Behcet's disease patients that have a thrombotic complication compared to those without thrombotic complication. Uric acid seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis. It is concluded that the elevation of serum uric acid level in patients with anterior uveitis with Behcet's disease is not statistically significant.

  3. Maldi-Tof /Tof-MS Reveals Elevated Serum Haptoglobin and Amyloid A in Behcet's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, L.; Dong, H.; Yang, P.; Zhou, H.; Huang, X.; Lin, X.; Kijlstra, A.

    2008-01-01

    Behcet¿s disease (BD) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease with unclear etiology and pathogenesis. To screen aberrant serum proteins in BD, serum samples were obtained from eight male BD patients with active uveitis and eight male healthy volunteers with informed consent. The serum samples from

  4. A case of the Behcet's disease diagnosed by the panniculits after mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babacan, Taner; Onat, Ahmet Mesut; Pehlivan, Yavuz; Comez, Gazi; Tutar, Ediz

    2010-11-01

    We herein report a case of 32-year-old woman who developed erythematous, indurated plaques, nodules on her lower back, hips and inguinal areas which had started after immunotherapy on the injection sites. She had a history of recurrent oral aphthous-like ulcers for 2 years and also had abdominal pain for 2 months. Colonoscopy revealed multiple aphthous ulcers on intestine. Diagnosis of lobular panniculitis was confirmed by histopathological finding of the skin biopsy and she was diagnosed as Behcet's disease. Eruptions due to mesotherapy accepted as hypersensitivity reaction. Before employing this technique, patients should be carefully examined for Behcet's pathognomonic clinical findings.

  5. Severe neuro-Behcet's disease treated with a combination of immunosuppressives and a TNF-inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Fatma Nur; Ozen, Gulsen; Ünal, Ali Uğur; Kahraman Koytak, Pınar; Tuncer, Nese; Direskeneli, Haner

    2016-01-01

    Abstract/ Resumo Behcet's disease (BD) is a multisystem inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, skin lesions and uveitis. The nervous system involvement of BD, neuro-Behcet's disease (NBD), is one of the important causes of mortality of the disease. Herein, we present a 29-year-old male with parenchymal NBD who has progressed rapidly and was managed with an uncommon aggressive immunosuppresive combination therapy. The patient first presented six years ago with vertigo and difficulty in talking and walking. On examination, he had oral ulcers, acneiform lesions on the torso, genital ulcer scar, dysartria, and ataxia. Along with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, the patient was diagnosed as NBD. After pulse methylprednisolone (1g/day, 3 days) and 8 courses of 1g/month iv cylophosphamide therapy, he was put on azathioprine and oral methlyprednisolone. On the 4th year of the maintenance therapy, he was admitted with NBD relapse which was treated with 3 days of iv 1g pulse methlyprednisolone. One year after the last relapse, the patient voluntarily stopped medications and presented with global aphasia, right hemihypoesthesia and quadriparesis. MRI findings were suggestive of NBD relapse. After exclusion of infection, pulse methylprednisolone was started but no improvement was observed. Considering the severity of the NBD, the patient was put on methylprednisolone (1mg/kg/day), iv cylophosphamide (1g) and adalimumab 40 mg/14 days subcutaneously with appropriate tuberculosis prophylaxis. Neurological examination and MRI findings after 4 weeks showed dramatic improvement however patient developed pulmonary tuberculosis. Methylprednisolone dose was decreased (0.5mg/kg/day) and quadruple antituberculosis therapy was started. Patient was discharged with 5/5 muscle strength in extremities without any respiratory symptoms 2 months after first presentation. Prompt introduction of immunosuppressive therapy is crucial in NBD. Although

  6. Is Further Examination Necessary in Patients with Behcets Disease Without Any Neurological Signs or Symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit YAsAR

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Visually evoked potential examination may be used as a conductive method to detect the subclinical neurological pathologies in Behcets disease. The possible silent neurological involvement should be evaluated with further neuro-screening methods. [Dis Mol Med 2015; 3(3.000: 29-34

  7. Hepatic artery aneurysm in a patient with Behcet's disease and segmental pancreatitis developing after its embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oto, A.; Cekirge, S.; Guelsuen, M.; Balkanci, F.; Besim, A.

    2000-01-01

    Segmental pancreatitis is an unusual form of acute pancreatitis mostly seen in the head of pancreas. We present the CT findings of a segmental pancreatitis in the body and tail of the pancreas developed following endovascular embolization of a giant hepatic artery aneurysm and arterioportal fistula in a patient with Behcet's disease. (orig.)

  8. Rate of cardiovascular system involvement and gender distribution in Behcets disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Bas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Behcets disease is a systemic vasculitis affecting arteries and veins. According to the International Working Group on diagnostic criteria, a clinical description of other non-recurrent oral ulceration, at least two of findings of their examinations; genital ulceration, eye lesions, skin lesions and pathergy test positivity to be accompanied. Vascular involvement is very important symptom in determining the prognosis of the disease that is commonly observed. In this study, 581 Behcets patients who were treated between 1993-2009 were reviewed. 52 patients with cardiovascular involvement retrospectively reviewed. Total cardiovascular system involvements were found to be 9% in Behcets disease patients. 41 thrombophlebit, 11 deep venous thrombosis, 4 aneurysm cases were found. Pulmonary artery aneurysms in 2 of them, 1 in the abdominal aorta, 1 of which was found in the femoral artery. All of aneurysm and deep vein thrombosis and 77% of thrombophlebitis were male. As a result, together with common skin and mucosal involvement severe systemic symptoms such as the cardiovascular system involvement were significantly found in Behcets disease. Moreover, a high percentage of these findings is seen in men have been identified. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 46-49

  9. A case of Neuro-Behcet's disease with an interesting CT scan picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Jinichi; Kamitani, Hiroshi; Masuzawa, Hideaki; Matsui, Takayoshi; Mizobe, Masafumi.

    1981-01-01

    A Case of Neuro-Behcet's disease with an interesting CT scan picture was reported. A 31-year-old man with a known history of Behcet's disease was transferred to the Kantoh-Teishin Hospital upon suspicion of a brain tumor in the basal ganglia. Right hemiparesis and mild dysarthria of three weeks' duration and long-standing bilateral blindness were noted. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated an enhanced mass in the basal ganglia and surrounding irregular, low-density area in the white matter of the left frotoparietal lobe. The ventricles were shifted to the right. Left carotid angiography revealed a shift of the anterior cerebral artery to the right and a mild deformity of the Sylvian triangle. No tumor stain or abnormal vessels were seen. After high doses of prednisolone, his condition gradually improved. A CT scan two weeks later revealed a decrease in the low-density area and the mass effect, but an unchanged pathological contrast enhancement in the basal ganglia. The contrast enhancement lasted for two months. The CT scan of Neuro-Behcet's disease was discussed. (author)

  10. THE CLINICAL AND PATHOGENETIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BEHCET'S DISEASE AND MENTAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Anatolyevna Ishchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the results of an investigation into the relationship between Behcet's disease (BB and mental disorders. It establishes the importance of an emotional stress factor for developing the clinical symptoms and disease. In its turn, the systemic immune inflammatory disease and its complications become a source of mental disorders. The literature describes different variants of BB, but anxiety-depressive spectrum disorders and moderate cognitive impairments are most common. The presence of depression contributes significantly to lower quality of life in patients with BB.

  11. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Behcet's Disease Current Activity Form in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyo Jin; Seo, Mi Ryoung; Ryu, Hee Jung; Baek, Han Joo

    2015-09-01

    This study was undertaken to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Behcet's Disease Current Activity Form (BDCAF, version 2006) questionnaire to the Korean language and to evaluate its reliability and validity in a population of Korean patients with Behcet's disease (BD). A cross-cultural study was conducted among patients with BD who attended our rheumatology clinic between November 2012 and March 2013. There were 11 males and 35 females in the group. The mean age of the participants was 48.5 years and the mean disease duration was 6.4 years. The first BDCAF questionnaire was completed on arrival and the second assessment was performed 20 minutes later by a different physician. The test-retest reliability was analyzed by computing κ statistics. Kappa scores of > 0.6 indicated a good agreement. To assess the validity, we compared the total BDCAF score with the patient's/clinician's perception of disease activity and the Korean version of the Behcet's Disease Quality of Life (BDQOL). For the test-retest reliability, good agreements were achieved on items such as headache, oral/genital ulceration, erythema, skin pustules, arthralgia, nausea/vomiting/abdominal pain, and diarrhea with altered/frank blood per rectum. Moderate agreement was observed for eye and nervous system involvement. We achieved a fair agreement for arthritis and major vessel involvement. Significant correlations were obtained between the total BDCAF score with the BDQOL and the patient's/clinician's perception of disease activity p < 0.05). The Korean version of the BDCAF is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring current disease activity in Korean BD patients.

  12. A case of Behcet's disease with aneurysms of common carotid arteries and abdominal aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yeon Myung; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Sung Jae

    1984-01-01

    One case of Behcet's disease with multiple aneurysms in both common carotid arteries and abdominal aorta is presented with brief review of the literatures. A 26-year-old woman had slowly enlarging pulsatile masses in both sides of neck and recurrent ulcerations in oral cavity and genitalia. One day prior to admission, aphasia, right facial nerve palsy and right hemiplegia suddenly developed. Brain CT showed acute infarction in left basal ganglia. Both Carotid Angiography and abdominal Aortography demonstrated multiple aneurysms in both common carotid arteries and abdominal aorta with organizing thrombi and thromboembolism of internal carotid artery

  13. Recurrent Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis in the Setting of May-Thurner Syndrome as the Presenting Symptom of Behcet's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakha, Sameer; Png, Chien Yi Maximilian; Chun, Kevin; Ting, Windsor

    2018-02-23

    Vascular manifestations including pulmonary artery aneurysms and venous thrombosis are seen in up to 14% of patients with Behcet's disease. We report a patient who had recurrent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) as the presenting symptom of Behcet's Disease. A 19-year-old male who presented with acute iliofemoral DVT, confirmed by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and venogram. May-Thurner syndrome was also observed. Repeated catheter-based pharmacomechanical thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and subsequent iliac vein stenting were performed. The patient was then discharged on rivaroxaban and aspirin. Five months later, the patient experienced left calf pain. In the interim, he had been diagnosed with Behcet's disease by a rheumatologist who was consulted due to oral ulcers and skin lesions and accordingly started on prednisone, colchicine, and azathioprine. At this time, IVUS and venogram revealed thrombotic occlusion of the previously placed stent. Tissue plasminogen activator was infused into the stent, and pharmacomechanical thrombectomy restored flow through the left iliac veins. Follow-up laboratory workup revealed that subtherapeutic azathioprine dosing, and after appropriate adjustment, the patient has been asymptomatic for 12 months. Acute refractory DVT is a possible presenting symptom of Behcet's disease, which may be complicated by May-Thurner syndrome. Such patients should receive therapeutic immunosuppression in addition to anticoagulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Bechcet's disease: helical computed tomography study; Aneurisma de la arteria pulmonar en la enfermedad de Behcet. Estudio con tomografia computarizada helicoidal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, J.; Caballero, P.; Olivera, M. J.; Cajal, M. L.; Caniego, J. L. [Hospital de la Princesa. Iniversidad Autonoma. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects arteries and veins of different sizes and can be associated with pulmonary artery aneurysms. We report the case of a patient with Behcet's disease and a pulmonary artery aneurysm who was studied by means of plain chest X ray, helical computed tomography and pulmonary arteriography. Helical computed tomography is a reliable technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (Author) 9 refs.

  15. IN TIME VARIATION OF PATHERGY PHENOMENON IN BEHCET'S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chams F. Davatchi

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathergy phenomenon (PP is one of the hallmarks of Behcet's Disease (BD. It has been reported to be positive from 17.5% to 83% of cases in different studies. PP is used as a diagnosis criterion in the Dilsen criteria, the Japan criteria, the International criteria, and the Iran criteria. It is therefore important to know wether PP is a fix manifestation of the disease or a cyclic manifestation like mucocutaneous disorders. To evaluate the charaterist'tc of P'P over a period of time, 77 patients were selected randomly (rcgaardless of their disease activity or their disease manifestations, to have a second pathergy test, lite pathcrgy test was performed by needle puncture on the skin of the forearm. Three methods were used: 1- needle prick with a 21 - gauge needle. 2- needle prick with a 25  gauge needle. 3- needle prick with a 25-guage needle and the injection of I drop of a sterile normal saline solution. Tlie result was evaluated 24 hours Liter. Tlie shortest interval between two tests-was one month and the longest 13 years. Die mean interval was 35.4 months, the standard deviation was 36.6 Tlurty-nine patients had a negative PI' at their first evaluation. At the second evaluation, 27 remained negative while 12 changed to positive. Thirty-eight patients had a positive PP at their first evaluation. At the second evaluation, 19 remained positive while 19 changed to negative. Although there is a difference between the two groups, it is not statistically significant (x=3.813 , p=0.05. Our data demonstrates that the pathergy phenomenon is waxing and waning, like the majority of other manifestations of Behcet's Disease. TJierefore, it may be repeated for diagnosis purposes.

  16. Efficacy of infliximab in refractory posterior uveitis in Behcet's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman K. El Garf

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the work: Ocular manifestations are the main cause of morbidity in Behcet's disease (BD. Infliximab (IFX, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor-alpha, may be efficient in refractory uveitis due to BD. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of IFX in the treatment of patients with BD-associated refractory posterior uveitis (PU. Patient and Methods: Twenty patients with refractory Behcet's PU received IFX therapy as intravenous infusions at the dose of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0,2, 6 (induction and every 8 weeks for a maximum of 6 infusions. Results: The mean age of the patients was 31.8 ± 9.1 years, disease duration was 8 ± 6 years and 17 (85% were males. After the third IFX infusion (week 8 a complete remission of PU was recorded in 8/20 (40% patients and partial remission in 12/20 (60% patients. At the end of week 32 a complete remission of PU was recorded in a total of 14 (70% patients. The visual acuity of the 36 affected eyes (16 bilateral and 4 unilateral showed a significant improvement at the week 8, and at week 32, while there was no additional improvement at week 56. Relapse occurred in 6 patients (30% between week 9 and week 18 with a mean of 13.5 weeks. Conclusion: IFX infusion should be considered for the control of acute PU, whereas repeated long-term IFX infusions were effective in reducing the number of episodes in refractory PU with fast regression and complete remission of complications. Keywords: Behçet’s disease, Posterior uveitis, Retinal vasculitis, Infliximab

  17. Methotrexate in ocular manifestations of Behcet's disease: a longitudinal study up to 15 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatchi, Fereydoun; Shams, Hormoz; Shahram, Farhad; Nadji, Abdolhadi; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Sadeghi Abdollahi, Bahar; Faezi, Tahereh; Akhlaghi, Massoomeh; Ashofteh, Farimah

    2013-10-01

    Ocular manifestations of Behcet's disease (BD) need aggressive treatment to prevent severe loss of vision or blindness. Cytotoxic drugs are the main therapeutic agents and the first line treatment. Methotrexate is the least toxic, used mainly for posterior uveitis. We present here the outcome of eye lesions with methotrexate and prednisolone, in a longitudinal study of up to 15 years, on 682 patients (5447 eye-years of follow-up). Methotrexate was started at 7.5-15 mg/week. Prednisolone was added at 0.5 mg/kg/daily, then adjusted as needed. (i) fulfilling the International Criteria for Behcet's Disease; and (ii) having active posterior uveitis (PU). Visual acuity (VA) was calculated on a scale of 10. Activity indexes were calculated for PU and retinal vasculitis (RV) for each eye. Total Inflammatory Activity Index (TIAI) demonstrating the inflammatory index of both eyes of the patient, and Total Adjusted Disease Activity Index (TADAI) showing both TIAI + VA were also calculated. Overall results: the mean VA improvement was 0.4 (P < 001), PU 1.2 (P < 0.001) and RV 0.6 (P < 0.001). VA improved in 46.5%, PU in 75.4%, and RV in 53.7% of eyes. TIAI improved in 74% of patients and TADAI in 69.4%. VA was aggravated in 37.2%, PU in 11.1%, and RV in 30.3% of eyes. TIAI was aggravated in 17.4% and TADAI in 21.6% of the patients. The remaining kept their baseline values. All parameters improved, PU better than RV. Improvement of VA was the least, mainly due to secondary cataracts. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Scientometric analysis and mapping of scientific articles on Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahram, Farhad; Jamshidi, Ahmad-Reza; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Habibi, Gholamreza; Mardani, Amir; Ghaemi, Marjan

    2013-04-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculitis disease with oral and genital aphthous ulceration, uveitis, skin manifestations, arthritis and neurological involvement. Many investigators have published articles on BD in the last two decades since introduction of diagnosis criteria by the International Study Group for Behçet's Disease in 1990. However, there is no scientometric analysis available for this increasing amount of literature. A scientometric analysis method was used to achieve a view of scientific articles about BD which were published between 1990 and 2010, by data retrieving from ISI Web of Science. The specific features such as publication year, language of article, geographical distribution, main journal in this field, institutional affiliation and citation characteristics were retrieved and analyzed. International collaboration was analyzed using Intcoll and Pajek softwares. There was a growing trend in the number of BD articles from 1990 to 2010. The number of citations to BD literature also increased around 5.5-fold in this period. The countries found to have the highest output were Turkey, Japan, the USA and England; the first two universities were from Turkey. Most of the top 10 journals publishing BD articles were in the field of rheumatology, consistent with the subject areas of the articles. There was a correlation between the citations per paper and the impact factor of the publishing journal. This is the first scientometric analysis of BD, showing the scientometric characteristics of ISI publications on BD. © 2013 The Authors International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Behcet's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the scrotum, similar to oral lesions, but deeper. Female — painful genital ulcers that develop on the vulva. Gastrointestinal Ulcerations may occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract from the mouth to the anus. The terminal ...

  20. Arterial homograft and medical therapy in pseudoaneurysm of infrarenal aorta concomitant with recurrent right ventricular thrombus in Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahedian, Jalal; Sadeghapour, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the infrarenal aorta due to Behcet s disease is very rare. We report a case of pseudoaneurysm associated with Behcet s disease in a 17-year-old boy with a recurrent right ventricular thrombus successfully treated with revascularization using arterial homograft patch. Echocardiography examination revealed a right ventricular mass, thought to be a thrombus in an unusual location. Postoperatively, the findings of the pathologic examination confirmed the mass as a thrombus. When the patient was subsequently re-admitted to the emergency unit with complaints of severe abdominal pain, fever, fatigue, sinus tachycardia, and a pulsating and tender abdominal mass, a right ventricular thrombus and a large pseudoaneurysm of the abdominal aorta were found on echocardiography and angiography. The patient underwent resection of the aortic aneurysm and aortoplasty, using arterial homograft patch, and received immunosuppressive and anticoagulation therapy. The thrombus of the right ventricle disappeared 4 months later. This case indicates that a right ventricular thrombosis in Behcet s disease may be managed by medical therapy. (author)

  1. Single center study on ethnic and clinical features of Behcet's disease in Moscow, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennikov, Anton; Alekberova, Zemfira; Goloeva, Regina; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Denisov, Lev; Namba, Kenichi; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Nasonov, Eugeny; Ishida, Susumu; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2015-02-01

    For the purpose of investigating Behcet's disease (BD) in Russia, 250 consecutive patients (177 men and 73 women) diagnosed with BD between 1990 and 2010 at the Research Institute of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences in Moscow were enrolled in this study. The ethnic backgrounds of the patients were reported as follows: 23.2% (58 cases) from Russia, 12.8% (32 cases) from Azerbaijan, 14.4% (36 cases) from Armenia, 8.8% (22 cases) from Chechnya, and 21.6% (55 cases) from Dagestan. The remaining 19.2% (48 cases) were from other regions or of unknown origin. More than half (57.6%) of the Behcet's disease patients originated from Central Asia, specifically Azerbaijan, Armenia, Chechnya, and Dagestan. The mean age at disease onset was 31.5 ± 9.38 (13-60) years old, and the most typical initial manifestations were oral aphthous ulcers. Patients aged 20-39 years old were more commonly affected and displayed a wide clinical spectrum of the disease, with varieties of severe internal organ involvement. The manifestations observed throughout the course of the disease included oral aphthous ulcers (100%), various cutaneous lesions (88.8%), genital ulcers (81.2%), and ocular lesions (54.0%). Besides these, many organs/systems were implicated in patient cases, namely joint (53.2%), vascular (25.2%), neurological (8.0%), gastrointestinal (25.2%), and cardiac (5.6%) systems. Involvements of ocular (p < 0.01) and skin (p < 0.01) lesions were more frequent in men than in women. HLA-B51 and HLA-A26 typing was performed in 127 patients and 508 healthy controls. HLA-B51 was found in 63.0% of BD patients compared to 20.7% of the healthy control subjects (p < 0.001), and HLA-A26 was present in 11.3% of BD patients and 18.9% of the control group. This study shows the presence of BD in Russia, and it is suggested that its prevalence in Central Asian people is much higher than that in White Russian.

  2. Decreased expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in ocular Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaokui; Ye, Zi; Kijlstra, Aize; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Peizeng

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is involved in immune responses. AhR is activated following interaction with its ligands, such as 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1'H-indole-3'-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE). In this study, we investigated the role of AhR activation by its endogenous ligands in the pathogenesis of ocular Behcet's disease (BD). The expression of AhR was significantly decreased in active BD patients as compared to inactive BD patients and normal controls. Both FICZ and ITE inhibited Th1 and Th17 polarization and induced the expression of IL-22 by PBMCs and by CD4(+)T cells in active BD patients and normal controls. Stimulation of purified CD4(+)T cells with FICZ or ITE caused a decreased expression of RORC, IL-17, IL-23R, and CCR6 and an increased phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT5. The present study suggests that a decreased AhR expression is associated with disease activity in BD patients. The activation of AhR by either FICZ or ITE was able to inhibit Th1 and Th17 cell polarization. Further studies are needed to investigate whether modulation of AhR might be used in the treatment of BD.

  3. Behcet disease combined with Sjogren syndrome: A unique case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Fang-He; Xu, Ting-Zhen; Hong, Hui-Hua; Mao, He; Wang, Meng; Wang, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    Behcet disease(BD) and Sjogren syndrome(SS) are separate conditions that rarely concomitantly affect an individual. In theory,mild symptoms of patients with BD or SS are easy to igore and,thus,remain undiagnosed. There,it is reasonable to believe there may be some clinical cases of combined diseases that go undiscovered and which needs to be taken seriously. In addition,it has been suggested that herpes simplex virus(HSV) types 1 and 2 are associated with BD,but have not been shown to be correlated to the direct pathogenesis of BD. The role of HSV in BD needs more research and attention. Here,we report a young woman who had both BD and SS. The first symptom of the disease was fever. However,the HSV type 1 IgG and HSV type 2 IgM antibody results were positive in our case and,which rendered this case unique. BD and SS concomitantly affect the individual,and BD was the acute type. IV methylprednisolone was used for 9 days and then oral glucocorticoids was used to instead,and the treatment works very well. BD and SS can concomitantly affect an individual,and we believe that HSV-2 may be directly related to the pathogenesis of BD. The nature of BD as an auto-inflammatory disorder, autoimmune disorder, or both, is controversial. If we can find more patients who combined affected these two disease, it might helpful for us to understand the nature of BD. For patients with clinical diagnosis of BD or SS,we need to be alert that it may combinded the other disease. Long term follow up and detailed inspection are important means to avoid undiscovered.

  4. Inspiratory and expiratory HRCT findings in Behcet's disease and correlation with pulmonary function tests

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    Oezer, Caner [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey)]. E-mail: cozer@mersin.edu.tr; Duce, Meltem Nass [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Ulubas, Bahar [Department of Respiratory Disease, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Bicer, Ali [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Tuersen, Uemit [Department of Dermatology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Apaydin, F. Demir [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Yildiz, Altan [Department of Radiology, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey); Camdeviren, Handan [Department of Biostatistics, Mersin University, Faculty of Medicine, Mersin (Turkey)

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to describe the pulmonary parenchymal changes of Behcet's disease using high-resolution computed tomography and to correlate them with pulmonary function tests. Materials and methods: Thirty-four patients with Behcet's disease (18 men, 16 women), 3 of whom were symptomatic, were included as the study group. Four of 34 patients were smokers. Twenty asymptomatic volunteers (12 men, 8 women), 4 of whom were smokers, constituted the control group. The pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography were performed for both groups. Results: Inspiratory high-resolution computed tomography findings were abnormal in nine patients (26.5%) of the study group. In eight patients, there were multiple abnormalities, whereas one patient had only one abnormality. Pleural thickening and irregularities, major fissure thickening, emphysematous changes, bronchiectasis, parenchymal bands, and irregular densities, and parenchymal nodules were the encountered abnormalities. Inspiratory high-resolution computed tomography scans were normal in the control group. On expiratory scans, there was statistically significant difference between study group and control group when air trapping, especially grades 3 and 4, was compared (P < 0.01). Pulmonary function tests of both the study and the control groups were in normal ranges, and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups according to pulmonary function tests (P > 0.05). Discussion and conclusion: High-resolution computed tomography is sensitive in the demonstration of pulmonary changes in patients with Behcet's disease. End-expiratory high-resolution computed tomography examination is very useful and necessary to show the presence of air trapping, thus the presence of small airway disease, even if the patient is asymptomatic or has normal pulmonary function tests.

  5. Epileptic seizures in Neuro-Behcet disease: why some patients develop seizure and others not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Semercioglu, Sencer; Ucler, Serap; Erdal, Abidin; Inan, Levent E

    2015-03-01

    Behcet disease (BD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder. Neuro BD (NBD) is seen in approximately 5% of all patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency, type and prognosis of epileptic seizures in different forms of NBD. All files of 42 patients with NBD were evaluated between 2006 and 2012, retrospectively. The demographic data, the presentation of NBD, clinical findings including seizures, EEG and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. The mean age of patients was 35.02±8.43 years. Thirty (71.4%) patients were male; the remaining 12 of them were female. Twenty-four patients had brainstem lesions; 16 patients had cerebral venous thrombosis. Spinal cord involvement was seen in two patients. Seven patients had epileptic seizures (six partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalization). Six of them had cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVT). Four patients had a seizure as the first symptom of the thrombosis. One patient had late onset seizure due to chronic venous infarct. The other patient with seizure had brainstem involvement. The remaining was diagnosed as epilepsy before the determination of NBD. CVT seen in BD seems to be the main risk factor for epileptic seizures in patients with NBD. The prognosis is usually good especially in patients with CVT. Epileptic seizures in patients with brainstem involvement may be an indicator for poor prognosis. Superior sagittal thrombosis or cortical infarct would be predictor of seizures occurrence because of the high ratio in patients with seizures. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interleukin-1beta-regulating antibody XOMA 052 (gevokizumab) in the treatment of acute exacerbations of resistant uveitis of Behcet's disease: an open-label pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gul, A.; Tugal-Tutkun, I.; Dinarello, C.A.; Reznikov, L.; Esen, B.A.; Mirza, A.; Scannon, P.; Solinger, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Uveitis and retinal vasculitis are sight-threatening manifestations of Behcet's disease with limited treatment options. This pilot study aimed to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and clinical activity of XOMA 052 (gevokizumab), a recombinant humanised anti-interleukin 1beta antibody,

  7. Efficacy of TNF-α antagonist and other immunomodulators in the treatment of patients with ophthalmologic manifestations of Behcet's disease and HLA B51 positive vasculitis

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    Zlatanović Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Behcet's disease is genetically conditioned, immune-mediated multisystem occlusive vasculitis of small blood vessels, espesially venules, of unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features, disease activity and therapy of the patients with ophthalmologic manifestation of Behcet's disease. Methods. In this study symptoms and signs of the disease were analyzed both prospectively and retrospectively during the active manifestation of the disease. The diagnosis was reached according to the International Criteria for Behcet's Disease (2006. The treatment effects were evaluated based on the presence of the best corrected visual acuity and the inflammation of the vitreous humour before and after the application of our therapeutic method. The applied therapeutic modality consisted of the primary application of corticosteroid therapy in the active stage of the disease complemented with the choice of drugs from the immunosuppressive group. In this study there drugs were cyclosporine or methotrexate. A treatment refractory patients with poor vision prognosis were treated with a third drug, the biological preparation infliximab, a tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α antagonist. Results. The mean age of 11 patients with ophthalmologic manifestation of Behcet's disease was 50.6 years. HLA B-5(51 was positive in 81% of the patients while 36% of the patients had positive pathergy test. Changes in affected eyes included vitritis (100%, posterior uveitis (45%, panuveitis (54%, retinal vasculitis (54%, cystoid macular edema (54%, and cystoid degeneration (18%. Increased intraocular pressure was observed in 27% of the patients. There was no statistically significant variation in disease activity parameters in any of the patients (p > 0.05. A statistically significant improvement in visual acuity (p < 0.05 and a high statistically significant decrease of inflammation of the worst affected eyes (p = 0.001 were detected

  8. Decreased B and T lymphocyte attenuator in Behcet's disease may trigger abnormal Th17 and Th1 immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi; Deng, Bolin; Wang, Chaokui; Zhang, Dike; Kijlstra, Aize; Yang, Peizeng

    2016-02-04

    Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic, systemic and recurrent inflammatory disease associated with hyperactive Th17 and Th1 immune responses. Recent studies have shown that B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) negatively regulates the immune response. In this study, we investigated whether BTLA activation could be exploited to inhibit the development of abnormal immune responses in BD patients. BTLA expression in PBMCs and CD4(+) T cells was significantly decreased in active BD patients. Decreased BTLA level was associated with increased Th17 and Th1 responses. Activation of BTLA inhibited the abnormal Th17 and Th1 responses and IL-22 expression in both patients and controls. Addition of an agonistic anti-BTLA antibody remarkably inhibited DC-induced Th17 and Th1 cell responses, resulted in decreased production of the Th17 and Th1-related cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-23 and IL-12p70 and reduced CD40 expression in DCs. In conclusion, decreased BTLA expression in ocular BD may lead to inappropriate control of the Th17 and Th1 immune responses and DC functions. Therefore, BTLA may be involved in the development and recurrence of this disease. Agonistic agents of BTLA may represent a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of BD and other inflammatory diseases mediated by abnormal Th17 and Th1 immune responses.

  9. Neuro-Behcet: about a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, G.; Perez, R.; Satriano, R.; Rotondo, M.

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 7-year-old Uruguayan boy with recurrent episodes of fever, oral aphthas lesions and meningoencephalitis with elevated protein levels and lymphocytic pleocytosis is presented. Other diagnoses were excluded. MRI showed in acute stages CNS involvement in iso- or hipointense in T1- weighted images and hyperintense in T2-weighted or fluid- attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in mesodiencephalic junction, cerebellar peduncles, pons, corpus callosum, basal ganglia and internal capsule, and cerebral hemispheres. In the evolution skin lesions appeared, fulfilling the International Study Group Criteria for the Diagnosis of Behcet' Disease. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressant treatment was done.The main difficulty in children is having all the criteria for diagnosis; especially when recurrent genital ulceration and eye lesion rarely appear at this age. (author) [es

  10. Masked assessment of MRI findings: is it possible to differentiate neuro-Behcet`s disease from other central nervous system

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    Coban, O.; Bahar, S.; Akman-Demir, G.; Tasci, B.; Serdaroglu, P. [Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Neurology; Yurdakul, S.; Yazici, H. [Univ. of Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Internal Medicine

    1999-04-01

    Two neuroradiologists reviewed MRI studies of 34 patients with neuro-Behcet`s disease (NBD), 22 with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with central nervous system involvement, masked to the clinical diagnosis, age and sex of the patients. Of the patients with NBD 12 were in an acute attack; the others had chronic disease. MRI was assessed using a set of criteria, looking at atrophy, the site of discrete parenchymal lesions, regions of predominant involvement and the extent of the lesion(s). The observers also made a guess at the clinical diagnosis. The brain stem and/or basal ganglia were the most predominantly involved sites in all patients with acute NBD; 75 % of these lesions were large and confluent, mainly extending from the brain stem to the diencephalon and basal ganglia. However, in chronic cases, the predominant involvement was in the brain stem and/or basal ganglia in only 36 %, and in cerebral hemisphere white matter in another 36 %; 27 % of these patients showed no parenchymal lesion. Hemisphere white-matter lesions were equally distributed between periventricular and other areas in NBD, while in MS more were periventricular, and in SLE more were nonperiventricular. Brain-stem atrophy was seen in 21 % of patients with NBD, with a specificity of 96.5 %. In the absence of cortical atrophy, its specificity was 100 %. The attempt at making a radiological diagnosis was successful in all cases of acute NBD and 95.5 % of patients with MS, but in only 40 % of patients with chronic NBD. Most of this latter groups MRI studies were interpreted as MS. An extensive lesion involving the brain stem and basal ganglia seemed to be diagnostic of acute NBD. However, hemisphere white-matter lesions could not be differentiated from those in MS. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 tabs., 18 refs.

  11. Quality of life in patients with Behcet's disease and Recurrent aphthous stomatitis

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    Burcu Tuğrul Ayanoğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Behçet’s disease (BD is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a condition affecting oral health-related quality of life (QoL. In this study, we aimed to evaluate QoL of BD patients by using the Behçet’s disease quality of life instrument (BDQLI and to compare the QoL of patients with BD with that of patients with RAS and healthy controls. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with BD and 40 patients with RAS and 40 healthy subjects with similar sociodemographic characteristics were included in the study. We used the BDQLI to evaluate QoL of patients with BD and the Dermatology-specific quality of life instrument for comparison of QqL between patients with BD and RAS. 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and clinical data form were applied in all participants. The results were analyzed statistically. The power of the study was 99%. Results: QoL of patients with BD were lower than that of healthy controls. It was observed that patients with BD had decreased physical functions, impaired perception of pain and poor general health (p0.05. Female gender, relapse periods and mucocutaneous symptoms negatively affected QoL of patients with BD. Female gender and duration of the disease were found to be the main factors affecting QoL of patients with RAS. Conclusion: Unlike the results obtained with other instruments, with BDQLI, QoL, particularly in patients with active period and female gender was found to be decreased. In this study, there was a dominance of active mucocutaneous symptoms. This may explain the effect of mucocutaneous symptoms on QoL and the fact that there was no difference in QoL between BD and RAS patients. Further studies comparing QoL of patients with BD in whom visceral involvement is also observed with those with other diseases. QoL of BD patients may be improved by paying attention on symptoms that patients have trouble and by evaluating QoL with

  12. Bilateral Knee Pain Associated with Bone Infarction in a Patient with Behcet's Disease

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    Pelin Oktayoglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 31-years-old female patient with severe pain in both knees who had been diagnosed as Behcet’s disease (BD for 12 years. She had had a history of complications due to BD including superior vena cava thrombosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, uveitis, and erythema nodosum and has reported the administration of corticosteroid therapy irregularly. After radiologic evaluation, she has been diagnosed with bone infarction of both left and right knee with the existance of lupus anticoagulants (LA positivity. Severe joint pain without the evidence of arthritis must alert the clinician to the possibility of bone necrosis of the extremity, although those may rarely occur bilateral in BD.

  13. Tratamento endovascular de aneurismas da aorta em pacientes com doença de Behçet: relato de dois casos Endovascular treatment of aortic aneurysms in patients with Behcet's disease: report of two cases

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    Sergio Quilici Belczak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Behçet, uma vasculite sistêmica de causa desconhecida, pode ser causa de doença aneurismática da aorta em alguns portadores dessa patologia. Nós apresentamos nossa experiência com dois casos de aneurismas aórticos em pacientes com doença de Behçet submetidos à terapêutica endovascular, descrevendo seus respectivos seguimentos. A terapêutica atual, a patofisiologia e os critérios diagnósticos vigentes foram revisados. Concluímos que a técnica endovascular é uma excelente opção terapêutica para certos pacientes com doença de Behçet e que esta deve ser acompanhada de tratamento imunossupressivo adequado.Behcet's disease, a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, may be the cause of aortic aneurysmal diseases in some patients. We report our experience with two Behcet's disease patients who presented with aortic aneurysms and were submitted to endovascular therapy, and describe their respective follow-ups. Current pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment approaches were reviewed. Our experience suggests that the endovascular approach, combined with adequate immunosuppressive treatment, is an excellent therapeutic option for some patients with Behcet's disease suffering from aneurysms.

  14. Brain stem type neuro-Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Satoshi; Hirose, Genjiro; Kosoegawa, Hiroshi; Oda, Rokuhei; Yoshioka, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Two cases of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome were evaluated by brain CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (Super-conducting type, 0.5 tesla) to correlate with the neurological findings. In the acute phase, low density area with peripheral enhancement effect and mass effect were seen at the brain stem in brain CT. MRI revealed a extensive high intensity signal area mainly involving the corticospinal tract in the meso-diencephalon as well as pons by T 2 weighted images (spin echo, TR = 1, 600 msec, TE = 90 msec) and the value of T 1 , T 2 , at the brain stem lesion were prolonged moderately. After high dose steroid treatment, the low density area in brain CT and high signal area in MRI were gradually reduced in its size. Peripheral enhancement effect in brain CT disappeared within 10 months in case 1, one month in the other case. In the chronic stage, the reduction of low density area and atrophy of brain stem were noted in brain CT. The lesion in chronic stage had low intensity in T 1 , T 2 weighted images and the T 1 , T 2 values at the lesion were mildly prolonged in MRI. Sequentially CT with enhancement and MRI examinations with T 1 , T 2 weighted images were useful to detect the lesion and to evaluate the activity, evolution of brain stem type Neuro-Behcet's syndrome. (author)

  15. Genetic Variation in the REL Gene Increases Risk of Behcet's Disease in a Chinese Han Population but That of PRKCQ Does Not.

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    Feilan Chen

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS and candidate gene studies have identified the REL and PRKCQ genes as risk loci for various autoimmune diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association of the REL and PRKCQ genes with Behcet's disease (BD in a Chinese Han population. A case-control study was conducted on three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs13031237, rs702873, and rs842647 of the REL gene and three SNPs (rs4750316, rs11258747, and rs947474 of the PRKCQ gene using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP in a total of 623 BD patients and 1,074 healthy controls. Multiple variables were assessed, including age, sex distribution, and extra-ocular findings. In the present study, the frequencies of rs842647 GG genotypes and rs842647 G alleles were significantly higher in patients than in controls and those of the rs842647 AG genotypes were lower in patients than in controls [GG genotype: Bonferroni corrected P-value for gender adjustment (Pc(a = 0.0074, odds ratio (OR = 1.63; G allele: Pc(a = 0.0072, OR = 1.57; AG genotype: Pc(a = 0.024, OR = 0.63, respectively]. No statistically significant differences in the frequencies of rs702873, rs13031237, rs4750316, rs11258747, and rs947474 between BD patients and controls were observed. Stratification analysis indicated that the REL rs842647 polymorphism was associated with BD patients with skin lesions. No significant association of the other five SNPs between BD patients with other extra-ocular findings, including genital ulcer, arthritis, and positive pathergy test results was found. The REL rs842647 polymorphism may be a susceptibility factor for BD pathogenesis and skin lesions, which indicate that c-Rel may be involved in the pathogenesis and skin lesions of BD through the NF-κB pathway.

  16. Behcet's syndrome involving the gastrointestinal tract - a diagnostic dilemma in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, D.A.; Daneman, A.; Cleghorn, G.J.; Durie, P.R.; Hamilton, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Behcet's syndrome is very rare in children, especially those under 10 years of age. Clinical and radiological features are described in 4 children, including 2 under the age of 5 years, with the syndrome. As in other pediatric cases reported, the incomplete form of Behcet's syndrome was present in each case. All 4 patients had oral and genital mucosal effects, arthritis and gastrointestinal and dermatological manifestations. Ophthalmological symptoms occurred in only 1 patient. Radiologically, the 4 cases demonstrated the spectrum of gastrointestinal involvement, from minimal irregularity and thickening of the terminal ileum to gross irregularity and deformity of the terminal ileum and cecum. Because of the difficulty in differentiating Behcet's syndrome from other forms of inflammatory bowel disease it is suggested that in children with gastrointestinal involvement, 3 major criteria be present before the diagnosis of Behcet's syndrome is made. (orig.)

  17. Neurological manifestations of Batch s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Ashjazadeh, Nahid; Nikseresht, Alireza; Shariat, Abdolhamid; Yousefipour, Gholamali; Samangooie, Shahdokht; Safari, Anahid

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical manifestations, and laboratory features of Neuro-Behcets disease. This prospective study was carried out in the Behcets Research Clinic in Shiraz (south-west Iran) and included the patients referred from 1990-1999. The patients' clinical records, images, CSF analyses, and electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed. Eighteen (15 males and 3 females) out of 690 Behcet s patients (2.6%, 95% CI = 1.4-3.8%) were found to have neurological involvement. The mean +/- standard deviation age of these patients was 34.7 +/- 8.6 years. All fulfilled the criteria of the International Study Group of Behcet s Disease. Central nervous system involvement was more common than peripheral nervous system manifestations. Headache, weakness, tingling, and numbness were the most common symptoms. Hyperreflexia, upward plantar reflex, and somatosensory findings were the most frequent signs. Hemispheral and brainstem stroke-like syndromes and cerebral venous thrombosis were the major neurologic presentations. There were also cases of myelitic, pure meningoencephalitic, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-like, multiple sclerosis-like, and Guillain Barre syndromes. Neuro-Behcets disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of stroke in young adults, chronic meningitis, intracranial hypertension, multiple sclerosis, myelopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. (author)

  18. Validation and reliability of a Behcet's Syndrome Activity Scale in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyo Jin; Seo, Mi Ryoung; Ryu, Hee Jung; Baek, Han Joo

    2016-01-01

    We prepared a cross-cultural adaptation of the Behcet's Syndrome Activity Scale (BSAS) and evaluated its reliability and validity in Korea. Fifty patients with Behcet's disease (BD) who attended the Rheumatology Clinic of Gachon University Gil Medical Center were included in this study. The first BSAS questionnaire was administered at each clinic visit, and the second questionnaire was completed at home within 24 hours of the visit. A Behcet's Disease Current Activity Form (BDCAF) and a Behcet's Disease Quality of Life (BDQOL) form were also given to patients. The test-retest reliability was analyzed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). To assess the validity, the total BSAS score was compared with the BDCAF score, the patient/physician global assessment, and the BDQOL by Spearman rank correlation. Twelve males and 38 females were enrolled. The mean age was 48.5 years and the mean disease duration was 6.7 years. Thirty-eight patients (76.0%) returned the questionnaire by mail. For the test-retest reliability, the two assessments were significantly correlated on all 10 items of the BSAS questionnaire (p < 0.05) and the total BSAS score (ICC, 0.925; p < 0.001). The total BSAS score was statistically correlated with the BDQOL, BDCAF, and patient/physician global assessment (p < 0.01). The Korean version of BSAS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure BD activity.

  19. Transformation of a Ruptured Giant Pulmonary Artery Aneurysm into an Air Cavity After Transcatheter Embolization in a Behcet's Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cil, Barbaros E.; Turkbey, Baris; Canyigit, Murat; Kumbasar, Ozlem O.; Celik, Gokhan; Demirkazik, Figen B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysms due to Behcet's disease are mainly seen in young males and very rarely in females. To our knowledge there are only 10 cases reported in the related literature. Emergent transcatheter embolization was performed in a female patient with a known history of Behcet's disease in whom massive hemoptysis developed because of rupture of a giant pulmonary artery aneurysm. At 6-month follow-up, transformation of the aneurysm sac into an air cavity was detected. To our knowledge, such a transformation has never been reported in the literature before. Embolization of the pulmonary artery aneurysm and the mechanism of cavity transformation are reviewed and discussed

  20. Pregnancy complicated by superior vena cava thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with Behcet disease and the use of heparin for treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, A.; Akdeniz, N.A.; Akyildiz, L.; Kale, E.

    2006-01-01

    Batch disease is a multi systemic vasculitis of unknown origin. Vascular involvement has been considered to result from systemic vasculitis, occurs in 5-10% of these patients. We report a 34-year-old pregnant woman complicated by superior vena ca va thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism in a patient with Batch disease. (author)

  1. Interferon alpha-2a treatment for refractory Behcet uveitis in Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hwan; Lee, Christopher Seungkyu; Lee, Sung Chul

    2018-02-20

    To evaluate therapeutic outcomes of interferon alpha-2a (IFNα2a) treatment in patients with Behcet's disease who were refractory to immunosuppressive agents. This retrospective case series reviewed the medical records of 5 patients with refractory Behcet uveitis from January 2011 to February 2017. IFNα2a was administered at a dose of 3 million IU 3 times per week. Clinical response, relapse rate, and change of visual acuity were evaluated. The mean age of patients was 39.60 ± 9.21 years, and the median treatment duration was 6 months. Four of the 5 patients (80%) presented with responses to IFNα2a without any uveitis attack during the treatment period. The mean number of uveitis attacks/year per patient during the treatment was 0.40 ± 0.89. The mean log of the Minimum Angle of Resolution visual acuity improved from 1.44 ± 0.38 at baseline to 1.02 ± 0.58 at the final follow up. IFNα2a is an effective therapy for Behcet uveitis refractory to conventional immunosuppressants in Korean patients.

  2. Asymptomatic giant coronary aneurysm in an adolescent with Behcet's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Behcet's is an idiopathic multi-organ syndrome, which may have onset during childhood. Vascular involvement is uncommon, with rarely reported coronary aneurysm formation. We present a case report of a teenager girl who developed recalcitrant life-threatening Behcet's vasculitis, involving both small and large venous and arterial systems including a giant coronary aneurysm. Case report De-identified data were collected retrospectively in case report format. Although our sixteen year old female with Behcet's vasculitis had resolution of many arterial aneurysms, she had persistent venous thrombosis of large vessels, as well as persistent, giant arterial aneurysms requiring intra-arterial coiling of a lumbar artery and coronary bypass grafting despite intensive immunosuppression including glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, infliximab, methotrexate, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin. Conclusions Vascular manifestations may be seen in Behcet's syndrome, including asymptomatic coronary aneurysm, which may be refractory to immunosuppression and ultimately require surgical intervention. Increased awareness is essential for prompt diagnosis and management.

  3. Imaging in hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, J.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the diagnostic and interventional use of imaging techniques in hepatobiliary disease. The first of the book's two sections describes the role of imaging in the diagnostic work up of common clinical syndromes. The second part is concerned with therapy and reviews interventional techniques for hepatobiliary disease

  4. Imaging of parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Maurice C.

    2008-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the imaging findings of parasitic diseases using modern imaging equipment. The chapters consist of short descriptions of causative pathogens, epidemiology, modes of transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, with illustrative examples of parasitic diseases that can affect various systems of the human body. Tables summarizing key diagnostic features and clinical data pertinent to diagnosis are also included. This book is intended for radiologists worldwide. (orig.)

  5. Imaging of parasitic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Maurice C. [American Univ. of Beirut Medical Center (Lebanon). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E. [Riyadh Military Hospital (Saudi Arabia). Radiology and Imaging Dept. 920W; Tamraz, Jean C. (eds.) [CHU Hotel-Dieu de France, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2008-07-01

    This book provides an overview of the imaging findings of parasitic diseases using modern imaging equipment. The chapters consist of short descriptions of causative pathogens, epidemiology, modes of transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, with illustrative examples of parasitic diseases that can affect various systems of the human body. Tables summarizing key diagnostic features and clinical data pertinent to diagnosis are also included. This book is intended for radiologists worldwide. (orig.)

  6. Behcet's Disease with Uveitis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Chung

    2008-10-01

    Conclusions: Visual outcome is poorer in males than in females and has improved in the recent decade, but still a significant proportion of patients lose their vision quickly. The number of new patients has not decreased.

  7. Widely scattered CT lesions in the midbrain and the pons in a case of neuro-Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Tohgi, Hideo; Kanayama, Hiroumi; Fujimori, Masaki; Aoki, Hidehiko

    1985-01-01

    We report on a 30-year-old man with neuro-Behcet's disease. His main neurologic symptoms and signs included headache, alternating hemiparesis, dysarthria, and truncal ataxia. Lumbar puncture demonstrated an elevated pressure, pleocytosis, and an increased protein concentration. Intravenous betamethasone produced a rapid and sustained improvement, without recurrence for two years. Widely scattered foci of small, low-density lesions were disclosed in the midbrain and the pons on a cranial CT scan with 2.5 mm thin-cut slices to enable us to focus on the brainstem. Such CT lesions are consistent with the neuropathological features of this illness, which shows a tendency for brainstem lesions to predominate; these lesions probably represent necrotic areas secondary to vasculitis. Brainstem CT studies with thin-cut slices may be an important diagnostic aid in patients suspected of having neuro-Behcet's disease. (author)

  8. Moyamoya disease: Diagnostic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Kułakowska, Alina; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Kapica-Topczewska, Katarzyna; Korneluk-Sadzyńska, Alicja; Brzozowska, Joanna; Drozdowski, Wiesław

    2011-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a progressive vasculopathy leading to stenosis of the main intracranial arteries. The incidence of moyamoya disease is high in Asian countries; in Europe and North America, the prevalence of the disease is considerably lower. Clinically, the disease may be of ischaemic, haemorrhagic and epileptic type. Cognitive dysfunction and behavioral disturbance are atypical symptoms of moyamoya disease. Characteristic angiographic features of the disease include stenosis or occlusion of the arteries of the circle of Willis, as well as the development of collateral vasculature. Currently, magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography with multi-row systems are the main imaging methods of diagnostics of the entire range of vascular changes in moyamoya disease. The most common surgical treatment combines the direct arterial anastomosis between the superficial temporal artery and middle cerebral, and the indirect synangiosis involving placement of vascularised tissue in the brain cortex, in order to promote neoangiogenesis. Due to progressive changes, correct and early diagnosis is of basic significance in selecting patients for surgery, which is the only effective treatment of the disease. An appropriate qualification to surgery should be based on a comprehensive angiographic and imaging evaluation of brain structures. Despite the rare occurrence of moyamoya disease in European population, it should be considered as one of causes of ischaemic or haemorrhagic strokes, especially in young patients

  9. MRI in neuro-Behcet's syndrome: comparison of conventional spin-echo and FLAIR pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, H.R.; Albrecht, T.; Curati-Alasonatti, W.L.; Williams, E.J.; Haskard, D.O.

    1999-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) sequence with that of a conventional dual-echo spin-echo (SE) sequence to brain lesions in 20 patients with Behcet's syndrome. They underwent 25 MRI examinations. The images were independently analysed for the number, type and anatomical location of lesions shown. There were 18 abnormal studies (13 initial and 5 follow-up). The FLAIR sequence detected significantly more lesions than the SE TE 80 (P < 0.05) and SE TE 20 (P < 0.01) sequences. It was particularly useful for demonstrating lesions in the juxtacortical white matter, which accounted for over half the lesions detected on the FLAIR images. Of patients presenting with nonspecific symptoms such as headache, seven had normal and five had abnormal studies. All patients presenting with focal neurological signs had abnormal imaging. We found supratentorial and, in particular, juxtacortical lesions to be more frequent than previously described. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  11. Lyme disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to the ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a deer ...

  12. Clinical application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (resistive type) on cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Katsuya; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Inagaki, Yoshiaki; Ikehira, Hiroo; Fukuda, Nobuo; Tateno, Yukio.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) imaging in diagnosing cardiovascular disease, 27 subjects were examined using a 0.1-Tesla resistive type (ASAHI MARK-J). In 10 normal subjects, four cardiac chambers, interventricular septum, aorta, pulmonary vessels and vena cava were clearly identified in NMR imaging. In two patients with old anteroseptal myocardial infarction, anteroseptal wall thinning and left ventricular aneurysm with mural thrombi were demonstrated. In two cases of antrolateral and posterolateral myocardial infarction, however, infarcted areas were not identified in NMR imaging. In one patient with congestive cardiomyopathy, enlarged left ventricle without hypertrophy was recognized. In two patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, NMR imaging disclosed thickened left ventricular wall associated with its narrowed cavity. A mural thrombus in the right ventricle was distinctly visualized in one patient with cardio-vascular Behcet's disease. In two patients with mitral valve stenosis, enlarged left atrium with a mural thrombus was clearly demonstrated in both cross and longitudinal sections. In three patients with thoratic aortic aneurysm, local dilatation of aorta and mural thrombi were recognized. In four patients with dissecting aortic aneurysm, double channels with an intimal flap in the aorta were visualized in NMR imaging. Mean T 1 values and standard deviations of left ventricle, left ventricular wall, and thrombi were 593+-89, 341+-20, 316+-84 msec, respectively. Mean T 1 values of thrombi were ordinally shorter than those of left ventricule. But some thrombi which might be expected fresh had longer T 1 values. (J.P.N.)

  13. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  14. Cushing's disease: pituitary imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.; Ammini, A.C.; Bhatia, R.; Gupta, R.; Berry, M.; Sarkar, C.; Mahajan, H.

    1994-01-01

    Fourteen patients with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent hypercortisolism underwent pituitary scanning with computed axial tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computed tomography revealed pituitary macroadenomas in two patients, pituitary hyperplasia in one and suspicion of pituitary microadenoma in one. Thirteen patients underwent MRI. One with a macroadenoma diagnosed on CT did not undergo MRI. The MRI revealed a pituitary macroadenoma in one, microadenoma in three and hyperplasia in two cases. Magnetic resonance imaging following gadolinium diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhancement revealed four more pituitary microadenomas. All patients who had pituitary adenomas (micro and macro) and hyperplasia underwent trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. One of the two patients, who had an enlarged pituitary on imaging but no demonstrable adenoma, was found to have a microadenoma at surgery. It is concluded that patients with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism should undergo MRI of the pituitary gland to identify/localize corticotroph pituitary ademonas. The study should include Gd-DTPA enhancement in cases where the scan is normal. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  15. Imaging of sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.J.; Sarnaik, S.

    1999-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an important health care issue in the United States and in certain areas in Africa, the Middle East and India. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the disease at the molecular and pathophysiologic level, specific treatment which is safe and accessible for most patients is still elusive. Going into the next millennium, the management of this disease is still largely dependent on early diagnosis and the treatment of complications with supportive care. Thus, diagnosis and evaluation of the complications of the disease are crucial in directing clinical care at the bedside. Modern imaging modalities have greatly improved, and their application in the patient with the sickling disorders has enhanced the decision - making process. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical aspects of common complications of the disease and to discuss imaging approaches which are useful in their evaluation. (orig.)

  16. MR imaging in Peyronie's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Young Yoel; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Jong Kwan

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of magnetic resonance (MR) images in Peyronie's disease and to assess the usefulness of post-erection penile MRI. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of seven patients in whom Peyronie's disease was clinically suspected. All seven underwent pre-and post-erectile MRI. After the acquisition of erectile MRI, three patients also underwent contrast-enhanced MRI. We compared image quality and the rate of detection of penile plaque between pre-erectile and post-erectile images. In three patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI, we assessed correlation between the contrast enhancement pattern, as seen on MRI, of the plaque and corpus cavernosa and clinical inflammatory signs such as painful erection. In the seven patients, all post-erectile MRI images showed localized thickening and irregularities of the tunica albuginea and the septum penis, suggesting penile plaque. On pre-erectile MRI, however, plaque was detected in five cases. In six of seven cases, plaque as seen on T2-weighted images (T2WI) showed low signal intensity similar to that of the tunica albuginea, and as seen on T1-weighted images (T1W1), a signal intensity of signal intensity similar to or similar to or slightly higher than that of the tunica albuginea. In one case, plaque showed high signal intensity on both T1WI and T2WI. On T1WI, the corpus cavernosa showed homogeneous medium-signal intensity on all pre- and post-erectile MR images. On pre-erectile T2WI, the corpus cavernosa of six patients showed heterogeneous high signal intensity, whereas on post-erectile T2WI the corpus cavernosa of all patients showed homogeneous high signal intensity. Due to the enlarged penis and homogeneous signal intensity of the corpus cavernosa, the image quality of post-erectile images was superior to that of pre-erectile images. The images of two of three patients who underwent contrast enhanced MRI showed strong enhancement of the plaque and adjacent corpus cavernosa, while in

  17. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akisada, Masayoshi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Tatezawa, Akira; Matsumoto, Kunihiko

    1982-01-01

    There has been no definite examining technique for the early diagnosis of pancreatic diseases, especially small cancers of the pancreas less than 3 cm. Plain abdominal X-rays do not produce reliable roentgenological signs of acute pancreatitis, but the advent of CT has elucidated the condition to some extent. Upper gastrointestinal series are alleged to demonstrate abnormal findings in 80% of cases of pancreatic cancer or cyst. Pancreatic RI scintigraphy expresses the function and anatomy, and the sensitivity with 75 Se is 88%, similar to 87% by US and 80% by CT. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography visualizes extrapancreatic secretory function, as well as the morphology of pancreas, differentiation is not easy in many cases. The greatest indication for US was cysts. The detection rate of pancreatic cancers is similar between plain and contrast CTs, and pancreatic angiography is not specific for pancreatic cancers. (Chiba, N.)

  18. Metabolic Imaging in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meles, Sanne K; Teune, Laura K; de Jong, Bauke M; Dierckx, Rudi A; Leenders, Klaus L

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on recent human 18 F-FDG PET studies in Parkinson disease. First, an overview is given of the current analytic approaches to metabolic brain imaging data. Next, we discuss how 18 F-FDG PET studies have advanced understanding of the relation between distinct brain regions and associated symptoms in Parkinson disease, including cognitive decline. In addition, the value of 18 F-FDG PET studies in differential diagnosis, identifying prodromal patients, and the evaluation of treatment effects are reviewed. Finally, anticipated developments in the field are addressed. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. MR imaging of muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.A.; Zeitler, E.; Schalke, B.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Because of high soft-tissue contrast, MR imaging is especially suitable for the investigation of muscle diseases. Between March 1984 and March 1986, 76 patients with different types of muscle diseases were examined using a 1-T superconductive magnet (Siemens Magnetom). Studied were 14 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy (including carriers), 32 patients with myositis, four patients with myotonic dystrophy, six patients with spinal muscular atrophy, and 20 patients with other muscle diseases, including metabolic disorders. MR imaging showed typical signal patterns in affected muscle groups. These patterns can be used in the differential diagnosis, in biopsy planning, or in evaluation of response to therapy. The T1/T2 ratio especially seems to indicate very early stages of muscle disease

  20. Imaging of Occupational Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlin, Jay; Edwards, Rachael; Pipavath, Sudhakar

    2016-11-01

    Occupational lung diseases span a variety of pulmonary disorders caused by inhalation of dusts or chemical antigens in a vocational setting. Included in these are the classic mineral pneumoconioses of silicosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestos-related diseases as well as many immune-mediated and airway-centric diseases, and new and emerging disorders. Although some of these have characteristic imaging appearances, a multidisciplinary approach with focus on occupational exposure history is essential to proper diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebral imaging revealing Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral imaging is the only non-invasive means of examining the brain and is essential in studying Alzheimer's disease. As a tool for early diagnosis, evaluation and treatment monitoring, this technology is at the heart of the research being done to further improve its reliability and sensitivity. (authors)

  2. FLAIR images of brain diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Fuminori; Kinoshita, Masao; Kishibayashi, Jun; Kamada, Kazuhiko; Sunohara, Nobuhiko.

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the usefulness of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in diagnosing brain diseases. The subjects were 20 patients with multiple cerebral infarction, multiple sclerosis, temporal epilepsy, or brain trauma, and 20 other healthy adults. FLAIR images, with a long repetitive time of 6000 msec and a long inversion time of 1400-1600 msec, showed low signal intensity in the cerebrospinal fluid in the lateral ventricles and the cerebral sulci, and high signal intensity in brain tissues. Signal intensity on FLAIR images correlated well with T2 relaxation times under 100 msec. For multiple sclerosis and cerebral infarction, cystic lesions, which were shown on T2-weighted images with long relaxation times over 100 msec, appeared as low-signal areas; and the lesions surrounding the cystic lesions appeared as high-signal areas. For temporal lobe epilepsy, the hippocampus was visualized as a high-signal area. Hippocampal lesions were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. In a patient with cerebral trauma, FLAIR images revealed the lobulated structure with the residual cortex shown as a high signal area. The lesions surrounding the cystic change were imaged as high signal areas. These structural changes were demonstrated better with FLAIR images than with conventional T2-weighted sequences. FLAIR images were useful in detecting white matter lesions surrounding the lateral ventricles and cortical and subcortical lesions near the brain surface, which were unclear on conventional T2-weighted and proton-density images. (N.K.)

  3. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dani, M.; Edison, P. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Brooks, D.J. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom); Aarhus University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [{sup 18}F]THK523, [{sup 18}F]THK5117, [{sup 18}F]THK5105 and [{sup 18}F]THK5351, [{sup 18}F]AV1451(T807) and [{sup 11}C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. (orig.)

  4. Radiological imaging of endocrine diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Imaging studies are playing an increasingly role in the evaluation of endocrine diseases; accordingly, familiarity with the specific indications for the various modalities, and with the characteristic findings, is essential. This multi-author work, which is intended for both radiologists and endocrinologists, considers the role of all the recent imaging techniques, including ultrasound (particular color Doppler), computed tomography, MRI, and scintigraphy. Following an extensive introduction on the pituitary, subsequent chapters discuss in detail the normal anatomy and pathology of the female and male reproductive systems. Remaining chapters provide state-of-the-art data on the thyroid, parathyroids, pancreatic endocrine tumors, adrenal glands, hormonal tumors (carcinoids and MEN), and imaging of the complications of hormone therapy. (orig.)

  5. Molecular imaging in cardiovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botnar, R.M.; Ebersberger, H.; Noerenberg, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized and developing countries. In clinical practice, the in-vivo identification of atherosclerotic lesions, which can lead to complications such as heart attack or stroke, remains difficult. Imaging techniques provide the reference standard for the detection of clinically significant atherosclerotic changes in the coronary and carotid arteries. The assessment of the luminal narrowing is feasible, while the differentiation of stable and potentially unstable or vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques is currently not possible using non-invasive imaging. With high spatial resolution and high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable method for the evaluation of the thin arterial wall. In clinical practice, native MRI of the vessel wall already allows the differentiation and characterization of components of atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid arteries and the aorta. Additional diagnostic information can be gained by the use of non-specific MRI contrast agents. With the development of targeted molecular probes, that highlight specific molecules or cells, pathological processes can be visualized at a molecular level with high spatial resolution. In this review article, the development of pathophysiological changes leading to the development of the arterial wall are introduced and discussed. Additionally, principles of contrast enhanced imaging with non-specific contrast agents and molecular probes will be discussed and latest developments in the field of molecular imaging of the vascular wall will be introduced.

  6. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  7. Pulmonary artery aneurysm in Bechcet's disease: helical computed tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, J.; Caballero, P.; Olivera, M. J.; Cajal, M. L.; Caniego, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown etiology that affects arteries and veins of different sizes and can be associated with pulmonary artery aneurysms. We report the case of a patient with Behcet's disease and a pulmonary artery aneurysm who was studied by means of plain chest X ray, helical computed tomography and pulmonary arteriography. Helical computed tomography is a reliable technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (Author) 9 refs

  8. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  9. Imaging epigenetics in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, Simone; Garaci, Francesco G; Toschi, Nicola; Hampel, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a prevalent, complex and chronically progressive brain disease. Its course is non-linear, dynamic, adaptive to maladaptive, and compensatory to decompensatory, affecting large-scale neural networks through a plethora of mechanistic and signaling pathway alterations that converge into regional and cell type-specific neurodegeneration and, finally, into clinically overt cognitive and behavioral decline. This decline includes reductions in the activities of daily living, quality of life, independence, and life expectancy. Evolving lines of research suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play a crucial role during AD development and progression. Epigenetics designates molecular mechanisms that alter gene expression without modifications of the genetic code. This topic includes modifications on DNA and histone proteins, the primary elements of chromatin structure. Accumulating evidence has revealed the relevant processes that mediate epigenetic modifications and has begun to elucidate how these processes are apparently dysregulated in AD. This evidence has led to the clarification of the roles of specific classes of therapeutic compounds that affect epigenetic pathways and characteristics of the epigenome. This insight is accompanied by the development of new methods for studying the global patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin alterations. In particular, high-throughput sequencing approaches, such as next-generation DNA sequencing techniques, are beginning to drive the field into the next stage of development. In parallel, genetic imaging is beginning to answer additional questions through its ability to uncover genetic variants, with or without genome-wide significance, that are related to brain structure, function and metabolism, which impact disease risk and fundamental network-based cognitive processes. Neuroimaging measures can further be used to define AD systems and endophenotypes. The integration of genetic neuroimaging

  10. Pituitary gland imaging in Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonneville, J.F.; Cattin, F.; Bonneville, F.; Schillo, F.; Jacquet, G.

    2003-01-01

    Specific MR techniques are r-required for optimal detection of adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting adenomas responsible for Cushing's disease. Adequate MR sequences, high resolution coronal T1 and T2 - weighted images, dynamic MR imaging, post-gadolinium delayed images, dose of gadolinium adjusted for each sequence can routinely demonstrate pituitary adenomas less than 3 mm in Cushing's disease. (authors)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, B.D.; Jacobstein, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Focusing primarily on MR imaging of the heart, this book covers other diagnostic imaging modalities as well. The authors review new technologies and diagnostic procedures pertinent to congenital heat disease and present each congenital heat abnormality as a separate entity

  12. PET/MR Imaging in Vascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    For imaging of atherosclerotic disease, lumenography using computed tomography, ultrasonography, or invasive angiography is still the backbone of evaluation. However, these methods are less effective to predict the likelihood of future thromboembolic events caused by vulnerability of plaques. PET...... through data and arguments that support increased use of PET/MR imaging in atherosclerotic imaging....

  13. Wilson’s disease: Atypical imaging features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopalan Y Vishnu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wilson’s disease is a genetic movement disorder with characteristic clinical and imaging features. We report a 17- year-old boy who presented with sialorrhea, hypophonic speech, paraparesis with repeated falls and recurrent seizures along with cognitive decline. He had bilateral Kayser Flescher rings. Other than the typical features of Wilson’s disease in cranial MRI, there were extensive white matter signal abnormalities (T2 and FLAIR hyperintensities and gyriform contrast enhancement which are rare imaging features in Wilson's disease. A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose Wilson’s disease when atypical imaging features are present.

  14. Clinical and Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Lower-extremity Vein Thrombosis in Behcet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyahi, Emire; Cakmak, Osman Serdal; Tutar, Burcin; Arslan, Caner; Dikici, Atilla Suleyman; Sut, Necdet; Kantarci, Fatih; Tuzun, Hasan; Melikoglu, Melike; Yazici, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vascular involvement can be seen in up to 40% of patients with Behcet syndrome (BS), the lower-extremity vein thrombosis (LEVT) being the most common type. The aim of the current study was to compare venous Doppler findings and clinical features between BS patients with LEVT and control patients diagnosed as having LEVT due to other causes. All consecutive 78 patients (71 men, 7 women; mean age 38.6 ± 10.3 years) with LEVT due to BS and 50 control patients (29 men, 21 women; mean age 42.0 ± 12.5 years) who had LEVT due to other causes, or idiopathic, were studied with the help of a Doppler ultrasonography after a detailed clinical examination. Patterns of venous disease were identified by cluster analyses. Clinical features of chronic venous disease were assessed using 2 classification systems. Venous claudication was also assessed. Patients with BS were more likely to be men, had significantly earlier age of onset of thrombosis, and were treated mainly with immunosuppressives and less frequently with anticoagulants. Furthermore, they had significantly more bilateral involvement, less complete recanalization, and more frequent collateral formation. While control patients had a disorganized pattern of venous involvement, BS patients had a contiguous and symmetric pattern, involving all deep and superficial veins of the lower extremities, with less affinity for crural veins. Clinical assessment, as measured by the 2 classification systems, also indicated a more severe disease among the BS patients. In line, 51% of the BS patients suffered from severe post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and 32% from venous claudication, whereas these were present in 8% and 12%, respectively, among the controls. Among BS patients, a longer duration of thrombosis, bilateral femoral vein involvement, and using no anticoagulation along with immunosuppressive treatment when first diagnosed were found to be associated independently with severe PTS. Lower-extremity vein

  15. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding. PMID:22723532

  16. Imaging in occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Kavakama, Jorge Issamu; Rodrigues, Reynaldo Tavares

    2006-01-01

    This chapter consists of a review of the literature regarding radiographic and tomographic characteristics of the principal occupational respiratory diseases (silicosis and asbestosis). Special attention is given to the practical relevance of high-resolution computed tomography, which is the most sensitive and specific method of identifying and quantifying the extent of pleural and parenchymal lesions related to such diseases. (author)

  17. Radiological imaging in pediatric rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuszewska, Genowefa; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Włodkowska-Korytkowska, Monika; Smorawińska, Patrycja; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Radiological imaging plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatic diseases. The basic method of imaging is a classic X-ray picture, which for many years has been used as a single method for the recognition and evaluation of the effects of disease management. In today’s modern day treatment of rheumatic diseases, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance are more commonly performed for early detection of inflammatory changes in the region of soft tissue, subchondral bone and bone marrow. In spite of their usefulness and fundamental role in the diagnosis, X-ray still remains an essential tool in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in children and is complementary to today’s methods of imaging diagnostics. In clinical practice, X-ray imaging is still an important examination performed not only to recognize the disorders, but also to provide a differential diagnosis. It helps estimate disease progression and is used to monitor the effects of treatment and the development of possible complications. Differential diagnosis of rheumatic diseases is performed on the basis of localization and type of radiographic changes. The surrounding periarticular soft tissues, bone structures, joint space, with special attention to articular bone surfaces and epiphyses, are analyzed. The aim of this work is to describe characteristic inflammatory changes present on X-ray imaging typical for the most commonly diagnosed rheumatic diseases in children, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile spondyloarthropathy and systemic vascular disease

  18. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes.

  19. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... called a prion. Loss of brain function resembles Alzheimer's disease, but is very rapid in progression. Complete dementia usually occurs by the sixth month, death follows quickly. There is no known cure.

  20. Recent advances in imaging in Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Toru; Takeda, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent knowledge on the pathophysiology of Parkinson disease, the precise and early diagnosis of this condition remains difficult. Advances in imaging techniques have enabled the assessment of in vivo structural, neurometabolic, and neurochemical changes in Parkinson disease, and their role as biomarkers have assumed greater importance in recent years. We presently review the various approaches with these imaging techniques for the study of Parkinson disease. Voxel-based morphometry studies with structural MRI showed a characteristic pattern of gray matter loss, and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) studies have indicated latent network abnormalities in Parkinson disease. Moreover, radiotracer imaging with dopaminergic markers facilitates the assessment of pre- and postsynaptic nigro-striatal integrity, and other radiotracers have been used in the studies of nondopaminergic neurotransmitter systems, such as the cholinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic systems. These imaging techniques can be used to detect presymptomatic disease and to monitor disease progression. Thus, imaging data provide meaningful insights into the pathological process in Parkinson disease. (author)

  1. Imaging and translational research: neuro degenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantraye, P.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging of neuro-degenerative diseases over the past two decades are the product of breakthroughs in imaging technology, more powerful computers, image-processing software, and expanding knowledge in basic and clinical neuro-science. In addition to the insights into normal brain structure and function that such methods provide, and the information that can be gained from disease-related changes in structure and function, functional imaging offers the promise of monitoring brain lesions and quantifying the therapeutic efficacy of innovative treatments for these largely incurable disorders. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2000-03-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando

    2000-01-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  4. INTRACRANIAL HYDATID DISEASE: IMAGING FINDINGS OF A RARE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    idil Gunes Tatar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by the larval stage of the parasite Echinococcus granulosus. It is mainly endemic in North African and Mediterranean countries. The disease usually manifests in liver and lungs although involvement of other organs are also seen. In this rare case intracranial hydatid disease in a 9-year-old female patient is presented with Magnetic Resonance Imaging findings. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 103-105

  5. Imaging of iliopsoas compartment disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocher, L.; Saint Maurice, J.P.; Le Quen, O.; Bazille, A.; Miquel, A.; Frouge, C.; Blery, M.

    1997-01-01

    Infection, neoplastic involvement, and hemorrhage, are the most frequent pathologies that involve the ilio-psoas compartment. The extension from contiguous pathological structures and particularly digestive and urological organs, are often the origin of abscess formation or malignant tumours. The radiological findings including ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonance imaging, show a low specificity, which improves if the clinical history is known. The final diagnosis is confirmed by puncture or biopsy. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo; Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  8. MR imaging of degenerative disc disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A.; Farshad, Mazda; Winklehner, Anna; Andreisek, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This systematic literature review summarizes the current knowledge on MR imaging in degenerative disc disease. • Different classification systems for segmental spine degeneration are summarized. • It outlines the diagnostic limitations of MR imaging. - Abstract: Magnet resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used imaging modality for diagnosis of degenerative disc disease (DDD). Lack of precise observations and documentation of aspects within the complex entity of DDD might partially be the cause of poor correlation of radiographic findings to clinical symptoms. This literature review summarizes the current knowledge on MRI in DDD and outlines the diagnostic limitations. The review further sensitizes the reader toward awareness of potentially untended aspects of DDD and the interaction of DDD and endplate changes. A summary of the available classifications for DDD is provided

  9. MR imaging of degenerative disc disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A., E-mail: nadja.farshad@usz.ch [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Farshad, Mazda [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Balgrist University Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Winklehner, Anna; Andreisek, Gustav [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • This systematic literature review summarizes the current knowledge on MR imaging in degenerative disc disease. • Different classification systems for segmental spine degeneration are summarized. • It outlines the diagnostic limitations of MR imaging. - Abstract: Magnet resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used imaging modality for diagnosis of degenerative disc disease (DDD). Lack of precise observations and documentation of aspects within the complex entity of DDD might partially be the cause of poor correlation of radiographic findings to clinical symptoms. This literature review summarizes the current knowledge on MRI in DDD and outlines the diagnostic limitations. The review further sensitizes the reader toward awareness of potentially untended aspects of DDD and the interaction of DDD and endplate changes. A summary of the available classifications for DDD is provided.

  10. MR imaging of adult glomerulocystic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egashira, K.; Nakata, H.; Hashimoto, O.; Kaizu, K.; University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Kitakyushu

    1991-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with hypertension and severe renal dysfunction was diagnosed as having adult glomerulocystic kidney disease. MR imaging of the kidney showed a diffuse reduction of the intensity of the renal cortex with a loss of normal cortico-medullary differentiation of T1-weighted images. Numerous small cortical cysts were also demonstrated. These MR findings complemented the results of the biopsy and were useful for making a definitive diagnosis. (orig.)

  11. Radioaerosol lung imaging in small airways disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, T; Dorow, P; Felix, R

    1981-06-01

    Aerosol inhalation lung imaging was performed in 35 asymptomatic smokers who have been selected on the basis of abnormal findings in small airways pulmonary function tests. Qualitative (image inspection) and quantitative (aerosol distribution index = ADI) analysis of the radioaerosol lung patterns was accomplished. Compared to healthy subjects as well as to patients with chronic obstructive lung disease significant differences of mean aerosol distribution homogeneity were observed. A characteristic type of abnormal aerosol pattern, indicating peripheral airways obstruction, was found in 71% of the patients with small airways disease.

  12. Unusual imaging characteristics of complicated hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Altin, Levent [Department of Radiology, Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Topcu, Salih [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey); Kilicoglu, Buelent [Department of 4th General Surgery, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Altinok, Tamer [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Kaptanoglu, Erkan [Department of Neurosurgery, Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Karademir, Alp [Department of Radiology, Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Kosar, Ugur [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-07-15

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although the liver and the lungs are the most frequently involved organs in the body, hydatid cysts of other organs are unusual. Radiologically, they usually demonstrate typical imaging findings, but unusual imaging characteristics of complicated cyst of hydatid disease, associated with high morbidity and mortality, are rarely described in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review the general features of hydatidosis and to discuss atypical imaging characteristics of the complicated hydatid disease in the human, with an emphasis on structure and rupture of the cystic lesion as well as ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of the disease. In our study, the available literature and images of the cases with complicated hydatidosis involving liver, lung, brain, spine and orbit were reviewed retrospectively. In hydatid disease, there are many potential local and systemic complications due to secondary involvement in almost any anatomic location in humans. Radiologically, in addition to the presence of atypical findings such as perifocal edema, non-homogenous contrast enhancement, multiplicity or septations and calcification, various unusual manifestations due to rupture or infection of the cyst have been observed in our cases with complicated hydatid disease. To prevent subsequent acute catastrophic results and the development of recurrences in various organs, it should be kept in mind that complicated hydatid cysts can cause unusual USG, CT, and MRI findings, in addition to typical ones, in endemic areas. Therefore, familiarity with atypical radiological appearances of complicated hydatid disease may be valuable in making a correct diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Unusual imaging characteristics of complicated hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, Ahmet Tuncay; Altin, Levent; Topcu, Salih; Kilicoglu, Buelent; Altinok, Tamer; Kaptanoglu, Erkan; Karademir, Alp; Kosar, Ugur

    2007-01-01

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although the liver and the lungs are the most frequently involved organs in the body, hydatid cysts of other organs are unusual. Radiologically, they usually demonstrate typical imaging findings, but unusual imaging characteristics of complicated cyst of hydatid disease, associated with high morbidity and mortality, are rarely described in the literature. The purpose of this study is to review the general features of hydatidosis and to discuss atypical imaging characteristics of the complicated hydatid disease in the human, with an emphasis on structure and rupture of the cystic lesion as well as ultrasonography (USG), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of the disease. In our study, the available literature and images of the cases with complicated hydatidosis involving liver, lung, brain, spine and orbit were reviewed retrospectively. In hydatid disease, there are many potential local and systemic complications due to secondary involvement in almost any anatomic location in humans. Radiologically, in addition to the presence of atypical findings such as perifocal edema, non-homogenous contrast enhancement, multiplicity or septations and calcification, various unusual manifestations due to rupture or infection of the cyst have been observed in our cases with complicated hydatid disease. To prevent subsequent acute catastrophic results and the development of recurrences in various organs, it should be kept in mind that complicated hydatid cysts can cause unusual USG, CT, and MRI findings, in addition to typical ones, in endemic areas. Therefore, familiarity with atypical radiological appearances of complicated hydatid disease may be valuable in making a correct diagnosis and treatment

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  15. Skeletal MR imaging in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effmann, E.L.; Kinney, T.R.; Utz, J.A.; Merten, D.F.; Herfkens, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors evaluated eight patients with sickle cell disease (mean age, 15.75 years; range 5-19 years) using MR imaging performed 24-72 hours after hospital admission for crisis. Coronal images of the lower extremities were obtained with a General Electric 1.5-T system and pulse sequences of TR/TE = 500/25 msec and 2,000/40, 80 msec. In three patients a mild decrease in signal intensity was seen on both T1- and T2-weighted images, probably secondary to marrow hyperplasia. In two patients a marked decrease in signal intensity was seen on both T1- and T2-weighted images, probably secondary to the diamagnetic effects of marrow iron. Six patients had bone infarct(s) which appeared as well-defined areas with prolonged T2 relaxation times. MR imaging appears promising for the evaluation of bone marrow in sickle cell anemia

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaka, Fumio; Tashiro, Kunio; Itoh, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Hamada, Takeshi.

    1992-01-01

    The width of substantia nigra (SN) in 59 cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease as well as 21 normal controls was analyzed by T2 weighted image (T2WI) of 1.5 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance image (MRI). All patients and controls underwent MRI with the spin-echo sequences used TR/TE: 3000/30 (short TE), and TR/TE: 3000/80 (long TE), in 5-mm-thick volumes. The width between the red nucleus and the cerebral peduncle showing low signal intensity areas was measured as that of SN and its ratio to the distance from the aqueduct to the midline of the cerebral peduncle was also measured. The calculated values of the width of SN and its ratio were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. The significant reduction in the width of SN and its ratio in Parkinson's disease were disclosed below: the mean calculated values of the width of SN were 2.95±0.51 mm in controls, 2.68±0.99 mm in Parkinson's disase on long TE images (P<0.01), and the mean ratio of the width of SN were 13.58±4.21% in controls, 10.52±3.07% in Parkinson's disease on long TE images (P=0.0002). The narrowing of SN in Parkinson's disease was more prominent in men, and advanced cases with Yahr stage III and IV. Considering that the pars reticulata, which is normally containing iron, shows low signal intensity on long TE images, the width of pars compacta could be measured more precisely on this sequences. The evaluation of the ratio of SN in midbrain on long TE images seemed to be more sensitive than the calculated values in detecting the narrowing of SN and pars compacta in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, C.G.; Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Wicks, J.D.; Stevens, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    How does magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) currently contribute in the evaluation of patients with suspected heart disease? What role will MRI play in the future in evaluation of cardiovascular disease? To understand better where MRI fits into the diagnostic algorithm of cardiovascular disease the authors first consider the characteristics that they would like to see in the ideal diagnostic test and then survey the available cardiac diagnostic tests to note the characteristics that limit or recommend a test. In the final analysis, the justification for expensive diagnostic tests such as MRI must be an overall improvement in survival or quality of life in those patients treated after diagnosis

  18. Alzheimer's Disease and Glaucoma: Imaging the Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A. Valenti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging through the visual system in Alzheimer's disease, with the technology currently in widespread use for the diagnosis and management of eye disease such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, is proving to be promising. In vivo cross-section imaging during an annual comprehensive eye exam has been available for a decade for glaucoma and macular degeneration, and this same imaging, using Optical Coherence Tomography, has been demonstrated to show deficits specific to AD and mild cognitive impairment. These deficits are in the form of nerve fiber layer tissue drop out in the retina and optic nerve. The retrograde loss of nerve fiber layer tissue in the retina and optic nerve may be an early biomarker of AD, and these deficits in the nerve fiber layer of the retina and optic nerve may be the earliest sign of AD, even prior to damage to the hippocampal region that impacts memory.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehericy, Stephane; Marjanska, Malgorzata; Mesrob, Lilia; Kinkingnehun, Serge; Sarazin, Marie

    2007-01-01

    A modern challenge for neuroimaging techniques is to contribute to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Early diagnosis includes recognition of pre-demented conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or having a high risk of developing AD. The role of neuroimaging therefore extends beyond its traditional role of excluding other conditions such as neurosurgical lesions. In addition, early diagnosis would allow early treatment using currently available therapies or new therapies in the future. Structural imaging can detect and follow the time course of subtle brain atrophy as a surrogate marker for pathological processes. New MR techniques and image analysis software can detect subtle brain microstructural, perfusion or metabolic changes that provide new tools to study the pathological processes and detect pre-demented conditions. This review focuses on markers of macro- and microstructural, perfusion, diffusion and metabolic MR imaging and spectroscopy in AD. (orig.)

  20. Imaging Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology with PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Porcello Schilling

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alzheimer's disease (AD has been reconceptualised as a dynamic pathophysiological process characterized by preclinical, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and dementia stages. Positron emission tomography (PET associated with various molecular imaging agents reveals numerous aspects of dementia pathophysiology, such as brain amyloidosis, tau accumulation, neuroreceptor changes, metabolism abnormalities and neuroinflammation in dementia patients. In the context of a growing shift toward presymptomatic early diagnosis and disease-modifying interventions, PET molecular imaging agents provide an unprecedented means of quantifying the AD pathophysiological process, monitoring disease progression, ascertaining whether therapies engage their respective brain molecular targets, as well as quantifying pharmacological responses. In the present study, we highlight the most important contributions of PET in describing brain molecular abnormalities in AD.

  1. 67Ga imaging in Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huys, J.; Schelstraete, K.; Simons, M.

    1982-01-01

    In order to answer the question if 67 Ga imaging has a practical utility for the management of the patient with Hodgkin's disease, 108 scans performed on 60 patients were reviewed. When used during the initial staging of the disease or during restaging because of recurrences, 67 Ga imaging-at least in our experience-gave many false negative results in the cervical, axillary and inguinal areas, whereas the majority of true positive scans was found at the mediastinal level (including the lower mediastinum), and also in the lung parenchyma and the upper epigastric regions. Because of its lack of sensitivity, 67 Ga imaging cannot replace other staging procedures, but nevertheless is a valuable adjunctive test, as it can identify tumor localization that may have remained undetected by other methods. Fifty-four scans were performed to monitor treatment with radiation therapy or chemotherapeutic agents. Disappearance or decreases of 67 Ga uptake after treatment usually corresponded to a disappearance or regression of the tumor as ascertained by other methods. When the treatment was shown to be ineffective, 67 Ga uptake persisted or even became more prominent. When during follow-up, a new concentration of 67 Ga appeared at the original location or elsewhere, a relapse was extremely likely. However, one must be aware of false positive images. In our material, no correlation was found between the intensity of the 67 Ga uptake and the histological subtypes of Hodgkin's disease. Neither did we observe any relation to the blood sedimentation rate or serum iron levels

  2. MR imaging of the meningeal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoerner, W.; Henkes, H.; Felix, R.

    1988-01-01

    The value of MR imaging in the diagnosis of meningeal diseases was studied in 22 patients with various meningeal alterations (tumor, inflammation, trauma, radiation). MR studies (0.5 T) included T2-weighted (spin echo [SE] 1,600/70 [repetition time msec/echo time msec]) images in 20 of 22 patients and T1-weighted images (SE 400/30) in all patients, before and after Gd-DTPA enhancement. As compared with a control group (20 cases), 16 of 20 T2-weighted studies of the patient group showed pathologically increased signal intensity of the subarchnoidal space. Whereas only normal findings were seen on T1-weighted images in the patient group, 21 of 22 patients had pathologically increased contrast accumulation of the meninges. In conclusion, pathologic changes of the meninges could be demonstrated on plain T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. In selected cases, detection of meningeal disease could be achieved only with Gd-DTPA-enhanced studies

  3. Multiple Sclerosis and autoimmune diseases: clinical cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Protti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS, the most frequent demyelinating disease in adults, is thought to be an autoimmune disease. Symptoms and signs observed in MS reflect lesions present mainly in the white matter of the central nervous system (CNS. The diagnosis remains difficult, at least concerning presenting symptoms, because of their low specificity. Diagnosis criteria are usually based on dissemination of signs in time and space, evoked potentials, findings of magnetic resonance imaging, results of cerebrospinal fluid examination, and the exclusion of other diagnosis possibly explaining the clinical signs. However, no clinical and paraclinical investigation can distinguish with certainity MS from other conditions such as autoimmune or inflammatory diseases predominantly affecting the central nervous system. These other disorders include systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, Behcet disease, Sjogren syndrome, sarcoidosis and vasculitides. We present four clinical cases showing the difficulty in reaching a proper diagnosis...

  4. Cine MR imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Itoh, Akira; Miyatake, Kunio

    1989-01-01

    Cine MR Imaging was carried out using FLASH (fast low angle shot) which employes TE of 16 msec and TR of 30/similar to/40 msec. Regurgitant jet was visible as discrete area of low signal intensity extending from the incompetent valve into the respective cardiac chamber. In 20 patients with mitral regurgitation, the correlation of the length and area of mitral jet by cine MR and color doppler mapping was 0.74 and 0.71, respectively. Cine MR imaging is a promising modality for detection and quantification of valvular heart disease.

  5. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John

    2014-01-01

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses

  6. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  7. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    2001-01-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  8. Adaptive optics imaging of inherited retinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michalis; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Patterson, Emily J; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-11-15

    Adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscopy allows for non-invasive retinal phenotyping on a microscopic scale, thereby helping to improve our understanding of retinal diseases. An increasing number of natural history studies and ongoing/planned interventional clinical trials exploit AO ophthalmoscopy both for participant selection, stratification and monitoring treatment safety and efficacy. In this review, we briefly discuss the evolution of AO ophthalmoscopy, recent developments and its application to a broad range of inherited retinal diseases, including Stargardt disease, retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia. Finally, we describe the impact of this in vivo microscopic imaging on our understanding of disease pathogenesis, clinical trial design and outcome metrics, while recognising the limitation of the small cohorts reported to date. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersting-Sommerhoff, B.A.; Diethelm, L.; Teitel, D.F.; Sommerhoff, C.P.; Higgins, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Sensitivity and specificity of MR imaging for the evaluation of congenital heart disease was assessed in 51 patients (31 male and 20 female, aged 3-69 years), with a total of 115 congenital heart lesions. The true diagnosis was established by angiocardiography, catheterization, or surgery. Sensitivity at a specificity level of 90% was determined by means of receiver operating characteristic curves for great vessel relationships (100%), thoracic aorta anomalies (94%), atrial (91%) and ventricular (100%) septal defects, visceroatrial situs (100%), loop (100%), right ventricular outflow obstructions (95%), aortic valve (52%), mitral valve (62%), and tricuspid valve (76%). Spin-echo MR imaging is a reliable method for the noninvasive evaluation of congenital heart disease but is limited in the assessment of some valvular anomalies

  10. Potts disease: Diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pursey, Jacqueline [MRI Department, Gartnavel General Hospitial, 1053 Great Western road, Glasgow G12 0YN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Jacqueline.pursey@ggc.scot.nhs.uk; Stewart, Sharon [School of Health and Social Care, Caledonian University, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The eponymously named Potts disease is a relatively rare form of Tuberculosis (TB) which affects the spine. TB of the spine is one of the earliest diseases known to man and in the 20th century was thought to be a disease which had been defeated by the advent of antitubercular drugs. Over the last two decades there have been several reports which indicate a revival of TB in both the developing and developed world. Factors which may be contributing to this are the spread of the HIV virus, increased immigration and the emergence of drug resistant strains of the TB bacteria. Potts disease has an insidious onset and often the radiographic findings are far advanced when a diagnosis is finally reached. MRI is able to detect changes to the vertebrae in Potts disease earlier than radiographs. This case report outlines the clinical presentation of a young male with Potts disease who was HIV negative, and the important role that MRI plays in diagnosis and therefore in appropriate and timely intervention. The typical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and the radiographic hallmarks of the disease will also be discussed.

  11. Potts disease: Diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursey, Jacqueline; Stewart, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The eponymously named Potts disease is a relatively rare form of Tuberculosis (TB) which affects the spine. TB of the spine is one of the earliest diseases known to man and in the 20th century was thought to be a disease which had been defeated by the advent of antitubercular drugs. Over the last two decades there have been several reports which indicate a revival of TB in both the developing and developed world. Factors which may be contributing to this are the spread of the HIV virus, increased immigration and the emergence of drug resistant strains of the TB bacteria. Potts disease has an insidious onset and often the radiographic findings are far advanced when a diagnosis is finally reached. MRI is able to detect changes to the vertebrae in Potts disease earlier than radiographs. This case report outlines the clinical presentation of a young male with Potts disease who was HIV negative, and the important role that MRI plays in diagnosis and therefore in appropriate and timely intervention. The typical magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and the radiographic hallmarks of the disease will also be discussed.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric neurological disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukiyama, Takashi; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Aihara, Toshinori; Tanaka, Osamu.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize our initial experience with Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric neurological disease. 17 children between the ages of 2 month and 8.5 year have been examined with MRI. All subjects tolerated the MRI procedure well, although sedation was necessary for young children. Result as follows : (1) MRI does not utilize ionising radiation to produce an image. (2) MRI images more clearly demonstrate cerebral gray and white matter than X-ray CT. (3) Compared with X-ray CT, MRI proved to be advantageous in detection and characterization of the pathology, especially when the abnormality was located along the posterior fossa and spinal canal. It is suggested that these nature of MRI makes it the ideal diagnostic method for children. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J.; King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric renal inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.; Schroeder, B.A.; Starshak, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Some form of imaging procedure should be used to document the presence of infection of the upper urinary tract in troublesome cases in children. During the past several years, sonography, nuclear radiology, and computed tomography (CT) have had a significant influence on renal imaging. The purpose of this article is to reevaluate the noninvasive imaging procedures that can be used to diagnose pediatric renal inflammatory disease and to assess the relative value of each modality in the various types of renal infection. The authors will not discuss the radiologic evaluation of the child who has had a previous renal infection, in whom cortical scarring or reflux nephropathy is a possibility; these are different clinical problems and require different diagnostic evaluation

  15. Imaging B lymphocytes in autoimmune inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodice, V.; Lauri, C.; Capriotti, G.; Lagana', B.; Germano, V.; D’Amelio, R.; Picchianti Diamanti, A.

    2014-01-01

    B cells arise from stem cells precursor and develop through a tightly regulated and selective process that lead to the generation of different B cell populations such as transitional, mature, memory and plasma cells. These B cell subsets can be identified using flow cytometry by the expression of specific surface antigens. The growing knowledge of the pivotal role played by B cells in the development and progression of autoimmune diseases combined with the advances in monoclonal antibody technology, led in the last years to the generation of different biological agents targeting B cells. In this context, nuclear medicine can offer the possibility to use a panel of biologic radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of inflammatory diseases. Radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and have an excellent imaging diagnostic potential for the evaluation of disease activity, selection and monitoring of immune therapies. Several molecules have been radiolabelled for the imaging of T lymphocytes whereas, by now, the anti CD20 rituximab is the only biological therapy targeting B cells that demonstrated to be efficiently radiolabelled and used to detect inflammation in autoimmune patients

  16. Imaging diagnosis of bronchial asthma and related diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Fumikazu; Fujimura, Mikihiko; Kimura, Fumiko; Fujimura, Kaori; Hayano, Toshio; Nishii, Noriko; Machida, Haruhiko; Toda, Jo; Saito, Naoko

    2002-01-01

    We describe imaging features of bronchial asthma and related diseases. The practical roles of imaging diagnosis are the evaluation of severity and complications of bronchial asthma and differential diagnosis of diseases showing asthmatic symptoms other than bronchial asthma. (author)

  17. Kimura's disease: imaging patterns on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinathan, Anil; Tan, T.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To define the role of computed tomography (CT) in identifying and classifying the imaging patterns of diagnostic value in Kimura's disease of the head and neck. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken comprising 13 patients with histopathological evidence of Kimura's disease. The patients' clinical and pathological records were reviewed against a detailed analysis of their CT images performed from the base of the skull to the arch of the aorta. Results: Both well-defined, nodular masses, as well as ill-defined plaque-like infiltrative masses were seen in the subcutaneous tissue of the head and neck region. All patients had lesions adjacent to the major salivary glands. The parotid gland was affected in 10 of the 13 cases and the submandibular gland was affected in the rest. Contrast enhancement was variable. More than half of the cases had associated lymphadenopathy. Some of them showed atrophy of the skin and subcutaneous fat overlying the subcutaneous masses. Blood eosinophilia was a consistent feature in all the cases. Conclusion: The patterns of distribution, morphology, and enhancement of the lesions in Kimura's disease that can be demonstrated at CT, enables a confident, non-invasive diagnosis of this condition, in an appropriate clinical context.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of glenohumeral joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Rozing, P.; Doornbos, J.

    1987-01-01

    Through the application of oblique planes and flexible surface coil techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to be of great clinical value in the evaluation of a variety of pathologic conditions affecting the shoulder. In patients with joint effusions, the tendinous portion of the rotator cuff, glenoid labrum, and bicipital tendon can be readily visualized. This capability has particular relevance in patients with inflammatory disease and traumatic conditions. Rotator cuff atrophy and impingement of the coracoacromial arc upon the supraspinatus muscle and tendon can also be demonstrated. MRI is also useful in the evaluation of shoulder instability. (orig.)

  19. Imaging in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Saher B; Dirksen, Asger; Bach, Karen S; Mortensen, Jann

    2007-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is divided into pulmonary emphysema and chronic bronchitis (CB). Emphysema is defined patho-anatomically as "permanent enlargement of airspaces distal to the terminal bronchiole, accompanied by the destruction of their walls, and without obvious fibrosis" (1). These lesions are readily identified and quantitated using computed tomography (CT), whereas the accompanying hyperinflation is best detected on plain chest X-ray, especially in advanced disease. The diagnosis of CB is clinical and relies on the presence of productive cough for 3 months in 2 or more successive years. The pathological changes of mucosal inflammation and bronchial wall thickening have been more difficult to identify with available imaging techniques. However, recent studies using Multi-detector row CT (MDCT) reported more reproducible assessment of air wall thickening.

  20. Imaging of gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases during pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, Philip A

    2012-02-03

    Imaging of the abdomen for suspected gastrointestinal and hepatic disease during pregnancy is assuming greater importance. Like clinical evaluation, imaging of the abdomen and pelvis is challenging but is vitally important to prevent delayed diagnosis or unnecessary interventions. Also choice of imaging modality is influenced by factors which could impact on fetal safety such as the use of ionising radiation and magnetic resonance imaging. This article discusses important issues in imaging of gastrointestinal and hepatic disease in pregnancy and the puerperium.

  1. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Medical image of the week: moyamoya disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 52-year-old, right-handed, Caucasian woman with a history of hypertension and morbid obesity presented with acute onset of word-finding difficulty and slurred speech. Her medical and family history was negative for cerebral vascular event, coronary artery disease or smoking. Computed tomography of the patient's brain showed narrow caliber middle cerebral artery vasculature bilaterally. This abnormal finding prompted further investigation with cerebral angiogram. The angiogram showed bilateral high-grade stenosis of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries, worse on the left (Figure 1. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple left sided punctate infarcts in the frontal and parietal lobes (Figure 2. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke secondary to moyamoya disease was established. This patient was not a candidate for fibrinolytic therapy since it had been more than 4 hours from initial presentation. She was treated with aspirin, clopidogrel, and atorvastatin for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Two months after her discharge date, the patient …

  3. MR imaging of white-matter diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Yuh, W.T.C.; Mathews, K.; Wiese, J.; Kao, S.; Schreiber, A.; Farner, R.; Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has become a valuable tool in the investigation of central nervous system abnormalities in children. This exhibit displays the MR imaging patterns in 30 children with diseases involving the white matter. Clinical, CT, and pathologic findings will be presented for comparison. The white matter disease entities studies include acquired white matter diseases, metabolic diseases, and phycomatoses. Specific examples include acute dissemination encephalomyelitis, anoxic encephalopathy, disseminated necrotizing leukoencephalopathy, demyelinating adrenoleukodystrophy, Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Tay-Sachs disease, Gaucher disease, neurofibromatosis, and Sturge-Weber syndrome

  4. Polarimetric imaging of retinal disease by polarization sensitive SLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Masahiro; Elsner, Ann E.; Iwasaki, Takuya; Goto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Polarimetry imaging is used to evaluate different features of the macular disease. Polarimetry images were recorded using a commercially- available polarization-sensitive scanning laser opthalmoscope at 780 nm (PS-SLO, GDx-N). From data sets of PS-SLO, we computed average reflectance image, depolarized light images, and ratio-depolarized light images. The average reflectance image is the grand mean of all input polarization states. The depolarized light image is the minimum of crossed channel. The ratio-depolarized light image is a ratio between the average reflectance image and depolarized light image, and was used to compensate for variation of brightness. Each polarimetry image is compared with the autofluorescence image at 800 nm (NIR-AF) and autofluorescence image at 500 nm (SW-AF). We evaluated four eyes with geographic atrophy in age related macular degeneration, one eye with retinal pigment epithelium hyperplasia, and two eyes with chronic central serous chorioretinopathy. Polarization analysis could selectively emphasize different features of the retina. Findings in ratio depolarized light image had similarities and differences with NIR-AF images. Area of hyper-AF in NIR-AF images showed high intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light image, representing melanin accumulation. Areas of hypo-AF in NIR-AF images showed low intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light images, representing melanin loss. Drusen were high-intensity areas in the ratio depolarized light image, but NIR-AF images was insensitive to the presence of drusen. Unlike NIR-AF images, SW-AF images showed completely different features from the ratio depolarized images. Polarization sensitive imaging is an effective tool as a non-invasive assessment of macular disease.

  5. Diffusion weighted imaging in cystic fibrosis disease: beyond morphological imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands); Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Andrinopoulou, Eleni Rosalina [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [Ca' Foncello - General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Colagrande, Stefano [University of Florence - Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Radiodiagnostic Unit n. 2, Florence (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, P.O. Box 2060, Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To explore the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess inflammatory lung changes in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) CF patients referred for their annual check-up had spirometry, chest-CT and MRI on the same day. MRI was performed in a 1.5 T scanner with BLADE and EPI-DWI sequences (b = 0-600 s/mm{sup 2}). End-inspiratory and end-expiratory scans were acquired in multi-row scanners. DWI was scored with an established semi-quantitative scoring system. DWI score was correlated to CT sub-scores for bronchiectasis (CF-CT{sub BE}), mucus (CF-CT{sub mucus}), total score (CF-CT{sub total-score}), FEV{sub 1}, and BMI. T-test was used to assess differences between patients with and without DWI-hotspots. Thirty-three CF patients were enrolled (mean 21 years, range 6-51, 19 female). 4 % (SD 2.6, range 1.5-12.9) of total CF-CT alterations presented DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots coincided with mucus plugging (60 %), consolidation (30 %) and bronchiectasis (10 %). DWI{sub total-score} correlated (all p < 0.0001) positively to CF-CT{sub BE} (r = 0.757), CF-CT{sub mucus} (r = 0.759) and CF-CT{sub total-score} (r = 0.79); and negatively to FEV{sub 1} (r = 0.688). FEV{sub 1} was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients without DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots strongly correlated with radiological and clinical parameters of lung disease severity. Future validation studies are needed to establish the exact nature of DWI-hotspots in CF patients. (orig.)

  6. Diffusion weighted imaging in cystic fibrosis disease: beyond morphological imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo; Andrinopoulou, Eleni Rosalina; Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni; Ros, Mirco; Colagrande, Stefano; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to assess inflammatory lung changes in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) CF patients referred for their annual check-up had spirometry, chest-CT and MRI on the same day. MRI was performed in a 1.5 T scanner with BLADE and EPI-DWI sequences (b = 0-600 s/mm 2 ). End-inspiratory and end-expiratory scans were acquired in multi-row scanners. DWI was scored with an established semi-quantitative scoring system. DWI score was correlated to CT sub-scores for bronchiectasis (CF-CT BE ), mucus (CF-CT mucus ), total score (CF-CT total-score ), FEV 1 , and BMI. T-test was used to assess differences between patients with and without DWI-hotspots. Thirty-three CF patients were enrolled (mean 21 years, range 6-51, 19 female). 4 % (SD 2.6, range 1.5-12.9) of total CF-CT alterations presented DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots coincided with mucus plugging (60 %), consolidation (30 %) and bronchiectasis (10 %). DWI total-score correlated (all p < 0.0001) positively to CF-CT BE (r = 0.757), CF-CT mucus (r = 0.759) and CF-CT total-score (r = 0.79); and negatively to FEV 1 (r = 0.688). FEV 1 was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) in patients without DWI-hotspots. DWI-hotspots strongly correlated with radiological and clinical parameters of lung disease severity. Future validation studies are needed to establish the exact nature of DWI-hotspots in CF patients. (orig.)

  7. Neuro-Behcet's syndrome with contrast enhancement on brain computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Tobimatsu, Shozo; Itoyama, Yasuto; Goto, Ikuo; Kuroiwa, Yoshigoro

    1986-01-01

    Two cases of neuro-Behcet's syndrome (N-B) with contrast enhancement (enhancement) on brain computed tomography (CT) are reported. Case 1. A 34-year-old man, who had a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, developed a left inferior homonymous quadrantanopsia. CT scans showed a large lucent area with a ring-like enhancement (3 cm in diameter) lesion in the right parietooccipital region. When he developed a left hemiplegia, CT scans showed a irregular lucent area with heterogenous enhancement lesions in the right basal ganglia and midbrain. Case 2. A 38-year-old woman, who had a history of recurrent aphthous stomatitis and genital ulcer, developed mental confusion. CT scans showed a large lucent area with a homogenous marked round enhancement lesion in the left basal ganglia. When she developed generalized convulsion, CT scans showed a large lucent area with a heterogenous irregular enhancement lesion in the right occipital lobe. Enhancement lesions were observed in the area corresponded to their neurological symptoms during acute exacerbations and disappeared within three months. Our cases suggest that N-B with acute exacerbations could show transient enhancement on CT. (author)

  8. MRI findings of the brainstem of the neuro-Behcet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiki, Naoto; Tashiro, Kunio; Yamada, Takayoshi; Ito, Kazunori; Honma, Sanae; Doi, Shizuki; Moriwaka, Fumio

    1987-10-01

    We reported three cases of neuro-Behcet's syndrome which showed brainstem lesions on MRI compatible with the clinical symptoms. In Case 1, MRI showed a large, abnormal signal-intensity area in the pons and small, abnormal signal-intensity areas at the right cerebral peduncle, the bilateral basal ganglia, and the left thalamus. These lesions disappeared on MRI, in accordance with the remission of clinical symptoms. On the other hand, CT showed no positive findings. In Case 2, an abnormal signal-intensity area was disclosed at the left cerebral peduncle on MRI. This lesion was also identified on the CT scan. In Case 3, an abnormal signal-intensity area was present in the pons on MRI. In this case, CT showed no positive findings. In Cases 2 and 3, these lesions seemed to represent inflammatory or necrotic areas attributable to vasculitis;however, the extensive brainstem lesion seen on the MRI of Case 1 was a quite unique finding, for which no exact pathophysiological explanation is possible at the present time.

  9. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, Diane S.

    2006-01-01

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  10. Serial MR imaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Hata, H.; Ohno, M. (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan). Dept. of Radiology); Yoshinaga, M.; Shiokawa, O. (Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan). Stroke Care Unit)

    1991-08-01

    Serial magnetic resonance (MR) imagings of two autopsied patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) are presented. Both patients showed a dramatic progression of brain atrophy. The initial MR imagings were, however, interpreted as normal except for localized mild cortical atrophy in one patient. When a normal MR image is obtained in a demented middle-aged or aged patient, CJD may still need to be ruled out: follow up MR imaging may be useful. (orig.).

  11. Serial MR imaging in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, A.; Hata, H.; Ohno, M.; Yoshinaga, M.; Shiokawa, O.

    1991-01-01

    Serial magnetic resonance (MR) imagings of two autopsied patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) are presented. Both patients showed a dramatic progression of brain atrophy. The initial MR imagings were, however, interpreted as normal except for localized mild cortical atrophy in one patient. When a normal MR image is obtained in a demented middle-aged or aged patient, CJD may still need to be ruled out: follow up MR imaging may be useful. (orig.)

  12. Cine MR imaging of valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Firmin, D.N.; Mohiaddin, R.H.; Klipstein, R.H.; Bogren, H.G.; Rees, R.S.O.; Longmore, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Cine MR imaging shows details of cardiac valve motion and the turbulence caused by regurgitation and stenosis. In 30 patients, the area of turbulence proximal to regurgitant valves correlated well with the regurgitant fraction measured from right and left ventricular stroke volumes. Turbulence distal to stenotic valves did not correlate with the pressure gradient because abnormal valves that were not stenosed produced turbulence. Valve motion and the presence of thrombus were easier to assess than in conventional images. Cine MR imaging provides an important addition to conventional imaging in valvular regurgitation, but pressure gradients cannot be assessed in valvular stenosis

  13. ECG gated magnetic resonance imaging in cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Im, Chung Kie; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan

    1985-01-01

    Using KAIS 0.15 Tesla resistive magnetic imaging system, ECG gated magnetic resonance (MR) image of various cardiovascular disease was obtained in 10 patients. The findings of MR image of the cardiovascular disease were analysed and the results were as follows: 1. In 6 cases of acquired and congenital cardiac diseases, there were 2 cases of myocardial infarction, 1 case of mitral stenosis and 3 cases of corrected transportation of great vessels. The others were 3 cases of aortic disease and 1 case of pericardial effusion with lymphoma. 2. Myocardial thinning and left ventricular aneurysm were detected in MR images of myocardial infarction. The left atrium was well delineated and enlarged in the case of mitral stenosis. And segmental analysis was possible in the cases of corrected transposition since all cardiac structures were well delineated anatomically. 3. In aortic diseases, the findings of MR image were enlarged lumen, compressed cardiac chambers in ascending aortic aneurysm, intimal flap, enhanced false lumen in dissecting aneurysm and irregular narrowing of aorta with arterial obstruction in Takayasu's arteritis. 4. Pericardial effusion revealed a conspicuous contrast with neighboring mediastinal fat and cardiac wall due to it low signal encircling cardiac wall. 5. ECG gated MR image is an accurate non-invasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease and better results of its clinical application are expected in the future with further development in the imaging system and more clinical experiences

  14. Imaging of lumbar degenerative disk disease: history and current state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emch, Todd M.; Modic, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most common indications for performing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the lumbar spine is the symptom complex thought to originate as a result of degenerative disk disease. MR imaging, which has emerged as perhaps the modality of choice for imaging degenerative disk disease, can readily demonstrate disk pathology, degenerative endplate changes, facet and ligamentous hypertrophic changes, and the sequelae of instability. Its role in terms of predicting natural history of low back pain, identifying causality, or offering prognostic information is unclear. As available modalities for imaging the spine have progressed from radiography, myelography, and computed tomography to MR imaging, there have also been advances in spine surgery for degenerative disk disease. These advances are described in a temporal context for historical purposes with a focus on MR imaging's history and current state. (orig.)

  15. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, A.T. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Altinok, T. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Topcu, S. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey); Kosar, U. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  16. Imaging Spectrum of Hydatid Disease: Usual and Unusual Locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, Maskal Revanna; Deepashri, Basavalingu; Lakshmeesha, Mogenahalli Thimmaiah

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a parasitic infection caused by Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis. It is common in endemic regions and can demonstrate a variety of imaging features that differ according to the affected organ and the stage of the disease. Liver and lungs are the most commonly affected organs. The classic features of hepatic hydatid disease are well known. However, diagnosing hydatid disease at unusual locations may be challenging because of myriad imaging features in each of these locations. Knowledge of the imaging spectrum in systemic hydatidoses in various organs is very valuable in improving the accuracy of radiological interpretation. The purpose of this article is to review the imaging features of hydatid disease at its varied locations

  17. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, A.T.; Altinok, T.; Topcu, S.; Kosar, U.

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  18. Significance of MR imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, H.; Globits, S.; Frank, H.; Glogar, D.; Nouhold, A.; Imhof, H.

    1989-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic impact of MR imaging in congenital heart disease, the authors used a 0.5- or 1.5-T magnet to examine 85 patients. Multisection spin-echo images were obtained in three planes. Diagnoses included atrial septal defect, trilogy and tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular septal defect, transposition (seven), single ventricle, and other complex disorders. Compared with other noninvasive techniques, MR imaging allowed a much better visualization of anatomic structures and the relationship of great vessels to shunt lesions in complex congenital heart disease. In 53 (63%) of 85 patients, MR imaging made a major contribution to establishing or modifying diagnoses

  19. PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiachuan; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University, Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); Tian, Mei [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Human neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis are caused by loss of different types of neurons and glial cells in the brain and spinal cord. At present, there are no effective therapies against these disorders. Discovery of the therapeutic potential of stem cells offers new strategies for the treatment of neurological diseases. Direct assessment of stem cells' survival, interaction with the host and impact on neuronal functions after transplantation requires advanced in vivo imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a potential molecular imaging modality to evaluate the viability and function of transplanted tissue or stem cells in the nervous system. This review focuses on PET molecular imaging in stem cell therapy for neurological diseases. (orig.)

  20. Imaging findings in systemic childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Adam Z; Gittler, Julia K; Nakrani, Radhika N; Alis, Jonathan; Blumfield, Einat; Levin, Terry L

    Many childhood diseases often present with skin abnormalities with which radiologists are largely unfamiliar. Knowledge of associated dermatologic manifestations may aid the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and recommending targeted imaging of affected organs. We review the imaging findings in childhood diseases associated with dermatologic manifestations. Diseases include dermatologic findings which herald underlying malignancy (Neuroblastoma, leukemia/lymphoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis),are associated with risk of malignancy (Epidermolysis Bullosa, basal cell nevus syndrome, Cowden's syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis),or indicate a systemic inflammatory/immune disorder (Kawasaki's disease, Henoch Schonlein Purpura, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, sarcoidosis, dermatomyositis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura). Familiarity with pertinent findings in childhood diseases presenting with dermatologic manifestations in childhood diseases aids the radiologist in confirming the diagnosis and guiding imaging workup. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Image diagnostic of colonic diseases - controversial questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomakov, P.; Rizov, A.; Stancheva, I.

    2013-01-01

    In the system of colonic diseases' diagnostic algorithm, fibrocolonoscopy (FCS) is defined as 'Golden Standard'. By this reason some X-ray diagnostic methods - irrigography, etc. are currently not being used in a number of health institutions. The aim of this study is a comparative analysis of FCS and irrigography diagnostic efficacy in various colonic diseases. For 10-years period, in cooperation with a gastroenterologist-gastroscopist, 2151 patients with various colonic diseases were evaluated by FCS and irrigography with pharmaco-diagnostics/when necessary. Advantage of FCS was established in diagnosing diseases with patho-morfologic changes on the inner surface of the colon - benign and malignant neoplastic processes, chronic inflammatory diseases, etc. At the same time functional changes - irritated colon syndrome, changes in defecation act, etc., are not an object of diagnosis through FCS. Correction in colonic diseases diagnostic algorithm is necessary. FCS should be mandatory. If result is negative - irrigography with pharmaco-diagnostics should be done. (authors)

  2. CT and MR imaging of gynecological emergency disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Shinya; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Tahara, Takatoshi; Matsusue, Eiji; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2004-01-01

    We describe the CT and MRI findings of gynecologic emergency diseases: pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, ovarian hemorrhage, ovarian torsion, rupture of ovarian tumor, eclampsia, and HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count) syndrome. Diagnostic keys to these diseases are presented in this review. CT and MRI play a complementary role to sonography in accurately diagnosing these diseases. In situations that require an exact, immediate diagnosis, radiologists should be familiar with the key imaging findings. (author)

  3. Multifunctional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grond, J. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last few years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a multipurpose imaging technique. In addition to anatomical information, data can be obtained on perfusion, metabolism and imaging of the vascular anatomy. Especially in the field of neuroradiology the possibilities for obtaining multifunctional information from combined MR examinations are promising. In particular, stroke or stroke-related research benefits from these developments. This article reviews the current status and the potential of newly developed MR techniques with regard to the intracranial hemodynamic changes in patients with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. The combination of MR angiography, perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging seems especially useful in the management of the individual patient. (orig.)

  4. Multifunctional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grond, J. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Utrecht, P. O. Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1998-06-02

    Over the last few years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed into a multipurpose imaging technique. In addition to anatomical information, data can be obtained on perfusion, metabolism and imaging of the vascular anatomy. Especially in the field of neuroradiology the possibilities for obtaining multifunctional information from combined MR examinations are promising. In particular, stroke or stroke-related research benefits from these developments. This article reviews the current status and the potential of newly developed MR techniques with regard to the intracranial hemodynamic changes in patients with severe stenosis or occlusion of the internal carotid artery. The combination of MR angiography, perfusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging seems especially useful in the management of the individual patient. (orig.) With 4 figs., 176 refs.

  5. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, France; Cognet, Francois; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krause, Denis [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Dijon Le Bocage University Hospital, 2 Blvd. Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, BP 1542, 21034 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases. (orig.)

  6. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being promoted through the use of

  7. Advances in imaging to allow personalized medicine in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, Markus F

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease is a destructive inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin that may lead to various complications such as strictures, stenosis, fistulas and colitis-associated neoplasias. However, the course of the disease varies substantially among patients and disease behaviour may also change with time. At diagnosis behaviour is inflammatory in the majority of patients, while penetrating or structuring behaviour become more prominent at later time points. Thus, medication in Crohn's disease needs frequent optimization over time. Therefore, new strategies for prediction of response to therapy are urgently needed. Here, recent advantages in imaging techniques for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease are reviewed. Such advantages include ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and new endoscopic approaches such as molecular endoscopy. It is expected that these novel techniques will lead to marked improvements in the assessment of disease behaviour and the prediction of response to clinical therapy with biologicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comprehensive MR imaging of acute gynecologic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohke, M; Watanabe, Y; Okumura, A; Amoh, Y; Hayashi, T; Yoshizako, T; Yasui, M; Nakashita, S; Nakanishi, J; Dodo, Y

    2000-01-01

    Rapid advances in techniques of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have enabled diagnosis of acute gynecologic conditions, which are characterized by sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, fever, genital bleeding, intraperitoneal bleeding, or symptoms of shock. The chemical-selective fat-suppression technique not only helps establish the characteristics of lesions that contain fat components but also increases the conspicuity of inflammatory lesions. When a T2-weighted image is obtained with a very long effective echo time (>250 msec), even a small amount of ascites can be easily identified and the contrast between urine and complex fluid becomes more conspicuous. T2*-weighted images are useful for identification of hemorrhagic lesions by demonstrating deoxyhemoglobin and hemosiderin. Contrast material-enhanced dynamic subtraction MR imaging performed with a three-dimensional fast field-echo sequence and a rapid bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine allows evaluation of lesion vascularity and the anatomic relationship between pelvic vessels and a lesion and allows identification of the bleeding point by demonstrating extravasation of contrast material. To optimize the MR imaging examination, attention should be given to the parameters of each pulse sequence and proper combination of the sequences.

  9. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance in hematological diseases. Imaging of bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive alternative to plain radiography, CT, and radionuclide studies for the imaging of normal and abnormal bone marrow. The cellularity and the corresponding fat/water ratio within the bone marrow show clear changes in haematological diseases. Thi...

  11. Using hyperspectral imaging technology to identify diseased tomato leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cuiling; Wang, Xiu; Zhao, Xueguan; Meng, Zhijun; Zou, Wei

    2016-11-01

    In the process of tomato plants growth, due to the effect of plants genetic factors, poor environment factors, or disoperation of parasites, there will generate a series of unusual symptoms on tomato plants from physiology, organization structure and external form, as a result, they cannot grow normally, and further to influence the tomato yield and economic benefits. Hyperspectral image usually has high spectral resolution, not only contains spectral information, but also contains the image information, so this study adopted hyperspectral imaging technology to identify diseased tomato leaves, and developed a simple hyperspectral imaging system, including a halogen lamp light source unit, a hyperspectral image acquisition unit and a data processing unit. Spectrometer detection wavelength ranged from 400nm to 1000nm. After hyperspectral images of tomato leaves being captured, it was needed to calibrate hyperspectral images. This research used spectrum angle matching method and spectral red edge parameters discriminant method respectively to identify diseased tomato leaves. Using spectral red edge parameters discriminant method produced higher recognition accuracy, the accuracy was higher than 90%. Research results have shown that using hyperspectral imaging technology to identify diseased tomato leaves is feasible, and provides the discriminant basis for subsequent disease control of tomato plants.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of iron storage diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hideo; Mano, Isamu; Asai, Sae; Yashiro, Naofumi; Itai, Yuji; Iio, Masahiro.

    1985-01-01

    We presented MRI findings of four patients of iron storage diseases with hemochromatosis and hemosiderosis. We examined detectavility of iron deposits with in vitro MR and X-CT observations of ferric (Fe 3+ ) solutions. Conculusion are as follows, 1) In detection of small amount of iron deposits, MRI is much better than X-CT. 2) MRI is a unique technique to detect iron deposits in bone marrow. 3) Early estimation of iron storage diseases will be promising using MRI technique. (author)

  13. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-08-09

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, advances in magnetic resonance enable the separation of patients with Parkinson's disease from healthy controls, and show great promise for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and other akinetic-rigid syndromes. Radionuclide imaging is useful to show the dopaminergic basis for both motor and behavioural complications of Parkinson's disease and its treatment, and alterations in non-dopaminergic systems. Both PET and MRI can be used to study patterns of functional connectivity in the brain, which is disrupted in Parkinson's disease and in association with its complications, and in other basal-ganglia disorders such as dystonia, in which an anatomical substrate is not otherwise apparent. Functional imaging is increasingly used to assess underlying pathological processes such as neuroinflammation and abnormal protein deposition. This imaging is another promising approach to assess the effects of treatments designed to slow disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Severe neuro-Behcet’s disease treated with a combination of immunosuppressives and a TNF-inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Nur Korkmaz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract/ Resumo Behcet's disease (BD is a multisystem inflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, skin lesions and uveitis. The nervous system involvement of BD, neuro-Behcet's disease (NBD, is one of the important causes of mortality of the disease. Herein, we present a 29-year-old male with parenchymal NBD who has progressed rapidly and was managed with an uncommon aggressive immunosuppresive combination therapy. The patient first presented six years ago with vertigo and difficulty in talking and walking. On examination, he had oral ulcers, acneiform lesions on the torso, genital ulcer scar, dysartria, and ataxia. Along with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings, the patient was diagnosed as NBD. After pulse methylprednisolone (1g/day, 3 days and 8 courses of 1g/month iv cylophosphamide therapy, he was put on azathioprine and oral methlyprednisolone. On the 4th year of the maintenance therapy, he was admitted with NBD relapse which was treated with 3 days of iv 1g pulse methlyprednisolone. One year after the last relapse, the patient voluntarily stopped medications and presented with global aphasia, right hemihypoesthesia and quadriparesis. MRI findings were suggestive of NBD relapse. After exclusion of infection, pulse methylprednisolone was started but no improvement was observed. Considering the severity of the NBD, the patient was put on methylprednisolone (1mg/kg/day, iv cylophosphamide (1g and adalimumab 40 mg/14 days subcutaneously with appropriate tuberculosis prophylaxis. Neurological examination and MRI findings after 4 weeks showed dramatic improvement however patient developed pulmonary tuberculosis. Methylprednisolone dose was decreased (0.5mg/kg/day and quadruple antituberculosis therapy was started. Patient was discharged with 5/5 muscle strength in extremities without any respiratory symptoms 2 months after first presentation. Prompt introduction of immunosuppressive therapy is crucial in

  15. Imaging Parkinson's disease below the neck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Knudsen, Karoline; Fedorova, Tatyana D

    2017-01-01

    )F-dopamine, and (11)C-donepezil. Other radiotracer and radiological imaging methods have shown highly prevalent dysfunction of pharyngeal and esophageal motility, gastric emptying, colonic transit time, and anorectal function. Here, we summarize the methodology and main findings of radio...

  16. Imaging malignant and apparent malignant transformation of benign gynaecological disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.Y.; Poder, L.; Qayyum, A.; Wang, Z.J.; Yeh, B.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Coakley, F.V., E-mail: Fergus.Coakley@radiology.ucsf.ed [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Common benign gynaecological diseases, such as leiomyoma, adenomyosis, endometriosis, and mature teratoma, rarely undergo malignant transformation. Benign transformations that may mimic malignancy include benign metastasizing leiomyoma, massive ovarian oedema, decidualization of endometrioma, and rupture of mature teratoma. The aim of this review is to provide a contemporary overview of imaging findings in malignant and apparent malignant transformation of benign gynaecological disease.

  17. Olfactory and imaging features in atypical Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihong Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cognition and speech disorders are the most common symptoms of dementia in neurodegenerative disease. Here, we present a detailed clinical evaluation of a case of logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (lv-PPA, an atypical form of Alzheimer disease (AD, including cognitive testing over time, brain imaging, electrophysiology, and tests of olfactory function.

  18. MR imaging of von Hippel-Lindau disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.; Waziri, M.H.; Smith, W.L.; Frey, E.E.; Franken, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Sixteen patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VH-L) and 11 asymptomatic family members underwent a total of 29 central nervous system (CNS) and 23 body MR imaging evaluations during a 2-year study period. Nineteen CNS and spinal lesions and nine abdominal visceral lesions were identified on MR imaging and were confirmed at surgery or by other imaging modalities. MR imaging is superior to CT in the evaluation of intraocular vitreous abnormalities and cerebellar and spinal hemangioblastomas because of superior tissue characterization and lack of bone artifacts. MR imaging adequately demonstrated the abdominal visceral lesions. MR imaging is a sensitive and reliable imaging modality for the various lesions of VH-L

  19. Imaging of cystic fibrosis lung disease and clinical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielpuetz, M.O.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Biederer, J. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Gross-Gerau Community Hospital (Germany). Radiologie Darmstadt; Wege, S. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology and Respiratory Medicine; Stahl, M.; Sommerburg, O. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Mall, M.A. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Translational Pulmonology; Puderbach, M. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Hufeland Hospital, Bad Langensalza (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-09-15

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable.

  20. Thyroid disease in the pediatric patient: emphasizing imaging with sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, Diane S. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Thyroid disease does occur in the pediatric patient, and imaging plays an important role in its evaluation. A review is presented of normal development of the thyroid gland, the technique and indications for thyroid sonography, and key imaging features of congenital thyroid disorders (ectopic or absent thyroid, infantile goiter, thyroglossal duct remnants), benign thyroid masses (follicular adenoma, degenerative nodules, colloid and thyroid cysts), malignant masses (follicular, papillary and medullary carcinoma) and diffuse thyroid disease (acute bacterial thyroiditis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Grave's disease). (orig.)

  1. Enhancement and denoising of mammographic images for breast disease detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Hematian, A.; Yousefi, M.

    2012-01-01

    In these two decades breast cancer is one of the leading cause of death among women. In breast cancer research, Mammographic Image is being assessed as a potential tool for detecting breast disease and investigating response to chemotherapy. In first stage of breast disease discovery, the density measurement of the breast in mammographic images provides very useful information. Because of the importance of the role of mammographic images the need for accurate and robust automated image enhancement techniques is becoming clear. Mammographic images have some disadvantages such as, the high dependence of contrast upon the way the image is acquired, weak distinction in splitting cyst from tumor, intensity non uniformity, the existence of noise, etc. These limitations make problem to detect the typical signs such as masses and microcalcifications. For this reason, denoising and enhancing the quality of mammographic images is very important. The method which is used in this paper is in spatial domain which its input includes high, intermediate and even very low contrast mammographic images based on specialist physician's view, while its output is processed images that show the input images with higher quality, more contrast and more details. In this research, 38 mammographic images have been used. The result of purposed method shows details of abnormal zones and the areas with defects so that specialist could explore these zones more accurately and it could be deemed as an index for cancer diagnosis. In this study, mammographic images are initially converted into digital images and then to increase spatial resolution power, their noise is reduced and consequently their contrast is improved. The results demonstrate effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed methods. (authors)

  2. CT imaging spectrum of infiltrative renal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, David H; De Alba, Luis; Migliaro, Matias; Previgliano, Carlos H; Sangster, Guillermo P

    2017-11-01

    Most renal lesions replace the renal parenchyma as a focal space-occupying mass with borders distinguishing the mass from normal parenchyma. However, some renal lesions exhibit interstitial infiltration-a process that permeates the renal parenchyma by using the normal renal architecture for growth. These infiltrative lesions frequently show nonspecific patterns that lead to little or no contour deformity and have ill-defined borders on CT, making detection and diagnosis challenging. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe the CT imaging findings of various conditions that may manifest as infiltrative renal lesions.

  3. Identification of Alfalfa Leaf Diseases Using Image Recognition Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qin

    Full Text Available Common leaf spot (caused by Pseudopeziza medicaginis, rust (caused by Uromyces striatus, Leptosphaerulina leaf spot (caused by Leptosphaerulina briosiana and Cercospora leaf spot (caused by Cercospora medicaginis are the four common types of alfalfa leaf diseases. Timely and accurate diagnoses of these diseases are critical for disease management, alfalfa quality control and the healthy development of the alfalfa industry. In this study, the identification and diagnosis of the four types of alfalfa leaf diseases were investigated using pattern recognition algorithms based on image-processing technology. A sub-image with one or multiple typical lesions was obtained by artificial cutting from each acquired digital disease image. Then the sub-images were segmented using twelve lesion segmentation methods integrated with clustering algorithms (including K_means clustering, fuzzy C-means clustering and K_median clustering and supervised classification algorithms (including logistic regression analysis, Naive Bayes algorithm, classification and regression tree, and linear discriminant analysis. After a comprehensive comparison, the segmentation method integrating the K_median clustering algorithm and linear discriminant analysis was chosen to obtain lesion images. After the lesion segmentation using this method, a total of 129 texture, color and shape features were extracted from the lesion images. Based on the features selected using three methods (ReliefF, 1R and correlation-based feature selection, disease recognition models were built using three supervised learning methods, including the random forest, support vector machine (SVM and K-nearest neighbor methods. A comparison of the recognition results of the models was conducted. The results showed that when the ReliefF method was used for feature selection, the SVM model built with the most important 45 features (selected from a total of 129 features was the optimal model. For this SVM model, the

  4. Identification of Alfalfa Leaf Diseases Using Image Recognition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Feng; Liu, Dongxia; Sun, Bingda; Ruan, Liu; Ma, Zhanhong; Wang, Haiguang

    2016-01-01

    Common leaf spot (caused by Pseudopeziza medicaginis), rust (caused by Uromyces striatus), Leptosphaerulina leaf spot (caused by Leptosphaerulina briosiana) and Cercospora leaf spot (caused by Cercospora medicaginis) are the four common types of alfalfa leaf diseases. Timely and accurate diagnoses of these diseases are critical for disease management, alfalfa quality control and the healthy development of the alfalfa industry. In this study, the identification and diagnosis of the four types of alfalfa leaf diseases were investigated using pattern recognition algorithms based on image-processing technology. A sub-image with one or multiple typical lesions was obtained by artificial cutting from each acquired digital disease image. Then the sub-images were segmented using twelve lesion segmentation methods integrated with clustering algorithms (including K_means clustering, fuzzy C-means clustering and K_median clustering) and supervised classification algorithms (including logistic regression analysis, Naive Bayes algorithm, classification and regression tree, and linear discriminant analysis). After a comprehensive comparison, the segmentation method integrating the K_median clustering algorithm and linear discriminant analysis was chosen to obtain lesion images. After the lesion segmentation using this method, a total of 129 texture, color and shape features were extracted from the lesion images. Based on the features selected using three methods (ReliefF, 1R and correlation-based feature selection), disease recognition models were built using three supervised learning methods, including the random forest, support vector machine (SVM) and K-nearest neighbor methods. A comparison of the recognition results of the models was conducted. The results showed that when the ReliefF method was used for feature selection, the SVM model built with the most important 45 features (selected from a total of 129 features) was the optimal model. For this SVM model, the

  5. Veno-occlusive disease of the colon - CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rademaker, J.

    1998-01-01

    Venous occlusion is a rare cause of ischemic bowel disease and is usually brought about by thrombosis that may occur as a complication of systemic disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus, Behcet disease or Churg-Strauss syndrome. This report describes a patient with veno-occlusive disease of the colon caused by lymphocytic phlebitis. Typical CT findings included homogeneous bowel wall thickening and vascular engorgement. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. Veno-occlusive disease of the colon - CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rademaker, J [Department of Radiology I, Medical School Hannover (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    Venous occlusion is a rare cause of ischemic bowel disease and is usually brought about by thrombosis that may occur as a complication of systemic disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus, Behcet disease or Churg-Strauss syndrome. This report describes a patient with veno-occlusive disease of the colon caused by lymphocytic phlebitis. Typical CT findings included homogeneous bowel wall thickening and vascular engorgement. (orig.) (orig.) With 1 fig., 4 refs.

  7. Hyperspectral imaging system for disease scanning on banana plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Daniel; Cevallos, Juan; Vargas, German; Criollo, Ronald; Romero, Dennis; Castro, Rodrigo; Bayona, Oswaldo

    2016-05-01

    Black Sigatoka (BS) is a banana plant disease caused by the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis. BS symptoms can be observed at late infection stages. By that time, BS has probably spread to other plants. In this paper, we present our current work on building an hyper-spectral (HS) imaging system aimed at in-vivo detection of BS pre-symptomatic responses in banana leaves. The proposed imaging system comprises a motorized stage, a high-sensitivity VIS-NIR camera and an optical spectrograph. To capture images of the banana leaf, the stage's speed and camera's frame rate must be computed to reduce motion blur and to obtain the same resolution along both spatial dimensions of the resulting HS cube. Our continuous leaf scanning approach allows imaging leaves of arbitrary length with minimum frame loss. Once the images are captured, a denoising step is performed to improve HS image quality and spectral profile extraction.

  8. Utility of magnetic resonance imaging in anorectal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Loren Berman; Gary M Israel; Shirley M McCarthy; Jeffrey C Weinreb; Walter E Longo

    2007-01-01

    Imaging of both benign and malignant anorectal diseases has traditionally posed a challenge to clinicians, and as a result history and physical exam have been relied on heavily. CT scanning and endorectal ultrasound have become popular in assessment of anatomy and staging of tumors, but have limitations. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) has the capability to fill in the gaps left open by more conventional imaging modalities and continues to be promising as the definitive imaging technique in the pelvis, especially with advancement of emerging technologies in this field. A comprehensive review of this topic has been undertaken. Anorectal disease is divided into three broad categories: cancer, fistula/abscess,and pelvic floor disorders. A review of the literature is performed to evaluate the use of MRI and other imaging modalities in these three areas. Preoperative imaging is useful in the evaluation of all three areas of anorectal disease. MRI is an effective tool in delineating anatomy and, when correlating with the specific clinical scenario,is an effective adjunct in clinical decision-making in order to optimize outcome. MRI continues to be a promising and novel approach to imaging various afflictions of the anorectum and the pelvic floor. Its role is more wellestablished in some areas than in others, and there are still significant limitations. As technology advances, MRI will shed more light on a complex anatomical area.

  9. Update on radionuclide imaging in hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthall, L.

    1981-01-01

    The recent introduction of technetium Tc 99m-labeled acetanilide iminodiacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-IDA) analogues has facilitated the clincal study of the bile flow pathways. A variety of /sup 99m/Tc-IDA derivaties are under investigation. Basically all are metabolized by the hepatocyte and immediately thereafter excreted unconjugated into the biliary tract. Of the various derivatives tested, e.g., dimethyl (lidofenin), diethyl, paraisopropyl (iprofenin), parabutyl (butilfenin), and diisopropyl (disofenin), the last named is the best universal agent at this time. By serial liver imaging the patency of the cystic duct and the integrity of altered cholangiointestinal anatomy can be assessed, leakage of bile and gastric reflux can be disclosed, and medical and surgical jaundice can be distinguished

  10. Imaging findings of Castleman disease of the abdomen and pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liangping; Wang Peihua; Peng Weijun; Yang Wentao; Zhang Bei; Guan Yubao; Zhou Kangrong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this work was to analysis the most suggestive imaging findings of Castleman disease in the abdomen and pelvis and to improve the recognition of this rare disease. Methods: Ten patients with pathologically proved Castleman disease in the abdomen (n=9) and pelvis (n=1) were included in this study. Patients were 18-56 yeas old (mean=40); 7 were men and 3 women. Imaging findings (CT and MRI, n=4; only CT, n=4; only MRI, n=2) were retrospectively reviewed and correlated with clinical and pathologic findings. Results: The lesions were divided into localized (n=9) and disseminated (n=1) group. The pathologic subtypes of all 9 cases of localized disease were hyaline vascular type. Imaging findings showed a single large mass in six and a single dominant mass with small satellite nodules in three. On plain CT images, the lesions manifested as homogeneous soft masses, which is isoattenuating to muscle. After intravenous injection of contrast media, most of the masses enhanced sharply (5/7) with the attenuation similar to large arteries at arterial phase and delay scans. On MR imaging, the lesions also were homogenous and had isointense or slightly low signal intensity compared with that of muscle on T 1 weighted images and high signal intensity on T 2 weighted images, and showed contrast enhancement in a similar pattern to contrast enhanced CT. After intravenous injection of contrast media, areas of central lower radial attenuation in the mass were noted in 4 cases of large masses ( > 5 cm) and proved to be fibrotic component pathologically. The pathologic subtypes of 1 cases of disseminated disease was plasma cell type. Imaging findings showed several well-defined nodules lied in the retroperitoneal zone that enhanced sharply with the attenuation similar to large arteries after intravenous injection of contrast media. Conclusion: Imaging findings of Castleman disease in the abdomen and pelvis are closely associated with its pathology. The most

  11. Imaging features of skeletal changes in children with Gaucher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ningning; Duan Xiaomin; Duan Yanlong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the imaging features of skeletal changes in children with Gaucher disease on X-ray and MRI images. Methods: One hundred and nine children with Gaucher disease were enrolled in this study. They all received routine X-ray for spine with anterior-posterior (A-P) and lateral view and bilateral femurs with A-P view. Among them, 18 patients received X-ray for pelvic with A-P view, 14 patients received X-ray for left wrist with A-P view, and 14 patients received MRI scan for femur. The MRI scan included T 1 -weighted imaging, T 2 -weighted imaging and fat-suppressed T 2 -weighted imaging with short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence. The imaging features of the X-ray and MRI images were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The most common feature is osteoporosis, which presented in 91 cases (83.5%). Besides this, decreased density of metaphysis occurred in 86 cases (78.9%), erlenmeyer flask deformity of metaphysis occurred in 89 patients (81.7%), thinner cortex occurred in 69 cases (63.3%), osteolytic destruction occurred in. 31 cases (28.4%), pathological fractures occurred in 26 cases (23.9%), osteosclerosis occurred in 12 cases (11.0%). cystic degeneration of bone occurred in 16 cases (14.7%), and dislocation of the hip occurred in 4 cases. All 14 patients received MRI presented abnormal signals. Among them, 4 patients presented low signal intensity both on T 1 -weighted and T 2 -weighted images in bone marrow, the other ten presented high signal intensity mixed in low signal intensity areas on T 2 - weighted and fat-suppressed T 2 -weighted images. Conclusions: The imaging features of skeletal changes in children with Gaucher disease are of some characteristics, which could provide useful information for the clinical treatment. (authors)

  12. Cervical spine and crystal-associated diseases: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feydy, Antoine; Chevrot, Alain; Drape, Jean-Luc [Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Liote, Frederic [Hopital Lariboisiere, Federation de Rhumatologie, Paris (France); Carlier, Robert [Hopital Raymond Poincare, Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2006-02-01

    The cervical spine may be specifically involved in crystal-associated arthropathies. In this article, we focus on the three common crystals and diseases: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease, and monosodium urate crystals (gout). The cervical involvement in crystal-associated diseases may provoke a misleading clinical presentation with acute neck pain, fever, or neurological symptoms. Imaging allows an accurate diagnosis in typical cases with calcific deposits and destructive lesions of the discs and joints. Most of the cases are related to CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; gout is much less common. (orig.)

  13. Cervical spine and crystal-associated diseases: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feydy, Antoine; Chevrot, Alain; Drape, Jean-Luc; Liote, Frederic; Carlier, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The cervical spine may be specifically involved in crystal-associated arthropathies. In this article, we focus on the three common crystals and diseases: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease, and monosodium urate crystals (gout). The cervical involvement in crystal-associated diseases may provoke a misleading clinical presentation with acute neck pain, fever, or neurological symptoms. Imaging allows an accurate diagnosis in typical cases with calcific deposits and destructive lesions of the discs and joints. Most of the cases are related to CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; gout is much less common. (orig.)

  14. Myocardial images in nonacute coronary and noncoronary heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poe, N.D.; Eber, L.M.; Norman, A.S.; Selin, C.E.; Terao, E.N.

    1977-01-01

    To determine the variables that might affect interpretability of myocardial perfusion images in patients with acute myocardial infarctions, images obtained following intravenous administration of potassium-43 or cesium-129 were evaluated in 68 patients with nonacute coronary or noncoronary heart diseases, who were undergoing cardiac catheterization. Severe coronary arterial disease usually produces no distinctive perfusion defects in the resting state. Remote infarcts likewise tend to remain undetectable unless accompanied by wall-motion disturbances that can be detected by ventriculography. Left ventricular hypertrophy or cardiac dilatation can produce perfusion patterns indistinguishable from the ischemic defects of infarction. Right ventricular hypertrophy can cause image alterations that mimic infarcts in the left ventricle. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, sequential imaging studies with perfusion indicators should be of value in determining the effects of various therapeutic maneuvers on regional myocardial perfusion, but variations caused by conditions other than acute vascular occlusion limit the usefulness of perfusion imaging for diagnosing acute infarction. In suspected acute infarction, perfusion imaging will be used most effectively in conjunction with other imaging or nonimaging procedures that show the presence of damaged or necrotic myocardium. The information derived from this study should be generally applicable to the interpretation of imaging results obtained with the newer indicators of myocardial perfusion now in use or under development

  15. MR imaging in Peyronie's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Yoel; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Jong Kwan [Chonbuk National Univ. Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of magnetic resonance (MR) images in Peyronie's disease and to assess the usefulness of post-erection penile MRI. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of seven patients in whom Peyronie's disease was clinically suspected. All seven underwent pre-and post-erectile MRI. After the acquisition of erectile MRI, three patients also underwent contrast-enhanced MRI. We compared image quality and the rate of detection of penile plaque between pre-erectile and post-erectile images. In three patients who underwent contrast-enhanced MRI, we assessed correlation between the contrast enhancement pattern, as seen on MRI, of the plaque and corpus cavernosa and clinical inflammatory signs such as painful erection. In the seven patients, all post-erectile MRI images showed localized thickening and irregularities of the tunica albuginea and the septum penis, suggesting penile plaque. On pre-erectile MRI, however, plaque was detected in five cases. In six of seven cases, plaque as seen on T2-weighted images (T2WI) showed low signal intensity similar to that of the tunica albuginea, and as seen on T1-weighted images (T1W1), a signal intensity of signal intensity similar to or similar to or slightly higher than that of the tunica albuginea. In one case, plaque showed high signal intensity on both T1WI and T2WI. On T1WI, the corpus cavernosa showed homogeneous medium-signal intensity on all pre- and post-erectile MR images. On pre-erectile T2WI, the corpus cavernosa of six patients showed heterogeneous high signal intensity, whereas on post-erectile T2WI the corpus cavernosa of all patients showed homogeneous high signal intensity. Due to the enlarged penis and homogeneous signal intensity of the corpus cavernosa, the image quality of post-erectile images was superior to that of pre-erectile images. The images of two of three patients who underwent contrast enhanced MRI showed strong enhancement of the plaque and adjacent corpus cavernosa

  16. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero M, Julian F; Perez A, Maria C; Cerquera C, Fredy M

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease,which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardioinfantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero Melo, Julian Francisco; Perez Alvarado, Maria Carolina; Cerquera Cabrera, Fredy Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease, which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardio infantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  18. MR imaging of metabolic white matter diseases: Therapeutic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebarski, S.S.; Allen, R.

    1987-01-01

    In metabolic diseases affecting the brain, MR imaging abnormalities include white-matter signal aberrations suggesting myelination delay, dysmyelination and demyelination, pathologic iron storage, and finally, loss of substance usually in a nonspecific pattern. The authors suggest that MR imaging may have therapeutic implications: (1) classic galactosemia - white-matter signal aberration became normal after dietary therapy; (2) phenylketonuria - age- and sex-matched treated and nontreated adolescents showed marked differences in brain volume, with the treated patient's volume nearly normal; (3) maple syrup urine disease - gross white-matter signal aberration became nearly normal after dietary therapy; and (4) hyperglycinemia - relentless progression of white-matter signal aberration and loss of brain substance despite therapy. These data suggest that brain MR imaging may provide a therapeutic index in certain metabolic diseases

  19. Automated rice leaf disease detection using color image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugoy, Reinald Adrian D. L.; Mariano, Vladimir Y.

    2011-06-01

    In rice-related institutions such as the International Rice Research Institute, assessing the health condition of a rice plant through its leaves, which is usually done as a manual eyeball exercise, is important to come up with good nutrient and disease management strategies. In this paper, an automated system that can detect diseases present in a rice leaf using color image analysis is presented. In the system, the outlier region is first obtained from a rice leaf image to be tested using histogram intersection between the test and healthy rice leaf images. Upon obtaining the outlier, it is then subjected to a threshold-based K-means clustering algorithm to group related regions into clusters. Then, these clusters are subjected to further analysis to finally determine the suspected diseases of the rice leaf.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of generalised musculo-skeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.A.; Schalke, B.C.G.

    1989-01-01

    The results presented are drawn from 320 examinations by NMR imaging of patients with various systemic muscle diseases (dystrophies, myositides, metabolic disorders), and are interpreted so as to explain the relevant characteristic distribution patterns of the degenerative processes in the femoral musculature as shown by the NMR images. Four basic patterns are presented according to the criteria homogeneous-heterogeneous and symmetric-asymmetric, and the diseases identified by the differential diagnostic evaluation are discussed. The optimum measuring conditions for magnetic resonance imaging of the musculature are given, and the specific magnetic resonance criteria of myositides, neurogenic myopathies, myofonous dystrophies, c.n. polio, morbus Pompe, familial hypokalemic paralysis, centronuclear mypathy, morbus Duchenne are explained. The significance of NMR imaging with regard to biopsy or therapy planning is discussed, and magnetic resonance examination is recommended to be applied prior to biopsy. (orig.) [de

  1. Abnormal I-123 HIPDM images in various disease entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, W.J.; Magoun, S.; Coupal, J.J.; Clark, D.B.; Dekosky, S.T.; Kung, H.F.; Beihn, R.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Eighty patients who were referred from neurology service for evaluation of stroke, Alzheimer disease (AD), and/or other neurologic diseases underwent the study. Four views of planar images were obtained following the intravenous injection of 3-5 mCi of I-123 HIPDM. SPECT images were then obtained using a camera interfaced to a PDP-11 computer. Forty of the 80 patients had scintigraphic findings of stroke, which correlated well with head CT/cerebral angiogram. Sixteen patients with AD had good correlation between the degree of temporoparietal abnormality in the images. Severe AD and severe stroke patients almost always had a positive planar image. Normal I-123 HIPDM localization in the brain requires intact cerebral flow and cerebral neuronal function. A focal area of decreased I-123 HIPDM localization may represent either interruption of blood flow or neurochemical dysfunction

  2. Computer-assisted instruction; MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Hi; Yu, Pil Mun; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kim, Yang Min

    1996-01-01

    To develop a software program for computer-assisted instruction on MR imaging of congenital heart disease for medical students and residents to achieve repetitive and effective self-learning. We used a film scanner(Scan Maker 35t) and IBM-PC(486 DX-2, 60 MHz) for acquisition and storage of image data. The accessories attached to the main processor were CD-ROM drive(Sony), sound card(Soundblaster-Pro), and speaker. We used software of Adobe Photoshop(v 3.0) and paint shop-pro(v 3.0) for preprocessing image data, and paintbrush from microsoft windows 3.1 for labelling. The language used for programming was visual basic(v 3.0) from microsoft corporation. We developed a software program for computer-assisted instruction on MR imaging of congenital heart disease as an effective educational tool

  3. OCT imaging of skin cancer and other dermatological diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a lar...... number of applications in the fields of non-melanoma skin cancer, malignant melanomas, psoriasis and dermatitis, infestations, bullous skin diseases, tattoos, nails, haemangiomas, and other skin diseases. (© 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)......Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides clinicians and researchers with micrometer-resolution, in vivo, cross-sectional images of human skin up to several millimeter depth. This review of OCT imaging applied within dermatology covers the application of OCT to normal skin, and reports on a large...

  4. Castleman disease of the neck: CT and MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xin-hua; Song, Hao-ming; Liu, Qing-yu; Cao, Yun; Li, Guo-hong; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Castleman disease of the neck. Methods: The imaging findings of 21 patients with Castleman disease of the neck were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 21 patients, 16 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT scans; 5 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI scans. Results: The unenhanced CT images showed isolated or multiple well-defined homogenous mild hypodensity lesions in fifteen cases, and a heterogeneous nodule with central areas of mild hypodensity in one case. Calcification was not observed in any of the patients. In five patients, MR T1-weighted images revealed well-defined, homogeneous isointense or mild hyperintense lesions to the muscle; T2-weighted images showed these as intermediate hyperintense. Sixteen cases showed intermediate to marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT or MR T1-weighted images. Of the other five cases that underwent double-phase CT scans, four showed mild or intermediate heterogeneous enhancement at the arterial phase, and homogeneous intermediate or marked enhancement at the venous phase; the remaining case showed mild and intermediate ring-enhancement with a central non-enhanced area at the arterial and venous phases, respectively. Conclusion: Castleman disease of the neck can be characterized as solitary or multiple well-defined, mild hypodensity or homogeneous intense lesions on plain CT/MR scans, and demonstrates intermediate and marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. On double-phase CT scans, Castleman disease often demonstrates mild enhancement at the arterial phase, and gradually uniform enhancement at venous phase. Double-phase enhanced CT or MRI may help to differentiate Castleman disease from other diseases

  5. Castleman disease of the neck: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xin-hua [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Song, Hao-ming [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tongji Hospital, Shanghai 200065 (China); Liu, Qing-yu [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120 (China); Cao, Yun [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Li, Guo-hong [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Zhang, Wei-dong, E-mail: dongw.z@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Objective: To characterize the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Castleman disease of the neck. Methods: The imaging findings of 21 patients with Castleman disease of the neck were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 21 patients, 16 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT scans; 5 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI scans. Results: The unenhanced CT images showed isolated or multiple well-defined homogenous mild hypodensity lesions in fifteen cases, and a heterogeneous nodule with central areas of mild hypodensity in one case. Calcification was not observed in any of the patients. In five patients, MR T1-weighted images revealed well-defined, homogeneous isointense or mild hyperintense lesions to the muscle; T2-weighted images showed these as intermediate hyperintense. Sixteen cases showed intermediate to marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT or MR T1-weighted images. Of the other five cases that underwent double-phase CT scans, four showed mild or intermediate heterogeneous enhancement at the arterial phase, and homogeneous intermediate or marked enhancement at the venous phase; the remaining case showed mild and intermediate ring-enhancement with a central non-enhanced area at the arterial and venous phases, respectively. Conclusion: Castleman disease of the neck can be characterized as solitary or multiple well-defined, mild hypodensity or homogeneous intense lesions on plain CT/MR scans, and demonstrates intermediate and marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. On double-phase CT scans, Castleman disease often demonstrates mild enhancement at the arterial phase, and gradually uniform enhancement at venous phase. Double-phase enhanced CT or MRI may help to differentiate Castleman disease from other diseases.

  6. Clinical and imaging diagnosis for heredodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddaert, Nathalie; Brunelle, Francis; Desguerre, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Clinical features (progressive psychomotor retardation, seizures, movement disorders and motor signs in both central and peripheral systems, sensorineural defects, and psychiatric symptoms) and brain imaging are the keys to diagnosis. CT is indicated for the detection of calcifications and blood, and for angiography. MRI in all three axes requires T1, T2, FLAIR (from 1 year on), eventually T2* or contrast administration, and diffusion in any acute condition. MR spectroscopy allows the dectection of lactate and creatine deficiency, elevated choline in high membrane turnover, and low NAA in neuronal death. The normal sequence of myelination needs to be taken into account. Pre- and neonatal anomalies include cystic and basal ganglia lesions, gyral and myelin anomalies, callosal agenesis, and large subdural spaces. Anomalies disclosed after 3 months of age include basal ganglia appearing hyper- or hypointense on T2, hypointense on T2*, or calcified white matter anomalies mainly periventricular or subcortical, or with contrast enhancement, associated with macrocephaly and/or large or very small cysts, and hypomyelination; there may be "vascular" or pseudostroke disorders, cortical atrophy, hypoplasia, or abnormal signal of the brainstem and/or cerebellum. Spectroscopy should investigate basal ganglia, white matter, and the cerebellum. MRI may reveal typical alterations of the brain at the preclinical stage in siblings of affected children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vivo PET imaging of neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, Julien; Sarazin, Marie; Bottlaender, Michel

    2018-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that neuroinflammation contributes to the pathophysiology of many neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular imaging by PET may be a useful tool to assess neuroinflammation in vivo, thus helping to decipher the complex role of inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and providing a potential means of monitoring the effect of new therapeutic approaches. For this objective, the main target of PET studies is the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), as it is overexpressed by activated microglia. In the present review, we describe the most widely used PET tracers targeting the TSPO, the methodological issues in tracer quantification and summarize the results obtained by TSPO PET imaging in AD, as well as in neurodegenerative disorders associated with AD, in psychiatric disorders and ageing. We also briefly describe alternative PET targets and imaging modalities to study neuroinflammation. Lastly, we question the meaning of PET imaging data in the context of a highly complex and multifaceted role of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases. This overview leads to the conclusion that PET imaging of neuroinflammation is a promising way of deciphering the enigma of the pathophysiology of AD and of monitoring the effect of new therapies.

  8. Molecular imaging and the neuropathologies of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cumming, Paul; Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    The main motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are linked to degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) fibers, especially those innervating the putamen. This degeneration can be assessed in molecular imaging studies with presynaptic tracers such as [(18)F]-fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA...... with denervation upregulation, but there is an accelerated rate of DA receptor loss as the disease advances. Animal studies and post mortem investigations reveal changes in brain opioid peptide systems, but these are poorly documented in imaging studies of PD. Relatively minor changes in the binding sites for GABA...

  9. Pattern analysis in MR imaging of muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.A.; Schalke, B.C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Between March 1984 and March 1987, 161 patients with muscle diseases underwent MR imaging performed with a 1.0-T superconductive magnet. Forty-four had progressive muscular dystrophies, 25 had different types of myositis, 19 had spinal or neural muscular atrophies, 16 had myotonic dystrophy, 22 had metabolic disorders, and 35 had other muscle disease, including muscle tumors, posttraumatic muscular atrophies, and postradiation effects. The advantages of MR imaging are the high sensitivity and soft-tissue contrast, as well as the depiction of typical distribution patterns of affected muscle groups, which can be used in diagnosis, biopsy planning, and design of therapy

  10. Current status of radionuclide imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Pohost, G.M.

    1980-12-18

    The current state-of-the-art in radionuclide imaging of valvular heart disease is based on different angiographic patterns in three left-sided valve abnormalities: pressure overload, volume overload, and inflow obstruction. In pressure overload, the left ventricle has normal dimensions or is minimally dilated the volume overload involves a left ventricular dilatation with a normal or reduced ejection fraction at rest the left ventricular function in inflow obstruction is normal, but in some cases may be depressed. Radionuclide angiography evaluates the effect of a valve abnormality on cardiac chamber and function thallium-201 imaging diagnoses regional myocardial blood flow and cell integrity and can evaluate the associated coronary artery disease.

  11. Diffusion MR imaging in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcak Cakir Pekoz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD is a rare dementing disease and is thought to caused by a prion. It is characterized by rapidly progressive dementia, ataxia, myoclonus, akinetic mutism and eventual death. Brain biopsy or autopsy is required for a definitive diagnosis of CJD. Diffusion-weighted imaging became an important tool for early diagnosis of CJD because of the high sensitivity. We present 59-year-old female patient diagnosed as sporadic CJD with typical MR imagings. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 880-883

  12. Current status of radionuclide imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, C.A.; Okada, R.D.; Pohost, G.M.

    1980-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in radionuclide imaging of valvular heart disease is based on different angiographic patterns in three left-sided valve abnormalities: pressure overload, volume overload, and inflow obstruction. In pressure overload, the left ventricle has normal dimensions or is minimally dilated the volume overload involves a left ventricular dilatation with a normal or reduced ejection fraction at rest the left ventricular function in inflow obstruction is normal, but in some cases may be depressed. Radionuclide angiography evaluates the effect of a valve abnormality on cardiac chamber and function thallium-201 imaging diagnoses regional myocardial blood flow and cell integrity and can evaluate the associated coronary artery disease

  13. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  14. Imaging of congenital heart disease in adults: choice of modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orwat, Stefan; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Baumgartner, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Major advances in noninvasive imaging of adult congenital heart disease have been accomplished. These tools play now a key role in comprehensive diagnostic work-up, decision for intervention, evaluation for the suitability of specific therapeutic options, monitoring of interventions and regular follow-up. Besides echocardiography, magnetic resonance (CMR) and computed tomography (CT) have gained particular importance. The choice of imaging modality has thus become a critical issue. This review summarizes strengths and limitations of the different imaging modalities and how they may be used in a complementary fashion. Echocardiography obviously remains the workhorse of imaging routinely used in all patients. However, in complex disease and after surgery echocardiography alone frequently remains insufficient. CMR is particularly useful in this setting and allows reproducible and accurate quantification of ventricular function and comprehensive assessment of cardiac anatomy, aorta, pulmonary arteries and venous return including complex flow measurements. CT is preferred when CMR is contraindicated, when superior spatial resolution is required or when "metallic" artefacts limit CMR imaging. In conclusion, the use of currently available imaging modalities in adult congenital heart disease needs to be complementary. Echocardiography remains the basis tool, CMR and CT should be added considering specific open questions and the ability to answer them, availability and economic issues.

  15. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging in Stargardt Disease: Potential Marker for Disease Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Dysli Chantal; Wolf Sebastian; Hatz Katja; Zinkernagel Martin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to describe autofluorescence lifetime characteristics in Stargardt disease (STGD) using fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) and to investigate potential prognostic markers for disease activity and progression. METHODS Fluorescence lifetime data of 16 patients with STGD (mean age, 40 years; range, 22-56 years) and 15 age-matched controls were acquired using a fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Eng...

  16. Characterization of clinical-imaging characteristics of the binswanger's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Mutuberria, Livan; Serra Valdes, Yusimi

    2002-01-01

    A review was made to go deep into the understanding of vascular dementias that behave as the second cause of dementia in practice. Binswanger's disease is one of the most important among them. Its detection has progressively increased with the continual improvement of the radiological diagnostic tools that allow to identify the ischemic damage of the hemispherical cerebral white matter and the presence of lacunar infarctions. It is a disease of chronic course and inexorably progressive that is characterized by the association of subcortical cognitive dysfunction, evidence of cerebrovascular disease, Parkinsonian rigidity and vesicle dysfunction with a characteristic imaging picture. The clinical picture and the main imaging characteristics are explained in this paper and the pathogens of the disease is briefly described

  17. Structural imaging in premanifest and manifest Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Rachael I; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Aylward, Elizabeth H

    2017-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) neuropathology has a devastating effect on brain structure and consequently brain function; neuroimaging provides a means to assess these effects in gene carriers. In this chapter we first outline the unique utility of structural imaging in understanding HD and discuss some of the acquisition and analysis techniques currently available. We review the existing literature to summarize what we know so far about structural brain changes across the spectrum of disease from premanifest through to manifest disease. We then consider how these neuroimaging findings relate to patient function and nonimaging biomarkers, and can be used to predict disease onset. Finally we review the utility of imaging measures for assessment of treatment efficacy in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. MR imaging of the knee in patients with rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, B.N.; Winalski, C.S.; Aliabadi, P.; Kikinis, R.; Shortkroff, S.; Sledge, C.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the MR appearances of the knees in patients with rheumatic diseases, including the grading of changes, quantification of changes, and the role of intravenous gadolinium. MR imaging of the knee was performed in 19 patients with arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis (n = 11), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (n = 2), Reiter syndrome (n = 2), Crohn arthritis (n = 1), and psoriatic arthritis (n = 3). Spin-echo images (T1, T2, and proton density weighted) were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. T1-weighted axial images were obtained before and after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA

  19. Imaging of total colonic Hirschsprung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranzinger, Enno; DiPietro, Michael A.; Strouse, Peter J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HD) is a functional obstruction of the bowel caused by the absence of intrinsic enteric ganglion cells. The diagnosis of total colonic HD (TCHD) based on contrast enemas is difficult in newborns because radiological findings vary. To evaluate the radiographic and contrast enema findings in patients with pathologically proven TCHD. From 1966 to 2007, 17 records from a total of 31 patients with TCHD were retrospectively evaluated for diameter and shape of the colon, diameter of the small bowel, bowel wall contour, ileal reflux, abdominal calcifications, pneumoperitoneum, filling defects, transitional zones and rectosigmoid index. Three colonic patterns of TCHD were found: microcolon, question-mark-shape colon and normal caliber colon. Additional findings included spasmodic colon, ileal reflux, delayed evacuation and abdominal calcifications. Colonic transitional zones were found in eight patients with TCHD. The diagnosis of TCHD is difficult to establish by contrast enema studies. The length of the aganglionic small bowel and the age of the patient can influence the radiological findings in TCHD. The transitional zone and the rectosigmoid index can be false-positive in TCHD. The colon can appear normal. Consider TCHD if the contrast enema study is normal but the patient remains symptomatic and other causes of distal bowel obstruction have been excluded. (orig.)

  20. In vivo calcium imaging of the aging and diseased brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhoff, Gerhard; Busche, Marc A.; Garaschuk, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, in vivo calcium imaging became a powerful tool for studying brain function. With the use of two-photon microscopy and modern labelling techniques, it allows functional studies of individual living cells, their processes and their interactions within neuronal networks. In vivo calcium imaging is even more important for studying the aged brain, which is hard to investigate in situ due to the fragility of neuronal tissue. In this article, we give a brief overview of the techniques applicable to image aged rodent brain at cellular resolution. We use multicolor imaging to visualize specific cell types (neurons, astrocytes, microglia) as well as the autofluorescence of the ''aging pigment'' lipofuscin. Further, we illustrate an approach for simultaneous imaging of cortical cells and senile plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in the acute stage of cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tokutaro; Sakai, Tsuneo; Fujishima, Ichiro; Yamamoto, Takamichi; Uemura, Kenichi; Teramura, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty patients with acute cerebrovascular disease were evaluated by both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The 17 patients with cerebral infarction (CI) were evaluated within 24 hours and the 13 with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) within 6 hours of the onset of symptoms. All ICHs were detected in T2-weighted images and appeared as perifocal, ring-like areas of high signal intensity. T2-weighted images also demonstrated a ruptured aneurysm and an arteriovenous malformation. In T1-weighted images, all ICHs displayed high signal intensity, which paralleled the CT images and is characteristic of MR imaging with an ultra-low magnetic filed. These findings were obtained as early as 90 minutes from the onset of symptoms. In cases of CI, T2-weighted images obtained 3 - 7 hours after onset demonstrated the pathology more clearly than did CT. This study proved MR imaging useful in the evaluation of both ICH and CI in the acute stage. In addition, it was possible to differentiate ICH from CI in the acute stage by T2-weighted images alone. (author)

  2. Insight into the Molecular Imaging of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abishek Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a complex neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Earlier it was diagnosed only via clinical assessments and confirmed by postmortem brain histopathology. The development of validated biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease has given impetus to improve diagnostics and accelerate the development of new therapies. Functional imaging like positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides a means of detecting and characterising the regional changes in brain blood flow, metabolism, and receptor binding sites that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Multimodal neuroimaging techniques have indicated changes in brain structure and metabolic activity, and an array of neurochemical variations that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Radiotracer-based PET and SPECT potentially provide sensitive, accurate methods for the early detection of disease. This paper presents a review of neuroimaging modalities like PET, SPECT, and selected imaging biomarkers/tracers used for the early diagnosis of AD. Neuroimaging with such biomarkers and tracers could achieve a much higher diagnostic accuracy for AD and related disorders in the future.

  3. Pinhole imaging in Legg--Perthes disease: further observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danigelis, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-nine patients with Legg--Perthes disease and 12 others were studied using /sup 99m/Tc-polyphosphate and the pinhole collimator imaging technique. Radiographs of both hips were correlated with images in each patient. In the Legg--Perthes patients, a radionuclide uptake deficiency of variable size was observed in the proximal femoral epiphysis (EOC), which we believe is related to varying degrees of impaired blood supply. During later disease stages, adjacent zones of increased radio-nuclide activity or revascularization were observed that would replace the uptake defect eventually. Unless radiographic evidence of new bone formation was observed in the EOC, it was impossible to predict either the presence or extent of revascularization until bone imaging was done. Those patients with revascularization activity in the EOC exhibited a relatively short time interval (average, 3.2 months) before evidence of new bone formation radiographically. Others with increased radionuclide concentration limited to the growth plate and/or metaphysis averaged a much longer 7.8 months. In two patients there was a reversal of the initially increased activity in the growth plate, suggesting another vascular insult. There were no false-negative bone-image findings in the 12 cases that clinically and/or radiologically simulated Legg-Perthes disease. Our image studies correlate well with published histopathologic investigations, indicating to us that assessment of extent of pathologic involvement and of the disease course is facilitated by this technique. Subsequently, this could influence treatment selection and provide a more objective baseline from which to judge treatment results. Continued experience suggests pinhole bone imaging has useful clinical application in Legg--Perthes disease and other childhood hip disorders

  4. Pinhole imaging in Legg-Perthes disease: further observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danigelis, J A

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-nine patients with Legg-Perthes disease and 12 others were studied using 99mTc-polyphosphate and the pinhole collimator imaging technique. Radiographs of both hips were correlated with images in each patient. In the Legg-Perthes patients, a radionuclide uptake deficiency of variable size was observed in the proximal femoral epiphysis (EOC), which we believe is related to varying degrees of impaired blood supply. During later disease stages, adjacent zones of increased radionuclide activity of revascularization were observed that would replace the uptake defect eventually. Unless radiographic evidence of new bone formation was observed in the EOC, it was impossible to predict either the presence or extent of revascularization until bone imaging was done. Those patients with revascularization activity in the EOC exhibited a relatively short time interval (average, 3.2 months) before evidence of new bone formation radiographically. Others with increased radionuclide concentration limited to the growth plate and/or metaphysis averaged a much longer 7.8 months. In two patients there was a reversal of the initially increased activity in the growth plate, suggesting another vascular insult. There were no false-negative bone-image findings in the 12 cases that clinically and/or radiologically simulated Legg-Perthes disease. Our image studies correlate well with published histopathologic investigations, indicating to us that assessment of extent of pathologic involvement and of the disease course is facilitated by this technique. Subsequently, this could influence treatment selection and provide a more objective baseline from which to judge treatment results. Continued experience suggests pinhole bone imaging has useful clinical application in Legg-Perthes disease and other childhood hip disorders.

  5. Inflammatory chronic disease of the colon: How to image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Roberta; Barchiesi, Annalisa; Di Mizio, Veronica; Di Terlizzi, Marco; Leo, Luca; Filippone, Antonella; Canalis, Luigi; Fossaceca, Rita; Carriero, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and UC, is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The inflammatory process in UC is confined to the mucosa and submucosa and it involves only the colon. In contrast, in Crohn's disease the inflammation process extends through the bowel wall layers and it can involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, inflammatory bowel disease of the colon may be associated with complications, such as toxic megacolon, fulminant colitis, acute bleeding, fistulas and abscesses. Radiographic imaging studies are useful for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, and may be used to assess the extent and severity of disease, rule out complications, and monitor the response to therapy. The double-contrast barium study is a valuable technique for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease colonic alterations, even in patients with early mucosal abnormalities. The earliest finding of UC is characterized by a fine granular appeareance of the colonic mucosa, usually involving the rectosigmoid junction. In chronic UC double-contrast enema may reveal marked colonic shortening with tubular narrowing of the bowel and loss of haustration. The earliest radiographics findings of Crohn's disease are represented by aphthous ulcers. As disease progresses, aphthous ulcers may enlarge and coalesce to form stellate or linear areas of ulceration. In advanced Crohn's disease, transmural ulceration may lead to the development of fissures, sinus tracts, fistulas, and abscesses. Cross sectional studies such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and sometimes ultrasound, are useful alternative tools not only in the assessment of bowel wall abnormalities, but also for the assessment of extraluminal alterations in patients with advanced disease

  6. Hydatid disease of the spleen; Ultrasonography, CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Stridbeck, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1992-09-01

    Seven patients with hydatid disease of the spleen were examined by radiography, ultrasound, CT, and in one case MR imaging. The observations were confirmed by patho-anatomic findings except in 2 patients where high indirect hemagglutination tests confirmed the diagnosis. (orig./MG).

  7. Imaging of respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, L; Ciet, P; van der Ploeg, A T; Brusse, E; van der Beek, N A M E; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruijne, M; Tiddens, H A W M; van Doorn, P A

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness frequently occurs in patients with neuromuscular disease. Measuring respiratory function with standard pulmonary function tests provides information about the contribution of all respiratory muscles, the lungs and airways. Imaging potentially enables the study of different respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm, separately. In this review, we provide an overview of imaging techniques used to study respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease. We identified 26 studies which included a total of 573 patients with neuromuscular disease. Imaging of respiratory muscles was divided into static and dynamic techniques. Static techniques comprise chest radiography, B-mode (brightness mode) ultrasound, CT and MRI, and are used to assess the position and thickness of the diaphragm and the other respiratory muscles. Dynamic techniques include fluoroscopy, M-mode (motion mode) ultrasound and MRI, used to assess diaphragm motion in one or more directions. We discuss how these imaging techniques relate with spirometric values and whether these can be used to study the contribution of the different respiratory muscles in patients with neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Machine Learning for Quantification of Small Vessel Disease Imaging Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghafoorian, M.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to developing fully automated methods for quantification of small vessel disease imaging bio-markers, namely WMHs and lacunes, using vari- ous machine learning/deep learning and computer vision techniques. The rest of the thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 2 describes

  9. Automatic segmentation and disease classification using cardiac cine MR images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    Segmentation of the heart in cardiac cine MR is clinically used to quantify cardiac function. We propose a fully automatic method for segmentation and disease classification using cardiac cine MR images. A convolutional neural network (CNN) was designed to simultaneously segment the left ventricle

  10. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...

  11. Imaging of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We review the imaging appearance of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck. Bilateral sialadenitis and dacryoadenitis are seen in Sjögren’s syndrome; ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint with sclerosis of the crico-arytenoid joint are reported in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus panniculitis with atypical infection are reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Relapsing polychondritis shows subglottic stenosis, prominent ear and saddle nose; progressive systemic sclerosis shows osteolysis of the mandible, fibrosis of the masseter muscle with calcinosis of the subcutaneous tissue and dermatomyositis/polymyositis shows condylar erosions and autoimmune thyroiditis. Vascular thrombosis is reported in antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome; cervical lymphadenopathy is seen in adult-onset Still’s disease, and neuropathy with thyroiditis reported in mixed connective tissue disorder. Imaging is important to detect associated malignancy with connective tissue disorders. Correlation of the imaging findings with demographic data and clinical findings are important for the diagnosis of connective tissue disorders. PMID:26988082

  12. An image processing technique for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoud Mahmoudian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD reportedly hibit hypersensitivity to much diluted tropicam solution (0.005%, a M4 muscarinic receptor antagonist. Therefore aocular application of 0.005% tropicamide ma be useful for screening dementia. The aim of this study was to simplify the pupil response test by using a new image analyzing system, which consists of a cheap, simple, and easy to use web-camera and a computer.
    • METHODS: Intraocular tropicamide of 0.005% concentration was administered in 3 groups: Alzheimer's disease patients (n = 8, average age = 76 ± 5, non-Alzheimer's disease elderly (n = 6, average age = 65 ± 7, and young subjects (n = 8, average age = 28 ± 5. Every 5 minutes for 60 minutes, image of the eye's shape were taken, and the diameter of the pupils was measured.
    • RESULTS: The results showed that differences in pupil dilation rate between Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer's disease subjects were statistically significant. ROC analysis showed that after 35 minutes the sensitivity and specificity of the test were 100%.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, we concluded that this recording system might be an appropriate and reliable tool for pupil response diagnosis test of Alzheimer's disease.
    • KEYWORDS: Alzheimer’s Disease, Tropicamide, Pupil.

  13. Imaging of demyelinating and degenerative diseases of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drayer, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    The emergence of cross-sectional brain imaging in the past decade has greatly expanded the role of imaging as a primary diagnostic modality for demyelinating and degenerative brain disorders. To remain an effective neurologic consultant, the radiologist must better understand the neuropathology and functional significance of these disorders. MR imaging has become the dominant imaging modality for multiple sclerosis and all demyelinating and dysmyelinating disorders. Detection is most sensitive with intermediate and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Although increased signal intensity in the white matter is a sensitive but nonspecific finding, a knowledge of the patient's history and disease pathoanatomy greatly improves diagnostic specificity. Since an increasing proportion of the population is over 65 years of age, the distinction of normal versus pathologic aging becomes critical. The role of imaging in dementing illness is to distinguish primary degenerative dementia from normal aging changes, vascular medullary artery distribution disease, microangiopathic leukoencephalopathy, communicating hydrocephalus, and mass lesions. The role of MR imaging, including brain iron mapping, is analyzed in bradykinetic, choreiform, and dystonic disorders. The complications of chronic ethanol abuse, including vermian atrophy, central pontine myelinolysis, and Wernicke encephalopathy, are also reviewed

  14. Hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease: imaging aspects and biological behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Aquino, Danilo Olavarria; Pinto, Alexandre de Lavra; Costa, Mauro Jose Brandao da; Fanelli, Vania A.; Abud, Lucas Giansante

    2005-01-01

    Objective: to demonstrate, using imaging methods (x-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US), the phases of hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease in joints, particularly in the shoulder, from the silent phase to the intra-osseous migration of calcifications and radiologic follow-up examinations showing complete remission after physical therapy. Material and method: we evaluated 27 joints (25 shoulders, one hip and one elbow) of patients followed-up with radiographs. Patients extremely symptomatic and refractory to treatment were referred to MRI or US. Results: total remission of calcifications was observed in 15 joints after treatment - 14 shoulders and one elbow. In two joint, migration of the calcification to bone was observed: one to the bursa subdeltoidea, one to biceps tendon, one to subcoracoid recess and one to the interior of the infra spinal muscle. In two cases MRI and CT scans showed a high inflammatory process triggered by the disease. Conclusion: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease affects multiple joints and can vary from asymptomatic to extremely symptomatic. Imaging methods show all phases of the disease, including the migratory phase. In general, the use of x-ray is enough for the diagnosis and follow-up. MRI and CT provide a more accurate diagnosis in the active phase of the disease. In this paper, remission was seen with physiotherapy (iontophoresis) in 55% of the cases. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journel, H.; Roussey, M.; Allaire, C.; Le Marec, B.; Gandon, Y.; Carsin, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher's disease is a progressive encephalopathy with demyelination of the cerebral white matter. The diagnosis cannot be made on clinical or biological grounds: pathological investigation is necessary to confirm tigroid demyelination. CT scanning failure to visualize this type of anomaly but detection is now possible with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors studied the case of a boy who, at the age of 8 presented with symptoms characeristic of the disease, rotatory nystagmus, progressive encephalopathy, and inherited X-linked recessive traits. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal in the supra-tentorial white matter and the usual contrast was inverted. The authors believe that MRI can make an important contribution to the diagnosis of the disease. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, A. de; Roest, A.A.W.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful in the assessment of patients with complex congenital heart disease and in the post-surgical follow-up of patients with corrected congenital heart disease. A thorough understanding of the congenital cardiac malformations that can be encountered is needed and the use of the sequential segmental analysis helps to standardize the evaluation and diagnosis of (complex) congenital heart disease. After surgical correction of congenital heart defects, patients must be followed over extended periods of time, because morphological and functional abnormalities may still be present or may develop. The use of echocardiography may be hampered in these patients as scar tissue and thorax deformities limit the acoustic window. Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be advantageous in the follow-up of these post-surgical patients and with the use of several different techniques the morphological as well as functional abnormalities can be evaluated and followed over time. (orig.)

  17. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of brachial plexus diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okinaga, Shuji; Korenaga, Tateo; Tekemura, Atsushi; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Kawano, Ken-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted image (DWI) can specifically give running of nerve fibers as they have diffusion anisotropic property and DW whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) procedure, which being capable of imaging cervical and lumber nerve roots, is thus suggested to be useful for diagnosis of diseases related to brachial plexus (BP). The purpose of the present study is to confirm the usefulness of DWIBS by comparison of its images of the normal and sick plexuses. Subjects are 5 normal healthy males (27-36 y), 29 patients (19 M/10 F, 7-73 y) with BP diseases (10 cases of external injury, 6 of obstetric palsy, 2 of paralysis by dysfunctional position, 6 by Schwannoma, 2 by metastasis of breast cancer and 3 by radiation) and, to see the diagnostic specificity, 9 patients (M 7/F 2, 15-64 y) with severely reduced hand force by nervous causes other than BP ones. MRI with Philips Gyroscan INTERA 1.5T machine is conducted for DWIBS by DWI with single shot EPI (echo planar imaging) with the coil of either sensitivity encoding (SENSE) Cardiac, Flex-M or -S. Images are reconstructed 3D by a radiological technician possessing no information concerning patient's conditions, with Philips software Soap-bubble tool on the workstation, and are then evaluated by a radiologist and an orthopedist separately. It is found that BP disorders by injury, obstetric palsy and tumors, of which diagnosis has been difficult hitherto, can be imaged either negatively or positively depending on their history. In radiation paralysis, only 1/3 cases give a reduced signal intensity in the whole BP. DWIBS will be a new diagnostic mean for systemic peripheral nerve diseases as well as BP ones. (T.T.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of canine degenerative lumbar spine diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkkainen, M.; Punto, L.U.; Tulamo, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Degenerative lumbar spine diseases, i.e., sacrolumbar stenosis, intervertebral disk degeneration and protrusion and spondylosis deformans of the canine lumbar spine were studied in eleven canine patients and three healthy controls using radiography and 0.02 T and 0.04 T low field magnetic resonance imaging. The T1 and T2 weighted images were obtained in sagittal and transverse planes. The loss of hydration of nucleus pulposus, taken as a sign of degeneration in the intervertebral disks, could be evaluated in both T1 and T2 weighted images. As a noninvasive method magnetic resonance imaging gave more exact information about the condition of intervertebral disks than did radiography. Sacrolumbar stenosis and compression of the spinal cord or cauda equina and surrounding tissue could be evaluated without contrast medium

  19. Multimodal imaging in health, disease, and man-made disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papineni, Rao V.L.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in the fields of molecular and functional imaging are rapidly emerging as potential advance research tools in health, Disease and drug discovery. Notable are the approaches utilizing multi-modal imaging strategies in preclinical studies that are becoming extremely useful in assessing the efficacy of the novel target molecules. This talk will focus on our efforts in bringing the multimodality to preclinical research with Optical, X-ray, and noninvasive nuclear imaging. The concepts and methods in molecular imaging to support drug targeting and drug discovery will be discussed along with a focus on its utilization in radiation induced changes in the bone physiology. Also, will discuss how such approaches can be employed in future as a biodosimetry for radiation disasters or in radiation threat. (author)

  20. The imaging of coeliac disease and its complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, O.; Brien, J.O.; Ward, E.; Doody, O.; Govender, P.; Torreggiani, W.C.

    2008-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a malabsorption syndrome in which dietary gluten damages the small bowel mucosa. Gluten contains gliadin, the primary toxic component that is primarily found in wheat, barley and rye products. The initial diagnosis of coeliac disease is usually made by endoscopic biopsy of the jejunum although sometimes imaging features can suggest the diagnosis. Once a diagnosis is made, patients need to be diet compliant and monitored for potential complications. Many complications are more common when dietary compliance is poor. Complications include intussusception (usually intermittent), ulcerative jejunitis, osteomalacia, cavitating lymph node syndrome and an increased risk of malignancies such as lymphoma, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Radiological evaluation is central in the evaluation of these complications. Imaging may assist both in the diagnosis and staging of complications as well as enabling radiological guided percutaneous biopsy for complications of coeliac disease such as lymphoma. As coeliac disease is a relatively common disorder, it is likely that most radiologists will encounter the disease and its potential complications. The aim of this review article is to discuss and illustrate the role of modern radiology in evaluating the many presentations of this complex disease

  1. The imaging of coeliac disease and its complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, O.; Brien, J.O.; Ward, E.; Doody, O.; Govender, P. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Torreggiani, W.C. [Adelaide and Meath Incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)], E-mail: William.torreggiani@amnch.ie

    2008-03-15

    Coeliac disease is a malabsorption syndrome in which dietary gluten damages the small bowel mucosa. Gluten contains gliadin, the primary toxic component that is primarily found in wheat, barley and rye products. The initial diagnosis of coeliac disease is usually made by endoscopic biopsy of the jejunum although sometimes imaging features can suggest the diagnosis. Once a diagnosis is made, patients need to be diet compliant and monitored for potential complications. Many complications are more common when dietary compliance is poor. Complications include intussusception (usually intermittent), ulcerative jejunitis, osteomalacia, cavitating lymph node syndrome and an increased risk of malignancies such as lymphoma, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Radiological evaluation is central in the evaluation of these complications. Imaging may assist both in the diagnosis and staging of complications as well as enabling radiological guided percutaneous biopsy for complications of coeliac disease such as lymphoma. As coeliac disease is a relatively common disorder, it is likely that most radiologists will encounter the disease and its potential complications. The aim of this review article is to discuss and illustrate the role of modern radiology in evaluating the many presentations of this complex disease.

  2. IR imaging of blood circulation of patients with vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsin; Wade, Dwight R., Jr.; Kam, Jack

    2004-04-01

    We conducted a preliminary IR imaging study of blood circulation in patients with peripheral vascular diseases. Abnormal blood flow is common in older adults, especially those with elevated blood lipids, diabetes, hypertension, and a history of smoking. All of these conditions have a high prevalence in our population, often with more than one condition in the same individual. The differences in blood flow is revealed by temperature differences in areas of the extremities as well as other regions of the body. However, what is needed is an imaging technique that is relatively inexpensive and can reveal the blood flow in real time. The IR imaging can show detailed venous system and small tempearture changes associated with blood flow. Six patients with vascular diseases were tested in a clinic set up. Their legs and feet were imaged. We observed large temperature differences (cooling of more than 10° C) at the foot, especially toes. More valuable information were obtained from the temperature distribution maps. IR thermography is potentially a very valuable tool for medical application, especially for vascular diseases.

  3. Transcranial sonography and functional imaging in glucocerebrosidase mutation Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, M J; Hagenah, J; Dhawan, V; Peng, S; Stanley, K; Raymond, D; Deik, A; Gross, S J; Schreiber-Agus, N; Mirelman, A; Marder, K; Ozelius, L J; Eidelberg, D; Bressman, S B; Saunders-Pullman, R

    2013-02-01

    Heterozygous glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations are the leading genetic risk factor for Parkinson disease, yet imaging correlates, particularly transcranial sonography, have not been extensively described. To determine whether GBA mutation heterozygotes with Parkinson disease demonstrate hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, transcranial sonography was performed in Ashkenazi Jewish Parkinson disease subjects, tested for the eight most common Gaucher disease mutations and the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, and in controls. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose or [(18)F]-fluorodopa positron emission tomography is also reported from a subset of Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations. Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations (n = 23) had a greater median maximal area of substantia nigral echogenicity compared to controls (n = 34, aSNmax = 0.30 vs. 0.18, p = 0.007). There was no difference in median maximal area of nigral echogenicity between Parkinson disease groups defined by GBA and LRRK2 genotype: GBA heterozygotes; GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes (n = 4, aSNmax = 0.27); subjects without LRRK2 or GBA mutations (n = 32, aSNmax = 0.27); LRRK2 heterozygotes/homozygotes without GBA mutations (n = 27, aSNmax = 0.28); and GBA heterozygotes/LRRK2 heterozygotes (n = 4, aSNmax = 0.32, overall p = 0.63). In secondary analyses among Parkinson disease subjects with GBA mutations, maximal area of nigral echogenicity did not differ based on GBA mutation severity or mutation number. [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (n = 3) and [(18)F]-fluorodopa (n = 2) positron emission tomography in Parkinson disease subjects with heterozygous GBA mutations was consistent with findings in idiopathic Parkinson disease. Both transcranial sonography and positron emission tomography are abnormal in GBA mutation associated Parkinson disease, similar to other Parkinson disease subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Parkinson's disease: diagnostic utility of volumetric imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wei-Che; Chen, Meng-Hsiang [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); Chou, Kun-Hsien [National Yang-Ming University, Brain Research Center, Taipei (China); Lee, Pei-Lin [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Tsai, Nai-Wen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Kaohsiung (China); Chen, Hsiu-Ling [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kaohsiung (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China); Hsu, Ai-Ling [National Taiwan University, Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); Huang, Yung-Cheng [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kaohsiung (China); Lin, Ching-Po [National Yang-Ming University, Brain Research Center, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Taipei (China)

    2017-04-15

    This paper aims to examine the effectiveness of structural imaging as an aid in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). High-resolution T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 72 patients with idiopathic PD (mean age, 61.08 years) and 73 healthy subjects (mean age, 58.96 years). The whole brain was parcellated into 95 regions of interest using composite anatomical atlases, and region volumes were calculated. Three diagnostic classifiers were constructed using binary multiple logistic regression modeling: the (i) basal ganglion prior classifier, (ii) data-driven classifier, and (iii) basal ganglion prior/data-driven hybrid classifier. Leave-one-out cross validation was used to unbiasedly evaluate the predictive accuracy of imaging features. Pearson's correlation analysis was further performed to correlate outcome measurement using the best PD classifier with disease severity. Smaller volume in susceptible regions is diagnostic for Parkinson's disease. Compared with the other two classifiers, the basal ganglion prior/data-driven hybrid classifier had the highest diagnostic reliability with a sensitivity of 74%, specificity of 75%, and accuracy of 74%. Furthermore, outcome measurement using this classifier was associated with disease severity. Brain structural volumetric analysis with multiple logistic regression modeling can be a complementary tool for diagnosing PD. (orig.)

  5. Imaging features of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, J.C.; Shaw, P.; Miller, R.F.; Cartledge, J.D.; Nelson, M.; Bower, M.; Francis, N.; Padley, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To describe the computed tomography (CT) features of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated Castleman's disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nine HIV-positive patients with biopsy-proven Castleman's disease were studied. Clinical and demographic data, CD4 count, histological diagnosis and human herpes type 8 (HHV8) serology or immunostaining results were recorded. CT images were reviewed independently by two radiologists. RESULTS: CT findings included splenomegaly (n=7) and peripheral lymph node enlargement (axillary n=8, inguinal n=4). All nodes displayed mild to avid enhancement after intravenous administration of contrast material. Hepatomegaly was evident in seven patients. Other features included abdominal (n=6) and mediastinal (n=5) lymph node enlargement and pulmonary abnormalities (n=4). Patterns of parenchymal abnormality included bronchovascular nodularity (n=2), consolidation (n=1) and pleural effusion (n=2). On histological examination eight patients (spleen n=3, lymph node n=9, lung n=1 bone marrow n=1) had the plasma cell variant and one had mixed hyaline-vascular/plasma cell variant. The majority had either positive immunostaining for HHV8 or positive serology (n=8). CONCLUSION: Common imaging features of multicentric Castleman's disease in HIV infection are hepatosplenomegaly and peripheral lymph node enlargement. Although these imaging features may suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical context, they lack specificity and so biopsy is needed for diagnosis. In distinction from multicentric Castleman's disease in other populations the plasma cell variant is most commonly encountered, splenomegaly is a universal feature and there is a strong association with Kaposi's sarcoma

  6. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise; Brauner, Michel W.; Lenoir, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  7. The advancement in Alzheimer disease of imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinyan; Guan Yihui

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative disorders that deteriorate the life quality of the elderly in China and developed countries. Prevention and treatment of AD are the focal point in the study of brain science. In recent years,the rapid development of medical imaging technology enables us to get functional orientation and structure description of brain noninvasively and provides a substantial basis for studies of cognition, cognitive impairment, and pathogenesis.It also makes such multi-tiered research and trans-subject combination possible. The progress in AD of imaging technology is briefly reviewed in this article. (authors)

  8. Imaging of the thyroid in benign and malignant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intenzo, Charles M; Dam, Hung Q; Manzone, Timothy A; Kim, Sung M

    2012-01-01

    The thyroid gland was one of the first organs imaged in nuclear medicine, beginning in the 1940s. Thyroid scintigraphy is based on a specific phase or prelude to thyroid hormone synthesis, namely trapping of iodide or iodide analogues (ie, Tc99m pertechnetate), and in the case of radioactive iodine, eventual incorporation into thyroid hormone synthesis within the thyroid follicle. Moreover, thyroid scintigraphy is a reflection of the functional state of the gland, as well as the physiological state of any structure (ie, nodule) within the gland. Scintigraphy, therefore, provides information that anatomical imaging (ie, ultrasound, computed tomography [CT], magnetic resonance imaging) lacks. Thyroid scintigraphy plays an essential role in the management of patients with benign or malignant thyroid disease. In the former, the structure or architecture of the gland is best demonstrated by anatomical or cross-sectional imaging, such as ultrasound, CT, or even magnetic resonance imaging. The role of scintigraphy, however, is to display the functional state of the thyroid gland or that of a clinically palpable nodule within the gland. Such information is most useful in (1) patients with thyrotoxicosis, and (2) those patients whose thyroid nodules would not require tissue sampling if their nodules are hyperfunctioning. In neoplastic thyroid disease, thyroid scintigraphy is often standard of care for postthyroidectomy remnant evaluation and in subsequent thyroid cancer surveillance. Planar radioiodine imaging, in the form of the whole-body scan (WBS) and posttherapy scan (PTS), is a fundamental tool in differentiated thyroid cancer management. Continued controversy remains over the utility of WBS in a variety of patient risk groups and clinical scenarios. Proponents on both sides of the arguments compare WBS with PTS, thyroglobulin, and other imaging modalities with differing results. The paucity of large, randomized, prospective studies results in dependence on consensus

  9. [Inflammatory spinal diseases: axial spondyloarthritis : Central importance of imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraliakos, X; Fruth, M; Kiltz, U; Braun, J

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) includes classical ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as well as earlier stages and abortive courses of the disease, in which structural alterations have not yet occurred. These are classified as non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpa). Inflammatory changes in the entire axial skeleton are characteristic for axSpA and can be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while in most patients structural alterations, such as new bone formation with syndesmophytes and ankylosis develop in the later course of the disease. These bony alterations can best be visualized by conventional radiography and by computed tomography. Certain MRI sequences are nowadays considered as the standard method for depiction of inflammatory changes in axSpA. The introduction of MRI has led to a paradigm shift for this disease because the inflammatory lesions characteristic for the disease can be visualized at an early stage using appropriate MRI sequences.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of diseased cervical and lumbar intervertebral discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, Satoru; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takarada, Akira; Yamamoto, Itaru; Sato, Shuji.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of diseased cervical and lumbar intervertebral discs involving both intrinsic and extrinsic cord lesions were examined using either a 0.15 T resistive or a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic imaging system. The vertebrae, intervertebral discs, and spinal cord were delineated on spin-echo (SE) images with a long repetition time (TR) and a short echo time (proton density-weighted image). Protrusion of degenerated intervertebral discs into the spinal canal was clearly demonstrated not only on sagittal but also on parasagittal and transverse views. The location of protruded discs and compression of the spinal cord, caudal sac, and nerve roots were well visualized three-dimensionally. Pathological features of intervertebral discs were well appreciated on T 2 -weighted images with long TR and SE pulse sequences. Degeneration of intervertebral discs resulted in decreased signal intensity in cases of lumbar disc involvement. For suspected myelomalacia, the intrinsic cord lesion resulting from traumatic disc protrusion appeared as focal low signal intensity on T 1 -weithed images and as somewhat high intensity on T 2 weighted images. The inversion recovery sequence with median inversion time displayed an inferior image of low contrast and was judged uninformative in comparison to SE imags. The findings showed MRI to be an essential diagnostic technique for spinal cord disorders. It clearly pinpoints the anatomic structures of the spine and the features of disc degeneration. Both extrinsic and intrinsic cord abnormalities can be identified with MRI. The selection of proper pulse sequences is required for the differentiation of the object of interest. (Namekawa, K)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of diseased cervical and lumbar intervertebral discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoya, Satoru; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takarada, Akira; Yamamoto, Itaru; Sato, Shuji.

    1989-02-01

    Magnetic resonance images (MRI) of diseased cervical and lumbar intervertebral discs involving both intrinsic and extrinsic cord lesions were examined using either a 0.15 T resistive or a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic imaging system. The vertebrae, intervertebral discs, and spinal cord were delineated on spin-echo (SE) images with a long repetition time (TR) and a short echo time (proton density-weighted image). Protrusion of degenerated intervertebral discs into the spinal canal was clearly demonstrated not only on sagittal but also on parasagittal and transverse views. The location of protruded discs and compression of the spinal cord, caudal sac, and nerve roots were well visualized three-dimensionally. Pathological features of intervertebral discs were well appreciated on T/sub 2/-weighted images with long TR and SE pulse sequences. Degeneration of intervertebral discs resulted in decreased signal intensity in cases of lumbar disc involvement. For suspected myelomalacia, the intrinsic cord lesion resulting from traumatic disc protrusion appeared as focal low signal intensity on T/sub 1/-weithed images and as somewhat high intensity on T/sub 2/ weighted images. The inversion recovery sequence with median inversion time displayed an inferior image of low contrast and was judged uninformative in comparison to SE imags. The findings showed MRI to be an essential diagnostic technique for spinal cord disorders. It clearly pinpoints the anatomic structures of the spine and the features of disc degeneration. Both extrinsic and intrinsic cord abnormalities can be identified with MRI. The selection of proper pulse sequences is required for the differentiation of the object of interest. (Namekawa, K).

  12. Chagas disease study using satellite image processing: A Bolivian case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cuentas, Natalia I.; Roman-Gonzalez, Avid; Mantari, Alicia Alva; Muñoz, Luis AnthonyAucapuma

    2018-03-01

    Remote sensing is the technology that has enabled us to obtain information about the Earth's surface without directly contacting it. For this reason, currently, the Bolivian state has considered a list of interesting applications of remote sensing in the country, including the following: biodiversity and environment monitoring, mining and geology, epidemiology, agriculture, water resources and land use planning. The use of satellite images has become a great tool for epidemiology because with this technological advance we can determine the environment in which transmission occurs, the distribution of the disease and its evolution over time. In that context, one of the important diseases related to public health in Bolivia is Chagas disease, also known as South American Trypanosomiasis. Chagas is caused by a blood-sucking bug or Vinchuca, which causes serious intestinal and heart long term problems and affects 33.4% of the Bolivian population. This disease affects mostly humble people, so the Bolivian state invests millions of dollars to acquire medicine and distribute it for free. Due to the above reasons, the present research aims to analyze some areas of Bolivia using satellite images for developing an epidemiology study. The primary objective is to understand the environment in which the transmission of the disease happens, and the climatic conditions under which occurs, observe the behavior of the blood-sucking bug, identify in which months occur higher outbreaks, in which months the bug leaves its eggs, and under which weather conditions this happens. All this information would be contrasted with information extracted from the satellite images and data from the Ministry of Health, and the Institute of Meteorology in Bolivia. All this data will allow us to have a more integrated understanding of this disease and promote new possibilities to prevent and control it.

  13. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson's disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α -synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson's disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson's Disease therapy and reduce its side effects.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schalke, B.C.G.; Rohkamm, R.; Kaiser, W.

    1990-01-01

    In the last few years imaging procedures became also important in the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. We examined more than 150 patients with different neuromuscular diseases with MRI. Conventional diagnostic procedures like EMG, muscle biopsy can not be replaced by imaging procedures. MRI gives the chance to get additional diagnostic informations. It is possible to determine exact distribution and intensity of pathological changes in the muscle. Inflammatory muscle diseases can be differrentiated by T1/T2 values from atrophic/dystrophic diseases. The resolving power is very high and allows the exact detection of affected areas even in a single muscle. This can help to reduce false negative muscle biopsies. This is very useful in children and young adults. MRI can be used for the early detection of genetic myopathies and neuropathies. MRI allows to examine all muscles, including the heart, bone artefacts are absent. Heart muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases can directly be shown by this method without any risk for the patient. In addition P-spectroscopy can be done for better understanding of pathogenesis, especially if the exact distribution of pathological changes is known. (author)

  15. Adult Moyamoya disease angiographic images evolutive characters and treatment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jiangnan; Ling Feng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the angiographic images with evolutional characters and the treatment methods of the Moyamoya disease. Methods: The clinical manifestations, the radiographic changes and the comparative analysis between medicine treatment and surgery treatment, together with the laboratory tests findings were analyzed in one cases adult Moyamoya disease during six years. Conclusions: The angiographic characteristics of MMD show the supplied artery trunk stenosis, and followed by occlusion, with later appearance of vascular smoking sign. Medical treatment proved to be of null. Direct or indirect intra or extra cranial vascular anastomosis are effective for treatment

  16. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data....... It is concluded that PD most likely is characterized by widespread cortical hypometabolism, probably even at early disease stages. Widespread subcortical hypermetabolism is probably not a feature of PD, although certain small basal ganglia structures, such as the external pallidum, may display true...

  17. Imaging diagnosis of congenital heart disease with single coronary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Li Yuhua; Zhong Yumin; Sun Aimin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To report 56 cases of congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery and to evaluate the imaging diagnostic techniques. Methods: All 56 patients with congenital single coronary artery underwent angiocardiography. Contrast enhancement magnetic resonance angiography (CE MRA) was performed in 4 cases. 48 cases were confirmed by operation. Results: In these 56 cases, single left coronary artery was found in 44 cases and single right coronary artery was found in 12. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease with congenital single coronary artery is not rare and correct diagnosis is very important for surgery

  18. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauwens, Matthias; Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn; Royen, Bart van; Backes, Walter; Bucerius, Jan; Mottaghy, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, 18 F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to 18 F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as 99m Tc-sestamibi, 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), 18 F-fluorodopa and 18 F-14(R,S)-[ 18 F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  19. Molecular imaging of brown adipose tissue in health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauwens, Matthias [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University, Research School NUTRIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wierts, Roel; Brans, Boudewijn [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Royen, Bart van; Backes, Walter [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University, Research School CARIM, Maastricht (Netherlands); Mottaghy, Felix [MUMC, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uniklinikum Aachen, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has transformed from an interfering tissue in oncological {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to an independent imaging research field. This review takes the perspective from the imaging methodology on which human BAT research has come to rely on heavily. This review analyses relevant PubMed-indexed publications that discuss molecular imaging methods of BAT. In addition, reported links between BAT and human diseases such as obesity are discussed, and the possibilities for imaging in these fields are highlighted. Radiopharmaceuticals aiming at several different biological mechanisms of BAT are discussed and evaluated. Prospective, dedicated studies allow visualization of BAT function in a high percentage of human subjects. BAT dysfunction has been implicated in obesity, linked with diabetes and associated with cachexia and atherosclerosis. Presently, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is the most useful tool for evaluating therapies aiming at BAT activity. In addition to {sup 18}F-FDG, other radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi, {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), {sup 18}F-fluorodopa and {sup 18}F-14(R,S)-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (FTHA) may have a potential for visualizing other aspects of BAT activity. MRI methods are under continuous development and provide the prospect of functional imaging without ionizing radiation. Molecular imaging of BAT can be used to quantitatively assess different aspects of BAT metabolic activity. (orig.)

  20. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebola O. Sogbein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed.

  1. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Sorantin, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of white matter diseases of prematurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary A.; Supramaniam, Veena; Ederies, Ashraf; Chew, Andrew; Anjari, Mustafa; Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Hammersmith Hospital, Robert Steiner MR Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Bassi, Laura; Groppo, Michela; Ramenghi, Luca A. [University of Milan, NICU, Institute of Pediatrics and Neonatology, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena, Milan (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Periventricular leucomalacia (PVL) and parenchymal venous infarction complicating germinal matrix/intraventricular haemorrhage have long been recognised as the two significant white matter diseases responsible for the majority of cases of cerebral palsy in survivors of preterm birth. However, more recent studies using magnetic resonance imaging to assess the preterm brain have documented two new appearances, adding to the spectrum of white matter disease of prematurity: punctate white matter lesions, and diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI). These appear to be more common than PVL but less significant in terms of their impact on individual neurodevelopment. They may, however, be associated with later cognitive and behavioural disorders known to be common following preterm birth. It remains unclear whether PVL, punctate lesions, and DEHSI represent a continuum of disorders occurring as a result of a similar injurious process to the developing white matter. This review discusses the role of MR imaging in investigating these three disorders in terms of aetiology, pathology, and outcome. (orig.)

  3. Soft tissue manifestations of early rheumatic disease. Imaging with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treitl, M.; Panteleon, A.; Koerner, M.; Becker-Gaab, C.; Reiser, M.; Wirth, S.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in early rheumatic diseases manifesting at the soft tissues of the hand using a retrospective analysis. A total of 186 MRI examinations of patients with clinical suspicion of a rheumatic disease were evaluated in a consensus reading by two experienced radiologists. All imaging patterns were assessed with respect to their type and localization. Under blinded and non-blinded conditions diagnoses were correlated with final clinical diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 45.7%) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA, 15.6%). The mean correlation between clinical and MRI diagnosis (r) was 0.75 in blinded and 0.853 in non-blinded reading (p [de

  4. Dissociation of Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease effects with imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Dawn C; Lukic, Ana S; Andrews, Randolph D; Marendic, Boris; Brewer, James; Rissman, Robert A; Mosconi, Lisa; Strother, Stephen C; Wernick, Miles N; Mobley, William C; Ness, Seth; Schmidt, Mark E; Rafii, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) adults experience accumulation of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like amyloid plaques and tangles and a high incidence of dementia and could provide an enriched population to study AD-targeted treatments. However, to evaluate effects of therapeutic intervention, it is necessary to dissociate the contributions of DS and AD from overall phenotype. Imaging biomarkers offer the potential to characterize and stratify patients who will worsen clinically but have yielded mixed findings in DS subjects. We evaluated 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), florbetapir PET, and structural magnetic resonance (sMR) image data from 12 nondemented DS adults using advanced multivariate machine learning methods. Our results showed distinctive patterns of glucose metabolism and brain volume enabling dissociation of DS and AD effects. AD-like pattern expression corresponded to amyloid burden and clinical measures. These findings lay groundwork to enable AD clinical trials with characterization and disease-specific tracking of DS adults.

  5. Imaging of pulmonary involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matcovschi, S.; Volcovschi, E.; Obada, A.; Cuciuc, S.

    2007-01-01

    Conjunctive tissue pathology obtains special aspect, by affecting most workable contingent - young and middle-age persons. In clinical practice special value has early diagnostic of these processes that permits to use in time adequate methods of treatment. In connection with appearance of new methods of imaging diagnostic, appears necessity of estimation of its diagnostic possibilities with main aim to optimize early diagnostic of these diseases. (authors)

  6. Dissociation of Down Syndrome and Alzheimers Disease Effects With Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    could significantly enhance the viability of clinical trials of AD- targeted therapies in DS adults.Acknowledgments We acknowledge and thank Janssen...Am J Psychiatry 2002;159:738–45. [11] Head E, Silverman W, Patterson D, Lott IT. Aging and DS. Curr Ger- ontol Geriatr Res 2012;2012:412536. [12...disease neuro- imaging initiative subjects. Ann Neurol 2009;65:403–13. [41] Matthews DC, Davies M, Murray J, Williams S, Tsui WH, Li Y, et al. Physical

  7. Three-dimensional MR imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laschinger, J.C.; Vannier, M.W.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Cox, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Contiguous 5-mm thick ECG-gated MR images of the thorax were edited using surface reconstruction techniques to produce three-dimensional (3D) images of the heart and great vessels in four healthy individuals and 25 patients with congenital heart disease (aged 3 months-30 years). Anomalies studied include atrial and ventricular septal defects, aortic coarctation, AV canal defects, double outlet ventricles, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and a wide spectrum of patients with tetralogy of Fallot. The results were correlated with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. Three-dimensional reconstructions accurately localized the dimensions and locations of all cardiac and great vessel anomalies and often displayed anatomic findings not diagnosed or visualized with other forms of diagnostic imaging

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.; Klatte, E.C.; Baehner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Seven children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the bone marrow: results showed that it is technically feasible to obtain good MR images of marrow in children. MR has detected abnormality in the bone marrow of a child who had metastatic neuroblastoma. The extent of abnormality in the femur correlated well with findings of a bone marrow isotope scan. In one child who had idiopathic aplastic anemia, diseased marrow could not be distinguished from normal marrow on MR images. MRI identified abnormality of the marrow in osteogenic sarcoma, and demonstrated change in response to chemotherapy. It displayed marrow spread of tumors as well as CT. MRI showed marrow abnormality in four children who had leukemia

  9. Imaging of carotid artery disease: from luminology to function?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, J.H. [University Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    There have been tremendous advances in our ability to image atheromatous disease, particularly in the carotid artery, which is accessible and large enough to image. The repertoire of methodology available is growing, giving anatomical information on luminal narrowing which is approaching the level at which conventional carotid angiography will become very uncommon as CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques become the norm. More exciting is the tentative ability to perform functional plaque imaging addressing enhancement patterns and macrophage activity using MR or positron-emission tomography techniques. These techniques, once rigorously evaluated, may, in addition to complex mathematical modelling of plaque, eventually allow us to assess true plaque risk. Time will best judge whether we will be able to move from the use of simple luminology to assessment of plaque function. (orig.)

  10. Imaging of carotid artery disease: from luminology to function?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    There have been tremendous advances in our ability to image atheromatous disease, particularly in the carotid artery, which is accessible and large enough to image. The repertoire of methodology available is growing, giving anatomical information on luminal narrowing which is approaching the level at which conventional carotid angiography will become very uncommon as CT and contrast-enhanced MR angiographic techniques become the norm. More exciting is the tentative ability to perform functional plaque imaging addressing enhancement patterns and macrophage activity using MR or positron-emission tomography techniques. These techniques, once rigorously evaluated, may, in addition to complex mathematical modelling of plaque, eventually allow us to assess true plaque risk. Time will best judge whether we will be able to move from the use of simple luminology to assessment of plaque function. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sechtem, U.; Welslau, R.; Hilger, H.H.; Theissen, P.; Jungehuelsing, M.; Schicha, H.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of the great number of imaging procedures available, it is still difficult to quantify the severity of valvular heart disease. Dynamic MRI offers new approaches to visualize the turbulent blood flow through stenosed or insufficient heart valves. In addition, it is possible to assess the severity of valvular insufficiency based on precise measurements of rigth- and left-ventricular stroke volumes or of systemic and pulmonary flow. Valvular stenoses are difficult to quantify by MRI because flow velocity measurements based on phase analysis can only be made at low flow rates at present. Some progress may be achieved by further shortening of echo times. In patients with cardiac valve replacement MRI is often superior to other imaging procedures because variable imaging planes facilitate differentiation between transvalvular and paravalvular leaks. Additionally, the severity of valvular incompetence can be assessed in such cases in the same way as in patients with insufficiency of the native heart valve. (orig.) [de

  12. MR imaging of the spine: trauma and degenerative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmink, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the capabilities and drawbacks of MR imaging in patients with trauma to the spine and degenerative spinal conditions. In spinal trauma MR imaging is secondary to plain X-ray films and CT because of the greater availability and ease of performance of these techniques and their superior capability for detecting vertebral fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting ligamentous ruptures and intraspinal mass lesions such as hematoma, and for assessing the state of the spinal cord and prognosis of a cord injury. In degenerative spinal disease the necessity is emphasized of critically evaluating the clinical relevance of any abnormal feature detected, as findings of degenerative pathology are common in individuals without symptoms. Magnetic resonance myelography permits rapid and accurate assessment of the state of the lumbar nerve roots (compressed or not). In the cervical region the quality of the myelographic picture is often degraded in patients with a narrow spinal canal. (orig.)

  13. Portable, low-priced retinal imager for eye disease screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila; VanNess, Richard; Barriga, E. S.; Zamora, Gilberto

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a portable, low-priced, easy to use non-mydriatic retinal camera for eye disease screening in underserved urban and rural locations. Existing portable retinal imagers do not meet the requirements of a low-cost camera with sufficient technical capabilities (field of view, image quality, portability, battery power, and ease-of-use) to be distributed widely to low volume clinics, such as the offices of single primary care physicians serving rural communities or other economically stressed healthcare facilities. Our approach for Smart i-Rx is based primarily on a significant departure from current generations of desktop and hand-held commercial retinal cameras as well as those under development. Our techniques include: 1) Exclusive use of off-the-shelf components; 2) Integration of retinal imaging device into low-cost, high utility camera mount and chin rest; 3) Unique optical and illumination designed for small form factor; and 4) Exploitation of autofocus technology built into present digital SLR recreational cameras; and 5) Integration of a polarization technique to avoid the corneal reflex. In a prospective study, 41 out of 44 diabetics were imaged successfully. No imaging was attempted on three of the subjects due to noticeably small pupils (less than 2mm). The images were of sufficient quality to detect abnormalities related to diabetic retinopathy, such as microaneurysms and exudates. These images were compared with ones taken non-mydriatically with a Canon CR-1 Mark II camera. No cases identified as having DR by expert retinal graders were missed in the Smart i-Rx images.

  14. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae [Sungkwunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults.

  15. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae

    2001-01-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging markers for early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Marino; Rosella Ciurleo; Giuseppe Di Lorenzo; Marina Barresi; Simona De Salvo; Sabrina Giacoppo; Alessia Bramanti; Pietro Lanzafame; Placido Bramanti

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective and progressive degeneration, as well as loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. In PD, approximately 60-70% of nigrostriatal neurons are degenerated and 80% of content of the striatal dopamine is reduced before the diagnosis can be established according to widely accepted clinical diagnostic criteria. This condition describes a stage of disease called "prodromal", where non-motor symptoms, such as olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder, depression, precede motor sign of PD. Detection of prodromal phase of PD is becoming an important goal for determining the prognosis and choosing a suitable treatment strategy. In this review, we present some non-invasive instrumental approaches that could be useful to identify patients in the prodromal phase of PD or in an early clinical phase, when the first motor symptoms begin to be apparent. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and advanced MRI techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging, diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI, are useful to differentiate early PD with initial motor symptoms from atypical parkinsonian disorders, thus, making easier early diagnosis. Functional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging techniques can show abnormalities in the olfactory system in prodromal PD.

  17. Neurochemical imaging of Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative dementias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.A.; Minoshima, S.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    A wide variety of neurochemical and functional imaging approaches have been applied to the study of progressive dementias, particularly Alzheimer's disease (Ad) and related disorders. Despite considerable progress in the past decade, the cause((s) of most cases of Ad remain undetermined and preventive or protective therapies are lacking. Specifically-designed imaging procedures have permitted the testing of pathophysiological hypotheses of the etiology and progression of Ad, and have yielded important insights in several areas including the potential roles of cerebral cortical cholinergic lesions, cellular inflammation, and losses of cortical synapses. From the perspective of clinical diagnosis, PET glucose metabolism imaging with use of ( 18 F)2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality yet identified. The overall performance of PET FDG is favorable for routine clinical evaluation of suspected Ad, and will likely gain increasing utilization in the near future. Assessments of glucose metabolism and other, specific aspects of neurochemistry in Ad will provide direct measures of therapeutic drug actions and may permit distinction of symptomatic versus disease-modifying therapies as they are developed and introduced in clinical trials

  18. Evaluation of Parkinson's disease using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedolin, Leonardo; Marchiori, Edson; Rieder, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Parkinson's disease. In the period from October 1999 to October 2002, 42 patients with parkinsonism were investigated using a 1.5 T MR equipment. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 26) and patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome (n = 16). The results were compared with a control group (n = 18). The following variables were evaluated: thickness of the mesencephalon compact pars, hypointense signal in the putamen, degree of brain atrophy, lesions in the mesencephalon, lesions in the white matter, and the presence of lesions in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen. Statistical data analysis was carried out using the SPSS program. Results: The mean age was 58.2 years for the Parkinson's disease and control groups, and 60.5 years for the atypical Parkinsonian syndrome group. Patients with Parkinson's disease and atypical Parkinsonian syndromes presented decreased thickness of the compact pars and a higher degree of signal hypointensity in the putamen. Cerebral atrophy was more prominent in the patients with atypical Parkinsonian syndrome. Lesions in mesencephalon and white matter were similar in both groups. The frequency of hyperintense signal in the posterior-lateral edge of the putamen was low within the studied population, although that could suggest multiple-system atrophy. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the detection of brain morphological changes that may help in the diagnosis of Parkinsonian syndromes. (author)

  19. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guio, F. De; Jouvent, E.; Biessels, G.J.; Black, S.E.; Brayne, C.; Chen, C.; Cordonnier, C.; Leeuw, F.E. de; Dichgans, M.; Doubal, F.; Duering, M.; Dufouil, C.; Duzel, E.; Fazekas, F.; Hachinski, V.; Ikram, M.A.; Linn, J.; Matthews, P.M.; Mazoyer, B.; Mok, V.; Norrving, B.; O'Brien, J.T.; Pantoni, L.; Ropele, S.; Sachdev, P.; Schmidt, R.; Seshadri, S.; Smith, E.E.; Sposato, L.A.; Stephan, B.; Swartz, R.H.; Tzourio, C.; Buchem, M. van; Lugt, A. van der; Oostenbrugge, R.; Vernooij, M.W.; Viswanathan, A.; Werring, D.; Wollenweber, F.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Chabriat, H.

    2016-01-01

    Brain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility of these

  20. Reproducibility and variability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging markers in cerebral small vessel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Guio, F. (François); Jouvent, E. (Eric); G.J. Biessels (Geert Jan); S.E. Black (Sandra); C. Brayne (Carol); C. Chen (Christopher); C. Cordonnier (Charlotte); H.F. de Leeuw (Frank); C. Kubisch (Christian); Doubal, F. (Fergus); Duering, M. (Marco); C. Dufouil (Carole); Duzel, E. (Emrah); F. Fazekas (Franz); V. Hachinski (Vladimir); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); J. Linn (Jennifer); P.M. Matthews (P.); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); Mok, V. (Vincent); B. Norrving (Bo); O'Brien, J.T. (John T.); Pantoni, L. (Leonardo); S. Ropele (Stefan); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); S. Seshadri (Sudha); E.E. Smith (Eric); L.A. Sposato (Luciano A); B.C.M. Stephan; Swartz, R.H. (Richard H.); C. Tzourio (Christophe); M.A. van Buchem (Mark); A. van der Lugt (Aad); R.J. van Oostenbrugge (Robert); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); Viswanathan, A. (Anand); D.J. Werring (David); Wollenweber, F. (Frank); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); Chabriat, H. (Hugues)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain imaging is essential for the diagnosis and characterization of cerebral small vessel disease. Several magnetic resonance imaging markers have therefore emerged, providing new information on the diagnosis, progression, and mechanisms of small vessel disease. Yet, the reproducibility

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral joints in rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Møller, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    The need for better methods than the conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographical examinations in the management of inflammatory joint diseases is evident, since these methods are not sensitive or specific to early pathologies and subtle changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers...... improved sensitivity to early inflammatory and destructive changes in peripheral joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and, even though less well documented, in other inflammatory joint diseases. Good evidence is available that MRI bone erosions represent true bone abnormalities and are predictors......, this chapter discusses the potential for the use of MRI in the clinical management of patients with suspected and diagnosed inflammatory joint diseases, as well as research priorities and clinical situations where the use of MRI could be suggested...

  2. Imaging Spectrums of the Male Breast Diseases: A Pictorial Essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Ahn, Hye Kyung; Chung, Soo Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Scred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ah young [Dept. of Pathology, Kangnam Scred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Most described male breast lesions, such as gynecomastia, are benign. The overall incidence of male breast cancer is less than 3%. Like women, common presentations of male breast diseases are palpable lumps or tenderness. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasound are generally used for work-up of breast diseases in both women and men. However, men do not undergo screening mammograms; all male patients are examined in symptomatic cases only. Therefore, all male breast examinations are diagnostic, whereas the majority of the examinations for women are for screening purpose. The differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions is important, especially for men, because the reported prognosis of male breast cancer is poor due to delayed diagnosis. In this article, we review the spectrum of male breast diseases, from benign to malignant, and illustrate their ultrasonographic and mammographic imaging features.

  3. Imaging Spectrums of the Male Breast Diseases: A Pictorial Essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye Jeong; Choi, Seon Hyeong; Ahn, Hye Kyung; Chung, Soo Young; Yang Ik; Jung, Ah young

    2011-01-01

    Most described male breast lesions, such as gynecomastia, are benign. The overall incidence of male breast cancer is less than 3%. Like women, common presentations of male breast diseases are palpable lumps or tenderness. Physical examination, mammography and ultrasound are generally used for work-up of breast diseases in both women and men. However, men do not undergo screening mammograms; all male patients are examined in symptomatic cases only. Therefore, all male breast examinations are diagnostic, whereas the majority of the examinations for women are for screening purpose. The differentiation between benign and malignant breast lesions is important, especially for men, because the reported prognosis of male breast cancer is poor due to delayed diagnosis. In this article, we review the spectrum of male breast diseases, from benign to malignant, and illustrate their ultrasonographic and mammographic imaging features.

  4. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, G. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Shaprio, R.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Abdelwahab, I.F. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  5. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, G.; Shaprio, R.S.; Abdelwahab, I.F.; Grabowski, G.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of CT scanning and radionuclide imaging in liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.L.; Esposito, F.S.

    1980-01-01

    Early experience with body CT suggested its usefulness in many diagnostic problems; jaundice, renal and pancreatic masses, and in the evaluation of relatively inaccessible parts of the body, such as the retroperitineum, mediastinum, and pelvis. Investigation of hepatic disease by CT was not unexpectedly compared to radionuclide liver scanning, the major preexisting modality for imaging the liver. In the evaluation of the jaundiced patient, CT rapidly assumed a major role, providing more specific information about the liver than the RN liver scan, as well as demonstrating adjacent organs. CT differentiate obstructive from non-obstructive jaundice. With respect to mass lesions of the liver, the RN liver scan is more sensitive than CT but less specific. The abnormalities on an isotope image of the liver consist of normal variants in configuration, extrinsic compression by adjacent structures, cysts, hemangiomata, abscesses, and neoplasms. These suspected lesions may then be better delineated by the CT image, and a more precise diagnosis made. The physiologic information provided by the RN liver scan is an added facet which is helpful in the patient with diffuse hepatic disease. The CT image will be normal in many of these patients, however, hemochromatosis and fatty infiltration lend themselves especially to density evaluation by CT. The evaluation of lymphoma is more thorough with CT. Structures other than the liver, such as lymph nodes, are visualized. Gallium, however, provides additional isotopic information in patients with lymphoma, and in addition, is known to be useful in the investigation of a febrile patient with an abscess. Newer isotopic agents expand hepatic imaging in other directions, visualizing the biliary tree and evaluating the jaundiced patient

  7. Molecular imaging in neurological diseases; Molekulare Bildgebung bei neurologischen Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimold, M.; Fougere, C. la [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Abteilung Nuklearmedizin und Klinische Molekulare Bildgebung, Department Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    In neurodegeneration and in neuro-oncology, the standard imaging procedure, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), shows limited sensitivity and specificity. Molecular imaging with specific positron-emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers allows various molecular targets and metabolic processes to be assessed and is thus a valuable adjunct to MRI. Two important examples are referred to here: amino acid transport for neuro-oncological issues, and the recently approved PET tracers for detecting amyloid depositions during the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease. This review discusses the clinical relevance and indications for the following nuclear medicine imaging procedures: amyloid PET, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET, and dopamine transporter (DaT)-SPECT for the diagnosis of dementia and the differential diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, in addition to amino acid PET for the diagnosis of brain tumors and somatostatin receptor imaging in meningioma. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) weist als Standardverfahren bei neurodegenerativen und neuroonkologischen Fragestellungen eine eingeschraenkte Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet auf. Die nuklearmedizinische molekulare Bildgebung mit spezifischen Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)- und single-photon-emission-computed-tomography(SPECT)-Tracern ermoeglicht die Darstellung verschiedener molekularer Targets bzw. Stoffwechselprozesse und stellt damit eine wichtige Ergaenzung zur MRT dar. Hier sei exemplarisch auf die Darstellung des Aminosaeuretransports im Rahmen neuroonkologischer Fragestellungen verwiesen, sowie auf die bereits im praeklinischen Stadium der Alzheimer-Demenz nachweisbaren Amyloidablagerungen mit hierfuer seit Kurzem zugelassenen PET-Tracern. Dieser Uebersichtsbeitrag bespricht die klinische Bedeutung bzw. die Indikationen der folgenden nuklearmedizinischen Untersuchungsverfahren: der Amyloid-PET, der {sup 18}F

  8. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in children with heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitomori, Toshihiro; Ono, Yasuo; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kohata, Tohru; Tanimoto, Takeshi.

    1985-01-01

    201-TlCl myocardial imaging studies were performed to evaluate systolic pressure of right ventricle on 107 patients including 89 patients with congenital cardiac disease, patients with primary pulmonary hypertension and 13 patients with history of MCLS with the age range of 2 months to 17 years. The congenital cardiac disease group included 30 patients with tetralogy of Fallot, 8 patients with pulmonary stenosis (included 1 patient with double chambered right ventricle), 20 patients with ventricular septal defect, 10 patients with patent ductus arteriosus, 9 patients with atrial septal defect and 12 patients with complete transposition of greate arteries. None of the patients with history of MCLS had coronary involvement. 50 μCi/kg of 201-TlCl was infused intravenously and after 15 minutes the images were obtained from 5 directions (anterior, LAO 30, LAO 45, LAO 60 and lateral). The angle was determined to demonstrate the intraventricular septum and ventricular free walls cleary separated. The image of end-diastolic phase was obtained with ECG syncronized gated method from that direction. The ROI (region of interest) was defined as a slice line by drawing two lines perpendicular to the septum and the counts of the left and right ventricular free wall (Cl and Cr) were analized to evaluate the pressure of right ventricle. The pressure of ventricles were obtained by cardiac catheterization performed at the same time with myocardial imaging. The ratio of Cl and Cr (Cr/Cl) had good correlation with the ratio of peak systolic pressure of left ventricle and right ventricle (regression equation Y=0.84X+0.08, r=0.87). In each congenital heart disease group, very good corelation was also demonstrated (Y=1.46X-0.30, r=0.96 in PS ; Y=0.70X0.20, r=0.91 in VSD ; Y=0.86X+0.15, r=0.78 in ASD and Y=0.72X+0.24, r=0.80 in PDA). Thus 201-TlCl myocardial imaging was useful method to evaluate right ventricular pressure noninvasively in congenital cardiac disease. (author)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in prostate disease. Review of 58 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevenois, P.A.; Van Regemorter, G.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Delcour, C.; Corbusier, A.; Struyven, J.

    1987-03-01

    Forty-eight patients with prostatic disease (benign prostatic hyperplasia (B.P.H.), carcinoma, cysts, myoma and prostatitis) and 10 normal volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging (M.R.I) of the prostate. The prostatic parenchyma was best evaluated by a T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequence. The prostate in patients with B.P.H. often had an homogeneous or more rarely a nodular appearance on T2-weighted images. In most cases, a peripheral dark rim is observed. All prostate in patients with carcinoma had an heterogeneous appearance on T2-weighted images. While most of the prostatic carcinomas appeared hypointense relative to adjacent prostatic parenchyma, some of the neoplasms had a high or mixed-high and low signal. The myoma showed a low-signal nodule like carcinoma. The cyst appears as a liquid tumor. The prostatitis had an homogeneous bright signal. With the used methodology, MRI can differentiate prostatic diseases in many cases. Nevertheless the technique has to be optimalized to improve its accuracy.

  10. Lung function imaging methods in Cystic Fibrosis pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziej, Magdalena; de Veer, Michael J; Cholewa, Marian; Egan, Gary F; Thompson, Bruce R

    2017-05-17

    Monitoring of pulmonary physiology is fundamental to the clinical management of patients with Cystic Fibrosis. The current standard clinical practise uses spirometry to assess lung function which delivers a clinically relevant functional readout of total lung function, however does not supply any visible or localised information. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is a well-established current 'gold standard' method for monitoring lung anatomical changes in Cystic Fibrosis patients. HRCT provides excellent morphological information, however, the X-ray radiation dose can become significant if multiple scans are required to monitor chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis. X-ray phase-contrast imaging is another emerging X-ray based methodology for Cystic Fibrosis lung assessment which provides dynamic morphological and functional information, albeit with even higher X-ray doses than HRCT. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-ionising radiation imaging method that is garnering growing interest among researchers and clinicians working with Cystic Fibrosis patients. Recent advances in MRI have opened up the possibilities to observe lung function in real time to potentially allow sensitive and accurate assessment of disease progression. The use of hyperpolarized gas or non-contrast enhanced MRI can be tailored to clinical needs. While MRI offers significant promise it still suffers from poor spatial resolution and the development of an objective scoring system especially for ventilation assessment.

  11. Cine magnetic resonance imaging in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, Teiji; Kiyomatsu, Yumi; Kato, Hirohisa; Abe, Toushi; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Ohtake, Hisashi; Eto, Takaharu.

    1989-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 33 patients aged 19 days to 18 years (mean 5.1 years), who had congenital heart disease comfirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI with spin echo (SE) sequence was perfomed to evaluate cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30 deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30∼40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128X128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients. Intracardiac and intravasucular blood flow were visualized with high signal intensity area, whereas ventricular filling flow and left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect and atrial septal defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. However, in the patients who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts. Gated MRI with SE sequence provides excellent visualization of fine structures, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  12. MR imaging of Minamata disease. Qualitative and quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korogi, Yukunori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa; Sumi, Minako; Hirai, Toshinori; Okuda, Tomoko; Shinzato, Jintetsu; Okajima, Toru.

    1994-01-01

    Minamata disease (MD), a result of methylmercury poisoning, is a neurological illness caused by ingestion of contaminated seafood. We evaluated MR findings of patients with MD qualitatively and quantitatively. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla was performed in seven patients with MD and in eight control subjects. All of our patients showed typical neurological findings like sensory disturbance, constriction of the visual fields, and ataxia. In the quantitative image analysis, inferior and middle parts of the cerebellar vermis and cerebellar hemispheres were significantly atrophic in comparison with the normal controls. There were no significant differences in measurements of the basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles, corpus callosum, or cerebral hemispheres between MD and the normal controls. The calcarine sulci and central sulci were significantly dilated, reflecting atrophy of the visual cortex and postcentral cortex, respectively. The lesions located in the calcarine area, cerebellum, and postcentral gyri were related to three characteristic manifestations of this disease, constriction of the visual fields, ataxia, and sensory disturbance, respectively. MR imaging has proved to be useful in evaluating the CNS abnormalities of methylmercury poisoning. (author)

  13. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging in prostate disease. Review of 58 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevenois, P.A.; Van Regemorter, G.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Delcour, C.; Corbusier, A.; Struyven, J.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with prostatic disease (benign prostatic hyperplasia (B.P.H.), carcinoma, cysts, myoma and prostatitis) and 10 normal volunteers underwent magnetic resonance imaging (M.R.I) of the prostate. The prostatic parenchyma was best evaluated by a T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequence. The prostate in patients with B.P.H. often had an homogeneous or more rarely a nodular appearance on T2-weighted images. In most cases, a peripheral dark rim is observed. All prostate in patients with carcinoma had an heterogeneous appearance on T2-weighted images. While most of the prostatic carcinomas appeared hypointense relative to adjacent prostatic parenchyma, some of the neoplasms had a high or mixed-high and low signal. The myoma showed a low-signal nodule like carcinoma. The cyst appears as a liquid tumor. The prostatitis had an homogeneous bright signal. With the used methodology, MRI can differentiate prostatic diseases in many cases. Nevertheless the technique has to be optimalized to improve its accuracy [fr

  15. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, Dominik; Ebersberger, Hans U.; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Botnar, Rene M.; Makowski, Marcus R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  16. Functional and morphological imaging of thyroid associated eye disease. Data evaluation by means of image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, H.

    2002-08-01

    Aim: to recognize the structures that show an uptake of a 99mTc-labeled octreotide tracer within the orbit and head in patients with thyroid associated eye disease relying on image fusion. Methods: A series of 18 patients presenting the signs and symptoms of thyroid associated eye disease were studied. Functional imaging was done with 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC, a newly in-house developed tracer. Both whole body as well as single photon emission tomographies (SPECT) of the head were obtained in each patient. Parallel to nuclear medicine imaging, morphological imaging was done using either computed tomography or magnetic resonance. Results: By means of image fusion farther more information on the functional status of the patients was obtained. All areas showing an uptake could be anatomically identified, revealing a series of organs that had not yet been consideren in this disease. The organs presenting tracer uptake showed characteristic forms as described below: - eye glass sign: lacrimal gland and lacrimal ducts - scissors sign: eye muscles, rectus sup. and inf. - arch on CT: muscle displacement - Omega sign: tonsils and salivary glands - W- sign: tonsils and salivary glands Conclusions: By means of image fusion it was possible to recognize that a series of organs of the neck and head express somatostatin receptors. We interpret these results as a sign of inflammation of the lacrimal glands, the lacrimal ducts, the cervical lymphatics, the anterior portions of the extra ocular eye muscles and muscles of the posterior cervical region. Somatostatin uptake in these sturctures reflects the prescence of specific receptors which reflect the immuno regulating function of the peptide. (author)

  17. Imaging noradrenergic influence on amyloid pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkeler, A.; Waerzeggers, Y.; Klose, A.; Monfared, P.; Thomas, A.V.; Jacobs, A.H.; Schubert, M.; Heneka, M.T.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims towards the non-invasive characterization of disease-specific molecular alterations in the living organism in vivo. In that, molecular imaging opens a new dimension in our understanding of disease pathogenesis, as it allows the non-invasive determination of the dynamics of changes on the molecular level. The imaging technology being employed includes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging as well as optical-based imaging technologies. These imaging modalities are employed together or alone for disease phenotyping, development of imaging-guided therapeutic strategies and in basic and translational research. In this study, we review recent investigations employing positron emission tomography and MRI for phenotyping mouse models of Alzheimers' disease by imaging. We demonstrate that imaging has an important role in the characterization of mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases. (orig.)

  18. Statistical image analysis of cerebral blood flow in moyamoya disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaru; Yuzawa, Izumi; Suzuki, Sachio; Kurata, Akira; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Asano, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The Summary of this study was to investigate pathophysiology of moyamoya disease, we analyzed brain single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images of patients with this disease by using interface software for a 3-dimensional (3D) data extraction format. Presenting symptoms were transient ischemic attack (TIA) in 21 patients and hemorrhage in 6 patients. All the patients underwent brain SPECT scan of 123 I-iofetamine (IMP) at rest and after acetazolamide challenge (17 mg/kg iv, 2-day method). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was quantitatively measured using arterial blood sampling and an autoradiography model. The group of the patients who presented with TIAs showed decreased CBF in the frontal lobe at rest compared to that of patients with hemorrhage, but Z-score ((mean-patient data)/ standard deviation (SD)) did not reach statistical significance. Significant CBF decrease after acetazolamide challenge was observed in a wider cerebral cortical area in the TIA group than in the hemorrhagic group. The brain region of hemodynamic ischemia (stage II) correlated well with the responsible cortical area for clinical symptoms of TIA. A hemodynamic ischemia stage image clearly represented recovery of reserve capacity after bypass surgery. Statistical evaluation of SPECT may be useful to understand and clarify the pathophysiology of this disease. (author)

  19. Imaging neurochemistry of cerebrovascular disease with PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatazawa, J.; Shimosegawa, E.

    1998-01-01

    Pathophysiology od cerebrovascular disease has been studied by measuring cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). These parameters are measures for brain tissue consisting of heterogeneous components such as neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. It is still difficult to evaluate brain damages specifically involving either neurons or other components. Several trials were recently conducted to visualize neuron-specific injury in cerebrovascular disease by means of 11 C flumazenil for PET and 123 I-iomazenil for SPECT. These tracers selectively bind to central benzodiazepine receptor which is purely neuronal. A reduced accumulation of these ligands was found in the area surrounding the complete infarction and in the cortex remote from putaminal hemorrhage, indicating the existence of neuron specific injury not visualized by CT and MR. Neurological deficits were well correlated with the loss of cortical accumulation of these ligands. These preliminary studies indicated a potential of neurochemical imaging in cerebrovascular disease. Vulnerability to ischemia which may differ among brain tissue components, among subpopulations of neurons, and among pre-synaptic and post-synaptic functions can be more precisely examined. Neurochemical imaging can be also applied to reveal releases and re-organization of each neurotransmitter-acceptor system after stroke

  20. Gender and images of heart disease in Scandinavian drug advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riska, Elianne; Heikell, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the construction of the "heart disease candidate" in advertisements for cardiovascular drugs in Scandinavian medical journals. All advertisements for cardiovascular drugs (n = 603) in Scandinavian medical journals (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) in 2005 were collected. Only advertisements that portray users (n = 289, 48% of the advertisements) were analyzed. The results show that coronary candidacy is constructed as a male condition in half of the advertisements for cardiovascular drugs. The advertisements suggest a gendering of heart disease: men are the major victims of heart failure and cardiac insufficiency, and women are in need of cholesterol-lowering drugs. The cardiovascular drug advertisements portray a restoration of men's hyperactive agency, valorized by means of sporty images, by drawing on masculinity as a fixed trait and behavior. Hypercholesterolemia as a woman's disease reproduces the tyranny of slimness for women: Only women's stoutness is medicalized, and there are no pictures of heavy men. The findings point to the public health implications of gendered images of coronary candidacy in medical advertising.

  1. Imaging neurochemistry of cerebrovascular disease with PET and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatazawa, J.; Shimosegawa, E. [Akita Research Institute of Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Pathophysiology od cerebrovascular disease has been studied by measuring cerebral blood flow and energy metabolism using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). These parameters are measures for brain tissue consisting of heterogeneous components such as neurons, glial cells, and blood vessels. It is still difficult to evaluate brain damages specifically involving either neurons or other components. Several trials were recently conducted to visualize neuron-specific injury in cerebrovascular disease by means of {sup 11}C flumazenil for PET and {sup 123}I-iomazenil for SPECT. These tracers selectively bind to central benzodiazepine receptor which is purely neuronal. A reduced accumulation of these ligands was found in the area surrounding the complete infarction and in the cortex remote from putaminal hemorrhage, indicating the existence of neuron specific injury not visualized by CT and MR. Neurological deficits were well correlated with the loss of cortical accumulation of these ligands. These preliminary studies indicated a potential of neurochemical imaging in cerebrovascular disease. Vulnerability to ischemia which may differ among brain tissue components, among subpopulations of neurons, and among pre-synaptic and post-synaptic functions can be more precisely examined. Neurochemical imaging can be also applied to reveal releases and re-organization of each neurotransmitter-acceptor system after stroke.

  2. Imaging in cell-based therapy for neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirik, Deniz; Breysse, Nathalie; Bjoerklund, Tomas; Besret, Laurent; Hantraye, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Fetal cell transplantation for the treatment of Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases has been developed over the past two decades and is now in early clinical testing phase. Direct assessment of the graft's survival, integration into the host brain and impact on neuronal functions requires advanced in vivo neuroimaging techniques. Owing to its high sensitivity, positron emission tomography is today the most widely used tool to evaluate the viability and function of the transplanted tissue in the brain. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques are opening new possibilities for imaging neurochemical events in the brain. The ultimate goal will be to use the combination of multiple imaging modalities for complete functional monitoring of the repair processes in the central nervous system. (orig.)

  3. Functional imaging in pre-motor Parkinson’s disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaldi, D.; Picco, A.; Ferrara, M.; Nobili, F.; Famà, F.; Buschiazzo, A.; Morbelli, S.; De Carli, F.

    2014-01-01

    Several non motor symptoms (NMS) can precede the onset of the classical motor Parkinson’s disease (PD) syndrome. The existence of pre-motor and even pre-clinical PD stages has been proposed but the best target population to be screened to disclose PD patients in a pre-clinical, thus asymptomatic, stage is still matter of debate. The REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) often affects PD patients at different stages of the disease and could precede the onset of motor symptoms by several years. However, RBD could also precede other synucleinopathies (namely, dementia with Lewy bodies and multisystem atrophy), and less frequently could be related to other neurological conditions or remain idiopathic. Moreover, not all PD patients exhibit RBD. Despite these caveats, RBD probably represents the best feature to disclose pre-motor PD patients given its high-risk of developing a full motor syndrome. Other clinical clues in the premotor stages of PD undergoing active investigation include hyposmia, depression, and autonomic dysfunction. Effective biomarkers are needed in order to improve the diagnostic accuracy in the pre-motor stage of PD, to monitor disease progression and to plan both pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention. Functional imaging, in particular radionuclide methodologies, has been often used to investigate dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic features as well as cortical functioning in patients with RBD in its idiopathic form (iRBD) and/or associated with PD. Recently, new tracers to image α-synuclein pathologies are under development. Functional imaging in pre-motor PD, and in particular in iRBD, could improve our knowledge about the underlying mechanisms and the neurodegenerative progress of PD

  4. Imaging and clinical characteristics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Shun-chang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Five patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD presented rapidly progressive dementia which were subacute onset from 1 to 4 months. Among these cases, periodic synchronous discharge (PSD of electroencephalography (EEG was seen in 2 patients. Besides, 4 patients obtained positive results in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis for 14-3-3 protein. The cranial MRI examination showed symmetrical or asymmetrical colored-ribbon-shaped high signals in cerebral cortex or basal ganglia by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, suggesting that DWI had high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of sCJD as a preferred method in the clinical examination of sCJD.

  5. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuff, Norbert; Vermathen, Peter; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Weiner, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ( 1 H MRSI) was used to investigate changes in brain metabolites in Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Examples of results from several ongoing clinical studies are provided. Multislice 1 H MRSI of the human brain, without volume pre selection offers considerable advantage over previously available techniques. Furthermore, MRI tissue segmentation and completely automated spectral curve fitting greatly facilitate quantitative data analysis. Future efforts will be devoted to obtain full volumetric brain coverage and data acquisition at short spin-echo times (TE<30 ms) for the detection of metabolites. (author)

  6. Early detection of Freiberg's disease by radionuclide bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Jingjing

    1993-01-01

    56 hallux valgus deformities of 28 patients were studied with radionuclide bone imaging (RNBI). Among them, 24 feet(42.85%) revealed increased uptake of radioactivity in second or third metatarsal. The ratio of radioactivity in lesion and contralateral normal site (D/N) was increased, the difference between the patient and normal groups was significant (P<0.01). The histologic study showed that there have been degenerative changes and bone cell necrosis in increased uptake area. It was concluded that RNBI was more sensitive than X ray and can be used for the early diagnosis of Freiberg's Disease

  7. Clinical image: Hydatid disease of the chest wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, R.J.; Berlin, J.W.; Ghahremani, G.G. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Hydatid disease is rarely encountered among the population of the United States, but it affects several million people in sheep-raising regions of the world. Human infestation with Echinococcus granulosus begins following ingestion of its ova, which are excreted into the contaminated water during the usual dog-sheep cycle. Hydatid cysts will then develop most frequently in the liver (75% of cases) and lungs (15%) of the human host. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in only 0.5-4.0% of patients in the endemic areas. Because of the rarity and perplexing imaging features of hydatid disease involving the chest wall, we wish herein to present a case evaluated recently at our institution. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Chronic granulomatous disease: Value of the newer imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricof, D.D.; Glazer, M.; Amendola, A.

    1984-01-01

    The contribution of computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US), and nuclear medicine studies in the evaluation and management of seven patients with chronic granulatous disease was retrospectively reviewed. These modalities proved valuable in detecting sites of infection, particularly in the abdomen. Three patients had liver abscesses, two had suppurative retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, one had empyema, and one hand a scrotal abscess. Furthermore, CT or US-guided percutaneous aspiration and/or drainage of infected material was successfully performed on three separate occasions in a single patient, obviating the need for surgery. The newer imaging modalities are useful in the prompt diagnosis and in some instances non-operative therapy of complications of chronic granulomatous disease. (orig.)

  9. Imaging neuroreceptors in the human brain in health and disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Dannals, R.F.; Frost, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    For nearly a century it has been known that chemical activity accompanies mental activity, but only recently has it been possible to begin to examine its exact nature. Positron-emitting radioactive tracers have made it possible to study the chemistry of the human brain in health and disease, using chiefly cyclotron-produced radionuclides, carbon-11, fluorine-18 and oxygen-15. It is now well established that measurable increases in regional cerebral blood flow, and glucose and oxygen metabolism accompany the mental functions of perception, cognition, emotion and motion. On 25 May 1983 the first imaging of a neuroreceptor in the human brain was accomplished with carbon-11 N-methyl spiperone, a ligand that binds preferentially to dopamine-2 receptors, 80% of which are located in the caudate nucleus and putamen. Quantitative imaging of serotonin-2, opiate, benzodiazapine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors has subsequently been accomplished. In studies of normal men and women, it has been found that dopamine and serotonin receptor activity decreases dramatically with age, such a decrease being more pronounced in men than in women and greater in the case of dopamine-2 receptors than in serotonin-2 receptors. Preliminary studies of patients with neuropsychiatric disorders suggest that dopamine-2 receptor activity is diminished in the caudate nucleus of patients with Huntington's disease. Positron tomography permits a quantitative assay of picomolar quantities of neuroreceptors within the living human brain. Studies of patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, acute and chronic pain states and drug addiction are now in progress. (author)

  10. Functional Brain Imaging Synthesis Based on Image Decomposition and Kernel Modeling: Application to Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Martinez-Murcia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The rise of neuroimaging in research and clinical practice, together with the development of new machine learning techniques has strongly encouraged the Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD of different diseases and disorders. However, these algorithms are often tested in proprietary datasets to which the access is limited and, therefore, a direct comparison between CAD procedures is not possible. Furthermore, the sample size is often small for developing accurate machine learning methods. Multi-center initiatives are currently a very useful, although limited, tool in the recruitment of large populations and standardization of CAD evaluation. Conversely, we propose a brain image synthesis procedure intended to generate a new image set that share characteristics with an original one. Our system focuses on nuclear imaging modalities such as PET or SPECT brain images. We analyze the dataset by applying PCA to the original dataset, and then model the distribution of samples in the projected eigenbrain space using a Probability Density Function (PDF estimator. Once the model has been built, we can generate new coordinates on the eigenbrain space belonging to the same class, which can be then projected back to the image space. The system has been evaluated on different functional neuroimaging datasets assessing the: resemblance of the synthetic images with the original ones, the differences between them, their generalization ability and the independence of the synthetic dataset with respect to the original. The synthetic images maintain the differences between groups found at the original dataset, with no significant differences when comparing them to real-world samples. Furthermore, they featured a similar performance and generalization capability to that of the original dataset. These results prove that these images are suitable for standardizing the evaluation of CAD pipelines, and providing data augmentation in machine learning systems -e.g. in deep

  11. Cine-MR imaging of valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Kim, Dae Jin; Kim, Woo Sung; Park, Hyun Wuk; Cho, Zang Hee

    1989-01-01

    Cine-MR imaging was done in 2 normal persons and 9 patients of valvular heart disease with 2.0 T superconducting MR system (Spectro-2000; GoldStar, Korea). The MRI was undertaken using gradient echo technique with small flip angle. Repetition time (TR) was 34 msec, and echo time (TE), 18 msec. In most cases, 20 to 30 frames could be obtained during one cardiac cycle. With normal heart, high signal intensity was identified in the blood filled cardiac chambers. Transient signal void was observed near tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves due to the turbulences induced by valve opening or closure. In 6 cases of mitral valvular disease, mitral valve was identified in all cases. The valvular motion was limited revealing doming toward cardiac apex during diastole. Signal void was evident in pansystolic phase of left ventricle in all cases. Evidence of combined aortic or tricuspid valve disease were also demonstrated, revealing signal void in the corresponding cardiac chambers. Cine-MRI seemed to be not only a good non-invasive diagnostic modality for the valvular heart disease, but also an accurate modality for cardiac functional evaluation

  12. Cine-MR imaging of valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Jin; Kim, Woo Sung; Park, Hyun Wuk; Cho, Zang Hee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-04-15

    Cine-MR imaging was done in 2 normal persons and 9 patients of valvular heart disease with 2.0 T superconducting MR system (Spectro-2000; GoldStar, Korea). The MRI was undertaken using gradient echo technique with small flip angle. Repetition time (TR) was 34 msec, and echo time (TE), 18 msec. In most cases, 20 to 30 frames could be obtained during one cardiac cycle. With normal heart, high signal intensity was identified in the blood filled cardiac chambers. Transient signal void was observed near tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves due to the turbulences induced by valve opening or closure. In 6 cases of mitral valvular disease, mitral valve was identified in all cases. The valvular motion was limited revealing doming toward cardiac apex during diastole. Signal void was evident in pansystolic phase of left ventricle in all cases. Evidence of combined aortic or tricuspid valve disease were also demonstrated, revealing signal void in the corresponding cardiac chambers. Cine-MRI seemed to be not only a good non-invasive diagnostic modality for the valvular heart disease, but also an accurate modality for cardiac functional evaluation.

  13. [Imaging of pleural diseases: evaluation of imaging methods based on chest radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Necdet; Kalkan, Havva; Ödev, Kemal; Ceran, Sami

    2017-03-01

    The most commonly employed radiologic method in diagnosis of pleural diseases is conventional chest radiograph. The commonest chest- X-Ray findings are the presence of pleural effusion and thickening. Small pleural effusions are not readily identified on posteroanterior chest radiograph. However, lateral decubitus chest radiograph and chest ultrasonography may show small pleural effusions. These are more efficient methods than posteroanterior chest radiograph in the erect position for demonstrating small amounts of free pleural effusions. Chest ultrasonograph may be able to help in distinguishing the pleural pathologies from parenchymal lesions. On chest radiograph pleural effusions or pleural thickening may obscure the visibility of the underlying disease or parenchymal abnormality. Thus, computed tomography (CT) may provide additional information of determining the extent and severity of pleural disease and may help to differentiate malign pleural lesions from the benign ones. Moreover, CT may provide the differentiation of parenchmal abnormalities from pleural pathologies. CT (coronal and sagittal reformatted images) that also show invasion of chest wall, mediastinum and diaphragm, as well as enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Standart non-invasive imaging techniques may be supplemented with magnetic resonans imaging (MRI).

  14. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow in hematologic systemic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, F.; Hahn, K.; Gamm, H.

    1987-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies of the bone marrow were carried out in 164 patients suffering from hematologic systemic disease. One third of 90 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) displayed a pathological distribution pattern representing bone marrow expansion. In HL there were 17% accumulation defects caused by metastases in contrast to only 7% in NHL. Among 30 patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia bone marrow expansion was found in 60%, bone marrow displacement and aplasia 10%. Focal bone marrow defects were found in 3 patients. All patients with primary polycythemia rubra vera displayed a pathologic bone marrow distribution pattern as well as splenomegaly. All patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with an acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) had a pathological distribution pattern with bone marrow expansion and displacement. Focal bone marrow defects were not seen. Multiple myeloma with bone marrow expansion was found in 6 of 12 patients and focal accumulation defects were found in 40%, the latter lesions being not visible or equivocal on skeletal imaging studies. Pathological changes in liver and spleen were found in a high percentage of the total collective. The results document the important clinical value of bone marrow scintigraphy among the hematologic diseases studied.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Koichiro; Uchishiba, Mika; Tateno, Shigeru; Aotsuka, Hiroyuki; Nakatani, Hayao; Matsuo, Kozo; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Tashima, Kazuyuki.

    1992-01-01

    We applied the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images for evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD). One hundred and ninety-three patients with CHD, ranging in age from 20 days to 18 years old, were studied by MRI. This study compared the effectiveness of MRI with cardiac angiography and echocardiography for the evaluation of major diagnosis of CHD and all components of cardiovascular anatomy. ECG-gated MRI was performed by spin echo and gradient refocused imaging techniques operating at 0.5 tesla. In all the patients not only cardiovascular anatomies of CHD but all structures relevant to the identification of arrangement of organs were displayed. In diagnosing a total of 193 of major cardiac anomalies and 741 segments of the vein, the atrium, the ventricle and the great vessels by MRI and angiocardiogram and/or echocardiogram, descrepancies were found in 6 patients (3.1%), and only 18 segments (2.4%), respectively. For vascular and complex cardiac anatomies MRI was able to provide good anatomical details. Based on these findings, the segmental analysis of cardiac MR images was found useful for achieving a systematic diagnosis of CHD. (author)

  16. CT imaging of splenic sequestration in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheth, S.; Piomelli, S.; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Berdon, W.E.

    2000-01-01

    Pooling of blood in the spleen is a frequent occurrence in children with sickle cell diseases, particularly in the first few years of life, resulting in what is termed ''splenic sequestration crisis.'' The spectrum of severity in this syndrome is wide, ranging from mild splenomegaly to massive enlargement, circulatory collapse, and even death. The diagnosis is usually clinical, based on the enlargement of the spleen with a drop in hemoglobin level by >2 g/dl, and it is rare that imaging studies are ordered. However, in the patient who presents to the emergency department with non-specific findings of an acute abdomen, it is important to recognize the appearance of sequestration on imaging studies. We studied seven patients utilizing contrast-enhanced CT scans and found two distinct patterns - multiple, peripheral, non-enhancing low-density areas or large, diffuse areas of low density in the majority of the splenic tissue. Although radiological imaging is not always necessary to diagnose splenic sequestration, in those situations where this diagnosis is not immediately obvious, it makes an important clarifying contribution. (orig.)

  17. PET Imaging of Epigenetic Influences on Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Couto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise role of environment-gene interactions (epigenetics in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is unclear. This review focuses on the premise that radiotracer-specific PET imaging allows clinicians to visualize epigenetically influenced events and that such imaging may provide new, valuable insights for preventing, diagnosing, and treating AD. Current understanding of the role of epigenetics in AD and the principles underlying the use of PET radiotracers for in vivo diagnosis are reviewed. The relative efficacies of various PET radiotracers for visualizing the epigenetic influences on AD and their use for diagnosis are discussed. For example, [18F]FAHA demonstrates sites of differential HDAC activity, [18F]FDG indirectly illuminates sites of neuronal hypomethylation, and the carbon-11 isotope-containing Pittsburgh compound B ([11C]PiB images amyloid-beta plaque deposits. A definitive AD diagnosis is currently achievable only by postmortem histological observation of amyloid-beta plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles. Therefore, reliable in vivo neuroimaging techniques could provide opportunities for early diagnosis and treatment of AD.

  18. MR imaging of the spine: trauma and degenerative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, J.T. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the capabilities and drawbacks of MR imaging in patients with trauma to the spine and degenerative spinal conditions. In spinal trauma MR imaging is secondary to plain X-ray films and CT because of the greater availability and ease of performance of these techniques and their superior capability for detecting vertebral fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting ligamentous ruptures and intraspinal mass lesions such as hematoma, and for assessing the state of the spinal cord and prognosis of a cord injury. In degenerative spinal disease the necessity is emphasized of critically evaluating the clinical relevance of any abnormal feature detected, as findings of degenerative pathology are common in individuals without symptoms. Magnetic resonance myelography permits rapid and accurate assessment of the state of the lumbar nerve roots (compressed or not). In the cervical region the quality of the myelographic picture is often degraded in patients with a narrow spinal canal. (orig.) With 10 figs., 14 refs.

  19. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A.; Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S.; Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 ± 4.7 cm 2 vs. 8.7 ± 2.3 cm 2 , p < 0.01 and 4.6 ± 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 ± 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 ± 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 ± 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 ± 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  20. Unicuspid aortic valve disease: a magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debl, K.; Buchner, S.; Heinicke, N.; Riegger, G.; Luchner, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Innere Medizin II, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Djavidani, B.; Poschenrieder, F.; Feuerbach, S. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Schmid, C.; Kobuch, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und herznahe Gefaesschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: congenitally malformed aortic valves are a common finding in adults with aortic valve disease. Most of these patients have bicuspid aortic valve disease. Unicuspid aortic valve disease (UAV) is rare. The aim of our study was to describe valve morphology and the dimensions of the proximal aorta in a cohort of 12 patients with UAV in comparison to tricuspid aortic valve disease (TAV) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods/results: MRI studies were performed on a 1.5 T scanner in a total of 288 consecutive patients with aortic valve disease. 12 aortic valves were retrospectively classified as UAV. Annulus areas and dimensions of the thoracic aorta were retrospectively compared to a cohort of 103 patients with TAV. In UAV, valve morphology was unicuspid unicommissural with a posterior commissure in all patients. Mean annulus areas and mean diameters of the ascending aorta were significantly greater in UAV compared to TAV (12.6 {+-} 4.7 cm{sup 2} vs. 8.7 {+-} 2.3 cm{sup 2}, p < 0.01 and 4.6 {+-} 0.7 cm vs. 3.6 {+-} 0.5 cm, p < 0.0001, respectively), while no differences were observed in the mean diameters of the aortic arch (2.3 {+-} 0.6 cm vs. 2.3 {+-} 0.4 cm, p = 0.69). The diameters of the descending aorta were slightly smaller in UAV compared to TAV (2.2 {+-} 0.5 cm vs. 2.6 {+-} 0.3 cm, p < 0.05). (orig.)

  1. Collaborative Initiative in Biomedical Imaging to Study Complex Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Weili [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Fiddy, Michael A. [The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    2012-03-31

    The work reported addressed these topics: Fluorescence imaging; Optical coherence tomography; X-ray interferometer/phase imaging system; Quantitative imaging from scattered fields, Terahertz imaging and spectroscopy; and Multiphoton and Raman microscopy.

  2. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B; Schroeder, T V

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease. Prospective and blinded comparative study. 100 limbs in 100 consecutive patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease, 74% suffering critical limb ischemia, were enrolled during a 9 months period. One physician with limited ultrasound experience performed all the ultrasound examinations of the arteries of the most symptomatic limb. Before enrolling any patients 15 duplex ultrasound examinations were performed supervised by an experienced vascular technologist. All patients had a digital subtraction arteriography performed by an experienced vascular radiologist, unaware of the ultrasound result. The number of insufficiently insonated segments (non-diagnostic segments) was significantly reduced during the study; from 9% among the initial 50 limbs to 2% among the last 50 limbs (Pultrasound and arteriography from the initial 50 patients (overall Kappa=0.66, (95%-CI: 0.60-0.72); supragenicular Kappa=0.73 (95%-CI: 0.64-0.82); infragenicular Kappa=0.61 (95%-CI: 0.54-0.69)) to the last 50 patients (overall Kappa=0.66 (95%-CI: 0.60-0.72), supragenicular Kappa=0.67 (95%-CI: 0.57-0.76); infragenicular Kappa=0.66 (95%-CI: 0.58-0.73)). The minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease appears to be less than 50 ultrasound examinations (probably only 15 examinations) for the supragenicular segments and 100 examinations for the infragenicular segments.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Taketo; Ebara, Masaaki; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    1987-01-01

    Fifty patients with various pancreatic diseases and 22 without pancreatic disease were studied by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare its diagnostic capability with that by an X-ray CT scan. To differentiate pancreas clearly from the bowel, an iron solution was orally administered as contrast medium, resulting in a usefullness, especially to differentiate the head of the pancreas from the bowel. The head of the pancreas could be identified in 89 % after iron solution but only in 62 % without it. MRI was inferior to CT in terms of visualization of the pancreatic duct and pancreatic stones, but was superior in a visualization of vessels around the pancreas. MRI was considered to be useful for a detection of carcinoma infiltrating to vessels. Pancreatic carcinoma was differentiated from chronic pancreatitis in terms of a local enlargement and disappearance of fat around the pancreas shown on MRI findings. The present results also showed statistically significant differences in T 1 relaxation times among normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, suggesting a useful marker in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. (author)

  4. Bioluminescence in vivo imaging of autoimmune encephalomyelitis predicts disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinman Lawrence

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis is a widely used animal model to understand not only multiple sclerosis but also basic principles of immunity. The disease is scored typically by observing signs of paralysis, which do not always correspond with pathological changes. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis was induced in transgenic mice expressing an injury responsive luciferase reporter in astrocytes (GFAP-luc. Bioluminescence in the brain and spinal cord was measured non-invasively in living mice. Mice were sacrificed at different time points to evaluate clinical and pathological changes. The correlation between bioluminescence and clinical and pathological EAE was statistically analyzed by Pearson correlation analysis. Results Bioluminescence from the brain and spinal cord correlates strongly with severity of clinical disease and a number of pathological changes in the brain in EAE. Bioluminescence at early time points also predicts severity of disease. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of bioluminescence imaging to monitor neuroinflammation for rapid drug screening and immunological studies in EAE and suggest that similar approaches could be applied to other animal models of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  5. Use of myocardial imaging in the evaluation of patients with cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, B.; Strauss, H.W.; Trhall, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The role of radioisotope tracer techniques in the evaluation of patients with congenital heart disease, valvular heart disease, suspected myocardial infarction, ischemia or suspected ventricular dysfunction is reviewed. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging and exercise blood pool imaging and Technetium-88m pyrophosphate imaging of myocardial infarction are most commonly used.

  6. A preliminary diffusional kurtosis imaging study of Parkinson disease: comparison with conventional diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamagata, Koji; Kamiya, Kouhei; Suzuki, Michimasa; Hori, Masaaki; Yoshida, Mariko; Aoki, Shigeki [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Hatano, Taku; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Osamu [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Shimoji, Keigo [National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry Hospital, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) is a more sensitive technique than conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for assessing tissue microstructure. In particular, it quantifies the microstructural integrity of white matter, even in the presence of crossing fibers. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare how DKI and DTI show white matter alterations in Parkinson disease (PD). DKI scans were obtained with a 3-T magnetic resonance imager from 12 patients with PD and 10 healthy controls matched by age and sex. Tract-based spatial statistics were used to compare the mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps of the PD patient group and the control group. In addition, a region-of-interest analysis was performed for the area of the posterior corona radiata and superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) fiber crossing. FA values in the frontal white matter were significantly lower in PD patients than in healthy controls. Reductions in MK occurred more extensively throughout the brain: in addition to frontal white matter, MK was lower in the parietal, occipital, and right temporal white matter. The MK value of the area of the posterior corona radiata and SLF fiber crossing was also lower in the PD group. DKI detects changes in the cerebral white matter of PD patients more sensitively than conventional DTI. In addition, DKI is useful for evaluating crossing fibers. By providing a sensitive index of brain pathology in PD, DKI may enable improved monitoring of disease progression. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of the imaging diagnosis on the ophthalmic orbital diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Toshikazu

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonographic examination, X-ray computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on orbital diseases. Ultrasonographic examination was a simple, rapid and harmless noninvasive precedure as a diagnostic tool for evaluation of soft tissues. Echography was not more precise than X-ray CT and MRI scan in orbital diagnosis of the localization, size and well-defined outline of the lesion, relating to the peri- and retroorbital organs, however, was useful for screening study of an orbital lesion. B-mode of orbital tumors was effective for the ultrasonic diagnosis and classification according to four types; solid, cystic, angiomatous and infiltrative patterns. B-scan study of intraorbital inflammatory pseudo tumor could provide a differential diagnosis between inflammatory edema and an inflammatory mass lesion. Echographic pictures of dural arterio-venous fistula disclosed the vascular dilatation of superior ophthalmic vein and those of Basedow's disease with thickening of extraocular muscles. X-ray CT revealed intraorbital and intraocular disease, the globes and its immediate surrounding tissue (optic nerve, extraocular muscle, etc.) and bony orbital walls as the same slice of film. X-ray CT pictures of a coronal section, the contrast enhancement, calcification and destruction of the bone were helpful for diagnosis. However, the displays of disorders near the bone were ill-defined because of an artifact induced by high X-ray absorptive power of the bone. MRI was an equipment for superior contrast resolution, with provided a tomography of any section, without artifacts of the bone, and was the superior technique for displaying a vascular lesion. MRI of orbital disease was effective for reconstructing the spatial correlations between the lesion and its surounding tissues. MRI, however, provided no information of the skeleton, being not available for subjects with a magnetic substance. (author)

  8. Whole heart cine MR imaging of pulmonary veins in patients with congenital heart disease. Comparison with Spin Echo MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hideaki; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki; Zuguchi, Masayuki; Yamada, Shogo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of Whole Heart Cine (WHC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the depiction of pulmonary veins (PVs) in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared to that of spin echo (SE) MR imaging. Among our 35 patients, 4 patients had anomalous PV return. Detectability of four PVs on each MR examination images were evaluated. MR imaging is an effective modality for the clarification of PVs, and WHC MR imaging is more useful in delineating PV anomalies than SE MR imaging. (author)

  9. Myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, H.W.; Cook, D.J.; Bailey, I.; Rouleau, J.; Pitt, B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of myocardial perfusion imaging using 201 Tl is described. Thallium is able to substitute for potassium in biological systems including transport by the sodium--potassium ATP-ase system. The high extraction efficiency of the heart for 201 Tl offers a method whereby a tracer may be administered intravenously and is concentrated to a significant degree by the heart. However, only about 3 to 4 percent of the dose administered lodges in the myocardium. Experiments with dogs indicated that the regional distribution of Tl in the heart reflects the regional distribution of blood flow. The goal is to develop a procedure that can detect those patients with significant disease prior to the onset of a catastrophic event and studies are being undertaken to improve the sensitivity of the method for the detection of smaller lesions in the myocardium

  10. Clinical application of MR susceptibility weighted imaging in cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Wenzhen; Qi Jianpin; Shen Hao; Wang Chengyuan; Xia Liming; Hu Junwu; Feng Dingyi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess clinical application value of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in cerebrovascular diseases. Method: Twenty-three patients with cerebrovascular disease were investigated, including 7 cases of cavernoma, 4 of venous hemangioma, 3 of small AVM, 1 of Sturge-Weber Syndrome, 2 of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and 6 of chronic cerebral infarction. All patients underwent standard Mill and SWI, and most of them also underwent enhanced T 1 WI and MRA. The corrected phase (CP) values were obtained at the lesions and control areas. Results: The average CP values of the lesions and the control areas were -0.112±0.032 and -0.013±0.004, respectively (t=2.167, P 2 WI. The cavemoma could be differentiated from the hemorrhage within lesions. Moreover, multiple microcavernomas were detected on SWI. In 4 cases of venous hemangioma, SWI detected spider-like lesions with more hair-thin pulp veins adjacent to the dilated draining vein than contrast MRI. In 3 cases of small AVM, SWI was more advantageous than MRA in clearly detecting the small feeding artery. In 1 case of Sturge-Weber Syndrome, SWI demonstrated large areas of calcification and the abnormal vessels on the cerebral surface and the deep part of the cerebrum at the same time. In 2 cases of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the deep draining veins and superficial venous rete were generally dilated and winding, and the hemorrhagic lesions could be detected earlier than conventional MR images in one case. In 6 eases of cerebral infarction, old hemorrhage was clearly displayed within the lesions. Conclusion: SWI has more predominant advantages than conventional MRI and MRA in detecting the low-flow cerebral vascular malformations, identifying microbleeds and cerebral infarction accompanying hemorrhage, and the dilation of cerebral deep or superficial veins in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Moreover, SWI can show the phase contrast between the lesions and the control areas. (authors)

  11. Imaging appearances of von Hippel-Lindau disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaolong; Wang Jianhua; Lu Jianping; Wang Li; Liu Qi; Jiang Hui; Wei Wei

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess imaging appearances of von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHLD). Methods: The clinical and imaging data of ten patients who met VHLD gene diagnostic criteria were retrospectively analyzed. Seven underwent CT abdominal scan, three underwent MRI abdominal scan. All patients underwent MRI cranial scan. Eight patients were treated by surgery, and three of them underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided aspiration biopsy of pancreatic tumors. Results: All patients had multiple cysts of the pancreas, eight patients suffered multiple cysts of kidneys. Three patients suffered multiple islet cell tumors of pancreas: one was accompanied with pancreatic serous cystadenoma, another was accompanied with left adrenal pheochromocytoma. Three patients had bilateral renal cell carcinoma (one of them had the right kidney cut off), one patient had right renal cell carcinoma. Two patients suffered cerebellar hemangioblastomas, and one of them was accompanied with mutiple spinal hemangioblastomas and the left retinal hemangioblastoma. Two patients with multiple cysts of pancreas and kidneys had not been found any tumor. Conclusion: Multiple cysts of pancreas and kidney are highly suggestive of VHLD. At the same time, endocrine tumors of pancreas, serous cystadenoma of pancreas, adrenal pheochromocytoma, renal carcinomas, multiple hemangioblastomas of central nervous system and retinal hemangioblastoma can also occur in VHLD. (authors)

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging of the nigrostriatal fibers in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Wu, I-Wei; Buckley, Shannon; Coffey, Christopher S; Foster, Eric; Mendick, Susan; Seibyl, John; Schuff, Norbert

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is histopathologically characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The depletion of these neurons is thought to reduce the dopaminergic function of the nigrostriatal pathway, as well as the neural fibers that link the substantia nigra to the striatum (putamen and caudate), causing a dysregulation in striatal activity that ultimately leads to lack of movement control. Based on diffusion tensor imaging, visualizing this pathway and measuring alterations of the fiber integrity remain challenging. The objectives were to 1) develop a diffusion tensor tractography protocol for reliably tracking the nigrostriatal fibers on multicenter data; 2) test whether the integrities measured by diffusion tensor imaging of the nigrostriatal fibers are abnormal in PD; and 3) test whether abnormal integrities of the nigrostriatal fibers in PD patients are associated with the severity of motor disability and putaminal dopamine binding ratios. Diffusion tensor tractography was performed on 50 drug-naïve PD patients and 27 healthy control subjects from the international multicenter Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative. Tractography consistently detected the nigrostriatal fibers, yielding reliable diffusion measures. Fractional anisotropy, along with radial and axial diffusivity of the nigrostriatal tract, showed systematic abnormalities in patients. In addition, variations in fractional anisotropy and radial diffusivity of the nigrostriatal tract were associated with the degree of motor deficits in PD patients. Taken together, the findings imply that the diffusion tensor imaging characteristic of the nigrostriatal tract is potentially an index for detecting and staging of early PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Super-Resolution of Plant Disease Images for the Acceleration of Image-based Phenotyping and Vigor Diagnosis in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Togami, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Norio

    2017-11-06

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones) are a very promising branch of technology, and they have been utilized in agriculture-in cooperation with image processing technologies-for phenotyping and vigor diagnosis. One of the problems in the utilization of UAVs for agricultural purposes is the limitation in flight time. It is necessary to fly at a high altitude to capture the maximum number of plants in the limited time available, but this reduces the spatial resolution of the captured images. In this study, we applied a super-resolution method to the low-resolution images of tomato diseases to recover detailed appearances, such as lesions on plant organs. We also conducted disease classification using high-resolution, low-resolution, and super-resolution images to evaluate the effectiveness of super-resolution methods in disease classification. Our results indicated that the super-resolution method outperformed conventional image scaling methods in spatial resolution enhancement of tomato disease images. The results of disease classification showed that the accuracy attained was also better by a large margin with super-resolution images than with low-resolution images. These results indicated that our approach not only recovered the information lost in low-resolution images, but also exerted a beneficial influence on further image analysis. The proposed approach will accelerate image-based phenotyping and vigor diagnosis in the field, because it not only saves time to capture images of a crop in a cultivation field but also secures the accuracy of these images for further analysis.

  14. Super-Resolution of Plant Disease Images for the Acceleration of Image-based Phenotyping and Vigor Diagnosis in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Yamamoto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs or drones are a very promising branch of technology, and they have been utilized in agriculture—in cooperation with image processing technologies—for phenotyping and vigor diagnosis. One of the problems in the utilization of UAVs for agricultural purposes is the limitation in flight time. It is necessary to fly at a high altitude to capture the maximum number of plants in the limited time available, but this reduces the spatial resolution of the captured images. In this study, we applied a super-resolution method to the low-resolution images of tomato diseases to recover detailed appearances, such as lesions on plant organs. We also conducted disease classification using high-resolution, low-resolution, and super-resolution images to evaluate the effectiveness of super-resolution methods in disease classification. Our results indicated that the super-resolution method outperformed conventional image scaling methods in spatial resolution enhancement of tomato disease images. The results of disease classification showed that the accuracy attained was also better by a large margin with super-resolution images than with low-resolution images. These results indicated that our approach not only recovered the information lost in low-resolution images, but also exerted a beneficial influence on further image analysis. The proposed approach will accelerate image-based phenotyping and vigor diagnosis in the field, because it not only saves time to capture images of a crop in a cultivation field but also secures the accuracy of these images for further analysis.

  15. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in carotid artery disease: does automated image registration improve image quality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, Jan; Larsen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive imaging alternative to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for patients with carotid artery disease. In DSA, image quality can be improved by shifting the mask image if the patient has moved during angiography. This study investigated whether such image registration may also help to improve the image quality of carotid MRA. Data from 370 carotid MRA examinations of patients likely to have carotid artery disease were prospectively collected. The standard nonregistered MRAs were compared to automatically linear, affine and warp registered MRA by using three image quality parameters: the vessel detection probability (VDP) in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in MIP images, and contrast-to-noise ratio in three-dimensional image volumes. A body shift of less than 1 mm occurred in 96.2% of cases. Analysis of variance revealed no significant influence of image registration and body shift on image quality (p > 0.05). In conclusion, standard contrast-enhanced carotid MRA usually requires no image registration to improve image quality and is generally robust against any naturally occurring body shift. (orig.)

  16. Imaging of chest disease due to intravenous heroin abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Xuhui; Chen Zhong; Ye Wenqin

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging findings of the chest disease due to intravenous heroin abuse. Methods: Twenty-five cases of clinically confirmed chest disease due to intravenous heroin abuse were retrospectively analyzed. 25 cases had conventional X-ray film, 6 cases had CT scanning, and 6 cases had echocardiography scanning. Results: On X-ray and CT, the following signs were found: lung making manifold (n = 5), small patchy shadow (n = 15), pneumatocele (n = 16), small cavity (n = 16), small node (n = 7), pleural effusion (n = 8 ), pneumothorax (n = 2), hydropneumothorax (n = 6), pulmonary edema (n = 2), megacardia (n = 11), multiple-shaped lesion (n = 20). On echocardiography, tricuspid vegetation (n = 4) and tricuspid insufficiency (n = 4) were found. Conclusion: The X-ray and CT manifestations of chest inflammation due to intravenous heroin abuse are multiple. The multiple small cavities and pneumatoceles sign are of some value in the diagnosis of lung inflammation due to intravenous heroin abuse among young patients

  17. Monitoring of the periodontal disease using digital image analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taba Junior, Mario.

    1995-01-01

    The radiographs play an important role in the diagnosis and management of periodontal disease although the most appropriate form of assessment vary. The great technologic advance and the easily accessible systems of digital image analyses, specify digitized radiographs, improve the diagnostic power. The studied group was 29 adults (14 female and 15 male) ranging in age from 18 to 45 years. They all had evidence of alveolar bone loss and established periodontitis. They were studied, without treatment, over a six month period with four posterior standardized vertical bite wings radiographs, electronic probing of attachment loss, and bacteriological and temperature analysis of periodontal pocket. The aim of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the loss of radiographic crestal bone height and probing attachment loss in digitized radiographs and show a standardization method for periodontal radiographs. Radiographic and probing attachment change at all sites, dichotomously classified as to not changing or loosing indicated 20.42% of sites were loosing by measurement of radiographic change and 5.29% were loosing by measurement of attachment change. There was concordance between the presence or absence of probing attachment loss and bone loss in 72% to 86% depending on the area. The results, admitting methodological limitations, indicate that when these two methods for the assessment of progressive periodontitis were used they represents measure degrees of different features of periodontitis and that the period of periodontal disease activity was detected in the either the soft tissue attachment or bone. (author)

  18. Dental diseases and radionuclide imaging of the jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Jose A; Pardo, Carlos; Olmos, Antonio; Cuadrado, Maria L; Ruibal, Alvaro

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results of radionuclide bone scans of the jaws with data obtained at the nuclear medicine department from a brief and feasible dental history, taking special account of cases with a positive scan and no recent dental events. Ninety-eight patients undergoing radionuclide bone scan as part of their diagnosis in non-dental, oncological and non-oncological diseases were imaged with 99mTc-labelled oxidronate. Superior and inferior halves of the mandible and maxilla (392 quadrants) were regarded as normal or having an abnormally high uptake. A recent (1 year) dental history was also obtained through a brief questionnaire and data were referred to each quadrant of the jaws. The association between the bone scan and dental disease was assessed by means of the chi-squared test. The overall results of scintigraphy and history coincided in 66 patients (46 with abnormal and 20 with normal findings; P = 0.002). Twenty-five patients had a positive scintigram without any known dental disorder. Results of scintigraphy and history coincided in 254 quadrants (78 with abnormal and 176 with normal findings; P < 0.001). Eighty-three quadrants had hot spots in the scintigram without any known dental lesion. It can be concluded that abnormal jaw scintigrams are frequent in patients without known dental disease, and this may indicate silent osteoblastic activity. These observations should be reported to the dentist for several reasons. First, they may reveal asymptomatic dental lesions. Second, the use of oral prostheses and implants is increasing and they require the support of healthy alveolar bone.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of ocular and orbital disease in 5 dogs and a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.V.; Ring, R.D.; Ward, D.A.; Adams, W.H.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images were acquired in five dogs and one cat with ocular and orbital disease. MR images were obtained in the dorsal or oblique dorsal, and oblique sagittal planes. Pathologic changes identified in MR images included inflammatory lesions, cystic structures, and neoplasms. All abnormalities were readily apparent in TI-weighted images. MR findings in affected animals were often similar in signal intensity, location, and growth pattern to those found in people with comparable diseases. Although no MR changes were considered pathognomonic for a given disease, MR imaging provided detailed information on the homogeneity, extent and invasiveness of the lesions

  20. Large-field image intensifiers versus conventional chest radiography: ROC study with simulated interstitial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, L.H.L.; Chakraborty, D.P.; Waes, P.F.G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Two image intensifier tubes have recently been introduced whose large imaging area makes them suitable for chest imaging (Phillips Pulmodiagnost TLX slit II and Siemens TX 57 large entrance field II). Both modalities present a 10 x 10-cm hard copy image to the radiologist. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve study with simulated interstitial disease was performed to compare the image quality of these image intensifiers with conventional chest images. The relative ranking in terms of decreasing ROC areas was Siemens, conventional, and Philips. Compared with conventional imaging, none of the differences in ROC curve area were statistically significant at the 5% level

  1. Multimodal PET Imaging of Amyloid and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer Disease and Non-Alzheimer Disease Dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chenjie; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-07-01

    Biomarkers of the molecular pathology underpinning dementia syndromes are increasingly recognized as crucial for diagnosis and development of disease-modifying treatments. Amyloid PET imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic assessment of Alzheimer disease. Its use has also deepened understanding of the role of amyloid pathology in Lewy body disorders and aging. Tau PET imaging is an imaging biomarker that will likely play an important role in the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment in dementias. Using tau PET imaging to examine how tau pathology relates to amyloid and other markers of neurodegeneration will serve to better understand the pathophysiologic cascade that leads to dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging of Brain Connectivity in Dementia: Clinical Implications for Diagnosis of its Underlying Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Meijboom (Rozanna)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIn this thesis we investigated the use of advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in identifying subtle brain abnormalities, associating brain abnormalities with disease symptomatology, and improving early (differential) diagnosis in several diseases underlying dementia.

  3. A potential amyloid-imaging probe for Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jiong; Wang Shizhen; Yuan Jiangang; Qiang Boqin

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To screen out the human single-chain fragment variable (scFv) against amyloid β peptide 40 from a human synthetic antibody library, sub-clone its gene into E. coli expression system, and express and purify it for amyloid peptide imaging research. The overload of amyloid β peptide and the appearance of senile plaques in the human brain tissue is one of the hallmark of the Alzheimer's disease, and in vivo imaging of amyloidβ peptide is valuable for the earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Amyloid β peptide 40 was bound on the solid surface of Nunc plates as antigen and a human antibody library constructed with human antibody heavy and light chain variable gene and nucleotides sequence coded (Gly4Ser)3 linker and displayed on the protein surface of filamentous phage was used to screen the binding clones. After five rounds of bio-panning, the host E. coli TG1 was infected with eluted filamentous phage from the last turn of selection. 55 well-separated colonies were picked randomly from the plates and several specific positive clones were identified by ELISA testing, and their binding sites were determined by competitive ELISA with amyloid 13 peptide 40, 1-16, 25-35. The single-chain Fv antibody gene was sequenced and their amino acids sequence was deduced. The scFv antibody gene was sub-cloned into a protokayotic expression vector pET-22b(+) and transformed into bacteria strain BL21 to express the His6-tagged single-chain antibody and the whole cell culture was subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis. The antibody was expressed in inclusion bodies and purified with serial buffers and verified with western blotting and their activity was tested by ELISA against amyloid β peptide 40. Results: ELISA testing showed that 33 clones could bind amyloid β peptide 40 and 10 of these clones could be inhibited by amyloid β peptide 40 itself to below 50% of its original binding activities. Five clones could also be inhibited by amyloid β peptide 1-16. DNA

  4. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  5. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T.

    2007-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement

  6. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine. Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement.

  7. White matter injury in newborns with congenital heart disease: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Ou, Xiawei; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Glasier, Charles M; Swearingen, Christopher J; Melguizo, Maria S; Yap, Vivien L; Schmitz, Michael L; Bhutta, Adnan T

    2014-09-01

    Brain injury is observed on cranial magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively in up to 50% of newborns with congenital heart disease. Newer imaging techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging provide sensitive measures of the white matter integrity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diffusion tensor imaging analysis technique of tract-based spatial statistics in newborns with congenital heart disease. Term newborns with congenital heart disease who would require surgery at less than 1 month of age were prospectively enrolled (n = 19). Infants underwent preoperative and postoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion tensor imaging. Tract-based spatial statistics, an objective whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging analysis technique, was used to determine differences in white matter fractional anisotropy between infant groups. Term control infants were also compared with congenital heart disease infants. Postmenstrual age was equivalent between congenital heart disease infant groups and between congenital heart disease and control infants. Ten infants had preoperative brain injury, either infarct or white matter injury, by conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging. The technique of tract-based spatial statistics showed significantly lower fractional anisotropy (P tensor imaging analysis technique that may have better sensitivity in detecting white matter injury compared with conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging in term newborns with congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of Osgood-Schlatter disease: the course of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Atsushi; Ishii, Tomoo; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2002-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to clarify the nature of Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) using MR images.Design. Thirty boys (40 knees) with OSD diagnosed by clinical symptoms and signs were investigated with MRI. Longitudinal evaluation was undertaken in 22 patients and the mean follow-up was 1.5±0.9 years. MR examinations were performed at least every 6 months in most cases. When a patient's symptoms changed, MRI was repeated and in cases where the initial MR examination showed an early or progressive stage of OSD, MRI was undertaken every month where possible. All MR examinations were performed in the sagittal plane with a 0.2 T imager.Results. MR images were classified into five stages as follows: normal, early, progressive, terminal and healing. The stage of 11 knees (28%) did not change during the course of the study and 21 knees (53%) showed a change of at least one stage. Eight knees (20%) did not have follow-up MR studies. The initial MR examination was normal in nine knees. Eight knees were at the early stage at presentation. MR images showed edema-like changes around the tibial tuberosity. Ten knees were classified as in the progressive stage at the initial presentation and six knees were classified in this group during progression on follow-up MRI. MR images showed partial avulsion of the secondary ossification center, which was seen to be being pulled proximally. Eleven knees were at the terminal stage on presentation, where the avulsed parts of the secondary ossification center had become completely separated. Two knees were classified as in the healing stage at presentation and 19 knees progressed to the healing stage from the normal, early and progressive stages. The MR images showed the separated part that did not create the ossicle had recovered by osseous healing. On the other hand, radiographs of the early stage appeared almost normal, and in the progressive stage could not show the avulsed parts.Conclusions. We clarified the progress

  9. Studies on motor neuron disease with cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Yagi, Yuji (Kinki Univ., Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    The present study was performed to examine the pyramidal tracts of the brain in both 51 normal subjects (21 male and 30 female subjects; mean age of 43.5[+-]16.1 years) and 12 patients with motor neuron disease (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age of 57.4[+-]7.9 years), using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 12 patients with motor neuron disease (MND) comprised 7 suffering from spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and 5 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MRI used in this study was of both short spin echo and long spin echo sequence. Of the 52 normal subjects, 24 of them (47%) had the T2 prolonged small areas (high signal intensity areas) at the posterior limb of internal capsule. These findings were not found in the normal subjects over fifty years old. No similar finding was detected in the pyramidal tracts except the posterior limb of internal capsule. On the other hand, 8 patients with MND (67%) proved to have the high signal intensity areas in the pyramidal tracts. Moreover, these high intensity areas were extended from the crus cerebri to corona radiata in 7 patients (58%). In all patients with ALS, these areas were extended in whole areas of the pyramidal tracts, and the similar findings were also found in two patients with SPMA. These findings were demonstrated to be more extensive than those in the normal subjects. The results thus obtained warrant us to conclude that cranial MRI is useful to detect the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of MND patients. (author).

  10. Studies on motor neuron disease with cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Yagi, Yuji

    1992-01-01

    The present study was performed to examine the pyramidal tracts of the brain in both 51 normal subjects (21 male and 30 female subjects; mean age of 43.5±16.1 years) and 12 patients with motor neuron disease (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age of 57.4±7.9 years), using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 12 patients with motor neuron disease (MND) comprised 7 suffering from spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and 5 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MRI used in this study was of both short spin echo and long spin echo sequence. Of the 52 normal subjects, 24 of them (47%) had the T2 prolonged small areas (high signal intensity areas) at the posterior limb of internal capsule. These findings were not found in the normal subjects over fifty years old. No similar finding was detected in the pyramidal tracts except the posterior limb of internal capsule. On the other hand, 8 patients with MND (67%) proved to have the high signal intensity areas in the pyramidal tracts. Moreover, these high intensity areas were extended from the crus cerebri to corona radiata in 7 patients (58%). In all patients with ALS, these areas were extended in whole areas of the pyramidal tracts, and the similar findings were also found in two patients with SPMA. These findings were demonstrated to be more extensive than those in the normal subjects. The results thus obtained warrant us to conclude that cranial MRI is useful to detect the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of MND patients. (author)

  11. PET imaging of neocortical monoaminergic terminals in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, R.M.; Barre, L.; Rioux, P.; Allain, P.; Lechevalier, B.; Baron, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Post-mortem neurochemical studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) have shown that, in addition to the typical nigro-striatal dopamine denervation, there exists a concomitant neocortical monoamine fibre deafferentation (of variable severity) whose role in motor, and especially in associated cognitive and affective impairment, remains elusive. We have extensively examined whether PET imaging with 11 C-S-Nomifensine ( 11 C-NMF), a radioligand of the dopamine and norepinephrine presynaptic reuptake sites which has been used so far to investigate the striatum, could provide a method for assessing in vivo the neocortical monoamine terminal loss in PD; previously, this has been a little addressed and controversial issue. To this end, we prospectively selected a highly homogeneous sample of nine non-demented, non-depressed idiopathic PD patients with mild to marked side-to-side asymmetry in motor impairment. In addition to recovering the previously-reported correlations with putaminal 11 C-NMF specific uptake asymmetries, the clinical motor asymmetries also significantly correlated in the clinically expected direction to neocortical (especially frontal) 11 C-NMF asymmetries. suggesting the monoamine neocortical denervation might play a direct role in motor impairment in PD. These results demonstrate that it is possible to assess in vivo the neocortical monoamine terminal loss. and to elucidate its potential role in the complex cognitive and affective impairment, in both PD and atypical degenerative parkinsonism. (author)

  12. Image dissimilarity-based quantification of lung disease from CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Loog, Marco; Lo, Pechin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose to classify medical images using dissimilarities computed between collections of regions of interest. The images are mapped into a dissimilarity space using an image dissimilarity measure, and a standard vector space-based classifier is applied in this space. The classif......In this paper, we propose to classify medical images using dissimilarities computed between collections of regions of interest. The images are mapped into a dissimilarity space using an image dissimilarity measure, and a standard vector space-based classifier is applied in this space...

  13. A case of neuro-Behcet syndrome with brainstem lesions confirmed by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Shunya; Haida, Munetaka; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Takagi, Shigeharu; Shinohara, Yukito

    1988-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with a 30-year history of oral and genital aphthous ulcers and joint pain. One day before his admission he developed double vision and weakness in the right extremities. Neurological examination revealed right 5th nerve palsy, left 6th to 18th nerve palsy, left Horner's sign, and motor and sensory impairment in the right upper and lower extremities. X-ray CT showed diffuse, weak, low-density areas in the brainstem. T1 weighted images showed low signals in the left side of the mid-pons, the left tegmentum and the right basis of the upper pons, and the left tegmentum of the midbrain. T2 weighted images showed high signals in the whole pons and the left side of the midbrain. MRI allowed the differentiation of reversible lesions, such as brain edema, and irreversible lesions, such as necrosis and demyelination of the tissue. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. Progress of PET imaging in the study of neural stem cell transplantation treating Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Haibo; Liu Xingdang

    2004-01-01

    PET imaging has important value in the study of neural stem cell transplantation treating Parkinson's disease, especial in the evaluation of the effect, the study of treating mechanisms and the comparation of effect in different transplantation places. PET imaging as a non-invasive method plays a more and more important role in the study of neural stem cell transplantation treating Parkinson's disease. (authors)

  15. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA).......to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  16. Imaging popliteal artery disease in young adults with claudication: self-assessment module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Felix S; Bui-Mansfield, Liem T

    2007-09-01

    The educational objectives of this self-assessment module on imaging popliteal artery disease in young adults with intermittent claudication are for the participant to exercise, self-assess, and improve his or her knowledge of the imaging and clinical features of popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, cystic adventitial disease,and masses associated with popliteal artery obstruction.

  17. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Systems for Brain Diseases in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Yamashita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the basics and recent researches of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems for assisting neuroradiologists in detection of brain diseases, e.g., asymptomatic unruptured aneurysms, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and multiple sclerosis (MS, in magnetic resonance (MR images. The CAD systems consist of image feature extraction based on image processing techniques and machine learning classifiers such as linear discriminant analysis, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines. We introduce useful examples of the CAD systems in the neuroradiology, and conclude with possibilities in the future of the CAD systems for brain diseases in MR images.

  18. Basic imaging in congenital heart disease. 3rd Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swischuk, L.E.; Sapire, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    The book retains its previous format with chapters on embryology, plain film interpretation, classification of pulmonary vascular patterns, cardiac malpositions and vascular anomalies, and illustrative cases. The book is organized with an abundance of illustrative figures, diagrams, and image reproductions. These include plain chest radiographs, angiograms, echocardiograms, and MR images. The authors present the pathophysiology and imaging of congenital heart lesions

  19. Neuromelanin imaging in Parkinson's disease. Presidential award proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Hisashi; Ida, Masahiro; Nagao, Takehiko; Yokochi, Masayuki; Ishiduka, Michiko; Motoyoshi, Kenichi; Saitou, Kenji; Akita, Fumio

    2010-01-01

    The most striking pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the loss of pigmented neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the locus coeruleus (LC), pigmentation that is attributable to neuromelanin (NM). NM has a paramagnetic T 1 -shortening effect when bound to iron. Sasaki and associates have reported that high resolution, fast spin-echo T 1 -weighted images obtained at 3-tesla can depict neuromelanin-generated signal in the SNpc and the LC because of the higher signal-to-noise ratio and prolongation of T 1 relaxation time than those at 1.5-tesla. We attempted to evaluate changes in NM in patients with PD using NM-sensitive magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (NMI). We conducted a series of MR examinations using a 3-tesla MR system. For NMI, we employed a 2D fast spin-echo, T 1 -weighted sequence with repetition time (TR) of 600 ms, echo time (TE) of 10 ms, voxel size of 0.6 x 0.4 x 2.5 mm. Trained neurologists examined 60 patients clinically diagnosed with PD (38 women, 22 men; age range 32 to 80 years, mean age 72.8 years). The visual score of NMI was determined by adding the SN and LC scores, and signal intensity of both medial and lateral portions of the SNpc was measured using square cursors. Compared with findings in normal volunteers, 50 of 60 patients with PD (83.3%) demonstrated decreased T 1 -shortening in the SNpc, and signal reduction on NMI tended to occur in the ventrolateral portion of the SNpc. Signal intensity of the lateral and medial segments of the SNpc on NMI are statistically significantly different between controls and patients with PD. However, the signal ratios between patients with PD and controls and HY1-5 overlap substantially. There is a subtle correlation between the depletion of NM signal and reduction of uptake of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in the sympathetic system of the myocardium, but they are not significantly different. There is a moderate correlation between the degree of depletion of NM and Hoehn

  20. GLOBAL CLASSIFICATION OF DERMATITIS DISEASE WITH K-MEANS CLUSTERING IMAGE SEGMENTATION METHODS

    OpenAIRE

    Prafulla N. Aerkewar1 & Dr. G. H. Agrawal2

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper to presents a global technique for classification of different dermatitis disease lesions using the process of k-Means clustering image segmentation method. The word global is used such that the all dermatitis disease having skin lesion on body are classified in to four category using k-means image segmentation and nntool of Matlab. Through the image segmentation technique and nntool can be analyze and study the segmentation properties of skin lesions occurs in...

  1. Optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin and skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mette; Thrane, Lars; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini

    2009-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technology based on light reflection. It provides real-time images with up to 2-mm penetration into the skin and a resolution of approximately 10 μm. It is routinely used in ophthalmology. The normal skin and its appendages have been studi...... technical solutions are being pursued to further improve the quality of the images and the data provided, and OCT is being integrated in multimodal imaging devices that would potentially be able to provide a quantum leap to the imaging of skin in vivo....

  2. A pilot study of three dimensional color CT images of brain diseases to improve informed consent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanizaki, Yoshio; Akiyama, Takenori; Hiraga, Kenji; Akaji, Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    We have described brain diseases to patients and their family using monochrome CT images. It is thought that patients have difficulties in giving their consent to our conventional explanation because their understanding of brain diseases is based on three dimensional and color images, however, standard CT images are two dimensional and gray scale images. We have been trying to use three dimensional color CT images to improve the typical patient's comprehension of brain diseases. We also try to simulate surgery using these images. Multi-slice CT accumulates precise isotropic voxel data within a half minute. These two dimensional and monochrome data are converted to three dimensional color CT images by 3D workstation. Three dimensional color CT images of each brain structures (e.g. scalp, skull, brain, ventricles and lesions) are created separately. Then, selected structures are fused together for different purposes. These images are able to rotate around any axis. Because the methods to generate three-dimensional color images have not established, we neurosurgeons must create these images. In particular, when an operation is required, the surgeon should create the images. In this paper, we demonstrate how three-dimensional color CT images can improve informed consent. (author)

  3. Diagnostic evaluation of brain SPECT imaging in diseases of nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsheng, Jiang; Chengmo, Zhu; Jixian, Zhang; Weijia, Tian [Shanghai Second Medical Univ. (China). Ruijing Hospital

    1992-11-01

    The dynamic distributions of home made ECD and the Amersham brain SPECT imaging agent 'Ceretec' in normal person as well as their diagnostic use in diseases of nervous system were investigated. Semi-quantitative analysis combined with direct observation was more accurate for the diagnosis. Aside from cerebrovascular diseases, SPECT brain imaging has its unique value for the diagnosis of transient ischemic attack, Alzheimer disease, multiple ischemic dementia and epilepsy etc.

  4. Real-time histology in liver disease using multiphoton microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haolu; Liang, Xiaowen; Mohammed, Yousuf H.; Thomas, James A.; Bridle, Kim R.; Thorling, Camilla A.; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Xu, Zhi Ping; Liu, Xin; Crawford, Darrell H. G.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional histology with light microscopy is essential in the diagnosis of most liver diseases. Recently, a concept of real-time histology with optical biopsy has been advocated. In this study, live mice livers (normal, with fibrosis, steatosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and ischemia-reperfusion injury) were imaged by MPM-FLIM for stain-free real-time histology. The acquired MPM-FLIM images were compared with conventional histological images. MPM-FLIM imaged subsurface cellular and subcellu...

  5. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease from ECG-triggered MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Laschinger, J.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Gronnemeyer, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction images of the heart and great vessels were produced from contiguous sequences of electrocardiographically triggered MR images in 25 patients with congenital heart disease and in three healthy subjects. The imaging data were semiautomatically processed to separate the epicardial and endocardial surfaces and to define the outline of the enclosed blood volumes on a section by section basis. Images were obtained at 5-mm intervals in patients aged 3 months to 30 years with anomalies of the great vessels, tetralogy of Fallot, septal defects, pulmonary atresia, and other congenital heart malformations. The results were used to facilitate the surgical treatment of these patients and were compared with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. These surface reconstruction images were useful for communicating the results of diagnostic examinations to cardiac surgeons, for sizing and location of intracardiac defects, for imaging the pulmonary venous drainage, and for assessing regional and global function

  6. Advances in endoscopic ultrasound imaging of colorectal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cârțână, Elena Tatiana; Gheonea, Dan Ionuț; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    in colorectal cancer, the monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease based on quantification of bowel wall vascularization, and differentiating between benign and malignant subepithelial tumours. Recent reports suggest that EUS elastography enables highly accurate discrimination of colorectal...

  7. Prediction of neurodegenerative diseases from functional brain imaging data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mudali, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are a challenge, especially in the developed society where life expectancy is high. Since these diseases progress slowly, they are not easy to diagnose at an early stage. Moreover, they portray similar disease features, which makes them hard to differentiate. In this

  8. Image registration for assessment of Crohn's disease severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects millions of people in Europe alone. It is important to accurately assess the disease severity in a safe and non-invasive manner in order to improve the treatment of patients with CD. Furthermore, the ideal assessment

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of lumbar spine disc diseases. Frequency of false negatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelot, J.M.; Maugars, Y.; Delecrin, Y.; Caillon, F.; Prost, A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has had an impressive impact on evaluation of degenerative diseases of the spine. Nevertheless, false negatives can occur on images involving lumbar discs. Degenerative disc diseases documented on discography and/or pathology examination of the discs can go unrecognized. Likewise sensitivity for the detection of protruding disc hernias is not totally satisfactory (20% false negatives). Finally, a magnetic resonance image visualizing displacement of the disc is not specific (10 to 15% false positives); images showing protrusion or hernia can be seen in 30% of asymptomatic patients. Although MRI gives slightly more information than other imaging techniques, false images do exist. Moreover, the usefulness of MRI to demonstrate disc disease in case of a negative CT-scan remains to be demonstrated. (authors). 26 refs

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital, Second Department of Radiology, Athens (Greece); Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Aghia Sofia Children' s Hospital, First Department of Paediatrics, Athens (Greece)

    2009-08-15

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and {tau}2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the small bowel in children with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease: evaluation of disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulou, Efthymia; Loggitsi, Dimitra; Economopoulos, Nikos; Papakonstantinou, Olympia; Kelekis, Nikolaos L.; Roma, Eleftheria; Panagiotou, Ioanna; Pahoula, Ioanna

    2009-01-01

    Examinations using ionizing radiation are frequently used in the evaluation of disease activity in children affected by idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). To develop an MR imaging protocol without the need for fluoroscopic insertion of an enteral tube and to assess the disease activity in children with IBD. Included in the study were 37 children (22 girls and 15 boys; age range 7-15 years, mean 11.67 years) with IBD who underwent MR imaging of the small bowel. Of these 37 children, 32 had Crohn disease and 5 had indeterminate colitis. A water solution containing herbal fibres was administered orally or through a nasogastric tube. Patients were imaged on a 1.5-T MR scanner with T1-weighted and Τ2-weighted sequences followed by a dynamic study using 3-D T1-W images after intravenous administration of gadolinium. The percentage enhancement of the bowel wall was significantly increased in patients with abnormal C-reactive protein (CRP) values compared to patients with CRP values in the normal range (P<0.001). A relatively weak but significant correlation between percentage enhancement of the bowel wall and CRP values was noted during all phases of enhancement. This MR imaging protocol is a safe and well-tolerated method for evaluating disease activity and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD in children. (orig.)

  12. Is there a role for scintigraphic imaging of bone manifestations in Gaucher disease? A review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikosch, P.; State Hospital Klagenfurt; Kohlfuerst, S.; Gallowitsch, H.J.; Kresnik, E.; Lind, P.; Mehta, A.B.; Hughes, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent inherited, lysosomal storage disease and is caused by deficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase. Bone and bone marrow alterations are frequent in the most prevalent non-neuronopathic form of Gaucher disease. Imaging of bone manifestations in Gaucher disease is performed by a variety of imaging methods, conventional X-ray and MRI as the most frequently and most important ones. However, different modalities of scintigraphic imaging have also been used. This article gives an overview on scintigraphic imaging with respect to bone manifestations in Gaucher disease discussing the advantages and limitations of scintigraphic imaging in comparison to other imaging methods. (orig.)

  13. Combining Image and Non-Image Data for Automatic Detection of Retina Disease in a Telemedicine Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aykac, Deniz [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fox, Karen [Delta Health Alliance; Garg, Seema [University of North Carolina; Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nichols, Trent L [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A telemedicine network with retina cameras and automated quality control, physiological feature location, and lesion/anomaly detection is a low-cost way of achieving broad-based screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and other eye diseases. In the process of a routine eye-screening examination, other non-image data is often available which may be useful in automated diagnosis of disease. In this work, we report on the results of combining this non-image data with image data, using the protocol and processing steps of a prototype system for automated disease diagnosis of retina examinations from a telemedicine network. The system includes quality assessments, automated physiology detection, and automated lesion detection to create an archive of known cases. Non-image data such as diabetes onset date and hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c) for each patient examination are included as well, and the system is used to create a content-based image retrieval engine capable of automated diagnosis of disease into 'normal' and 'abnormal' categories. The system achieves a sensitivity and specificity of 91.2% and 71.6% using hold-one-out validation testing.

  14. Usefulness of MR imaging for diseases of the small intestine: comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hoon; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Sohn, Min Jae; Shin, Byung Suck; Lee, Young Suk; Chung, Soo Yoon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of MR imaging for diseases of the small intestine, emphasizing a comparison with CT. Thirty-four patients who underwent both CT and MR imaging using FLASH 2D and HASTE sequences were analyzed. All patients had various small bowel diseases with variable association of peritoneal lesions. We compared the detectabilities of CT and MR imaging using different MR pulse sequences. The capability for analyzing the characteristics of small intestinal disease was also compared. MR imaging was nearly equal to CT for detecting intraluminal or peritoneal masses, lesions in the bowel and mesentery, and small bowel obstruction, but was definitely inferior for detecting omental lesions. The most successful MR imaging sequence was HASTE for demonstrating bowel wall thickening, coronal FLASH 2D for mesenteric lesions, and axial FLASH 2D for omental lesions. MR imaging yielded greater information than CT in six of 12 inflammatory bowel diseases, while it was equal to CT in six of seven neoplasms and inferior in five of seven mesenteric ischemia. In determining the primary causes of 15 intestinal obstructions, MR imaging was correct in 11 (73%) and CT in nine (60%) patients. MR imaging can serve as an alternative diagnostic tool for patients with suspected inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal neoplasm or obstruction.

  15. God image and happiness in chronic pain patients: the mediating role of disease interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezutter, Jessie; Luyckx, Koen; Schaap-Jonker, Hanneke; Büssing, Arndt; Corveleyn, Jozef; Hutsebaut, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    The present study explored the role of the emotional experience of God (i.e., positive and negative God images) in the happiness of chronic pain (CP) patients. Framed in the transactional model of stress, we tested a model in which God images would influence happiness partially through its influence on disease interpretation as a mediating mechanism. We expected God images to have both a direct and an indirect (through the interpretation of disease) effect on happiness. A cross-sectional questionnaire design was adopted in order to measure demographics, pain condition, God images, disease interpretation, and happiness. One hundred thirty-six CP patients, all members of a national patients' association, completed the questionnaires. Correlational analyses showed meaningful associations among God images, disease interpretation, and happiness. Path analyses from a structural equation modeling approach indicated that positive God images seemed to influence happiness, both directly and indirectly through the pathway of positive interpretation of the disease. Ancillary analyses showed that the negative influence of angry God images on happiness disappeared after controlling for pain severity. The results indicated that one's emotional experience of God has an influence on happiness in CP patients, both directly and indirectly through the pathway of positive disease interpretation. These findings can be framed within the transactional theory of stress and can stimulate further pain research investigating the possible effects of religion in the adaptation to CP.

  16. FOOT ROT DISEASE IDENTIFICATION FOR VELLAIKODI VARIETY OF BETELVINE PLANTS USING DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vijayakumar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Betelvine plants are infected variety of diseases in the complete plantation without any premature warning of the diseases. The aim of this paper is to detection of foot rot disease in the vellaikodi variety of betelvine plants using digital image processing techniques. The digital images of the uninfected or normal betelvine leaves and the digital images of the infected in foot rot diseased betelvine leaves at different stages are collected from different Betelvine plants using a high resolution digital camera and collected betelvine images are stored with JPEG format. The digital images of the betelvine leaves analyses are done using the image processing toolbox in MATLAB which gives the normal patterns of the digital images. Using RGB encoding process, the RGB components of the betelvine leaves are separated. The mean and median values for all sample leaves are computed and calculated values are stored in the system. The mean and median values of test leaves are computed and compared with the stored values. As the result of this comparison, it is identified whether test leaves are affected by foot rot disease or not. Finally this analysis helps to recognize the foot rot disease can be identified before it spreads to entire crop.

  17. Discrimination of skin diseases using the multimodal imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, N.; Heuke, S.; Akimov, D.; Latka, I.; Kluschke, F.; Röwert-Huber, H.-J.; Lademann, J.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical microspectroscopic tools reveal great potential for dermatologic diagnostics in the clinical day-to-day routine. To enhance the diagnostic value of individual nonlinear optical imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) or two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), the approach of multimodal imaging has recently been developed. Here, we present an application of nonlinear optical multimodal imaging with Raman-scattering microscopy to study sizable human-tissue cross-sections. The samples investigated contain both healthy tissue and various skin tumors. This contribution details the rich information content, which can be obtained from the multimodal approach: While CARS microscopy, which - in contrast to spontaneous Raman-scattering microscopy - is not hampered by single-photon excited fluorescence, is used to monitor the lipid and protein distribution in the samples, SHG imaging selectively highlights the distribution of collagen structures within the tissue. This is due to the fact, that SHG is only generated in structures which lack inversion geometry. Finally, TPF reveals the distribution of autofluorophores in tissue. The combination of these techniques, i.e. multimodal imaging, allows for recording chemical images of large area samples and is - as this contribution will highlight - of high clinically diagnostic value.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease; The evaluation of the width of pars compacta on T2 weighted image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriwaka, Fumio; Tashiro, Kunio; Itoh, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Kazuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine; Hamada, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    The width of substantia nigra (SN) in 59 cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease as well as 21 normal controls was analyzed by T2 weighted image (T2WI) of 1.5 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance image (MRI). All patients and controls underwent MRI with the spin-echo sequences used TR/TE: 3000/30 (short TE), and TR/TE: 3000/80 (long TE), in 5-mm-thick volumes. The width between the red nucleus and the cerebral peduncle showing low signal intensity areas was measured as that of SN and its ratio to the distance from the aqueduct to the midline of the cerebral peduncle was also measured. The calculated values of the width of SN and its ratio were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. The significant reduction in the width of SN and its ratio in Parkinson's disease were disclosed below: the mean calculated values of the width of SN were 2.95{+-}0.51 mm in controls, 2.68{+-}0.99 mm in Parkinson's disase on long TE images (P<0.01), and the mean ratio of the width of SN were 13.58{+-}4.21% in controls, 10.52{+-}3.07% in Parkinson's disease on long TE images (P=0.0002). The narrowing of SN in Parkinson's disease was more prominent in men, and advanced cases with Yahr stage III and IV. Considering that the pars reticulata, which is normally containing iron, shows low signal intensity on long TE images, the width of pars compacta could be measured more precisely on this sequences. The evaluation of the ratio of SN in midbrain on long TE images seemed to be more sensitive than the calculated values in detecting the narrowing of SN and pars compacta in Parkinson's disease. (author).

  19. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V.

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed

  20. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V

    2003-04-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed.

  1. Imaging techniques in the management of chronic kidney disease: current developments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget-Rosenthal, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    The measurement of both renal function and structure is critical in clinical nephrology to detect, stage, and monitor chronic kidney disease (CKD). Current imaging modalities especially ultrasound (US), computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide adequate information on structural changes but little on functional impairment in CKD. Although not yet considered first-line procedures for evaluating patients with renal disease, new US and MR imaging techniques may permit the assessment of renal function in the near future. Combined with established imaging techniques, contrast-enhanced US, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, blood oxygen level dependency MRI, or diffusion-weighted imaging may provide rapid, accurate, simultaneous, and noninvasive imaging of the structure of kidneys, macrovascular and microvascular renal perfusion, oxygenation, and glomerular filtration rate. Recent developments in molecular imaging indicate that pathophysiological pathways of renal diseases such as apoptosis, coagulation, fibrosis, and ischemia will be visualized at the tissue level. These major advances in imaging and developments in hardware and software could enable comprehensive imaging of renal structure and function in four dimensions (three dimensions plus time), and imaging is expected to play an increasing role in the management of CKD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Focal hepatic lesions with peripheral eosinophilia: imaging features of various disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Joon Beom; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Chi Sung [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    Due to the recent advent of various imaging modalities such as ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, as well as knowledge of the characteristic imaging features of hepatic lesions, radiologic examination plays a major role in the differential diagnosis of focal hepatic lesions. However, various 'nonspecific' or 'unusual' imaging features of focal hepatic lesions are occasionally encountered, and this makes correct diagnosis difficult. In such a situation, the presence of peripheral eosinophilia helps narrow the differential diagnoses. The aim of this pictorial essay is to describe the imaging features of various disease entities which cause focal hepatic lesions and peripheral eosinophilia.

  3. Imaging fusion (SPECT/CT) in degenerative disease of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, P.; Ucros, G.; Bermudez, S.; Ocampo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine the utility of Fusion Imaging SPECT/CT in degenerative pathology of the spine and to establish the impact of the use of fusion imaging in spinal pain due to degenerative changes of the spine. Materials and methods: 44 Patients (M=21, F=23) average age of 63 years and with degenerative pathology of spine were sent to Diagnosis Imaging department in FSFB. Bone scintigraphy (SPECT), CT of spine (cervical: 30%, Lumbar 70%) and fusion imaging were performed in all of them. Bone scintigraphy was carried out in a gamma camera Siemens Diacam double head attached to ESOFT computer. The images were acquired in matrix 128 x 128, 20 seg/imag, 64 images. CT of spine was performed same day or two days after in Helycoidal Siemens somatom emotion CT. The fusion was done in a Dicom workstation in sagital, axial and coronal reconstruction. The findings were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians and 2 radiologists of the staff of FSFB in an independent way. Results: Bone scan (SPECT) and CT of 44 patients were evaluated. CT showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 27 (61.3%) patients, uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 7 (15.9%), bulging disc in 9(20.4%), spinal nucleus lesion in 7(15.9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%), spinal foraminal stenosis in 7 (15.9%), spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis in 4 (9%). Bone scan showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 29 (65.9%), uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 4 (9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%) and normal 3 (6.8%). The imaging fusion showed coincidence findings (main lesion in CT with high uptake in scintigraphy) in 34 patients (77.2%) and no coincidence in 10 (22.8%). In 15 (34.09%) patients the fusion provided additional information. The analysis of the findings of CT and SPECT showed similar results in most of the cases and the fusion didn't provide additional information but it allowed to confirm the findings but when the findings didn't match where the CT showed several findings and SPECT only one area with high uptake

  4. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lol, Pechin; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan compared with intensities in the deformed baseline image indicate local loss of lung tissue that is associated with progression of emphysema. To account for differences in lung intensity owing to differences in the inspiration level in the two scans rather than disease progression, we propose to adjust the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans and may result in a more sensitive measure of disease progression than standard quantitative CT measures.

  5. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson’s disease, and dystonia

    OpenAIRE

    Stoessl, A. Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, adva...

  6. Infectious diseases of the brain: imaging and differential diagnosis; Infektioese Hirnerkrankungen: Bildgebung und differenzialdiagnostische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, S.; Seitz, A. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany); Storch-Hagenlocher, B. [Abt. Neurologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Infectious diseases of the central nervous system have to be considered in differential diagnosis particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuro-imaging, specifically advanced techniques such as diffusion weighted MRI and perfusion MRI contribute much to the differentiation of brain infections and for differentiating brain infections from other, for instance, neoplastic diseases. In this review we present the imaging criteria of the most important brains infections in adults and in pediatric patients and discuss differential diagnostic aspects in detail. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease at 0.3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmgren, N

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential of static MR imaging in congenital heart disease. The diagnosis of vascular rings, causing significant respiratory morbidity, previously required invasive methods for diagnosis. In aberrant left pulmonary artery, an uncommon anomaly, MR imaging at 0.3 T provided complete anatomic information. Complex congenital heart malformation is a diagnostic challenge. MR imaging at 0.3 T was efficient in defining most of the components of complex disease. It is especially valuable for imaging of extracardiac structures, which can be difficult to evaluate using echocardiography. MR imaging is an important complement to echocardiography. Improved equipment with sophisticated dynamic applications using high magnetic field strength is now available. The anatomical evaluation of congenital heart anomalies is however still based on static images, and low field magnets will certainly be used even in the future. 141 refs, 11 figs, 8 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of congenital heart disease by three-dimensional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Canter, C.E.; Yoffie, R.L.; Hildebolt, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    In an evaluation of the detectability of intra-and extracardiac morphologic defects with electrocardiographically gated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, 100 patients were studied, including ten without and 90 with abnormalities. The abnormalities included septal defects, tetrology of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, transposition of the great vessels, and others. The patients with abnormalities were studied angiographically and with echocardiographic analyses. Two radiologists with cardiac MR imaging experience evaluated the scans in a blinded fashion, and the results were analyzed by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic value of routine two-dimensional cardiac MR imaging was compared with that of three-dimensional reconstruction imaging and with the results of cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. The reported sensitivity and specificity of echocardiography in the detection of congenital heart disease is comparable to that of MR imaging. The differences in diagnostic value between various modalities for the imaging of congenital heart disease may be determined from the results of the preliminary series

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmgren, N.

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the potential of static MR imaging in congenital heart disease. The diagnosis of vascular rings, causing significant respiratory morbidity, previously required invasive methods for diagnosis. In aberrant left pulmonary artery, an uncommon anomaly, MR imaging at 0.3 T provided complete anatomic information. Complex congenital heart malformation is a diagnostic challenge. MR imaging at 0.3 T was efficient in defining most of the components of complex disease. It is especially valuable for imaging of extracardiac structures, which can be difficult to evaluate using echocardiography. MR imaging is an important complement to echocardiography. Improved equipment with sophisticated dynamic applications using high magnetic field strength is now available. The anatomical evaluation of congenital heart anomalies is however still based on static images, and low field magnets will certainly be used even in the future. 141 refs, 11 figs, 8 tabs

  10. Utility of axial images in an early Alzheimer disease diagnosis support system (VSRAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masami; Aoki, Shigeki; Abe, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has become a popular tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. The Voxel-Based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD), a VBM system that uses MRI, has been reported to be clinically useful. The able-bodied person database (DB) of VSRAD, which employs sagittal plane imaging, is not suitable for analysis by axial plane imaging. However, axial plane imaging is useful for avoiding motion artifacts from the eyeball. Therefore, we created an able-bodied person DB by axial plane imaging and examined its utility. We also analyzed groups of able-bodied persons and persons with dementia by axial plane imaging and reviewed the validity. After using the DB of axial plane imaging, the Z-score of the intrahippocampal region improved by 8 in 13 instances. In all brains, the Z-score improved by 13 in all instances. (author)

  11. [Utility of axial images in an early Alzheimer disease diagnosis support system (VSRAD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masami; Aoki, Shigeki; Abe, Osamu; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Yasushi; Satake, Yoshiroh; Nishida, Katsuji; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Iida, Kyohhito; Mima, Kazuo; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-09-20

    In recent years, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) has become a popular tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer disease. The Voxel-Based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD), a VBM system that uses MRI, has been reported to be clinically useful. The able-bodied person database (DB) of VSRAD, which employs sagittal plane imaging, is not suitable for analysis by axial plane imaging. However, axial plane imaging is useful for avoiding motion artifacts from the eyeball. Therefore, we created an able-bodied person DB by axial plane imaging and examined its utility. We also analyzed groups of able-bodied persons and persons with dementia by axial plane imaging and reviewed the validity. After using the DB of axial plane imaging, the Z-score of the intrahippocampal region improved by 8 in 13 instances. In all brains, the Z-score improved by 13 in all instances.

  12. Functional brain imaging of gastrointestinal sensation in health and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lukas Van Oudenhove; Steven J Coen; Qasim Aziz

    2007-01-01

    It has since long been known, from everyday experience as well as from animal and human studies, that psychological processes-both affective and cognitiveexert an influence on gastrointestinal sensorimotor function. More specifically, a link between psychological factors and visceral hypersensitivity has been suggested,mainly based on research in functional gastrointestinal disorder patients. However, until recently, the exact nature of this putative relationship remained unclear,mainly due to a lack of non-invasive methods to study the (neurobiological) mechanisms underlying this relationship in non-sleeping humans. As functional brain imaging, introduced in visceral sensory neuroscience some 10 years ago, does provide a method for in vivo study of brain-gut interactions, insight into the neurobiological mechanisms underlying visceral sensation in general and the influence of psychological factors more particularly,has rapidly grown. In this article, an overview of brain imaging evidence on gastrointestinal sensation will be given, with special emphasis on the brain mechanisms underlying the interaction between affective & cognitive processes and visceral sensation. First, the reciprocal neural pathways between the brain and the gut (braingut axis) will be briefly outlined, including brain imaging evidence in healthy volunteers. Second, functional brain imaging studies assessing the influence of psychological factors on brain processing of visceral sensation in healthy humans will be discussed in more detail.Finally, brain imaging work investigating differences in brain responses to visceral distension between healthy volunteers and functional gastrointestinal disorder patients will be highlighted.

  13. Imaging of Mitral Valve Prolapse: What Can We Learn from Imaging about the Mechanism of the Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronen Durst

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitral valve prolapse (MVP is the most common mitral valve disorder affecting 2%–3% of the general population. Two histological forms for the disease exist: Myxomatous degeneration and fibroelastic disease. Pathological evidence suggests the disease is not confined solely to the valve tissue, and accumulation of proteoglycans and fibrotic tissue can be seen in the adjacent myocardium of MVP patients. MVP is diagnosed by demonstrating valve tissue passing the annular line into the left atrium during systole. In this review we will discuss the advantages and limitations of various imaging modalities in their MVP diagnosis ability as well as the potential for demonstrating extra associated valvular pathologies.

  14. Value of medical imaging in the complications of hydatid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Noblinski, B.; Tubiana, J.M.; Hannoun, L.

    1987-12-03

    The aim of this study is to analyse the experience of Hopital St-Antoine in the field of abdominal hydatid disease due to Echinococcus granulosus over the last seven years. 9 cases of rare complications of this disease, revealed by this retrospective study, are analysed and presented. The authors discuss the value of ultrasonography and computed tomography in this serious disease. The importance of routine ultrasonographic detection of these complications has been recently emphasized. The authors also present a review of the literature.

  15. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Brownell, Anna-Liisa; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders

  16. Usefulness of CT based SPECT Fusion Image in the lung Disease : Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Kim, Tae Hyung; Shin, Ji Yun

    2012-01-01

    Recently, SPECT/CT system has been applied to many diseases, however, the application is not extensively applied at pulmonary disease. Especially, in case that, the pulmonary embolisms suspect at the CT images, SPECT is performed. For the accurate diagnosis, SPECT/CT tests are subsequently undergoing. However, without SPECT/CT, there are some limitations to apply these procedures. With SPECT/CT, although, most of the examination performed after CT. Moreover, such a test procedures generate unnecessary dual irradiation problem to the patient. In this study, we evaluated the amount of unnecessary irradiation, and the usefulness of fusion images of pulmonary disease, which independently acquired from SPECT and CT. Using NEMA PhantomTM (NU2-2001), SPECT and CT scan were performed for fusion images. From June 2011 to September 2010, 10 patients who didn't have other personal history, except lung disease were selected (male: 7, female: 3, mean age: 65.3±12.7). In both clinical patient and phantom data, the fusion images scored higher than SPECT and CT images. The fusion images, which is combined with pulmonary vessel images from CT and functional images from SPECT, can increase the detection possibility in detecting pulmonary embolism in the resin of lung parenchyma. It is sure that performing SPECT and CT in integral SPECT/CT system were better. However, we believe this protocol can give more informative data to have more accurate diagnosis in the hospital without integral SPECT/CT system.

  17. Diagnosis of temporal bone diseases using three-dimensional images with multislice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Yoshihiro; Togami, Taro; Murota, Makiko; Fukunaga, Kotaro; Hino, Ichiro; Sato, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of three-dimensional images with multislice CT in the temporal bone diseases. Fifty-nine cases (26 with medial otitis, 8 choresteatoma, 10 congenital malformation, 3 high jugular bulb, 2 otosclerosis, and 10 others) were included in this study. In the ossicular and inner ear lesions, oblique multiplanar images of the long axis of each ossicle was useful the detection of abnormality. Structural deformity of ossicles and bony labyrinth were clearly delineated by surface rendering images. (author)

  18. Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma: spectrum of disease and imaging presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaetke-Udager, Kara; Yablon, Corrie M.; Morag, Yoav [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lucas, David R. [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-03-15

    To describe the imaging findings of a series of myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcomas (MFSs) from our institution, including a case of dedifferentiated MFS and two cases with areas of high-grade tumor, in addition to typical cases of low-grade tumor. To correlate the imaging findings with the pathologic features of these tumors. IRB approval was obtained. Retrospective search of the pathology database at our institution from 2000 to 2015 identified seven cases of MFS with available imaging. Imaging, pathology, and clinical data were reviewed. Unlike the majority of well-differentiated tumors in our series (four cases), one tumor showed dedifferentiation and two cases had areas of high-grade tumor. The dedifferentiated tumor showed peripheral post-contrast enhancement. One case with a substantial high-grade component showed osseous destruction and peripheral enhancement in the high-grade area, while the low-grade component enhanced diffusely. The second case had a small high-grade area and showed diffuse enhancement. All three of these cases had non-acral locations and lacked association with a tendon. The four cases of low-grade MFS demonstrated diffuse enhancement, were located in the distal extremities, and were associated with a tendon. The imaging findings of dedifferentiated and high-grade MFS differ from the more typical low-grade tumors in that they have nonenhancing areas, a non-acral location, lack association with a tendon, and may involve bone. The radiologist should be aware that MFS represents a spectrum that includes low-grade tumors, tumors with high-grade areas, and tumors with dedifferentiation and that this spectrum presents with differing imaging features. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of new imaging techniques in breast diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordenne, W; Bauduin, E [Liege Univ. (Belgium)

    1989-01-01

    During the last decade, the hypothetical carcinogenic effects of mammography have lead to new technical developments in X-ray diagnosis and to use of other imaging techniques such as ultrasonography (US), transillumination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many preliminary studies were published but few clinical trials are really convincing. According to the definition of a diagnostic tool, none of these new modalities is supposed to supplant mammography in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Improvements are expected by digital mammography in the near future. (Authors).

  20. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson’s disease, and dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A. Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, advances in magnetic resonance enable the separation of patients with Parkinson’s disease from healthy controls, and show great promise for differentiation between Parkinson’s disease and other akinetic-rigid syndromes. Radionuclide imaging is useful to show the dopaminergic basis for both motor and behavioural complications of Parkinson’s disease and its treatment, and alterations in non-dopaminergic systems. Both PET and MRI can be used to study patterns of functional connectivity in the brain, which is disrupted in Parkinson’s disease and in association with its complications, and in other basal-ganglia disorders such as dystonia, in which an anatomical substrate is not otherwise apparent. Functional imaging is increasingly used to assess underlying pathological processes such as neuroinflammation and abnormal protein deposition. This imaging is another promising approach to assess the effects of treatments designed to slow disease progression. PMID:24954673

  1. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song In Chan; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kwon, Bae Ju; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Sang Yun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To compare conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in terms of their depiction of the abnormalities occurring in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of conventional (T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in four patients with biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The signal intensity of the lesion was classified by visual assessment as markedly high, slightly high, or isointense, relative to normal brain parenchyma. Both conventional and diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated bilateral high signal intensity in the basal ganglia in all four patients. Cortical lesions were observed on diffusion-weighted MR images in all four, and on fluidattenuated inversion recovery MR images in one, but in no patient on T2-weighted images. Conventional MR images showed slightly high signal intensity in all lesions, while diffusion-weighted images showed markedly high signal intensity in most. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is more sensitive than its conventional counterpart in the depiction of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and permits better detection of the lesion in both the cerebral cortices and basal ganglia.

  2. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song In Chan; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kwon, Bae Ju; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Sang Yun

    2001-01-01

    To compare conventional and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in terms of their depiction of the abnormalities occurring in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We retrospectively analyzed the findings of conventional (T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging in four patients with biopsy-proven Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The signal intensity of the lesion was classified by visual assessment as markedly high, slightly high, or isointense, relative to normal brain parenchyma. Both conventional and diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated bilateral high signal intensity in the basal ganglia in all four patients. Cortical lesions were observed on diffusion-weighted MR images in all four, and on fluidattenuated inversion recovery MR images in one, but in no patient on T2-weighted images. Conventional MR images showed slightly high signal intensity in all lesions, while diffusion-weighted images showed markedly high signal intensity in most. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is more sensitive than its conventional counterpart in the depiction of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and permits better detection of the lesion in both the cerebral cortices and basal ganglia

  3. Pulmonary MR imaging with ultra-short TEs: Utility for disease severity assessment of connective tissue disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Takahashi, Masaya; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Obara, Makoto; Cauteren, Marc van; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with ultra-short echo times (UTEs) at a 3.0 T MR system for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from 18 CTD patients (eight men and ten women) and eight normal subjects with suspected chest disease (three men and five women). All subjects underwent thin-section MDCT, pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6. Regional T2* maps were generated from each MR data set, and mean T2* values were determined from ROI measurements. From each thin-section MDCT data set, CT-based disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system. Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were statistically compared by using Student's t-test. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments, mean T2* values were statistically correlated with pulmonary functional parameters, serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity. Results: Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were significantly different (p = 0.0019) and showed significant correlations with %VC, %DL CO , serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity of CTD patients (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs is useful for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of CTD patients with ILD

  4. Pulmonary MR imaging with ultra-short TEs: Utility for disease severity assessment of connective tissue disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi, Hyogo (Japan); Takahashi, Masaya [Advanced Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Obara, Makoto; Cauteren, Marc van [Philips Electronics Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of pulmonary magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with ultra-short echo times (UTEs) at a 3.0 T MR system for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of connective tissue disease (CTD) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Materials and methods: This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and written informed consent was obtained from 18 CTD patients (eight men and ten women) and eight normal subjects with suspected chest disease (three men and five women). All subjects underwent thin-section MDCT, pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs, pulmonary function test and serum KL-6. Regional T2* maps were generated from each MR data set, and mean T2* values were determined from ROI measurements. From each thin-section MDCT data set, CT-based disease severity was evaluated with a visual scoring system. Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were statistically compared by using Student's t-test. To assess capability for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments, mean T2* values were statistically correlated with pulmonary functional parameters, serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity. Results: Mean T2* values for normal and CTD subjects were significantly different (p = 0.0019) and showed significant correlations with %VC, %DL{sub CO}, serum KL-6 and CT-based disease severity of CTD patients (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Pulmonary MR imaging with UTEs is useful for pulmonary functional loss and disease severity assessments of CTD patients with ILD.

  5. Imaging of disease progression in a case of idiopathic moyamoya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison is also made with conventional angiography at the last visit. Characteristic imaging appearances of asymmetric narrowing of the internal carotid arteries (especially the supraclinoid portion) with numerous collateral vessels around the brainstem, especially within the ambient and quadrigeminal plate cisterns, ...

  6. Imaging in the infectious diseases of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, F.; Gandon, Y.; Heautot, J.F.; Montagne, C.; Michelet, C.; Carsin, M.

    1989-01-01

    The basic signs of the major bacterial, viral, parasitic or mycotic infections of the central nervous system with CT and MRI are described. The problems arising from the presence of the HIV virus are emphasized and the attitude required according to the findings of imaging, is defined [fr

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse malignant bone marrow diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, R.; Rehn, S.; Glimelius, B.; Hagberg, H.; Hemmingsson, A.; Jung, B.; Simonsson, B.; Sundstroem, C.

    Twenty-four patients with malignant bone marrow involvement or polycythemia vera, 8 patients with reactive bone marrow and 7 healthy individuals were examined with spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging at 0.35 T and 0.5 T. Signs of an increased longitudinal relaxation time, T1, were found when normal bone marrow was replaced by malignant cells, polycythemia vera or reactive marrow. A shortened T1 was indicated in 4 patients in bone marrow regions treated by radiation therapy; the marrow was most likely hypocellular in these cases. The estimated T1 relaxation times were highly correlated to the cellularity of the bone marrow as assessed by histology. Among patients with close to 100% cellularity neither T1 nor T2 discriminated between the various malignancies or between malignant and reactive, non-malignant bone marrow. Characterization of tissues in terms of normalized image intensities was also attempted, the motive being to avoid approximations and uncertainties in the assessment of T1 and T2. The normalization was carried out with respect to the image of highest intensity, i.e. the proton density weighted image. The results were in agreement with those for T1 and T2. It was concluded that MRI is valuable for assessing bone marrow cellularity, but not for differentiating between various bone marrow disorders having a similar degree of cellularity.

  8. Imaging chronic renal disease and renal transplant in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, Jim; Easty, Marina

    2010-01-01

    At Great Ormond Street Hospital we have the highest number of paediatric renal transplant patients in Europe, taking cases from across the United Kingdom and abroad. Our caseload includes many children with rare complicating medical problems and chronic renal failure related morbidity. This review aims to provide an overview of our experience of imaging children with chronic renal failure and transplants. (orig.)

  9. Stress magnetic resonance imaging in coronary artery disease. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, D.J.; Underwood, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of MRI of wall motion and cardiovascular haemodynamics has been investigated during pharmacological stress with dipyridamole and dobutamine as pharmacological stressors. The authors conclude that dobutamine is preferable to dipyridamole for inducing myocardial ischemia during imaging. (H.W.). 74 refs.; 8 figs.; 5 tabs

  10. A study of intraluminal flow in patients with aortic disease by cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Kusuoka, Hideo; Kitabatake, Akira; Kamada, Takenobu.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of aortic disease, we applied cine MR sequences with conventional spin echo (SE) sequence to 15 patients with aortic aneurysm and 5 patients with aortic dissection. ECG gated multi slice SE images (single echo) were obtained in transverse plane and the planes along the long axis of aorta. TE of SE sequence ranged from 15 to 32 msec. Cine MR images were obtained in 17 frames, where TR ranged from 30 to 60 msec and TE from 10 to 22 msec. We got these results as follows. For aortic aneurysm, SE images showed aneurysmal dilatation in thoracic aorta in 9 cases, and in abdominal aorta in 6 cases. Cine MR images showed us the intraluminal flow with high signal intensity. We could differentiate the slow flow image from mural thrombus using SE and cine MR sequences in the same plane. We could evaluate the dynamic flow image within a cavity of aneurysm and in in-flow and out-flow portions of aorta by cine MR imaging. For aortic dissection, SE images delineated the intimal tear and two separated lumens in all cases. We could obtain flow images within true and false lumen by cine MR imaging. The signal intensity within true lumen was higher than that within false lumen. It seemed to be due to the difference of flow velocity and the turbulence within false lumen. Entry to false lumen was seen as the interruption of dissected intima on SE images. Cine MR images clearly depicted the blood flow communication between two lumens through the entry. In 3 of 5 cases the blood flow through the entry was seen in both directions, from true to false lumen in systole and inversely in diastole. Thus, cine MR imaging will add the useful hemodynamic information in the diagnosis of aortic disease by conventional MR imaging. (author)

  11. Pulmonary imaging techniques in the diagnosis of occupational interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.F.; Templeton, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The chest radiograph is extensively used in evaluating workers at risk for developing occupational lung disease. Other pulmonary imaging techniques used in conjunction with the initial chest radiograph include conventional computed tomography, high resolution computed tomography, and gallium scintigraphy. This chapter evaluates the use of these techniques and their appropriate applications in the pneumoconioses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, berylliosis, and hard metal diseases.65 references

  12. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: A Multimodality Imaging Approach with Impact on Diagnosis and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanda, S.; Ramani, S.; Dhanda, S.; Ramani, S.; Thakur, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease is a condition of uncertain etiology, comprised of hydatiform mole (complete and partial), invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and placental site trophoblastic tumor. It arises from abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. Early diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic disease and its potential complications is important for timely and successful management of the condition with preservation of fertility. Initial diagnosis is based on a multimodality approach: encompassing clinical features, serial quantitative β-hCG titers, and pelvic ultrasonography. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is sometimes used as a problem-solving tool to assess the depth of myometrial invasion and extra uterine disease spread in equivocal and complicated cases. Chest radiography, body computed tomography (CT), and brain MRI have been recommended as investigative tools for overall disease staging. Angiography has a role in management of disease complications and metastases. Efficacy of PET (positron emission tomography) and PET/CT in the evaluation of recurrent or metastatic disease has not been adequately investigated yet. This paper discusses the imaging features of gestational trophoblastic disease on various imaging modalities and the role of different imaging techniques in the diagnosis and management of this entity. 1. Introduction Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) refers to an abnormal trophoblastic proliferation composed of a broad spectrum of lesions ranging from benign, albeit pre malignant hydatiform mole (complete and partial), through to the aggressive invasive mole, choriocarcinoma

  13. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Haseem, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan...... the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans...

  14. Understanding the physiology of complex congenital heart disease using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappanayil, Mahesh; Kannan, Rajesh; Kumar, Raman Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Complex congenital heart diseases are often associated with complex alterations in hemodynamics. Understanding these key hemodynamic changes is critical to making management decisions including surgery and postoperative management. Existing tools for imaging and hemodynamic assessment like echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac catheterization have inherent limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful bouquet of tools that allow not only excellent imaging, but also a unique insight into hemodynamics. This article introduces the reader to cardiac MRI and its utility through the clinical example of a child with a complex congenital cyanotic heart disease

  15. Unusual magnetic resonance imaging features in Menkes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnerias, C.; Desguerre, I.; Dulac, O.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; Boddaert, N.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Boddaert, N.; Guiraud, P.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Dulac, O.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Dulac, O.; Bahi-Buisson, N.; De Lonlay, P.

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of an inherited disorder of copper metabolism, Menkes disease in which MRI studies revealed the coexistence of T2 hyper-signal in the temporal white matter with an increase of apparent diffusion coefficient indicative of vasogenic oedema combined with T2 hyper-signal of the putamen and head of the caudate and decreased apparent diffusion coefficient indicative of cytotoxic oedema. These unusual MRI features emphasize the interest of newly developed techniques in early diagnosis in Menkes disease. The acute cerebral damage might result from the combined effects of acute metabolic stress due to infectious disease and prolonged status epilepticus, acting on a highly susceptible developing brain. Vasogenic oedema in the temporal white matter could be related to prolonged status epilepticus and vascular abnormalities. Cytotoxic oedema of the putamen and head caudate could result from energetic failure. (authors)

  16. Unusual magnetic resonance imaging features in Menkes disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnerias, C; Desguerre, I; Dulac, O; Bahi-Buisson, N [Hop Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Dept Paediat Neurol and Metab Dis, F-75743 Paris 15 (France); Boddaert, N; Hertz-Pannier, L [Hop Necker Enfants Malad, AP-HP, Dept Pediat Radiol, F-75743 Paris (France); Boddaert, N [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, INSERM, U797, F-91406 Orsay (France); Guiraud, P [Univ Grenoble, Serv Biochim, Genet Hop, Grenoble (France); Hertz-Pannier, L; Dulac, O; Bahi-Buisson, N [INSERM, U663, F-75015 Paris (France); Hertz-Pannier, L; Dulac, O; Bahi-Buisson, N [Univ Paris 05, F-75005 Paris (France); De Lonlay, P [Hop Necker Enfants Malades, AP-HP, Dept Paediat Neurol and Metab Dis, F-75743 Paris 15 (France); Hop Necker Enfants Malades, AP HP, Ctr Reference Malad Metab, F-75743 Paris 15 (France)

    2008-07-01

    We present a case of an inherited disorder of copper metabolism, Menkes disease in which MRI studies revealed the coexistence of T2 hyper-signal in the temporal white matter with an increase of apparent diffusion coefficient indicative of vasogenic oedema combined with T2 hyper-signal of the putamen and head of the caudate and decreased apparent diffusion coefficient indicative of cytotoxic oedema. These unusual MRI features emphasize the interest of newly developed techniques in early diagnosis in Menkes disease. The acute cerebral damage might result from the combined effects of acute metabolic stress due to infectious disease and prolonged status epilepticus, acting on a highly susceptible developing brain. Vasogenic oedema in the temporal white matter could be related to prolonged status epilepticus and vascular abnormalities. Cytotoxic oedema of the putamen and head caudate could result from energetic failure. (authors)

  17. Detection of plant leaf diseases using image segmentation and soft computing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijai Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural productivity is something on which economy highly depends. This is the one of the reasons that disease detection in plants plays an important role in agriculture field, as having disease in plants are quite natural. If proper care is not taken in this area then it causes serious effects on plants and due to which respective product quality, quantity or productivity is affected. For instance a disease named little leaf disease is a hazardous disease found in pine trees in United States. Detection of plant disease through some automatic technique is beneficial as it reduces a large work of monitoring in big farms of crops, and at very early stage itself it detects the symptoms of diseases i.e. when they appear on plant leaves. This paper presents an algorithm for image segmentation technique which is used for automatic detection and classification of plant leaf diseases. It also covers survey on different diseases classification techniques that can be used for plant leaf disease detection. Image segmentation, which is an important aspect for disease detection in plant leaf disease, is done by using genetic algorithm.

  18. Multimodality Cardiac Imaging in a Patient with Kawasaki Disease and Giant Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjini Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease is a well-known cause of acquired cardiac disease in the pediatric and adult population, most prevalent in Japan but also seen commonly in the United States. In the era of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment, the morbidity associated with this disease has decreased, but it remains a serious illness. Here we present the case of an adolescent, initially diagnosed with Kawasaki disease as an infant, that progressed to giant aneurysm formation and calcification of the coronary arteries. We review his case and the literature, focusing on the integral role of multimodality imaging in managing Kawasaki disease.

  19. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in the detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKillop, J.H.; Murray, R.G.; Turner, J.G.; Gray, H.W.; Bessent, R.G.; Lorimer, A.R.; Greig, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial imaging can detect abnormalities of myocardial perfusion. Visual interpretation of the images is complicated by some inhomogeneity of tracer uptake normally present. Using a quantitative approach we have established the regional variation of Thallium-201 uptake present in 23 normal controls and applied the same technique to 49 patients who had undergone selective coronary arteriography with left ventriculography because of chest pain. Half of the patients with significant coronary artery disease had abnormal rest Thallium-201 images, usually corresponding to areas of abnormal wall motion at ventriculography. Stress Thallium-201 images were abnormal in over 90% of patients with coronary artery disease. The stress image abnormalities and the arteriographic lesions correlated well in most patients with single and double vessel disease but in triple vessel disease the correspondence between the two studies was poor. Two of a group of patients with normal coronary arteriograms had abnormal Thallium-201 images due to other myocardial pathology. Our technique was highly sensitive in the non-invasive detection of significant coronary artery disease in a group of patients with chest pain. A small number of positive studies were also encountered due to other myocardial disorders. (author)

  20. Acute pelvic inflammatory disease: pictorial essay focused on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febronio, Eduardo Miguel; Rosas, George de Queiroz; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe_dr@uol.com.br [Department of Imaging Diagnosis, Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPMUnifesp), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    The present study was aimed at describing key computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with acute abdominal pain derived from pelvic inflammatory disease. Two radiologists consensually selected and analyzed computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies performed between January 2010 and December 2011 in patients with proven pelvic inflammatory disease leading to presentation of acute abdomen. Main findings included presence of intracavitary fluid collections, anomalous enhancement of the pelvic excavation and densification of adnexal fat planes. Pelvic inflammatory disease is one of the leading causes of abdominal pain in women of childbearing age and it has been increasingly been diagnosed by means of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging supplementing the role of ultrasonography. It is crucial that radiologists become familiar with the main sectional imaging findings in the diagnosis of this common cause of acute abdomen (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging for extramammary Paget's disease: radiological and pathological correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaike, Gensuke; Nozaki, Taiki; Matsusako, Masaki; Saida, Yukihisa; Matsui, Mizuko; Ohtake, Naoyuki; Eto, Hikaru; Suzuki, Koyu

    2013-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous neoplasm that is thought to represent intraepithelial adenocarcinoma developing in an area rich in apocrine glands. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for this disease are not well established. We report three cases of pathologically confirmed EMPD in which MRI was performed before surgery. The lesions were widespread in the epidermis and the dermis. Lesions were sharply well enhanced on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and appeared hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging in all cases. Areas with enhancement in depth corresponded well with the pathological lesion. In addition, different malignant legions were found on the same images from MRI in two cases, indicating potential associations with other malignancies. We describe the MRI findings and their pathological correlation. MRI could be useful for preoperative evaluation of disease spread and detection of associated malignancies. (orig.)

  2. Automated Detection of Healthy and Diseased Aortae from Images Obtained by Contrast-Enhanced CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gayhart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We developed the next stage of our computer assisted diagnosis (CAD system to aid radiologists in evaluating CT images for aortic disease by removing innocuous images and highlighting signs of aortic disease. Materials and Methods. Segmented data of patient’s contrast-enhanced CT scan was analyzed for aortic dissection and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU. Aortic dissection was detected by checking for an abnormal shape of the aorta using edge oriented methods. PAU was recognized through abnormally high intensities with interest point operators. Results. The aortic dissection detection process had a sensitivity of 0.8218 and a specificity of 0.9907. The PAU detection process scored a sensitivity of 0.7587 and a specificity of 0.9700. Conclusion. The aortic dissection detection process and the PAU detection process were successful in removing innocuous images, but additional methods are necessary for improving recognition of images with aortic disease.

  3. Gaucher disease in the liver on hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyala, Rama S.; Teot, Lisa A.; Perez Rossello, Jeanette M.

    2017-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a hereditary lipid storage disorder that affects the enzyme beta glucocerebrosidase, causing accumulation of glucocerebroside in macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Accumulation can occur in the liver and spleen, manifesting as hepatosplenomegaly, as well as within the bone marrow. Hepatic involvement is usually diffuse but can occasionally manifest as focal liver lesions. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy with Gaucher disease and an infiltrating liver lesion detected on imaging, which was pathologically shown to be focal changes related to the disease. Imaging characteristics of this lesion using hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MRI, which have not been previously discussed in the literature, are described. (orig.)

  4. Gaucher disease in the liver on hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayyala, Rama S. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Teot, Lisa A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Perez Rossello, Jeanette M. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Gaucher disease is a hereditary lipid storage disorder that affects the enzyme beta glucocerebrosidase, causing accumulation of glucocerebroside in macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system. Accumulation can occur in the liver and spleen, manifesting as hepatosplenomegaly, as well as within the bone marrow. Hepatic involvement is usually diffuse but can occasionally manifest as focal liver lesions. We present a case of a 2-year-old boy with Gaucher disease and an infiltrating liver lesion detected on imaging, which was pathologically shown to be focal changes related to the disease. Imaging characteristics of this lesion using hepatocyte specific contrast agent enhanced MRI, which have not been previously discussed in the literature, are described. (orig.)

  5. Canavan disease - unusual imaging features in a child with mild clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ho V.; Ishak, Gisele E.

    2015-01-01

    Canavan disease is a rare hereditary leukodystrophy that manifests in early childhood. Associated with rapidly progressive clinical deterioration, it usually results in death by the third year of life. The predominant MRI appearance is diffuse and symmetrical white matter disease. We discuss an atypical, late presentation of Canavan disease with a benign clinical course and uncharacteristic imaging features. This case introduces a previously unreported pattern of diffuse cortical abnormality without significant white matter involvement. (orig.)

  6. The progress of research on myocardial perfusion imaging in diabetic coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qian; Li Juan

    2007-01-01

    The morbidity of diabetes mellitus is gradually increasing. It's most important complication is cardiovascular disease. The coronary disease is the main cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus. The stress myocardial perfusion imaging help diagnose diabetic coronary disease and prognosis judgement and risk assessment. So it can improve the living standard of patients with diabetes mellitus, and decrease the mortality of diabetes mellitus. (authors)

  7. Canavan disease - unusual imaging features in a child with mild clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ho V.; Ishak, Gisele E. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Canavan disease is a rare hereditary leukodystrophy that manifests in early childhood. Associated with rapidly progressive clinical deterioration, it usually results in death by the third year of life. The predominant MRI appearance is diffuse and symmetrical white matter disease. We discuss an atypical, late presentation of Canavan disease with a benign clinical course and uncharacteristic imaging features. This case introduces a previously unreported pattern of diffuse cortical abnormality without significant white matter involvement. (orig.)

  8. Automatic detection of diseased tomato plants using thermal and stereo visible light images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-e-Ahmed Raza

    Full Text Available Accurate and timely detection of plant diseases can help mitigate the worldwide losses experienced by the horticulture and agriculture industries each year. Thermal imaging provides a fast and non-destructive way of scanning plants for diseased regions and has been used by various researchers to study the effect of disease on the thermal profile of a plant. However, thermal image of a plant affected by disease has been known to be affected by environmental conditions which include leaf angles and depth of the canopy areas accessible to the thermal imaging camera. In this paper, we combine thermal and visible light image data with depth information and develop a machine learning system to remotely detect plants infected with the tomato powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici. We extract a novel feature set from the image data using local and global statistics and show that by combining these with the depth information, we can considerably improve the accuracy of detection of the diseased plants. In addition, we show that our novel feature set is capable of identifying plants which were not originally inoculated with the fungus at the start of the experiment but which subsequently developed disease through natural transmission.

  9. Diverticular Disease of the Colon: News From Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, Nicola; Soldi, Simone; Zanchetta, Edoardo; Sbaraini, Sara; Pesapane, Filippo

    2016-10-01

    Different scenarios embrace computed tomography imaging and diverticula, including asymptomatic (diverticulosis) and symptomatic patients (acute diverticulitis, follow-up of acute diverticulitis, chronic diverticulitis). If the role of computed tomography is validated and widely supported by evidence in case of acute diverticulitis, this is not the case of patients in their follow-up for acute diverticulitis or with symptoms related to diverticula, but without acute inflammation. In these settings, computed tomography colonography is gaining consensus as the preferred radiologic test.

  10. Evaluation of multi-gated myocardial perfusion imaging in various heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshitake; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1980-01-01

    Multi-gated myocardial perfusion imaging were studied in a hundred cases of various heart diseases. In normal cases, ED ES images showed thinning and thickening of wall motion respectively to compare with static images. In the myocardial infarction cases, the dynamic changes of wall motion was decreased at infarcted areas in all cases. In congestive cardiomyopathy, the change of wall motion is smaller than normal cases in all cases, while in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the change is not so hyperdynamic to compare with normal cases and by multi-gated images, asymmetric hypertrophy was clearly detected in HCM than static images. In conclusion, these methods were useful to detect the myocardial contraction stage in various heart diseases. (author)

  11. Imaging The Complications Of Paget's Disease Of Bones In A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The skull and chest radiographs, CT scan and echocardiography with their findings are highlighted so as to increase awareness and index of suspicion in physicians to this relatively rare bone disease. Classical features were illustrated on plain skull radiograph and CT Scan. Echocardiography revealed left ventricular ...

  12. Multimodal imaging of the disease progression of birdshot chorioretinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teussink, M.M.; Veld, P.I. Huis In Het; Vries, L.A.M. de; Hoyng, C.B.; Klevering, B.J.; Theelen, T.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study outer retinal deterioration in relation to clinical disease activity in patients with birdshot chorioretinopathy using fundus autofluorescence and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). METHODS: A single-centre retrospective cohort study was carried out on 42 eyes of

  13. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G

    2001-09-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  14. MRI of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Imaging features and recommended MRI protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collie, D.A.; Sellar, R.J.; Zeidler, M.; Colchester, A.C.F.; Knight, R.; Will, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) is a rare, progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by specific histopathological features. Of the four subtypes of CJD described, the commonest is sporadic CJD (sCJD). More recently, a new clinically distinct form of the disease affecting younger patients, known as variant CJD (vCJD), has been identified, and this has been causally linked to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent in cattle. Characteristic appearances on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been identified in several forms of CJD; sCJD may be associated with high signal changes in the putamen and caudate head and vCJD is usually associated with hyperintensity of the pulvinar (posterior nuclei) of the thalamus. These appearances and other imaging features are described in this article. Using appropriate clinical and radiological criteria and tailored imaging protocols, MRI plays an important part in the in vivodiagnosis of this disease. Collie, D.A. et al. (2001)

  15. The preliminary study of MR diffusion weighted imaging with background body signal suppression on pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Huawei; Cheng Jiejun; Xu Jianrong; Lu Qing; Ge Xin; Li Lei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate maximum intensity projection (MIP) images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of MR diffusion weighted imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) on pulmonary diseases. Methods: Sixty-one patients with pulmonary diseases underwent DWlBS. The findings in three dimensional(3D) MIP image were observed and the ADC values of diseased region were measured. The diagnostic value of DWIBS on pulmonary diseases was evaluated. Results: Lung cancer and inflammatory disease were all demonstrated as dense intensity area on DWIBS. The mean ADC value of central lung cancer was (1.05±0.23) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value of peripheral lung cancer was (1.10 ± 0.17) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value of the inflammatory disease was (1.69 ± 0.29) x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. The mean ADC value had significant difference between peripheral lung cancer and the inflammatory disease (P<0.05). The MR sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in diagnosing the pulmonary diseases with DWIBS (86.84%, 82.60%, 85.24%, respectively) was higher than conventional MRI(78.94%, 78.26%, and 78.68%, respectively). Conclusion: DWIBS can demonstrate clearly the lesion's shape with 3D display. The quantitative measurement of ADC values is feasible. DWIBS may be a potential diagnostic method for differentiation on pulmonary diseases. (authors)

  16. MRI of degenerative lumbar spine disease: comparison of non-accelerated and parallel imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noelte, Ingo; Gerigk, Lars; Brockmann, Marc A.; Kemmling, Andre; Groden, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Parallel imaging techniques such as GRAPPA have been introduced to optimize image quality and acquisition time. For spinal imaging in a clinical setting no data exist on the equivalency of conventional and parallel imaging techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine whether T1- and T2-weighted GRAPPA sequences are equivalent to conventional sequences for the evaluation of degenerative lumbar spine disease in terms of image quality and artefacts. In patients with clinically suspected degenerative lumbar spine disease two neuroradiologists independently compared sagittal GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2, time reduction approximately 50%) and non-GRAPPA images (25 patients) and transverse GRAPPA (acceleration factor 2, time reduction approximately 50%) and non-GRAPPA images (23 lumbar segments in six patients). Comparative analyses included the minimal diameter of the spinal canal, disc abnormalities, foraminal stenosis, facet joint degeneration, lateral recess, nerve root compression and osteochondrotic vertebral and endplate changes. Image inhomogeneity was evaluated by comparing the nonuniformity in the two techniques. Image quality was assessed by grading the delineation of pathoanatomical structures. Motion and aliasing artefacts were classified from grade 1 (severe) to grade 5 (absent). There was no significant difference between GRAPPA and non-accelerated MRI in the evaluation of degenerative lumbar spine disease (P > 0.05), and there was no difference in the delineation of pathoanatomical structures. For inhomogeneity there was a trend in favour of the conventional sequences. No significant artefacts were observed with either technique. The GRAPPA technique can be used effectively to reduce scanning time in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease while preserving image quality. (orig.)

  17. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: A Multimodality Imaging Approach with Impact on Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Dhanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic disease is a condition of uncertain etiology, comprised of hydatiform mole (complete and partial, invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, and placental site trophoblastic tumor. It arises from abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue. Early diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic disease and its potential complications is important for timely and successful management of the condition with preservation of fertility. Initial diagnosis is based on a multimodality approach: encompassing clinical features, serial quantitative β-hCG titers, and pelvic ultrasonography. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is sometimes used as a problem-solving tool to assess the depth of myometrial invasion and extrauterine disease spread in equivocal and complicated cases. Chest radiography, body computed tomography (CT, and brain MRI have been recommended as investigative tools for overall disease staging. Angiography has a role in management of disease complications and metastases. Efficacy of PET (positron emission tomography and PET/CT in the evaluation of recurrent or metastatic disease has not been adequately investigated yet. This paper discusses the imaging features of gestational trophoblastic disease on various imaging modalities and the role of different imaging techniques in the diagnosis and management of this entity.

  18. Mapping preclinical compensation in Parkinson's disease: an imaging genomics approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Nuenen, Bart F L; van Eimeren, Thilo; van der Vegt, Joyce P M

    2009-01-01

    development of overt disease. In two separate experiments, Parkin mutation carriers displayed stronger activation of rostral supplementary motor area (SMA) and right dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) during a simple motor sequence task and anterior cingulate motor area and left rostral PMd during internal movement....... Extensions of this line of research involve fMRI paradigms probing nonmotor brain functions. Additionally, the same fMRI paradigms should be applied to nonmanifesting mutation carriers in genes linked to autosomal dominant PD. This will help to determine how "generically" the human brain compensates......Mutations in the Parkin (PARK2) and PINK1 gene (PARK 6) can cause recessively inherited Parkinson's disease (PD). The presence of a single Parkin or PINK1 mutation is associated with a dopaminergic nigrostriatal dysfunction and conveys an increased risk to develop PD throughout lifetime. Therefore...

  19. Development of a quantitative assessment method of pigmentary skin disease using ultraviolet optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Onseok; Park, Sunup; Kim, Jaeyoung; Oh, Chilhwan

    2017-11-01

    The visual scoring method has been used as a subjective evaluation of pigmentary skin disorders. Severity of pigmentary skin disease, especially melasma, is evaluated using a visual scoring method, the MASI (melasma area severity index). This study differentiates between epidermal and dermal pigmented disease. The study was undertaken to determine methods to quantitatively measure the severity of pigmentary skin disorders under ultraviolet illumination. The optical imaging system consists of illumination (white LED, UV-A lamp) and image acquisition (DSLR camera, air cooling CMOS CCD camera). Each camera is equipped with a polarizing filter to remove glare. To analyze images of visible and UV light, images are divided into frontal, cheek, and chin regions of melasma patients. Each image must undergo image processing. To reduce the curvature error in facial contours, a gradient mask is used. The new method of segmentation of front and lateral facial images is more objective for face-area-measurement than the MASI score. Image analysis of darkness and homogeneity is adequate to quantify the conventional MASI score. Under visible light, active lesion margins appear in both epidermal and dermal melanin, whereas melanin is found in the epidermis under UV light. This study objectively analyzes severity of melasma and attempts to develop new methods of image analysis with ultraviolet optical imaging equipment. Based on the results of this study, our optical imaging system could be used as a valuable tool to assess the severity of pigmentary skin disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fundus characterization for automatic disease screening through retinal image processing

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Martínez, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    [EN] The World Health Organization estimates that in 2010 there were 285 million people visually impaired in the world. It is calculated that the 80\\% of these cases are preventable or treatable. In addition, aging population and chronic disease increase are two factors that predict a higher number of blindness cases in the future. Hypertension, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma are the most common pathologies in the current society that provoke re...

  1. Diffuse phalangeal signal abnormality on magnetic resonance imaging: phalangeal microgeodic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Emery, Kathleen H.; Merrow, Arnold C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Phalangeal microgeodic disease is a rare and benign self-limited condition involving the phalanges, often in the setting of cold exposure, with characteristic MR imaging abnormalities. Radiographic case descriptions are predominantly from Asia and Europe, with only seven cases using MR to characterize phalangeal microgeodic disease. In this study we describe the MR imaging appearance of unusual and striking phalangeal signal abnormality compatible with phalangeal microgeodic disease at our institution in North America. We retrospectively reviewed cases presenting at our institution with unusual or unexplained phalangeal signal abnormalities between 2001 and 2014. We reviewed the MR imaging appearances in conjunction with radiographs and any other available imaging investigations. Of 189 examinations reviewed during the study period, 8 imaging studies in 6 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Signal abnormality was present in 57 of 112 phalanges (51%), frequently involving the distal phalanges (70%, 28 of 40), followed by the middle phalanges (56%, 18 of 32) and the proximal phalanges (28%, 11 of 40). The pattern of involvement was most commonly diaphysis (38%), followed by metaphysis (32%) and epiphysis (30%). The extent of MR signal abnormality was greater than that suspected based on clinical presentation or on radiographs. The presence of unexplained diffuse characteristic marrow involvement of multiple painful phalanges on MR images, often in the setting of cold exposure, should raise the possibility of phalangeal microgeodic disease. Consideration of this diagnosis based on MR findings would lead to a more conservative management and avoid unnecessary invasive diagnostic procedures. (orig.)

  2. Choosing Between MRI and CT Imaging in the Adult with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnichsen, Crystal; Ammash, Naser

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in the outcomes of surgical and catheter-based interventions and medical therapy have led to a growing population of adult patients with congenital heart disease. Adult patients with previously undiagnosed congenital heart disease or those previously palliated or repaired may have challenging echocardiographic examinations. Understanding the distinct anatomic and hemodynamic features of the congenital anomaly and quantifying ventricular function and valvular dysfunction plays an important role in the management of these patients. Rapid advances in imaging technology with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography angiography (CTA) allow for improved visualization of complex cardiac anatomy in the evaluation of this unique patient population. Although echocardiography remains the most widely used imaging tool to evaluate congenital heart disease, alternative and, at times, complimentary imaging modalities should be considered. When caring for adults with congenital heart disease, it is important to choose the proper imaging study that can answer the clinical question with the highest quality images, lowest risk to the patient, and in a cost-efficient manner.

  3. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging analysis of dental pulp inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgini, E; Sabbatini, S; Conti, C; Rubini, C; Rocchetti, R; Fioroni, M; Memè, L; Orilisi, G

    2017-05-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy let characterize the macromolecular composition and distribution of tissues and cells, by studying the interaction between infrared radiation and matter. Therefore, we hypothesize to exploit this analytical tool in the analysis of inflamed pulps, to detect the different biochemical features related to various degrees of inflammation. IR maps of 13 irreversible and 12 hyperplastic pulpitis, together with 10 normal pulps, were acquired, compared with histological findings and submitted to multivariate (HCA, PCA, SIMCA) and statistical (one-way ANOVA) analysis. The fit of convoluted bands let calculate meaningful band area ratios (means ± s.d., P < 0.05). The infrared imaging analysis pin-pointed higher amounts of water and lower quantities of type I collagen in all inflamed pulps. Specific vibrational markers were defined for irreversible pulpitis (Lipids/Total Biomass, PhII/Total Biomass, CH 2 /CH 3 , and Ty/AII) and hyperplastic ones (OH/Total Biomass, Collagen/Total Biomass, and CH 3 Collagen/Total Biomass). The study confirmed that FTIR microspectroscopy let discriminate tissues' biological features. The infrared imaging analysis evidenced, in inflamed pulps, alterations in tissues' structure and composition. Changes in lipid metabolism, increasing amounts of tyrosine, and the occurrence of phosphorylative processes were highlighted in irreversible pulpitis, while high amounts of water and low quantities of type I collagen were detected in hyperplastic samples. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. UAV Based Imaging for Crop, Weed and Disease Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Ruiz, Francisco Jose

    Summary Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) equipped with cameras have become a powerful technology to collect high resolution remote sensing data from agricultural crops. When equipped with multispectral cameras, light invisible for the human eye may be captured and used to characterize the physiolog......Summary Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) equipped with cameras have become a powerful technology to collect high resolution remote sensing data from agricultural crops. When equipped with multispectral cameras, light invisible for the human eye may be captured and used to characterize...... the physiological status of the vegetation. UAV imagery may be divided into three steps (1) spectral characterization of the targets of interest, (2) flight and image acquisition and (3) image processing and interpretation. The overall aims of this study were to improve knowledge in all three steps associated...... with UAV-based remote sensing for practical use in agriculture and to contribute to the incipient research on UAV based remote sensing for agricultural applications. Three case studies were performed to (1) Characterize the spectral signatures of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) and creeping thistle (Cirsium...

  5. Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and multiple infarct dementia by tomographic imaging of iodine-123 IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Graham, L.S.; Lake, R.

    1986-01-01

    Tomographic imaging of the brain was performed using a rotating slant hole collimator and [ 123 I]N-isopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) in normal subjects (n = 6) and patients with either Alzheimer's disease (n = 5) or multiple infarct dementia (n = 3). Four blinded observers were asked to make a diagnosis from the images. Normal subjects and patients with multiple infarct dementia were correctly identified. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed in three of the five patients with this disease. One patient with early Alzheimer's disease was classified as normal by two of the four observers. Another patient with Alzheimer's disease had an asymmetric distribution of IMP and was incorrectly diagnosed as multiple infarct dementia by all four observers. Limited angle tomography of the cerebral distribution of 123 I appears to be a useful technique for the evaluation of demented patients

  6. The manifestation of 18F-FDG imaging of coincidence SPECT in benign pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jisheng; Liu Jinjun; Wu Jiyong; Pan Huizhong; Wang Huoqiang; Shen Yi; Shi Degang

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the uptake of the 18 F-FDG in the benign pulmonary diseases with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system. Methods: Scanning were performed with dual head SPECT coincidence detection system for patients with pulmonary diseases,the uptake and the imaging characteristic of the diseases were analysed. Results: 1) In 28 tuberculosis (TB) patients, 19 cases with a negative imaging (68%, 19/28), whereas 9 cases with a positive result (32%, 9/28). The T/N value of the TB is 1.7 +- 1.2, but the T/N of the lung cancer is 4.1 +- 2.4, significantly different from them. In the skin PPD test, 9 cases with positive scans showed a 16.2 (12 - 22) mm diameter red spot, but 7 cases of negative scans with a 8.6 (0 - 15) mm diameter, both also have a significant difference. 2) Out of the 8 patients suffered from sarcoidosis, among them 5 active stage with positive scans, whereas another 3 remission cases with negative results. 3) In 18 inflammation cases, positive imagings were showed in 6 patients with cryptococcosis, mycoplasma pneumonia, mycosis, organized pneumonia, lung abscess and bacteria pneumonia. Conclusions: In some benign pulmonary diseases, 18 F-FDG imaging can be positive also. Analysing the characteristic of the imaging could rise specificity in lung cancer and also give some new clues to treatment of these benign pulmonary diseases

  7. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny B. Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery disease (PAD is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic.

  8. MR imaging findings of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with Kikuchi disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Kato, Zenichiro; Teramoto, Takahide; Kondo, Naomi; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the MR imaging findings of cervical lymphadenopathy in patients with Kikuchi disease (histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis). Materials and methods: Nine patients with Kikuchi disease underwent MR imaging with a 1.5 T unit including diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging and five of nine underwent gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. MR images were reviewed for numbers, sizes, locations, focal hypointense areas on T2-weighted images, focal non-enhancing areas on gadolinium-enhanced MR images, and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of enlarged lymph nodes. Results: 52 enlarged nodes (range, 2–11 nodes; mean, 5.8 nodes per patients) were identified. Lymphadenopathy was unilateral in 7 patients (78%) and bilateral in 2 (22%). Enlarged nodes were located at level IIA in 7 nodes, IIB in 23, III in 8, IV in 4, VA in 2, and VB in 8. Focal hypointense areas on T2-weighted images were found in 7 patients (78%) and 21 nodes (40%), and had a peripheral distribution in 19 nodes (90%) and had clear margins in 16 nodes (76%). Focal non-enhancing areas were seen in 3 patients (60%) and 6 nodes (23%). ADCs were variable (range, 0.69–1.78 [×10 −3 mm 2 /s]; mean, 1.01 ± 0.28). Conclusion: Cervical lymphadenopathy in Kikuchi disease showed predominantly a unilateral distribution at levels II–V. Furthermore, Kikuchi disease should be considered when T2-weighted images demonstrate hypointensity areas at the peripheries of enlarged cervical nodes, which corresponded to histopathological findings of coagulative necrosis in paracortical areas.

  9. Brain imaging and cognitive dysfunctions in Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Alonso; Price, Bruce H.; Menear, Matthew; Lepage, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Recent decades have seen tremendous growth in our understanding of the cognitive dysfunctions observed in Huntington's disease (HD). Advances in neuroimaging have contributed greatly to this growth. We reviewed the role that structural and functional neuroimaging techniques have played in elucidating the cerebral bases of the cognitive deficits associated with HD. We conducted a computer-based search using PubMed and PsycINFO databases to retrieve studies of patients with HD published between 1965 and December 2004 that reported measures on cognitive tasks and used neuroimaging techniques. Structural neuroimaging has provided important evidence of morphological brain changes in HD. Striatal and cortical atrophy are the most common findings, and they correlate with cognitive deficits in attention, working memory and executive functions. Functional studies have also demonstrated correlations between striatal dysfunction and cognitive performance. Striatal hypoperfusion and decreased glucose utilization correlate with executive dysfunction. Hypometabolism also occurs throughout the cerebral cortex and correlates with performance on recognition memory, language and perceptual tests. Measures of presynaptic and postsynaptic dopamine biochemistry have also correlated with measurements of episodic memory, speed of processing and executive functioning. Aided by the results of numerous neuroimaging studies, it is becoming increasingly clear that cognitive deficits in HD involve abnormal connectivity between the basal ganglia and cortical areas. In the future, neuroimaging techniques may shed the most light on the pathophysiology of HD by defining neurodegenerative disease phenotypes as a valuable tool for knowing when patients become “symptomatic,” having been in a gene-positive presymptomatic state, and as a biomarker in following the disease, thereby providing a prospect for improved patient care. PMID:16496032

  10. Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging of Unusual White Matter Lesion in a Patient with Menkes Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Shin; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Jae Min; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Shin, Hee Suk

    2007-01-01

    We report here on the diffusion-weighted imaging of unusual white matter lesions in a case of Menkes disease. On the initial MR imaging, the white matter lesions were localized in the deep periventricular white matter in the absence of diffuse cortical atrophy. The lesion showed diffuse high signal on the diffusion weighted images and diffuse progression and persistent hyperintensity on the follow up imaging. Our case suggests that the white matter lesion may precede diffuse cortical atrophy in a patient with Menkes disease. Menkes disease is an X-linked disorder that's caused by impaired intracellular transport of copper. We describe here the DWI findings of unusual and progressive white matter lesions in a case of Menkes disease. Menkes disease is an X-linked recessive disorder, and it is due to an inborn error of copper metabolism. The cause of Menkes disease has been isolated to a genetic defect in copper-transporting adenosine triphosphatase, and this results in low levels of intracellular copper. It is characterized clinically by failure to thrive, retarded mental and motor development, clonic seizure and peculiarly coarse, sparse and colorless scalp hair. These clinical findings can be explained by a dysfunction of the copper-dependent enzymes

  11. Exploring the possibility of using digital image processing technique to detect diseases of rice leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H Peyman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rice is a very important staple food crop provides more than half of the world caloric supply. Rice diseases lead to significant annual crop losses, have negative impacts on quality of the final product and destroy plant variety. Rice Blast is one of the most widespread and most destructive fungal diseases in tropical and subtropical humid areas, which causes significant decrease in the amount of paddy yield and quality of milled rice. Brown spot disease is another important fungal disease in rice which infects the plant during the rice growing season from the nursery period up to farm growth stage and productivity phase. The later the disease is diagnosed the higher the amount of chemicals is needed for treatment. Due to high costs and harmful environmental impacts of chemical toxins, the accurate early detection and treatment of plant disease is seemed to be necessary. In general, observation with the naked eye is used for disease detection. However, the results are indeed depend on the intelligence of the person performing the operation. So usually the accurate determination of the severity and progression of the disease can’t be achieved. On the other side, the use of experts for continuous monitoring of large farms might be prohibitively expensive and time consuming. Thus, investigating the new approaches for rapid, automated, inexpensive and accurate plant disease diagnosis is very important. Machine vision and image processing is a new technique which can capture images from a scene of interest, analyze the images and accurately extract the desired information. Studies show that image processing techniques have been successfully used for plant disease detection. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of image processing techniques for diagnosing the rice blast and rice brown spot. Materials and Methods: The samples of rice leaf infected by brown spot and rice blast diseases were collected from rice fields and

  12. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-02-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of /sup 99m/Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure.

  13. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Floate, D. [John Hunter Hospital, NewCastle, NSW (Australia). Departments of Medical Imaging and Neurology; Harper, C. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Neuropathology

    1999-02-01

    Rapidly progressive dementia in an adult with findings of bilateral, symmetric high signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences and normal findings on T1-weighted sequences predominantly in the deep grey matter is suggestive of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The peripheral cortex may be involved, as it was in the present case. The absence of subcortical periventricular white matter high signal intensity suggests that symmetric high signal intensities within the basal ganglia and cortical grey matter are more likely to be due to a degenerative process rather than due to ischaemia, infection or tumour. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 17 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puvaneswary, M.; Floate, D.; Harper, C.

    1999-01-01

    Rapidly progressive dementia in an adult with findings of bilateral, symmetric high signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences and normal findings on T1-weighted sequences predominantly in the deep grey matter is suggestive of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The peripheral cortex may be involved, as it was in the present case. The absence of subcortical periventricular white matter high signal intensity suggests that symmetric high signal intensities within the basal ganglia and cortical grey matter are more likely to be due to a degenerative process rather than due to ischaemia, infection or tumour. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  15. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of sup(99m)Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure. (orig.) [de

  16. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  17. Imaging pitfalls, normal anatomy, and anatomical variants that can simulate disease on cardiac imaging as demonstrated on multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpenning, Silanath; White, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in computed tomography have led to continuous improvement in cardiac imaging. Dedicated postprocessing capabilities, faster scan times, and cardiac gating methods reveal details of normal cardiac anatomy and anatomic variants that can mimic pathologic conditions. This article will review normal cardiac anatomy and variants that can mimic disease. Radiologists should be familiar with normal cardiac anatomy and anatomic variants to avoid misinterpretation of normal findings for pathologic processes

  18. Nuclide imaging and computed tomography in cerebral vascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, L.C.; Christie, J.H.; Schapiro, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    This report presents our experience with computed tomographic and radionuclide scans in 224 patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic infarcts or intracerebral hematomas secondary to cerebral occlusive vascular diseases. The results vary according to the site of vascular occlusion. The radionuclide angiograms and static scintigrams show four distinct patterns in cases of occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Computed tomographic scans exhibit less variation in appearance and have a higher sensitivity in cases of recent ischemic infarction. The ''tentorial confluence sign'' is an important finding on static scintigrams in patients with occipital infarction; if this sign is not present, this diagnosis should be suspect. Earlier reports have established the value of computed tomography and radionuclide scans in the evaluation of cerebral infarction. In individual cases, however, each of these modalities may render nondiagnostic or false negative findings; combining both types of examinations and comparing results yield a greater likelihood of an accurate diagnosis of cerebrovascular disease. Computed tomography is clearly more valuable than radionuclide scans in the diagnosis and follow-up of hemorrhagic infarcts or parenchymal hematomas

  19. MR imaging and spectroscopy in Lhermitte-Duclos disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraja, S.; Powell, T.; Griffiths, P.D.; Wilkinson, I.D.

    2004-01-01

    Lhermitte-Duclos disease is a rare abnormality occurring in the cerebellum with only 130 cases reported in the literature. There is debate as to whether this abnormality is a hamartoma, a malformation or a tumour. In this case report we discuss the spectroscopy findings from two patients presenting with this disease. The patients, one 40-year-old Caucasian woman with a 6-year history of headaches, unsteady gait and falls, deterioration in vision and another 28-year-old Caucasian man with a 1-year history of headaches and a previous history of a transient stroke, were found to have this lesion in the cerebellum. Proton spectroscopic data were obtained using a single-voxel PRESS technique (TE=135 ms, TR=1600 ms), from the region of the abnormality. The results were expressed as ratios under the three prominent resonances representing choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetyl (NA) moieties. The metabolite ratios were compared to normative data. The two cases demonstrated reduced ratios in NA/Cho and NA/Cr in relation to the controls. The ratios of Cho/Cr appeared closer to the normal mean ratio. There were peaks attributable to lactate in both cases. The low NA/Cr and NA/Cho ratios could be due to the apparent lack of neuronal architecture and the presence of embryonic neural tissue, which does not express NA, indicating more favourably towards a 'benign' hamartoma rather than a tumour. (orig.)

  20. Detecting culprit vessel of coronary artery disease with SPECT 99Tcm-MIBI myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Zhaosheng; Zhou Wen; Peng Yong; Su Yuwen; Tian Jianhe; Gai lue; Sun Zhijun

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of detecting culprit vessel of coronary artery disease (CAD) with SPECT 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imaging. Methods: Forty-six patients with CAD were studied. Every patients had multiple-vessel lesion showed by coronary arteriography and was treated by revascularization as percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or laser holing. Exercise (EX), rest (RE) and intravenous infusion of nitroglycerine (NTG) SPECT 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imagings were performed before revascularization. Exercise and rest images revealed the myocardial ischemia. NTG images revealed myocardial viability. Culprit vessels were detected according to the defects showed by above mentioned images. The veracity of detected culprit vessels was tested with the outcome of the reperfusion therapy. Results: In this group, the coronary arteriography revealed 107 lesioned coronary arteries. Myocardial imaging detected 46 culprit vessels including 23 left anterior descending (LAD), 19 left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) and 4 right coronary artery (RCA). All 46 culprit vessels underwent revascularization and had nice outcome. The veracity of 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imaging detected culprit vessels was high according to patients' outcome. Conclusion: Exercise, rest and NTG 99 Tc m -MIBI myocardial imaging is a great method for detecting culprit vessels in multivessel coronary disease

  1. Adult onset glycogen storage disease type II (adult onset Pompe disease): report and magnetic resonance images of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Gaizo, Andrew; Banerjee, Sima; Terk, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII), also referred to as Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency, is a rare inherited condition caused by a deficiency in acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) enzyme activity. The condition is often classified by age of presentation, with infantile and late onset variants (Laforet et al. J Neurology 55:1122-8, 2000). Late onset tends to present with progressive proximal muscle weakness and respiratory insufficiency (Winkel et al. J Neurology 252:875-84, 2005). We report two cases of biopsy confirmed adult onset GSDII, along with key Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. (orig.)

  2. Diagnostic imaging of digestive tract involvement in cystic fibrosis. Part 1: hepatobiliary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miralles, M.; Gonzalez, G.; Serrano, C.; Manzanares, J.; Berrocal, T.

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease characterized by epithelial chloride channel dysfunction, leading to the production of abnormally thick secretions. The abnormal gene is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Hepatobiliary involvement derives from ductal obstruction causing cholestasis, steatosis, cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Biliary sludge, cholelithiasis and gallbladder sclerosis and atrophy are common findings. As the correlation between the hepatobiliary changes and their clinical and analytical impact is very limited, imaging techniques are essential in this disease. Ultrasound is the basic imaging tool, both for initial evaluation and follow-up of the hepatic and biliary involvement, although other techniques such as radionuclide imaging, magnetic resonance and computed tomography can be highly useful. Given the long-term, chronic nature of this disease, the use of aggressive techniques or irradiation should be carefully weighed. (Author) 38 refs

  3. Light chain deposition disease in multiple myeloma: MR imaging features correlated with histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Staebler, A.; Reiser, M.; Lamerz, R.; Bartl, R.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical, histopathological, and imaging findings on MRI of a 56-year-old woman with light chain deposition disease occurring in multiple myeloma are presented. Light chain deposition disease is a variant of multiple myeloma with distinct clinical and histological characteristics. MRI of this patient also revealed an infiltration pattern in the bone marrow distinct from that of typical multiple myeloma. Multiple small foci of low signal intensity were present on T1- and T2-weighted spin echo and STIR images, corresponding to conglomerates of light chains in bone marrow biopsy. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted spin echo images show diffuse enhancement of 51% over all vertebral bodies, with a minor enhancement of the focal conglomerates of light chains. Light chain deposition disease in multiple myeloma should be added to the list of those few entities with normal radiographs and discrete low-signal marrow lesions on T1- and T2-weighted spin echo pulse sequences. (orig.)

  4. Imaging technique and current status of valvular heart disease using cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, J.; Sohns, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The main indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of valvular heart disease are pathologies of the aortic and pulmonary valve. For mitral and tricuspid valve pathologies MRI is not the first line modality as these are usually well visualized by echocardiography. The advantages of MRI in valvular heart disease are a high reliability in the evaluation of ventricular volumes and function as well as the assessment of the perivalvular arterial or atrial structures. This reliability and the limitless access to any imaging plane partially compensates for the lower temporal and spatial resolution in comparison to echocardiography. In patients with congenital heart disease, cardiac MRI is established as a valuable diagnostic tool in daily clinical management, especially for the evaluation of pulmonary valve defects. Nevertheless, echocardiography remains the first-line diagnostic imaging tool for the foreseeable future. (orig.) [de

  5. MR imaging of the vestibular aqueduct in normal volunteers and patients with Meniere's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Asai, Hideaki; Ishigaki, Takeo; Sakuma, Sadayuki

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we attempted MR visualization of the vestibular aqueduct (VA) with a surface coil. Sagittal plane was most preferable from the result of preliminary study using a dry temporal bone. In all of ten normal volunteers, VAs were visualized well. In none of them, proton-density weighted spin-echo (SE) images were inferior to both T1- and T2-weighted SE images. In four of eight patients with Meniere's disease, VAs were not visualized due to obstruction of VA, although in all of ten non-Meniere's disease patients with hearing loss or vertigo, VAs were well visualized. Although further investigation is needed, MR imaging of VA including both its content and surrounding bony structure would give important information to manage the patients with either Meniere's disease or other disorders of internal ears. (author)

  6. Myocardial CT perfusion imaging and SPECT for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, Richard T; Mehra, Vishal C; Chen, Marcus Y

    2014-01-01

    %, respectively, for SPECT. CONCLUSION: The overall performance of myocardial CT perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of anatomic CAD (stenosis ≥50%), as demonstrated with the Az, was higher than that of SPECT and was driven in part by the higher sensitivity for left main and multivessel disease.......PURPOSE: To compare the diagnostic performance of myocardial computed tomographic (CT) perfusion imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of anatomically significant coronary artery disease (CAD) as depicted at invasive coronary angiography....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was approved by the institutional review board. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Sixteen centers enrolled 381 patients from November 2009 to July 2011. Patients underwent rest and adenosine stress CT perfusion imaging and rest and either exercise...

  7. Prognostic value of gated 201Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zicheng; Chen Xiaoming; Xu Hao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the prognostic value of gated 201 Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with coronary artery disease and assessment of therapy strategy for the individual patient. Methods: Eighty-four patients underwent rest and exercise stress 201 Tl gated myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging and were followed up for (32.92 ± 16.77) months. Images were studied using 17 segments and 1 to 4 scoring. Global summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS) and summed difference score (SDS=SSS-SRS) were also calculated. Post-stress and rest ejection fraction (EF) were automatically measured. Results: Nine cardiac events occurred (3.90% per year). SSS, SDS, SRS and EF were the independent predictors of cardiac events (P 201 Tl myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging can provide prognostic assessment for the patients with coronary artery disease and guide in selection of therapeutic strategy. Among all of the indices SSS is the best predictors of cardiac events. (authors)

  8. The value of thyroid blood flow and static imaging for diagnosis of hashimotos disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Bangkun; Yang Jishen; Shen Dawei; Liu Bin; Xue Yuanming; Shi Jue

    1995-01-01

    The diagnostic value of the combination of thyroid blood flow and static imaging for Hashimotos disease are evaluated. Both thyroid blood flow and static imaging with 99m Tc was carried out in 108 Hashimotos disease proved by fine needle biopsy. 87% of them had markedly or slightly increased thyroid blood flow. On static imaging 89.8% showed active nonuniformity, among them, 16.7% was cold nodules. The 99m Tc uptake was normal in 66 (58.3%), decreased in 26 (26.9%), but only increased in 16, in them 4 accompanying hyperthyroidism. Thyroid blood flow and static imaging, a simple and convenient approach, combining with radioimmunoassay and clinical manifestation, can be used as routine diagnostic model

  9. IgG4-related cardiovascular disease. The emerging role of cardiovascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2017-01-01

    Immunoglobulin 4-related disease (IgG4-related disease) is a systemic inflammatory disease that presents with increases of serum IgG4. It may affect various systems, including the cardiovascular (CV) system. Assessment of serum IgG4 levels and involved organ biopsy are necessary for diagnosis. IgG4-related disease is characterized by fibrosclerosis, lymphocytic infiltration and presence of IgG4-positive plasma cells. The disease usually responds to treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive medication. CV involvement may manifest as cardiac pseudotumors, inflammatory periaortitis, coronary arteritis and/or pericarditis. IgG4-related cardiovascular disorders can severely affect patient prognosis. Various imaging techniques, including echocardiography, Computed Tomography (CT), 18FDG-PET, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) and cardiac catheterisation, have been successfully used for early disease detection and follow-up. Echocardiography and vascular ultrasound are the most commonly used non-invasive, non-radiating imaging techniques for the evaluation of IgG4-related CV disease. Periaortitis/periarteritis can be also assessed by CT, showing a soft tissue thickening around arteries. Coronary artery aneurysms can be easily diagnosed by coronary CT. In case of active periarterial or coronary artery inflammation, 18FDG-PET will show FDG uptake at the area of the lesion. CMR, due to its capability to perform function and tissue characterisation, can offer an integrated imaging of aorta, coronary arteries and the heart, assessment of disease acuity, extent of fibrosis and guide further treatment. However, multimodality imaging may be necessary for assessment of disease activity and fibrosis extent in those cases with multifocal CV involvement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of disease activity in Crohn's disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, Karin; Bipat, Shandra; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Stoker, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the accuracy of MRI for grading disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD). The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the accuracy of MRI in grading CD compared to a predefined reference standard. Two independent observers

  11. Imaging the impact of genes on Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Vegt, J P M; van Nuenen, B F L; Bloem, B R

    2009-01-01

    by the discovery of mutations in single genes that can cause autosomal dominant (alpha-synuclein (SNCA)) and leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene) or recessive (Parkin, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), DJ-1, and ATP13A2 gene) forms of PD. Here, we review how structural and functional neuroimaging...... of individuals carrying a mutation in one of the PD genes has offered a unique avenue of research into the pathogenesis of PD. In symptomatic mutation carriers (i.e. those with overt disease), brain mapping can help to link the molecular pathogenesis of PD more directly with functional and structural changes...... monogenic forms of PD, common polymorphisms in genes that influence mono-aminergic signaling or synaptic plasticity may have modifying effects on distinct aspects of PD. We also discuss how functional and structural neuroimaging can be used to better characterize these genotype-phenotype correlations....

  12. Imaging techniques in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.

    1997-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Coronary angiography makes it possible to visualize coronary artery stenosis and can be used for angioplasty and stent implantation; however, it does not allow the assessment of changes in myocardial microcirculation. The severity of an angiographically evaluated coronary stenosis does not always correspond to the extent of myocardial ischemia. Nonivasive techniques are needed to reexamine our reliance on coronary angiography and to explore the clinical value fo the physiological assessment of coronary artery stenoses. Such noninvasive techniques might become important tools in the future following an overal evaluation of coronary morphology, myocardial function and perfusion ascertained by all available methods. (orig.) [de

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging applied to motor neuron disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroal, Gonzalo M.; Giavitto, Enrique; Nagel, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Differentiate Motor Neuron Disease by MRI. Material and Methods: 10 patients were studied, 7 patients had a diagnosis of definite ALS by the El Escorial criteria, 2 patients had lower motor neuron signs (LMN) and hyperreflexia and one patient had LMN signs without pain. MRI was performed: slices brain: Sagittal T1-weighted, sagittal and axial FSE T2, axial and coronal FLAIR, diffusion, singlevoxel spectroscopy in protuberances. Functional MRI with motor test; slices in cervical spine: Sagittal T1-weighted, sagittal and axial FSE T2, sagittal FSIR. Results: The 7 patients with definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 2 patients with LMN signs and hyperreflexia: hyperintensity signal in FSE T2 and FLAIR extending from the motor cortex down to the corona radiate, posterior limb of internal capsules, cerebral peduncles and protuberance base; FSE T2: hypointensity sign in motor cortex; elevation in diffusivity and hyperintensity signal in ADC in posterior limb of internal capsule; reduction of NAA, high levels of Glutamine-Glutamate and of Colina. One of these 9 patients showed disc hernia in C4-5, and other patient in C3-C4, C4-C5 without cord lesion. The patient with LMN signs without pain showed normal brain and disc hernia C5-C6, hypertrophy yellow ligament, anterior-posterior diminution of medullar canal, hyperintensity signal in spine cord in the same level in sagittal FSIR. fMRI: increase signal in contralateral, ipsilateral motor area, and areas involved in initiation and planning movement. Conclusion: MRI allow differentiation between ALS and myelopathy cervical spondylitis and others motor neuron disease. (author) [es

  14. Two Cases of Sternal 'Cold' Lesions on Bone Imaging in the Metastatic Skeletal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung Gun; Seo, Bong Kwan; Lee, Hoon Yong; Lee, Myung Chul; Choi, Sung Jae; Kim, Noe Kyeong; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-09-15

    Traditionally, a positive bone scan shows single or multiple areas of increased uptake in them metastatic skeletal disease. The occurrence of 'cold' lytic-like or photon-deficient lesions in bone imaging is probably uncommon. Photon-deficient focus or cold lesion of the sternum was demonstrated on {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone imaging in 2 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia and primary hepatoma, respectively.

  15. IgG4-related cardiovascular disease. The emerging role of cardiovascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie, E-mail: soma13@otenet.gr; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Assessment of serum IgG4 levels and involved organ biopsy are necessary for diagnosis of IgG4-related disease. • CV involvement may manifest as cardiac pseudotumors, inflammatory periaortitis, coronary arteritis and/or pericarditis. • Echocardiography and vascular ultrasound are the most commonly used non-invasive, non-radiating imaging techniques. • CT can assess periarteritis and coronary artery aneurysms, while 18FDG-PET shows FDG uptake at the area of the lesion. • CMR offers an integrated imaging of CV system, including assessment of disease acuity, extent of fibrosis and can guide further treatment. - Abstract: Immunoglobulin 4-related disease (IgG4-related disease) is a systemic inflammatory disease that presents with increases of serum IgG4. It may affect various systems, including the cardiovascular (CV) system. Assessment of serum IgG4 levels and involved organ biopsy are necessary for diagnosis. IgG4-related disease is characterized by fibrosclerosis, lymphocytic infiltration and presence of IgG4-positive plasma cells. The disease usually responds to treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive medication. CV involvement may manifest as cardiac pseudotumors, inflammatory periaortitis, coronary arteritis and/or pericarditis. IgG4-related cardiovascular disorders can severely affect patient prognosis. Various imaging techniques, including echocardiography, Computed Tomography (CT), 18FDG-PET, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) and cardiac catheterisation, have been successfully used for early disease detection and follow-up. Echocardiography and vascular ultrasound are the most commonly used non-invasive, non-radiating imaging techniques for the evaluation of IgG4-related CV disease. Periaortitis/periarteritis can be also assessed by CT, showing a soft tissue thickening around arteries. Coronary artery aneurysms can be easily diagnosed by coronary CT. In case of active periarterial or coronary artery inflammation, 18

  16. IgG4-related cardiovascular disease. The emerging role of cardiovascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of serum IgG4 levels and involved organ biopsy are necessary for diagnosis of IgG4-related disease. • CV involvement may manifest as cardiac pseudotumors, inflammatory periaortitis, coronary arteritis and/or pericarditis. • Echocardiography and vascular ultrasound are the most commonly used non-invasive, non-radiating imaging techniques. • CT can assess periarteritis and coronary artery aneurysms, while 18FDG-PET shows FDG uptake at the area of the lesion. • CMR offers an integrated imaging of CV system, including assessment of disease acuity, extent of fibrosis and can guide further treatment. - Abstract: Immunoglobulin 4-related disease (IgG4-related disease) is a systemic inflammatory disease that presents with increases of serum IgG4. It may affect various systems, including the cardiovascular (CV) system. Assessment of serum IgG4 levels and involved organ biopsy are necessary for diagnosis. IgG4-related disease is characterized by fibrosclerosis, lymphocytic infiltration and presence of IgG4-positive plasma cells. The disease usually responds to treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive medication. CV involvement may manifest as cardiac pseudotumors, inflammatory periaortitis, coronary arteritis and/or pericarditis. IgG4-related cardiovascular disorders can severely affect patient prognosis. Various imaging techniques, including echocardiography, Computed Tomography (CT), 18FDG-PET, Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) and cardiac catheterisation, have been successfully used for early disease detection and follow-up. Echocardiography and vascular ultrasound are the most commonly used non-invasive, non-radiating imaging techniques for the evaluation of IgG4-related CV disease. Periaortitis/periarteritis can be also assessed by CT, showing a soft tissue thickening around arteries. Coronary artery aneurysms can be easily diagnosed by coronary CT. In case of active periarterial or coronary artery inflammation, 18

  17. Hyperspectral imaging and ankle: brachial indices in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Saraf, Lida; Gordon, Ian L

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the correlation between ankle:brachial indices (ABI) and visible light reflectance spectroscopy hyperspectral imaging (HSI) determinations of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin (oxyHgb and deoxyHgb) levels in the skin of the distal lower extremity. This is a prospective, open, comparator trial which took place at the Vascular laboratory of a Veterans Administration Hospital in Long Beach, USA. Fifty-eight patients (85 limbs) were referred for routine vascular laboratory studies including ABI had concomitant HSI. Limbs with noncompressible pedal signals were excluded from the analysis. ABI was determined with continuous wave Doppler ultrasound and leg blood pressure cuffs. A commercial HSI system (Oxu-Vu(R), Hypermed, Inc.) was used to measure oxyHgb, deoxyHgb, and percent oxygenated hemoglobin (%oxyHgb) in the dorsum of the foot and ankle. HSI measurements of volar forearm skin were also obtained to normalize the lower extremity HSI measurements in a manner comparable with ABI. For purposes of comparison, data sets were divided into 3 groups: ABI > 0.9 (n = 53), 0.45 failed to show a clinically useful correlation between HSI measurements of oxyHgb levels, further evaluation of this novel technology is warranted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Benefits of optical coherence tomography for imaging of skin diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utz S.R.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: working out the methods of visualization of information obtained during optical coherent tomography in normal skin and in series of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods. OCS1300SS (made in Thorlabs, USA was used in which the source of emission of radiation was a super-luminiscent diode with mean wavelength of 1325 nm. 12 patients with different skin conditions and 5 virtually healthy volunteers were examined with ОСТ procedure in OPD and IPD settings. High resolution USG numerical system DUB (TPM GmbH, Germany was used for comparative USG assessment. Results. ОСТ demonstrated considerably more detailed picture of the objects scanned compared to USG investigation. Image obtained with the help of ОСТ contains vital information about sizes of macro-morphological elements, status of vascular elements and their density in different depths of the skin. Conclusion. Additional results obtained from ОСТ of the skin lesions in plane section improves attraction for ОСТ in practical dermatology.

  19. Chronic diseases of lung parenchyma in children: the role of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haran Jogeesvaran, K.; Owens, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic diseases of the lung parenchyma (CDoLP) in children encompass a vast number of distinct clinico-pathological conditions. The prevalence of CDoLP has continued to increase in the last 10-15 years and the paediatric radiologist will therefore have to become more familiar with the imaging appearances of CDoLP. This review highlights some of the key imaging appearances of CDoLP, focussing mainly on airways disease. We also explore issues around technique optimisation and dose minimisation that remain of paramount importance in children. (orig.)

  20. Comparison of exercise electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging for one-vessel coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, S.; Kiess, M.; Liu, P.; Guiney, T.E.; Pohost, G.M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The relative value of exercise electrocardiography and computer analyzed thallium-201 imaging was compared in 124 patients with 1-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD). Of these, 78 had left anterior descending (LAD), 32 right and 14 left circumflex (LC) CAD. In patients with no previous myocardial infarction (MI), thallium imaging was more sensitive than the electrocardiogram (78% vs 64%, p less than 0.01), but in patients with previous MI, sensitivity was similar. Further, thallium imaging was more sensitive only in LAD and LC disease. Redistribution was compared with ST-segment depression as a marker of ischemia. Only in patients with prior MI (76% vs 44%, p less than 0.01) and only in LC and right CAD did redistribution occur more often than ST depression. Thallium imaging was more accurate in localizing stenoses than the electrocardiogram (p less than 0.001), but did not always correctly predict coronary anatomy. Septal thallium defects were associated with LAD disease in 84%, inferior defects with right CAD in 40% and posterolateral lesion defects with LC CAD in 22%. The results indicate the overall superiority of thallium imaging in 1-vessel CAD compared with exercise electrocardiography; however, there is a wide spectrum of extent and location of perfusion defects associated with each coronary artery. Thallium imaging complements coronary angiography by demonstrating the functional impact of CAD on myocardial perfusion