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Sample records for behavioral intervention pilot

  1. Development of a novel mindfulness and cognitive behavioral intervention for stress-eating: a comparative pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsica, Joyce; Hood, Megan M; Katterman, Shawn; Kleinman, Brighid; Ivan, Iulia

    2014-12-01

    Stress-related eating is increasingly cited as a difficulty in managing healthy eating behaviors and weight. However few interventions have been designed to specifically target stress-related eating. In addition, the optimal target of such an intervention is unclear, as the target might be conceptualized as overall stress reduction or changing emotional eating-related thoughts and behaviors. This pilot study compared the effects of three interventions targeting those components individually and in combination on stress-related eating, perceived stress, and weight loss to determine whether the two intervention components are effective alone or are more effective when combined. Fifty-three overweight participants (98% female) who reported elevated levels of stress and stress-eating and were at risk for obesity were randomly assigned to one of three six-week interventions: a modified mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) intervention, a cognitive behavioral stress-eating intervention (SEI), and a combined intervention that included all MBSR and SEI components. All three interventions significantly reduced perceived stress and stress-eating, but the combination intervention resulted in greater reductions and also produced a moderate effect on short term weight loss. Benefits persisted at six week follow-up.The pattern of results preliminarily suggests that the combination intervention (MBSR+SEI) may yield promise in the treatment of stress-related eating.

  2. Development and pilot-testing of a cognitive behavioral coping skills group intervention for patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Evon, Ph.D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial interventions for patients with chronic hepatitis C viral (HCV infection are needed to attenuate the impact of extrahepatic symptoms, comorbid conditions, and treatment side effects on HCV health outcomes. We adapted empirically-supported interventions for similar patient populations to develop a Cognitive Behavioral Coping Skills group intervention for HCV patients (CBCS-HCV undergoing treatment. The objectives of this paper are to describe the research activities associated with CBCS-HCV development and pilot testing, including: (1 formative work leading to intervention development; (2 preliminary study protocol; and (3 pilot feasibility testing of the intervention and study design. Formative work included a literature review, qualitative interviews, and adaption, development, and review of study materials. A preliminary study protocol is described. We evaluate the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT of the CBCS-HCV with 12 study participants in Wave 1 testing to examine: (a feasibility of intervention delivery; (b patient acceptability; (c recruitment, enrollment, retention; (d feasibility of conducting a RCT; (d therapist protocol fidelity; and (e feasibility of data collection. Numerous lessons were learned. We found very high rates of data collection, participant attendance, engagement, retention and acceptability, and therapist protocol fidelity. We conclude that many aspects of the CBCS-HCV intervention and study protocol were highly feasible. The greatest challenge during this Wave 1 pilot study was efficiency of participant enrollment due to changes in standard of care treatment. These findings informed two additional waves of pilot testing to examine effect sizes and potential improvements in clinical outcomes, with results forthcoming.

  3. An Evaluation of a Smartphone–Assisted Behavioral Weight Control Intervention for Adolescents: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Kristina M; Lott, Mark A; Hunsaker, Sanita L; Duraccio, Kara M; Woolford, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of adolescent weight control treatments is modest, and effective treatments are costly and are not widely available. Smartphones may be an effective method for delivering critical components of behavioral weight control treatment including behavioral self-monitoring. Objective To examine the efficacy and acceptability of a smartphone assisted adolescent behavioral weight control intervention. Methods A total of 16 overweight or obese adolescents (mean age=14.29 years, standard deviation=1.12) received 12 weeks of combined treatment that consisted of weekly in-person group behavioral weight control treatment sessions plus smartphone self-monitoring and daily text messaging. Subsequently they received 12 weeks of electronic-only intervention, totaling 24 weeks of intervention. Results On average, participants attained modest but significant reductions in body mass index standard score (zBMI: 0.08 standard deviation units, t (13)=2.22, P=.04, d=0.63) over the in-person plus electronic-only intervention period but did not maintain treatment gains over the electronic-only intervention period. Participants self-monitored on approximately half of combined intervention days but less than 20% of electronic-only intervention days. Conclusions Smartphones likely hold promise as a component of adolescent weight control interventions but they may be less effective in helping adolescents maintain treatment gains after intensive interventions. PMID:27554704

  4. The effect of a structured intervention on caregivers of patients with dementia and problem behaviors: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Alessandro; Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Liscio, Mariarosaria; Petrucci, Bianca; Porro, Gabriella Salvini

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of a structured intervention on caregiver stress and the institutionalization rate of patients with dementia and problem behaviors. Caregivers contacting the Federazione Alzheimer Italia (AI) to receive help, advice, or information in relation to problem behaviors of outpatients were enrolled. Eligible caregiver-patient dyads were randomized to receive either a structured intervention or the counseling AI usually provides (control group). After basal assessment, families were reassessed at 6 and 12 months. Problem behavior (particularly agitation) was the only variable significantly correlated (P = 0.006) with the baseline caregivers' stress score. Thirty-nine families completed the 12-month follow-up; the mean problem behavior score was significantly lower in the intervention than the control group (p < 0.03); the time needed for care of the patient increased by 0.5 +/- 9.7 hours/day in the control group and decreased by 0.3 +/- 4.1 in the intervention group (p = 0.4, Wilcoxon test). The main determinant of institutionalization seemed to be the level of caregiver stress (p = 0.03). In patients of the intervention group, there was a significant reduction in the frequency of delusions. This pilot study suggests that caregiver stress is relieved by a structured intervention. The number of families lost to follow-up, the relatively short duration of the study, and the ceiling effect due to the severity of the clinical characteristics of patients probably all partly dilute the observed findings.

  5. Pilot Study Results for a Novel Behavior Plus Nutrition Intervention for Caregivers of Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susana R.; Odar, Cathleen; Midyett, L. Kurt; Clements, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This pilot study presents results for a parent-based educational intervention targeting mealtime behaviors plus nutrition among families of young children (M age: 5.0±1.2 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods We recruited nine caregivers who participated in the six-session intervention and completed baseline and post-treatment assessments. Results Children’s mean daily glycemic levels decreased from 185±46 mg/dl to 159±40 mg/dl (p<0.001). There were also decreases in problematic parent and child mealtime behaviors. There was no change in children’s dietary intake indicators. Conclusions and Implications It appears promising that our targeted behavior plus nutrition intervention can improve glycemic control and behavior for young children with T1DM. Our next step will be to modify the intervention to improve our nutrition education modules. Ultimately, we plan to test the intervention in a large randomized clinical trial to examine if it can yield improvements to children’s diet and glycated hemoglobin levels. PMID:24438850

  6. Tailored behavioral support for smoking reduction: development and pilot results of an innovative intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Arnold H; Glasgow, Russell E; Gaglio, Bridget; Smith, Tammy L; Cahoon, Jana; Marcus, Alfred C

    2008-04-01

    Reduction of smoking may increase the likelihood of eventual smoking cessation among those not ready to quit. We describe the development and acceptance of a smoking-reduction intervention that integrates telephone counseling sessions with newsletters. A computer-assisted telephone interviewing program generates real-time-tailored counseling delivered by lay interviewers. Pilot participants (n = 53) were adult smokers scheduled for outpatient procedures in a health maintenance organization, randomized to intervention or a control condition (quarterly mailings). Smoking levels were measured by self-report and biochemically. Among intervention participants continuing at 3 months, all but one rated their telephone support person positively on all dimensions. Counseling calls were 'about right' in number, and newsletters were perceived as quite personal. Intervention recipients reported smoking significantly fewer mean cigarettes per day at 3 months than at baseline, and significantly fewer than control participants. Comparisons were non-significant under intent-to-treat analyses and on biochemical measures. The program was well received by outpatients who were not ready to quit smoking, and was implemented successfully by telephone staff who had no previous smoking cessation counseling experience. An ongoing trial is evaluating effectiveness, cost and relationship to eventual cessation.

  7. Feasibility and Impact of a Combined Supervised Exercise and Nutritional-Behavioral Intervention following Bariatric Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich C. Jassil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lifestyle intervention programs after bariatric surgery have been suggested to maximise health outcomes. This pilot study aimed to investigate the feasibility and impact of an 8-week combined supervised exercise with nutritional-behavioral intervention following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Methods. Eight female patients (44 ± 8 years old, BMI = 38.5 ± 7.2 kgm−2 completed the program. Before and after intervention, anthropometric measures, six-minute walk test (6MWT, physical activity level, eating behavior, and quality of life (QoL were assessed. Percentage weight loss (%WL outcomes were compared with a historical matched control group. Results. The program significantly improved functional capacity (mean increment in 6MWT was 127 ± 107 meters, p=0.043, increased strenuous intensity exercise (44 ± 49 min/week, p=0.043, increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (p=0.034, reduced consumption of ready meals (p=0.034, and improved “Change in Health” in QoL domain (p=0.039. The intervention group exhibited greater %WL in the 3–12-month postsurgery period compared to historical controls, 12.2 ± 7.5% versus 5.1 ± 5.4%, respectively (p=0.027. Conclusions. Lifestyle intervention program following bariatric surgery is feasible and resulted in several beneficial outcomes. A large randomised control trial is now warranted.

  8. A Pilot Study of an Acceptance-Based Behavioral Intervention for Weight Regain After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lauren E; Forman, Evan M; Kerrigan, Stephanie G; Butryn, Meghan L; Herbert, James D; Sarwer, David B

    2016-10-01

    Tens of thousands of bariatric surgery patients each year experience sub-optimal weight loss, significant regain, or both. Weight regain can contribute to a worsening of weight-related co-morbidities, and for some, leads to secondary surgical procedures. Poor weight outcomes have been associated with decreased compliance to the recommended postoperative diet. Decreased compliance may be partially due to a lack of psychological skills necessary to engage in healthy eating behaviors over the long term, especially as the effects of surgery (on appetite, hunger, and desire for food) decrease. Many behavioral interventions do not sufficiently address these challenges and often have limited effectiveness. The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a novel 10-week acceptance-based behavioral intervention to stop postoperative weight regain. A sample of bariatric surgery patients (n = 11) who regained at least 10 % of their maximum lost postoperative weight was recruited. All participants received the intervention, which emphasized psychological skills thought to be integral to successful weight control post-surgery. The intervention was shown to be feasible and acceptable, with 72 % retention and high mean rating (4.25 out of 5.00) of program satisfaction among completers. Weight regain was stopped, and even reversed, with a mean total body weight loss of 3.58 ± 3.02 % throughout the 10-week intervention. There were also significant improvements in eating-related and acceptance-related variables. These findings provide initial support for the use of a psychological acceptance-based intervention for weight regain in bariatric surgery patients.

  9. Evaluation of a Serious Self-Regulation Game Intervention for Overweight-Related Behaviors (“Balance It”): A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spook, J.E.; Paulussen, T.; Kok, G.; Empelen, P. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: Serious games have the potential to promote health behavior. Because overweight is still a major issue among secondary vocational education students in the Netherlands, this study piloted the effects of “Balance It,” a serious self-regulation game intervention targeting students’ overwei

  10. Evaluation of an mHealth intervention aiming to improve health-related behavior and sleep and reduce fatigue among airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile Rl; Hlobil, Hynek; Twisk, Jos Wr; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an mHealth intervention (intervention using mobile technology) consisting of tailored advice regarding exposure to daylight, sleep, physical activity, and nutrition, and aiming to improve health-related behavior, thereby reducing sleep problems and fatigue and improving health perception of airline pilots. A randomized controlled trial was conducted among 502 airline pilots. The intervention group was given access to both the MORE Energy mobile application (app) with tailored advice and a website with background information. The control group was directed to a website with standard information about fatigue. Health-related behavior, fatigue, sleep, and health perception outcomes were measured through online questionnaires at baseline and at three and six months after baseline. The effectiveness of the intervention was determined using linear and Poisson mixed model analyses. After six months, compared to the control group, the intervention group showed a significant improvement on fatigue (β= -3.76, P<0.001), sleep quality (β= -0.59, P=0.007), strenuous physical activity (β=0.17, P=0.028), and snacking behavior (β= -0.81, P<0.001). No significant effects were found for other outcome measures. The MORE Energy mHealth intervention reduced self-reported fatigue compared to a minimal intervention. Some aspects of health-related behavior (physical activity and snacking behavior) and sleep (sleep quality) improved as well, but most did not. The results show offering tailored advice through an mHealth intervention is an effective means to support employees who have to cope with irregular flight schedules and circadian disruption. This kind of intervention might therefore also be beneficial for other working populations with irregular working hours.

  11. Behavioral Impacts of a Mindfulness Pilot Intervention for Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpin, Scott B.; Rossi, AnneMarie; Kim, Amber K.; Swanson, Leah M.

    2016-01-01

    Elementary school students in today's urban classrooms face many life circumstances at home and in their communities that contribute to stress and coping needs. These stressors are often brought into the classroom, which impact learning, behaviors, and overall academic performance. Mindfulness has been used in classroom settings, particularly with…

  12. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-Esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae-Na Choi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents, Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control.

  13. Pilot and Feasibility Test of a Mobile Health-Supported Behavioral Counseling Intervention for Weight Management Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Quintiliani, Lisa M.; Mann, Devin M; Puputti, Marissa; Quinn, Emily; Bowen, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health behavior and weight management interventions for cancer survivors have the potential to prevent future cancer recurrence and improve long-term health; however, their translation can be limited if the intervention is complex and involves high participant burden. Mobile health (mHealth) offers a delivery modality to integrate interventions into daily life routines. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a one-group trial with a pre-post evaluation...

  14. A Pilot Intervention Designed to Address Behavioral Factors That Place Overweight/Obese Young Children at Risk for Later-Life Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Leigh; Thacker, Leroy; Aldrich, Heather; Bonds-McClain, Darya; Melnyk, Bernadette

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) was to intervene with parents of overweight/obese 4- to 8-year-old children to improve child internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Parent-child dyads ( N = 60) were randomly assigned to treatment or comparison conditions. Parents attended four intervention sessions at their child's primary health care office over 3 months. Child behaviors were assessed at 0, 3, 6, and 12 months post intervention. Parental beliefs in their skills/abilities increased in the experimental group parents, but there was no statistical difference between groups at any time. Child externalizing behaviors significantly decreased from baseline to postintervention for both groups ( F = 3.26, p = .020). Post hoc model testing suggests that this change was more pronounced in the intervention group ( F = 0.56, p = .692). Child somatic symptoms significantly decreased over time ( F = 4.55, p = .004), and there were group differences in child depressive behaviors ( F = 6.19, p = .020). These findings suggest that a parent-focused intervention program demonstrated positive preliminary effects on children's behaviors.

  15. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Text Messaging Intervention Versus Medical Management for HIV-Infected Substance Users: Study Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Patrick, Kevin; Ybarra, Michele L; Reback, Cathy J; Rawson, Richard A; Chokron Garneau, Helene; Chavez, Kathryn; Venegas, Alexandra

    2016-06-24

    Evidence-based psychosocial interventions for addictions and related conditions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are underutilized. Obstacles to implementation of CBT in clinical settings include limited availability of quality training, supervision, and certification in CBT for clinicians; high rates of clinician turnover and high caseloads; and limited qualifications of the workforce to facilitate CBT expertise. Mobile phone-based delivery of CBT, if demonstrated to be feasible and effective, could be transformative in broadening its application and improving the quality of addiction treatment. No experimental interventions that deliver CBT targeting both drug use and medication adherence using text messaging have been previously reported; as such, the objective of this study is to develop and test an SMS-based treatment program for HIV-positive adults with comorbid substance use disorders. With user input, we developed a 12-week CBT-based text messaging intervention (TXT-CBT) targeting antiretroviral (ART) adherence, risk behaviors, and drug use in a population of HIV-infected substance users. The intervention has been developed and is presently being tested in a pilot randomized clinical trial. Results will be reported later this year. This investigation will yield valuable knowledge about the utility of a cost-effective, readily deployable text messaging behavioral intervention for HIV-infected drug users.

  16. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy–Based Text Messaging Intervention Versus Medical Management for HIV-Infected Substance Users: Study Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Kevin; Ybarra, Michele L; Reback, Cathy J; Rawson, Richard A; Chokron Garneau, Helene; Chavez, Kathryn; Venegas, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence-based psychosocial interventions for addictions and related conditions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are underutilized. Obstacles to implementation of CBT in clinical settings include limited availability of quality training, supervision, and certification in CBT for clinicians; high rates of clinician turnover and high caseloads; and limited qualifications of the workforce to facilitate CBT expertise. Objective Mobile phone–based delivery of CBT, if demonstrated to be feasible and effective, could be transformative in broadening its application and improving the quality of addiction treatment. No experimental interventions that deliver CBT targeting both drug use and medication adherence using text messaging have been previously reported; as such, the objective of this study is to develop and test an SMS-based treatment program for HIV-positive adults with comorbid substance use disorders. Methods With user input, we developed a 12-week CBT-based text messaging intervention (TXT-CBT) targeting antiretroviral (ART) adherence, risk behaviors, and drug use in a population of HIV-infected substance users. Results The intervention has been developed and is presently being tested in a pilot randomized clinical trial. Results will be reported later this year. Conclusions This investigation will yield valuable knowledge about the utility of a cost-effective, readily deployable text messaging behavioral intervention for HIV-infected drug users. PMID:27341852

  17. Effects of a classroom-based yoga intervention on cortisol and behavior in second- and third-grade students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Bethany; Day, Danielle; Potts, Adam; Ryan, Connor; Coulombe, Sarah; Davies, Brandie; Weidknecht, Kimberly; Ebert, Marina; Flynn, Lisa; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2015-01-01

    This uncontrolled pilot study examined the effects of a classroom-based yoga intervention on cortisol concentrations and perceived behavior in children. A 10-week Yoga 4 Classrooms intervention was implemented in one second-grade and one third-grade classroom. Students' salivary cortisol responses were assessed at 3 time points. Classroom teachers also documented their perceptions of the effects of the intervention on students' cognitive, social, and emotional skills. Second, but not third, graders showed a significant decrease in baseline cortisol from before to after the intervention. Second and third graders both showed significant decreases in cortisol from before to after a cognitive task, but neither grade showed additional decreases from before to after a single yoga class. The second-grade teacher perceived significant improvements in several aspects his/her students' behavior. The third-grade teacher perceived some, but fewer, improvements in his/her students' behavior. Results suggest that school-based yoga may be advantageous for stress management and behavior.

  18. Effects of a Classroom-Based Yoga Intervention on Cortisol and Behavior in Second- and Third-Grade Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Bethany; Day, Danielle; Potts, Adam; Ryan, Connor; Coulombe, Sarah; Davies, Brandie; Weidknecht, Kimberly; Ebert, Marina; Flynn, Lisa; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2015-01-01

    This uncontrolled pilot study examined the effects of a classroom-based yoga intervention on cortisol concentrations and perceived behavior in children. A 10-week Yoga 4 Classrooms® intervention was implemented in one second- and one third-grade classroom. Students’ salivary cortisol responses were assessed at three time points. Classroom teachers also documented their perceptions of the effects of the intervention on students’ cognitive, social and emotional skills. Second, but not third, graders showed a significant decrease in baseline cortisol from before to after the intervention. Second and third graders both showed significant decreases in cortisol from before to after a cognitive task, but neither grade showed additional decreases from before to after a single yoga class. The second-grade teacher perceived significant improvements in several aspects his/her students’ behavior. The third-grade teacher perceived some, but fewer, improvements in his/her students’ behavior. Results suggest that school-based yoga may be advantageous for stress management and behavior. PMID:25412616

  19. Behavioral observation differentiates the effects of an intervention to promote sleep in premature infants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Linda; Casper, Tammy; Dixon, Melodie; Harmeyer, Joann; Haberman, Beth; Alberts, Jeffrey R; Simakajornboon, Narong; Visscher, Marty O

    2015-02-01

    Sleep and ongoing cycling of sleep states are required for neurosensory processing, learning, and brain plasticity. Many aspects of neonatal intensive care environments such as handling for routine and invasive procedures, bright lighting, and noise can create stress, disrupt behavior, and interfere with sleep in prematurely born infants. The study empirically investigated whether a 30-minute observation of infant sleep states and behavior could differentiate an intervention to promote sleep in premature infants with feeding difficulties relative to conventional care (standard positioning, standard crib mattress [SP]). We included an intervention to determine the ability of the method to discriminate treatments and generate a benchmark for future improvements. The intervention, a conformational positioner (CP), is contoured around the infant to provide customized containment and boundaries. To more fully verify the 30-minute observational sleep results, standard polysomnography was conducted simultaneously and sleep outcomes for the 2 modalities were compared. In a randomized crossover clinical trial, 25 infants, 31.5 ± 0.6 weeks' gestational age and 38.4 ± 0.6 weeks at the study, with gastrointestinal conditions or general feeding difficulties used each intervention during an overnight neonatal intensive care unit sleep study. Infant sleep states and behaviors were observed during two 30-minute periods--that is, on the positioner and mattress--using the naturalistic observation of newborn behavior. Two certified developmental care nurses assessed sleep state, self-regulatory, and stress behaviors during 2-minute intervals and summed over 30 minutes. Sleep characteristics from standard polysomnography were measured at the time of behavior observations. Infants on CP spent significantly less time in alert, active awake, or crying states by observation compared with SP. Surgical subjects spent more time awake, active awake, or crying and displayed a higher number

  20. A Novel Behavioral Intervention in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improves Glycemic Control: Preliminary Results from a Pilot Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranda, Louise; Lau, May; Stewart, Sunita M; Gupta, Olga T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop and pilot an innovative behavioral intervention in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) incorporating structured care of a pet to improve glycemic control. Methods Twenty-eight adolescents with A1C > 8.5% (69 mmol/mol) were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (care of a Betta splendens pet fish) or the control group (usual care). Adolescents in the intervention group were given instructions to associate daily and weekly fish care duties with diabetes self-management tasks including blood glucose testing and parent-adolescent communication. Results After 3 months the participants in the intervention group exhibited a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels (−0.5%) compared to their peers in the control group who had an increase in A1C levels (0.8%)(p = 0.04). The younger adolescents (ages 10–13) demonstrated a greater response to the intervention which was statistically significant (−1.5% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.04) compared with the older adolescents (ages 14–17). Conclusions Structured care of a pet fish can improve glycemic control in adolescents with T1DM, likely by providing cues to perform diabetes self-management behaviors. PMID:25614529

  1. Piloting behavioral family systems therapy to improve adherence among adolescents with HIV: a case series intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wendy N; Janicke, David M; Fennell, Eileen B; Driscoll, Danielle C; Lawrence, Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Adolescents with HIV are at high risk for suboptimal adherence but have been ignored by the literature. Treatment outcome and feasibility data for the first-known adaptation of Behavioral Family Systems Therapy (BFST) targeting adherence among adolescents with HIV are presented for four adolescents with suboptimal adherence. The intervention was delivered in an alternating home-based and telehealth format and a multi-method adherence assessment approach was used. Adherence improved for three adolescents, viral load decreased for two adolescents, and barriers to adherence declined for all participants. Delivery of an adapted BFST intervention was acceptable to families and may be a promising treatment approach.

  2. Pilot and Feasibility Test of a Mobile Health-Supported Behavioral Counseling Intervention for Weight Management Among Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Quintiliani, Lisa; Mann, Devin M; Puputti, Marissa; Quinn, Emily; Bowen, Deborah J

    2016-05-09

    Health behavior and weight management interventions for cancer survivors have the potential to prevent future cancer recurrence and improve long-term health; however, their translation can be limited if the intervention is complex and involves high participant burden. Mobile health (mHealth) offers a delivery modality to integrate interventions into daily life routines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a one-group trial with a pre-post evaluation design on engagement (use and acceptability), physiological (weight), behavioral (diet and physical activity), and other secondary outcomes. The 10-week intervention consisted of mHealth components (self-monitoring of selected diet behaviors via daily text messages, wireless devices to automatically track weight and steps) and 4 motivational interviewing-based technology-assisted phone sessions with a nonprofessionally trained counselor. Participants were overweight breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment and owned a smartphone. Weight was measured objectively; diet and physical activity were measured with brief self-reported questionnaires. Ten women participated; they had a mean age of 59 years (SD 6), 50% belonged to a racial or ethnic minority group, 50% had some college or less, and 40% reported using Medicaid health insurance. Engagement was high: out of 70 days in total, the mean number of days recording steps via the wristband pedometer was 64 (SD 7), recording a weight via the scale was 45 (SD 24), and responding to text messages was 60 (SD 13); 100% of participants completed all 4 calls with the counselor. Most (90%) were very likely to participate again and recommend the program to others. Mean weight in pounds decreased (182.5 to 179.1, mean change -3.38 [SD 7.67]), fruit and vegetable daily servings increased (2.89 to 4.42, mean change 1.53 [SD 2.82]), and self-reported moderate physical activity increased in metabolic equivalent of task (MET) minutes per week (2791 to

  3. Pilot and Feasibility Test of a Mobile Health-Supported Behavioral Counseling Intervention for Weight Management Among Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; Mann, Devin M; Puputti, Marissa; Quinn, Emily; Bowen, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Background Health behavior and weight management interventions for cancer survivors have the potential to prevent future cancer recurrence and improve long-term health; however, their translation can be limited if the intervention is complex and involves high participant burden. Mobile health (mHealth) offers a delivery modality to integrate interventions into daily life routines. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a one-group trial with a pre-post evaluation design on engagement (use and acceptability), physiological (weight), behavioral (diet and physical activity), and other secondary outcomes. Methods The 10-week intervention consisted of mHealth components (self-monitoring of selected diet behaviors via daily text messages, wireless devices to automatically track weight and steps) and 4 motivational interviewing–based technology-assisted phone sessions with a nonprofessionally trained counselor. Participants were overweight breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment and owned a smartphone. Weight was measured objectively; diet and physical activity were measured with brief self-reported questionnaires. Results Ten women participated; they had a mean age of 59 years (SD 6), 50% belonged to a racial or ethnic minority group, 50% had some college or less, and 40% reported using Medicaid health insurance. Engagement was high: out of 70 days in total, the mean number of days recording steps via the wristband pedometer was 64 (SD 7), recording a weight via the scale was 45 (SD 24), and responding to text messages was 60 (SD 13); 100% of participants completed all 4 calls with the counselor. Most (90%) were very likely to participate again and recommend the program to others. Mean weight in pounds decreased (182.5 to 179.1, mean change −3.38 [SD 7.67]), fruit and vegetable daily servings increased (2.89 to 4.42, mean change 1.53 [SD 2.82]), and self-reported moderate physical activity increased in metabolic equivalent of

  4. Evaluation of a Serious Self-Regulation Game Intervention for Overweight-Related Behaviors (“Balance It”): A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulussen, Theo; Kok, Gerjo; van Empelen, Pepijn

    2016-01-01

    Background Serious games have the potential to promote health behavior. Because overweight is still a major issue among secondary vocational education students in the Netherlands, this study piloted the effects of “Balance It,” a serious self-regulation game intervention targeting students’ overweight-related behaviors: dietary intake and physical activity (PA). Objective We aimed to pilot the effects of Balance It on secondary vocational education students’ dietary intake and PA. Methods In total, 501 secondary vocational education students participated at baseline (intervention: n=250; control: n=251) in this pre-post cluster randomized trial. After 4 weeks, at immediate posttest, 231 students filled in the posttest questionnaire (intervention: n=105; control: n=126). The sample had a mean age of 17.28 (SD 1.26, range 15-21) years, 62.8% (145/231) were female, and 26.8% (62/231) had a non-Dutch background. Body mass index (BMI kg/m2) ranged from 14.4 to 31.1 (mean 21.1, SD 3.3). The intervention and control groups were compared on the primary (behavioral) outcomes of dietary intake (fruit and vegetable consumption, snack consumption, and soft drink consumption) and PA (moderate and vigorous). Additionally, we explored (1) differences between the intervention and control groups in determinants of dietary intake and PA, including attitude, self-efficacy, intention, barrier identification, action planning, and action control, and (2) differences between active (intervention) users and the control group in dietary intake, PA, and associated determinants. Results After corrections for multiple testing, we did not find significant differences between the intervention group and control group in terms of dietary intake, PA, and determinants of dietary intake and PA. Exploratory research indicated that only 27.6% (29/105) of the intervention group reported actual intervention use (ie, active users). For exploratory reasons, we compared the active users (n=29) with

  5. Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Tiffany L.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, ShaRhonda J.; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; West, Delia Smith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week…

  6. Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Tiffany L.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, ShaRhonda J.; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; West, Delia Smith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week…

  7. The importance of piloting an RCT intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Nancy; Cossette, Sylvie; Côté, José; Héon, Marjolaine; Stremler, Robyn; Martorella, Geraldine; Purden, Margaret

    2009-06-01

    The pilot study provides a unique opportunity to identify and prepare for the challenges of evaluating an intervention. Ultimately, it will enhance the scientific rigour and value of the full-scale study. Although some journals publish reports of pilot studies, little attention has been given to the types of research questions and issues specific to these studies. This article focuses on the utility of a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) as a first step towards conducting an RCT. Three major objectives of a pilot RCT are discussed: assessing the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention, assessing the feasibility and acceptability of the design and procedures, and facilitating the determination of effect sizes for use in sample-size calculations.

  8. Assessing acceptability of hypertensive/diabetic patients towards mobile health based behavioral interventions in Pakistan: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Mahrukh; Islam, Mohammad Yousuf ul; Mufti, Bushra Abid Iqbal; Khan, Natasha; Farooq, Muhammad Saad; Muhammad, Mariam Gul; Osama, Muhammad; Kherani, Danish; Kazi, Abdul Nafey; Kazi, Abdul Momin

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are prevalent chronic diseases among the general population of Pakistan with an exponential progress expected over the upcoming years. Mobile Health services can be an efficient method of helping curtail this rise and improve quality of life of such patients as proven in developed countries. We aim to assess the acceptability of using Mobile Health services among diabetic and hypertensive patients in Pakistan. A total of 100 patients were approached in a large tertiary care Government Hospital of Karachi, Pakistan, using a nonprobability convenient sampling technique. Co-authors conducted an interview based sampling of a modified questionnaire to each participant after consent. All data was recorded and analyzed on SPSS 16. A total of 100 patients participated in our study with 66 (66%) males and 34 (34%) females having a mean prevalence age of 54.27. All the 100 participants had easy access to cell phones with 88% participants (88/100) stating that they would be willing to participate in Mobile Health based interventions. A statistically significant number (p=0.014) of them preferred receiving phone calls (85.2%) rather than SMS (14.8%) reminders for these interventions. 85% of the participants even agreed to participate in such intervention on cash incentives. The use of phone call reminders or SMS reminders seems like an acceptable and favorable option among hypertensive and diabetic patients. This can greatly improve their self-management and help curtail this rise in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effects of a Nutrition Intervention on Nutrition Knowledge, Behaviors, and Efficacy Expectations in Middle School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Mariane M.; Dake, Joseph A.; McCaughtry, Nate; Martin, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Background: This was a pilot study to determine the impact of the Michigan Model (MM) Nutrition Curriculum on nutrition knowledge, efficacy expectations, and eating behaviors in middle school students. Methods: The study was conducted in a large metropolitan setting and approved by the Institutional Review Board. The participants for this study…

  10. Effects of a cognitive behavioral self-help program and a computerized structured writing intervention on depressed mood for HIV-infected people : A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Vivian; van Emmerik, Arnold; Garnefski, Nadia; Schroevers, Maya J.; Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah; van Empelen, Pepijn; Dusseldorp, Elise; Witlox, Robert; Maes, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine whether low-resource, cost-effective intervention programs can be effective in improving depressed mood in people with HIV. The efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral self-help program (CBS) and a computerized structured writing intervention (SWI) w

  11. Behavioral Activation for Depressed Teens: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Lorie A.; Ramirez, Cynthia L.; Jones, Meredith; Craighead, W. Edward

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation (BA) is a psychosocial intervention that has shown promising treatment outcome results with depressed adults. The current pilot study evaluated a version of BA adapted for depressed adolescents. Six teens (3 male, 3 female, ages 14-17) who met criteria for major depressive disorder participated in the study. Participants were…

  12. Pilot Study of an Exercise Intervention for Depressive Symptoms and Associated Cognitive-Behavioral Factors in Young Adults With Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasstasia, Yasmina; Baker, Amanda L; Halpin, Sean A; Lewin, Terry J; Hides, Leanne; Kelly, Brian J; Callister, Robin

    2016-10-31

    This study assesses the feasibility of integrating motivational interviewing (MI) with an exercise intervention. It also explores patterns of depressive symptom changes (cognitive, affective, and somatic subscales) and their relationship to cognitive, behavioral, and immunological factors (interleukin 6, IL-6, a marker for inflammation) across the exercise intervention. Twelve young adults (20.8 ± 1.7 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder received a brief MI intervention followed by a 12-week exercise intervention. Assessments were conducted preintervention, postintervention, throughout the intervention, and at follow-up. Preliminary results show differential effects of exercise, with the largest standardized mean improvements for the affective subscale (-1.71), followed by cognitive (-1.56) and somatic (-1.39) subscales. A significant relationship was observed between increased behavioral activation and lower levels of IL-6. Despite study limitations, the magnitude of changes suggests that natural remission of depressive symptoms is an unlikely explanation for the findings. A randomized controlled trial has commenced to evaluate effectiveness of the intervention.

  13. A pilot study of a nurse-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy intervention (Ziphamandla) for adherence and depression in HIV in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lena S; Magidson, Jessica F; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Remmert, Jessica E; Kagee, Ashraf; Leaver, Matthew; Stein, Dan J; Safren, Steven A; Joska, John

    2016-04-26

    Depression is prevalent among people living with HIV in South Africa and interferes with adherence to antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated a nurse-delivered, cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for adherence and depression among antiretroviral therapy users with depression in South Africa (n = 14). Primary outcomes were depression, antiretroviral therapy adherence, feasibility, and acceptability. Findings support robust improvements in mood through a 3-month follow up. Antiretroviral therapy adherence was maintained during the intervention period. Participant retention supports acceptability; however, modest provider fidelity despite intensive supervision warrants additional attention to feasibility. Future effectiveness research is needed to evaluate this nurse-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for adherence and depression in this context.

  14. Brief Client-Centered Motivational and Behavioral Intervention to Promote HPV Vaccination in a Hard-to-Reach Population: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Natalie Pierre; Bernstein, Judith; Pelton, Steve; Belizaire, Myrdell; Goff, Ginette; Horanieh, Nour; Freund, Karen M

    2016-08-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a client-centered behavioral intervention (Brief Negotiated Interviewing) on mothers' human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine knowledge and vaccination initiation for their adolescent daughters. Methods We randomized mothers to intervention (n = 100) and control (n = 100) groups, and followed them over 12 months. Electronic medical records were reviewed to determine vaccination status. The primary outcome was receipt of the first vaccine. The secondary outcome was HPV vaccine knowledge among mothers. Results Brief Negotiated Interviewing intervention mothers demonstrated increased knowledge about HPV (pre/post mean score of 5 to 10 out of a possible 11; P < .001) and significantly higher mean knowledge scores (10 vs 6, P < .001) than control mothers. However, initiation and completion rates of the vaccine were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions Increasing HPV vaccine knowledge did not translate into increased vaccine uptake or completion of vaccination series. Future intervention must explore vaccine reminders to increase HPV vaccination rates.

  15. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and anxiety in Parkinson's disease — A pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kraepelien, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Lindefors, Nils; Kaldo, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    .... The availability of evidence-based psychological interventions is low. Objective: This pilot study investigates the feasibility and preliminary effect of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT...

  16. Reduction in neural activation to high-calorie food cues in obese endometrial cancer survivors after a behavioral lifestyle intervention: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nock Nora L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity increases the risk of endometrial cancer (EC and obese EC patients have the highest risk of death among all obesity-associated cancers. However, only two lifestyle interventions targeting this high-risk population have been conducted. In one trial, food disinhibition, as determined by the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, decreased post-intervention compared to baseline, suggesting an increase in emotional eating and, potentially, an increase in food related reward. Therefore, we evaluated appetitive behavior using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and a visual food task in 8 obese, Stage I/II EC patients before and after a lifestyle intervention (Survivors in Uterine Cancer Empowered by Exercise and a Healthy Diet, SUCCEED, which aimed to improve nutritional and exercise behaviors over 16 group sessions in 6 months using social cognitive theory. Results Congruent to findings in the general obese population, we found that obese EC patients, at baseline, had increased activation in response to high- vs. low-calorie food cues after eating a meal in brain regions associated with food reward (insula, cingulate gyrus; precentral gyrus; whole brain cluster corrected, p  Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest behavioral lifestyle interventions may help to reduce high-calorie food reward in obese EC survivors who are at a high-risk of death. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate such changes.

  17. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Text Messaging Intervention Versus Medical Management for HIV-Infected Substance Users: Study Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Glasner-Edwards, S; Patrick, K; Ybarra, ML; Reback, CJ; Rawson, RA; Chokron Garneau, H; Chavez, K; Venegas, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence-based psychosocial interventions for addictions and related conditions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are underutilized. Obstacles to implementation of CBT in clinical settings include limited availability of quality training, supervision, and certification in CBT for clinicians; high rates of clinician turnover and high caseloads; and limited qualifications of the workforce to facilitate CBT expertise. Objective Mobile phone–based delivery of CBT, if demonstra...

  18. Pilot Evaluation of a Web-Based Intervention Targeting Sexual Health Service Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. E.; Newby, K.; Caley, M.; Danahay, A.; Kehal, I.

    2016-01-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among…

  19. A bio-behavioral intervention to decrease intravaginal practices and bacterial vaginosis among HIV infected Zambian women, a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaide, Maria L; Chisembele, Maureen; Malupande, Emeria; Rodriguez, Violeta J; Fischl, Margaret A; Arheart, Kristopher; Jones, Deborah L

    2017-05-12

    Intravaginal practices (IVP) (cleansing or introducing products inside the vagina for hygiene, health or to please sexual partners) are common among women with HIV. IVP increase the risk of developing bacterial Vaginosis (BV), the most common genital infection associated with transmission of sexually transmitted infections and HIV. This study tested a pilot intervention to reduce IVP and BV in HIV infected women in Zambia. One hundred twenty-eight HIV infected women engaging in IVP were randomized to two conditions: enhanced standard of care (n = 70) and experimental (n = 58) from May 1, 2013 to February 28, 2014. All participants received a brief educational counseling session on discontinuation of IVP, and those with BV, were provided with medical treatment for BV. Women in the experimental condition received an additional group-based, culturally tailored intervention. Participants completed questionnaires assessing sexual risk factors and IVP and were assessed for BV using Nugent criteria at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. At 12-month, the proportion of self-reported use of IVPs decreased in the experimental condition: soap (28% vs. 47%); cloth or a rag (19% vs. 38%); and traditional medicines (22% vs. 42%) (all p < 0.05)) compared with the enhanced standard of care condition. The prevalence of BV at 6 and 12 months did not differ by study condition but averaging over study condition, prevalence of BV decreased from 64.2% at baseline to 15.6% at 6 months (p < 0.01) and to 23.6% at 12 months (p = 0.15). Using an enhanced standard of care approach and an enhanced standard of care + a group intervention, IVP and BV decreased over time, but the experimental condition had greater reduction in self-reported use of IVP. Future studies should address interventions in communities with high burden of IVP, BV and HIV. Interventions that could be administered during routine medical care and decrease IVP and BV are needed, and should be considered part of

  20. A Problem Solving Intervention for hospice caregivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Fruehling, Lynne Thomas; Haggarty-Robbins, Donna; Doorenbos, Ardith; Wechkin, Hope; Berry, Donna

    2010-08-01

    The Problem Solving Intervention (PSI) is a structured, cognitive-behavioral intervention that provides people with problem-solving coping skills to help them face major negative life events and daily challenges. PSI has been applied to numerous settings but remains largely unexplored in the hospice setting. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of PSI targeting informal caregivers of hospice patients. We enrolled hospice caregivers who were receiving outpatient services from two hospice agencies. The intervention included three visits by a research team member. The agenda for each visit was informed by the problem-solving theoretical framework and was customized based on the most pressing problems identified by the caregivers. We enrolled 29 caregivers. Patient's pain was the most frequently identified problem. On average, caregivers reported a higher quality of life and lower level of anxiety postintervention than at baseline. An examination of the caregiver reaction assessment showed an increase of positive esteem average and a decrease of the average value of lack of family support, impact on finances, impact on schedules, and on health. After completing the intervention, caregivers reported lower levels of anxiety, improved problem solving skills, and a reduced negative impact of caregiving. Furthermore, caregivers reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention, perceiving it as a platform to articulate their challenges and develop a plan to address them. Findings demonstrate the value of problem solving as a psycho-educational intervention in the hospice setting and call for further research in this area.

  1. Evaluating the feasibility and impact of interactive telephone technology and incentives when combined with a behavioral intervention for weight loss: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ard JD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mary Annette Hess,1 David E Vance,1,2 Peggy R McKie,1 Laura S Burton,3 Jamy D Ard,4 Josh Klapow5,61School of Nursing, 2Edward R Roybal Center for Translational Research in Aging and Mobility, 3Department of Nutrition Sciences, 4UAB EatRight Weight Management Services, Department of Nutrition Sciences, 5School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA; 6ChipRewards, Inc, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of delivering the ‘EatRight Lifestyle’ program as an educational weight loss program when combined with a system for behavior-based incentives (ie, ChipRewards. Participants (N = 70 were randomly assigned to one of two interventions over a 12-week period: (1 ‘EatRight Lifestyle’ only (control, and (2 ‘EatRight Lifestyle plus ChipRewards’. From baseline to the 12-week visit, the overall attrition rate was 27.14% (n = 19. A completers only and an intent-to-treat repeated measures analysis of covariance was conducted on the outcome measures (ie, weight loss, change in blood glucose for the baseline and 12-week visit. It was found that waist circumference decreased slightly for those in the ‘EatRight Lifestyle plus ChipRewards’ program; however, BMI and weight was slightly more reduced for those who were more compliant to the study protocol in general, regardless of group assignment. No other time or group differences were detected. This study showed that these two weight loss programs did not produce drastically differential effects on these outcome measures.Keywords: behavior, obesity, diet, physical activity, education, token economy, online intervention, phone counseling

  2. Towards Behaviorally Informed Public Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Olejniczak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This article informs readers about the theoretical and practical origins of the behaviorally informed interventions (BIPI, analyzes examples of the BIPI from different policy sectors and strategies they offer for policy and regulatory design, and discusses applications and implications of BIPI for public interventions Methodology: This paper is based on a review of literature, as well as an inspection of administrative practices in OECD countries. It encompasses a systematic analysis of scientific papers fromthe SCOPUS database and a query carried out at the library of George Washington University. Findings: The traditional approach to public policy research is based on rational choice theory. It offers limited support, because by assuming perfect rationality of policy decisions, it overlooks existence of systematic errors and biases of human decision-making. The authors argue that behaviorally informed public interventions (BIPI might contribute to improving the effectiveness of a number of public measures – regulation, projects, programs, and even entire policies. Practical implications: The behavioral approach allows decision-makers to better understand the decisions and behaviors of citizens, as well as to design more effective interventions with minimum effort by adapting the existing solutions to real decision mechanisms of citizens. Originality: By combining the concepts of traditional approach with the growing behavioral approach, the authors aim to propose a new theoretical framework (BIPI to be used as a tool for policy design, delivery and evaluation.

  3. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated With Enrolling People With Insomnia and High Blood Pressure Into an Online Behavioral Sleep Intervention: A Single-Site Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routledge, Faye S; Davis, Tara D; Dunbar, Sandra B

    Recruitment in clinical research is a common challenge and source of study failure. The reporting of recruitment methods and costs in hypertension trials is limited especially for smaller, single-site trials, online intervention trials, and trials using newer online recruitment strategies. The aims of this study are to describe and examine the feasibility of newer online-e-mail recruitment strategies and traditional recruitment strategies used to enroll participants with insomnia and high blood pressure into an online behavioral sleep intervention study (Sleeping for Heart Health). The 16 online-e-mail-based and traditional recruitment strategies used are described. Recruitment strategy feasibility was examined by study interest and enrollee yields, conversion rates, and costs (direct, remuneration, labor, and cost per enrollee). From August 2014 to October 2015, 183 people were screened and 58 (31.7%) enrolled in the study (51.1 ± 12.9 years, 63.8% female, 72.4% African American, 136 ± 12/88 ± 7 mm Hg, 87.9% self-reported hypertension, 67.2% self-reported antihypertensive medication use). The recruitment strategies yielding the highest enrollees were the university hospital phone waiting message system (25.4%), Craigslist (22.4%), and flyers (20.3%) at a per enrollee cost of $42.84, $98.90, and $128.27, respectively. The university hospital phone waiting message system (55.6%) and flyers (54.5%) had the highest interested participant to enrolled participant conversion rate of all recruitment strategies. Approximately 70% of all enrolled participants were recruited from the university hospital phone waiting message system, Craigslist, or flyers. Given the recruitment challenges that most researchers face, we encourage the documenting, assessing, and reporting of detailed recruitment strategies and associated recruitment costs so that other researchers may benefit.

  4. Mood Management Intervention for College Smokers with Elevated Depressive Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Holly E.; Harris, Kari Jo; Campbell, Duncan G.; Harrar, Solomon W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined smoking reduction and cessation among college smokers with elevated depressive symptomatology participating in a group-based behavioral counseling, mood management, and motivational enhancement combined intervention (CBT). Participants and Methods: Fifty-eight smokers (smoked 6 days in the past 30) were…

  5. Physical Activity Intervention for Older Adults with Intellectual Disability: Report on a Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorski, Carol Ann; Kessler, Karen; Cacia, Barbara; Peterson, Derick R.; Henderson, C. Michael

    2004-01-01

    A 12-week pilot project on physical activity was introduced in a day habilitation setting to a group of 12 older adults with intellectual disability and a variety of physical and behavioral conditions. Our purpose was to determine whether (a) this intervention would positively impact physical function in this population, (b) consumers would choose…

  6. Counseling to prevent obesity among preschool children: acceptability of a pilot urban primary care intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, M Diane; Maher, Stacia; Deen, Darwin; Blank, Arthur E

    2010-01-01

    To help design effective primary care-based interventions, we explored urban parents' reactions to a pilot and feasibility study designed to address risk behaviors for obesity among preschool children. We conducted 3 focus groups (2 in English, 1 in Spanish) to evaluate the pilot intervention. Focus group participants explored the acceptability of the pilot intervention components (completion of a new screening tool for risk assessment, discussion of risk behaviors and behavior change goal setting by physicians, and follow-up contacts with a lifestyle counselor) and the fidelity of the pilot intervention delivery. Parents expressed a desire to change behaviors to achieve healthier families. They believed that doctors should increase their focus on healthy habits during visits. Parents were more accepting of nutrition discussions than increasing activity (citing a lack of safe outdoor space) or decreasing sedentary behaviors (citing many benefits of television viewing). Contacts with the lifestyle counselor were described as empowering, with parents noting her focus on strategies to achieve change for the whole family while recognizing that many food behaviors relate to cultural heritage. Parents expressed frustration with physicians for offering advice about changing behavior but not how to achieve it, for dismissing concerns about picky eating or undereating, and in some cases for labels of overweight that they believed were inappropriately applied. Parents welcomed efforts to address family lifestyle change in pediatric visits. The model of physician goal setting with referral for behavior change counseling is highly acceptable to families. Future interventions should acknowledge parental concerns about undereating and perceived benefits of television viewing.

  7. Behavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Nakaaki, Shutaro; Torii, Katsuyoshi; Oka, Mizuki; Negi, Atsushi; Tatsumi, Hiroshi; Narumoto, Jin; Furukawa, Toshi A; Mimura, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Background Agitated behaviors are frequently observed in patients with dementia and can cause severe distress to caregivers. However, little evidence of the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions for agitated behaviors exists for patients with dementia. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate a behavioral management program developed by the Seattle Protocols for patients with agitated behaviors in Japan. Methods Eighteen patients with dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, n = 14; dementia with Lewy bodies, n = 4) participated in an open study testing the effectiveness of a behavioral management program. The intervention consisted of 20 sessions over the course of 3 months. The primary outcomes were severity of agitation in dementia, as measured using the Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale (ABID) and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI). Results The behavioral management program resulted in significant reductions in total scores on both the ABID and CMAI. Although both physically agitated and verbally agitated behavior scores on the ABID improved significantly, symptoms of psychosis did not improve after the intervention. Conclusion The behavioral management technique may be beneficial to distressed caregivers of patients with dementia. In the future, a well designed study to develop the behavioral management program more fully is needed. PMID:23293522

  8. C-A1-01: Changes in Physical Activity and Nutrition in a Behavioral Intervention Pilot Study - Passport to Brain Wellness

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Leah R.; Martinson, Brian C.; Sherwood, Nancy E.; Crain, A Lauren; Hayes, Marcia G.; O’Connor, Patrick J; Matthews, Rachel B; Cooner, Jacob M

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: Increasing concerns about cognitive decline and dementia in the aging populations of most westernized countries suggests the need for interventions that can preserve cognitive function, are cost-effective, and feasibly implemented on a large scale. Empirical evidence is accumulating that points to the potential beneficial effects of cardiovascular fitness, healthy diet, social integration and participation in cognitively stimulating activities in the maintenance of cognitive ...

  9. eHealth Familias Unidas: Pilot Study of an Internet Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Family Intervention to Reduce Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Hispanic Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannine Estrada

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Internet adaptation of an evidenced-based intervention for Hispanic families, eHealth Familias Unidas, and explores whether an Internet-based format is feasible and acceptable to Hispanic families. Core intervention components from the evidence-based intervention, Familias Unidas, were transposed into a video format and edited for content. Additionally, interactive exercises and a soap opera series were incorporated to reinforce intervention content and optimize participant engagement and retention. To understand the feasibility and acceptability of eHealth Familias Unidas, we conducted a pilot study and examined findings from: (1 session completion rates for both e-parent group sessions and family sessions (n = 23 families; and (2 qualitative data collected from Hispanic parents (n = 29 that received the eHealth intervention. Engagement and attendance in the intervention showed that 83% of families engaged in the intervention and that there was an overall session completion rate of 78%. Qualitative interviews were conducted mid and post intervention with a combined total of 29 participants. A general inductive approach was used to derive themes from the collected data. Overall, parents expressed positive feedback in regards to the intervention and stated that there were multiple lessons learned from participating in eHealth Familias Unidas. Findings indicate that an Internet-based family intervention is not only feasible and acceptable for Hispanic families, but also offers a viable option to ameliorate barriers to participation and implementation of preventive interventions.

  10. eHealth Familias Unidas: Pilot Study of an Internet Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Family Intervention to Reduce Drug Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Hispanic Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Yannine; Molleda, Lourdes; Murray, Ashley; Drumhiller, Kathryn; Tapia, Maria; Sardinas, Krystal; Rosen, Alexa; Pantin, Hilda; Perrino, Tatiana; Sutton, Madeline; Cano, Miguel Ángel; Dorcius, Daphney; Wendorf Muhamad, Jessica; Prado, Guillermo

    2017-03-04

    This paper describes the Internet adaptation of an evidenced-based intervention for Hispanic families, eHealth Familias Unidas, and explores whether an Internet-based format is feasible and acceptable to Hispanic families. Core intervention components from the evidence-based intervention, Familias Unidas, were transposed into a video format and edited for content. Additionally, interactive exercises and a soap opera series were incorporated to reinforce intervention content and optimize participant engagement and retention. To understand the feasibility and acceptability of eHealth Familias Unidas, we conducted a pilot study and examined findings from: (1) session completion rates for both e-parent group sessions and family sessions (n = 23 families); and (2) qualitative data collected from Hispanic parents (n = 29) that received the eHealth intervention. Engagement and attendance in the intervention showed that 83% of families engaged in the intervention and that there was an overall session completion rate of 78%. Qualitative interviews were conducted mid and post intervention with a combined total of 29 participants. A general inductive approach was used to derive themes from the collected data. Overall, parents expressed positive feedback in regards to the intervention and stated that there were multiple lessons learned from participating in eHealth Familias Unidas. Findings indicate that an Internet-based family intervention is not only feasible and acceptable for Hispanic families, but also offers a viable option to ameliorate barriers to participation and implementation of preventive interventions.

  11. A pilot study of immune and mood outcomes of a community-based intervention for dementia caregivers: the PLST intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garand, Linda; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Lubaroff, David; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Frantz, Rita A; Ansley, Timothy N

    2002-08-01

    Providing care to a family member with dementia is conceptualized as a chronic stressor with adverse psychological and physical effects. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate mood and immune outcomes of caregivers exposed to a community-based psychoeducational nursing intervention based on the progressively lowered stress threshold (PLST) model. The PLST intervention is designed to strengthen the psychological resources of dementia caregivers by teaching methods of preventing and/or managing behavioral problems exhibited by the person with dementia. Mood and immune outcomes were compared between caregivers randomly assigned to receive either the PLST or a comparison intervention. Results of this pilot study suggest that caregivers who received the PLST intervention showed significantly stronger T-cell proliferative responses to both PHA and ConA, indicating an improvement in T-cell immune function immediately after the in-home intervention (T2) and again after 6 months of telephone support for application of the PLST model (T3). Findings do not support the hypothesis that the PLST intervention had a significant effect on total mood disturbance or natural killer cell cytotoxicity over the course of the study.

  12. Pilot study of a multimodal intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarden, Mary Ellen; Hovgaard, Doris; Boesen, Ellen

    2007-01-01

    Substantial physical and functional deconditioning and diminished psychological wellbeing are all potential adverse effects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety and benefits (physical and functional capacity) of a 4......-6 week supervised and structured mixed-type exercise, progressive relaxation and psychoeducation programme in patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Nineteen patients were randomized to an intervention or a conventional care group (CC) and were tested for physical and functional capacity before admission...

  13. Models of Pilot Behavior and Their Use to Evaluate the State of Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirgl, Miroslav; Jalovecky, Rudolf; Bradac, Zdenek

    2016-07-01

    This article discusses the possibilities of obtaining new information related to human behavior, namely the changes or progressive development of pilots' abilities during training. The main assumption is that a pilot's ability can be evaluated based on a corresponding behavioral model whose parameters are estimated using mathematical identification procedures. The mean values of the identified parameters are obtained via statistical methods. These parameters are then monitored and their changes evaluated. In this context, the paper introduces and examines relevant mathematical models of human (pilot) behavior, the pilot-aircraft interaction, and an example of the mathematical analysis.

  14. Effects of a participatory ergonomics intervention computer workshop for university students: a pilot intervention to prevent disability in tomorrow's workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michelle M; Amick, Benjamin C; Hupert, Nathaniel; Pellerin-Dionne, Mary; Cha, Eugene; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2002-01-01

    A participatory approach was used to create a computer ergonomics workshop for college students, incorporating an instructional systems design process and adult learning inquiry perspectives. The primary objective of this participatory ergonomic pilot intervention was to involve students throughout the training design process in solving computer workstation ergonomic problems and adopting healthy computing behaviors. Students' level of participation included becoming part of the training design team, a co-facilitator, or a student trainee. A second objective was to examine the translation of an industrial office ergonomics training program into a college computer ergonomics training program. The long term goal was to reduce upper extremity symptoms and disability. The program was piloted at one private university. The three student trainees significantly increased their knowledge of computer ergonomics from 69% of test items answered correctly pre-training to 82% post-training. Trainees were also successful in conducting computer ergonomic evaluations of students' computing work areas. They achieved 100% accuracy in identifying ergonomic problems and proposing solutions in five ergonomic workstation assessments in the field. This approach was successful in creating a sense of ownership among the student developers and facilitators as reflected in their self-reports during a post-intervention debriefing. The results of this pilot study justify formal controlled trials of this intervention in university students, who will become tomorrow's workers.

  15. Parent-directed cognitive behavioral therapy for young anxious children: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluis, C.M.; van der Bruggen, C.O.; Brechman-Toussaint, M.L.; Thissen, M.A.P.; Bögels, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety in children age 8 years and above has been successfully treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). However, the efficacy of CBT for anxious children ages 4-7 years has not, to date, been fully investigated. This paper piloted a CBT intervention targeting child anxiety that was delivere

  16. Addictive Behavior Interventions Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Emily R; Lemke, Austin W; Shah, Sonia M; Dean, Kimberlye E; Richter, Ashley A; Buckner, Julia D

    2016-12-01

    Addictive behaviors among college students are a significant public health concern. This manuscript reviews the past two years of literature on prevention and treatment approaches for college students who engage in addictive behaviors. In-person skills-based interventions and motivational interventions that incorporate personalized feedback are effective in the short-term but little support was found for long-term effects. Although web-based interventions reduced certain addictive behaviors (e.g., alcohol, problematic gambling), in-person interventions that include motivational interviewing components and personalized feedback appear to be more efficacious. Research has largely focused on alcohol and little is known about the utility of interventions for students who use tobacco or illicit substances or who engage in problematic gambling. Research on interventions for these high-risk behaviors is recommended.

  17. Positive Effects of Promoting Prosocial Behavior in Early Adolescence: Evidence from a School-Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Kanacri, Bernadette Paula Luengo; Gerbino, Maria; Zuffianò, Antonio; Alessandri, Guido; Vecchio, Giovanni; Caprara, Eva; Pastorelli, Concetta; Bridglall, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a pilot school-based intervention called CEPIDEA, designed to promote prosocial behavior in early adolescence. The study took place in a middle school located in a small city near Rome. The intervention group included 151 students (52.3% males; M[subscript age] = 12.4), and the control group…

  18. Adapting Behavioral Interventions for Social Media Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoto, Sherry; Waring, Molly E; May, Christine N; Ding, Eric Y; Kunz, Werner H; Hayes, Rashelle; Oleski, Jessica L

    2016-01-29

    Patients are increasingly using online social networks (ie, social media) to connect with other patients and health care professionals--a trend called peer-to-peer health care. Because online social networks provide a means for health care professionals to communicate with patients, and for patients to communicate with each other, an opportunity exists to use social media as a modality to deliver behavioral interventions. Social media-delivered behavioral interventions have the potential to reduce the expense of behavioral interventions by eliminating visits, as well as increase our access to patients by becoming embedded in their social media feeds. Trials of online social network-delivered behavioral interventions have shown promise, but much is unknown about intervention development and methodology. In this paper, we discuss the process by which investigators can translate behavioral interventions for social media delivery. We present a model that describes the steps and decision points in this process, including the necessary training and reporting requirements. We also discuss issues pertinent to social media-delivered interventions, including cost, scalability, and privacy. Finally, we identify areas of research that are needed to optimize this emerging behavioral intervention modality.

  19. Stop regain: a pilot psychological intervention for bariatric patients experiencing weight regain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Susan M; Grothe, Karen B; Clark, Matthew M; Swain, James M; Collazo-Clavell, Maria L; Sarr, Michael G

    2015-05-01

    A subset of bariatric patients fails to achieve or maintain long-term successful weight loss. Psychological and behavioral factors contributing to poor long-term outcomes include decreased adherence to surgical eating guidelines, life stressors that derail weight maintenance, unhealthy eating patterns, and substance use. A 6-week pilot group behavioral intervention utilizing techniques of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was developed to treat bariatric patients experiencing weight regain. Patients were treated at a large Midwestern academic medical center. Twenty-eight patients (93% female, 100% Caucasian) with a mean age of 53 and a mean BMI of 35.6 had regained an average of 17 kg or 37% of the weight lost after initially successful Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). All patients completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID I) modules assessing mood and substance dependence, and completed a series of questionnaires before and after group treatment, with weekly assessment of depressive symptoms, binge eating, and alcohol use. Results were analyzed utilizing repeated measures ANOVA. Weight decreased during the intervention by an average of 1.6 ± 2.38 kg (p ≤ 0.01). Level of depressive symptoms improved for treatment completers (p ≤ 0.01). Food records indicated that grazing patterns decreased (p ≤ 0.01) and subjective binge eating episodes decreased (p ≤ 0.03). A 6-week pilot group behavioral intervention demonstrated an ability to help patients reverse their pattern of weight regain. Tailored behavioral interventions may be a useful treatment to enhance maintenance of long-term weight loss.

  20. A Sleep Intervention for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Schoen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parents of children who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD commonly report sleep problems, which typically exacerbate daytime behavior problems. This pilot study sought to identify the short-term effects on sleep, behavior challenges, attention, and quality of life of children with ASD following use of the iLs Dreampad ™ pillow, which delivers bone conducted music and environmental sounds. Aims were to demonstrate acceptability and feasibility, identify measures sensitive to change, and describe individual characteristics responsive to change. Method: Parent report questionnaires assessed sleep behavior, attention, autism-related behaviors, and quality of life from 15 participants before and during intervention. A Sleep Diary documented average sleep duration and average time to fall asleep during the preintervention phase and the last 2 weeks of the treatment phase. Results: Procedures were acceptable and feasible for families. All measures were sensitive to change. Children with ASD demonstrated significant change in sleep duration and time needed to fall asleep from pretest to intervention. Improvements were noted in autism-related behaviors, attention, and quality of life. Parent satisfaction was high. Conclusions: The iLs Dreampad™ pillow may be one alternative intervention to pharmacological interventions for children with ASD who have sleep problems. Further study is warranted.

  1. Behavior management approach for agitated behavior in Japanese patients with dementia: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Junko Sato,1 Shutaro Nakaaki,2 Katsuyoshi Torii,1 Mizuki Oka,2 Atsushi Negi,1 Hiroshi Tatsumi,3 Jin Narumoto,4 Toshi A Furukawa,5 Masaru Mimura21Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 3Department of Health Science, Faculty of Psychological and Physical Science, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, 4Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, 5Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior (Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, JapanBackground: Agitated behaviors are frequently observed in patients with dementia and can cause severe distress to caregivers. However, little evidence of the efficacy of nonpharmacological interventions for agitated behaviors exists for patients with dementia. The present pilot study aimed to evaluate a behavioral management program developed by the Seattle Protocols for patients with agitated behaviors in Japan.Methods: Eighteen patients with dementia (Alzheimer’s disease, n = 14; dementia with Lewy bodies, n = 4 participated in an open study testing the effectiveness of a behavioral management program. The intervention consisted of 20 sessions over the course of 3 months. The primary outcomes were severity of agitation in dementia, as measured using the Agitated Behavior in Dementia scale (ABID and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI.Results: The behavioral management program resulted in significant reductions in total scores on both the ABID and CMAI. Although both physically agitated and verbally agitated behavior scores on the ABID improved significantly, symptoms of psychosis did not improve after the intervention.Conclusion: The behavioral management technique may be beneficial to distressed caregivers of

  2. PREVIEW Behavior Modification Intervention Toolbox (PREMIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlert, Daniela; Unyi-Reicherz, Annelie; Stratton, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    of behavior modification by providing a deeper understanding of successful intervention components. OBJECTIVE: To develop a physical activity and dietary behavior modification intervention toolbox (PREMIT) that fulfills current requirements of being theory-driven and evidence-based, comprehensively described......) implementing the intervention and assuring quality. RESULTS: PREMIT is based on a trans-theoretical approach referring to valid behavior modification theories, models and approaches. A major "product" of PREMIT is a matrix, constructed for use by onsite-instructors. The matrix includes objectives, tasks...... and feasible to evaluate. PREMIT is part of an intervention trial, which aims to prevent the onset of type-2 diabetes in pre-diabetics in eight clinical centers across the world by guiding them in changing their physical activity and dietary behavior through a group counseling approach. METHODS: The program...

  3. PREVIEW Behavior Modification Intervention Toolbox (PREMIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahlert, Daniela; Unyi-Reicherz, Annelie; Stratton, Gareth;

    2016-01-01

    of behavior modification by providing a deeper understanding of successful intervention components. OBJECTIVE: To develop a physical activity and dietary behavior modification intervention toolbox (PREMIT) that fulfills current requirements of being theory-driven and evidence-based, comprehensively described...... and feasible to evaluate. PREMIT is part of an intervention trial, which aims to prevent the onset of type-2 diabetes in pre-diabetics in eight clinical centers across the world by guiding them in changing their physical activity and dietary behavior through a group counseling approach. METHODS: The program...... development took five progressive steps, in line with the Public Health Action Cycle: (1) Summing-up the intervention goal(s), target group and the setting, (2) uncovering the generative psychological mechanisms, (3) identifying behavior change techniques and tools, (4) preparing for evaluation and (5...

  4. Behavioral interventions for insomnia: Theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Mahendra P.; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is a general clinical term that refers to a difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep. Insomnia is widely prevalent in the general population, especially in the elderly and in those with medical and psychiatric disorders. Hypnotic drug treatments of insomnia are effective but are associated with potential disadvantages. This article presents an overview of behavioral interventions for insomnia. Behavioral interventions for insomnia include relaxation training, stimulus control th...

  5. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Pilot Parenting Educational Intervention in a Pregnancy Buprenorphine Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Averie C; Ren, Dianxu; Founds, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    We developed a pilot evidence-based prenatal educational intervention to increase knowledge of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and early parenting skills for women with opiate dependency who enrolled in a pregnancy buprenorphine clinic. We developed, implemented, and tested modules regarding expectations during newborn hospitalization for observation or treatment of NAS and regarding evidence-based parenting skills in response to NAS behaviors. Testing evaluated baseline knowledge of early parenting skills with newborns at risk for NAS and change from baseline after the educational intervention. No statistically significant difference in composite knowledge scores was observed. A brief survey completed by the participants postpartum affirmed the perception of women that the educational intervention effectively prepared them for the early postpartum period while their newborns were hospitalized.

  6. Joint marketing as a framework for targeting men who have sex with men in China: a pilot intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jingguang; Cai, Rui; Lu, Zuxun; Cheng, Jinquan; de Vlas, Sake J; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2013-04-01

    To apply the joint marketing principle as a new intervention approach for targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) who are often difficult to reach in societies with discrimination towards homosexuality and HIV/AIDS. A pilot intervention according to the principles of joint marketing was carried out by the CDC in Shenzhen, China, in MSM social venues. A self-designed questionnaire of HIV knowledge, condom use, and access to HIV-related services was used before and after the pilot intervention to evaluate its effectiveness. The CDC supported gatekeepers of MSM social venues in running their business and thereby increasing their respectability and income. In return, the gatekeepers cooperated with the CDC in reaching the MSM at the venues with health promotion messages and materials. Thus a win-win situation was created, bringing together two noncompetitive parties in reaching out to a shared customer, the MSM. The pilot intervention succeeded in demonstrating acceptability and feasibility of the joint marketing approach targeting MSM. HIV knowledge, the rate of condom use, and access to HIV-related services of participants in the pilot intervention increased significantly. The joint marketing intervention is an innovative way to create synergies between the gatekeepers of MSM social venues and public health officials for reaching and potentially changing HIV high-risk behaviors among MSM.

  7. A pilot study of the impact of stress management techniques on the classroom behavior of elementary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R; Oldfield, D

    1985-02-01

    Intervention studies have demonstrated the benefit of stress management techniques on health-related variables among school-age children. It was hypothesized that teaching elementary school children stress management skills would promote appropriate classroom study behavior by enhancing student ability to attend to teacher assigned tasks. This pilot study supports the contention that stress management skills can increase classroom "on-task" behavior.

  8. Mind magic: a pilot study of preventive mind-body-based stress reduction in behaviorally inhibited and activated children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellesma, F.C.; Cornelis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of study: The aim of this pilot study was to examine a mind-body-based preventive intervention program and to determine relationships between children's behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and behavioral activation system, stress, and stress reduction after the program. Design of study: Child

  9. Innovative Techniques for Evaluating Behavioral Nutrition Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E; Laugero, Kevin D; Graham, Dan J; Cunningham, Brian T; Jahns, Lisa; Lora, Karina R; Reicks, Marla; Mobley, Amy R

    2017-01-01

    Assessing outcomes and the impact from behavioral nutrition interventions has remained challenging because of the lack of methods available beyond traditional nutrition assessment tools and techniques. With the current high global obesity and related chronic disease rates, novel methods to evaluate the impact of behavioral nutrition-based interventions are much needed. The objective of this narrative review is to describe and review the current status of knowledge as it relates to 4 different innovative methods or tools to assess behavioral nutrition interventions. Methods reviewed include 1) the assessment of stress and stress responsiveness to enhance the evaluation of nutrition interventions, 2) eye-tracking technology in nutritional interventions, 3) smartphone biosensors to assess nutrition and health-related outcomes, and 4) skin carotenoid measurements to assess fruit and vegetable intake. Specifically, the novel use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, by characterizing the brain's responsiveness to an intervention, can help researchers develop programs with greater efficacy. Similarly, if eye-tracking technology can enable researchers to get a better sense as to how participants view materials, the materials may be better tailored to create an optimal impact. The latter 2 techniques reviewed, smartphone biosensors and methods to detect skin carotenoids, can provide the research community with portable, effective, nonbiased ways to assess dietary intake and quality and more in the field. The information gained from using these types of methodologies can improve the efficacy and assessment of behavior-based nutrition interventions.

  10. School-based interventions for disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Youth disruptive behavior is a concern for youth, school personnel,families, and society. Early childhood disruptive behaviors negatively impact the classroom, and are associated with negative academic, social, behavioral, emotional, substance use, health, and justice system outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. Effective, comprehensive, multicomponent interventions targeting risk/protective factors and pathways associated with antisocial behavior reduce and/or mitigate these negative outcomes. Positive effects have been demonstrated for universal and indicated programs for participating youth and families in early childhood, and for high-risk youth in adolescence and young adulthood. These empirically supported programs inform the treatment of complex and difficult-to-treat disruptive behavior.

  11. COGNITIVE INTERVENTIONS IN BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EMMELKAMP, PMG; VANOPPEN, P

    1993-01-01

    In this report an overview is given of the contribution of cognitive approaches to behavioral medicine. The (possible) contribution of cognitive therapy is reviewed in the area of coronary heart disease, obesity, bulimia nervosa, chronic pain, benign headache, cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndr

  12. COGNITIVE INTERVENTIONS IN BEHAVIORAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EMMELKAMP, PMG; VANOPPEN, P

    1993-01-01

    In this report an overview is given of the contribution of cognitive approaches to behavioral medicine. The (possible) contribution of cognitive therapy is reviewed in the area of coronary heart disease, obesity, bulimia nervosa, chronic pain, benign headache, cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndr

  13. Endoscopic procedure with a modified Reiki intervention: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Rosalinda S; Stuart-Shor, Eileen M; Russo, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of Reiki prior to colonoscopy to reduce anxiety and minimize intraprocedure medications compared with usual care. A prospective, nonblinded, partially randomized patient preference design was employed using 21 subjects undergoing colonoscopy for the first time. Symptoms of anxiety and pain were assessed using a Likert-type scale. Between-group differences were assessed using chi-square analyses and analysis of variance. There were no differences between the control (n = 10) and experimental (n = 11) groups on age (mean = 58 years, SD = 8.5) and gender (53% women). The experimental group had higher anxiety (4.5 vs. 2.6, p = .03) and pain (0.8 vs. 0.2, p = .42) scores prior to colonoscopy. The Reiki intervention reduced mean heart rate (-9 beats/minute), systolic blood pressure (-10 mmHg), diastolic blood pressure (-4 mmHg), and respirations (-3 breaths/minute). There were no between-group differences on intraprocedure medication use or postprocedure physiologic measures. Although the experimental group patients had more symptoms, they did not require additional pain medication during the procedure, suggesting that (1) anxious people may benefit from an adjunctive therapy; (2) anxiety and pain are decreased by Reiki therapy for patients undergoing colonoscopy, and (3) additional intraprocedure pain medication may not be needed for colonoscopy patients receiving Reiki therapy. This pilot study provided important insights in preparation for a rigorous, randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  14. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Guided Self-Help Intervention to Manage Chronic Orofacial Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthorpe, Joanna; Lovell, Karina; Peters, Sarah; McGowan, Linda; Nemeth, Imola; Roberts, Christopher; Aggarwal, Vishal R

    2017-01-01

    To conduct a pilot trial to test the feasibility of a guided self-help intervention for chronic orofacial pain. A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted to compare the intervention with usual treatment. A total of 37 patients with chronic orofacial pain were randomized into either the intervention group (n = 19) or the usual treatment (control) group (n = 18). Validated outcome measures were used to measure the potential effectiveness of the intervention over a number of domains: physical and mental functioning (Short Form 36 [SF-36]); anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]); pain intensity and interference with life (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]); disability (Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale [MOPDS]); and illness behavior (Revised Illness Perceptions Questionnaire [IPQr]). Bootstrap confidence intervals were computed for the treatment effect (ES) posttreatment and at 3 months follow-up and adjusted for baseline values of the outcome measure by using analysis of covariance. At posttreatment and the 3-month follow-up, 11 participants in the intervention group and 7 in the control group failed to complete outcome measures. The intervention was acceptable and could be feasibly delivered face to face or over the telephone. Although the pilot trial was not powered to draw conclusions about the effectiveness, it showed significant (P orofacial pain. It showed potential effectiveness on outcome domains related to functioning and illness perception. Further research is needed to understand the cost effectiveness of the intervention for chronic orofacial pain.

  15. Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for Repetitive Behaviors in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Brian A.; McDonough, Stephen G.; Bodfish, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There has been an increased research emphasis on repetitive behaviors; however, this research primarily has focused on phenomenology and mechanisms. Thus, the knowledge base on interventions is lagging behind other areas of research. The literature…

  16. Behavioral interventions for insomnia: Theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mahendra P; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2012-10-01

    Insomnia is a general clinical term that refers to a difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep. Insomnia is widely prevalent in the general population, especially in the elderly and in those with medical and psychiatric disorders. Hypnotic drug treatments of insomnia are effective but are associated with potential disadvantages. This article presents an overview of behavioral interventions for insomnia. Behavioral interventions for insomnia include relaxation training, stimulus control therapy, sleep restriction therapy, sleep hygiene, paradoxical intention therapy, cognitive restructuring, and other approaches. These are briefly explained. Research indicates that behavioral interventions are efficacious, effective, and likely cost-effective treatments for insomnia that yield reliable, robust, and long-term benefits in adults of all ages. Detailed guidance is provided for the practical management of patients with insomnia.

  17. Driver behavior following an automatic steering intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Nicola; Griesche, Stefan; Schieben, Anna; Hesse, Tobias; Baumann, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The study investigated driver behavior toward an automatic steering intervention of a collision mitigation system. Forty participants were tested in a driving simulator and confronted with an inevitable collision. They performed a naïve drive and afterwards a repeated exposure in which they were told to hold the steering wheel loosely. In a third drive they experienced a false alarm situation. Data on driving behavior, i.e. steering and braking behavior as well as subjective data was assessed in the scenarios. Results showed that most participants held on to the steering wheel strongly or counter-steered during the system intervention during the first encounter. Moreover, subjective data collected after the first drive showed that the majority of drivers was not aware of the system intervention. Data from the repeated drive in which participants were instructed to hold the steering wheel loosely, led to significantly more participants holding the steering wheel loosely and thus complying with the instruction. This study seems to imply that without knowledge and information of the system about an upcoming intervention, the most prevalent driving behavior is a strong reaction with the steering wheel similar to an automatic steering reflex which decreases the system's effectiveness. Results of the second drive show some potential for countermeasures, such as informing drivers shortly before a system intervention in order to prevent inhibiting reactions.

  18. Continuous evaluation of evolving behavioral intervention technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Cheung, Ken; Schueller, Stephen M; Hendricks Brown, C; Duan, Naihua

    2013-10-01

    Behavioral intervention technologies (BITs) are web-based and mobile interventions intended to support patients and consumers in changing behaviors related to health, mental health, and well-being. BITs are provided to patients and consumers in clinical care settings and commercial marketplaces, frequently with little or no evaluation. Current evaluation methods, including RCTs and implementation studies, can require years to validate an intervention. This timeline is fundamentally incompatible with the BIT environment, where technology advancement and changes in consumer expectations occur quickly, necessitating rapidly evolving interventions. However, BITs can routinely and iteratively collect data in a planned and strategic manner and generate evidence through systematic prospective analyses, thereby creating a system that can "learn." A methodologic framework, Continuous Evaluation of Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies (CEEBIT), is proposed that can support the evaluation of multiple BITs or evolving versions, eliminating those that demonstrate poorer outcomes, while allowing new BITs to be entered at any time. CEEBIT could be used to ensure the effectiveness of BITs provided through deployment platforms in clinical care organizations or BIT marketplaces. The features of CEEBIT are described, including criteria for the determination of inferiority, determination of BIT inclusion, methods of assigning consumers to BITs, definition of outcomes, and evaluation of the usefulness of the system. CEEBIT offers the potential to collapse initial evaluation and postmarketing surveillance, providing ongoing assurance of safety and efficacy to patients and consumers, payers, and policymakers.

  19. Innovative techniques for evaluating behavioral nutrition interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessing outcomes and impact from behavioral nutrition interventions in the community has remained challenging for a variety of reasons. One main reason is the lack of methods available beyond traditional nutrition assessment tools and techniques. With current global obesity and related chronic dis...

  20. Pilot evaluation of a web-based intervention targeting sexual health service access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K E; Newby, K; Caley, M; Danahay, A; Kehal, I

    2016-04-01

    Sexual health service access is fundamental to good sexual health, yet interventions designed to address this have rarely been implemented or evaluated. In this article, pilot evaluation findings for a targeted public health behavior change intervention, delivered via a website and web-app, aiming to increase uptake of sexual health services among 13-19-year olds are reported. A pre-post questionnaire-based design was used. Matched baseline and follow-up data were identified from 148 respondents aged 13-18 years. Outcome measures were self-reported service access, self-reported intention to access services and beliefs about services and service access identified through needs analysis. Objective service access data provided by local sexual health services were also analyzed. Analysis suggests the intervention had a significant positive effect on psychological barriers to and antecedents of service access among females. Males, who reported greater confidence in service access compared with females, significantly increased service access by time 2 follow-up. Available objective service access data support the assertion that the intervention may have led to increases in service access. There is real promise for this novel digital intervention. Further evaluation is planned as the model is licensed to and rolled out by other local authorities in the United Kingdom.

  1. Integrated smoking cessation and binge drinking intervention for young adults: a pilot efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Steven C; Pokorny, Steven B; Schroeder, Darrell R; Tan, Winston; Werch, Chudley E

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol consumption is strongly associated with cigarette smoking in young adults. The primary aim of this investigation was to complete a pilot evaluation of the efficacy of an integrated intervention that targets both cigarette smoking and binge drinking on the cigarette smoking and binge behavior of young adults at 6-month follow-up. Participants were 95 young adult (M=24.3; SD=3.5 years) smokers (≥1 cigarettes per day) who binge drink (≥1 time per month) and who were randomly assigned to standard treatment (n=47) involving six individual treatment visits plus eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy or the identical smoking cessation treatment integrated with a binge drinking intervention (integrated intervention; n=48). Using an intent-to-treat analysis for tobacco abstinence, at both 3 month end of treatment and 6 month follow-up, more participants who received integrated intervention were biochemically confirmed abstinent from tobacco than those who received standard treatment at 3 months (19% vs. 9%, p=0.06) and 6 months (21% vs. 9%, p=0.05). At 6 months, participants who completed the study and who received integrated intervention consumed fewer drinks per month (psmoking cessation and reduces binge drinking compared to standard treatment.

  2. Occupational health and metabolic risk factors: A pilot intervention for transport workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L. Naug

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Heavy vehicle transport workers have a high risk of obesity and obesity-related disorders including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Sedentary nature of their work makes a healthy work and lifestyle balance difficult to achieve. Educational interventions that promote behavioral changes have been shown to be effective in various group settings. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of metabolic risk factors among a population of urban bus drivers; to deliver a 3-month educational intervention specifically tailored for the workplace environment of transport workers; and to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention through quantitative measurements and qualitative feedback. Material and Methods: Thirty-three bus drivers from depots in south Queensland were recruited for the study. Baseline metabolic data were collected through anthropometric measurements, blood collection and diet/lifestyle questionnaires. Metabolic risk factors that were analyzed included: waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose, blood triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C. Three interactive seminars were delivered over a 3-month period. At the end of the period, data collection was repeated. Results: At the commencement of the study, 35% of the participants exhibited ≥ 3 of the metabolic risk factors that characterize metabolic syndrome. This is higher than the reported prevalence in the general Australian population (22.1%. A total 21 of the 33 participants remained committed to the intervention and provided pre and post intervention data. Of these, 28% (N = 6 showed a decrease in one or more of the risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome. There was a significant increase in the average HDL-C after the intervention. Qualitative feedback indicated that the workers benefited from the program, especially regarding their awareness of the risks associated with their profession. Conclusions: This pilot

  3. Undergraduate Pilot Training: Instructor Pilot Behavior and Student Stress and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    to those reported for power-on-stall and spin recovery units flown by students in the Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT ) (Krahenbuhl, Marett...in the ASPT (Krahenbuhl et al., 1978, 1979). The instructor behavior data were collapsed across trials in order to calculate mean rates for each

  4. Development and Pilot Investigation of Behavioral Activation for Negative Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Hilary; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Keeley, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Negative symptoms cause functional impairment and impede recovery from psychosis, not least, because of limited developments in empirically validated treatments. This article details a pilot evaluation of a behavioral activation (BA) treatment with eight people presenting with psychosis and marked negative symptoms. The rationale for this…

  5. Adaptive Interventions in Drug Court: A Pilot Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Arabia, Patricia L; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Croft, Jason R; McKay, James R

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study (N = 30) experimentally examined the effects of an adaptive intervention in an adult misdemeanor drug court. The adaptive algorithm adjusted the frequency of judicial status hearings and clinical case-management sessions according to pre-specified criteria in response to participants' ongoing performance in the program. Results revealed the adaptive algorithm was acceptable to both clients and staff, feasible to implement with greater than 85% fidelity, and showed promise for eliciting clinically meaningful improvements in drug abstinence and graduation rates. Estimated effect sizes ranged from 0.40 to 0.60 across various dependent measures. Compared to drug court as-usual, participants in the adaptive condition were more likely to receive responses from the drug court team for inadequate performance in the program and received those responses after a substantially shorter period of time. This suggests the adaptive algorithm may have more readily focused the drug court team's attention on poorly-performing individuals, thus allowing the team to "nip problems in the bud" before they developed too fully. These preliminary data justify additional research evaluating the effects of the adaptive algorithm in a fully powered experimental trial.

  6. Nutritional Intervention and Breakfast Behavior of Kindergartens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqing GAO

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To examine the effect of nutritional education on children’s breakfast patternsMethods: A kindergarten based nutrition intervention was started in September 2001 among 8 kindergartens in Hefei with a total of 2,012 children aged 4-6 years and their parent pairs.Results: Monthly nutrition education sessions were held over two semesters in kindergartens part of the intervention arm.  The approach in education and the content of other activities were uniform across all the kindergartens. A validated questionnaire was used to record breakfast behavior over 7 days including at least one weekend. The parents recorded the children’s breakfast pattern (frequency, time, and food selection at baseline, middle, and end of the study. After intervention, there were significant differences at the final stage, but none at the baseline before intervention. There were changes not only in breakfast frequency, but also in the breakfast selectionConclusion: The breakfast pattern of Chinese children can be modified through nutrition education after a long term intervention. Keywords: Breakfast, Children, Intervention, China

  7. Discrete time modeling of heavy transport plane pilot behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, D.

    1977-01-01

    The desire to improve flight safety leads to a classification of various flight troubles in three groups: (1) troubles from sensitivity to flight disturbances, (2) maneuverability troubles (whenever a correction maneuver induces an unexpected deviation on another parameter), and (3) pilot troubles (pilot overload when required attention is excessive or underload entailing a loss of vigilance). Sensitivity to disturbances and maneuverability of a given aircraft may be evaluated from the early design stage. Evaluation of the pilot behavior, however, may be realized only in actual flight or with a flight simulator, that is quite late in the development period. For this reason, it is desirable to have available, at the design stage, a model of the pilot behavior to command the differential system describing the envisioned aircraft. This aim implies two major requirements. First, the program must be compatible with a wide range of possible aircraft designs; ideally, the program should be self-learning. Second, mental load and overall pilot performance must be modeled.

  8. The Influence of Neighborhood Crime on Increases in Physical Activity during a Pilot Physical Activity Intervention in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyles, Stephanie T; Myers, Candice A; Drazba, Kathryn T; Marker, Arwen M; Church, Timothy S; Newton, Robert L

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether neighborhood crime moderated the response (increases in steps) to a pilot intervention to increase physical activity in children. Twenty-seven insufficiently active children aged 6-10 years (mean age = 8.7 years; 56 % female; 59 % African American) were randomly assigned to an intensive intervention group (IIG) or minimal intervention group (MIG). Change in average daily number of steps from baseline was regressed against an index of neighborhood crime in a multilevel repeated-measures model that included a propensity score to reduce confounding. Safer neighborhoods were associated with higher increases in steps during the pilot intervention (interaction p = 0.008). Children in the IIG living in low-crime neighborhoods significantly increased their physical activity (5275 ± 1040 steps/day) while those living in high-crime neighborhoods did not (1118 ± 1007) (p for difference = 0.046). In the IIG, the increase in daily steps was highly correlated with neighborhood crime (r = 0.58, p = 0.04). These findings suggest the need for physical activity interventions to account for participants' environments in their design and/or delivery. To promote healthy behaviors in less-supportive environments, future studies should seek to understand how environments modify intervention response and to identify mediators of the relationship between environment and intervention.

  9. Behavioral Decision Research Intervention Reduces Risky Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Julie S; Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Fischhoff, Baruch; Murray, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Although adolescents are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted infections, most sex education programs have shown little effect on sexual behavior. An interactive video intervention developed by our team has been identified as one of a few programs that have been documented to reduce sexually transmitted infections in this population. Building on behavioral decision research, we used a mental models approach to interview young women about their sexual decisions, finding, among other things, the strong role of perceived social norms. We based our intervention on these results, aiming to help young women identify and implement personally and socially acceptable decision strategies. A randomized controlled trial found that the video reduced risky sexual behavior and the acquisition of chlamydia infection. We recently revised the video to suit more diverse audiences, and upgraded it to modern standards of cinematography and interactivity. It is now in field trial.

  10. Authoritative feeding behaviors to reduce child BMI through online interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenn, Marilyn; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Felzer, Holly; Zhang, Jiannan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE.: The purpose of the study was to examine the feasibility and initial efficacies of parent- and/or child-focused online interventions and variables correlated with child body mass index percentile change. DESIGN AND METHODS.: A feasibility and cluster randomized controlled pilot study was used. RESULTS.: Recruitment was more effective at parent-teacher conferences compared with when materials were sent home with fifth- to eighth-grade culturally diverse students. Retention was 90% for students and 62-74% for parents. Authoritative parent feeding behaviors were associated with lower child body mass index. A larger study is warranted. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS.: Online approaches may provide a feasible option for childhood obesity prevention and amelioration.

  11. Development and pilot study of a marketing strategy for primary care/internet-based depression prevention intervention for adolescents (the CATCH-IT intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Watson, Natalie; Bridges, John F P; Fogel, Joshua; Galas, Jill; Kramer, Clarke; Connery, Marc; McGill, Ann; Marko, Monika; Cardenas, Alonso; Landsback, Josephine; Dmochowska, Karoline; Kuwabara, Sachiko A; Ellis, Justin; Prochaska, Micah; Bell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent depression is both common and burdensome, and while evidence-based strategies have been developed to prevent adolescent depression, participation in such interventions remains extremely low, with less than 3% of at-risk individuals participating. To promote participation in evidence-based preventive strategies, a rigorous marketing strategy is needed to translate research into practice. To develop and pilot a rigorous marketing strategy for engaging at-risk individuals with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention in primary care targeting key attitudes and beliefs. A marketing design group was constituted to develop a marketing strategy based on the principles of targeting, positioning/competitor analysis, decision analysis, and promotion/distribution and incorporating contemporary models of behavior change. We evaluated the formative quality of the intervention and observed the fielding experience for prevention using a pilot study (observational) design. The marketing plan focused on "resiliency building" rather than "depression intervention" and was relayed by office staff and the Internet site. Twelve practices successfully implemented the intervention and recruited a diverse sample of adolescents with > 30% of all those with positive screens and > 80% of those eligible after phone assessment enrolling in the study with a cost of $58 per enrollee. Adolescent motivation for depression prevention (1-10 scale) increased from a baseline mean value of 7.45 (SD = 2.05) to 8.07 poststudy (SD = 1.33) (P = .048). Marketing strategies for preventive interventions for mental disorders can be developed and successfully introduced and marketed in primary care.

  12. Impact evaluation of a pilot web-based intervention to increase physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Melissa; Hortz, Brian; Petosa, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to conduct an impact evaluation of a 10-week Web-based physical activity intervention. Quasi-experimental, three-group pretest, posttest design. Large Midwestern university. Participants (N = 233) included college students registered for three courses. The study employed a convenience sample consisting of a Web-based group (n = 108), a physical activity group (n = 64), and a general health group (n = 61). The Web-based group received a Social Cognitive Theory behavioral skill-building intervention and exercised 3 days per week in their leisure time. The physical activity group received exercise instruction and was required to attend three physical activity labs per week. The comparison group received health instruction. Outcome variables included moderate and vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, social support, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations and expectancies. Differences between groups were assessed at pretest and posttest using multiple analyses of variance. Vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, and outcome expectancy value changed significantly in the Web-based and physical activity course groups (p lecture and activity lab interventions were superior in eliciting changes in vigorous physical activity, self-regulation, and outcome expectancy value than a traditional health course.

  13. Behavioral intervention reduces unhealthy eating behaviors in preschool children via a behavior card approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming; Pan, Li-Ping; Han, Juan; Li, Li; Jiang, Jing-Xiong; Jin, Run-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Many eating behaviors form in childhood, and some unhealthy behaviors may persist into adulthood and have potential impacts on people's health. This study evaluated the effectiveness of behavioral intervention in reducing consumption of Western fast food, sweetened beverages, fried food in preschool children, and changing parents' rewarding behaviors that encourage the consumption of the unhealthy foods. The research was a cluster randomized trial of seven kindergartens, involving 1138 children aged 3-6 years and their parents in Beijing, China. Parents and children allocated to the intervention group received two lectures and printed resources, including behavior cards, educational sheets. Children's behavior cards, applied with behavior-changing techniques, were used to intervene, and monitor behavior changes over time. Children in the control group just followed their usual health education curriculum in kindergartens. Intervention effects on food consumption behaviors were assessed by examining pre- and post-questionnaires. Of the 1138 children screened at baseline, 880 (77.3%) were measured at the end of the intervention period. The intervention lasted from March to June in 2010. The results showed that consumption of Western fast food, sweetened beverages, and fried food was decreased among the intervention group (Pchildren were decreased (P=0.002). From March to June 2010, the frequency of each target behavior in children tended to decrease over the intervention period (Pchildren and reduces the parents' practice of using unhealthy foods as reward.

  14. An ADHD educational intervention for elementary schoolteachers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaresi, W J; Olsen, R D

    1998-04-01

    We assessed the effect of pediatrician-led inservice training on the knowledge and stress of elementary schoolteachers related to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The subjects were 44 schoolteachers staffing a 750-student school. Preintervention and postintervention questionnaires assessed teachers' training and knowledge concerning ADHD, teacher stress, and teacher-rated student behavior. The intervention was an ADHD curriculum developed by the national organization, Children and Adults with Attention-Deficit Disorder (CHADD). At preintervention, 41% of the teachers thought that ADHD could be caused by poor parenting and 41%, by sugar or food additives; 64% thought that methylphenidate should be used only as a last resort. Postintervention percentages of teachers holding these beliefs were 7%, 5%, and 34%, respectively. Sixty-one percent had no contact with physicians prescribing stimulants. Teacher stress correlated with ADHD behavior in male students and decreased postintervention. Use of the CHADD curriculum and discussion with a pediatrician were associated with improved teacher knowledge and decreased teacher stress related to ADHD.

  15. Self-regulation and weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes : A pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, S.; de Gucht, V.; Maes, S.; Schroevers, M.; Chatrou, M.; Haak, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a self-regulation (SR) weight reduction intervention on weight, body mass index(BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (primary outcomes), exercise, nutrition and quality of life (secondary outcomes). Methods: A pilot intervention (n = 53) based on SR-principles

  16. A Pilot Study of Immune and Mood Outcomes of a Community-Based Intervention for Dementia Caregivers: The PLST Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Garand, Linda; Buckwalter, Kathleen C.; Lubaroff, David M.; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Frantz, Rita A.; Ansley, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    Providing care to a family member with dementia is conceptualized as a chronic stressor with adverse psychological and physical effects. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate mood and immune outcomes of caregivers exposed to a community-based psychoeducational nursing intervention based on the Progressively Lowered Stress Threshold (PLST) model. The PLST intervention is designed to strengthen the psychological resources of dementia caregivers by teaching methods of preventing and/or...

  17. Physical activity for an ethnically diverse sample of endometrial cancer survivors: a needs assessment and pilot intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Amerigo; Moadel-Robblee, Alyson; Garber, Carol Ewing; Kuo, Dennis; Goldberg, Gary; Einstein, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the physical activity (PA) behavior, needs and preferences for underserved, ethnically diverse women with a history of endometrial cancer (EC). Methods Women with a history of EC (41 non-Hispanic black, 40 non-Hispanic white, and 18 Hispanic) completed a needs assessment during their regular follow-up appointments at Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, NY, USA. An 8-week pilot PA intervention based on the results of the needs assessment was conducted with 5 EC survivors. Results Mean body mass index (BMI) among the 99 respondents was 34.1±7.6 kg/m2, and 66% did not exercise regularly. Self-described weight status was significantly lower than actual BMI category (p<0.001). Of the 86% who were interested in joining an exercise program, 95% were willing to attend at least once weekly. The primary motivations were improving health, losing weight, and feeling better physically. Despite the high interest in participation, volunteer rate was very low (8%). However, adherence to the 8-week pilot PA intervention was high (83%), and there were no adverse events. Body weight decreased in all pilot participants. Conclusion These data show that ethnically diverse EC survivors have a great need for, and are highly interested in, PA interventions. However, greater care needs to be taken to assess and identify barriers to increase participation in such programs. PMID:25872894

  18. Process evaluation of a tailored mobile health intervention aiming to reduce fatigue in airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; Boot, Cécile R L; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; van der Beek, Allard J

    2016-08-26

    MORE Energy is a mobile health intervention which aims to reduce fatigue and improve health in airline pilots. The primary objective of this process evaluation was to assess the reach, dose delivered, compliance, fidelity, barriers and facilitators, and satisfaction of the intervention. The second objective was to investigate the associations of adherence to the intervention with compliance and with participant satisfaction. Thirdly, we investigated differences between the subgroups within the target population. The intervention consisted of a smartphone application, supported by a website. It provided advice on optimal light exposure, sleep, nutrition, and physical activity, tailored to flight and personal characteristics. The reach of the intervention was determined by comparing the intervention group participants and the airline pilots who did not participate. The dose delivered was defined as the total number of participants that was sent an instruction email. Objective compliance was measured through the Control Management System of the application. To determine the fidelity, an extensive log was kept throughout the intervention period. Subjective compliance, satisfaction, barriers, facilitators, and adherence were assessed using online questionnaires. Associations between the extent to which the participants applied the advice in daily life (adherence), compliance, and satisfaction were analysed as well. Finally, outcomes of participants of different age groups and haul types were compared. A total of 2222 pilots were made aware of the study. From this group, 502 pilots met the inclusion criteria and did agree to participate. The reach of the study proved to be 22 % and the dose delivered was 99 %. The included pilots were randomized into the intervention group (n = 251) or the control group (n = 251). Of the intervention group participants, 81 % consulted any advice, while 17 % did this during four weeks or more. Fidelity was 67 %. The

  19. Mystery Motivator: a Tier 1 classroom behavioral intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz, Eva A; Coffee, Gina

    2014-06-01

    This study is an examination of the effectiveness of the Mystery Motivator-an interdependent group contingency, variable-ratio, classwide intervention-as a tool for reducing disruptive classroom behavior in eight diverse general-education elementary school classrooms across seven different schools. The study was conducted using an ABAB, changing criterion design, and the effectiveness of the intervention was assessed for an 8-week period. The frequency of disruptive behavior in all classrooms decreased. Teacher intervention acceptability data indicated seven of eight teachers found the intervention to be acceptable. Overall, data indicated the Mystery Motivator intervention was a powerful intervention for reducing disruptive behaviors in elementary classrooms.

  20. Changing the home nutrition environment: effects of a nutrition and media literacy pilot intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alexandra E; Dave, Jayna; Tanner, Andrea; Duhe, Sonya; Condrasky, Margaret; Wilson, Dawn; Griffin, Sarah; Palmer, Meredith; Evans, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The specific aim for this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nutrition and media literacy intervention targeting elementary students and their parents. The purpose of the intervention was to increase child fruit and vegetables (FV) consumption and change the home nutrition environment (measured with FV availability and accessibility and parental social support). During the intervention, students learned about nutrition, the role media plays in shaping values concerning nutrition, and developed a media campaign for their parents. A quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The media intervention was effective in changing the home environment.

  1. Evaluation of a pilot healthy eating intervention in restaurants and food stores of a rural community: a randomized community trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Donate, Ana P; Riggall, Ann Josie; Meinen, Amy M; Malecki, Kristen; Escaron, Anne L; Hall, Bev; Menzies, Anne; Garske, Gary; Nieto, F Javier; Nitzke, Susan

    2015-02-12

    Research suggests that the food environment influences individual eating practices. To date, little is known about effective interventions to improve the food environment of restaurants and food stores and promote healthy eating in rural communities. We tested "Waupaca Eating Smart " (WES), a pilot intervention to improve the food environment and promote healthy eating in restaurants and supermarkets of a rural community. WES focused on labeling, promoting, and increasing the availability of healthy foods. We conducted a randomized community trial, with two Midwestern U.S. communities randomly assigned to serve as intervention or control site. We collected process and outcome data using baseline and posttest owner and customer surveys and direct observation methods. The RE-AIM framework was used to guide the evaluation and organize the results. Seven of nine restaurants and two of three food stores invited to participate in WES adopted the intervention. On a 0-4 scale, the average level of satisfaction with WES was 3.14 (SD=0.69) for restaurant managers and 3 (SD=0.0) for store managers. On average, 6.3 (SD=1.1) out of 10 possible intervention activities were implemented in restaurants and 9.0 (SD=0.0) out of 12 possible activities were implemented in food stores. One month after the end of the pilot implementation period, 5.4 (SD=1.6) and 7.5 (SD=0.7) activities were still in place at restaurants and food stores, respectively. The intervention reached 60% of customers in participating food outlets. Restaurant food environment scores improved from 13.4 to 24.1 (p customer behaviors were observed after a 10-month implementation period. The intervention achieved high levels of reach, adoption, implementation, and maintenance, suggesting the feasibility and acceptability of restaurant-and food store-based interventions in rural communities. Pilot outcome data indicated very modest levels of effectiveness, but additional research adequately powered to test the impact

  2. The Team Nutrition pilot study: lessons learned from implementing a comprehensive school-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Elyse; Olander, Carol; Lefebvre, Craig; Cusick, Pam; Biesiadecki, Laura; McGoldrick, Danny

    2002-01-01

    Team Nutrition (TN) is an educational and promotional initiative developed by the US Department of Agriculture to change children's eating behaviors through social marketing techniques. This article reports on the process evaluation of a TN pilot project targeting students in kindergarten to grade 4 and systematically documents the implementation experience. Even with a very short start-up period, schools implemented most components of this multichannel nutrition intervention and formed new, supportive relationships with local media and community partners. School teachers and administrators, along with foodservice professionals, generally expressed support for and satisfaction with TN, citing the positive experience and gains for students. The lessons learned from this study highlight the management and organizational issues involved in a comprehensive intervention. These include the importance of local coordinators to support and create a bridge between teachers and cafeteria staff and to forge links with key external partners. To function effectively, coordinators themselves may need training in coalition building and working with media. Relationships formed with parents, local businesses, other educational institutions, health organizations, and the media offer promise for helping to sustain nutrition education efforts. The TN process evaluation identified multiple ideas for pursuing these partnerships more successfully.

  3. Rationale, design and methods of the HEALTHY study behavior intervention component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, E M; Elliot, D L; Faith, M S; Firrell, L S; Giles, C M; Goldberg, L; Marcus, M D; Schneider, M; Solomon, S; Thompson, D; Yin, Z

    2009-08-01

    HEALTHY was a multi-center primary prevention trial designed to reduce risk factors for type 2 diabetes in adolescents. Seven centers each recruited six middle schools that were randomized to either intervention or control. The HEALTHY intervention integrated multiple components in nutrition, physical education, behavior change and communications and promotion. The conceptual rationale as well as the design and development of the behavior intervention component are described. Pilot study data informed the development of the behavior intervention component. Principles of social learning and health-related behavior change were incorporated. One element of the behavior intervention component was a sequence of peer-led, teacher-facilitated learning activities known as FLASH (Fun Learning Activities for Student Health). Five FLASH modules were implemented over five semesters of the HEALTHY study, with the first module delivered in the second semester of the sixth grade and the last module in the second semester of the eighth grade. Each module contained sessions that were designed to be delivered on a weekly basis to foster self-awareness, knowledge, decision-making skills and peer involvement for health behavior change. FLASH behavioral practice incorporated individual and group self-monitoring challenges for eating and activity. Another element of the behavior intervention component was the family outreach strategy for extending changes in physical activity and healthy eating beyond the school day and for supporting the student's lifestyle change choices. Family outreach strategies included the delivery of newsletters and supplemental packages with materials to promote healthy behavior in the home environment during school summer and winter holiday breaks. In conclusion, the HEALTHY behavior intervention component, when integrated with total school food and physical education environmental changes enhanced by communications and promotional campaigns, is a feasible and

  4. Hypertension Improvement Project (HIP) Latino: results of a pilot study of lifestyle intervention for lowering blood pressure in Latino adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pilar Rocha-Goldberg, María; Corsino, Leonor; Batch, Bryan; Voils, Corrine I.; Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Svetkey, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of a culturally tailored behavioral intervention for improving hypertension-related health behaviors in Hispanic/Latino adults. Design Feasibility pilot study in a community health center and a Latino organization in Durham, North Carolina (NC). Intervention The culturally adapted behavioral intervention consisted of 6 weekly group sessions incorporating motivational interviewing techniques. Goals included weight loss if overweight, adoption of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern, and increased physical activity. Participants were also encouraged to monitor their daily intake of fruits, vegetables, dairy and fat, and to record physical activity. Cultural adaptations included conducting the study in familiar places, using Spanish-speaking interventionist, culturally-appropriate food choices, and physical activity. Main outcomes Systolic blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), exercise, and dietary pattern were measured at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Qualitative evaluations of the recruitment process and the intervention were also conducted. Results There were 64 potential participants identified via health care provider referrals (33%), printed media (23%), and direct contact (44%). Seventeen participants completed the intervention and had main outcome data available. Participants “strongly agreed/ agreed” that the group sessions provided them with the tools they needed to achieve weight loss, blood pressure control, and the possibility of sustaining the lifestyle changes after completing the intervention. At the end of the intervention, all physiological, diet, and exercise outcomes were more favorable, with the exception of fat. After 6 weeks, systolic blood pressure decreased an average of −10.4 ± 10.6 mmHg, weight decreased 1.5 ± 3.2 lbs, BMI decreased 0.3 ± 0.5, and physical activity increased 40 minutes per week. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lifestyle

  5. A two-session psychological intervention for siblings of pediatric cancer patients: a randomized controlled pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prchal Alice

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since siblings of pediatric cancer patients are at risk for emotional, behavioral, and social problems, there is considerable interest in development of early psychological interventions. This paper aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a two-session psychological intervention for siblings of newly diagnosed pediatric cancer patients. Methods Thirty siblings age 6-17 years were randomly assigned to an intervention group or an active control group with standard psychosocial care. The manualized intervention provided to siblings in the first 2 months after the cancer diagnosis of the ill child included medical information, promotion of coping skills, and a psychoeducational booklet for parents. At 4 to 6 weeks, 4 months, and 7 months after the diagnosis, all siblings and their parents completed measures (from standardized instruments of social support, quality of life, medical knowledge, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and anxiety. Results At follow-up siblings in the intervention group showed better psychological well-being, had better medical knowledge, and reported receiving social support from more people. However, the intervention had no effects on posttraumatic stress symptoms and anxiety. Conclusions The results of this pilot trial suggest that a two-session sibling intervention can improve siblings' adjustment, particularly psychological well-being, in the early stage after a cancer diagnosis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00296907

  6. Pilot trial of a dissonance-based cognitive-behavioral group depression prevention with college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Shaw, Heather; Gau, Jeff M

    2016-07-01

    Conduct a pilot trial testing whether a new cognitive-behavioral (CB) group prevention program that incorporated cognitive-dissonance change principles was feasible and appeared effective in reducing depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder onset relative to a brochure control condition in college students with elevated depressive symptoms. 59 college students (M age = 21.8, SD = 2.3; 68% female, 70% White) were randomized to the 6-session Change Ahead group or educational brochure control condition, completing assessments at pretest, posttest, and 3-month follow-up. Recruitment and screening methods were effective and intervention attendance was high (86% attended all 6 sessions). Change Ahead participants showed medium-large reductions in depressive symptoms at posttest (M d = 0.64), though the effect attenuated by 3-month follow-up. Incidence of major depression onset at 3-month follow-up was 4% for Change Ahead participants versus 13% (difference ns). Change Ahead appears highly feasible and showed positive indications of reduced acute phase depressive symptoms and MDD onset relative to a minimal intervention control in this initial pilot. Given the brevity of the intervention, its apparent feasibility, and the lack of evidence-based depression prevention programs for college students, continued evaluation of Change Ahead appears warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Text Message Behavioral Interventions: From Here to Where?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffoletto, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Text messaging is an efficient and personal electronic form of communication, making it an ideal modality for remote delivery of behavioral interventions. The ubiquity of cell phones and short message service (SMS) worldwide allow the possibility of SMS behavioral inteventions to impact global health. Studies to date suggest that SMS interventions can effectively support health behaviors and may offer advantages compared to other forms of computerized interventions. Program features optimizing user engagament and persuasiveness are suggested to mediate SMS intervention effect. Future research is tasked with identifying what SMS features are useful to which individuals at what times to best help them initiate and maintain health behaviors. PMID:26665157

  8. Behavioral Activation as an Early Intervention for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression among Physically Injured Trauma Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy W.; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Ghesquiere, Angela; Jurkovich, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptation of behavioral activation (BA) for the early intervention of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among physically injured survivors of traumatic injury, and presents pilot data on a small randomized effectiveness trial (N = 8). The application of BA to PTSD is based on the theory that increases in…

  9. A pilot study of a smoking cessation intervention for women living with HIV: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SS

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sun S Kim, Sabreen Darwish, Sang A Lee, Rosanna F DeMarco Department of Nursing, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA, USA Background: Prevalence of cigarette smoking is substantially higher among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV than the general population in the USA. Women living with HIV (WLHIV who smoke are at higher risk of developing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and have a higher mortality rate than nonsmoking WLHIV. Compared to men, women generally require more intensive counseling for smoking cessation. The primary aim of this study is to examine the acceptability and feasibility of a videoconferencing smoking cessation intervention that is tailored to the specific needs of WLHIV. Methods: A total of 50 WLHIV will be randomized at a ratio of 1:1 to either a videoconferencing or a telephone counseling arm. Both arms have the same cessation intervention, that is, eight weekly individualized counseling sessions of 30-minute cognitive behavioral therapy plus active nicotine patches for 8 weeks. The only difference between the two arms is the delivery mode of the counseling, that is, telephone video call vs. telephone voice call. Data collection is scheduled at baseline and three follow-up points: 1, 3, and 6 months from the target quit day. Data will be analyzed using STATA 14. The primary outcome is a 6-month prolonged abstinence. Home-based salivary cotinine test will be conducted to verify self-reported smoking abstinence using a NicAlert® test strip, while a research coordinator monitors the whole process by a telephone video call. Conclusion: The study is a two-arm parallel-group pilot clinical trial of a smoking cessation intervention. It attempts to examine whether videoconferencing smoking cessation intervention will be acceptable and feasible for WLHIV and will yield a better cessation outcome than telephone counseling intervention. Findings may have the

  10. Increasing Knowledge and Confidence in Behavioral Change: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frates, Elizabeth P; Xiao, Ryan C; Simeon, Kate; McCargo, Tracie; Guo, Michelle; Stern, Theodore A

    2016-11-24

    To assess whether and how effectively an interactive presentation about lifestyle medicine could impact the knowledge and attitudes of medical students to prepare them for managing chronic conditions in their patients. Chronic diseases are increasingly prevalent and problematic. Although chronic disease management involves lifestyle modification, few physicians are adequately trained in effective motivational interventions. We surveyed first- and second-year Harvard Medical School students in October 2015 before and after a presentation on lifestyle medicine and quantified changes in their knowledge, attitudes/confidence, and skills. Medical students learned the basics of behavioral change after a 1-hour presentation, and their confidence with regard to implementing interventions increased. Median scores of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes improved as did their ability to counsel patients on exercise, nutrition, sleep, stress management, and smoking cessation. After a brief intervention, medical students can learn principles of behavioral management and how to implement the skills with patients suffering from chronic illnesses.

  11. A Group-Based Yoga Therapy Intervention for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Alison J.; Jenny, Hillary E.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Schembri, Michael; Subak, Leslee L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention for middle-aged and older women with urinary incontinence. Methods We conducted a pilot randomized trial of ambulatory women aged 40 years and older with stress, urgency, or mixed-type incontinence. Women were randomized to a 6-week yoga therapy program (N=10) consisting of twice weekly group classes and once weekly home practice or a waitlist control group (N=9). All participants also received written pamphlets about standard behavioral self-management strategies for incontinence. Changes in incontinence were assessed by 7-day voiding diaries. Results Mean (±SD) age was 61.4 (±8.2) years, and mean baseline frequency of incontinence was 2.5 (±1.3) episodes/day. After 6 weeks, total incontinence frequency decreased by 66% (1.8 [±0.9] fewer episodes/day) in the yoga therapy versus 13% (0.3 [±1.7] fewer episodes/day) in the control group (P=0.049). Participants in the yoga therapy group also reported an average 85% decrease in stress incontinence frequency (0.7 [±0.8] fewer episodes/day) compared to a 25% increase in controls (0.2 [± 1.1] more episodes/day) (P=0.039). No significant differences in reduction in urgency incontinence were detected between the yoga therapy versus control groups (1.0 [±1.0] versus 0.5 [±0.5] fewer episodes/day, P=0.20). All women starting the yoga therapy program completed at least 90% of group classes and practice sessions. Two participants in each group reported adverse events unrelated to the intervention. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence to support the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of a group-based yoga therapy intervention to improve urinary incontinence in women. PMID:24763156

  12. Physician coaching to enhance well-being: a qualitative analysis of a pilot intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Suzanne; Kingsolver, Karen; Rosdahl, Jullia

    2014-01-01

    Physicians in the United States increasingly confront stress, burnout, and other serious symptoms at an alarming level. As a result, there is growing public interest in the development of interventions that improve physician resiliency. The aim of this study is to evaluate the perceived impact of Physician Well-being Coaching on physician stress and resiliency, as implemented in a major medical center. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 physician-participants, and three coaches of a Physician Well-being Coaching pilot focused on three main areas: life context, impacts of coaching, and coaching process. Interviewees were physicians who completed between three and eight individual coaching sessions between October 2012 and May 2013 through the Physician Well-being Coaching pilot program. Qualitative content analysis of the 11 physician interviews and three coach interviews using Atlas.ti to generate patterns and themes. Physician Well-being Coaching helped participants increase resilience via skill and awareness development in the following three main areas: (1) boundary setting and prioritization, (2) self-compassion and self-care, and (3) self-awareness. These insights often led to behavior changes and were perceived by physicians to have indirect but positive impact on patient care. Devaluing self-care while prioritizing the care of others may be a significant, but unnecessary, source of burnout for physicians. This study suggests that coaching can potentially help physicians alter this pattern through skill development and increased self-awareness. It also suggests that by strengthening physician self-care, coaching can help to positively impact patient care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A pilot study of a primary prevention curriculum to address preschool behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upshur, Carole; Wenz-Gross, Melodie; Reed, George

    2013-10-01

    Behavior problems among preschool children are common. They are important targets for intervention because early externalizing problems and self-regulation issues tend to persist without appropriate attention, and can affect later mental health and school achievement outcomes. However, few preschool curricula addressing social and emotional development exist, and evidence for effects are mixed. In this study, the Second Step Pre/Kindergarten Social and Emotional Learning curriculum was adapted and tested in a small cluster randomized pilot study of community preschool classrooms to determine if it could improve outcomes in: (1) individual children's teacher-rated behavior problems and prosocial skills; (2) classroom climate (classroom interactions and two measures of disruptive behavior); and (3) teacher interaction skills. Year 1 outcomes were modest and were accounted for by baseline differences. In Year 2, classroom climate, measured by independent observers, differed significantly in intervention classrooms, largely because of declines in control classrooms, and there was some evidence for better teacher interaction skills in intervention classrooms. The pattern of effects suggests important impacts on classroom quality worth investigating in a larger study. Both fidelity and implementation rates, as well as positive teacher responses to the curriculum, indicate potential for widespread adoption.

  14. Entrepreneurial behavior among employees. Pilot study: Employees from Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionuţ Constantin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many objective or subjective factors influence the decision to open a business. The most important factors are: the existence of an adequate opportunity or a market, perception that starting a business could be difficult because of bureaucracy, financial barriers or the need to acquire new skills, a lack of money, etc. Also, entrepreneurial behavior is generally influenced by socio-economic status of the family of origin [1]. Thus, children from wealthy families have the “competitive advantage” to receive an education appropriate for managing a business and of course have the necessary financial resources and its start [2]. However, abilities of every individual can “correct’’ these benefits are completely eliminated/reduced exogenous barriers [3]. In this article I will present the results of a pilot study conducted in 2014 at Bucharest employees to observe their entrepreneurial behavior.

  15. Integrating Behavioral HIV Interventions into Biomedical Prevention Trials with Youth: Lessons from Chicago's Project PrEPare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosek, Sybil G; Green, Keith R; Siberry, George; Lally, Michelle; Balthazar, Christopher; Serrano, Pedro A; Kapogiannis, Bill

    2013-01-01

    On the heels of several trials demonstrating the efficacy of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and the recent approval by the FDA of the supplemental indication for Truvada as PrEP, researchers, advocates, and community providers are calling for the investigation of implementation strategies that combine behavioral interventions with biomedical prevention. This paper describes the modification and integration of an evidence-based group-level intervention into a small PrEP pilot trial with young men who have sex with men (YMSM). The behavioral intervention as well as ongoing risk reduction counseling sessions were found to be highly acceptable among a sample of racially diverse YMSM.

  16. Behavioral functionality of mobile apps in health interventions: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Hannah E; Lister, Cameron; West, Joshua H; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2015-02-26

    Several thousand mobile phone apps are available to download to mobile phones for health and fitness. Mobile phones may provide a unique means of administering health interventions to populations. The purpose of this systematic review was to systematically search and describe the literature on mobile apps used in health behavior interventions, describe the behavioral features and focus of health apps, and to evaluate the potential of apps to disseminate health behavior interventions. We conducted a review of the literature in September 2014 using key search terms in several relevant scientific journal databases. Only English articles pertaining to health interventions using mobile phone apps were included in the final sample. The 24 studies identified for this review were primarily feasibility and pilot studies of mobile apps with small sample sizes. All studies were informed by behavioral theories or strategies, with self-monitoring as the most common construct. Acceptability of mobile phone apps was high among mobile phone users. The lack of large sample studies using mobile phone apps may signal a need for additional studies on the potential use of mobile apps to assist individuals in changing their health behaviors. Of these studies, there is early evidence that apps are well received by users. Based on available research, mobile apps may be considered a feasible and acceptable means of administering health interventions, but a greater number of studies and more rigorous research and evaluations are needed to determine efficacy and establish evidence for best practices.

  17. Strategies to promote healthier food purchases: a pilot supermarket intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Blakely, Tony; Wall, Joanne; Rodgers, Anthony; Jiang, Yannan; Wilton, Jenny

    2007-06-01

    To pilot the design and methodology for a large randomised controlled trial (RCT) of two interventions to promote healthier food purchasing: culturally appropriate nutrition education and price discounts. A 12-week, single-blind, pilot RCT. Effects on food purchases were measured using individualised electronic shopping data ('Shop 'N Go' system). Partial data were also collected on food expenditure at other (non-supermarket) retail outlets. A supermarket in Wellington, New Zealand. Eligible customers were those who were the main household shoppers, shopped mainly at the participating store, and were registered to use the Shop 'N Go system. Ninety-seven supermarket customers (72% women; age 40 +/- 9.6 years, mean +/- standard deviation) were randomised to one of four intervention groups: price discounts, nutrition education, a combination of price discounts and nutrition education, or control (no intervention). There was a 98% follow-up rate of participants, with 85% of all reported supermarket purchases being captured via the electronic data collection system. The pilot did, however, demonstrate difficulty recruiting Maori, Pacific and low-income shoppers using the electronic register and mail-out. This pilot study showed that electronic sales data capture is a viable way to measure effects of study interventions on food purchases in supermarkets, and points to the feasibility of conducting a large-scale RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of price discounts and nutrition education. Recruitment strategies will, however, need to be modified for the main trial in order to ensure inclusion of all ethnic and socio-economic groups.

  18. Preschool Based JASPER Intervention in Minimally Verbal Children with Autism: Pilot RCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, Kelly Stickles; Ishijima, Eric; Chang, Ya-Chih; Kasari, Connie

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot study, we tested the effects of a novel intervention (JASPER, Joint Attention Symbolic Play Engagement and Regulation) on 3 to 5 year old, minimally verbal children with autism who were attending a non-public preschool. Participants were randomized to a control group (treatment as usual, 30 h of ABA-based therapy per week) or a…

  19. Gender, Dialogue and Discursive Psychology: A Pilot Sexuality Intervention with South African High-School Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearey-Graham, Nicola; Macleod, Catriona Ida

    2017-01-01

    Good-quality sexuality education can be effective in reducing sexual health risks, but may also be disconnected from the lived realities of learners' lives and reinforce gendered stereotypes. In line with the trend towards "empowerment" in and through sexuality education, we implemented a pilot sexuality intervention with Grade 10…

  20. A Pilot Study on the Impact of a Home-Based Parenting Intervention: Parents Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Ellie; Holland, Sally; Jerzembek, Gabi

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot study undertaken in order to explore the impact of a home-based parenting intervention (Parents Plus), on parents and families. Parents Plus is part of a Welsh Early Years strategy called Flying Start and aims to promote positive parent-child interactions. This article explores the medium-term to long-term impact of…

  1. A pilot study to test the feasibility and effectiveness of an intervention to help teen mothers and their mothers clarify relational boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Anne Scott

    2008-12-01

    Teen mothers and their mothers experience conflict due to poor relational boundaries. This conflict can result in maternal stress, which can affect the quality of mother-infant interactions. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of an intervention to improve relational boundaries between teen mothers and their mothers. Seven first-time teen mothers living with their mothers or mother figures completed the cognitive-behavioral intervention. Participants evaluated each session and the accompanying homework. Relational boundaries were observed before and after the intervention. Results revealed many feasibility issues including scheduling, language, and sample recruitment. Findings are discussed, and recommendations for further research are offered.

  2. Development and Pilot Study of a Marketing Strategy for Primary Care/Internet–Based Depression Prevention Intervention for Adolescents (The CATCH-IT Intervention)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Natalie; Bridges, John F. P.; Fogel, Joshua; Galas, Jill; Kramer, Clarke; Connery, Marc; McGill, Ann; Marko, Monika; Cardenas, Alonso; Landsback, Josephine; Dmochowska, Karoline; Kuwabara, Sachiko A.; Ellis, Justin; Prochaska, Micah; Bell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescent depression is both common and burdensome, and while evidence-based strategies have been developed to prevent adolescent depression, participation in such interventions remains extremely low, with less than 3% of at-risk individuals participating. To promote participation in evidence-based preventive strategies, a rigorous marketing strategy is needed to translate research into practice. Objective: To develop and pilot a rigorous marketing strategy for engaging at-risk individuals with an Internet-based depression prevention intervention in primary care targeting key attitudes and beliefs. Method: A marketing design group was constituted to develop a marketing strategy based on the principles of targeting, positioning/competitor analysis, decision analysis, and promotion/distribution and incorporating contemporary models of behavior change. We evaluated the formative quality of the intervention and observed the fielding experience for prevention using a pilot study (observational) design. Results: The marketing plan focused on “resiliency building” rather than “depression intervention” and was relayed by office staff and the Internet site. Twelve practices successfully implemented the intervention and recruited a diverse sample of adolescents with > 30% of all those with positive screens and > 80% of those eligible after phone assessment enrolling in the study with a cost of $58 per enrollee. Adolescent motivation for depression prevention (1–10 scale) increased from a baseline mean value of 7.45 (SD = 2.05) to 8.07 poststudy (SD = 1.33) (P = .048). Conclusions: Marketing strategies for preventive interventions for mental disorders can be developed and successfully introduced and marketed in primary care. PMID:20944776

  3. Determining Responsiveness to School Counseling Interventions Using Behavioral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruman, Diana H.; Hoelzen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    School districts are in the process of adopting the Response to Intervention (RTI) approach to identify and remediate academic and behavioral deficits. As an integral member of the school behavior team, school counselors must use data on individual interventions to contribute to the data-based decision making process in RTI. This article presents…

  4. Behavioral Intervention to Reduce Child and Parent Distress during Venipuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manne, Sharon L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigated behavioral intervention to control child distress during invasive cancer treatment. Children (n=23) requiring physical restraint to complete venipuncture were alternately assigned to behavioral intervention or attention control condition. Observed child distress, parent-rated child distress, and parent ratings of own distress were…

  5. Mixed methods evaluation of a randomized control pilot trial targeting sugar-sweetened beverage behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Jamie; Cook, Emily; Chen, Yvonnes; You, Wen; Davy, Brenda; Estabrooks, Paul

    2013-02-01

    This Excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and low health literacy skills have emerged as two public health concerns in the United States (US); however, there is limited research on how to effectively address these issues among adults. As guided by health literacy concepts and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), this randomized controlled pilot trial applied the RE-AIM framework and a mixed methods approach to examine a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intervention (SipSmartER), as compared to a matched-contact control intervention targeting physical activity (MoveMore). Both 5-week interventions included two interactive group sessions and three support telephone calls. Executing a patient-centered developmental process, the primary aim of this paper was to evaluate patient feedback on intervention content and structure. The secondary aim was to understand the potential reach (i.e., proportion enrolled, representativeness) and effectiveness (i.e. health behaviors, theorized mediating variables, quality of life) of SipSmartER. Twenty-five participants were randomized to SipSmartER (n=14) or MoveMore (n=11). Participants' intervention feedback was positive, ranging from 4.2-5.0 on a 5-point scale. Qualitative assessments reavealed several opportunties to improve clarity of learning materials, enhance instructions and communication, and refine research protocols. Although SSB consumption decreased more among the SipSmartER participants (-256.9 ± 622.6 kcals), there were no significant group differences when compared to control participants (-199.7 ± 404.6 kcals). Across both groups, there were significant improvements for SSB attitudes, SSB behavioral intentions, and two media literacy constructs. The value of using a patient-centered approach in the developmental phases of this intervention was apparent, and pilot findings suggest decreased SSB may be achieved through targeted health literacy and TPB strategies. Future efforts are needed to examine

  6. A pilot study: mindfulness meditation intervention in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Roxane Raffin; Giardino, Nicholas; Larson, Janet L

    2015-01-01

    Living well with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) requires people to manage disease-related symptoms in order to participate in activities of daily living. Mindfulness practice is an intervention that has been shown to reduce symptoms of chronic disease and improve accurate symptom assessment, both of which could result in improved disease management and increased wellness for people with COPD. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate an 8-week mindful meditation intervention program tailored for the COPD population and explore the use of breathing timing parameters as a possible physiological measure of meditation uptake. Results demonstrated that those randomized to the mindful meditation intervention group (N=19) had a significant increase in respiratory rate over time as compared to those randomized to the wait-list group (N=22) (P=0.045). It was also found that the mindful meditation intervention group demonstrated a significant decrease in level of mindfulness over time as compared to the wait-list group (P=0.023). When examining participants from the mindful meditation intervention who had completed six or more classes, it was found that respiratory rate did not significantly increase in comparison to the wait-list group. Furthermore, those who completed six or more classes (N=12) demonstrated significant improvement in emotional function in comparison to the wait-list group (P=0.032) even though their level of mindfulness did not improve. This study identifies that there may be a complex relationship between breathing parameters, emotion, and mindfulness in the COPD population. The results describe good feasibility and acceptability for meditation interventions in the COPD population.

  7. Smoking Cessation Intervention After Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack. A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner Frandsen, Nicole; Sørensen, Margit; Hyldahl, Tanja Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is widely recommended for secondary stroke prevention. However, little is known about the efficacy of smoking cessation intervention after stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). METHODS: Ninety-four smokers under age 76, admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA were......-report and verified by measurement of exhaled carbon monoxide (CO). Fewer patients than expected were recruited, which renders this report a pilot study. RESULTS: The 6-month self-reported smoking cessation rate was 37.8% in the minimal intervention group and 42.9% in the intensive intervention group. Smoking...... randomized to minimal smoking cessation intervention or intensive smoking cessation intervention. All patients attended a 30-min individual counseling by the study nurse. Patients randomized to intensive smoking cessation intervention also participated in a 5-session outpatient smoking cessation program...

  8. Life skills: evaluation of a theory-driven behavioral HIV prevention intervention for young transgender women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Robert; Johnson, Amy K; Kuhns, Lisa M; Cotten, Christopher; Joseph, Heather; Margolis, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    Young transgender women are at increased risk for HIV infection due to factors related to stigma/marginalization and participation in risky sexual behaviors. To date, no HIV prevention interventions have been developed or proven successful with young transgender women. To address this gap, we developed and pilot tested a homegrown intervention "Life Skills," addressing the unique HIV prevention needs of young transgender women aged 16-24 years. Study aims included assessing the feasibility of a small group-based intervention with the study population and examining participant's engagement in HIV-related risk behaviors pre- and 3-months-post-intervention. Fifty-one (N = 51) young transgender women enrolled in the study. Our overall attendance and retention rates demonstrate that small group-based HIV prevention programs for young transgender women are both feasible and acceptable. Trends in outcome measures suggest that participation in the intervention may reduce HIV-related risk behaviors. Further testing of the intervention with a control group is warranted.

  9. Piloting a Savings-Led Microfinance Intervention with Women Engaging in Sex Work in Mongolia: Further Innovation for HIV Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Laura Cordisco; Witte, Susan S; Aira, Toivgoo; Altantsetseg, Batsukh; Riedel, Marion

    2011-12-30

    This paper describes a pilot study testing the feasibility of an innovative savings-led microfinance intervention in increasing the economic empowerment and reducing the sexual risk behavior of women engaging in sex work in Mongolia. Women's economic vulnerability may increase their risk for HIV by compromising their ability to negotiate safer sex with partners and heightening the likelihood they will exchange sex for survival. Microfinance has been considered a potentially powerful structural HIV prevention strategy with women conducting sex work, as diversification of income sources may increase women's capacity to negotiate safer transactional sex. With 50% of all reported female HIV cases in Mongolia detected among women engaging in sex work, direct prevention intervention with women conducting sex work represents an opportunity to prevent a potentially rapid increase in HIV infection in urban Mongolia. The piloted intervention consisted of a matched savings program in which matched savings could be used for business development or vocational education, combined with financial literacy and business development training for women engaging in sex work. Results of the pilot demonstrate participants' increased confidence in their ability to manage finances, greater hope for pursuing vocational goals, moderate knowledge gains regarding financial literacy, and an initial transition from sex work to alternative income generation for five out of nine participants. The pilot findings highlight the potential for such an intervention and the need for a clinical trial testing the efficacy of savings-led microfinance programs in reducing HIV risk for women engaging in sex work in Mongolia.

  10. Changes in Pilot Behavior with Predictive System Status Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    1998-01-01

    Research has shown a strong pilot preference for predictive information of aircraft system status in the flight deck. However, changes in pilot behavior associated with using this predictive information have not been ascertained. The study described here quantified these changes using three types of predictive information (none, whether a parameter was changing abnormally, and the time for a parameter to reach an alert range) and three initial time intervals until a parameter alert range was reached (ITIs) (1 minute, 5 minutes, and 15 minutes). With predictive information, subjects accomplished most of their tasks before an alert occurred. Subjects organized the time they did their tasks by locus-of-control with no predictive information and for the 1-minute ITI, and by aviatenavigate-communicate for the time for a parameter to reach an alert range and the 15-minute conditions. Overall, predictive information and the longer ITIs moved subjects to performing tasks before the alert actually occurred and had them more mission oriented as indicated by their tasks grouping of aviate-navigate-communicate.

  11. Development and pilot testing a social cognitive theory-based intervention to prevent childhood obesity among elementary students in rural Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavera, Megan; Sharma, Manoj; Murnan, Judy

    The purpose of this study was to develop and pilot test a social cognitive theory-based intervention for children to prevent childhood obesity. Focus groups were conducted with 5th grade students and their parents on the behaviors of physical activity, watching television, and eating habits, specifically fruit and vegetable intake and water consumption. Results from the focus groups were used to develop a 12-week program which was pilot tested in 5th grade physical education classes. The 12-week intervention was conducted with 122 students at a rural elementary school in Kentucky. Significant findings from the intervention were the increase in expectations for drinking water (p=0.049), increase in expectations for watching television (p=0.002), and increase in the number of glasses of water consumed (p=0.022) from pre-test to post-test. Recommendations have been offered for future obesity reduction programs that can be implemented in the elementary schools.

  12. Systematic Review of School-based Interventions to Modify Dietary Behavior: Does Intervention Intensity Impact Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racey, Megan; O'Brien, Charlene; Douglas, Sabrina; Marquez, Olivia; Hendrie, Gilly; Newton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to the associations between diet and health, it is important that effective health promotion strategies establish healthful eating behaviors from an early age. We reviewed the intensity of school-based interventions aimed to modify dietary behavior in preadolescent and adolescents and related intervention characteristics to…

  13. A pilot randomized controlled trial testing a minimal intervention to prepare breast cancer survivors for recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Katherine Regan; Armeson, Kent; Franco, Regina; Harper, Jennifer; Patten, Rebecca; Kindall, Stacey; Bearden, James; Zapka, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions addressing cancer survivors’ post-treatment concerns can be time-intensive and require specialized staff. Research is needed to identify feasible minimal intervention strategies to improve survivors’ quality of life after treatment. Objectives The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility and short-term impact of a minimal clinic intervention on breast cancer survivors’ quality of life, unmet needs, distress and cancer worry. Interventions/Methods In this randomized controlled pilot trial, we enrolled breast cancer survivors at the end of treatment and administered baseline surveys. Participants were randomized to study arm (4-week video plus educational booklet intervention group and usual care group) and completed follow-up surveys at 10 weeks. Linear regression was used to examine intervention effects on quality of life outcomes controlling for clinical and demographic factors. Open-ended questions were used to examine program satisfaction and obtain feedback to improve the intervention. Results We enrolled 92 survivors in the trial. Participants rated the intervention highly and reported feeling less isolated and having more realistic expectations about their recovery after completing the program. Despite positive qualitative findings, no significant intervention effects were observed for quality of life, unmet needs, distress or cancer worry in unadjusted or adjusted analyses. Conclusions Future research is needed to define optimal intervention elements to prepare breast cancer survivors for the post-treatment period. Implications for Practice Effective survivorship interventions may require more intensive components such as clinical input and longer follow-up periods. PMID:24831043

  14. COPING SKILLS IN CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY--EVALUATION OF COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY INTERVENTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Maja; Mestrović, Antonela; Vekić, Ana Marija; Malenical, Masa; Kukuruzović, Monika; Begovac, Ivan

    2015-12-01

    A pilot study was conducted to examine the efficiency and satisfaction of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention in youth with epilepsy regarding coping strategies. The CBT intervention was based on the main principles and empirically supported cognitive-behavioral techniques. The intervention consists of epilepsy education, stress education, and coping skill strategies. Seventeen children and adolescents aged 9-17 diagnosed with epilepsy for at least one year, with at least average intelligence and no history of serious mental illness completed the CBT intervention during summer camp, providing data on the efficiency of and satisfaction with CBT intervention. Upon completion of the CBT intervention, study subjects achieved significantly higher scores on the following Scale of Coping with Stress subscales: Problem solving; Seeking for social support from friends; Seeking for social support from family; and Cognitive restructuring, for both measures of usage frequency and effectiveness of each subscale. The participants reported a high level of satisfaction with the CBT intervention. This study provided explanation of research limitations and recommendations for future clinical trials.

  15. Promoting Positive Learning in Australian Students Aged 10- to 12-Years-Old Using Attribution Retraining and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodkiewicz, Alicia R; Boyle, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This study piloted an intervention using attribution retraining and cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to promote positive learning experiences and outcomes for students. This research is an important step to revitalise the dwindling field of attribution retraining research by assessing whether these techniques effectively improve student…

  16. 不同干预措施对战士吸烟行为的影响%Effects of psychological intervention, auricular acupuncture and smoking cessation medication on cigarette smoking behavior in soldiers: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜斌; 左芳; 吴蕾; 何耀; 陈肇始; 郑家强; 林大庆

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of different smoking cessation interventions on cigarette consumption for young soldiers.Methods Sixty-eight soldiers were prospectively investigated in this randomly controlled clinical trial and assigned to the psychological intervention group,auricular acupuncture group,and smoking cessation medication group.Results All the participants showed significant reduction(33.3% to 73.9%)in post-treatment cigarette consumption.The highest quit rate was found at 7 days,although this declining trend was faded over time.One-year follow-up indicated a 6-month quit rate of 16.7%,23.8% and 30.4% in three groups,respectively.Conclusion Psychological intervention,auricular acupuncture and smoking cessation medication may be effective methods of reducing cigarette consumption and improving quit rate in young soldiers.%目的 探讨和评价不同的干预措施对集体生活年轻人群吸烟行为的影响.方法 将68名吸烟战士随机分为3组,分别采取心理干预、心理干预+耳针和心理干预+药物对其吸烟行为进行干预.采用统一问卷进行基线调查,在1、3、6个月和1年进行随访,观察不同随访时点吸烟量的减少和戒烟率.结果 三组研究对象可比性较好.在1、3、6个月随访时点,各组吸烟者的吸烟量均有不同程度的下降(33.3%~73.9%).在上述各随访时点,7d时点戒烟率均较高,而持续1个月的戒烟率和持续3个月的戒炯率有随时间下降的趋势.但3组1年随访时,持续6个月的戒烟率仍可达到16.7%、23.8%、30.4%.结论 集体管理生活环境中的戒烟心理干预是年轻战士吸烟量的减少和提高戒烟成功率的有效措施之一,药物和耳针等辅助戒烟方法的使用亦有一定的促进作用.

  17. Parent-directed cognitive behavioral therapy for young anxious children: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluis, Cathy M; van der Bruggen, Corine O; Brechman-Toussaint, Margaret L; Thissen, Michèl A P; Bögels, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Anxiety in children age 8 years and above has been successfully treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). However, the efficacy of CBT for anxious children ages 4-7 years has not, to date, been fully investigated. This paper piloted a CBT intervention targeting child anxiety that was delivered exclusively to parents of 26 children with anxiety symptoms ages 4-7 years. The intervention consisted of four 2-hour group sessions of four to six parents (couples). These group sessions were followed by four individual telephone sessions, once per week across a 4-week period. The pre- and postintervention assessment involved measures of multiple constructs of child anxiety (anxiety symptoms, children's fears, behavioral inhibition, and internalizing symptoms) from multiple informants (parents, children, and teachers). Parents also reported parenting strategies they were likely to use to manage their children's anxiety pre- and postintervention. Results indicated a significant decrease in child anxiety and behavioral inhibition as reported by parents and teachers. Furthermore, mothers reported significant increases in their use of positive reinforcement, and modeling and reassurance, and a significant decrease in their use of reinforcement of dependency directly after treatment. Taken together, parent-directed CBT appears to be an effective approach for treating children ages 4-7 years with anxiety symptoms. Limitations of the current research are discussed.

  18. Theory, evidence and Intervention Mapping to improve behavior nutrition and physical activity interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Isabel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present paper intends to contribute to the debate on the usefulness and barriers in applying theories in diet and physical activity behavior-change interventions. Discussion Since behavior theory is a reflection of the compiled evidence of behavior research, theory is the only foothold we have for the development of behavioral nutrition and physical activity interventions. Application of theory should improve the effectiveness of interventions. However, some of the theories we use lack a strong empirical foundation, and the available theories are not always used in the most effective way. Furthermore, many of the commonly-used theories provide at best information on what needs to be changed to promote healthy behavior, but not on how changes can be induced. Finally, many theories explain behavioral intentions or motivation rather well, but are less well-suited to explaining or predicting actual behavior or behavior change. For more effective interventions, behavior change theory needs to be further developed in stronger research designs and such change-theory should especially focus on how to promote action rather than mere motivation. Since voluntary behavior change requires motivation, ability as well as the opportunity to change, further development of behavior change theory should incorporate environmental change strategies. Conclusion Intervention Mapping may help to further improve the application of theories in nutrition and physical activity behavior change.

  19. Adaptive interventions may optimize outcomes in drug courts: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Arabia, Patricia L; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M; Croft, Jason R

    2009-10-01

    Adaptive interventions apply a priori decision rules for adjusting treatment services in response to participants' clinical presentation or performance in treatment. This pilot study (n = 30) experimentally examined an adaptive intervention in a misdemeanor drug court. The participants were primarily charged with possession of marijuana (73%) or possession of drug paraphernalia (23%). Results revealed that participants in the adaptive condition had higher graduation rates and required significantly less time to graduate from the program and achieve a final resolution of the case. It took an average of nearly 4 fewer months for participants in the adaptive intervention to resolve their cases compared with those participating in drug court as usual. Participants in the adaptive condition also reported equivalent satisfaction with the program and therapeutic alliances with their counselors. These data suggest that adaptive interventions may enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of drug courts and justify examining adaptive interventions in large-scale drug court studies.

  20. Teaching internal medicine resident physicians about Alcoholics Anonymous: a pilot study of an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Adam J; Stein, Melissa R; Arnsten, Julia H; Saitz, Richard

    2006-09-01

    Greater physician confidence in treating alcoholism is associated with a higher frequency of referring alcoholic patients for treatment, but many physicians have limited experience with Alcoholics Anonymous. We implemented a brief, didactic and experiential educational intervention about AA and evaluated its effect on knowledge and attitudes, using a before-after repeated measures study design. Thirty-six first-year internal medicine resident physicians received an educational intervention, which consisted of a 45-minute lecture about AA, a visit to an AA meeting, and a 30-minute debriefing session the next day. Residents' knowledge and attitudes were assessed by a brief written anonymous survey before and after the educational intervention. Residents reported increases in self-perceived knowledge about AA and had more favorable attitudes towards AA after the intervention. Our pilot study shows that a brief, didactic and experiential course can improve physician knowledge and attitudes about AA, and holds promise for improving physician interface with this commonly used intervention.

  1. The Behavior Intervention Support Team (BIST) Program: Underlying Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulden, Walter T.

    2010-01-01

    The Behavior Intervention Support Team (BIST) is a proactive school-wide behavior management plan for all students, emphasizing schools partnering with students and parents through caring relationships and high expectations. The BIST program is well-grounded in behavioral theory and combines strength-based and resiliency principles within the…

  2. Classwide Intervention to Manage Disruptive Behavior in the Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoey, Kara E.; Schneider, Dana L.; Rezzetano, Kristin M.; Prodan, Tana; Tankersley, Melody

    2010-01-01

    The authors present an investigation of a classwide intervention to reduce disruptive behavior in a kindergarten classroom. Participants included children in 3 kindergarten classrooms and their teachers in an at-risk school district in Northeast Ohio. On the basis of student behaviors and teacher goals, the authors chose the Good Behavior Game…

  3. Dogs, physical activity, and walking (dogs PAW): acceptability and feasibility of a pilot physical activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Elizabeth A; Ogata, Niwako; Ting, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the development of and investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a pilot randomized controlled physical activity intervention based on social cognitive theory that used a dog walking strategy. Participants (n = 49) were randomized into an intervention or control group. Overall, participants were middle-aged (M = 45.7 ± 13.4 years), Caucasian, and on average considered obese with a mean body mass index of 30.0 ± 5.5. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize participant characteristics and analyze the feasibility and acceptability data. Regression models were used to (a) examine significant differences between intervention and control groups across time (baseline to post-intervention) and (b) examine if changes in theoretical constructs from baseline to post-intervention resulted in changes in dog walking in both the intervention and control group. Participants agreed that the intervention e-mails were easy to read and understand (M = 4.3 ± 0.7). Participants reported that the frequency of e-mails was adequate (M = 4.3 ± 0.8), but there was lower agreement that the e-mails encouraged an increase in dog walking (M = 3.6 ± 1.2). Post-intervention, the control group increased weekly dog walking to 19.4 ± 4.9 minutes, whereas the intervention group increased it to 79.3 ± 11.2 minutes. Preliminary results suggest that this pilot intervention is an acceptable and feasible strategy for promoting dog walking among dog owners. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  4. Reality therapy oriented intervention program for cyberbullying behaviors and testing its efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taşkın Tanrıkulu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop an intervention program for cyberbullying based on reality therapy and also to investigate the efficiency of this program for such behavior. For the study, firstly, the concept of cyberbullying is analyzed and discussed within the framework of choice theory. Secondly, a psychological counseling program intended to reduce cyberbullying behaviors is developed and a pilot scheme is launched. Remarks of experts are taken into consideration in analyzing the pilot scheme and the program’s suitability with reality therapy is established. An intervention program is implemented at a high school in Istanbul in the first half of the 2012-2013 school year. In the study, designed with 2x3 split-plot method, experimental and control groups consisting of 12 people are formed and a ten-session program is implemented for the experimental group. Analyses show that cyberbullying behaviors decreased in the experimental group, while there was no change in the level of cyberbullying behaviors in the control group.

  5. Developing Items to Measure Theory of Planned Behavior Constructs for Opioid Administration for Children: Pilot Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Catherine; Riley, Barth B; Wilkie, Diana J

    2015-12-01

    The Theory of Planned Behavior (TpB) is useful to direct nursing research aimed at behavior change. As proposed in the TpB, individuals' attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived behavior control predict their intentions to perform a behavior and subsequently predict their actual performance of the behavior. Our purpose was to apply Fishbein and Ajzen's guidelines to begin development of a valid and reliable instrument for pediatric nurses' attitudes, perceived norms, perceived behavior control, and intentions to administer PRN opioid analgesics when hospitalized children self-report moderate to severe pain. Following Fishbein and Ajzen's directions, we were able to define the behavior of interest and specify the research population, formulate items for direct measures, elicit salient beliefs shared by our target population and formulate items for indirect measures, and prepare and test our questionnaire. For the pilot testing of internal consistency of measurement items, Cronbach alphas were between 0.60 and 0.90 for all constructs. Test-retest reliability correlations ranged from 0.63 to 0.90. Following Fishbein and Ajzen's guidelines was a feasible and organized approach for instrument development. In these early stages, we demonstrated good reliability for most subscales, showing promise for the instrument and its use in pain management research. Better understanding of the TpB constructs will facilitate the development of interventions targeted toward nurses' attitudes, perceived norms, and/or perceived behavior control to ultimately improve their pain behaviors toward reducing pain for vulnerable children. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Condom use following a pilot test of the Popular Opinion Leader intervention in the Barbados Defence Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastario, Michael P; Dabreo, Julia; Morris, Jackie; Hallum-Montes, Rachel; Arredondo, Gricel; Creel, Alisha; Cowan, Lisa; Chun, Helen

    2013-02-01

    Worldwide, military personnel have been recognized as a population at elevated risk for sexually transmitted infections and HIV. However, few evidence based behavioral interventions for the prevention of HIV and STIs have been rigorously evaluated in military personnel. We adapted the Popular Opinion Leaders (POL) intervention and piloted the adapted program with the Barbados Defence Force at one military base in Barbados. Popular Opinion Leaders were selected and trained to focus conversations on condom use. Behavioral questionnaires were administered using audio computer-assisted self interview at baseline (n = 256) and 6-month follow-up (n = 303). Mid-point focus groups were conducted with a sample of 15 POLs at a 3 month mid-point assessment. Quantitative data showed moderate increases in condom use at 6-months, and significant uptake of condom use during oral-genital contact in female personnel. A subgroup analysis suggests that this change was partially mediated by post-intervention changes in injunctive norms surrounding condom use in women. Focus groups revealed that POLs were heavily focusing on condom demonstrations, condom provision within social networks, speaking with coworkers about pleasure associated with condom use, and that the most common venues for conversations included those where alcohol was consumed. During the intervention, POLs dispersed from the intervention site as a result of normal personnel movement across bases, resulting in our having to use a pre and post intervention design across the population. It is likely that larger effect sizes would be observed in efforts that account for the natural dispersion of personnel across bases.

  7. Randomized controlled pilot of an intervention to reduce and break-up overweight/obese adults' overall sitting-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júdice, Pedro B; Hamilton, Marc T; Sardinha, Luís B; Silva, Analiza M

    2015-11-02

    Too much prolonged sitting is a prevalent health risk among adults. Interventions have focused mainly on the workplace, with limited attention to non-work settings. The effectiveness of a short-term intervention to reduce and break-up sitting-time in overweight/obese adults was examined. This pilot study sought to determine the feasibility of interrupting sitting to stand/ambulate objectively with ActivPAL devices which provide a valid measurement of sit/stand transitions. This is a cross-over randomized controlled pilot that included 10 participants (aged 37-65 years) and although a small and short-term intervention (1-week intervention; no washout) further informs on the feasibility of interventions on a larger scale. At the workplace, screen-delivered hourly alerts prompted participants to break-up sitting-time through adopting walking behaviors (approximately 30-60 minutes day(-1)). During transportation/home/leisure-time individual goals for steps day(-1) were set and sitting-reduction strategies (including behavioral self-monitoring) were delivered through daily text messages. Change in inclinometer-derived sitting-time is the main outcome. Standing, stepping, number of sit/stand transitions and participant satisfaction were also examined. For the intervention compared to the control-week (mean difference (95 % confidence interval); p value), participants had less sitting-time (1.85 hours (0.96-2.75); p = 0.001), more standing (0.77 hours (0.06-1.48); p = 0.036), and more stepping (1.09 hours (0.79- 1.38); p change in the total number of sit/stand transitions (3.28 (-2.33-8.89); p = 0.218) despite successfully reducing sitting-time and increasing time spent standing and walking. Sitting-time in overweight/obese adults can be reduced following a brief multi-component intervention based on prompts, telephone support, goal setting and behavioral self-monitoring. However, the results from this pilot study provide new insight that when overweight

  8. Pilot trial of an intervention aimed at modifying drug preparation practices among injection drug users in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Hector M; Finlinson, Henriette A; Negron, Juan; Sosa, Irmaly; Rios-Olivares, Eddy; Robles, Rafaela R

    2009-06-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) contaminate preparation materials with blood-borne pathogens by using syringes as measuring and dispensing devices. In collaboration with IDUs, we developed a preventive intervention consisting of four new preparation practices aimed at avoiding the use of syringes in the preparation, and reducing the contamination of the materials. This report describes the results of a pilot trial introducing the new practices to ascertain their adoption potential and their potential efficacy in reducing contamination. Participants comprised 37 active IDUs among whom the new practices were promoted during 16 weeks. In addition to self-reported behaviors, the study collected cookers and plastic caps from shooting galleries and tested them for the presence of blood residues. Adoption rates were: (1) cleaning of skin area with hand sanitizer--65.6%; (2) directly pouring water with a dropper into the cooker--56.3%; (3) drawing drug solution with a preparation syringe and syringe filter--34.4%; and, (4) backload rinsing syringes--53.1%. Rates of blood residues detected in cookers and plastic caps were 41.7% prior to the trial, 28.6% at week 8, 24.6% at week 14, and 12.0% at week 18. We believe the results of the pilot trial are compelling and suggest that this intervention merits further formal testing.

  9. Improving a web-based employability intervention for work-disabled employees: results of a pilot economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noben, C.; Evers, S.; Genabeek, J.V.; Nijhuis, F.; Rijk, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to improve web-based employability interventions for employees with work-related health problems for both intervention content and study design by means of a pilot economic evaluation. Methods Uptake rate analysis for the intervention elements, cost effectiveness

  10. A culturally appropriate intervention to improve health behaviors in Hispanic mother-child dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Melinda S; Nader, Philip R; Kennedy, Christine; Gahagan, Sheila

    2013-04-01

    Obesity interventions targeting Hispanic preschool children are still nascent, and few are culturally appropriate. We evaluated the feasibility of a culturally relevant 9-month intervention program to improve health behaviors in low-income Mexican mothers with 3- to 5-year-old children. A community engagement approach was used to culturally and linguistically tailor an intervention program that was pilot tested with 33 mother-child dyads enrolled from a large California urban health center. A one-group, pretest-posttest design assessed changes in children's consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), mothers' pedometer steps, and BMI. Data were collected at baseline, postintervention and at 6 months postintervention. At postintervention, SSB consumption had significantly decreased for soda and other sugary drinks with a modest reduction for 100% juice. Consumption of water had significantly increased, whereas milk had an increased trend. Maternal step counts significantly increased for weekdays by 69% and weekend days by 49%. Overall, maternal BMI decreased while children's BMI% remained stable. At 6 months postintervention, children's soda and juice consumption reverted toward baseline levels, as did maternal step counts, but children's consumption of sugary drinks remained lower, while water and milk remained higher. Findings suggest that a culturally relevant intervention was feasible for improving target health behaviors in a low-income Mexican community. Future work should assess an enhanced intervention including a maintenance phase for long-term adherence to health behavior changes and influence on maternal and child BMI.

  11. Baseline Behavior of Pilot Whales and their Responses to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Baseline Behavior of Pilot Whales and their Responses to...N000141210417 LONG-TERM GOALS This project investigated the social ecology and baseline behavior of long-finned pilot whales as part of a broad...noise sources compared to beaked whales . However, studies have been hindered by high inherent variability in acoustic and diving behavior and a lack

  12. Trials of Intervention Principles: Evaluation Methods for Evolving Behavioral Intervention Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Schueller, Stephen M; Riley, William T; Brown, C Hendricks; Cuijpers, Pim; Duan, Naihua; Kwasny, Mary J; Stiles-Shields, Colleen; Cheung, Ken

    2015-07-08

    In recent years, there has been increasing discussion of the limitations of traditional randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodologies for the evaluation of eHealth and mHealth interventions, and in particular, the requirement that these interventions be locked down during evaluation. Locking down these interventions locks in defects and eliminates the opportunities for quality improvement and adaptation to the changing technological environment, often leading to validation of tools that are outdated by the time that trial results are published. Furthermore, because behavioral intervention technologies change frequently during real-world deployment, even if a tested intervention were deployed in the real world, its shelf life would be limited. We argue that RCTs will have greater scientific and public health value if they focus on the evaluation of intervention principles (rather than a specific locked-down version of the intervention), allowing for ongoing quality improvement modifications to the behavioral intervention technology based on the core intervention principles, while continuously improving the functionality and maintaining technological currency. This paper is an initial proposal of a framework and methodology for the conduct of trials of intervention principles (TIPs) aimed at minimizing the risks of in-trial changes to intervention technologies and maximizing the potential for knowledge acquisition. The focus on evaluation of intervention principles using clinical and usage outcomes has the potential to provide more generalizable and durable information than trials focused on a single intervention technology.

  13. Behavior problems, foster home integration, and evidence-based behavioral interventions: What predicts adoption of foster children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Sonya J.; Spielfogel, Jill E.; Gleeson, James P.; Rolock, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adoption is particularly important for foster children with special mental health needs who are unable to return home, as adoption increases parental support often critically needed by youth with mental health issues. Unfortunately, significant behavior problems frequently inhibit foster parents from adopting, and little is known about factors that predict adoption when a child has behavior problems. Previous research suggests that foster parent behavioral training could potentially increase rates of successful adoptions for pre-school-aged foster children with behavior problems (Fisher, Kim, & Pears, 2009), but this has not been previously tested in older samples. In older children, effective treatment of behavior problems might also increase adoption by reducing the interference of behavior problems and strengthening the child’s foster home integration. This pilot study focused on this question by testing associations between behavior problems, foster home integration, an evidence-based foster parent intervention, and adoption likelihood. Methods This study used an intent-to-treat design to compare foster home integration and adoption likelihood for 31 foster children with histories of abuse and neglect whose foster parents received a foster behavioral parenting intervention (see Chamberlain, 2003) or usual services. Random effect regression analyses were used to estimate outcomes across four time points. Results As expected, externalizing behavior problems had a negative effect on both integration and adoption, and foster home integration had an independent positive effect on adoption. Internalizing behavior problems (e.g., depression/anxiety) were not related to adoption or integration. However, the intervention did not have a direct effect on either foster home integration or adoption despite its positive effect on behavior problems. Conclusions Results from this preliminary study provide further evidence of the negative effect of externalizing

  14. Increasing physical activity efficiently: an experimental pilot study of a website and mobile phone intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsen, Kjærsti; Vittersø, Joar; Svendsen, Gunnvald Bendix

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this pilot study was to test the effectiveness of an online, interactive physical activity intervention that also incorporated gaming components. The intervention design included an activity planner, progress monitoring, and gamification components and used SMS text as a secondary delivery channel and feedback to improve engagement in the intervention content. Healthy adults (n = 21) recruited through ads in local newspapers (age 35-73) were randomized to the intervention or the control condition. Both groups reported physical activity using daily report forms in four registration weeks during the three-month study: only the experiment condition received access to the intervention. Analyses showed that the intervention group had significantly more minutes of physical activity in weeks five and nine. We also found a difference in the intensity of exercise in week five. Although the intervention group reported more minutes of physical activity at higher intensity levels, we were not able to find a significant effect at the end of the study period. In conclusion, this study adds to the research on the effectiveness of using the Internet and SMS text messages for delivering physical activity interventions and supports gamification as a viable intervention tool.

  15. Theory, evidence and Intervention Mapping to improve behavior nutrition and physical activity interventions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Brug (Hans); A. Oenema (Anke); A. Ferreira (Isabel)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The present paper intends to contribute to the debate on the usefulness and barriers in applying theories in diet and physical activity behavior-change interventions. DISCUSSION: Since behavior theory is a reflection of the compiled evidence of behavior research, theory is th

  16. A pilot evaluation of a social media literacy intervention to reduce risk factors for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Siân A; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Masters, Jennifer; Paxton, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    This pilot study investigated the effectiveness of a social media literacy intervention for adolescent girls on risk factors for eating disorders. A quasi-experimental pre- to post-test design comparing intervention and control conditions was used. Participants were 101 adolescent girls (Mage  = 13.13, SD = 0.33) who were allocated to receive three social media literacy intervention lessons (n = 64) or to receive classes as usual (n = 37). Self-report assessments of eating disorder risk factors were completed one week prior to, and one week following the intervention. Significant group by time interaction effects revealed improvements in the intervention condition relative to the control condition for body image (body esteem-weight; d = .19), disordered eating (dietary restraint; d = .26) and media literacy (realism scepticism; d = .32). The outcomes of this pilot study suggest that social media literacy is a potentially useful approach for prevention of risk for eating disorders in adolescent girls in the current social media environment of heightened vulnerability. Replication of this research with larger, randomized controlled trials, and longer follow-up is needed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pediatric nurses' beliefs and pain management practices: an intervention pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Wilkie, Diana J; Wang, Edward

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated feasibility of the Internet-based Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol to improve nurses' management of children's pain. RCP is an interactive, content-focused, and Kolb's experiential learning theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pretest-posttest design, we evaluated feasibility of RCP and pretest-posttest difference in scores for nurses' beliefs, and simulated and actual pain management practices. Twenty-four RNs completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest as did simulated practice scores. After RCP in actual hospital practice, nurses administered significantly more ibuprofen and ketorolac and children's pain intensity significantly decreased. Findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of RCP and study procedures and significant improvement in nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. The 2-hr RCP program is promising and warrants replication with an attention control group and a larger sample.

  18. A pilot study of a weekend retreat intervention for family survivors of homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Inez; Baliko, Beverly; Schubert, Christine M; Anderson, Lorraine

    2012-10-01

    Homicide causes negative unintended consequences for family survivors. Family survivors face complicated grief and overwhelming loss with minimal support from others. The authors offered a retreat intervention as a way to ameliorate the effects of the homicidal death for family survivors of homicide. An exploratory longitudinal pilot study examined the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and explored the impact of the TOZI© Healing intervention on participants' distress symptoms. Eight family members participated in the 2-day retreat and completed surveys at five time intervals over 30 months. Descriptive statistics and correlations were used to analyze the data. Although sample sizes were too small to achieve statistical significance, changes on selected holistic health outcomes, supported by overwhelmingly positive focus group responses to the intervention, affirm the need for further study.

  19. A clinic-based youth development program to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent girls: prime time pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Renee E; Bernat, Debra H; Resnick, Michael D; Oliphant, Jennifer; Pettingell, Sandra; Plowman, Shari; Skay, Carol

    2012-07-01

    Multifaceted, sustained efforts are needed to reduce early pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases among high-risk adolescents. An important area for research is testing youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful and few efforts have rigorously evaluated a dual approach of building protective factors while addressing risk. This article presents findings from a pilot study of Prime Time, a clinic-based youth development intervention to reduce sexual risk behaviors among girls at risk for early pregnancy. Girls aged 13 to 17 years meeting specified risk criteria were assigned to Prime Time treatment groups. The Prime Time intervention included a combination of case management services and peer leadership groups. Participants completed self-report surveys at baseline, 12 and 18 months following enrollment. At 12 months, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sexual partners than the control group. At 18 months, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent condom use with trends toward more consistent hormonal and dual method use. Dose-response analyses suggested that relatively high levels of exposure to a youth development intervention were needed to change contraceptive use behaviors among adolescents at risk for early pregnancy. Given promising findings, further testing of the Prime Time intervention is warranted.

  20. Automated dialogue generation for behavior intervention on mobile devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fitrianie, S.; Griffioen-Both, F.; Spruit, S.; Lancee, J.; Beun, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Communication in the form of dialogues between a virtual coach and a human patient (coachee) is one of the pillars in an intervention app for smartphones. The virtual coach is considered as a cooperative partner that supports the individual with various exercises for a behavior intervention therapy.

  1. Using Data to Intensify Behavioral Interventions for Individual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Lee; Wehby, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    In an earlier article (EJ1058920), Lee Kern and Joseph H. Wehby identified the reasons and process for using adaptive intensive behavioral intervention. Kern and Wehby use this article to present a fictional example of how the intervention is applied. Isaac, a 12 year old, 7th grade student at Highland Middle School, had a history of behavior…

  2. Educational and Behavioral Interventions in Management of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Koyeli; Lobo, Leera; Krishnamurthy, Vibha

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) makes early recognition, evaluation and management an important task for pediatricians, physicians and other professionals caring for children. Educational interventions form the mainstay of management for children with autism spectrum disorder. Such interventions focus on improving social interaction, communication and challenging behaviors, thereby promoting learning and independence in children. This article provides an overview of educational and behavioral interventions in autism spectrum disorder, with special reference to challenges and feasible solutions in the Indian context. Articles were retrieved from various databases including Google Scholar, Medscape, Cochrane, PubMed using the search terms 'autism spectrum disorder OR autism AND educational interventions'; 'autism spectrum disorder OR autism, educational interventions AND India' and 'autism spectrum disorder OR autism AND India'. Reference lists from retrieved articles as well as websites of organizations working in this space in India were also searched. Extracted manuscripts were analysed for content related to various aspects of educational and behavioral interventions in autism spectrum disorder. Intervention models for autism spectrum disorder are based on various theoretical orientations and target specific deficits associated with the disorder. In addition, evidence-based principles for effective intervention are highlighted. In developing countries like India, access to interventions is a challenge and resources are limited. In such settings, the pediatrician's or physician's role is vital in supporting families choose programs that are evidence-based, target individual needs and result in improved outcomes.

  3. Emotion Acceptance Behavior Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Cheng, Yu; McCabe, Elizabeth B.; Gaskill, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy of Emotion Acceptance Behavior Therapy (EABT), an outpatient psychotherapeutic intervention for anorexia nervosa (AN) based on a disorder-specific model of symptom maintenance that emphasizes emotion avoidance. EABT combines standard behavioral interventions that are central to the clinical management of AN with evidence-supported strategies to increase emotion awareness, decrease emotion avoidance, and encourage resumption of valued activities and relationships outside the eating disorder. Method Twenty-four individuals aged ≥17 years with AN were treated using the EABT manual. EABT was delivered in 33–58 individual sessions provided over 38–53 weeks. Assessments were conducted before and after treatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Results Thirteen patients (54.2%) completed EABT; 11 (45.8%) dropped out or were withdrawn. EABT was associated with significant improvements in weight, disordered eating symptoms, and emotion avoidance that were maintained over 6-month follow-up. The majority of EABT completers achieved a body mass index >18.5 (n=9/13) or had a normal Eating Disorder Examination Global score (n=10/13) at post-treatment. Discussion Preliminary data suggest that EABT may have utility for a subset of adults with AN. Future research will focus on improving outcomes in EABT non-responders and identifying of mechanisms that drive treatment response. PMID:24407934

  4. The role of teacher behavior management in the development of disruptive behaviors: an intervention study with the good behavior game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflot, Geertje; van Lier, Pol A C; Onghena, Patrick; Colpin, Hilde

    2010-08-01

    The role of teacher behavior management for children's disruptive behavior development (hyperactive and oppositional behavior) was investigated using a universal classroom preventive intervention study. Five-hundred seventy children were followed from second to third grade of elementary school. Observations of teacher behavior management and children's on-task and off-task classroom behavior and peer reports of hyperactive and oppositional behavior were available. Results showed that the reduced use of negative remarks of intervention teachers predicted children's increase in on-task behavior and decrease in talking-out behavior. These improved children's classroom behaviors in turn mediated the impact of the intervention on the development of hyperactive and oppositional behavior over the studied period. These results were similar for girls and boys. The results underscore the role of teachers' classroom management strategies in improving children's classroom behavior, which, in turn is an important component in the reduction of disruptive behavior development.

  5. A telehealth behavioral coaching intervention for neurocognitive disorder family carers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, Judith R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the differential impact of two telehealth programs for women caring for an older adult with a neurocognitive disorder. Outcomes examined were depressive symptoms, upset following disruptive behaviors, anxious and angry mood states, and caregiving self‐efficacy. Methods Women cohabitating with a family member diagnosed with a neurocognitive disorder were assigned via random allocation to either of the following: (1) a 14‐week behavioral intervention using video instructional materials, workbook and telephone coaching in behavioral management, pleasant events scheduling, and relaxation or (2) a basic education guide and telephone support comparison condition. Telephone assessments were conducted by interviewers blind to treatment condition at pre‐intervention, post‐intervention, and 6 months following intervention. Results For those providing in‐home care at post‐treatment, depressive symptoms, upset following disruptive behaviors, and negative mood states were statistically lower in the behavioral coaching condition than in the basic education and support condition. Reliable change index analyses for Beck Depression Inventory II scores favored the behavioral coaching condition. Caregiving self‐efficacy scores for obtaining respite and for managing patient behavioral disturbances were significantly higher in the coaching condition. Effect sizes were moderate but not maintained at the 6‐month follow‐up. Conclusions This study provides some initial evidence for the efficacy of a telehealth behavioral coaching intervention compared with basic education and telephone support. Carers' abilities to maintain strategy use during progressive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease likely require longer intervention contact than provided in the current study. Dementia carers, including those living in rural areas, can benefit from accessible and empirically supported interventions that can be easily disseminated across distances

  6. A telehealth behavioral coaching intervention for neurocognitive disorder family carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Ann M; Gant, Judith R

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the differential impact of two telehealth programs for women caring for an older adult with a neurocognitive disorder. Outcomes examined were depressive symptoms, upset following disruptive behaviors, anxious and angry mood states, and caregiving self-efficacy. Women cohabitating with a family member diagnosed with a neurocognitive disorder were assigned via random allocation to either of the following: (1) a 14-week behavioral intervention using video instructional materials, workbook and telephone coaching in behavioral management, pleasant events scheduling, and relaxation or (2) a basic education guide and telephone support comparison condition. Telephone assessments were conducted by interviewers blind to treatment condition at pre-intervention, post-intervention, and 6 months following intervention. For those providing in-home care at post-treatment, depressive symptoms, upset following disruptive behaviors, and negative mood states were statistically lower in the behavioral coaching condition than in the basic education and support condition. Reliable change index analyses for Beck Depression Inventory II scores favored the behavioral coaching condition. Caregiving self-efficacy scores for obtaining respite and for managing patient behavioral disturbances were significantly higher in the coaching condition. Effect sizes were moderate but not maintained at the 6-month follow-up. This study provides some initial evidence for the efficacy of a telehealth behavioral coaching intervention compared with basic education and telephone support. Carers' abilities to maintain strategy use during progressive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease likely require longer intervention contact than provided in the current study. Dementia carers, including those living in rural areas, can benefit from accessible and empirically supported interventions that can be easily disseminated across distances at modest cost. © 2015 The Authors. International

  7. Implementation of Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Juanita Mathis

    2013-01-01

    Many teachers have expressed their concern about continuous classroom disruption. Time taken to correct undesired behaviors is reducing the number of instructional minutes in the classroom on a daily basis. Instead of relying solely on classroom rules, the teacher who wishes to implement Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports should use and…

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Interventions with Maltreated Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduyn, Chrissie; Calam, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of cognitive behavioral interventions with abused children and adolescents covers use of cognitive therapy with adults, therapeutic processes in cognitive therapy, involvement of parents and carers in cognitive behavioral therapy, and cognitive schema and maltreatment. Application is made to types of abuse (physical, emotional, sexual)…

  9. A Brief Social Skills Intervention to Reduce Challenging Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Bruhn, Allison L.; Troughton, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Social skills instruction has been recommended as a way of improving behavioral and social outcomes for students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). A brief social skills intervention ("Stop and Think" (Knoff in "The stop & think social skills program," Sopris West, Longmont, CO, 2001) was used to extend the…

  10. Teaching Effort and the Future of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.; Solari, Emily J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we discuss two impediments to widespread adoption and implementation of cognitive-behavioral intervention (CBI) procedures by teachers of students with behavior disorders. First, its principles can be difficult, even for researchers and other specialists. Second, despite ample demonstration that teachers can be taught CBI…

  11. Social Validity of a Positive Behavior Interventions and Support Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramontes, Nancy Y.; Marchant, Michelle; Heath, Melissa Allen; Fischer, Lane

    2011-01-01

    As more schools turn to positive behavior interventions and support (PBIS) to address students' academic and behavioral problems, there is an increased need to adequately evaluate these programs for social relevance. The present study used social validation measures to evaluate a statewide PBIS initiative. Active consumers of the program were…

  12. The Social Validity Assessment of Social Competence Intervention Behavior Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Jennifer J.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Feurer, Irene D.

    2010-01-01

    Social validation is the value judgment from society on the importance of a study. The social validity of behavior goals used in the social competence intervention literature was assessed using the Q-sort technique. The stimulus items were 80 different social competence behavior goals taken from 78 classroom-based social competence intervention…

  13. Longitudinal Outcomes of Functional Behavioral Assessment--Based Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Lee; Gallagher, Patricia; Starosta, Kristin; Hickman, Wesley; George, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A critical measure of intervention effectiveness is durability over time. Still, few studies have examined the long-term outcomes of support derived from a functional behavioral assessment as well as enablers and barriers that contribute to or impede successful outcomes. In the current study, a functional behavioral assessment was conducted with a…

  14. Changing energy-related behavior: An Intervention Mapping approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gerjo, E-mail: g.kok@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Work and Social Psychology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Lo, Siu Hing, E-mail: siu-hing.lo@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Work and Social Psychology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y., E-mail: gj.peters@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Work and Social Psychology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Ruiter, Robert A.C., E-mail: r.ruiter@maastrichtuniversity.nl [Department of Work and Social Psychology, Maastricht University, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    This paper's objective is to apply Intervention Mapping, a planning process for the systematic development of theory- and evidence-based health promotion interventions, to the development of interventions to promote energy conservation behavior. Intervention Mapping (IM) consists of six steps: needs assessment, program objectives, methods and applications, program development, planning for program implementation, and planning for program evaluation. Examples from the energy conservation field are provided to illustrate the activities associated with these steps. It is concluded that applying IM in the energy conservation field may help the development of effective behavior change interventions, and thus develop a domain specific knowledge-base for effective intervention design. - Highlights: > Intervention Mapping (IM) is a planning process for developing evidence-based interventions.> IM takes a problem-driven rather than theory-driven approach. > IM can be applied to the promotion of energy-conservation in a multilevel approach. > IM helps identifying determinants of behaviors and environmental conditions. > IM helps selecting appropriate theory-based methods and practical applications.

  15. Intervention Integrity in the Low Countries: Interventions Targeting Social-Emotional Behaviors in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Margot; Ekels, Elles; van der Valk, Cindel; van der Molen, Maurits

    2017-01-01

    The current study presents a review of intervention studies conducted in the Low Countries (i.e., The Netherlands and Flanders) focusing on social-emotional behaviors in the school. The primary purpose of this review was to assess whether studies included an operational definition of the intervention under study and reported data on the…

  16. The art and science of patient storytelling-harnessing narrative communication for behavioral interventions: the ACCE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Thomas K; Cherrington, Andrea; Coley, Heather L; Robinson, Kimberly M; Trobaugh, John A; Williams, Jessica H; Foster, Pamela H; Ford, Daniel E; Gerber, Ben S; Shewchuk, Richard M; Allison, Jeroan J

    2011-08-01

    Narrative communication is an emerging form of persuasive communication used in health education to solicit actual patient stories. Eliciting a narrative is an open-ended process and may or may not map to desired intervention objectives or underlying behavioral constructs. In addition, incorporating actual, unscripted narratives into multimedia interventions is challenging. The authors evaluated a protocol of editing narratives for a multimedia intervention to promote smoking cessation in the African American community that maintains fidelity to the original message and was related to behavioral constructs from social cognitive theory. The authors used four steps: (a) narrative collection (videotaping), (b) narrative review (rating of content), (c) narrative editing (documentary style), and (d) pilot testing (usability and assessment of transportation). The authors videotaped 50 personal smoking cessation narratives. After coding for presence of theoretical constructs, perceived risks of smoking (present in 53% of narratives) was the most common related behavioral construct. Four narratives were chosen for inclusion in the DVD. Pilot testing showed viewers reported high level of transportation into the narrative. The authors found that some behavioral constructs were rare and difficult to solicit in this population but that the final product was engaging to the viewers. Lessons learned may be useful for other video-based behavioral interventions that incorporate personal narratives.

  17. Behavioral Mediators of Weight Loss in Two Group-Based Behavioral Interventions in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruth, Meghan; Schlaff, Rebecca A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Understanding the mechanisms by which behavioral interventions exert their effects is important. Purpose: To examine behavioral mediators of weight loss in a sample of older adults participating in an evidence-based physical activity (PA) or nutrition intervention. Methods: Participants (n = 46) were randomized to a 12-week,…

  18. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Natalie V; Haas, Sarah M; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Willoughby, Michael T; Helseth, Sarah A; Crum, Kathleen I; Coles, Erika K; Pelham, William E

    2014-09-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits (i.e., lack of empathy, lack of guilt/lack of caring behaviors) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), whereas reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (Condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (Condition C), compared with a standard behavioral intervention (Condition A). Interventions were delivered through a summer treatment program over 7 weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of 11 children (7-11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low-punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the 7 weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed.

  19. Cognitive-behavioral group treatment for perinatal anxiety: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sheryl M; Haber, Erika; Frey, Benicio N; McCabe, Randi E

    2015-08-01

    Along with physical and biological changes, a tremendous amount of upheaval and adjustment accompany the pregnancy and postpartum period of a woman's life that together can often result in what is commonly known as postpartum depression. However, anxiety disorders have been found to be more frequent than depression during pregnancy and at least as common, if not more so, during the postpartum period, e.g., Brockington et al., (Archieves Women's Ment Health 9:253-263, 2006; Wenzel et al. (J Anxiety Disord, 19:295-311, 2005). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a well-established psychological treatment of choice for anxiety; however, few studies have specifically examined a cognitive-behavioral intervention targeting perinatal anxiety. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral group treatment (CBGT) program specifically tailored to address perinatal anxiety in 10 women who were either pregnant or within 12 months postpartum. Participants were recruited from a women's clinic at an academic hospital setting, with anxiety identified as their principal focus of distress. Following a diagnostic interview confirming a primary anxiety disorder and completion of assessment measures, participants completed a 6-week CBGT program. There was a statistically significant reduction in anxiety and depressive symptoms following the CBGT program (all p anxiety. These findings suggest that CBGT for perinatal anxiety is a promising treatment for both anxiety and depressive symptoms experienced during the perinatal period. Further studies are needed to evaluate the treatment efficacy through larger controlled trials.

  20. Behavioral economics: merging psychology and economics for lifestyle interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorgeirsson, Tryggvi; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    The field of behavioral economics combines psychology and economics to investigate how individuals actually behave as opposed to how they would behave if they were being perfectly rational (as in the sense of maximizing their utility). Although initial applications focused on consumer behavior, such as explaining why people failed to save adequately for retirement, the field has moved increasingly into the area of explaining health behaviors as well as the design of lifestyle interventions, such as weight loss and smoking-cessation programs. This article provides an overview of several important behavioral economics concepts of relevance to public health and health behavior change.

  1. Integrating alcohol response feedback in a brief intervention for young adult heavy drinkers who smoke: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridberg, Daniel J; Cao, Dingcai; King, Andrea C

    2015-10-01

    More effective approaches are needed to enhance drinking and other health behavior (e.g., smoking) outcomes of alcohol brief intervention (BI). Young adult heavy drinkers often engage in other health risk behaviors and show sensitivity to alcohol's stimulating and rewarding effects, which predicts future alcohol-related problems. However, standard alcohol BIs do not address these issues. The current pilot study tested the utility of including feedback on alcohol response phenotype to improve BI outcomes among young adult heavy drinkers who smoke (HDS). Thirty-three young adult (M±SD age=23.8±2.1 years) HDS (8.7±4.3 binge episodes/month; 23.6±6.3 smoking days/month) were randomly assigned to standard alcohol BI (BI-S; n=11), standard alcohol BI with personalized alcohol response feedback (BI-ARF; n=10), or a health behavior attention control BI (AC; n=11). Alcohol responses (stimulation, sedation, reward, and smoking urge) for the BI-ARF were recorded during a separate alcohol challenge session (.8g/kg). Outcomes were past-month drinking and smoking behavior assessed at 1- and 6-months post-intervention. At 6-month follow-up, the BI-ARF produced significant reductions in binge drinking, alcohol-smoking co-use, drinking quantity and frequency, and smoking frequency, but not maximum drinks per occasion, relative to baseline. Overall, the BI-ARF produced larger reductions in drinking/smoking behaviors at follow-up than did the BI-S or AC. Including personalized feedback on alcohol response phenotype may improve BI outcomes for young adult HDS. Additional research is warranted to enhance and refine this approach in a broader sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Statistical challenges in assessing potential efficacy of complex interventions in pilot or feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Duncan T; Walwyn, Rebecca Ea; Brown, Julia; Farrin, Amanda J; Brown, Sarah R

    2016-06-01

    Early phase trials of complex interventions currently focus on assessing the feasibility of a large randomised control trial and on conducting pilot work. Assessing the efficacy of the proposed intervention is generally discouraged, due to concerns of underpowered hypothesis testing. In contrast, early assessment of efficacy is common for drug therapies, where phase II trials are often used as a screening mechanism to identify promising treatments. In this paper, we outline the challenges encountered in extending ideas developed in the phase II drug trial literature to the complex intervention setting. The prevalence of multiple endpoints and clustering of outcome data are identified as important considerations, having implications for timely and robust determination of optimal trial design parameters. The potential for Bayesian methods to help to identify robust trial designs and optimal decision rules is also explored. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. A mindfulness-based intervention to control weight after bariatric surgery: Preliminary results from a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Sara A; Yeh, Gloria Y; Davis, Roger B; Wee, Christina C

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to develop and test a novel mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) designed to control weight after bariatric surgery. Randomized, controlled pilot trial. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. Bariatric patients 1-5 years post-surgery (n=18) were randomized to receive a 10-week MBI or a standard intervention. Primary outcomes were feasibility and acceptability of the MBI. Secondary outcomes included changes in weight, eating behaviors, psychosocial outcomes, and metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers. Qualitative exit interviews were conducted post-intervention. Major themes were coded and extracted. Attendance was excellent (6 of 9 patients attended ≥7 of 10 classes). Patients reported high satisfaction and overall benefit of the MBI. The intervention was effective in reducing emotional eating at 6 months (-4.9±13.7 in mindfulness vs. 6.2±28.4 in standard, p for between-group difference=0.03) but not weight. We also observed a significant increase in HbA1C (0.34±0.38 vs. -0.06±0.31, p=0.03). Objective measures suggested trends of an increase in perceived stress and symptoms of depression, although patients reported reduced stress reactivity, improved eating behaviors, and a desire for continued mindfulness-based support in qualitative interviews. This novel mindfulness-based approach is highly acceptable to bariatric patients post-surgery and may be effective for reducing emotional eating, although it did not improve weight or glycemic control in the short term. Longer-term studies of mindfulness-based approaches may be warranted in this population. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02603601. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Computer-Delivered Screening and Brief Intervention for Alcohol Use in Pregnancy: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondersma, Steven J.; Beatty, Jessica R.; Svikis, Dace S.; Strickler, Ronald C.; Tzilos, Golfo K.; Chang, Grace; Divine, W.; Taylor, Andrew R.; Sokol, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although screening and brief intervention (SBI) for unhealthy alcohol use has demonstrated efficacy in some trials, its implementation has been limited. Technology-delivered approaches are a promising alternative, particularly during pregnancy when the importance of alcohol use is amplified. The present trial evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of an interactive, empathic, video-enhanced, and computer-delivered SBI (e-SBI) plus three separate tailored mailings, and estimated intervention effects. Methods We recruited 48 pregnant women who screened positive for alcohol risk at an urban prenatal care clinic. Participants were randomly assigned to the e-SBI plus mailings or to a control session on infant nutrition, and were reevaluated during their postpartum hospitalization. The primary outcome was 90-day period-prevalence abstinence as measured by timeline follow-back interview. Results Participants rated the intervention as easy to use and helpful (4.7-5.0 on a 5-point scale). Blinded follow-up evaluation at childbirth revealed medium-size intervention effects on 90-day period prevalence abstinence (OR = 3.4); similarly, intervention effects on a combined healthy pregnancy outcome variable (live birth, normal birthweight, and no NICU stay) were also of moderate magnitude in favor of e-SBI participants (OR=3.3). As expected in this intentionally under-powered pilot trial, these effects were non-significant (p = .19 and .09, respectively). Conclusions This pilot trial demonstrated the acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a computer-delivered screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) plus tailored mailings for alcohol use in pregnancy. These findings mirror the promising results of other trials using a similar approach, and should be confirmed in a fully-powered trial. PMID:26010235

  5. Hypertension Education Intervention with Ugandan Nurses Working in Hospital Outpatient Clinic: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs pose a significant global burden in both developed and developing countries. It is estimated that, by 2025, 41.7% of males and 38.7% of females in Sub-Saharan Africa will develop high blood pressure (HBP. This is particularly true in Uganda with hypertensive prevalence rates estimated to range from 22.5% to 30.5%. Coupled with low levels of detection, treatment, and control, hypertension represents a Ugandan public health crisis. An innovative WHO-ISH education program culturally was adapted in a pilot study and focused on knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA of nurses caring for hypertensive patients in an outpatient clinic. Pre-post intervention data was collected and analyzed in which significant improvements were noted on all the three outcome measures. This pilot study demonstrated that nurses’ knowledge, skills, and attitudes could be significantly improved with a multimodal education program implemented in a low resource environment.

  6. Adolescents' preference for technology-based emergency department behavioral interventions: does it depend on risky behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Choo, Esther K; Spirito, Anthony; Mello, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) determine the prevalence of technology use and interest in technology-based interventions among adolescent emergency department patients and (2) examine the association between interest in an intervention and self-reported risky behaviors. Adolescents (age, 13-17 years) presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department completed a survey regarding baseline technology use, risky behaviors, and interest in and preferred format for behavioral health interventions. Questions were drawn from validated measures when possible. Descriptive statistics and χ2 tests were calculated to identify whether self-reported risky behaviors were differentially associated with intervention preference. Two hundred thirty-four patients (81.8% of eligible) consented to participate. Almost all used technology, including computers (98.7%), social networking (84.9%), and text messaging (95.1%). Adolescents reported high prevalence of risky behaviors as follows: unintentional injury (93.2%), peer violence exposure (29.3%), dating violence victimization (23.0%), depression or anxiety (30.0%), alcohol use (22.8%), drug use (36.1%), cigarette use (16.4%), and risky sexual behaviors (15.1%). Most were interested in receiving behavioral interventions (ranging from 93.6% interest in unintentional injury prevention, to 73.1% in smoking cessation); 45% to 93% preferred technology-based (vs in person, telephone call, or paper) interventions for each topic. Proportion interested in a specific topic and proportion preferring a technology-based intervention did not significantly differ by self-reported risky behaviors. Among this sample of adolescent emergency department patients, high rates of multiple risky behaviors are reported. Patients endorsed interest in receiving interventions for these behaviors, regardless of whether they reported the behavior. Most used multiple forms of technology, and approximately 50% preferred a technology-based intervention format.

  7. A pilot food store intervention in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittelsohn, Joel; Dyckman, William; Frick, Kevin D; Boggs, Malia K; Haberle, Heather; Alfred, Julia; Vastine, Amy; Palafox, Neal

    2007-09-01

    To improve diet and reduce risk for obesity and chronic disease, we developed, implemented and evaluated a pilot intervention trial with 23 large and small food stores in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (12 intervention, 11 control). The intervention included both mass media (radio announcements, newspaper ads, video) and in-store (cooking demonstrations, taste tests, shelf labeling) components. Consumer exposure to the mass media components was high (65% had heard half or more of the radio announcements, 74% had seen at least one of the newspaper ads). Consumer exposure to the in-store components of the intervention was moderate (61% attended at least one cooking demonstrations, 59% received at least one recipe card). After adjustment for age, sex and education level, increased exposure to the intervention was associated with higher diabetes knowledge (pbehaviors. The intervention was associated with increased purchasing of certain promoted foods (pfish, canned fruit and local vegetables. It was also associated with improvements in healthiness of cooking methods (pbehavioral factors relating to food choice and preparation, and may contribute to lessening the burden of diet-related chronic disease worldwide.

  8. Cognitive-behavioral Intervention for Older Hypertensive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René García Roche

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging-associated diseases contribute to morbidity and mortality in the population; therefore, it is necessary to develop intervention strategies to prevent and/or minimize their consequences. Objectives: to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral intervention aimed at older hypertensive patients treated in primary care in Cardenas and Santiago de Cuba municipalities during 2011-2013. Methods: an intervention study of older adults with hypertension was conducted in two municipalities: Santiago de Cuba and Cárdenas. The intervention group was composed of 399 older patients living in the catchment areas of the Carlos Juan Finlay and Héroes del Moncada polyclinics while the control group included 377 older adults served by the Julian Grimau and Jose Antonio Echeverría polyclinics. The intervention consisted of a systematic strategy to increase knowledge of the disease in order to change lifestyles. Results: in the intervention group, there were more patients with sufficient knowledge of the disease (OR: 1.82, greater control of hypertension (OR: 1.51 and better adherence to treatment (OR: 1.70. By modeling the explanatory variables with hypertension control, being in the intervention group (OR: 0.695 and adhering to treatment (OR: 0.543 were found to be health protective factors. Conclusion: the congnitive-behavioral intervention for older adults treated in primary care of the municipalities studied was effective in improving blood pressure control since it contributed to a greater adherence to treatment.

  9. JOINT MARKETING AS A FRAMEWORK FOR TARGETING MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN IN CHINA : A PILOT INTERVENTION STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Jingguang; Cai, Rui; Lu, Zuxun; Cheng, Jinquan; de Vlas, Sake J.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    To apply the joint marketing principle as a new intervention approach for targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) who are often difficult to reach in societies with discrimination towards homosexuality and HIV/AIDS. A pilot intervention according to the principles of joint marketing was carried ou

  10. Joint marketing as a framework for targeting men who have sex with men in China: A pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tan (Jingguang); R. Cai (Rui); Z. Lu (Zhongbing); J. Cheng (Jianguo); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTo apply the joint marketing principle as a new intervention approach for targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) who are often difficult to reach in societies with discrimination towards homosexuality and HIV/ AIDS. A pilot intervention according to the principles of joint marketing w

  11. A pilot study on early home-based intervention through an intelligent baby gym (CareToy) in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Bartalena, Laura; Cecchi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CareToy is an intelligent system, inspired by baby gyms, aimed to provide an intensive, individualized, home-based and family-centred early intervention (EI) program. AIMS: A pilot study was carried out to explore the feasibility of CareToy intervention in preterm infants, aged 3-9 mo...

  12. Joint marketing as a framework for targeting men who have sex with men in China: A pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tan (Jingguang); R. Cai (Rui); Z. Lu (Zhongbing); J. Cheng (Jianguo); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTo apply the joint marketing principle as a new intervention approach for targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) who are often difficult to reach in societies with discrimination towards homosexuality and HIV/ AIDS. A pilot intervention according to the principles of joint marketing

  13. JOINT MARKETING AS A FRAMEWORK FOR TARGETING MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN IN CHINA : A PILOT INTERVENTION STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Jingguang; Cai, Rui; Lu, Zuxun; Cheng, Jinquan; de Vlas, Sake J.; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    To apply the joint marketing principle as a new intervention approach for targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) who are often difficult to reach in societies with discrimination towards homosexuality and HIV/AIDS. A pilot intervention according to the principles of joint marketing was carried ou

  14. Joint marketing as a framework for targeting men who have sex with men in China: A pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tan (Jingguang); R. Cai (Rui); Z. Lu (Zhongbing); J. Cheng (Jianguo); S.J. de Vlas (Sake); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTo apply the joint marketing principle as a new intervention approach for targeting men who have sex with men (MSM) who are often difficult to reach in societies with discrimination towards homosexuality and HIV/ AIDS. A pilot intervention according to the principles of joint marketing w

  15. Behavioral economics strategies for promoting adherence to sleep interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia and continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnea are among the most efficacious sleep interventions. Unfortunately, adherence levels are disappointingly low for these interventions. Behavioral economics offers a promising framework for promoting adherence, often through relatively brief and straightforward strategies. The assumptions, goals, and key strategies of behavioral economics will be introduced. These strategies include providing social norms information, changing defaults, using the compromise effect, utilizing commitment devices, and establishing lottery-based systems. Then, this review will highlight specific behavioral economic approaches to promote patient adherence for three major sleep interventions: 1) behavioral treatment for pediatric insomnia, 2) cognitive-behavioral treatment for adult insomnia, and 3) continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea. Next, behavioral economic strategies will be discussed as ways to improve health care provider adherence to clinical practice guidelines regarding appropriate prescribing of hypnotics and ordering sleep-promoting practices for hospitalized inpatients. Finally, possible concerns that readers may have about behavioral economics strategies, including their efficacy, feasibility, and sustainability, will be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Brief Intervention Within Primary Care for At-Risk Gambling: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlin, Christina; Nyberg, Fred; Jess, Kari

    2016-12-01

    Studies on interventions for at-risk gambling are scarce. This pilot study is the first step in a larger project aimed to develop methods to prevent more serious gambling problems. Drawing on experiences from the alcohol field, the brief intervention (BI) model was tested in a primary care setting. Primary care personnel was trained for 2 days. Patients were screened, and those with signs of problematic gambling were offered a return visit to discuss their gambling habits. Of the 537 screened, 34 (6.3 %) screened positive for problem gambling. Of those, 24 were at-risk gamblers whereof 19 agreed to participate. Six of those 19 took part in a 1-month follow-up. Important information for the planning of upcoming studies was collected from the pilot work. Given that the rate of at-risk gamblers was elevated in this setting we consider primary care a suitable arena for intervention. Staff training and support appeared essential, and questionnaires should be selected that are clear and well-presented so staff feel secure and comfortable with them. The BI model was found to be most suitable for patients already known to the caregiver. The number of participants who were willing to take part in the follow-up was low. To ensure power in future studies, a much larger number of screened patients is evidently necessary.

  17. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  18. The Role of Teacher Behavior Management in the Development of Disruptive Behaviors: An Intervention Study with the Good Behavior Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leflot, Geertje; van Lier, Pol A. C.; Onghena, Patrick; Colpin, Hilde

    2010-01-01

    The role of teacher behavior management for children's disruptive behavior development (hyperactive and oppositional behavior) was investigated using a universal classroom preventive intervention study. Five-hundred seventy children were followed from second to third grade of elementary school. Observations of teacher behavior management and…

  19. A Pilot Study of Training and Compensation Interventions for Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Konsztowicz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This pilot clinical trial sought to estimate the feasibility and efficacy of two interventions aimed at improving memory performance in geriatric clinic patients with mild cognitive impairment. Methods: Fifteen participants were randomized to either a memory training group or a memory compensation group. Results: Recruitment rates were low, whereas adherence and retention rates were acceptable. The memory training group improved in self-reported memory abilities and satisfaction with memory. The memory compensation group improved on one objective memory test but showed no consistent changes on any other outcomes. Conclusion: Effect size estimates will inform the design of larger clinical trials.

  20. COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION FOR PTSD IN COLOMBIAN COMBAT VETERANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLINA BOTERO GARCÍA

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of cognitive-behavioral group interventions applied from 2002 to 2004 to 42 colombian combat veteranswith Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD are presented. The goal of the study was to stablish the effectiveness ofthe group interventions based in Prolonged Exposition and Stress Inoculation treatment processes. Differencesbetween pre-in-post symptomatology scores of PTSD were measured by Foa Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale(PDS and the Beck Depression Inventory. The statistical analysis was made by t test for paired samples, with alpha of0.05. Results show significant decrease in symptomatology and severity level after the intervention both in depressionand PTSD symptoms.

  1. Comparison of behavioral intervention and sensory-integration therapy in the treatment of challenging behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Sarah; Healy, Olive; Leader, Geraldine; Hughes, Brian M

    2011-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of sensory-integration therapy (SIT) and a behavioral intervention on rates of challenging behavior (including self-injurious behavior) in four children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. For each of the participants a functional assessment was conducted to identify the variables maintaining challenging behavior. Results of these assessments were used to design function-based behavioral interventions for each participant. Recommendations for the sensory-integration treatment were designed by an Occupational Therapist, trained in the use of sensory-integration theory and techniques. The sensory-integration techniques were not dependent on the results of the functional assessments. The study was conducted within an alternating treatments design, with initial baseline and final best treatment phase. For each participant, results demonstrated that the behavioral intervention was more effective than the sensory integration therapy in the treatment of challenging behavior. In the best treatment phase, the behavioral intervention alone was implemented and further reduction was observed in the rate of challenging behavior. Analysis of saliva samples revealed relatively low levels of cortisol and very little stress-responsivity across the SIT condition and the behavioral intervention condition, which may be related to the participants' capacity to perceive stress in terms of its social significance.

  2. Behavior Basics: Quick Behavior Analysis and Implementation of Interventions for Classroom Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shanon S.

    2011-01-01

    Dealing with student behavior is often cited as one of the most frustrating aspects of teaching, yet many classroom teachers receive no pre-service training in the basics of behavior management. This article describes the process of implementing a quick behavioral analysis for the purpose of designing a basic intervention. It will provide general…

  3. Pilot Study Results from a Brief Intervention to Create Smoke-Free Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Kegler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Very few community-based intervention studies have examined how to effectively increase the adoption of smoke-free homes. A pilot study was conducted to test the feasibility, acceptability, and short-term outcomes of a brief, four-component intervention for promoting smoke-free home policies among low-income households. We recruited forty participants (20 smokers and 20 nonsmokers to receive the intervention at two-week intervals. The design was a pretest-posttest with follow-up at two weeks after intervention. The primary outcome measure was self-reported presence of a total home smoking ban. At follow-up, 78% of participants reported having tried to establish a smoke-free rule in their home, with significantly more nonsmokers attempting a smoke-free home than smokers (P=.03. These attempts led to increased smoking restrictions, that is, going from no ban to a partial or total ban, or from a partial to a total ban, in 43% of the homes. At follow-up, 33% of the participants reported having made their home totally smoke-free. Additionally, smokers reported smoking fewer cigarettes per day. Results suggest that the intervention is promising and warrants a rigorous efficacy trial.

  4. Make Your Work Matter: development and pilot evaluation of a purpose-centered career education intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Bryan J; Steger, Michael F; Gibson, Amanda; Peisner, William

    2011-01-01

    Developing a sense of purpose is both salient and desirable for adolescents, and purpose in people's lives and careers is associated with both general and work-related well-being. However, little is known about whether purpose can be encouraged through school-based interventions. This article reports the results of a quasi-experimental pilot study and follow-up focus group that evaluated Make Your Work Matter, a three-module, school-based intervention designed to help adolescent youth explore, discover, and enact a sense of purpose in their early career development. Participants were eighth-grade students. Compared to the control group, the intervention group reported increases in several outcomes related to purpose-centered career development, such as a clearer sense of career direction; a greater understanding of their interests, strengths, and weaknesses; and a greater sense of preparedness for the future. However, no significant differences were found on items directly related to purpose, calling, and prosocial attitudes. These results inform the ongoing development of Make Your Work Matter and other school-based career interventions and pave the way for larger-scale trials of such purpose-promoting intervention strategies.

  5. A Positive Affect Intervention for People Experiencing Health-Related Stress: Development and Non-randomized Pilot Test

    OpenAIRE

    Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie; Hult, Jen R.; Duncan, Larissa G.; Cohn, Michael A.; Maurer, Stephanie; Bussolari, Cori; Acree, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present background, theoretical rationale, and pilot data on the development of an intervention designed to increase positive affect in people living with serious health-related stress. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a multiple-component positive affect intervention is feasible and acceptable for people newly diagnosed with HIV. Retention in the intervention and adherence to home practice were high. Participants reported significant increases in positive affect...

  6. Integrating a Nurse-Midwife-Led Oral Health Intervention Into CenteringPregnancy Prenatal Care: Results of a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sally H; Gregorich, Steven E; Rising, Sharon S; Hutchison, Margaret; Chung, Lisa H

    2017-07-01

    National and professional organizations recommend oral health promotion in prenatal care to improve women's oral health. However, few prenatal programs include education about oral health promotion. The objective of this study was to determine if women receiving a brief, low-cost, and sustainable educational intervention entitled CenteringPregnancy Oral Health Promotion had clinically improved oral health compared to women receiving standard CenteringPregnancy care. Women attending CenteringPregnancy, a group prenatal care model, at 4 health centers in the San Francisco Bay Area, participated in this nonrandomized controlled pilot study in 2010 to 2011. The intervention arm received the CenteringPregnancy Oral Health Promotion intervention consisting of two 15-minute skills-based educational modules addressing maternal and infant oral health, each module presented in a separate CenteringPregnancy prenatal care session. The present analysis focused on the maternal module that included facilitated discussions and skills-building activities including proper tooth brushing. The control arm received standard CenteringPregnancy prenatal care. Dental examinations and questionnaires were administered prior to and approximately 9 weeks postintervention. Primary outcomes included the Plaque Index, percent bleeding on probing, and percent of gingival pocket depths 4 mm or greater. Secondary outcomes were self-reported oral health knowledge, attitudes (importance and self-efficacy), and behaviors (tooth brushing and flossing). Regression models tested whether pre to post changes in outcomes differed between the intervention versus the control arms. One hundred and one women participated in the study; 49 were in the intervention arm, and 52 were in the control arm. The control and intervention arms did not vary significantly at baseline. Significant pre to post differences were noted between the arms with significant improvements in the intervention arm for the Plaque Index

  7. Review of AIDS Health Education and Behavioral Interventions in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yumao(蔡于茂); ZENG Xuchun(曾序春); DONG Shifu(董时富)

    2002-01-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) isan infectious disease caused by HIV. It has been epidemic formore than 20 years, but there is no cure of it. Health educationand behavioral interventions are some of the most effectiveapproaches in the control and prevention of AIDS. China isone of the countries with the fastest growing HIVseroprevalence rate, and is facing a widespread epidemic ofAIDS. Currently, high-risk populations such as individualswith multiple sexual partners and intravenous drug users arethe main foci of health education and behavioral interventionsin China. Encouraging results have been observed in manyforms of health education and behavioral intervention. Theapplication of health education and behavioral interventionsmust emerge from scientific evidence, follow a series ofstrategies, be carried out from various perspectives, andrequire the participation of all societal communities.

  8. A pilot randomized trial of two cognitive rehabilitation interventions for mild cognitive impairment: caregiver outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuc, Andrea V; Locke, Dona E C; Duncan, Noah; Fields, Julie A; Snyder, Charlene Hoffman; Hanna, Sherrie; Lunde, Angela; Smith, Glenn E; Chandler, Melanie

    2017-02-24

    This study aims to provide effect size estimates of the impact of two cognitive rehabilitation interventions provided to patients with mild cognitive impairment: computerized brain fitness exercise and memory support system on support partners' outcomes of depression, anxiety, quality of life, and partner burden. A randomized controlled pilot trial was performed. At 6 months, the partners from both treatment groups showed stable to improved depression scores, while partners in an untreated control group showed worsening depression over 6 months. There were no statistically significant differences on anxiety, quality of life, or burden outcomes in this small pilot trial; however, effect sizes were moderate, suggesting that the sample sizes in this pilot study were not adequate to detect statistical significance. Either form of cognitive rehabilitation may help partners' mood, compared with providing no treatment. However, effect size estimates related to other partner outcomes (i.e., burden, quality of life, and anxiety) suggest that follow-up efficacy trials will need sample sizes of at least 30-100 people per group to accurately determine significance. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Disseminating ASD interventions: a pilot study of a distance learning program for parents and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainer, Allison L; Ingersoll, Brooke R

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for the adaptation of training in evidence-based interventions to non-traditional methods, particularly for individuals working with children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). An internet-based self-directed distance learning program was created to teach reciprocal imitation training, a naturalistic behavioral intervention aimed at increasing imitation in children with ASD. A single-subject multiple-baseline design study evaluated the effect of the program on changes in therapist (sample 1) and parent (sample 2) knowledge and behavior, and changes in child behavior. Adult participants improved their knowledge and use of the intervention techniques, and child participants improved their rates of imitation. Results suggest that a self-directed distance learning program may be effective for disseminating evidence-based practices to individuals working with children with ASD.

  10. Pilot Testing an Internet-Based STI and HIV Prevention Intervention With Chilean Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Natalia; Santisteban, Daniel; Cianelli, Rosina; Ferrer, Lilian; Ambrosia, Todd; Peragallo, Nilda; Lara, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is high among young Chilean women, and there are no STI or HIV prevention interventions available to them that incorporate technology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the preliminary efficacy of an Internet-based STI and HIV prevention intervention (I-STIPI) for Chilean young women on measures of STI- and HIV-related information, motivation, behavioral skills, and preventive behaviors. Design This is a pretest-posttest study. Forty young Chilean women between 18 and 24 years of age participated in an investigation of the I-STIPI’s preliminary efficacy on STI and HIV prevention-related outcomes between baseline and a postintervention assessment. The intervention consisted of four online modules. Data collection was conducted in Santiago, Chile. Paired-samples t test analysis was used to determine whether there were significant differences in each of the outcome variables. Findings After receiving I-STIPI, women reported a significant increase in levels of STI- and HIV-related knowledge, attitudes toward the use of condoms and perceived self-efficacy, and a reduction of risky sexual behaviors with uncommitted partners. Conclusions The I-STIPI showed promise as an Internet-based intervention that can reduce barriers to accessing preventive interventions and increase STI and HIV preventive behaviors in young Chilean women. Clinical Relevance The study provided important information about the ability of an Internet-based intervention to reduce young women’s risk factors and to provide positive preliminary efficacy on STI- and HIV-related outcomes. Internet-based interventions can eliminate many barriers to receiving prevention interventions and may prove to be cost effective. PMID:25410132

  11. Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change: background and intervention development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Polly

    2009-01-01

    An essential characteristic of advanced practice nurses is the use of theory in practice. Clinical nurse specialists apply theory in providing or directing patient care, in their work as consultants to staff nurses, and as leaders influencing and facilitating system change. Knowledge of technology and pharmacology has far outpaced knowledge of how to facilitate health behavior change, and new theories are needed to better understand how practitioners can facilitate health behavior change. In this article, the Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change is described, and an example of its use as foundation to intervention development is presented. The Integrated Theory of Health Behavior Change suggests that health behavior change can be enhanced by fostering knowledge and beliefs, increasing self-regulation skills and abilities, and enhancing social facilitation. Engagement in self-management behaviors is seen as the proximal outcome influencing the long-term distal outcome of improved health status. Person-centered interventions are directed to increasing knowledge and beliefs, self-regulation skills and abilities, and social facilitation. Using a theoretical framework improves clinical nurse specialist practice by focusing assessments, directing the use of best-practice interventions, and improving patient outcomes. Using theory fosters improved communication with other disciplines and enhances the management of complex clinical conditions by providing holistic, comprehensive care.

  12. A Positive Psychology Intervention in a Hindu Community: The Pilot Study of the Hero Lab Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Siddhi; Qureshi, Adil; Galiatsatos, Panagis

    2016-12-01

    India has high rates of mental health issues among its youth and low-income communities experience a disproportionate amount of depression and suicide. Positive psychology, the act of promoting well-being, could be used as a tool to promote wellness and help improve the mental health of youth living in slum areas of India. A pilot positively psychology program, "The Hero Lab", was conducted in a migratory slum in Worli, Mumbai, with trained Hindu community leaders implementing the interventions toward at-risk Hindu youth. The curriculum's impact showed statistical improvement (p < 0.001) in happiness (General Happiness Scale from 11.24 ± 1.56 to 19.08 ± 3.32), grit (Grit Survey from 2.23 ± 0.34 to 3.24 ± 0.67), empathy (Toronto Empathy Questionnaire from 24.92 ± 3.27 to 41.96 ± 8.41), and gratitude (Gratitude Survey from 16.88 ± 3.47 to 27.98 ± 6.59). While a pilot study, the Hero Lab curriculum demonstrates that positive psychology interventions may be an important tool in improving mental health in at-risk children.

  13. Understanding and Promoting Effective Engagement With Digital Behavior Change Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Lucy; Spring, Bonnie J; Riper, Heleen; Morrison, Leanne G; Crane, David H; Curtis, Kristina; Merchant, Gina C; Naughton, Felix; Blandford, Ann

    2016-11-01

    This paper is one in a series developed through a process of expert consensus to provide an overview of questions of current importance in research into engagement with digital behavior change interventions, identifying guidance based on research to date and priority topics for future research. The first part of this paper critically reflects on current approaches to conceptualizing and measuring engagement. Next, issues relevant to promoting effective engagement are discussed, including how best to tailor to individual needs and combine digital and human support. A key conclusion with regard to conceptualizing engagement is that it is important to understand the relationship between engagement with the digital intervention and the desired behavior change. This paper argues that it may be more valuable to establish and promote "effective engagement," rather than simply more engagement, with "effective engagement" defined empirically as sufficient engagement with the intervention to achieve intended outcomes. Appraisal of the value and limitations of methods of assessing different aspects of engagement highlights the need to identify valid and efficient combinations of measures to develop and test multidimensional models of engagement. The final section of the paper reflects on how interventions can be designed to fit the user and their specific needs and context. Despite many unresolved questions posed by novel and rapidly changing technologies, there is widespread consensus that successful intervention design demands a user-centered and iterative approach to development, using mixed methods and in-depth qualitative research to progressively refine the intervention to meet user requirements.

  14. Mystery Motivator: A Tier 1 Classroom Behavioral Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz, Eva A.; Coffee, Gina

    2014-01-01

    This study is an examination of the effectiveness of the Mystery Motivator--an interdependent group contingency, variable-ratio, classwide intervention--as a tool for reducing disruptive classroom behavior in eight diverse general-education elementary school classrooms across seven different schools. The study was conducted using an ABAB, changing…

  15. Improving Breastfeeding Behaviors: Evidence from Two Decades of Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Cynthia P.

    This report summarizes research on interventions intended to improve four key breastfeeding behaviors: early initiation of breastfeeding, feeding of colostrum to newborns, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 0-6 months, and continued breastfeeding through the second year and beyond. It clarifies what is known about improving these practices in…

  16. Modeling Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports for Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Doris Adams; Flores, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    The authors modeled programwide positive behavior interventions and supports (PBIS) principles to 26 preservice teachers during consolidated yearly extended school year (ESY) services delivered to elementary students from four school districts. While PBIS were in place for preservice teachers to implement with students, a similar system was…

  17. Mystery Motivator: A Tier 1 Classroom Behavioral Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewicz, Eva A.; Coffee, Gina

    2014-01-01

    This study is an examination of the effectiveness of the Mystery Motivator--an interdependent group contingency, variable-ratio, classwide intervention--as a tool for reducing disruptive classroom behavior in eight diverse general-education elementary school classrooms across seven different schools. The study was conducted using an ABAB, changing…

  18. Pilot randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness-based group intervention in adolescent girls at risk for type 2 diabetes with depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B; Bruggink, Stephanie; Pivarunas, Bernadette; Skoranski, Amanda; Foss, Jillian; Chaffin, Ella; Dalager, Stephanie; Annameier, Shelly; Quaglia, Jordan; Brown, Kirk Warren; Broderick, Patricia; Bell, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    (1) Evaluate feasibility and acceptability of a mindfulness-based group in adolescent girls at-risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) with depressive symptoms, and (2) compare efficacy of a mindfulness-based versus cognitive-behavioral group for decreasing depressive symptoms and improving insulin resistance. Parallel-group, randomized controlled pilot trial conducted at a university. Thirty-three girls 12-17y with overweight/obesity, family history of diabetes, and elevated depressive symptoms were randomized to a six-week mindfulness-based (n=17) or cognitive-behavioral program (n=16). Both interventions included six, one-hour weekly group sessions. The mindfulness-based program included guided mindfulness awareness practices. The cognitive-behavioral program involved cognitive restructuring and behavioral activation. Adolescents were evaluated at baseline, post-intervention, and six-months. Feasibility/acceptability were measured by attendance and program ratings. Depressive symptoms were assessed by validated survey. Insulin resistance was determined from fasting insulin and glucose, and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to assess body composition. Most adolescents attended ≥80% sessions (mindfulness: 92% versus cognitive-behavioral: 87%, p=1.00). Acceptability ratings were strong. At post-treatment and six-months, adolescents in the mindfulness condition had greater decreases in depressive symptoms than adolescents in the cognitive-behavioral condition (psmindfulness-based intervention also had greater decreases in insulin resistance and fasting insulin at post-treatment, adjusting for fat mass and other covariates (psmindfulness-based intervention shows feasibility and acceptability in girls at-risk for T2D with depressive symptoms. Compared to a cognitive-behavioral program, after the intervention, adolescents who received mindfulness showed greater reductions in depressive symptoms and better insulin resistance. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02218138

  19. Can theoretical intervention improve hand hygiene behavior among nurses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baghaei R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rahim Baghaei,1 Elham Sharifian,1 Aziz Kamran2 1Inpatient Safety Research Center, Nursing and Midwifery School, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, 2Public Health Department, Khalkhal Faculty of Medical Sciences, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, IranBackground: Hand washing is the best strategy to prevent known nosocomial infections but the nurses' hand hygiene is estimated to be poor in Iran.Objective: This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of BASNEF (Behavior, Attitude, Subjective Norms, and Enabling Factors model on hand hygiene adherence education.Methods: This controlled quasi-experimental study was conducted on 70 hemodialysis unit nurses (35 case and 35 control in the health and educational centers of the University of Medical Sciences of Urmia, Iran. To collect the data, a six-part validated and reliable questionnaire was used. The data were analyzed using SPSS version18, using Wilcoxon, Mann–Whitney, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. The significance level was considered P<0.05.Results: The mean age was 38.4±8.1 years for the intervention group and 40.2±8.0 years for the control group. There was no significant difference between the two groups for any demographic variables. Also, before the intervention, there was no significant difference between the two groups for any components of the BASNEF model. Post-intervention, the attitude, subjective norms, enabling factors, and intention improved significantly in the intervention group (P<0.001, but hand hygiene behavior did not show any significant change in the intervention group (P=0.16.Conclusion: Despite the improving attitudes and intention, the intervention had no significant effect on hand hygiene behavior among the studied nurses.Keywords: hand hygiene, adherence, education nurse, behavior

  20. Using Video Conferencing to Deliver a Brief Motivational Intervention for Alcohol and Sex Risk to Emergency Department Patients: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celio, Mark A; Mastroleo, Nadine R; DiGuiseppi, Graham; Barnett, Nancy P; Colby, Suzanne M; Kahler, Christopher W; Operario, Don; Suffoletto, Brian; Monti, Peter M

    2017-01-01

    Brief motivational intervention (MI) is an efficacious approach to reduce heavy drinking and associated sexual risk behavior among Emergency Department (ED) patients, but the intensity of demands placed on ED staff makes the implementation of in-person MIs logistically challenging. This proof-of-concept pilot study examined the acceptability and logistic feasibility of using video-conferencing technology to deliver an MI targeting heavy drinking and risky sexual behavior to patients in an ED setting. Rigorous screening procedures were employed to ensure that the pilot sample represents the target portion of ED patients who would benefit from this multi-target MI. Mixed qualitative and quantitative data from a sample of seven ED patients (57% Female; Mage = 35 years) who received MI by video conference consistently demonstrated high levels of satisfaction, engagement, and acceptability. The observed completion rate supports logistic feasibility, and patient feedback identified methods to improve the experience by using high-definition hardware, ensuring stronger network connectivity, and effectively communicating information regarding protection of privacy. Post-intervention patient ratings and independent ratings of the audio-recorded sessions (using the Motivational Interviewing Skills Coding system) were very high, suggesting that intervention fidelity and MI adherence was not compromised by delivery modality. Collectively, these data suggest video conferencing is a viable technology that can be employed to implement brief evidence-based MIs in ED settings.

  1. Impact of health education intervention on food safety and hygiene of street vendors: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ansk Kumar; Dudeja, Puja; Kaushal, Nitin; Mukherji, Sandip

    2016-07-01

    Street foods are major source of food to millions of people. However, these are frequently associated with food-borne illnesses. It is imperative that street food vendors are educated to maintain hygiene and hence safety of food. With this background, a pilot study was undertaken to assess the impact of health education intervention on food safety and hygiene of street vendors. The aim of this study was to assess impact of health education intervention on food safety of street vendors. It was a before and after study conducted in twenty street vendors of an urban area. Tool based on Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS) 2012 was prepared with scoring system to rate hygiene and sanitation of street vendors (score 0-156). Health education was given to all and scores of these vendors on same tool were reassessed after four weeks. Mean age of the study subjects was 35 ± 13.2 years. Highest score attained in BIS tool for food safety was 104 out of 156 (66.6%). No vendor was found to have achieved excellent score. Reasons for poor score were poor condition of vending cart, location, lack personal hygiene and incorrect and unsafe food handling practices. After intervention, it was observed that there was no significant improvement in overall score of vendors. However, scores in domains of personal habits, hygiene and food handling practices improved significantly after intervention (p safety. Health education alone can only partly improve food safety practices of street vendors.

  2. Pilot study of a self-administered stress management and exercise intervention during chemotherapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rick W; Taliaferro, Lindsay A; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2006-09-01

    This pilot project explored the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of a self-administered exercise and stress management intervention for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Thirty-nine of 56 eligible patients (acceptance =69%) with a variety of solid tumors volunteered for the study. Participants were advised to exercise 20-40 min at 50-75% estimated heart rate reserve 3-5 times per week. In addition, patients were provided with instruction and written materials regarding stress management techniques. Follow-up data were collected during regularly scheduled outpatient visits at the start of the second, third, and fourth chemotherapy cycles using diary entries and the same questionnaires previously administered at baseline. Twenty-four of 39 patients (62%) completed all study requirements. These participants completed 438 of the 678 exercise sessions assigned (adherence =62%). Of the stress management techniques, positive thinking most practiced most frequently (48%), followed by deep breathing (38%) and active relaxation (37%). Paired t tests, comparing baseline values with final recorded values, indicated a significant improvement over time in bodily pain (p<0.03) and mental health (p<0.04) subscale scores. Participants' evaluations of the combined intervention were favorable: 90% felt it was helpful to them and 100% would recommend it to another patient. A self-administered intervention combining aerobic exercise and stress management was acceptable and safe for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Preliminary data demonstrating intervention efficacy should be confirmed in subsequent randomized clinical trials.

  3. Implicit Processes, Self-Regulation, and Interventions for Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Quinton, Tom; Brunton, Julie A.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to regulate and subsequently change behavior is influenced by both reflective and implicit processes. Traditional theories have focused on conscious processes by highlighting the beliefs and intentions that influence decision making. However, their success in changing behavior has been modest with a gap between intention and behavior apparent. Dual-process models have been recently applied to health psychology; with numerous models incorporating implicit processes that influence behavior as well as the more common conscious processes. Such implicit processes are theorized to govern behavior non-consciously. The article provides a commentary on motivational and volitional processes and how interventions have combined to attempt an increase in positive health behaviors. Following this, non-conscious processes are discussed in terms of their theoretical underpinning. The article will then highlight how these processes have been measured and will then discuss the different ways that the non-conscious and conscious may interact. The development of interventions manipulating both processes may well prove crucial in successfully altering behavior.

  4. A childhood obesity intervention developed by families for families: results from a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison Kirsten K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ineffective family interventions for the prevention of childhood obesity have, in part, been attributed to the challenges of reaching and engaging parents. With a particular focus on parent engagement, this study utilized community-based participatory research to develop and pilot test a family-centered intervention for low-income families with preschool-aged children enrolled in Head Start. Methods During year 1 (2009–2010, parents played an active and equal role with the research team in planning and conducting a community assessment and using the results to design a family-centered childhood obesity intervention. During year 2 (2010–2011, parents played a leading role in implementing the intervention and worked with the research team to evaluate its results using a pre-post cohort design. Intervention components included: (1 revisions to letters sent home to families reporting child body mass index (BMI; (2 a communication campaign to raise parents’ awareness of their child’s weight status; (3 the integration of nutrition counseling into Head Start family engagement activities; and (4 a 6-week parent-led program to strengthen parents’ communication skills, conflict resolution, resource-related empowerment for healthy lifestyles, social networks, and media literacy. A total of 423 children ages 2–5 years, from five Head Start centers in upstate New York, and their families were exposed to the intervention and 154 families participated in its evaluation. Child outcome measures included BMI z-score, accelerometer-assessed physical activity, and dietary intake assessed using 24-hour recall. Parent outcomes included food-, physical activity- and media-related parenting practices and attitudes. Results Compared with pre intervention, children at post intervention exhibited significant improvements in their rate of obesity, light physical activity, daily TV viewing, and dietary intake (energy and macronutrient intake

  5. A post cardiac surgery intervention to manage delirium involving families: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailhot, Tanya; Cossette, Sylvie; Côté, José; Bourbonnais, Anne; Côté, Marie-Claude; Lamarche, Yoan; Denault, André

    2017-07-01

    As many delirium manifestations (e.g., hallucinations or fears) are linked to patients' experiences and personality traits, it is suggested that interventions should be tailored to optimize its management. The inclusion of family members, as part of an intervention, has recently emerged as a solution to developing individualised patient care, but has never been assessed in post-cardiac surgery intensive care unit where almost half of patients will present with delirium. To assess the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of an nursing intervention involving family caregivers (FC) in delirium management following cardiac surgery. A randomized pilot study. A total of 30 patient/FC dyads were recruited and randomized to usual care (n = 14) or intervention (n = 16). The intervention was based on the Human Caring Theory, a mentoring model, and sources informing self-efficacy. It comprised seven planned encounters spread over 3 days between an intervention nurse and the FC, each including a 30-min visit at the patient's bedside. During this bedside visit, the FC used delirium management strategies, e.g. reorient the person with delirium. The primary indicator of acceptability was to obtain consent from 75% of approached FCs. The preliminary effect of the intervention on patient outcomes was assessed on (1) delirium severity using the Delirium Index, (2) occurrence of complications, such as falls, (3) length of postoperative hospital stay and (4) psycho-functional recovery using the Sickness Impact Profile. The preliminary effect on FC outcomes was assessed on FC anxiety and self-efficacy. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, ANCOVAs and logistic regressions. The primary indicator of obtaining consent from FC was achieved (77%). Of the 14 dyads, thirteen (93%) dyads received all seven encounters planned in the experimental intervention. Intervention group patients presented better psycho-functional recovery scores when compared with

  6. Pilot study: understanding the effects of voicing intervention on HFCC therapy in people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wha Jung; Braverman, Jane; Lee, Yong Wan; Hansen, Leland; Nozzarella, Mario

    2009-07-01

    The efficacy of High-Frequency Chest Compression (HFCC) airway clearance therapy is linked to the induced-peak expiratory airflow pulse (IPEF) at the patient's mouth. The authors' goal was to determine the conditions that yield the highest IPEF using HFCC running at 6Hz in conjunction with voicing intervention. A pilot experimental study was conducted in a laboratory setting. Six adults with moderate to mild cystic fibrosis (CF) and 10 healthy adults participated. When the component characteristics of voicing were disregarded in data analysis of four conditions, voicing only intervention (V(1)I(0)), HFCC only intervention (V(0)I(1)), voicing intervention and HFCC intervention combinations (V(1)I(1)) and nonintervention (V(0)I(0)), V(0)I(1) had significantly higher (PHFCC intervention (V(1)I(0) and V(1)I(1)), were examined. One condition in V(1)I(0) had significantly higher (P<0.000001) IPEF than other conditions in V(1)I(0) and V(1)I(1) in both experimental and control groups. Based on these findings, V(1)I(1) may yield higher IPEF than V(0)I(1). One condition of amplitude component of voicing and one condition of rhythm component of voicing had significantly higher (P<0.0001) IPEF than other conditions of amplitude and rhythm components in both CF and control subjects. Analysis of this combined condition of V(1)I(1) showed that this specific condition of V(1)I(1) had significantly higher (P<0.000001) IPEF than any other conditions in V(1)I(1) and V(0)I(1).

  7. LA Sprouts: a garden-based nutrition intervention pilot program influences motivation and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Nicole M; Ventura, Emily E; Cook, Lauren T; Gyllenhammer, Lauren E; Davis, Jaimie N

    2012-06-01

    Garden-based approaches to nutrition education may be effective for improving nutrition habits in adolescents. A quasi-experimental, garden-based intervention for Latino youth (LA Sprouts) was piloted and assessed for its influence on behavior associated with dietary intake and psychosocial factors. Study participants were 104 predominately Latino fourth and fifth grade students in Los Angeles (mean age, 9.8±0.7 years; n=70 control subjects, n=34 LA Sprouts participants); more than half (n=61, 59.8%) were overweight or obese (body mass index ≥85th percentile). LA Sprouts participants received an intervention of weekly 90-minute culturally tailored, interactive classes for 12 consecutive weeks at a community garden during the spring of 2010; control participants received an abbreviated delayed intervention. Questionnaire data were obtained before and after the intervention. Compared with control subjects, LA Sprouts participants had an increased preference for vegetables overall, increased preferences for three target fruits and vegetables, as well as improved perceptions that "vegetables from the garden taste better than vegetables from the store." In the overweight/obese subgroup (n=61), LA Sprouts participants had a 16% greater increase in their preference for vegetables compared with control subjects (P=0.009). Results from this pilot study suggest that a cooking, nutrition, and gardening after-school program in a garden-based setting can improve attitudes and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth, which may lead to improved nutritional habits and dietary intake and reduced health disparities.

  8. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Recurrent Binge Eating in Adolescent Girls: A Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBar, Lynn L.; Wilson, G. Terence; Yarborough, Bobbi Jo; Burns, Beryl; Oyler, Barbara; Hildebrandt, Tom; Clarke, Gregory N.; Dickerson, John; Striegel, Ruth H.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for treatment interventions to address the high prevalence of disordered eating throughout adolescence and early adulthood. We developed an adolescent-specific manualized CBT protocol to treat female adolescents with recurrent binge eating and tested its efficacy in a small, pilot randomized controlled trial. We present lessons…

  9. Influencing citizen behavior: experiences from multichannel marketing pilot projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wijngaert, Lidwien; Pieterson, Willem Jan; Teerling, Marije L.

    2011-01-01

    Information technology allows national and local governments to satisfy the needs of citizens in a cost effective way. Unfortunately, citizens still tend to prefer traditional, more costly channels, such as the front desk, phone and mail. Through pilot projects government agencies attempt to

  10. Influencing citizen behavior: Experiences from multichannel marketing pilot projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaert, van de Lidwien; Pieterson, Willem; Teerling, Marije L.

    2011-01-01

    Information technology allows national and local governments to satisfy the needs of citizens in a cost effective way. Unfortunately, citizens still tend to prefer traditional, more costly channels, such as the front desk, phone and mail. Through pilot projects government agencies attempt to influen

  11. An HIV-Prevention Intervention for Sex Workers in Tijuana, Mexico: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Thomas L.; Semple, Shirley J.; Fraga, Miguel; Bucardo, Jesus; Davila-Fraga, Wendy; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2005-01-01

    Female sex workers (FSW) are at high risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, and putting their clients and other partners at risk for infection. There is considerable evidence that Social Cognitive Theory (SCT)?based interventions are effective in reducing high-risk sexual behavior among at-risk populations in the…

  12. Results of a Pilot Study to Ameliorate Psychological and Behavioral Outcomes of Minority Stress Among Young Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Hart, Trevor A; Kidwai, Ammaar; Vernon, Julia R G; Blais, Martin; Adam, Barry

    2017-09-01

    Project PRIDE (Promoting Resilience In Discriminatory Environments) is an 8-session small group intervention aimed at reducing negative mental and behavioral health outcomes resulting from minority stress. This study reports the results of a one-armed pilot test of Project PRIDE, which aimed to examine the feasibility and potential for efficacy of the intervention in a sample of 33 gay and bisexual men aged 18 to 25. The intervention appeared feasible to administer in two different sites and all participants who completed posttreatment (n = 22) or follow-up (n = 19) assessments reported high satisfaction with the intervention. Small to large effect sizes were observed for increases in self-esteem; small effect sizes were found for decreases in loneliness and decreases in minority stress variables; and small and medium effect sizes were found for reductions in alcohol use and number of sex partners, respectively. Overall, Project PRIDE appears to be a feasible intervention with promise of efficacy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. The relation between child feeding problems as measured by parental report and mealtime behavior observation: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Marijn; Bruinsma, Eke; Hauser, M Paulina

    2016-04-01

    Because feeding problems have clear negative consequences for both child and caretakers, early diagnosis and intervention are important. Parent-report questionnaires can contribute to early identification, because they are efficient and typically offer a 'holistic' perspective of the child's eating in different contexts. In this pilot study, we aim to explore the concurrent validity of a short screening instrument (the SEP, which is the Dutch MCH-FS) in one of its target populations (a group of premature children) by comparing the total score with the observed behavior of the child and caretaker during a regular home meal. 28 toddlers (aged 9-18 months) and their caretakers participated in the study. Video-observations of the meals were coded for categories of eating behavior and parent-child interaction. The results show that the total SEP-score correlates with food refusal, feeding efficiency, and self-feeding, but not with negative affect and parental instructions. This confirms that the SEP has a certain degree of concurrent validity in the sense that its total score is associated with specific 'benchmark' feeding behaviors: food refusal, feeding efficiency and autonomy. Future studies with larger samples are needed to generalize the findings from this pilot to a broader context.

  14. A positive affect intervention for people experiencing health-related stress: development and non-randomized pilot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie; Hult, Jen R; Duncan, Larissa G; Cohn, Michael A; Maurer, Stephanie; Bussolari, Cori; Acree, Michael

    2012-07-01

    In this article we present background, theoretical rationale, and pilot data on the development of an intervention designed to increase positive affect in people living with serious health-related stress. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a multiple-component positive affect intervention is feasible and acceptable for people newly diagnosed with HIV. Retention in the intervention and adherence to home practice were high. Participants reported significant increases in positive affect and significant decreases in negative affect. This positive affect intervention can serve as a template for programs to be developed to help people experiencing health-related and other types of life stress.

  15. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD - a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-09-07

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing.

  16. Positive Emotions Program for Schizophrenia (PEPS): a pilot intervention to reduce anhedonia and apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favrod, Jérôme; Nguyen, Alexandra; Fankhauser, Caroline; Ismailaj, Alban; Hasler, Jean-David; Ringuet, Abel; Rexhaj, Shyhrete; Bonsack, Charles

    2015-09-29

    Recent literature has distinguished the negative symptoms associated with a diminished capacity to experience (apathy, anhedonia) from symptoms associated with a limited capacity for expression (emotional blunting, alogia). The apathy-anhedonia syndrome tends to be associated with a poorer prognosis than the symptoms related to diminished expression. The efficacy of drug-based treatments and psychological interventions for these symptoms in schizophrenia remains limited. There is a clear clinical need for new treatments. This pilot study tested the feasibility of a program to reduce anhedonia and apathy in schizophrenia and assessed its impact on 37 participants meeting the ICD-10 criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders. Participants were pre- and post-tested using the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). They took part in eight sessions of the Positive Emotions Program for Schizophrenia (PEPS)--an intervention that teaches participants skills to help overcome defeatist thinking and to increase the anticipation and maintenance of positive emotions. Thirty-one participants completed the program; those who dropped out did not differ from completers. Participation in the program was accompanied by statistically significant reductions in the total scores for Avolition-Apathy and Anhedonia-Asociality on the SANS, with moderate effect sizes. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant reduction of depression on the CDSS, with a large effect size. Emotional blunting and alogia remain stable during the intervention. Findings indicate that PEPS is both a feasible intervention and is associated with an apparently specific reduction of anhedonia and apathy. However, these findings are limited by the absence of control group and the fact that the rater was not blind to the treatment objectives. PEPS is a promising intervention to improve anhedonia and apathy which need to be

  17. Piloting a mobile health intervention to increase physical activity for adolescents with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Erin; Moreno, Megan; Wilner, Molly; Whitlock, Kathryn B; Mendoza, Jason A

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity (PA) reduces symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); interventions to increase PA may improve functioning and health for adolescents with ADHD. Mobile health (mHealth) technology and social media constitute promising interactive modalities for engaging adolescents-who are at highest risk for ADHD treatment drop-out-in interventions to increase PA. The current pilot study evaluated feasibility and acceptability of an innovative intervention incorporating an mHealth-linked wearable activity tracker (Fitbit Flex) and a Facebook group to increase PA among adolescents with ADHD. 11 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD (age 14-18, m = 15.5; 54% female) participated in a 4-week trial utilizing the Fitbit Flex in conjunction with (1) weekly personalized step count goals (2) social support through a Facebook group and (3) daily text messages about PA. The study took place in the greater Seattle, Washington area in the fall of 2015. Adolescents completed online surveys twice per week to rate their ADHD symptoms and positive and negative mood states, and parents rated adolescent ADHD symptoms weekly. Participants were adherent to the study protocol and acceptability of the intervention was high. Linear mixed models indicated that participants significantly increased their average weekly steps over the course of the study and demonstrated improvements in both adolescent and parent-reported ADHD Inattentive symptoms. Results indicate that this mHealth intervention is engaging and promising for increasing PA among adolescents with ADHD, and warrant further study. Implications for improving ADHD symptoms and overall functioning for this undertreated population are discussed.

  18. INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENTS IN BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE HEALTH: UNPRECEDENTED OPORTUNITIES FOR BEHAVIOR ANALYSTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurti, Allison N; Dallery, Jesse

    2014-09-01

    The use of mobile devices is growing worldwide in both industrialized and developing nations. Alongside the worldwide penetration of web-enabled devices, the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are increasingly modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., improving one's diet and exercising more). Behavior analysts have the opportunity to promote health by combining effective behavioral methods with technological advancements. The objectives of this paper are (1) to highlight the public health gains that may be achieved by integrating technology with a behavior analytic approach to developing interventions, and (2) to review some of the currently, under-examined issues related to merging technology and behavior analysis (enhancing sustainability, obtaining frequent measures of behavior, conducting component analyses, evaluating cost-effectiveness, incorporating behavior analysis in the creation of consumer-based applications, and reducing health disparities). Thorough consideration of these issues may inspire the development, implementation, and dissemination of innovative, efficacious interventions that substantially improve global public health.

  19. INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENTS IN BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS TO PROMOTE HEALTH: UNPRECEDENTED OPORTUNITIES FOR BEHAVIOR ANALYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    KURTI, ALLISON N.; DALLERY, JESSE

    2015-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is growing worldwide in both industrialized and developing nations. Alongside the worldwide penetration of web-enabled devices, the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are increasingly modifiable lifestyle factors (e.g., improving one’s diet and exercising more). Behavior analysts have the opportunity to promote health by combining effective behavioral methods with technological advancements. The objectives of this paper are (1) to highlight the public health gains that may be achieved by integrating technology with a behavior analytic approach to developing interventions, and (2) to review some of the currently, under-examined issues related to merging technology and behavior analysis (enhancing sustainability, obtaining frequent measures of behavior, conducting component analyses, evaluating cost-effectiveness, incorporating behavior analysis in the creation of consumer-based applications, and reducing health disparities). Thorough consideration of these issues may inspire the development, implementation, and dissemination of innovative, efficacious interventions that substantially improve global public health. PMID:25774070

  20. Impact of a classroom behavior management intervention on teacher risk ratings for student behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, William B; Bishop, Dana C; Jackson-Newsom, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Classroom behavior management interventions have been used successfully with drug prevention programs to prevent subsequent antisocial behavior and substance use among youth. This article presents results from implementation of the All Stars Challenge, a classroom-based behavior management component to a drug prevention program for fifth graders. Risk ratings for shyness and lack of awareness of social norms among high-risk students who received the All Stars Challenge were reduced compared with fifth graders who did not receive the intervention. In contrast, physical and social aggressivity among low-risk students who received the program increased when compared to similar control students.

  1. Intervention for homeless, substance abusing mothers: findings from a non-randomized pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem

    2012-01-01

    Little empirically-based information is available regarding how best to intervene with substance-abusing homeless mothers. This study pilot-tested a comprehensive intervention with 15 homeless women and their 2- to 6-year-old children, recruited from a local family shelter. All participants were offered integrated intervention with three major components. The first component was housing which included 3 months of rental and utility assistance, and these services were not contingent upon women's abstinence from drugs or alcohol. The second and third components included 6 months of case management services and an evidence-based substance abuse treatment (Community Reinforcement Approach; CRA). Analysis revealed that women showed reductions in substance use (F(2,22) = 3.63; p homelessness (F(2,24) = 25.31; p intervention is a promising approach to meet the multiple needs of this vulnerable population. These positive outcomes support the need for future research to replicate the findings with a larger sample using a randomized design.

  2. Behavioral interventions for office-based care: interventions in the family medicine setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele McCarthy

    2014-03-01

    The practice of family medicine includes the care of many patients with mental health or behavior change needs. Patients in mild to moderate distress may benefit from brief interventions performed in the family physician's office. Patients in more extreme distress may be helped by referral to behavioral health clinicians for short-term or open-ended therapies. Electronic therapy programs and bibliotherapy are also useful resources. The transition to the patient-centered medical home model may allow for more widespread integration of behavioral health care clinicians into primary care, in person and through telemental health care. Integrated care holds the promise of improved access, greater effectiveness of behavioral health service provision, and enhanced efficiency of primary care for patients with behavioral health care needs.

  3. Feasibility and impact of Creciendo Sanos, a clinic-based pilot intervention to prevent obesity among preschool children in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Andrade, Gloria Oliva; Cespedes, Elizabeth M; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Romero-Quechol, Guillermina; González-Unzaga, Marco Aurelio; Benítez-Trejo, María Amalia; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Horan, Chrissy; Haines, Jess; Taveras, Elsie M; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Gillman, Matthew W

    2014-03-20

    Mexico has the highest adult overweight and obesity prevalence in the Americas; 23.8% of children obese. Creciendo Sanos was a pilot intervention to prevent obesity among preschoolers in Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) clinics. We randomized 4 IMSS primary care clinics to either 6 weekly educational sessions promoting healthful nutrition and physical activity or usual care. We recruited 306 parent-child pairs: 168 intervention, 138 usual care. Children were 2-5 years old with WHO body mass index (BMI) z-score 0-3. We measured children's height and weight and parents reported children's diet and physical activity at baseline and 3 and 6-month follow-up. We analyzed behavioral and BMI outcomes with generalized mixed models incorporating multiple imputation for missing values. 93 (55%) intervention and 96 (70%) usual care families completed 3 and 6-month follow-up. At 3 months, intervention v. usual care children increased vegetables by 6.3 servings/week (95% CI, 1.8, 10.8). In stratified analyses, intervention participants with high program adherence (5-6 sessions) decreased snacks and screen time and increased vegetables v. usual care. No further effects on behavioral outcomes or BMI were observed. Transportation time and expenses were barriers to adherence. 90% of parents who completed the post-intervention survey were satisfied with the program. Although satisfaction was high among participants, barriers to participation and retention included transportation cost and time. In intention to treat analyses, we found intervention effects on vegetable intake, but not other behaviors or BMI. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01539070.Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica del IMSS: 2009-785-120.

  4. Feasibility and impact of Creciendo Sanos, a clinic-based pilot intervention to prevent obesity among preschool children in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mexico has the highest adult overweight and obesity prevalence in the Americas; 23.8% of children obese. Creciendo Sanos was a pilot intervention to prevent obesity among preschoolers in Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) clinics. Methods We randomized 4 IMSS primary care clinics to either 6 weekly educational sessions promoting healthful nutrition and physical activity or usual care. We recruited 306 parent-child pairs: 168 intervention, 138 usual care. Children were 2-5 years old with WHO body mass index (BMI) z-score 0-3. We measured children’s height and weight and parents reported children’s diet and physical activity at baseline and 3 and 6-month follow-up. We analyzed behavioral and BMI outcomes with generalized mixed models incorporating multiple imputation for missing values. Results 93 (55%) intervention and 96 (70%) usual care families completed 3 and 6-month follow-up. At 3 months, intervention v. usual care children increased vegetables by 6.3 servings/week (95% CI, 1.8, 10.8). In stratified analyses, intervention participants with high program adherence (5-6 sessions) decreased snacks and screen time and increased vegetables v. usual care. No further effects on behavioral outcomes or BMI were observed. Transportation time and expenses were barriers to adherence. 90% of parents who completed the post-intervention survey were satisfied with the program. Conclusions Although satisfaction was high among participants, barriers to participation and retention included transportation cost and time. In intention to treat analyses, we found intervention effects on vegetable intake, but not other behaviors or BMI. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01539070. Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica del IMSS: 2009-785-120. PMID:24649831

  5. The In Vivo Adherence Intervention For at Risk Adolescents With Asthma: Report of a Randomized Pilot Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Seid, Michael; D'Amico, Elizabeth J.; Varni, James W; Munafo, Jennifer K.; Britto, Maria T.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Drotar, Dennis; King, Eileen C.; Darbie, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Objective Low-income and minority adolescents are at high risk for poor asthma outcomes, due in part to adherence. We tested acceptability, feasibility, and effect sizes of an adherence intervention for low socioeconomic status (SES) minority youth with moderate- and severe-persistent asthma. Design and Methods Single-site randomized pilot trial: intervention (n = 12; asthma education, motivational interviewing, problem-solving skills training, 1 month cell-phone with tailored text messaging)...

  6. A Pilot Study of Parent Training in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearss, Karen; Johnson, Cynthia; Handen, Benjamin; Smith, Tristram; Scahill, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Guidance on effective interventions for disruptive behavior in young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited. We present feasibility and initial efficacy data on a structured parent training program for 16 children (ages 3-6) with ASD and disruptive behavior. The 6-month intervention included 11 Core and up to 2 Optional…

  7. Globalization of Behavioral Risks Needs Faster Diffusion of Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahul Ebrahim, MD, MSc, PhD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available International trade, population migration, changes in living conditions (i.e., consumption transition, nutritional transition, and changes in production, marketing, and availability of consumer goods (i.e., production transition have brought about continuous and rapid changes in the human environment. Such changes have improved the health and economic status of many people in developing countries. At the same time, a parallel phenomenon is occurring: the rapid emergence and expansion of modifiable risk behaviors. These behaviors adversely affect the national health of developing countries and that of future generations because of their impact on maternal, child, and adolescent health. Furthermore, these behaviors are increasing at a faster rate than interventions to curb their growth are being implemented. We discuss the current status of five modifiable risk behaviors — alcohol consumption, tobacco use, overweight and obesity, low fruit and vegetable consumption, and physical inactivity — to emphasize the need for global advocacy and local action to enhance policy formulation and diffusion of interventions necessary to moderate the spread of these behaviors.

  8. Measuring emotion in the voice during psychotherapy interventions: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneta, María E; Penna, Mario; Loyola, Hugo; Buchheim, Anna; Kächele, Horst

    2008-01-01

    The voice as a representation of the psychic world of patients in psychotherapeutic interventions has not been studied thoroughly. To explore speech prosody in relation to the emotional content of words, voices recorded during a semi-structured interview were analyzed. The subjects had been classified according to their childhood emotional experiences with caregivers and their different attachment representations. In this pilot study, voice quality as spectral parameters extracted from vowels of the key word "mother" (German: "Mutter") were analyzed. The amplitude of the second harmonic was large relative to the amplitude of the third harmonic for the vowel "u" in the secure group as compared to the preoccupied group. Such differences might be related to the subjects' emotional involvement during an interview eliciting reconstructed childhood memories.

  9. Adaptation and implementation of cognitive behavioral intervention for trauma in schools with American Indian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodkind, Jessica R; Lanoue, Marianna D; Milford, Jaime

    2010-01-01

    American Indian adolescents experience higher rates of suicide and psychological distress than the overall U.S. adolescent population, and research suggests that these disparities are related to higher rates of violence and trauma exposure. Despite elevated risk, there is limited empirical information to guide culturally appropriate treatment of trauma and related symptoms. We report a pilot study of an adaptation to the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools in a sample of 24 American Indian adolescents. Participants experienced significant decreases in anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and avoidant coping strategies, as well as a marginally significant decrease in depression symptoms. Improvements in anxiety and depression were maintained 6 months postintervention; improvements in posttraumatic stress disorder and avoidant coping strategies were not.

  10. Translating Behavioral Interventions Onto mHealth Platforms: Developing Text Message Interventions for Smoking and Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Beth C; Rosen, Rochelle K; Barnett, Nancy P; Thind, Herpreet; Walaska, Kristen; Foster, Robert; Deutsch, Christopher; Traficante, Regina

    2015-02-24

    The development of mHealth applications is often driven by the investigators and developers with relatively little input from the targeted population. User input is commonly limited to "like/dislike" post- intervention consumer satisfaction ratings or device or application specific user analytics such as usability. However, to produce successful mHealth applications with lasting effects on health behaviors it is crucial to obtain user input from the start of each project and throughout development. The aim of this tutorial is to illustrate how qualitative methods in an iterative process of development have been used in two separate behavior change interventions (targeting smoking and alcohol) delivered through mobile technologies (ie, text messaging). A series of focus groups were conducted to assist in translating a face-to-face smoking cessation intervention onto a text message (short message service, SMS) delivered format. Both focus groups and an advisory panel were used to shape the delivery and content of a text message delivered intervention for alcohol risk reduction. An in vivo method of constructing message content was used to develop text message content that was consistent with the notion of texting as "fingered speech". Formative research conducted with the target population using a participatory framework led to important changes in our approach to intervention structure, content development, and delivery. Using qualitative methods and an iterative approach that blends consumer-driven and investigator-driven aims can produce paradigm-shifting, novel intervention applications that maximize the likelihood of use by the target audience and their potential impact on health behaviors.

  11. Behavioral interventions in patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibović, Mirela; Burg, Matthew M; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2013-01-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the first-line treatment for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. A subgroup of patients experience psychological distress postimplant, and no clear evidence base exists regarding how best to address patients' needs. The aim...... of this critical review is to provide an overview of behavioral interventions in ICD patients to date, and to delineate directions for future research using lessons learned from the ongoing RISTA and WEBCARE trials....

  12. A Pilot Study of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Workshop Intervention for Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adria N.; Follette, Victoria M.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction is a source of significant distress among non-eating-disordered women, but because it is subclinical it is generally not treated. It remains stable throughout adulthood, and has proven resistant to many prevention interventions. This study presents a pilot test of a practical alternative: a 1-day Acceptance and…

  13. SunSmart: Evaluation of a Pilot School-Based Sun Protection Intervention in Hispanic Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. A.; Langholz, B. M.; Ly, T.; Harris, S. C.; Richardson, J. L.; Peng, D. H.; Cockburn, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is rising among Hispanic populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of a pilot sun safety educational intervention conducted from 2006 to 2012 on Hispanic early adolescents in a high ultraviolet environment. Nineteen schools with high Hispanic enrollment were recruited from urban…

  14. A Play and Joint Attention Intervention for Teachers of Young Children with Autism: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Connie S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to pilot test a classroom-based intervention focused on facilitating play and joint attention for young children with autism in self-contained special education classrooms. Thirty-three children with autism between the ages of 3 and 6 years participated in the study with their classroom teachers (n = 14). The 14 preschool…

  15. A Pilot Study of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a Workshop Intervention for Body Dissatisfaction and Disordered Eating Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Adria N.; Follette, Victoria M.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Body image dissatisfaction is a source of significant distress among non-eating-disordered women, but because it is subclinical it is generally not treated. It remains stable throughout adulthood, and has proven resistant to many prevention interventions. This study presents a pilot test of a practical alternative: a 1-day Acceptance and…

  16. Health behavior models in the age of mobile interventions: are our theories up to the task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Rivera, Daniel E; Atienza, Audie A; Nilsen, Wendy; Allison, Susannah M; Mermelstein, Robin

    2011-03-01

    Mobile technologies are being used to deliver health behavior interventions. The study aims to determine how health behavior theories are applied to mobile interventions. This is a review of the theoretical basis and interactivity of mobile health behavior interventions. Many of the mobile health behavior interventions reviewed were predominately one way (i.e., mostly data input or informational output), but some have leveraged mobile technologies to provide just-in-time, interactive, and adaptive interventions. Most smoking and weight loss studies reported a theoretical basis for the mobile intervention, but most of the adherence and disease management studies did not. Mobile health behavior intervention development could benefit from greater application of health behavior theories. Current theories, however, appear inadequate to inform mobile intervention development as these interventions become more interactive and adaptive. Dynamic feedback system theories of health behavior can be developed utilizing longitudinal data from mobile devices and control systems engineering models.

  17. Promoting contraceptive use among unmarried female migrants in one factory in Shanghai: a pilot workplace intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In urban China, more single women are becoming pregnant and resorting to induced abortion, despite the wide availability of temporary methods of contraception. We developed and piloted a workplace-based intervention to promote contraceptive use in unmarried female migrants working in privately owned factories. Methods Quasi-experimental design. In consultation with clients, we developed a workplace based intervention to promote contraception use in unmarried female migrants in a privately owned factory. We then implemented this in one factory, using a controlled before-and-after design. The intervention included lectures, bespoke information leaflets, and support to the factory doctors in providing a contraceptive service. Results 598 women participated: most were under 25, migrants to the city, with high school education. Twenty percent were lost when staff were made redundant, and implementation was logistically complicated. All women attended the initial lecture, and just over half the second lecture. Most reported reading the educational material provided (73%, but very few women reported using the free family planning services offered at the factory clinic (5% or the Family Planning Institute (3%. At baseline, 90% (N = 539 stated that contraceptives were required if having sex before marriage; of those reporting sex in the last three months, the majority reporting using contraceptives (78%, 62/79 but condom use was low (44%, 35/79. Qualitative data showed that the reading material seemed to be popular and young women expressed a need for more specific reproductive health information, particularly on HIV/AIDS. Women wanted services with some privacy and anonymity, and views on the factory service were mixed. Conclusion Implementing a complex intervention with a hard to reach population through a factory in China, using a quasi-experimental design, is not easy. Further research should focus on the specific needs and

  18. A pilot home-based early intervention study to improve the mathematical skills of young children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Şükran Öz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Children who come from low socioeconomic backgrounds and children with learning disabilities are found to be at risk for future failure in mathematics. Even though the mathematics scores increases over time the achievement gap remains between the various ethnic and socioeconomic groups. One way to prevent this failure is to identify the students who are at risk and provide them with effective early intervention. This study reports the results of a pilot early mathematics intervention study focusing on two Turkish families in the US. In this single-subject research, a multiple probe technique was used in order to examine the impact of the SRA DLM Math Pre-K CD-ROM in combination with parent scaffolding on young children’s number sense skills. Two parent-child dyads participated in this study. Two semi-structured interviews were conducted with the parents before and after the intervention. The child participants received 3 Mathematical Curriculum Based Measure (CBM every week to monitor their progress. Building Blocks Assessment was used to identify whether children were able to generalize the number sense skills developed during work sessions in different settings. This measure was administered both before and after the intervention.This study demonstrated that children’s and parents’ use of a software program where they work collaboratively at home resulted in increased number sense skills. These results were interpreted in the context of socio-cultural theory. The parents displayed different strategies during the mathematics work sessions, reflecting their own feelings about mathematics and technology.

  19. A pilot investigation of emotion-focused two-chair dialogue intervention for self-criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Ben; Carlin, Erica R; Engle, David E; Hegde, Jayanta; Szepsenwol, Ohad; Arkowitz, Hal

    2012-01-01

    Self-criticism plays a key role in many psychological disorders and predicts poor outcome in psychotherapy. Yet, psychotherapy research directly targeting self-critical processes is limited. In this pilot study, we examined the efficacy of an emotion-focused intervention, the two-chair dialogue task, on self-criticism, self-compassion and the ability to self-reassure in times of stress, as well as on depressive and anxiety symptoms among nine self-critical clients. Results showed that the intervention was associated with significant increases in self-compassion and self-reassuring, and significant reductions in self-criticism, depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms. Effect sizes were medium to large, with most clients exhibiting low and non-clinical levels of symptomatology at the end of therapy, and maintaining gains over a 6-month follow-up period. Although preliminary, these finding suggest that emotion-focused chair work might be a promising intervention addressing self-criticism. Self-criticism is an important process in a variety of clinical disorders and predicts poor outcome in brief therapy for depression. Yet, little is known about how self-criticism can be effectively addressed in psychological treatment. Practitioners can benefit from increasing their awareness of self-critical processes in their clinical work, and from directly working with emotions in addressing self-criticisim. Emotion-focused two-chair dialogue intervention can be effective in reducing self-criticism, increasing self-compassion, and decreasing depressive and anxiety symptoms, and these improvements are largely maintained six months after therapy. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Feasibility of a Personal Health Technology-Based Psychological Intervention for Men with Stress and Mood Problems: Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Lappalainen, Raimo; Hoffrén, Henna; Myllymäki, Tero; Kinnunen, Marja-Liisa; Mattila, Elina; Happonen, Antti P; Rusko, Heikki; Korhonen, Ilkka

    2013-01-01

    Background Work-related stress is a significant problem for both people and organizations. It may lead to mental illnesses such as anxiety and depression, resulting in increased work absences and disabilities. Scalable interventions to prevent and manage harmful stress can be delivered with the help of technology tools to support self-observations and skills training. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the P4Well intervention in treatment of stress-related psychological problems. P4Well is a novel intervention which combines modern psychotherapy (the cognitive behavioral therapy and the acceptance and commitment therapy) with personal health technologies to deliver the intervention via multiple channels, includinggroup meetings, Internet/Web portal, mobile phone applications, and personal monitoring devices. Methods This pilot study design was a small-scale randomized controlled trial that compared the P4Well intervention with a waiting list control group. In addition to personal health technologies for self-assessment, the intervention consisted of 3 psychologist-assisted group meetings. Self-assessed psychological measures through questionnaires were collected offline pre- and post-intervention, and 6 months after the intervention for the intervention group. Acceptance and usage of technology tools were measured with user experience questionnaires and usage logs. Results A total of 24 subjects were randomized: 11 participants were followed up in the intervention group (1 was lost to follow-up) and 12 participants did not receive any intervention (control group). Depressive and psychological symptoms decreased and self-rated health and working ability increased. All participants reported they had benefited from the intervention. All technology tools had active users and 10/11 participants used at least 1 tool actively. Physiological measurements with personal feedback were considered the most useful intervention component. Conclusions

  1. A Low-Intensity Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Mood Symptoms in People with Early Psychosis: Development and Pilot Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Alan Chun Yat; Lin, Jessie Jing Xia; Cheung, Veronica Yuen Ki; Lau, Nicole Ka Man; Chang, Wing Chung; Chan, Sherry Kit Wa; Hui, Christy Lai Ming; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Chen, Eric Yu Hai

    2016-11-01

    Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common in people suffering from early psychosis. Growing evidence shows that mindfulness-based intervention is an effective option in handling depression and anxiety disorders. Current article aims to provide documentation on the development and pilot study, before a RCT of larger scale, evaluating the acceptability and potential effects of a 7-week mindfulness-based intervention programme (MBI-p). MBI-p was developed over nine months in 2014. A total of 14 people with early psychosis were recruited to three pilot trials of MBI-p. Eleven of them completed the programme and were interviewed. Eight of them were measured quantitatively at baseline and post-intervention on clinical symptoms, depression and anxiety levels, quality of life and mindfulness. Mixed qualitative and quantitative results supported MBI-p as an acceptable and feasible intervention. Significant statistical improvements were found in depression levels, mental quality of life, general psychopathology and ability to observe emotions and act with awareness. Qualitative comments suggested that the intervention was safe, enjoyable and had a positive impact on mood symptoms. In summary, these results provide a promising pilot support for a potentially effective and cost-efficient treatment option for people with early psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Depressive and anxiety symptoms are common in people with early psychosis but long received little attention. A low-intensity mindfulness-based intervention targeting depression and anxiety symptoms among people with early psychosis was developed and pilot tested. It is feasible and acceptable to use mindfulness-based intervention as a complementary treatment for psychosis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  3. Improving Homework Compliance in Career Counseling with a Behavioral Activation Functional Assessment Procedure: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, David E.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Bowe, William M.; Pfennig, Sherri L.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral activation has emerged as a widely used treatment for depression in a number of health care settings due to its concrete, straightforward emphasis on out-of-session client homework, but it lacks explicit guidelines for identifying and overcoming barriers that interfere with homework completion. The purpose of this pilot study was to…

  4. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  5. Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Mood Management in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoori, Bita; Ratanasiripong, Paul; Holladay, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) often display mental health symptoms that may benefit from psychotherapy. In this pilot study, a newly designed cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group treatment targeting mood difficulties was provided to 8 adults with mild-borderline ID. Assessment occurred at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 4…

  6. Group dialectical behavior therapy adapted for obese emotional eaters; a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosen, M.A.; Safer, D.; Adler, S.; Cebolla, A.; Strien, T. van

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been shown to effectively target binge eating disorder (BED). This study pilots the effectiveness of group DIVE for obese "emotional eaters" to reduce eating psychopathology and achieve weight maintenance. Thirty-five obese male and female emotional eaters

  7. Using mobile health technology to improve behavioral skill implementation through homework in evidence-based parenting intervention for disruptive behavior disorders in youth: study protocol for intervention development and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Anil; Isham, Andrew; Cleek, Andrew F; McKay, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) (oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD)) are prevalent, costly, and oftentimes chronic psychiatric disorders of childhood. Evidence-based interventions that focus on assisting parents to utilize effective skills to modify children's problematic behaviors are first-line interventions for the treatment of DBDs. Although efficacious, the effects of these interventions are often attenuated by poor implementation of the skills learned during treatment by parents, often referred to as between-session homework. The multiple family group (MFG) model is an evidence-based, skills-based intervention model for the treatment of DBDs in school-age youth residing in urban, socio-economically disadvantaged communities. While data suggest benefits of MFG on DBD behaviors, similar to other skill-based interventions, the effects of MFG are mitigated by the poor homework implementation, despite considerable efforts to support parents in homework implementation. This paper focuses on the study protocol for the development and preliminary evaluation of a theory-based, smartphone mobile health (mHealth) application (My MFG) to support homework implementation by parents participating in MFG. This paper describes a study design proposal that begins with a theoretical model, uses iterative design processes to develop My MFG to support homework implementation in MFG through a series of pilot studies, and a small-scale pilot randomised controlled trial to determine if the intervention can demonstrate change (preliminary efficacy) of My MFG in outpatient mental health settings in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities. This preliminary study aims to understand the implementation of mHealth methods to improve the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine outpatient mental health care settings for youth with disruptive behavior and their families. Developing methods to augment the benefits of evidence

  8. Children's Physical Activity Behavior during School Recess: A Pilot Study Using GPS, Accelerometer, Participant Observation, and Go-Along Interview.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Skau Pawlowski

    Full Text Available Schoolyards are recognized as important settings for physical activity interventions during recess. However, varying results have been reported. This pilot study was conducted to gain in-depth knowledge of children's physical activity behavior during recess using a mixed-methods approach combining quantitative GPS and accelerometer measurements with qualitative go-along group interviews and participant observations. Data were collected during three weekdays in a public school in Denmark. Eighty-one children (47 girls wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X and GPS (QStarz BT-Q1000xt, sixteen children participated in go-along group interviews, and recess behavior was observed using an ethnographical participant observation approach. All data were analyzed separated systematically answering the Five W Questions. Children were categorized into Low, Middle and High physical activity groups and these groups were predominantly staying in three different locations during recess: school building, schoolyard and field, respectively. Mostly girls were in the building remaining in there because of a perceived lack of attractive outdoor play facilities. The children in the schoolyard were predominantly girls who preferred the schoolyard over the field to avoid the competitive soccer games on the field whereas boys dominated the field playing soccer. Using a mixed-methods approach to investigate children's physical activity behavior during recess helped gain in-depth knowledge that can aid development of future interventions in the school environment.

  9. Aquatic aerobic exercise for children with cerebral palsy: a pilot intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A; Smith, Hilary J; Lombard, Kelly A; Barlow, Carrie; O'Neil, Margaret E

    2014-02-01

    The primary purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a14-week aquatic exercise program on gross motor function and walking endurance in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The secondary purpose was to evaluate changes in functional strength, aerobic capacity and balance. A prospective time series group design consisting of four measurement sessions (two baseline, one post intervention, and 1-month follow-up) was used. Eight ambulatory children ages 6-15 years with CP and classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System Level I or Level III participated in an aquatic aerobic exercise program. Significant improvements were observed for the primary outcomes of gross motor function and walking endurance. No significant differences between any of the secondary measures were observed, although all of the measures demonstrated trends of improvement after intervention. Ambulatory children with CP may improve their gross motor skills and walking endurance after an aquatic exercise program held twice per week for 14 weeks, utilizing moderate-to-vigorous exercise intensity and consisting of functional activities.

  10. Self-tuning behavioral analysis in AAL "FOOD" project pilot environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Niccolò; Losardo, Agostino; De Munari, Ilaria; Ciampolini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral analysis, based on unobtrusive monitoring through environmental sensors, is expected to increase health awareness of AAL systems. In this paper, techniques for assessing behavioral quantitative features are discussed, suitable for detecting behavioral anomalies in an unsupervised fashion, i.e., with no need of defining target reference behaviors and of tuning user-specific threshold parameters. Such technique is being exploited for analyzing data coming from a set of European pilot sites, in the framework of the EU/AAL-JP project "FOOD", specifically focused at kitchen activity. Simple results are illustrated, suitable for proof-of-concept validation.

  11. Behavioral Processes in Long-Lag Intervention Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dale T; Dannals, Jennifer E; Zlatev, Julian J

    2017-05-01

    We argue that psychologists who conduct experiments with long lags between the manipulation and the outcome measure should pay more attention to behavioral processes that intervene between the manipulation and the outcome measure. Neglect of such processes, we contend, stems from psychology's long tradition of short-lag lab experiments where there is little scope for intervening behavioral processes. Studying process in the lab invariably involves studying psychological processes, but in long-lag field experiments it is important to study causally relevant behavioral processes as well as psychological ones. To illustrate the roles that behavioral processes can play in long-lag experiments we examine field experiments motivated by three policy-relevant goals: prejudice reduction, health promotion, and educational achievement. In each of the experiments discussed we identify various behavioral pathways through which the manipulated psychological state could have produced the observed outcome. We argue that if psychologists conducting long-lag interventions posited a theory of change that linked manipulated psychological states to outcomes via behavioral pathways, the result would be richer theory and more practically useful research. Movement in this direction would also permit more opportunities for productive collaborations between psychologists and other social scientists interested in similar social problems.

  12. Sanitary pad interventions for girls' education in Ghana: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Paul; Ryus, Caitlin R; Dolan, Catherine S; Dopson, Sue; Scott, Linda M

    2012-01-01

    Increased education of girls in developing contexts is associated with a number of important positive health, social, and economic outcomes for a community. The event of menarche tends to coincide with girls' transitions from primary to secondary education and may constitute a barrier for continued school attendance and performance. Following the MRC Framework for Complex Interventions, a pilot controlled study was conducted in Ghana to assess the role of sanitary pads in girls' education. A sample of 120 schoolgirls between the ages of 12 and 18 from four villages in Ghana participated in a non-randomized trial of sanitary pad provision with education. The trial had three levels of treatment: provision of pads with puberty education; puberty education alone; or control (no pads or education). The primary outcome was school attendance. After 3 months, providing pads with education significantly improved attendance among participants, (lambda 0.824, F = 3.760, peducation alone improved attendance to a similar level (M = 91.26, SD = 7.82) as sites where pads were provided with puberty education (Rural M = 89.74, SD = 9.34; Periurban M = 90.54, SD = 17.37), all of which were higher than control (M = 84.48, SD = 12.39). The total improvement through pads with education intervention after 5 months was a 9% increase in attendance. After 3 months, providing pads with education significantly improved attendance among participants. The changes in attendance at the end of the trial, after 5 months, were found to be significant by site over time. With puberty education alone resulting in a similar attendance level. This pilot study demonstrated promising results of a low-cost, rapid-return intervention for girls' education in a developing context. Given the considerable development needs of poorer countries and the potential of young women there, these results suggest that a large-scale cluster randomized trial is warranted. Pan African

  13. Behavioral intervention on quality of life in chronic heart congestive failure patients with urinary incontinence: a pilot randomized controlled trial%行为干预改善慢性心力衰竭尿失禁患者生命质量的随机对照试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于艳丽; 张洪莹; 田春燕

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of behavioral intervention on the quality of life of chronic heart congestive failure patients with urinary incontinence, to further provide basis for more effective clinical nursing measures. Methods 62 patients with chronic heart congestive failure combining urinary incontinence were divided into two groups by random digital table method, the control group and the intervention group, with 31 cases in each group. Patients in the control group received routine nursing care, while patients in the intervention group received behavioral intervention on the basis of routine care. The behavioral intervention included pelvic floor muscle training, pectineus exercise and reconstruction of micturition habits. The effect of the intervention on incontinence, quality of life and depression were observed in two groups. Results 61 patients completed the study, including 30 cases in the intervention group and 31 cases in the control group. There were no significant differences in the scores of the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence Short Form (ICI-Q-SF), the MOS item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Zung Self-rating Depression Scale ( SDS) between two groups before the intervention (P>0.05). After 6 weeks of continuous intervention, the scores of ICI-Q-SF and SDS in the intervention group were(8.69±1.94)points and (55.91±4.57) points, which were significantly lower than (11.07±2.14) points and (61.44±5.98) points of the control group (t=5.04, 3.18, P0.05;连续干预6周后,干预组ICI-Q-SF评分为(8.69±1.94)分, SDS评分为(55.91±4.57)分,均明显低于对照组的(11.07±2.14)分和(61.44±5.98)分,t=5.04和3.18,P<0.01,差异均有统计学意义;干预组SF-36评分中生理功能、社会功能两方面评分分别为(76.77±10.34)分和(77.69±6.17)分,明显高于对照组的(60.39±10.07)分和(59.38±8.25)分,t=43.31和120.36,P<0.01,差异均有统计学意义.结论 行为干预能

  14. Development and pilot of a group skills-and-support intervention for mothers of children with feeding problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C J; Bryant-Waugh, R

    2012-04-01

    Child feeding problems are often associated with parental factors which may influence and maintain difficulties. This paper reports the development, pilot and preliminary evaluation of a group intervention for mothers of children with feeding problems. Themes for the group were derived from a survey of parents and professionals. Three pilot interventions were conducted in order to make an assessment of the feasibility, acceptability and potential for achieving change in levels of maternal mood, parenting stress and concerns related to feeding. While single case analysis revealed little change in standardised measures of mood and parenting stress, participants valued the social and emotional support offered by the group and reported improvements in concerns and maladaptive behaviours related to feeding. An intervention which provides support and a sense of a shared experience appears to have beneficial effects for mothers of children with feeding problems and therefore, may offer a constructive means of supporting this population.

  15. Treatment Fidelity: Special Educators' Perceptions of Measures Used to Monitor the Implementation of Behavior Intervention Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 requires empirically based interventions to be used when treating chronic problem behaviors. The fundamental part of behavior modification is the ability to demonstrate that behavior change occurred due to the intervention. This can only be accomplished when the intervention is…

  16. The Optimal Ordering Strategy of Outsourcing Procurement of Health Education and Behavior Intervention Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai-Ge; Wu, Zhi-Fan; Sun, Xiao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Health communication and behavior intervention are main measures adopted in health education. Behavior intervention among these measures is the direct one to affect individual and group behaviors. Patients demand more than health information communication, but rely on health intervention service and related products. This essay starts from…

  17. Improvements in Child Behavior and Family Mealtime Environment After an Intensive Behavioral Feeding Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiverling, Laura; Hendy, Helen M; Yusupova, Stella

    2016-08-31

    The present study examined changes in child and family mealtime patterns before and after intensive behavioral feeding intervention at a multidisciplinary hospital-based program for 50 children. At preintervention and postintervention, caregivers completed surveys to report child feeding goals and the About Your Child's Eating scale (AYCE). In addition, at postintervention, each caregiver rated intervention effectiveness for his or her child's feeding goals identified at preintervention and provided intervention satisfaction ratings. Results revealed that caregivers perceived all three AYCE family mealtime patterns to improve from preintervention to postintervention, the majority of caregivers rated intervention as being effective for improving the specific child feeding goals identified at preintervention, and caregivers gave high satisfaction ratings for the intervention.

  18. Children with Autism and Attention Difficulties: A Pilot Study of the Association between Sensory, Motor, and Adaptive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattard-Labrecque, Carolanne; Ben Amor, Leila; Couture, Mélanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study aimed to compare sensory processing, motor skills and adaptive behaviors in children with a double diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (ASD+ADHD) with children with ADHD alone and to examine the association of sensory processing and motor skills with adaptive behaviors (self-care). Method: Thirty children aged 5–14 years diagnosed with ASD+ADHD (n = 13) or ADHD (n = 17) were evaluated on their sensory processing and motor skills and adaptive behaviors. Analysis of covariance compared the groups on these dimensions. Correlation analyses examined the association between sensory processing and motor skills and adaptive behaviors. Results: Compared to children with ADHD alone, children with ASD+ADHD had poorer skills in sensory processing (p < 0.001), motor (p = 0.001) and adaptive behaviors (p < 0.001). For all children, increased autonomy in self-care was correlated with better sensory processing (p < 0.001) and motor skills (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Children with ASD+ADHD have poorer sensory processing, motor and adaptive skills than those with ADHD alone. Sensory processing and motor deficits were negatively associated with autonomy in self-care. Interventions aiming to improve sensory processing and motor skills and autonomy in self-care should become important targets for these children. PMID:23667360

  19. Comparative effectiveness of CBT interventions for co-morbid chronic pain & insomnia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Wilfred R; Moynihan, Jan; Matteson-Rusby, Sara; Jungquist, Carla R; Xia, Yinglin; Tu, Xin; Perlis, Michael L

    2012-11-01

    Chronic pain is difficult to treat and often precedes or exacerbates sleep disturbances such as insomnia. Insomnia, in turn, can amplify the pain experience. Both conditions are associated with inflammatory processes, which may be involved in the bi-directional relationship between pain and sleep. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain and CBT for insomnia are evidence based interventions for, respectively, chronic pain and insomnia. The study objectives were to determine the feasibility of combining CBT for pain and for insomnia and to assess the effects of the combined intervention and the stand alone interventions on pain, sleep, and mood outcomes compared to a control condition. Twenty-one adults with co-occurring chronic pain and chronic insomnia were randomized to either CBT for pain, CBT for insomnia, combined CBT for pain and insomnia, or a wait-list control condition. The combined CBT intervention was feasible to deliver and produced significant improvements in sleep, disability from pain, depression and fatigue compared to the control condition. Overall, the combined intervention appeared to have a strong advantage over CBT for pain on most outcomes, modest advantage over both CBT for insomnia in reducing insomnia severity in chronic pain patients. CBT for pain and CBT for insomnia may be combined with good results for patients with co-occurring chronic pain and insomnia. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Improving self-esteem in women diagnosed with Turner syndrome: results of a pilot intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Paul M; Smyth, Arlene; Liao, Lih-Mei

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate a brief intervention to improve the self esteem of women diagnosed with Turner syndrome (TS). Prospective observational study. Turner Syndrome Support Society, UK. 30 women aged 18-60 years. A 1-day psychology workshop targeting problems of self-esteem in women diagnosed with TS. The workshop drew on cognitive-behavioral therapy and narrative therapy skills and emphasized increased self-awareness of interpersonal difficulties and improved capacity for self-management. Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSS); Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); bespoke user experiences questionnaire. All 30 women provided baseline data, 27/30 provided immediate post-intervention data and 22/30 provided follow-up data at 3 months. The intervention improved RSS and HADS scores at 3 months. Generic skills-based psychological interventions have the potential to be adapted to provide brief and low-cost interventions to improve self-esteem and reduce psychological distress in women diagnosed with TS. Copyright © 2014 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Amigas Latinas Motivando el ALMA (ALMA): Development and Pilot Implementation of a Stress Reduction Promotora Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melissa A; Perez, Georgina; Ornelas, India J; Tran, Anh N; Blumenthal, Connie; Lyn, Michelle; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2012-08-01

    Use of mental health care services for psychological distress is limited among Latino immigrants. In geographic areas where migration has been rapid, mental health systems possess limited capacity to provide bilingual and bicultural assistance. The development of a bilingual and bicultural workforce is a necessary yet long-term solution. More immediate strategies, however, are needed to meet the needs of immigrant Latinos. This paper describes the development of a stress-reduction focused, lay health advisor training that targets individual behavior change among Latina immigrants. The theoretical foundation, curriculum components, and pilot implementation of the training are discussed. As natural leaders, Latina promotoras disseminated learned strategies and resources within their communities. The lay health advisor model is a salient method for disseminating information regarding mental health and stress reduction among Latinas.

  2. Amigas Latinas Motivando el ALMA (ALMA): Development and Pilot Implementation of a Stress Reduction Promotora Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melissa A.; Perez, Georgina; Ornelas, India J.; Tran, Anh N.; Blumenthal, Connie; Lyn, Michelle; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2014-01-01

    Use of mental health care services for psychological distress is limited among Latino immigrants. In geographic areas where migration has been rapid, mental health systems possess limited capacity to provide bilingual and bicultural assistance. The development of a bilingual and bicultural workforce is a necessary yet long-term solution. More immediate strategies, however, are needed to meet the needs of immigrant Latinos. This paper describes the development of a stress-reduction focused, lay health advisor training that targets individual behavior change among Latina immigrants. The theoretical foundation, curriculum components, and pilot implementation of the training are discussed. As natural leaders, Latina promotoras disseminated learned strategies and resources within their communities. The lay health advisor model is a salient method for disseminating information regarding mental health and stress reduction among Latinas. PMID:25364312

  3. Reducing Youth Risk Behaviors Through Interactive Theater Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Watson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of risk behaviors in secondary schools is a key concern for parents, teachers, and school administrators. School is one of the primary contexts of socialization for young people; thus, the investment in school-based programs to reduce risk behaviors is essential. In this study, we report on youth who participated in an intervention designed to improve decision-making skills based on positive youth development approaches. We examine changes in decision-making skills before and after involvement in the Teen Interactive Theater Education (TITE program and retrospective self-assessment of change in knowledge, abilities, and beliefs as a result of participating in TITE (n = 127. Youth that reported increases in knowledge, abilities, and beliefs due to the intervention (n = 89 were more likely to think about the consequences of their decisions and list options before making a decision compared to their counterparts that reported less overall learning (n = 38. Implications for intervention research and stakeholders are discussed.

  4. Pilot nutrition and physical activity intervention for preschool children attending daycare centres (JUNJI: primary and secondary outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Salazar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A pilot intervention was conducted to promote physical activity and nutrition in public preschool education (near half a million children in Chile, in order to prevent obesity. Objective: To assess the primary (body fat and secondary outcomes (physical activity and energy intake of a nutrition and physical activity pilot intervention for preschool children, attending day care centres. Methods: A pilot intervention in six day care centres selected at random (n = 530, in 4-5 years old preschool children, Santiago, Chile intending to: provide nutritional and physical activity education to educators and health promotion activities for the family, which in turn, will affect the primary (body fat, and secondary outcomes (physical activity pattern and energy food intake were measured in a representative subsample of 120 intervened and 145 controls children. Results: In relation to secondary outcomes monitoring, moderate-vigorous activity was duplicated in the intervention group (+5.4% and +4.7%, respectively, in both obese and eutrophic children. Energy intake decreased in 11.7% in obese and 7.5% in eutrophic children. Dietary fat intake was reduced (-11 g in obese and -8.4 g in eutrophic children. Intervened obese children reduced body fat in 1.5%, meanwhile in control obese children, body fat increased 1.3% (p < 0.01. Conclusions: The pilot intervention demonstrated the feasibility to influence dietary risk factors and physical activity at the day care centres and families. Therefore, the implementation of the validated intervention program will be tested in different weather conditions, to prevent unhealthy habits in preschool children and their families.

  5. Effects of Different Heave Motion Components on Pilot Pitch Control Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this paper had two objectives. The first objective was to investigate if a different weighting of heave motion components decomposed at the center of gravity, allowing for a higher fidelity of individual components, would result in pilot manual pitch control behavior and performance closer to that observed with full aircraft motion. The second objective was to investigate if decomposing the heave components at the aircraft's instantaneous center of rotation rather than at the center of gravity could result in additional improvements in heave motion fidelity. Twenty-one general aviation pilots performed a pitch attitude control task in an experiment conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames under different hexapod motion conditions. The large motion capability of the Vertical Motion Simulator also allowed for a full aircraft motion condition, which served as a baseline. The controlled dynamics were of a transport category aircraft trimmed close to the stall point. When the ratio of center of gravity pitch heave to center of gravity heave increased in the hexapod motion conditions, pilot manual control behavior and performance became increasingly more similar to what is observed with full aircraft motion. Pilot visual and motion gains significantly increased, while the visual lead time constant decreased. The pilot visual and motion time delays remained approximately constant and decreased, respectively. The neuromuscular damping and frequency both decreased, with their values more similar to what is observed with real aircraft motion when there was an equal weighting of the heave of the center of gravity and heave due to rotations about the center of gravity. In terms of open- loop performance, the disturbance and target crossover frequency increased and decreased, respectively, and their corresponding phase margins remained constant and increased, respectively. The decomposition point of the heave components only had limited

  6. A Pilot Study Examining the Online Behavior of Web Users with Visual Impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Brinkley

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the results of a pilot study on the online behavioral habits of 46 internet users; 26 of whom self-identified as having a visual impairment (either blind or low vision. While significant research exists which documents the degree of difficulty that users with visual impairments have in interacting with the Web relative to the sighted, few have addressed the degree to which this usability disparity impacts online behavior; information seeking and online exploratory behaviors especially. Fewer still have addressed this usability disparity within the context of distinct website types; i.e. are usability issues more pronounced with certain categories of websites as opposed to others? This pilot study was effective both in exploring these issues and in identifying the accessibility of online social networks as a primary topic of investigation with respect to the formal study that is to follow.

  7. Effects of a food advertising literacy intervention on Taiwanese children's food purchasing behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Li-Ling; Lai, I-Ju; Chang, Li-Chun; Lee, Chia-Kuei

    2016-08-01

    Unhealthy food advertising is an important contributor to childhood obesity. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of a food advertising literacy program that incorporated components of health-promoting media literacy education on fifth-grade children. Participants were 140 fifth-graders (10 and 11 years old) from one school who were randomly divided into three groups. Experimental Group A received a food advertising literacy program, experimental Group B received a comparable knowledge-based nutrition education program and the control group did not receive any nutrition education. Repeated measures analysis of variance and multivariate analysis of covariance were used to test mean changes between pretest, posttest and follow-up on participants' nutritional knowledge, food advertising literacy and food purchasing behavior. Results showed that, as compared with Group B and the control groups, Group A showed higher nutritional knowledge, food advertising literacy and food purchasing behavior at post-intervention, but had no significant improvements in nutritional knowledge and food purchasing behavior at the 1-month follow-up. Although some improvements were observed, future studies should consider a long-term, settings-based approach that is closely connected with children's daily lives, as this might be helpful to solidify children's skills in recognizing, evaluating and understanding unhealthy food advertising.

  8. Intensive Behavioral Intervention for School-Aged Children with Autism: Una Breccia nel Muro (UBM)--A Comprehensive Behavioral Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Leonardo; Vicari, Stefano; Valeri, Giovanni; D'Elia, Lidia; Arima, Serena; Strauss, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Although, reviews and outcome research supports empirical evidence for Early Intensive Behavior Intervention in pre-scholars, intensive behavioral service provision for school-aged children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are less subject to research studies. In order to provide effective behavioral interventions for school-aged children it…

  9. Flight management research utilizing an oculometer. [pilot scanning behavior during simulated approach and landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, A. A., Jr.; Kurbjun, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the flight management work being conducted using NASA Langley's oculometer system. Tests have been conducted in a Boeing 737 simulator to investigate pilot scan behavior during approach and landing for simulated IFR, VFR, motion versus no motion, standard versus advanced displays, and as a function of various runway patterns and symbology. Results of each of these studies are discussed. For example, results indicate that for the IFR approaches a difference in pilot scan strategy was noted for the manual versus coupled (autopilot) conditions. Also, during the final part of the approach when the pilot looks out-of-the-window he fixates on his aim or impact point on the runway and holds this point until flare initiation.

  10. Flight management research utilizing an oculometer. [pilot scanning behavior during simulated approach and landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, A. A., Jr.; Kurbjun, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the flight management work being conducted using NASA Langley's oculometer system. Tests have been conducted in a Boeing 737 simulator to investigate pilot scan behavior during approach and landing for simulated IFR, VFR, motion versus no motion, standard versus advanced displays, and as a function of various runway patterns and symbology. Results of each of these studies are discussed. For example, results indicate that for the IFR approaches a difference in pilot scan strategy was noted for the manual versus coupled (autopilot) conditions. Also, during the final part of the approach when the pilot looks out-of-the-window he fixates on his aim or impact point on the runway and holds this point until flare initiation.

  11. Cancer risk and preventive behavior: persuasion as an intervention strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonani, Marcela; Carvalho, Emilia Campos de

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of interventions for health promotion, protection, and early diagnosis may include the process of persuasion employed. This study aims to evaluate the risk level of developing cancer, considering the pertinent risk factors, and the presence of persuasion and characteristics in communication regarding cancer prevention and early detection. It is an observational study, conducted among 110 inhabitants of a neighborhood in Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, Brazil. It was confirmed that there are high risks for colon/rectum, cervical, and endometrial cancer; and moderate risks for the above as well as lung and breast cancer. In terms of persuasion, it was observed that cancer information was spread but not sustained for long periods. Moreover, there was no reinforcement. In view of cancer risk and the identified preventive behaviors, persuasion is considered a useful strategy to reduce these risks, as well as to encourage and sustain preventive behaviors, since it indicates routes to be followed.

  12. Pilot Testing of a Parent-Directed Intervention (Project ASPIRE) for Underserved Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Chana; Shay, Sophie; Repplinger, Lyra; Leffel, Kristin R.; Sapolich, Shannon G.; Suskind, Elizabeth; Tannenbaum, Sally; Suskind, Dana

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study explored the potential for Project ASPIRE to effect behavior change in a sample of 11 parents of children with hearing loss who were from typically underserved populations, such as families from backgrounds of low socioeconomic status or families who speak English as a second language. The study consisted of one education session,…

  13. Feasibility of a Preventive Parenting Intervention for Very Preterm Children at 18 Months Corrected Age: A Randomized Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flierman, Monique; Koldewijn, Karen; Meijssen, Dominique; van Wassenaer-Leemhuis, Aleid; Aarnoudse-Moens, Cornelieke; van Schie, Petra; Jeukens-Visser, Martine

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of an age-appropriate additional parenting intervention for very preterm born toddlers. In a randomized controlled pilot study, 60 of 94 eligible very preterm born children who had received a responsive parenting intervention in their first year were randomized to usual care or the additional intervention, consisting of 4-6 home visits between 18 and 22 months' corrected gestational age (CA). Parents were supported to responsively interact during increasingly complex daily activities and play. Parental satisfaction with the intervention was evaluated with a questionnaire. At baseline and 24 months CA, parents completed the Infant Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment, the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, and the Dutch Schlichting Lexilist for receptive language. At 24 months CA, motor, and cognitive development was measured by the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition Dutch version, and parent-child interaction was evaluated by the Emotional Availability Scales. Parental compliance and satisfaction with the intervention was high. Effect sizes (after correction for baseline variables) were small for internalizing and competence behavior, receptive language, and problem solving; medium for cognitive development and parent-child interaction; and large for externalizing and dysregulation behavior and motor development. After a postdischarge intervention during the first year, an additional responsive parenting support at toddler-age is feasible and associated with positive outcomes in a broad array of parental and child outcome measures. www.toetsingonline.nl: NL40208.018.12. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cortisol Patterns for Young Children Displaying Disruptive Behavior: Links to a Teacher-Child, Relationship-Focused Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Bridget E; Williford, Amanda P

    2017-01-01

    Supportive and close relationships that young children have with teachers have lasting effects on children's behavior and academic success, and this is particularly true for children with challenging behaviors. These relationships are also important for children's developing stress response system, and children in child care may be more likely to display atypical cortisol patterns at child care. However, warm, supportive relationships with teachers may buffer these negative effects of child care. While many relationship-focused early childhood interventions demonstrate changes in child behavior, associations with children's stress response system are unknown. This study assessed children's activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis via salivary cortisol as a function of their participation in a dyadic intervention intended to improve a teacher's interaction quality with a particular child. Seventy teachers and 113 preschool children participated who were part of a larger study of teachers and children were randomly assigned at the classroom level across three intervention conditions: Banking Time, Time-Control Comparison (Child Time), and Business-as-Usual. At the end of the school year, children in the Banking Time condition displayed a significantly greater decline in cortisol across the morning during preschool compared to children in Business-as-Usual condition. These pilot results are among the first to provide preliminary evidence that school-based interventions that promote sensitive and responsive interactions may improve young children's activity in the stress response system within the child care/early education context.

  15. Positive Intervention for Serious Behavior Problems: Best Practices in Implementing the Hughes Bill (A.B. 2586) and the Positive Behavioral Intervention Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Diana Browning; Gurman, Harvey B.

    This manual provides guidelines to educators attempting to comply with California's Hughes Bill, which is intended to ensure the rights of special education students to have positive behavioral intervention plans designed to bring lasting behavioral changes without interventions that cause pain or trauma. An introductory chapter summarizes the…

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Principles within Group Mentoring: A Randomized Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jent, Jason F.; Niec, Larissa N.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group mentoring program that included components of empirically supported mentoring and cognitive behavioral techniques for children served at a community mental health center. Eighty-six 8- to 12-year-old children were randomly assigned to either group mentoring or a wait-list control group. Group…

  17. Multimodal therapy for painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis: pilot study combining behavioral, pharmacologic, and endoscopic therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S. Hanley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We evaluated the effectiveness of combining behavioral therapy, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistension for treating painful bladder syndrome / interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five patients with PBS/IC were prospectively enrolled in a pilot multimodal behavioral, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment protocol. Behavioral modification included diet recommendations, fluid restriction to 64 oz. /day, progressive timed voiding and Kegel exercises. Oral pharmacologic therapy consisted of daily doses of macrodantin 100 mg, hydroxyzine 10-20 mg and urised 4 tablets. Patients underwent endoscopic bladder hydrodistention under anesthesia at least 2 weeks after protocol enrollment. Behavioral and pharmacological treatments were continued after the hydrodistention. O'Leary-Sant questionnaire scores were recorded before starting the protocol, after pharmacologic/behavioral therapy, 2 months post-hydrodistension, and at scheduled follow-up. Results: Eighteen patients (72% completed the pilot multimodal treatment protocol and were followed for a mean of 10.2 months. All patients were female with a median age of 36.3 years and had mean bladder capacity under anesthesia of 836 milliliters. Mean O'Leary-Sant symptom index scores for baseline symptoms, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistension and during follow up were 12.5, 8.6, 7.0, and 6.7 (p < 0.05. Mean O'Leary-Sant problem index scores for baseline, after behavioral/pharmacologic treatment, post-hydrodistention and during follow up were 12.7, 8.9, 6.7, and 7.7 (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Our pilot multimodal protocol of behavioral modification, pharmacologic therapy and endoscopic hydrodistention demonstrated a significant progressive improvement in PBS/IC quality of life scores, compared to a pre-treatment baseline. These results should be validated in a larger, placebo controlled trial.

  18. Population-Level Quality Measures for Behavioral Screening and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Richard L; Smith, Mindy A

    2016-07-01

    Delivered routinely in general health care settings, smoking, alcohol, depression, and obesity screening and intervention (behavioral screening and intervention [BSI]) could substantially improve population health and reduce health care costs. Yet BSI is seldom delivered in an evidence-based manner. This article assesses the adequacy of quality measures for BSI. Online searches of the National Quality Forum's Quality Positioning System and the National Clearinghouse for Quality Measures databases were conducted using the keywords smoking, tobacco, alcohol, depression, and obesity The types and focuses of each measure were classified, and differences between the metrics and evidence-based practice were identified. Most measures indicate whether BSI components are delivered, not how well. Clinicians can perform well on most metrics without delivering evidence-based services. More rigorous quality measures are needed. A new kind of measure is proposed, whereby separate terms representing the reach and effectiveness of key BSI components are multiplied to produce a single indicator of population-level impact for each behavioral topic.

  19. Intervention with vitamins in patients with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolek MK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael K Smolek,1 Neil F Notaroberto,1,2 Arley G Jaramillo,1,2 Lisa R Pradillo1,2 1CLEVER Eye Institute, 2EyeCare 20/20, Slidell, LA, USA Background: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a combination of vitamins B6, B9, and B12 is an effective intervention for reducing the signs and symptoms of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Methods: Ten subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n = 20 eyes with clinically diagnosed mild to moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy were recruited from a private practice ophthalmology clinic for this open-label, uncontrolled, prospective six-month study. Metanx® vitamin tablets (containing 3 mg L-methylfolate calcium, 35 mg pyridoxal-5′-phosphate, and 2 mg methylcobalamin were administered at a dosage of two tablets daily. Primary outcome indicators were the percent change in mean retinal sensitivity threshold measured by macular microperimetry and the percent change in mean central retinal thickness measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Results: Three subjects were lost to follow-up. In the remaining seven subjects, two of 14 eyes had foveal edema that prevented microperimetry measurements due to poor fixation. The remaining 12 eyes showed a nonlinear improvement in mean threshold retinal sensitivity (P < 0.001. Overall change in mean central retinal thickness in 14 eyes was linear (R2 = 0.625; P = 0.034, with a significant reduction between one and six months (P = 0.012. Conclusion: In this pilot study, the Metanx intervention appeared to have some beneficial effects with respect to reducing retinal edema and increasing light sensitivity in subjects with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy. Keywords: diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, vitamin B, homocysteine, nitric oxide, microperimetry

  20. A pilot study assessing art therapy as a mental health intervention for subfertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Edward G; da Silva, Alicia Mann

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND Subfertility is a common but hidden source of anxiety, depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Counselling reduces this emotional burden and may even enhance the likelihood of pregnancy. Art therapy may be a useful intervention, because it facilitates the expression of feelings, both visually and verbally, and may ease emotional distress. METHODS Weekly 2-h art therapy group courses were held for a total of 21 subfertile women. The impact of subfertile women's support systems and barriers to coping were all explored. The effectiveness of art therapy was assessed using Beck Hopelessness, Depression and Anxiety Inventories, administered before and after participation, as well as a qualitative exit questionnaire. RESULTS The mean age of participants was 35.7 (SD 2.1) years and duration of infertility was 64 (12.0) months. Mean Beck Hopelessness Scale fell from 6.1 (3.8) to 3.5 (3.1, P = 0.01) after therapy. Beck Depression Inventory-II Score fell from 19.8 (11.0) to 12.5 (10.2, P = 0.01) and Beck Anxiety Inventory Score changed from 12.4 (8.4) to 8.4 (5.2, P = 0.3). Based on the exit questionnaire, women felt the course was insightful, powerful and enjoyable. CONCLUSIONS Art therapy is an inexpensive, non-pharmacological intervention, which was associated with decreased levels of hopelessness and depressed mood in subfertile women. It also provides insight into the meaning and emotional implications of subfertility for patients and caregivers. This pilot study highlights the need for further research in this field.

  1. Using Game Theoretic Models to Predict Pilot Behavior in NextGen Merging and Landing Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Yildiray; Lee, Ritchie; Brat, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an implementation of the Semi Network-Form Game framework to predict pilot behavior in a merging and landing scenario. In this scenario, two aircraft are approaching to a freeze horizon with approximately equal distance when they become aware of each other via an ADS-B communication link that will be available in NextGen airspace. Both pilots want to gain advantage over the other by entering the freeze horizon earlier and obtain the first place in landing. They re-adjust their speed accordingly. However, they cannot simply increase their speed to the maximum allowable values since they are concerned with safety, separation distance, effort, possibility of being vectored-off from landing and possibility of violating speed constraints. We present how to model these concerns and the rest of the system using semi network-from game framework. Using this framework, based on certain assumptions on pilot utility functions and on system configuration, we provide estimates of pilot behavior and overall system evolution in time. We also discuss the possible employment of this modeling tool for airspace design optimization. To support this discussion, we provide a case where we investigate the effect of increasing the merging point speed limit on the commanded speed distribution and on the percentage of vectored aircraft.

  2. Mindfulness-Based Intervention for Adolescents with Recurrent Headaches: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni Hesse

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent headaches cause significant burden for adolescents and their families. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs have been shown to reduce stress and alter the experience of pain, reduce pain burden, and improve quality of life. Research indicates that MBIs can benefit adults with chronic pain conditions including headaches. A pilot nonrandomized clinical trial was conducted with 20 adolescent females with recurrent headaches. Median class attendance was 7 of 8 total sessions; average class attendance was 6.10±2.6. Adherence to home practice was good, with participants reporting an average of 4.69 (SD = 1.84 of 6 practices per week. Five participants dropped out for reasons not inherent to the group (e.g., extracurricular scheduling; no adverse events were reported. Parents reported improved quality of life and physical functioning for their child. Adolescent participants reported improved depression symptoms and improved ability to accept their pain rather than trying to control it. MBIs appear safe and feasible for adolescents with recurrent headaches. Although participants did not report decreased frequency or severity of headache following treatment, the treatment had a beneficial effect for depression, quality of life, and acceptance of pain and represents a promising adjunct treatment for adolescents with recurrent headaches.

  3. An Exploratory Analysis of the Smoking and Physical Activity Outcomes From a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of an Exercise Assisted Reduction to Stop Smoking Intervention in Disadvantaged Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Tom Paul; Greaves, Colin J; Ayres, Richard; Aveyard, Paul; Warren, Fiona C; Byng, Richard; Taylor, Rod S; Campbell, John L; Ussher, Michael; Green, Colin; Michie, Susan; West, Robert; Taylor, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Economically disadvantaged smokers not intending to stop may benefit from interventions aimed at reducing their smoking. This study assessed the effects of a behavioral intervention promoting an increase in physical activity versus usual care in a pilot randomized controlled trial. Disadvantaged smokers who wanted to reduce but not quit were randomized to either a counseling intervention of up to 12 weeks to support smoking reduction and increased physical activity (n = 49) or usual care (n = 50). Data at 16 weeks were collected for various smoking and physical activity outcomes. Primary analyses consisted of an intention to treat analysis based on complete case data. Secondary analyses explored the impact of handling missing data. Compared with controls, intervention smokers were more likely to initiate a quit attempt (36 vs. 10%; odds ratio 5.05, [95% CI: 1.10; 23.15]), and a greater proportion achieved at least 50% reduction in cigarettes smoked (63 vs. 32%; 4.21 [1.32; 13.39]). Postquit abstinence measured by exhaled carbon monoxide at 4-week follow-up showed promising differences between groups (23% vs. 6%; 4.91 [0.80; 30.24]). No benefit of intervention on physical activity was found. Secondary analyses suggested that the standard missing data assumption of "missing" being equivalent to "smoking" may be conservative resulting in a reduced intervention effect. A smoking reduction intervention for economically disadvantaged smokers which involved personal support to increase physical activity appears to be more effective than usual care in achieving reduction and may promote cessation. The effect does not appear to be influenced by an increase in physical activity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Collaborating with Parents in Reducing Children's Challenging Behaviors: Linking Functional Assessment to Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Fettig

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between a functional assessment-based parent intervention and preschoolers' challenging behaviors was examined in the current study. A single subject design with a multiple baseline across 2 parent-child dyads was implemented. The researchers collaborated with parents to design the FA-based interventions and parents received varying levels of support throughout the study. Results indicate that parents were able to implement the functional assessment-based interventions, and these interventions effectively reduced children's challenging behaviors. In addition, parents continued implementing the intervention strategies following termination of the intervention, and children's challenging behaviors remained low.

  5. The Effects of the UK Pregnancies Better Eating and Activity Trial Intervention on Dietary Patterns in Obese Pregnant Women Participating in a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Angela C.; Schneeberger, Caroline; Seed, Paul T.; Barr, Suzanne; Poston, Lucilla; Goff, Louise M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of the UK Pregnancies Better Eating and Activity Trial (UPBEAT) behavioral intervention on dietary patterns in obese pregnant women. METHODS Dietary patterns were derived from Food Frequency Questionnaires using principal component analysis in 183 UPBEAT pilot study participants. RESULTS Two unhealthy dietary patterns, processed and traditional, predominantly characterized by foods high in sugar and fat, improved [processed −0.54 (−0.92 to −0.16), P = 0.006 and traditional −0.83 (−1.20 to −0.45), P < 0.001] following the intervention, while a cultural pattern that was found to be associated with the Black African/Caribbean participants did not change [−0.10 (−0.46 to 0.26), P = 0.589]. CONCLUSION Unhealthy dietary patterns are evident in obese pregnant women. The UPBEAT intervention was effective in improving maternal dietary patterns; however, obese pregnant women from minority ethnic groups may be less receptive to intervention. PMID:27385914

  6. Piloting a low-cost hardware intervention to reduce improper disposal of solid waste in communal toilets in low-income settlements in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeasmin, Farzana; Luby, Stephen P; Saxton, Ronald E; Nizame, Fosiul A; Alam, Mahbub-Ul; Dutta, Notan Chandra; Masud, Abdullah-Al; Yeasmin, Dalia; Layden, Anita; Rahman, Habibur; Abbott, Rachel; Unicomb, Leanne; Winch, Peter J

    2017-08-29

    Bangladesh faces daunting challenges in addressing the sanitation needs of its urban poor. Maintaining the cleanliness and functionality of communal toilets is dependent upon periodic emptying of fecal sludge, and cooperation between users of communal toilets. Trash disposal into latrines can block the outflow pipes, rendering the toilets non-functional. Pre-intervention: We conducted in-depth interviews with five operators of fecal sludge emptying equipment and five adult residents who were also caregivers of children. We identified factors contributing to improper disposal of trash into communal toilets, a barrier to operation of the equipment, in low-income communities of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Intervention design: We developed behavior change communication materials to discourage waste disposal in toilets, and promote use of waste bins. We conducted six focus group discussions with adult male, female, landlord and children to select the preferred design for waste bins to be placed inside toilets, and finalize communication materials. Post-intervention: We then pilot-tested an intervention package to promote appropriate trash disposal practices and thus facilitate periodic removal of fecal sludge when the latrine pits become full. We conducted 20 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with community residents, landlords and cleaners of communal toilets. Barriers to appropriate waste disposal included lack of private location for disposal of menstrual hygiene products, limited options for formal trash collection and disposal, and the use of plastic bags for disposing children's feces. A pilot intervention including behavior change communication and trash bins was implemented in two urban slum communities. Spot checks confirmed that the bins were in place and used. Respondents described positive improvements in the appearance of the toilet and surrounding environment. The current practice on the part of local residents of disposing of waste into toilets

  7. Ibobbly mobile health intervention for suicide prevention in Australian Indigenous youth: a pilot randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Fiona; Ridani, Rebecca; Mackinnon, Andrew; De La Mata, Nicole; Christensen, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Rates of youth suicide in Australian Indigenous communities are 4 times the national youth average and demand innovative interventions. Historical and persistent disadvantage is coupled with multiple barriers to help seeking. Mobile phone applications offer the opportunity to deliver therapeutic interventions directly to individuals in remote communities. The pilot study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-help mobile app (ibobbly) targeting suicidal ideation, depression, psychological distress and impulsivity among Indigenous youth in remote Australia. Setting Remote and very remote communities in the Kimberley region of North Western Australia. Participants Indigenous Australians aged 18–35 years. Interventions 61 participants were recruited and randomised to receive either an app (ibobbly) which delivered acceptance-based therapy over 6 weeks or were waitlisted for 6 weeks and then received the app for the following 6 weeks. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the Depressive Symptom Inventory—Suicidality Subscale (DSI-SS) to identify the frequency and intensity of suicidal ideation in the previous weeks. Secondary outcomes were the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) and the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11). Results Although preintervention and postintervention changes on the (DSI-SS) were significant in the ibobbly arm (t=2.40; df=58.1; p=0.0195), these differences were not significant compared with the waitlist arm (t=1.05; df=57.8; p=0.2962). However, participants in the ibobbly group showed substantial and statistically significant reductions in PHQ-9 and K10 scores compared with waitlist. No differences were observed in impulsivity. Waitlist participants improved after 6 weeks of app use. Conclusions Apps for suicide prevention reduce distress and depression but do not show significant reductions on suicide ideation or impulsivity. A feasible

  8. A yoga intervention for type 2 diabetes risk reduction: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem in many countries including India. Yoga may be an effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategy in India, particularly given its cultural familiarity. Methods This was a parallel, randomized controlled pilot study to collect feasibility and preliminary efficacy data on yoga for diabetes risk factors among people at high risk of diabetes. Primary outcomes included: changes in BMI, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and cholesterol. We also looked at measures of psychological well-being including changes in depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect and perceived stress. Forty-one participants with elevated fasting blood glucose in Bangalore, India were randomized to either yoga (n = 21) or a walking control (n = 20). Participants were asked to either attend yoga classes or complete monitored walking 3–6 days per week for eight weeks. Randomization and allocation was performed using computer-generated random numbers and group assignments delivered in sealed, opaque envelopes generated by off-site study staff. Data were analyzed based on intention to treat. Results This study was feasible in terms of recruitment, retention and adherence. In addition, yoga participants had significantly greater reductions in weight, waist circumference and BMI versus control (weight −0.8 ± 2.1 vs. 1.4 ± 3.6, p = 0.02; waist circumference −4.2 ± 4.8 vs. 0.7 ± 4.2, p yoga intervention and walking control over the course of the study. Conclusion Among Indians with elevated fasting blood glucose, we found that participation in an 8-week yoga intervention was feasible and resulted in greater weight loss and reduction in waist circumference when compared to a walking control. Yoga offers a promising lifestyle intervention for decreasing weight-related type 2 diabetes risk factors and potentially increasing

  9. Developing a Motion Comic for HIV/STD Prevention for Young People Ages 15-24, Part 2: Evaluation of a Pilot Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Leigh A; Kachur, Rachel; Castellanos, Ted J; Nichols, Kristen; Mendoza, Maria C B; Gaul, Zaneta J; Spikes, Pilgrim; Gamayo, Ashley C; Durham, Marcus D; LaPlace, Lisa; Straw, Julie; Staatz, Colleen; Buge, Hadiza; Hogben, Matthew; Robinson, Susan; Brooks, John; Sutton, Madeline Y

    2016-12-29

    In the United States, young people (ages 15-24 years) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), due at least in part to inadequate or incorrect HIV/STD-related knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behavioral intentions (KABI). Comic book narratives are a proven method of HIV/STD prevention communication to strengthen KABI for HIV/STD prevention. Motion comics, a new type of comic media, are an engaging and low-cost means of narrative storytelling. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot six-episode HIV/STD-focused motion comic series to improve HIV/STD-related KABI among young people. We assessed change in HIV/STD knowledge, HIV stigma, condom attitudes, HIV/STD testing attitudes, and behavioral intentions among 138 participants in 15 focus groups immediately before and after viewing the motion comic series. We used paired t-tests and indicators of overall improvement to assess differences between surveys. We found a significant decrease in HIV stigma (p comic intervention improved HIV/STD-related KABI of young adult viewers by reducing HIV stigma and increasing behavioral intentions to engage in safer sex. Our results demonstrate the promise of this novel intervention and support its use to deliver health messages to young people.

  10. The effects of macro-level interventions on addictive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacula, R L; Chaloupka, F J

    2001-12-01

    Drug addictions are often viewed as compulsive behaviors, not sensitive to the typical rules of self-discipline or market forces. Nonetheless, many governments try to discourage consumption of addictive substances through macro policy tools, such as taxation, regulation and prohibition, in an effort to reduce the harmful consequences that result from their consumption. The government's ability to discourage this type of behavior through these macro policies depends critically on the responsiveness of addictive consumption to market interventions. This paper reviews the growing literature that applies economic principles to the analysis of "substance abuse." Specifically, we review the impact of prices and public policies on the demands for tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs. The findings from these studies clearly demonstrate that even addictive behaviors are sensitive to changes in the price of substances being abused. When the full price of the addictive good rises, consumption of that good falls, even among abusers. Therefore, public policies that raise the full price of a drug to a consumer, particularly youth, are likely to result in long run reductions in rates of addiction.

  11. Theory-based behavior change interventions: comments on Hobbis and Sutton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Martin; Ajzen, Icek

    2005-01-01

    Hobbis and Sutton (this issue) suggest that Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) techniques can be used in interventions based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Although this suggestion has merit, CBT is only one of many applicable methods for producing belief and behavior change. Moreover, CBT's primary purpose is to help people carry out intended behaviors, not to influence intentions, and that it is more useful in face-to-face than in community-level interventions. Contrary to Hobbis and Sutton's critique, TPB can accommodate core beliefs or fundamental assumptions, but the theory suggests that interventions targeted at such beliefs are less effective than interventions targeted at behavior specific beliefs.

  12. Internet-based video-group delivery of Healthy Relationships--a "prevention with positives" intervention: report on a single group pilot test among women living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhefka, Stephanie L; Iziduh, Sharon; Fuhrmann, Hollie J; Lopez, Bernice; Glueckauf, Robert; Lynn, Vickie; Baldwin, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Women living with HIV (WLH) face challenges related to stigma, disclosure of HIV status, and negotiating safer sex. Several effective behavioral interventions, such as Healthy Relationships (HR), help WLH address these challenges and are disseminated by the USA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions project. However, many WLH living in poor urban or rural locations cannot access interventions such as HR because implementation is not feasible. Video-conferencing technology holds promise for expanding access to effective behavioral interventions for WLH. Following a systematic adaptation to the video-conferencing format, this pilot study tested the delivery of HR via video-group (VG) among WLH. The video-conferencing-based intervention, HR-VG, consisted of six, two-hour sessions led by two facilitators, and used structured activities and video-clips to build disclosure and safer sex skills. Four minority WLH received HR-VG at four different community-based intervention sites in a private room equipped with a video-phone for participating in HR-VG and a desktop computer for completing assessments via Audio Computer-Assisted Self Interview. Participants completed a baseline assessment prior to HR-VG and post-session assessment after each HR-VG session. The post-intervention assessment and video-focus group were completed following the last HR-VG session. Facilitators completed an assessment after each HR-VG session and an open-ended questionnaire following HR-VG. HR-VG was implemented in its entirety with minimal challenges. Both participants and facilitators reported feeling either "very comfortable" or "completely comfortable" with the technology and the overall intervention. Participants also reported high levels of unity and togetherness among the group. These preliminary findings suggest VG delivery of HR for WLH is both feasible and highly valued by participants. A follow-up randomized controlled trial

  13. A cognitive-existential intervention to improve existential and global quality of life in cancer patients: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Pierre; Fillion, Lise; Robitaille, Marie-Anik; Girard, Michèle; Tardif, François; Cochrane, Jean-Philippe; Le Moignan Moreau, Joanie; Breitbart, William

    2015-08-01

    We developed a specific cognitive-existential intervention to improve existential distress in nonmetastatic cancer patients. The present study reports the feasibility of implementing and evaluating this intervention, which involved 12 weekly sessions in both individual and group formats, and explores the efficacy of the intervention on existential and global quality of life (QoL) measures. Some 33 nonmetastatic cancer patients were randomized between the group intervention, the individual intervention, and the usual condition of care. Evaluation of the intervention on the existential and global QoL of patients was performed using the existential well-being subscale and the global scale of the McGill Quality of Life (MQoL) Questionnaire. All participants agreed that their participation in the program helped them deal with their illness and their personal life. Some 88.9% of participants agreed that this program should be proposed for all cancer patients, and 94.5% agreed that this intervention helped them to reflect on the meaning of their life. At post-intervention, both existential and psychological QoL improved in the group intervention versus usual care (p = 0.086 and 0.077, respectively). At the three-month follow-up, global and psychological QoL improved in the individual intervention versus usual care (p = 0.056 and 0.047, respectively). This pilot study confirms the relevance of the intervention and the feasibility of the recruitment and randomization processes. The data strongly suggest a potential efficacy of the intervention for existential and global quality of life, which will have to be confirmed in a larger study.

  14. A cognitive–existential intervention to improve existential and global quality of life in cancer patients: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAGNON, PIERRE; FILLION, LISE; ROBITAILLE, MARIE-ANIK; GIRARD, MICHÈLE; TARDIF, FRANÇOIS; COCHRANE, JEAN-PHILIPPE; LE MOIGNAN MOREAU, JOANIE; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2017-01-01

    Objective We developed a specific cognitive–existential intervention to improve existential distress in nonmetastatic cancer patients. The present study reports the feasibility of implementing and evaluating this intervention, which involved 12 weekly sessions in both individual and group formats, and explores the efficacy of the intervention on existential and global quality of life (QoL) measures. Method Some 33 nonmetastatic cancer patients were randomized between the group intervention, the individual intervention, and the usual condition of care. Evaluation of the intervention on the existential and global QoL of patients was performed using the existential well-being subscale and the global scale of the McGill Quality of Life (MQoL) Questionnaire. Results All participants agreed that their participation in the program helped them deal with their illness and their personal life. Some 88.9% of participants agreed that this program should be proposed for all cancer patients, and 94.5% agreed that this intervention helped them to reflect on the meaning of their life. At post-intervention, both existential and psychological QoL improved in the group intervention versus usual care (p = 0.086 and 0.077, respectively). At the three-month follow-up, global and psychological QoL improved in the individual intervention versus usual care (p = 0.056 and 0.047, respectively). Significance of results This pilot study confirms the relevance of the intervention and the feasibility of the recruitment and randomization processes. The data strongly suggest a potential efficacy of the intervention for existential and global quality of life, which will have to be confirmed in a larger study. PMID:25050872

  15. Sensory-Based Intervention for Children with Behavioral Problems: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Yunus, Farahiyah; Liu, Karen P.; Bissett, Michelle; Penkala, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Sensory-based intervention is a common approach used to address behavioral problems in children. Types of sensory-based intervention for children and details of the intervention effectiveness have not been systematically examined. This review examined the effectiveness and ideal types of sensory-based interventions for children with behavioral…

  16. Implementation Planning to Promote Parents' Treatment Integrity of Behavioral Interventions for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Lindsay M.; Collier-Meek, Melissa A.; Sanetti, Lisa M. H.; Feinberg, Adam B.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral interventions delivered across home and school settings can promote positive outcomes for youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Yet, stakeholders who deliver these interventions may struggle to implement interventions as intended. Low levels of treatment integrity can undermine potentially positive intervention outcomes. One way…

  17. Process evaluation of the Teamplay parenting intervention pilot: implications for recruitment, retention and course refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Sebire, Simon J; Bentley, Georgina F; Turner, Katrina M; Goodred, Joanna K; Fox, Kenneth R; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Lucas, Patricia J

    2013-12-01

    Parenting programs could provide effective routes to increasing children's physical activity and reducing screen-viewing. Many studies have reported difficulties in recruiting and retaining families in group parenting interventions. This paper uses qualitative data from the Teamplay feasibility trial to examine parents' views on recruitment, attendance and course refinement. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 intervention and 10 control group parents of 6-8 year old children. Topics discussed with the intervention group included parents' views on the recruitment, structure, content and delivery of the course. Topics discussed with the control group included recruitment and randomization. Interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and thematically analyzed. Many parents in both the intervention and control group reported that they joined the study because they had been thinking about ways to improve their parenting skills, getting ideas on how to change behavior, or had been actively looking for a parenting course but with little success in enrolling on one. Both intervention and control group parents reported that the initial promotional materials and indicative course topics resonated with their experiences and represented a possible solution to parenting challenges. Participants reported that the course leaders played an important role in helping them to feel comfortable during the first session, engaging anxious parents and putting parents at ease. The most commonly reported reason for parents returning to the course after an absence was because they wanted to learn new information. The majority of parents reported that they formed good relationships with the other parents in the group. An empathetic interaction style in which leaders accommodated parent's busy lives appeared to impact positively on course attendance. The data presented indicate that a face-to-face recruitment campaign which built trust and emphasized how the program was

  18. Development and evaluation of an intervention aiming to reduce fatigue in airline pilots: design of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drongelen, Alwin; van der Beek, Allard J; Hlobil, Hynek; Smid, Tjabe; Boot, Cécile R L

    2013-08-26

    A considerable percentage of flight crew reports to be fatigued regularly. This is partly caused by irregular and long working hours and the crossing of time zones. It has been shown that persistent fatigue can lead to health problems, impaired performance during work, and a decreased work-private life balance. It is hypothesized that an intervention consisting of tailored advice regarding exposure to daylight, optimising sleep, physical activity, and nutrition will lead to a reduction of fatigue in airline pilots compared to a control group, which receives a minimal intervention with standard available information. The study population will consist of pilots of a large airline company. All pilots who posses a smartphone or tablet, and who are not on sick leave for more than four weeks at the moment of recruitment, will be eligible for participation.In a two-armed randomised controlled trial, participants will be allocated to an intervention group that will receive the tailored advice to optimise exposure to daylight, sleep, physical activity and nutrition, and a control group that will receive standard available information. The intervention will be applied using a smartphone application and a website, and will be tailored on flight- and participant-specific characteristics. The primary outcome of the study is perceived fatigue. Secondary outcomes are need for recovery, duration and quality of sleep, dietary and physical activity behaviours, work-private life balance, general health, and sickness absence. A process evaluation will be conducted as well. Outcomes will be measured at baseline and at three and six months after baseline. This paper describes the development of an intervention for airline pilots, consisting of tailored advice (on exposure to daylight and sleep-, physical activity, and nutrition) applied into a smartphone application. Further, the paper describes the design of the randomised controlled trial evaluating the effect of the intervention on

  19. An intervention to improve care and reduce costs for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostrowski Shannon

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small percentage of high-risk patients accounts for a large proportion of Medicaid spending in the United States, which has become an urgent policy issue. Our objective was to pilot a novel patient-centered intervention for high-risk patients with frequent hospital admissions to determine its potential to improve care and reduce costs. Methods Community and hospital-based care management and coordination intervention with pre-post analysis of health care utilization. We enrolled Medicaid fee-for-service patients aged 18-64 who were admitted to an urban public hospital and identified as being at high risk for hospital readmission by a validated predictive algorithm. Enrolled patients were evaluated using qualitative and quantitative interview techniques to identify needs such as transportation to/advocacy during medical appointments, mental health/substance use treatment, and home visits. A community housing partner initiated housing applications in-hospital for homeless patients. Care managers facilitated appropriate discharge plans then worked closely with patients in the community using a harm reduction approach. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled; all were male, 18/19 were substance users, and 17/19 were homeless. Patients had a total of 64 inpatient admissions in the 12 months before the intervention, versus 40 in the following 12 months, a 37.5% reduction. Most patients (73.3% had fewer inpatient admissions in the year after the intervention compared to the prior year. Overall ED visits also decreased after study enrollment, while outpatient clinic visits increased. Yearly study hospital Medicaid reimbursements fell an average of $16,383 per patient. Conclusions A pilot intervention for high-cost patients shows promising results for health services usage. We are currently expanding our model to serve more patients at additional hospitals to see if the pilot's success can be replicated. Trial registration

  20. Behavioral Interventions in the Treatment of Pathological Gambling: A Review of Activity Scheduling and Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Nicki; Jackson, Alun C.; Thomas, Shane A.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive and behavioral interventions have been cautiously recommended as "best practice" in the treatment of pathological gambling. Behavioral interventions, using a range of techniques, have been the most commonly evaluated approach to the psychological treatment of pathological gambling. The recent literature evaluating behavioral treatments…

  1. Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacologic Interventions for Children's Distress during Painful Medical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Susan M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated efficacy of cognitive-behavioral intervention package and low-risk pharmacologic intervention (oral Valium) as compared with minimal treatment-attention control condition, in reducing children leukemia patients' distress during bone marrow aspirations. The cognitive-behavioral therapy reduced behavioral distress, pain ratings and pulse…

  2. Preventing disruptive behavior in early elementary schoolchildren: impact of a universal classroom-based preventive intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.C. van Lier (Pol)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractKnowledge about the development of children with disruptive behaviors, leading to disruptive disorders and related poor outcomes, guides prevention research in the development and evaluation of preventive interventions. The overview of effective interventions in this chapter showed that

  3. Meta-analyses on behavioral interventions to reduce the risk of transmission of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergidis, Paschalis I; Falagas, Matthew E

    2009-06-01

    Different behavioral interventions have found to be efficacious in reducing high-risk sexual activity. Interventions have been evaluated in both original research and meta-analytic reviews. Most of the studies have shown that interventions are efficacious among different study populations. In adolescents, both in- and out-of-the classroom interventions showed a decrease in the risk of unprotected sex. In African Americans, greater efficacy was found for interventions including peer education. For Latinos, effect was larger in interventions with segmentation in the same gender. Geographic and social isolation are barriers in approaching MSM. For IDUs, interventions provided within a treatment program have an impact on risk reduction above that produced by drug treatment alone. Finally, people diagnosed with HIV tend to reduce their sexual risk behavior. However, adherence to safe sex practices for life can be challenging. Relentless efforts for implementation of behavioral interventions to decrease high-risk behavior are necessary to decrease HIV transmission.

  4. Supportive intervention using a mobile phone in behavior modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hareva, David H; Okada, Hiroki; Kitawaki, Tomoki; Oka, Hisao

    2009-04-01

    The authors previously developed a mobile ecological momentary assessment (EMA) system as a real-time data collection device using a mobile phone. In this study, a real-time advice function and real-time reporting function were added to the previous system as a supportive intervention. The improved system was found to work effectively and was applied to several clinical cases, including patients with depressive disorder, dizziness, smoking habit, and bronchial asthma. The average patient compliance rate was high (89%) without the real-time advice and higher (93%) with the advice. The trends in clinical data for patients using a mobile EMA with/without the new function were analyzed for up to several months. In the case of dizziness, an improving trend in its clinical data was observed after applying the real-time advice, and in the case of depressive disorder, a stabilizing trend was observed. The mobile EMA system with the real-time advice function could be useful as a supportive intervention in behavior modification and for motivating patients in self-management of their disease.

  5. Supportive intervention using a mobile phone in behavior modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hareva,David H.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The authors previously developed a mobile ecological momentary assessment (EMA system as a real-time data collection device using a mobile phone. In this study, a real-time advice function and real-time reporting function were added to the previous system as a supportive intervention. The improved system was found to work effectively and was applied to several clinical cases, including patients with depressive disorder, dizziness, smoking habit, and bronchial asthma. The average patient compliance rate was high (89% without the real-time advice and higher (93% with the advice. The trends in clinical data for patients using a mobile EMA with/without the new function were analyzed for up to several months. In the case of dizziness, an improving trend in its clinical data was observed after applying the real-time advice, and in the case of depressive disorder, a stabilizing trend was observed. The mobile EMA system with the real-time advice function could be useful as a supportive intervention in behavior modification and for motivating patients in self-management of their disease.

  6. A comparison of family interventions to address adolescent risky behaviors: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tsui-Sui; Gibbs, Marilyn Beth; Clemen-Stone, Susan; Duffy, Sonia

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this integrative review is to describe, compare, and synthesize traditional and computer-based family interventions that aim to change adolescents' risky sexual behaviors and substance abuse. Family interventions have been shown to generate protective effects for preventing adolescents from risky behaviors. It is not clear, however, whether there are significant differences or similarities in the designs and effects of traditional and computer-based family interventions. An integrative literature review was conducted to describe and compare the designs and effects of traditional and computer-based family interventions. Both interventions have generated significant effects on reducing risky behavior among adolescents. Interventions guided by theory, tailored to participants' culture/gender, and which included sufficient boosting dosages in their designs demonstrated significant short- or long-term effects in terms of reducing adolescents' risky behaviors. Regardless of delivery method, well-designed family interventions are noted to maximize familial protective effects and reduce risky behaviors.

  7. Effectiveness of a Fundamental Motor Skill Intervention for 4-Year-Old Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Emily; Balogh, Robert; Lloyd, Meghann

    2015-01-01

    A wait-list control experimental design was employed to investigate the effectiveness of a fundamental motor skill intervention at improving the motor skills, adaptive behavior, and social skills of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (experimental n?=?5, control n?=?4); the impact of intervention intensity was also explored. The…

  8. Advancing Intervention Research in School Psychology: Finding the Balance between Process and Outcome for Social and Behavioral Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Reinke, Wendy M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2011-01-01

    School psychology research focused on child outcomes is critical for understanding which social and behavioral interventions affect children in schools. Yet effective interventions fulfill their promise when they fit their implementation contexts, are implemented well with existing resources, and can be sustained or scaled up to new populations.…

  9. Pilot program on patient dosimetry in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando [Clinical Sciences Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty and CHIDE, Tarapaca University, Arica (Chile); Radiology Department, Complutense University and San Carlos Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago (Chile); Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago, Chile and Faculty of Medicine, Diego Portales University, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the results of a pilot program on patient dosimetry carried out in Chile during the last 5 yr, using a biplane x-ray angiography system settled for pediatrics. This research was conducted in Latin America under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supporting programs on radiological protection (RP) of patients. Methods: Patient age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time, and two dosimetric quantities [air kerma-area product (P{sub ka}) and cumulative dose (CD) at the patient entrance reference point] were recorded for each procedure. Results: The study includes 544 patients grouped into four age groups. The distributions by age group were 150 for <1 yr; 203 for 1 to <5 yr; 97 for 5 to <10 yr; and 94 for 10 to <16 yr. Median values of P{sub ka} and CD for the four age groups were 0.94, 1.46, 2.13, and 5.03 Gy cm{sup 2} and 23.9, 26.8, 33.5, and 51.6 mGy, respectively. No significant statistical differences were found between diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A moderate correlation (r = 0.64) was seen between P{sub ka} and patient weight. Conclusions: The dose values reported in this paper were lower than those published in the previous work for the same age groups as a result of the optimization actions carried out by cardiologists and medical physicists with the support of the IAEA. Methodology and results will be used as a starting point for a wider survey in Chile and Latin America with the goal to obtain regional diagnostic reference levels as recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for interventional procedures.

  10. What is the benefit of the biomedical and behavioral interventions in preventing HIV transmission?

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Kuchenbecker

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTIntroduction:Scientific evidence supports the sinergy between biomedical and behavioral interventions aimed at preventing the transmission of HIV as a strategy to eradicate AIDS.Objective:To characterize comparatively the benefits from biomedical and behavioral interventions to prevent HIV transmission.Methods:Narrative review. We performed a comparative analysis of the benefits of studied interventions by means of estimating the number needed to treat (NNT). Evaluated interventions: ...

  11. A Boxing-Oriented Exercise Intervention for Obese Adolescent Males: Findings from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah P. Shultz, Lee Stoner, Danielle M. Lambrick, Andrew M. Lane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In New Zealand, obese Māori and Pasifika adolescents are at risk of numerous cardio-metabolic conditions with raising physical activity levels being proposed as a useful intervention. The present study used a mixed method design to explore the effects of a non-contact boxing-oriented training programme designed in terms of improvements to cardio-metabolic variables. Traditional recruitment strategies (media, referrals were employed, with limited success leading to 3 adolescent boys (14-15 y participating in the pilot intervention. Exercise sessions included 30 minutes of non-contact boxing training, followed by 30 minutes of progressive resistance training. Participants attended three 1h training sessions each week, for a total of 12 weeks. Physiological variables included anthropometric indices, visceral fat thickness, central blood pressures, central arterial stiffness (augmentation index: AIx, and carotid arterial stiffness (β. Results revealed that there was no trend for change in body weight (125.5 ± 12.1 kg vs. 126.5 ± 11.0 kg or BMI (39.3 ± 4.1 kg·m-2 vs. 39.0 ± 4.6 kg·m-2. However, there was a moderate decrease in visceral fat thickness (4.34 ± 2.51 cm vs 3.65 ± 1.11 cm, d = 0.36. There was no change in central pulse pressure (38.7 ± 7.3 mmHg vs. 38.3 ± 5.0 mmHg, however, there was a small improvement in β (3.01 ± 0.73 vs. 2.87 ± 0.84, d = 0.18. Focus group interview data with participants and their parents were used to explore issues related to motivation to participation. Results revealed participants commented on how the programme has led to new friendships, changes to their physical appearance, and increased physical fitness. Parents commented on increased self-confidence, better performance in school, and a willingness to take part in new activities. In conclusion, it appears participating in the boxing oriented training programme was motivating to participants who engaged and had some physiological benefits in obese

  12. Surgical nurses' attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer - a pilot study of an educational intervention on existential issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, C; Melin-Johansson, C; Henoch, I; Axelsson, B; Danielson, E

    2014-07-01

    This is a randomised controlled pilot study using a mixed methods design. The overall aim was to test an educational intervention on existential issues and to describe surgical nurses' perceived attitudes towards caring for patients dying of cancer. Specific aims were to examine whether the educational intervention consisting of lectures and reflective discussions, affects nurses' perceived confidence in communication and to explore nurses' experiences and reflections on existential issues after participating in the intervention. Forty-two nurses from three surgical wards at one hospital were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Nurses in both groups completed a questionnaire at equivalent time intervals: at baseline before the educational intervention, directly after the intervention, and 3 and 6 months later. Eleven face-to-face interviews were conducted with nurses directly after the intervention and 6 months later. Significant short-term and long-term changes were reported. Main results concerned the significant long-term effects regarding nurses' increased confidence and decreased powerlessness in communication, and their increased feelings of value when caring for a dying patient. In addition, nurses described enhanced awareness and increased reflection. Results indicate that an understanding of the patient's situation, derived from enhanced awareness and increased reflection, precedes changes in attitudes towards communication. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dietary Interventions in Multiple Sclerosis: Development and Pilot-Testing of an Evidence Based Patient Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann-Lorenz, Karin; Eilers, Marlene; von Geldern, Gloria; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Köpke, Sascha; Heesen, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary factors have been discussed to influence risk or disease course of multiple sclerosis (MS). Specific diets are widely used among patients with MS. Objective To design and pilot-test an evidence based patient education program on dietary factors in MS. Methods We performed a systematic literature search on the effectiveness of dietary interventions in MS. A web-based survey among 337 patients with MS and 136 healthy controls assessed knowledge, dietary habits and information needs. An interactive group education program was developed and pilot-tested. Results Fifteen randomised-controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the systematic review. Quality of evidence was low and no clear benefit could be seen. Patients with MS significantly more often adhered to a `Mediterranean Diet`(29.7% versus 14.0%, pnutrition and MS (43%). A pilot test of our newly developed patient education program with 13 participants showed excellent comprehensibility and the MS-specific content was judged as very important. However, the poor evidence base for dietary approaches in MS was perceived disappointing. Conclusions Development and pilot-testing of an evidence-based patient education program on nutrition and MS is feasible. Patient satisfaction with the program suffers from the lack of evidence. Further research should focus on generating evidence for the potential influence of lifestyle habits (diet, physical activity) on MS disease course thus meeting the needs of patients with MS. PMID:27764237

  14. Design and methods for a pilot randomized clinical trial involving exercise and behavioral activation to treat comorbid type 2 diabetes and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristin L; Pagoto, Sherry L; Handschin, Barbara; Panza, Emily; Bakke, Susan; Liu, Qin; Blendea, Mihaela; Ockene, Ira S; Ma, Yunsheng

    2011-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The comorbidity of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and depression is associated with poor glycemic control. Exercise has been shown to improve mood and glycemic control, but individuals with comorbid T2DM and depression are disproportionately sedentary compared to the general population and report more difficulty with exercise. Behavioral activation, an evidence-based depression psychotherapy, was designed to help people with depression make gradual behavior changes, and may be helpful to build exercise adherence in sedentary populations. This pilot randomized clinical trial will test the feasibility of a group exercise program enhanced with behavioral activation strategies among women with comorbid T2DM and depression. METHODS/DESIGN: Sedentary women with inadequately controlled T2DM and depression (N=60) will be randomly assigned to one of two conditions: exercise or usual care. Participants randomized to the exercise condition will attend 38 behavioral activation-enhanced group exercise classes over 24 weeks in addition to usual care. Participants randomized to the usual care condition will receive depression treatment referrals and print information on diabetes management via diet and physical activity. Assessments will occur at baseline and 3-, 6-, and 9-months following randomization. The goals of this pilot study are to demonstrate feasibility and intervention acceptability, estimate the resources and costs required to deliver the intervention and to estimate the standard deviation of continuous outcomes (e.g., depressive symptoms and glycosylated hemoglobin) in preparation for a fully-powered randomized clinical trial. DISCUSSION: A novel intervention that combines exercise and behavioral activation strategies could potentially improve glycemic control and mood in women with comorbid type 2 diabetes and depression. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01024790.

  15. NURTURE: Development and Pilot Testing of a Novel Parenting Intervention for Mothers with Histories of an Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runfola, Cristin D.; Zucker, Nancy L.; Von Holle, Ann; Mazzeo, Suzanne; Hodges, Eric A.; Perrin, Eliana M.; Bentley, Margaret E.; Ulman, T. Frances; Hoffman, Elizabeth R.; Forsberg, Sarah; Ålgars, Monica; Zerwas, Stephanie; Pisetsky, Emily M.; Taico Colie, L.C.S.W.; Kuhns, Rebecca A.; Hamer, Robert M.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the treatment development and pilot testing of a group parenting intervention, NURTURE (Networking, Uniting, and Reaching out To Upgrade Relationships and Eating), for mothers with histories of eating disorders. Method Based on focus group findings, extant research, and expert opinion, NURTURE was designed to be delivered weekly over 16 (1.5 hour) sessions via an interactive web conferencing forum. It comprises four modules: 1) laying the foundation, 2) general parenting skills, 3) eating and feeding, and 4) breaking the cycle of risk. Pilot testing was conducted with three groups of 3–6 mothers (N = 13) who had children ages 0–3 years to determine feasibility (e.g., retention), acceptability (e.g., feedback questionnaire responses), and preliminary efficacy. Maternal satisfaction with NURTURE and changes in mother-child feeding relationship measures, maternal feeding style, maternal self-efficacy, and maternal psychopathology (eating disorder, depression, and anxiety symptoms) across three time points (baseline, post-treatment, 6-month follow-up) were examined. All outcomes were exploratory. Results The intervention was well tolerated with a 100% retention rate. Feedback from mothers was generally positive and indicated that the groups provided an engaging, supportive experience to participants. We observed changes suggestive of improvement in self-reported maternal self-efficacy and competence with parenting. There were no notable changes in measures of maternal feeding style or psychopathology. Discussion NURTURE is a feasible, acceptable, and potentially valuable intervention for mothers with eating disorder histories. Results of this pilot will inform a larger randomized-controlled intervention to determine efficacy and impact on child outcomes. PMID:23983082

  16. Health behaviors of mandated and voluntary students in a motivational intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Intervention programs to reduce drinking by college students need to address developmental dynamics of freshmen students, including gender, psychosocial factors, personality, and lifestyle health-promoting behaviors.

  17. A livelihood intervention to improve economic and psychosocial well-being in rural Uganda: Longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Kakuhikire

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV and poverty are inextricably intertwined in sub-Saharan Africa. Economic and livelihood intervention strategies have been suggested to help mitigate the adverse economic effects of HIV, but few intervention studies have focused specifically on HIV-positive persons. We conducted three pilot studies to assess a livelihood intervention consisting of an initial orientation and loan package of chickens and associated implements to create poultry microenterprises. We enrolled 15 HIV-positive and 22 HIV-negative participants and followed them for up to 18 months. Over the course of follow-up, participants achieved high chicken survival and loan repayment rates. Median monthly income increased, and severe food insecurity declined, although these changes were not statistically significant (P-values ranged from 0.11 to 0.68. In-depth interviews with a purposive sample of three HIV-positive participants identified a constellation of economic and psychosocial benefits, including improved social integration and reduced stigma.

  18. Comparison of a smartphone app for alcohol use disorders with an Internet-based intervention plus bibliotherapy: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Vivian M; Dulin, Patrick L

    2015-04-01

    To date, no research has evaluated the efficacy of a stand-alone, smartphone-based intervention for individuals with an alcohol use disorder. The current pilot study evaluated the short-term outcomes of a smartphone-based intervention for alcohol use disorders compared with an Internet-based brief motivational intervention plus bibliotherapy. Adults (18 to 45 years old) with an alcohol use disorder received either the Location-Based Monitoring and Intervention for Alcohol Use Disorders (LBMI-A; n = 28), a smartphone-based intervention, or the online Drinker's Check-up plus bibliotherapy (DCU + bib; n = 26). These groups were compared using the Timeline Followback interview for percent days abstinent (PDA), percent heavy drinking days (PHDD), and drinks per week (DPW) from baseline to 6 weeks after the introduction of the interventions. Multilevel models revealed that the LBMI-A resulted in a significant increase in PDA over the course of the study, whereas the DCU + bib did not. Effect sizes for change from baseline for PDA suggest that the DCU + bib resulted in moderate a decrease, whereas the LBMI-A resulted in a large increase in PDA. Both interventions resulted in significant decreases in PHDD and DPW. The LBMI-A produced larger reductions in the first 3 to 4 weeks after the intervention was introduced than the DCU + bib. On weeks with greater LBMI-A usage, participants reported less DPW and PHDD. Both interventions resulted in significant decreases in alcohol use over the 6-week trial, which is promising for stand-alone technology-based intervention systems aimed at individuals with an alcohol use disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Two-Arm Randomized Pilot Intervention Trial to Decrease Sitting Time and Increase Sit-To-Stand Transitions in Working and Non-Working Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Takemoto, Michelle; Bolling, Khalisa; Atkin, Andrew; Carlson, Jordan; Rosenberg, Dori; Crist, Katie; Godbole, Suneeta; Lewars, Brittany; Pena, Claudia; Merchant, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Excessive sitting has been linked to poor health. It is unknown whether reducing total sitting time or increasing brief sit-to-stand transitions is more beneficial. We conducted a randomized pilot study to assess whether it is feasible for working and non-working older adults to reduce these two different behavioral targets. Thirty adults (15 workers and 15 non-workers) age 50-70 years were randomized to one of two conditions (a 2-hour reduction in daily sitting or accumulating 30 additional brief sit-to-stand transitions per day). Sitting time, standing time, sit-to-stand transitions and stepping were assessed by a thigh worn inclinometer (activPAL). Participants were assessed for 7 days at baseline and followed while the intervention was delivered (2 weeks). Mixed effects regression analyses adjusted for days within participants, device wear time, and employment status. Time by condition interactions were investigated. Recruitment, assessments, and intervention delivery were feasible. The 'reduce sitting' group reduced their sitting by two hours, the 'increase sit-to-stand' group had no change in sitting time (p sit-to-stand transition group increased their sit-to-stand transitions, the sitting group did not (p < .001). This study was the first to demonstrate the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of specific sedentary behavioral goals. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02544867.

  20. The person-based approach to intervention development: application to digital health-related behavior change interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Lucy; Morrison, Leanne; Bradbury, Katherine; Muller, Ingrid

    2015-01-30

    This paper describes an approach that we have evolved for developing successful digital interventions to help people manage their health or illness. We refer to this as the "person-based" approach to highlight the focus on understanding and accommodating the perspectives of the people who will use the intervention. While all intervention designers seek to elicit and incorporate the views of target users in a variety of ways, the person-based approach offers a distinctive and systematic means of addressing the user experience of intended behavior change techniques in particular and can enhance the use of theory-based and evidence-based approaches to intervention development. There are two key elements to the person-based approach. The first is a developmental process involving qualitative research with a wide range of people from the target user populations, carried out at every stage of intervention development, from planning to feasibility testing and implementation. This process goes beyond assessing acceptability, usability, and satisfaction, allowing the intervention designers to build a deep understanding of the psychosocial context of users and their views of the behavioral elements of the intervention. Insights from this process can be used to anticipate and interpret intervention usage and outcomes, and most importantly to modify the intervention to make it more persuasive, feasible, and relevant to users. The second element of the person-based approach is to identify "guiding principles" that can inspire and inform the intervention development by highlighting the distinctive ways that the intervention will address key context-specific behavioral issues. This paper describes how to implement the person-based approach, illustrating the process with examples of the insights gained from our experience of carrying out over a thousand interviews with users, while developing public health and illness management interventions that have proven effective in trials

  1. Cognitive changes in cardiovascular patients following a tailored behavioral smoking cessation intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, FJ; Dijkstra, A; de Haes, JCJM; Legemate, DA; Smets, EMA

    2005-01-01

    Background. Action aimed at changing smoking behavior to prevent cardiovascular patients from further impairing their health is advisable. Cognitive behavioral interventions can be effective in this regard since they attempt to influence cognitive determinants that presumably lead to smoking cessati

  2. Improving social functioning and challenging behaviors in adolescents with ASD and significant ID: A randomized pilot feasibility trial of reciprocal imitation training in a residential setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Berger, Natalie; Carlsen, Danielle; Hamlin, Theresa

    2016-08-11

    There is a lack of effective social interventions for youths with ASD and co-morbid intellectual disability (ID). A previous single-case design study indicated that reciprocal imitation training (RIT) may improve social interaction and challenging behavior in this population. The current pilot study examined the feasibility of conducting an RCT to investigate the effectiveness of RIT for improving social functioning and challenging behaviors in 20 adolescents with ASD and severe ID in a residential program. The assessment protocol was feasible. RIT was well-tolerated by the adolescents and implemented with fidelity by teaching staff. Preliminary findings indicate that treatment had moderate to large effects on social functioning and challenging behavior, with mixed findings for imitation skills. A larger RCT of RIT for this population is feasible and warranted.

  3. A multimedia mobile phone-based youth smoking cessation intervention: findings from content development and piloting studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph; McRobbie, Hayden; Bullen, Chris; Denny, Simon; Dorey, Enid; Ellis-Pegler, Mary; van Rooyen, Jaco; Rodgers, Anthony

    2008-11-25

    While most young people who smoke want to quit, few access cessation support services. Mobile phone-based cessation programs are ideal for young people: mobile phones are the most common means of peer communication, and messages can be delivered in an anonymous manner, anywhere, anytime. Following the success of our text messaging smoking cessation program, we developed an innovative multimedia mobile phone smoking cessation intervention. The aim of the study was to develop and pilot test a youth-oriented multimedia smoking cessation intervention delivered solely by mobile phone. Development included creating content and building the technology platform. Content development was overseen by an expert group who advised on youth development principles, observational learning (from social cognitive theory), effective smoking cessation interventions, and social marketing. Young people participated in three content development phases (consultation via focus groups and an online survey, content pre-testing, and selection of role models). Video and text messages were then developed, incorporating the findings from this research. Information technology systems were established to support the delivery of the multimedia messages by mobile phone. A pilot study using an abbreviated 4-week program of video and text content tested the reliability of the systems and the acceptability of the intervention. Approximately 180 young people participated in the consultation phase. There was a high priority placed on music for relaxation (75%) and an interest in interacting with others in the program (40% would read messages, 36% would read a blog). Findings from the pre-testing phase (n = 41) included the importance of selecting "real" and "honest" role models with believable stories, and an interest in animations (37%). Of the 15 participants who took part in the pilot study, 13 (87%) were available for follow-up interviews at 4 weeks: 12 participants liked the program or liked it most

  4. A boxing-oriented exercise intervention for obese adolescent males: findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sarah P; Stoner, Lee; Lambrick, Danielle M; Lane, Andrew M

    2014-12-01

    In New Zealand, obese Māori and Pasifika adolescents are at risk of numerous cardio-metabolic conditions with raising physical activity levels being proposed as a useful intervention. The present study used a mixed method design to explore the effects of a non-contact boxing-oriented training programme designed in terms of improvements to cardio-metabolic variables. Traditional recruitment strategies (media, referrals) were employed, with limited success leading to 3 adolescent boys (14-15 y) participating in the pilot intervention. Exercise sessions included 30 minutes of non-contact boxing training, followed by 30 minutes of progressive resistance training. Participants attended three 1h training sessions each week, for a total of 12 weeks. Physiological variables included anthropometric indices, visceral fat thickness, central blood pressures, central arterial stiffness (augmentation index: AIx), and carotid arterial stiffness (β). Results revealed that there was no trend for change in body weight (125.5 ± 12.1 kg vs. 126.5 ± 11.0 kg) or BMI (39.3 ± 4.1 kg·m(-2) vs. 39.0 ± 4.6 kg·m(-2)). However, there was a moderate decrease in visceral fat thickness (4.34 ± 2.51 cm vs 3.65 ± 1.11 cm, d = 0.36). There was no change in central pulse pressure (38.7 ± 7.3 mmHg vs. 38.3 ± 5.0 mmHg), however, there was a small improvement in β (3.01 ± 0.73 vs. 2.87 ± 0.84, d = 0.18). Focus group interview data with participants and their parents were used to explore issues related to motivation to participation. Results revealed participants commented on how the programme has led to new friendships, changes to their physical appearance, and increased physical fitness. Parents commented on increased self-confidence, better performance in school, and a willingness to take part in new activities. In conclusion, it appears participating in the boxing oriented training programme was motivating to participants who engaged and had some physiological benefits in obese

  5. On becoming a coach: a pilot intervention study with managers in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Greta; Mallidou, Anastasia A; Masaoud, Elmabrok; Kumbamu, Ashok; Schalm, Corinne; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Health care leaders have called for the development of communication and leadership skills to improve manager-employee relationships, employee job satisfaction, quality care, and work environments. The aim of the study reported here was to pilot how a 2-day coaching workshop ("Coaching for Impressive CARE") conducted as a leadership development strategy influenced frontline care managers' coaching practices in residential long-term care (LTC) settings. We had four objectives: (a) to identify managers' perceptions of their role as a coach of employee performance in LTC facilities, (b) to understand managers' intentions to coach employee performance, (c) to examine opportunities and factors that contributed to or challenged implementation of workshop coaching skills in daily leadership/management practice, and (d) to examine managers' reports of using coaching practices and employee responses after the workshop. We used an exploratory/descriptive design involving pre-/post-workshop surveys, e-mail reminders, and focus groups to examine participation of 21 LTC managers in a 2-day coaching workshop and their use of coaching practices in the workplace. Focus group findings provided examples of how participants used their coaching skills in practice (e.g., communicating empathy) and how staff responded. Factors contributing to and challenging implementation of these coaching skills in the workplace were identified. Attitudes and intentions to be a coach increased significantly, and some coaching skills were used more frequently after the workshop, specifically planning for performance change with employees. The coaching workshop was feasible to implement, well received by participants, influenced their willingness to become coaches, and had some noted impact on their use of coaching behaviors in the workplace. Coaching skills by managers to improve staff performance with residents in LTC facilities can be learned.

  6. Comparing telehealth-based and clinic-based group cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depression and anxiety: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatri N

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nasreen Khatri, Elsa Marziali, Illia Tchernikov, Nancy ShepherdRotman Research Institute, Toronto, ON, CanadaBackground: The primary objective of this pilot study was to demonstrate reliable adherence to a group cognitive behavioral (CBT therapy protocol when delivered using on-line video conferencing as compared with face-to-face delivery of group CBT. A secondary aim was to show comparability of changes in subject depression inventory scores between on-line and face-to-face delivery of group CBT.Methods: We screened 31 individuals, 18 of whom met the criteria for a DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition diagnosis of mood and/or anxiety disorder. All qualifying participants had the necessary equipment (computer, webcam, Internet for participation in the study, but could exercise their preference for either the on-line or face-to-face format. Eighteen completed the 13 weekly session intervention program (ten face-to-face; eight video conferencing. We coded adherence to protocol in both intervention formats and generated pre–post changes in scores on the Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition (BDI-II for each participant.Results: Application of the CBT protocol coding system showed reliable adherence to the group CBT intervention protocol in both delivery formats. Similarly, qualitative analysis of the themes in group discussion indicated that both groups addressed similar issues. Pre–post intervention scores for the BDI-II were comparable across the two delivery formats, with 60% of participants in each group showing a positive change in BDI-II severity classification (eg, from moderate to low symptoms.Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrates that group CBT could be delivered in a technology-supported environment (on-line video conferencing and can meet the same professional practice standards and outcomes as face-to-face delivery of the intervention program.Keywords: psychotherapy, gerontology, mood

  7. The behavioral intervention technology model: an integrated conceptual and technological framework for eHealth and mHealth interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C; Schueller, Stephen M; Montague, Enid; Burns, Michelle Nicole; Rashidi, Parisa

    2014-06-05

    A growing number of investigators have commented on the lack of models to inform the design of behavioral intervention technologies (BITs). BITs, which include a subset of mHealth and eHealth interventions, employ a broad range of technologies, such as mobile phones, the Web, and sensors, to support users in changing behaviors and cognitions related to health, mental health, and wellness. We propose a model that conceptually defines BITs, from the clinical aim to the technological delivery framework. The BIT model defines both the conceptual and technological architecture of a BIT. Conceptually, a BIT model should answer the questions why, what, how (conceptual and technical), and when. While BITs generally have a larger treatment goal, such goals generally consist of smaller intervention aims (the "why") such as promotion or reduction of specific behaviors, and behavior change strategies (the conceptual "how"), such as education, goal setting, and monitoring. Behavior change strategies are instantiated with specific intervention components or "elements" (the "what"). The characteristics of intervention elements may be further defined or modified (the technical "how") to meet the needs, capabilities, and preferences of a user. Finally, many BITs require specification of a workflow that defines when an intervention component will be delivered. The BIT model includes a technological framework (BIT-Tech) that can integrate and implement the intervention elements, characteristics, and workflow to deliver the entire BIT to users over time. This implementation may be either predefined or include adaptive systems that can tailor the intervention based on data from the user and the user's environment. The BIT model provides a step towards formalizing the translation of developer aims into intervention components, larger treatments, and methods of delivery in a manner that supports research and communication between investigators on how to design, develop, and deploy BITs.

  8. Cognitive Behavior Therapy to Treat Sleep Disturbance and Fatigue After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Sylvia; McKay, Adam; Wong, Dana; Rajaratnam, Shantha M; Spitz, Gershon; Williams, Gavin; Mansfield, Darren; Ponsford, Jennie L

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of adapted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for sleep disturbance and fatigue in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Parallel 2-group randomized controlled trial. Outpatient therapy. Adults (N=24) with history of TBI and clinically significant sleep and/or fatigue complaints were randomly allocated to an 8-session adapted CBT intervention or a treatment as usual (TAU) condition. Cognitive behavior therapy. The primary outcome was the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) posttreatment and at 2-month follow-up. Secondary measures included the Insomnia Severity Index, Fatigue Severity Scale, Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. At follow-up, CBT recipients reported better sleep quality than those receiving TAU (PSQI mean difference, 4.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.56-7.14). Daily fatigue levels were significantly reduced in the CBT group (BFI difference, 1.54; 95% CI, 0.66-2.42). Secondary improvements were significant for depression. Large within-group effect sizes were evident across measures (Hedges g=1.14-1.93), with maintenance of gains 2 months after therapy cessation. Adapted CBT produced greater and sustained improvements in sleep, daily fatigue levels, and depression compared with TAU. These pilot findings suggest that CBT is a promising treatment for sleep disturbance and fatigue after TBI. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gamification of active travel to school: A pilot evaluation of the Beat the Street physical activity intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Emma; Jones, Andy

    2016-05-01

    Beat the Street aims to get children more active by encouraging them to walk and cycle in their neighbourhood using tracking technology with a reward scheme. This pilot study evaluates the impact of Beat the Street on active travel to school in Norwich, UK. Eighty children 8-10 yrs were recruited via an intervention and control school. They wore an accelerometer for 7 days at baseline, mid-intervention and post-intervention (+20 weeks), and completed a travel diary. Physical activity overall was not higher at follow-up amongst intervention children compared to controls. However, there was a positive association between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during school commute times and the number of days on which children touched a Beat the Street sensor. This equated to 3.46min extra daily MVPA during commute times for children who touched a sensor on 14.5 days (the mean number of days), compared to those who did not engage. We also found weekly active travel increased at the intervention school (+10.0% per child) while it decreased at the control (-7.0%), p=0.056. Further work is needed to understand how improved engagement with the intervention might impact outcomes.

  10. IDEAS (Integrate, Design, Assess, and Share): A Framework and Toolkit of Strategies for the Development of More Effective Digital Interventions to Change Health Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummah, Sarah Ann; Robinson, Thomas N; King, Abby C; Gardner, Christopher D; Sutton, Stephen

    2016-12-16

    Developing effective digital interventions to change health behavior has been a challenging goal for academics and industry players alike. Guiding intervention design using the best combination of approaches available is necessary if effective technologies are to be developed. Behavioral theory, design thinking, user-centered design, rigorous evaluation, and dissemination each have widely acknowledged merits in their application to digital health interventions. This paper introduces IDEAS, a step-by-step process for integrating these approaches to guide the development and evaluation of more effective digital interventions. IDEAS is comprised of 10 phases (empathize, specify, ground, ideate, prototype, gather, build, pilot, evaluate, and share), grouped into 4 overarching stages: Integrate, Design, Assess, and Share (IDEAS). Each of these phases is described and a summary of theory-based behavioral strategies that may inform intervention design is provided. The IDEAS framework strives to provide sufficient detail without being overly prescriptive so that it may be useful and readily applied by both investigators and industry partners in the development of their own mHealth, eHealth, and other digital health behavior change interventions.

  11. Pilot survey of a novel incentive to promote healthy behavior among school children and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Kwang Yoo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversing the obesity epidemic has been a persistent global public health challenge, particularly among low socioeconomic status populations and racial/ethnic minorities. We developed a novel concept of community-based incentives to approach this problem in such communities. Applying this concept, we proposed a school intervention to promote obesity prevention in the U.S. We conducted a pilot survey to explore attitudes towards this future intervention. The survey was collected as a nonprobability sample (N = 137 school-aged children (5–12 years in northern California in July 2013. We implemented multivariable logistic regression analyses where the dependent variable indicated the intention to participate in the future intervention. The covariates included the body mass index (BMI based weight categories, demographics, and others. We found that the future intervention is expected to motivate generally-high-risk populations (such as children and parents who have never joined a past health-improvement program compared to those who have completed a past health-improvement program (the odds-ratio (OR = 5.84, p < 0.05 and children with an obese/overweight parent (OR = 2.72, p < 0.05 compared to those without one to participate in future obesity-prevention activities. Our analyses also showed that some subgroups of high-risk populations, such as Hispanic children (OR = 0.27, p < 0.05 and children eligible for a free or reduced price meal program (OR = 0.37, p < 0.06, remain difficult to reach and need an intensive outreach activity for the future intervention. The survey indicated high interest in the future school intervention among high-risk parents who have never joined a past health-improvement program or are obese/overweight. These findings will help design and implement a future intervention.

  12. Review of recent behavioral interventions targeting older adults living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illa, Lourdes; Echenique, Marisa; Bustamante-Avellaneda, Victoria; Sanchez-Martinez, Mario

    2014-12-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to older adults living with HIV over the past few years given the increasing prevalence of HIV in this age group. Yet, despite numerous studies documenting psychosocial and behavioral differences between older and younger HIV-infected adults, few evidence-based behavioral interventions have been developed for this population. This review found only 12 manuscripts describing behavioral intervention studies in older HIV-positive adults published between 2011 and 2014, and they reported on a total of six interventions. Despite promising findings, there is a clear need for large-scale clinical trials to replicate these initial results and further develop additional interventions to address important clinical issues such as depression, sexual risk behaviors, cognition, and other significant issues affecting this cohort. This represents an exciting opportunity for behavioral scientists and HIV specialists to develop interventions that combine the psychological and behavioral with medical aspects of the disease.

  13. The impact of a pilot cooking intervention for parent-child dyads on the consumption of foods prepared away from home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Shannon M; Stough, Cathleen Odar; Stark, Lori J

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study investigated the impact of a parent-child dyad cooking intervention on reducing eating dinner away from home. Eating away from home often results in consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods that can contribute to excess energy consumption in children. A pre-post design to evaluate a 10-week cooking intervention on reducing eating dinner away from home, energy intake, and improving diet quality was implemented. The intervention was delivered at an instructional kitchen on a university campus and assessments were completed at a children's academic medical center. Subjects included six parent-child dyads whom reported eating dinner away from home ≥3 times/week and in which the parent was overweight based on their body mass index (BMI) of ≥25 kg/m(2). Parents were a mean age of 34.7 (SD = 3.9) years, and children were a mean age of 8.7 (SD = 2.0) years. Two-thirds of parents self-identified themselves and their children as White. Results showed the proportion of dinners consumed by parent-child dyads away from home significantly decreased (F (1,161) = 16.1, p < 0.05) from 56% at baseline to 25% at post-treatment. Dyad cholesterol intake at dinner also significantly decreased over time; however, changes in energy intake, total fat, saturated fat, and sodium at dinner were not significant. A large effect size was found for changes in parent ratings of enjoyment of cooking between baseline and post-treatment. A cooking intervention that involves parent-child dyads and incorporates behavior management strategies and nutrition education may be an innovative obesity prevention intervention.

  14. The efficacy of computerized alcohol intervention tailored to drinking motives among college students: a quasi-experimental pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Natale; Vieno, Alessio; Santinello, Massimo; Chieco, Francesca; Andriolo, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    Although motivational processes may influence the intervention effects and help prevention programmes identify students at great risk for alcohol-related problems, no computerized alcohol intervention has yet to be tailored to drinking motives. To describe the development and initial pilot testing of a computer-delivered intervention tailored to drinking motives, to prevent alcohol abuse and its adverse consequences among university students in general and among baseline hazardous drinkers specifically. 124 college students attending a public university in northeastern Italy participated in this study in October of 2012 (89.2% female- mean age = 21.64-34% baseline hazardous drinkers). Two classes (one undergraduate, one graduate) were assigned to one of two conditions: intervention and control group. Both groups received profile-specific feedback and then the intervention group received profile-specific online training for 4 weeks. This profile was based on their risk type (high-low) and drinking motives (enhancement-social-conformity-coping). Controlling for corresponding baseline alcohol measures, analyses showed a significant interaction between intervention condition and hazardous drinkers at baseline. For hazardous drinkers at baseline, the alcohol intervention results showed a significant decrease in frequency and quantity of alcohol use at follow-up, while no difference was observed between intervention conditions for non-hazardous drinkers at baseline. The results suggest that hazardous drinkers (college students) who completed the specific training and received personalized feedback seemed to do better on frequency and quantity of alcohol use than hazardous drinkers (college students) who received only personalized feedback. These results seem to provide support for a larger trial of the intervention and for more appropriate evaluations.

  15. [Pilot study about the effectivity of an intervention based on games in nutritional status and muscle strength on children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Sánchez, Johana Patricia; Pavez Saldiviar, Nicolás Fernando; Bravo-Gatica, Javier Ignacio; White Ortiz, Alan Rigoberto; Jaque Fernández, Francisco Ignacio; Vargas-Gyllen, Cristian Ignacio; Arriagada Cárdenas, Sandra; Carrasco Naranjo, Fernando; Cano-Cappellacci, Marcelo Antonio

    2014-07-01

    The overnutrition is a constant on developing countries; Chile is not an exception because it has a marked tendency to overweight and obesity in schoolchildren. The muscular strength has been associated with cardiovascular and metabolic health status in scholars. Effective interventions using games are needed to improve the nutritional status and physical fitness in school children. To assess the intervention effectiveness based on games played at school time to improve the nutritional status and physical fitness in schoolchildren. 156 students aged between 7 to 15 years, attending to two public schools with full school day, to which a pilot program was applied. This pilot program was based on dynamic recreational games during 45 minutes from monday to friday for 3 months in the largest playtime of the school day. At the end of the intervention, we observed a significant modification on children nutritional status, which highlights an increase in the number of children that reached the normal nutritional status (p nutritional status (p nutritional status. However, we didn't observed modifications in the muscular strength. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Sarah; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigates the comparative effects of sensory-integration therapy and behavioral interventions on rates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in a 9-year-old boy with diagnosis of autism. A functional analysis was conducted to identify the variables maintaining the self-injurious behavior. This analysis demonstrated that SIB was…

  17. The Effects of Function-Based Self-Management Interventions on Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) struggle to achieve social and academic outcomes. Many studies have demonstrated self-management interventions to be effective at reducing problem behavior and increasing positive social and academic behaviors. Functional behavior assessment (FBA) information may be used in designing…

  18. The Effects of Function-Based Self-Management Interventions on Student Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) struggle to achieve social and academic outcomes. Many studies have demonstrated self-management interventions to be effective at reducing problem behavior and increasing positive social and academic behaviors. Functional behavior assessment (FBA) information may be used in designing…

  19. ABA and PBS: The Dangers in Creating Artificial Dichotomies in Behavioral Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mary Jane; DelPizzo-Cheng, Eliza; LaRue, Robert H.; Sloman, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of controversy regarding the definition and independence of Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS) within the context of behavioral intervention. Specifically, behavior analysts have argued over whether PBS is subsumed within Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) or whether it can be considered a separate…

  20. A Qualitative Investigation of the Impact of a Livelihood Intervention on Gendered Power and Sexual Risk Behaviors Among HIV-Positive Adults in Rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaras, Jennifer M; Weiser, Sheri D; Hatcher, Abigail M; Weke, Elly; Burger, Rachel L; Cohen, Craig R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Dworkin, Shari L

    2017-05-01

    Despite the recognized links between food insecurity, poverty, and the risk of HIV/AIDS, few randomized trials have evaluated the impact of livelihood interventions on HIV risk behaviors. The current study draws upon data collected from a qualitative process evaluation that was embedded into a pilot randomized controlled trial that tested whether a multisectoral agricultural intervention (Shamba Maisha) affected the HIV-related health of HIV-positive adults in rural Kenya. In the current study, we drew upon longitudinal, in-depth interviews with 45 intervention participants and nine control participants (N = 54) in order to examine the impacts of the intervention on gendered power and sexual risk reduction among both women and men. Female and male participants in the intervention described positive changes in sexual practices and gendered power dynamics as a result of intervention participation. Changes included reduced sexual risk behaviors, improved gender-related power dynamics, and enhanced quality of intimate relationships. These findings illuminate how a multisectoral agricultural intervention may affect inequitable gender relations and secondary transmission risk. Further research is needed to explore how to best leverage agricultural interventions to address the important intersections between poverty and inequitable gender relations that shape HIV risks.

  1. A Blended Intervention for Patients With Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis in the Physical Therapy Practice: Development and a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Daniël; Kloek, Corelien; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny; Veenhof, Cindy

    2016-02-24

    Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face care, is seen as a promising treatment option. However, actual use of blended interventions in practice is disappointing. The objective of this study was two folded. The first aim was to develop a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis that matches the values of the users and that can be implemented in the daily routine of physical therapists. The second aim was to investigate the feasibility through interviews and a pilot study. In this paper, we employed the first 3 steps of the CeHRes road map to develop a blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. We used interviews, a focus group and discussions with stakeholders to explore the needs, values, and requirements with respect to our to-be-developed blended intervention, which we called e-Exercise. The first version of e-Exercise was tested in a pilot study. Feasibility outcomes, including recruitment rates within each practice, website usage (assignments completed and website visits), and user satisfaction, were measured. In addition, therapists and patients from the pilot study were interviewed to investigate users' experiences. The study captured important information about stakeholders' needs and perspectives. Based on our findings, we created a first version and attuned the application's content, functionality, and structure. Patients and, to lesser extent, physical therapists were satisfied with the e-Exercise intervention. Eight patients were recruited by 8 physical therapists. Of the 8 patients, 6 completed more than 7 of 12 modules. This study outlines the development and feasibility of a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. E-Exercise offers an alternative approach in the physical therapy treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This study provides valuable information to conduct a further trial to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of

  2. Health Behavior Change Interventions for Teenage and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Gemma; Gravestock, Helen L; Hough, Rachael E; King, Wendy M; Wardle, Jane; Fisher, Abigail

    2016-06-01

    It is important that teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer survivors adopt a healthy lifestyle, since health vulnerabilities associated with their diagnosis and treatment may be exacerbated by poor health behaviors. This review aims to synthesize the current literature on health behavior change interventions created specifically for TYA-aged cancer survivors. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases were searched for studies investigating interventions targeting one or more health behaviors, including: physical activity, diet, smoking cessation, and alcohol consumption. Studies were eligible for review if the study population were defined as TYA cancer survivors and the mean age of the sample was younger than 30 years of age. Twelve studies were identified, of which nine were randomized controlled trials. Physical activity was the most commonly targeted health behavior. Six of the 12 interventions included within this review were successful in changing health behavior. Due to the heterogeneity of intervention characteristics, the relationship between intervention efficacy or outcome and intervention content, delivery mode, or theoretical framework was not discernible. Nevertheless, trends emerged relating to the delivery and content of health behavior interventions designed specifically for TYA cancer survivors. More research is required to identify the most effective means of promoting health behavior change among the TYA cancer survivor population. Specifically, future research should focus on providing evidence of the efficiency and feasibility of interventions that use online technologies to facilitate remote intervention delivery and peer support.

  3. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivle, L.D.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Fahlman, A.; Lam, F.P.A.; Tyack, P.L.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales

  4. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivle, L.D.; Kvadsheim, P.H.; Fahlman, A.; Lam, F.P.A.; Tyack, P.L.; Miller, P.J.O.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Phy

  5. Translating HIV interventions into practice: community-based organizations' experiences with the diffusion of effective behavioral interventions (DEBIs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaret Dolcini, M; Gandelman, Alice A; Vogan, Stacy A; Kong, Carol; Leak, Tia-Nicole; King, A J; Desantis, Linda; O'Leary, Ann

    2010-11-01

    Efficacious behavioral interventions developed to address the spread of HIV/STIs are currently being disseminated in the USA through a national diffusion program (DEBI) spearheaded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Understanding how interventions are translated to real world settings is necessary to further scientific knowledge of this process and to facilitate future translation efforts in public health. Prior studies have begun to elucidate how agencies translate behavioral interventions into practice, but further work is needed. Guided by the ADAPT framework, we examined agencies' assessment, preparation, and implementation of interventions. Our qualitative interview-based study focused on six community-based agencies in California (United States) funded to implement three group-level HIV interventions. Findings showed considerable variation in the extent to which agencies engaged in assessment and broad-based preparation and in the ease with which agencies implemented the interventions. The findings provide insight into the process that agencies undergo in the translation of effective behavioral interventions and illustrate how agencies can inform logic models that guide translation. We also identify relevant dimensions of existing models, including the ADAPT framework and Rogers's (1995, 2005) diffusion of innovations in organizations, that have value for agencies that are translating research to practice.

  6. Influence of behavioral theory on fruit and vegetable intervention effectiveness among children: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that interventions clearly based on theory, multiple theories, or a formal intervention planning process will be more effective in changing fruit and vegetable consumption among children than interventions with no behavioral theoretical foundati...

  7. Understanding mechanisms of change in the development of antisocial behavior: The impact of a universal intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.C. van Lier (Pol); P. Vuijk (Patricia); A.A.M. Crijnen (Alfons)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe association between the development of antisocial behavior, affiliation with deviant friends, and peer rejection was tested with a preventive intervention; 664 boys and girls were randomly assigned to a universal classroom-based intervention targeting disruptive behavior or a control

  8. Behavioral Stuttering Interventions for Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Chad; Vanryckeghem, Martine; Schwartz, Jamie B.; Herder, Carl; Turner, Herbert M., III.; Howard, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral interventions designed to treat stuttering in children. Method: Studies were included for review if (a) the treatment was a behavioral intervention, (b) participants were between 2 and 18 years old, (c) the design was an experimental or quasi-experimental group design, and (d) the reported…

  9. Verbal Bullying Changes among Students Following an Educational Intervention Using the Integrated Model for Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Saloshni; Satorius, Benn K.; de Vries, Hein; Taylor, Myra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bullying behavior in schools can lead to psychosocial problems. School-based interventions are important in raising student awareness, developing their skills and in planning to reduce bullying behavior. Methods: A randomized controlled trial, using a school-based educational intervention to reduce verbal bullying, was conducted among…

  10. Understanding mechanisms of change in the development of antisocial behavior: The impact of a universal intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.C. van Lier (Pol); P. Vuijk (Patricia); A.A.M. Crijnen (Alfons)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe association between the development of antisocial behavior, affiliation with deviant friends, and peer rejection was tested with a preventive intervention; 664 boys and girls were randomly assigned to a universal classroom-based intervention targeting disruptive behavior or a control

  11. Verbal Bullying Changes among Students Following an Educational Intervention Using the Integrated Model for Behavior Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Saloshni; Satorius, Benn K.; de Vries, Hein; Taylor, Myra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bullying behavior in schools can lead to psychosocial problems. School-based interventions are important in raising student awareness, developing their skills and in planning to reduce bullying behavior. Methods: A randomized controlled trial, using a school-based educational intervention to reduce verbal bullying, was conducted among…

  12. A systematic review of evidence-based interventions for students with challenging behaviors in school settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Aaron M

    2011-05-01

    The author's systematic review of 2,294 articles from 10 journals in the fields of education, special education, school social work, school psychology, and school counseling identified 42 articles meeting search criteria of addressing evidence-based interventions for students with challenging behaviors in school settings. Interventions were considered evidence-based if they were (a) manualized or structured to facilitate replication; (b) evaluated with an experimental design; and (c) demonstrated to be effective. Current practices available to address students who require evidence-based interventions for challenging behaviors are summarized. Suggestions for intervention development to address the needs of students with difficult behaviors are offered.

  13. A pilot lifestyle intervention study: effects of an intervention using an activity monitor and Twitter on physical activity and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Masato; Nakashima, Nana; Ikegami, Yumi; Kawakami, Ryoko; Kurobe, Kazumichi; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2017-04-01

    This pilot study aimed to examine the effects of a lifestyle intervention comprising an activity monitor and the concurrent use of Twitter, on physical activity (PA) and body composition. Seventeen healthy volunteers (36±3 years) were randomly assigned to normal (N, N.=8) or Twitter (T, N.=9) intervention groups for six weeks. Participants in both groups wore an activity monitor but those in the T group also tweeted daily about their PA. An observer read the tweets from each participant and provided feedback. Body composition was determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis before and after the intervention. Significantly more daily steps and PA at an intensity of ≥3 metabolic equivalents (METs) were recorded by the T than the N during six weeks. The number of steps and PA did not significantly change over time in the N, but significantly increased in the T from weeks one to six (8170±1130 to 12,934±1400 steps/day and 2.6±0.5 to 5.0±0.8 METs·h/day). In addition, significantly more body fat was lost in the T, than in the N (-1.1±0.2 vs. -0.1±0.3 kg), and the changes in PA significantly correlated with the changes in body fat (r=-0.713). Lifestyle intervention can increase daily PA and reduce body fat more effectively when using an activity monitor and Twitter than an activity monitor alone.

  14. The Frankfurt early intervention program FFIP for preschool aged children with autism spectrum disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christine M; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Valerian, Jennifer; Teufel, Karoline; Wilker, Christian

    2012-09-01

    Different early intervention programs, developed predominantly in the US, for preschool aged children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have been published. Several systematic review articles including a German Health Technology Assessment on behavioural and skill-based early interventions in children with ASD reported insufficient evidence and a substantial problem of generalisability to the German context. In Germany, approx. 2-5 h early intervention is supported by social services. Here, we report the results of a 1 year pre-post pilot study on a developmentally based social pragmatic approach, the Frankfurt Early Intervention program FFIP. In FFIP, individual 2:1, behaviourally and developmentally based therapy with the child is combined with parent training and training of kindergarten teachers. Treatment frequency is 2 h/week. Outcome measures were the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales II (VABS), mental age and the ADOS severity score. Improvements after 1 year were observed for the VABS socialisation scale and the mental age quotient/IQ (medium effect sizes). Results are comparable with several other studies with a similar or slightly higher therapeutic intensity implementing comparable or different early intervention methods or programs. Compared to most high-intensity programs (30-40 h/week), lower cognitive gains were observed. Results have to be replicated and assessed by a randomized-controlled study before any final conclusions can be drawn.

  15. Health behavior models for informing digital technology interventions for individuals with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Kim, Sunny Jung; McHugo, Gregory J; Unützer, Jürgen; Bartels, Stephen J; Marsch, Lisa A

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical models offer valuable insights for designing effective and sustainable behavioral health interventions, yet the application of theory for informing digital technology interventions for people with mental illness has received limited attention. We offer a perspective on the importance of applying behavior theories and models to developing digital technology interventions for addressing mental and physical health concerns among people with mental illness. In this commentary, we summarize prominent theories of human behavior, highlight key theoretical constructs, and identify opportunities to inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. We consider limitations with existing theories and models, and examine recent theoretical advances that can specifically guide development of digital technology interventions. Established behavioral frameworks including health belief model, theory of planned behavior, transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory consist of important and overlapping constructs that can inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. As digital technologies continue to evolve and enable longitudinal data collection, real-time behavior monitoring, and adaptive features tailored to users' changing needs over time, there are new opportunities to broaden our understanding of health behaviors and mechanisms of behavior change. Recent advances include dynamic models of behavior, persuasive system design, the behavioral intervention technology model, and behavioral models for just-in-time adaptive interventions. Behavior theories offer advantages for guiding use of digital technologies. Future researchers must explore how theoretical models can effectively advance efforts to develop, evaluate, and disseminate digital health interventions targeting individuals with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Behavioral Nutrition Interventions Using e- and m-Health Communication Technologies: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christine M

    2016-07-17

    e- and m-Health communication technologies are now common approaches to improving population health. The efficacy of behavioral nutrition interventions using e-health technologies to decrease fat intake and increase fruit and vegetable intake was demonstrated in studies conducted from 2005 to 2009, with approximately 75% of trials showing positive effects. By 2010, an increasing number of behavioral nutrition interventions were focusing on body weight. The early emphasis on interventions that were highly computer tailored shifted to personalized electronic interventions that included weight and behavioral self-monitoring as key features. More diverse target audiences began to participate, and mobile components were added to interventions. Little progress has been made on using objective measures rather than self-reported measures of dietary behavior. A challenge for nutritionists is to link with the private sector in the design, use, and evaluation of the many electronic devices that are now available in the marketplace for nutrition monitoring and behavioral change.

  17. Piloting a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) Infused Skills Group in a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard, Richard J.; Lerma, Eunice; Heard, Courtney C. C.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the impact of a 4-week skills group intervention based on the principles of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) with a sample of adolescents attending a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program. This article provides a session-by-session overview of activities adapted from DBT-specified training modules of mindfulness,…

  18. The SHINE Trial Infant Feeding Intervention: Pilot Study of Effects on Maternal Learning and Infant Diet Quality in Rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amy; Smith, Laura E; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Chigumira, Ancikaria; Fundira, Dadirai; Tavengwa, Naume V; Malaba, Thokozile R; Majo, Florence D; Humphrey, Jean H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2015-12-15

    The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is designed to measure the independent and combined effects of improved water, sanitation, and hygiene and improved infant feeding on child stunting and anemia in Zimbabwe. We developed and pilot-tested the infant feeding intervention delivered by 9 village health workers to 19 mothers of infants aged 7-12 months. Between September 2010 and January 2011, maternal knowledge was assessed using mixed methods, and infant nutrient intakes were assessed by 24-hour recall. We observed positive shifts in mothers' knowledge. At baseline, 63% of infants met their energy requirement and most did not receive enough folate, zinc, or calcium; none met their iron requirement. Postintervention, all infants received sufficient fat and vitamin A, and most consumed enough daily energy (79%), protein (95%), calcium (89%), zinc (89%), folate (68%), and iron (68%). The SHINE trial infant feeding intervention led to significant short-term improvements in maternal learning and infant nutrient intakes.

  19. Acceptability of an acupuncture intervention for geriatric chronic pain: an open pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-France Couilliot; Véronique Darees; Gérard Delahaye; Philippe Ercolano; Maud Carcaillé; Pavla Vytopilova; Bruno Tenenbaum

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:This study investigated the acceptability and effectiveness of acupuncture for persistent musculoskeletal pain in the elderly and assessed the conditions for a future controlled trial.METHODS:A total of 60 patients,hospitalized in a geriatric hospital were enrolled.The intervention consisted of eight acupuncture sessions.The main outcome was the patient's participation rate.Regarding pain,the evaluation was based on pre-and post-treatment variations.As a high proportion of the patients had cognitive impairment,the behavioral pain scale DOLOPLUS-2 was chosen although self evaluation was used wherever possible.RESULTS:The mean age of the patients was 83 years.The acceptance rate was very high (89.6%) and 90% of the patients completed the entire course of treatment.After five weeks,the mean DOLOPLUS score had decreased significantly (P<0.01).The patients reported improved sleep quality and a reduction in their anxiety symptoms.Furthermore,caregivers noticed a decrease in patient aggressiveness making care easier.CONCLUSION:Our results suggest that acupuncture is highly acceptable and could be very useful in the management of chronic pain when performed in very old frail people with chronic physical and mental disability.TRIAL REGISTRATION IDENTIFIER:NCT01043692 ClinicalTrials.gov.

  20. Effects of physical examination and diet consultation on serum cholesterol and health-behavior in the Korean pilots employed in commercial airline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Ki Youn

    2013-01-01

    An objective of this study is to search how physical examination and diet consultation can influence those risk factors of cardiovascular disease. The subjects were 326 pilots of the "B" airline company in Korea whose total cholesterol values were over 220 mg/dl on their regular physical examinations from April 2006 to December 2008. They were divided into two groups, one who had diet consultation (an intervention group) and a control group. The physical examination components used to each group were body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG). The behavioral, anthropometric and biomedical measurements were collected at each visit. This study compares and investigates the changes of serum cholesterol and also the health-behavior at each physical examination. Within the intervention group significant improvements were observed for total cholesterol, BMI (body mass index) and HDL (high density lipoprotein). The normalizing rates for cholesterol level to decrease down to lower than 200 mg/dl were 17.7% in intervention group and 8.7% in control group, which is statistically significantly higher among the intervention group. The odds ratio of diet consultation was 2.80 (95% CI=1.35-5.79), which indicates that it is a significantly contributing factor to normalize the serum cholesterol value down to lower than 200 mg/dl. Based on result, it is recommended to have regular physical examination and intensive management with diet and exercise consultation.

  1. Student Academic Performance Outcomes of a Classroom Physical Activity Intervention: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin, Heather; Alicia FEDEWA; Ahn, Soyeon

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is beneficial to children’s health, yet academic pressures limit opportunities for students throughout the school day. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a classroom PA intervention on student academic performance outcomes. Intervention participants (n=15) received daily PA breaks. Reading and mathematics fluency, PA, grades, and standardized test scores were collected. Effects of the intervention were examined using mixed-design ANOVAs. Intervention st...

  2. [Development of the scale of knowledge, attitude, and behavior of lifestyle intervention in a diabetes high-risk population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W J; Dong, J

    2016-07-06

    To establish a scale of knowledge, attitude, and behavior of lifestyle interventions among a population at high risk of diabetes with good cultural adaptability, validity, and reliability. The original item pool was formed based on a literature review, group discussions, and interviews with experts. We used the Delphi method to determine core items of the scale (30 cases in the first round and 26 cases in the second round, respectively). We invited 30 experts from clinical medicine, nursing, preventive medicine, health education, and community diabetes prevention and control to completed expert consultation tables. For each item, experts were asked to provide an importance score, the judgment basis, and a familiarity score. We analyzed the positive coefficient, authoritative coefficient, degree of concentration, and harmonious coefficient, to determine the selected items. Using face-to-face questionnaire surveys, 31 participants at high risk of diabetes were selected for the pilot study. We analyzed understanding of the scale's content and presentation and corrected the scale based on the analysis. We received 26 and 23 inquiry forms, respectively, in two rounds of consultation. Responses rates of the two rounds were 87% and 88%. The scores of authoritative coefficients were 0.79 ± 0.14 and 0.87 ± 0.10. The score of total scale in the first consultation was 4.32±0.25, the coefficient of variation was 0.06, and the coefficient of concordance was 0.163; in the second consultation, these were 4.58±0.21, 0.05, 0.150, respectively. In the first consultation, 22 experts proposed amendments and made suggestions, a rate of 85% (22/26). After the second round, 30 items were included in the final scale. In the pilot study, 13 males and 18 females with high risk of diabetes were interviewed. Average age of the population was (62.24 ± 10.23) years. The time to complete the survey was (9.35 ± 2.71) minutes. After the pilot study was completed, the order of the items was

  3. System dynamics-based evaluation of interventions to promote appropriate waste disposal behaviors in low-income urban areas: A Baltimore case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaqing; Hobbs, Benjamin F; Lasater, Molly E; Parker, Cindy L; Winch, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    Inappropriate waste disposal is a serious issue in many urban neighborhoods, exacerbating environmental, rodent, and public health problems. Governments all over the world have been developing interventions to reduce inappropriate waste disposal. A system dynamics model is proposed to quantify the impacts of interventions on residential waste related behavior. In contrast to other models of municipal solid waste management, the structure of our model is based on sociological and economic studies on how incentives and social norms interactively affect waste disposal behavior, and its parameterization is informed by field work. A case study of low-income urban neighborhoods in Baltimore, MD, USA is presented. The simulation results show the effects of individual interventions, and also identify positive interactions among some potential interventions, especially information and incentive-based policies, as well as their limitations. The model can help policy analysts identify the most promising intervention packages, and then field test those few, rather than having to pilot test all combinations. Sensitivity analyses demonstrate large uncertainties about behavioral responses to some interventions, showing where information from survey research and social experiments would improve policy making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVocht, James W; Goertz, Christine M; Hondras, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). METHODS: The authors assigned 80...... the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study...

  5. Educating low-SES and LEP survivors about breast cancer research: pilot test of the Health Research Engagement Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Alyssa; Burke, Nancy J; Cohen, Elly; Caprio, Maria; Joseph, Galen

    2014-12-01

    The Health Research Engagement Intervention (HREI) aims to reduce information and access disparities for breast cancer research opportunities among low-socioeconomic status (SES) and limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer survivors by providing neutral, non-trial-specific information about health research via a trusted patient navigator. Qualitative methods in the context of a community-based participatory research design were used to iteratively design the HREI in collaboration with community-based care navigators from a trusted community organization, Shanti Project, and to locate appropriate research studies in collaboration with a web-based trial-matching service, BreastCancerTrials.org (BCT). Navigators were first trained in clinical trials and health research and then to deliver the HREI, providing feedback that was incorporated into both the HREI design and BCT's interface. Our intervention pilot with low SES and LEP survivors (n = 12) demonstrated interest in learning about "health research." All 12 participants opted to obtain more information when offered the opportunity. Post-intervention questionnaires showed that three of 11 (27 %) participants independently pursued additional information about research opportunities either online or by phone in the week following the intervention. Post-intervention navigator questionnaires indicated that navigators could confidently and efficiently deliver the intervention. LEP patients who pursued information independently faced language barriers. The HREI is a promising and potentially scalable intervention to increase access to neutral information about breast cancer research opportunities for low-SES and LEP individuals. However, in order for it to be effective, systems barriers to participation such as language accessibility at sources of health research information must be addressed.

  6. Educating Low-SES and LEP Survivors About Breast Cancer Research: Pilot Test of the Health Research Engagement Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Alyssa; Burke, Nancy J.; Cohen, Elly; Caprio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Health Research Engagement Intervention (HREI) aims to reduce information and access disparities for breast cancer research opportunities among low-socioeconomic status (SES) and limited English proficient (LEP) breast cancer survivors by providing neutral, non-trial-specific information about health research via a trusted patient navigator. Qualitative methods in the context of a community-based participatory research design were used to iteratively design the HREI in collaboration with community-based care navigators from a trusted community organization, Shanti Project, and to locate appropriate research studies in collaboration with a web-based trial-matching service, BreastCancerTrials.org (BCT). Navigators were first trained in clinical trials and health research and then to deliver the HREI, providing feedback that was incorporated into both the HREI design and BCT's interface. Our intervention pilot with low SES and LEP survivors (n=12) demonstrated interest in learning about “health research.” All 12 participants opted to obtain more information when offered the opportunity. Post-intervention questionnaires showed that three of 11 (27 %) participants independently pursued additional information about research opportunities either online or by phone in the week following the intervention. Post-intervention navigator questionnaires indicated that navigators could confidently and efficiently deliver the intervention. LEP patients who pursued information independently faced language barriers. The HREI is a promising and potentially scalable intervention to increase access to neutral information about breast cancer research opportunities for low-SES and LEP individuals. However, in order for it to be effective, systems barriers to participation such as language accessibility at sources of health research information must be addressed. PMID:24744119

  7. Interest in Health Behavior Intervention Delivery Modalities Among Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Emily C; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Cox, Matthew G; Lyons, Elizabeth J; Carmack, Cindy L; Blalock, Janice A; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-02-11

    Effective, broad-reaching channels are important for the delivery of health behavior interventions in order to meet the needs of the growing population of cancer survivors in the United States. New technology presents opportunities to increase the reach of health behavior change interventions and therefore their overall impact. However, evidence suggests that older adults may be slower in their adoption of these technologies than the general population. Survivors' interest for more traditional channels of delivery (eg, clinic) versus new technology-based channels (eg, smartphones) may depend on a variety of factors, including demographics, current health status, and the behavior requiring intervention. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that predict cancer survivors' interest in new technology-based health behavior intervention modalities versus traditional modalities. Surveys were mailed to 1871 survivors of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer. Participants' demographics, diet and physical activity behaviors, interest in health behavior interventions, and interest in intervention delivery modalities were collected. Using path analysis, we explored the relationship between four intervention modality variables (ie, clinic, telephone, computer, and smartphone) and potential predictors of modality interest. In total, 1053 respondents to the survey (56.3% response rate); 847 provided complete data for this analysis. Delivery channel interest was highest for computer-based interventions (236/847, 27.9% very/extremely interested) and lowest for smartphone-based interventions (73/847, 8.6%), with interest in clinic-based (147/847, 17.3%) and telephone-delivered (143/847, 16.9%) falling in between. Use of other technology platforms, such as Web cameras and social networking sites, was positively predictive of interest in technology-based delivery channels. Older survivors were less likely to report interest in smartphone-based diet interventions

  8. Vitamin C intervention may lower the levels of persistent organic pollutants in blood of healthy women - A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weihong; Huen, Karen; Park, June-Soo; Petreas, Myrto; Crispo Smith, Sabrina; Block, Gladys; Holland, Nina

    2016-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals including persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has a long term impact on human health. The goal of this pilot study was to test whether antioxidant intervention by vitamin C supplementation may be a remedial approach to decrease body burden of POPs in humans. Using solid phase extraction coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and a gas chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry, we measured 18 PCBs, 7 OCPs, and 5 PBDEs in the blood of 15 healthy California women (8 were obese/overweight and 7 had normal weight) before and after 2 months of vitamin C supplementation (1000 mg/day). We observed higher PBDE levels than PCBs and OCPs, but only PCB and OCP levels were strongly and positively correlated with participant's BMI and age. We also found statistically significant decreases in 6 PCBs (PCB-74, PCB-118, PCB-138, PCB-153, PCB-180, and PCB-187), and 2 OCPs (4,4'-DDE, and 4,4'-DDT), but not PBDEs after vitamin C supplementation. Pending confirmation of this pilot finding in a larger study of both sexes, vitamin C intervention may have important public health implications in protecting health by reducing body burdens of POPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-based behavioral interventions to promote diabetes management in children, adolescents, and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Powell, Priscilla W; Anderson, Barbara J

    2016-10-01

    As members of multidisciplinary diabetes care teams, psychologists are well-suited to support self-management among youth with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their families. Psychological and behavioral interventions can promote adherence to the complex and demanding diabetes care regimen, with the goals of promoting high quality of life, achieving optimal glycemic control, and ultimately preventing disease-related complications. This article reviews well-researched contemporary behavioral interventions to promote optimal diabetes family- and self-management and health outcomes in youth with T1D, in the context of key behavioral theories. The article summarizes the evidence base for established diabetes skills training programs, family interventions, and multisystemic interventions, and introduces emerging evidence for technology and mobile health interventions and health care delivery system interventions. Next steps in behavioral T1D intervention research include tailoring interventions to meet individuals' and families' unique needs and strengths, and systematically evaluating cost-effectiveness to advocate for dissemination of well-developed interventions. Although in its infancy, this article reviews observational and intervention research for youth with T2D and their families and discusses lessons for future research with this population. Interventions for youth with T2D will need to incorporate family members, consider cultural and family issues related to health behaviors, and take into account competing priorities for resources. As psychologists and behavioral scientists, we must advocate for the integration of behavioral health into routine pediatric diabetes care in order to effectively promote meaningful change in the behavioral and medical well-being of youth and families living with T1D and T2D. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Behavioral Interventions to Reduce Sexual Risk Behavior in Adults with HIV/AIDS Receiving HIV Care: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Laisaar, Kaja-Triin; Raag, Mait; Rosenthal, Marika; Uusküla, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Regular interactions with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) who are receiving care provide caregivers opportunities to deliver interventions to reduce HIV-related risks. We conducted a systematic review of behavioral interventions for PLWHA (provided at individual level by caregivers at HIV care settings) to determine their efficacy in reducing sexual risk behavior. Conference websites and biomedical literature databases were searched for studies from 1981 to 2013. Randomized and quasi-rand...

  11. Feasibility of Pairing Behavioral Activation With Exercise for Women With Type 2 Diabetes and Depression: The Get It Study Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristin L; Panza, Emily; Handschin, Barbara; Ma, Yunsheng; Busch, Andrew M; Waring, Molly E; Appelhans, Bradley M; Whited, Matthew C; Keeney, Jacey; Kern, Daniel; Blendea, Mihaela; Ockene, Ira; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Major depressive disorder is often comorbid with diabetes and associated with worse glycemic control. Exercise improves glycemic control and depression, and thus could be a parsimonious intervention for patients with comorbid diabetes and major depression. Because patients with diabetes and comorbid depression are often sedentary and lack motivation to exercise, we developed a group exercise intervention that integrates strategies from behavioral activation therapy for depression to increase motivation for and enjoyment of exercise. We conducted a 6-month pilot randomized controlled trial to test the feasibility of the behavioral activation exercise intervention (EX) for women with diabetes and depression. Of the 715 individuals who contacted us about the study, 29 participants were randomized to the EX condition or an enhanced usual care condition (EUC), which represents 4.1% of participants who initially contacted us. Inclusion criteria made recruitment challenging and limits the feasibility of recruiting women with diabetes and depression for a larger trial of the intervention. Retention was 96.5% and 86.2% at 3 and 6months. Participants reported high treatment acceptability; use of behavioral activation strategies and exercise class attendance was acceptable. No condition differences were observed for glycemic control, depressive symptoms, and physical activity, though depressive symptoms and self-reported physical activity improved over time. Compared to participants in the EUC condition, participants in the EX condition reported greater exercise enjoyment and no increase in avoidance behavior over time. Using behavioral activation strategies to increase exercise is feasible in a group exercise setting. However, whether these strategies can be delivered in a less intensive manner to a broader population of sedentary adults, for greater initiation and maintenance of physical activity, deserves further study.

  12. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Hannah E; Lister, Cameron; West, Josh; Bernhardt, Jay M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several thousand mobile phone apps are available to download to mobile phones for health and fitness. Mobile phones may provide a unique means of administering health interventions to populations. Objective The purpose of this systematic review was to systematically search and describe the literature on mobile apps used in health behavior interventions, describe the behavioral features and focus of health apps, and to evaluate the potential of apps to disseminate health behavior in...

  13. Applied behavior analysis as intervention for autism: definition, features and philosophical concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Síglia Pimentel Höher Camargo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a lifelong pervasive developmental disorder with no known causes and cure. However, educational and behavioral interventions with a foundation in applied behavior analysis (ABA have been shown to improve a variety of skill areas such as communication, social, academic, and adaptive behaviors of individuals with ASD. The goal of this work is to present the definition, features and philosophical concepts that underlie ABA and make this science an effective intervention method for people with autism.

  14. Behavioral Functionality of Mobile Apps in Health Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Hannah E.; Lister, Cameron; West, Josh; Bernhardt, Jay M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several thousand mobile phone apps are available to download to mobile phones for health and fitness. Mobile phones may provide a unique means of administering health interventions to populations. Objective The purpose of this systematic review was to systematically search and describe the literature on mobile apps used in health behavior interventions, describe the behavioral features and focus of health apps, and to evaluate the potential of apps to disseminate health behavior in...

  15. Implementing brief cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignogna, Joseph; Hundt, Natalie E; Kauth, Michael R; Kunik, Mark E; Sorocco, Kristen H; Naik, Aanand D; Stanley, Melinda A; York, Kaki M; Cully, Jeffrey A

    2014-06-01

    Effective implementation strategies are needed to improve the adoption of evidence-based psychotherapy in primary care settings. This study provides pilot data on the test of an implementation strategy conducted as part of a multisite randomized controlled trial examining a brief cognitive-behavioral therapy versus usual care for medically ill patients in primary care, using a hybrid (type II) effectiveness/implementation design. The implementation strategy was multifaceted and included (1) modular-based online clinician training, (2) treatment fidelity auditing with expert feedback, and (3) internal and external facilitation to provide ongoing consultation and support of practice. Outcomes included descriptive and qualitative data on the feasibility and acceptability of the implementation strategy, as well as initial indicators of clinician adoption and treatment fidelity. Results suggest that a comprehensive implementation strategy to improve clinician adoption of a brief cognitive-behavioral therapy in primary care is feasible and effective for reaching high levels of adoption and fidelity.

  16. Predicting Pilot Behavior in Medium Scale Scenarios Using Game Theory and Reinforcement Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Yildiray; Agogino, Adrian; Brat, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Effective automation is critical in achieving the capacity and safety goals of the Next Generation Air Traffic System. Unfortunately creating integration and validation tools for such automation is difficult as the interactions between automation and their human counterparts is complex and unpredictable. This validation becomes even more difficult as we integrate wide-reaching technologies that affect the behavior of different decision makers in the system such as pilots, controllers and airlines. While overt short-term behavior changes can be explicitly modeled with traditional agent modeling systems, subtle behavior changes caused by the integration of new technologies may snowball into larger problems and be very hard to detect. To overcome these obstacles, we show how integration of new technologies can be validated by learning behavior models based on goals. In this framework, human participants are not modeled explicitly. Instead, their goals are modeled and through reinforcement learning their actions are predicted. The main advantage to this approach is that modeling is done within the context of the entire system allowing for accurate modeling of all participants as they interact as a whole. In addition such an approach allows for efficient trade studies and feasibility testing on a wide range of automation scenarios. The goal of this paper is to test that such an approach is feasible. To do this we implement this approach using a simple discrete-state learning system on a scenario where 50 aircraft need to self-navigate using Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) information. In this scenario, we show how the approach can be used to predict the ability of pilots to adequately balance aircraft separation and fly efficient paths. We present results with several levels of complexity and airspace congestion.

  17. Outcomes of a pilates-based intervention for individuals with lateral epicondylosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Lucinda M; Mikuski, Connie; Miller, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Core stability and flexibility, features of Pilates exercise, can reduce loads to the upper extremities. Reducing loads is essential to improve symptoms for individuals with lateral epicondylosis. Although Pilates exercise has gained popularity in healthy populations, it has not been studied for individuals with lateral epicondylosis. The purpose of this study was to determine if adding Pilates-based intervention to standard occupational therapy intervention improved outcomes as measured by the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE) more than standard intervention for individuals with lateral epicondylosis. Participants (N= 17) were randomized to the standard intervention group or Pilates-based intervention group. All participants received standard intervention. The Pilates-based intervention group additionally completed abdominal strengthening, postural correction, and flexibility. For both groups, paired t-tests showed significantly improved PRTEE scores, 38.1 for the Pilates-based intervention group, and 22.9 for the standard intervention group. Paired t-test showed significantly improved provocative grip strength and pain for both groups. Independent t-tests showed no significant difference between groups in improved scores of PRTEE, pain, and provocative grip. Although the Pilates-based intervention group showed greater improvement in PRTEE outcome, provocative grip, and pain, scores were not significantly better than those of the standard intervention group, warranting further research.

  18. Get+Connected: Development and Pilot Testing of an Intervention to Improve Computer and Internet Attitudes and Internet Use Among Women Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seplovich, Gabriela; Horvath, Keith J; Haughton, Lorlette J; Blackstock, Oni J

    2017-03-31

    For persons living with chronic medical conditions, the Internet can be a powerful tool for health promotion, and allow for immediate access to medical information and social support. However, women living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States face numerous barriers to computer and Internet use. Health behavior change models suggest that the first step towards adopting a new health behavior is to improve attitudes towards that behavior. To develop and pilot test Get+Connected, an intervention to improve computer and Internet attitudes and Internet use among women living with HIV. To develop Get+Connected, we reviewed the extant literature, adapted an existing curriculum, and conducted a focus group with HIV-positive women (n=20) at a community-based organization in the Bronx, New York. Get+Connected was comprised of five weekly sessions covering the following topics: basic computer knowledge and skills, identifying reliable health-related websites, setting up and using email and Facebook accounts, and a final review session. We recruited 12 women to participate in pilot testing. At baseline, we collected data about participants' sociodemographic information, clinical characteristics, and technology device ownership and use. At baseline, intervention completion, and three months postintervention, we collected data regarding attitudes towards computers and the Internet (Attitudes Towards Computers and the Internet Questionnaire [ATCIQ]; possible scores range from 5-50) as well as frequency of Internet use (composite measure). To examine changes in ATCIQ scores and Internet use over time, we used generalized estimating equations. We also collected qualitative data during intervention delivery. Among women in our sample, the median age was 56 years (interquartile range=52-63). All participants were black/African American and/or Latina. Seven participants (7/12, 58%) had a high school diploma (or equivalent) or higher degree. Ten participants (10

  19. Pilot Testing "Okay with Asthma"[TM]: An Online Asthma Intervention for School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tami H.; Hauenstein, Emily J.

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is the leading cause of missed school days despite advancements in asthma treatment. This may be, in part, due to a lack of understanding about asthma. "Okay With Asthma"[TM], an online story with psychosocial management strategies for school-age children, was pilot tested to measure its effect on asthma knowledge and attitude. The online…

  20. Computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy for children with epilepsy and anxiety: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocher, Jacquelyn B; Fujikawa, Mayu; Sung, Connie; Jackson, Daren C; Jones, Jana E

    2013-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are prevalent in children with epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, adaptability, and feasibility of a manual-based, computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention for anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy. Fifteen anxious youth (aged 8-13 years) with epilepsy completed 12 weeks of manualized computer-assisted CBT. The children and parents completed a semi-structured interview at baseline, and questionnaires assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression, and behavior problems were completed prior to treatment, at treatment midpoint, after treatment completion, and at three months posttreatment. There were significant reductions in the symptoms of anxiety and depression reported by the children at completion of the intervention and at the three-month follow-up. Similarly, the parents reported fewer symptoms of anxiety and a reduction in behavior problems. No adverse events were reported. This CBT intervention for children with epilepsy and anxiety disorders appears to be safe, effective, and feasible and should be incorporated into future intervention studies.

  1. Examination of an antecedent communication intervention to reduce tangibly maintained challenging behavior: a controlled analog analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Mark; Fragale, Christina; Gainey, Summer; Kang, Soyeon; Koch, Heather; Shubert, Jennifer; Zein, Farah El; Longino, Deanna; Chung, Moon; Xu, Ziwei; White, Pamela; Lang, Russell; Davis, Tonya; Rispoli, Mandy; Lancioni, Giulio; Didden, Robert; Healy, Olive; Kagohara, Deborah; van der Meer, Larah; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    We examined the influence of an antecedent communication intervention on challenging behavior for three students with developmental disorders. Students were taught to request tangible items that were identified as reinforcers for challenging behavior in a prior functional analysis. Individual participant multielement and reversal designs were used to compare the effects of the antecedent communication intervention versus a no antecedent communication intervention condition. Immediately following the antecedent manipulations students were exposed to the tangible condition of the functional analysis. Results indicate that the antecedent communication intervention reduced challenging behavior in the subsequent tangible test condition for all three students. The importance of examining antecedent interventions to treat challenging behavior from a function analytic perspective is discussed.

  2. The application of nursing behavior intervention on the post-operation pain in abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fei WU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of behavioral intervention for the post-operation pain in abdomen. Methods: Forty patients from the county hospital during October 2013 to January 2014 were selected as the observation objects and randomly divided into two groups, intervention group and control groups with 20 patients in each.The control group received conventional general care and the intervention group received nursing behavior interventions,including, the effective evaluation of pain, improvement of health education, strengthening of physical intervention, psychological intervention and psychosocial intervention etc. Two sets of VAS scores and nursing intervention effects were analyzed with statistical methods. Results: After taking nursing behavior interventions,the intervention group had significantly lower VAS scores,and lower level was more significant than that in the control group,The difference has statistically significant P<0.05.The intervention group has higher satisfaction for nursing service. Conclusion: The implementation of nursing behavior interventions can significantly relieve the patient pain, improve the postoperative analgesic treatment effect, and raise the quality of nursing and the comfort and satisfaction of the patients. Thereby reducing the incidence of postoperative complications, and promoting the patient recover. 

  3. Evidence-based interventions for adolescents with disruptive behaviors in school-based settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Tarah M; Ebert, Jon S; Gracey, Kathy A; Chapman, Gabrielle L; Epstein, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Disruptive behaviors in the school setting can threaten the maintenance of optimal learning environments in schools. Challenging behaviors, such as defiance, hostility, and aggression, often define disruptive classroom behaviors. This article presents a clinical review of existing literature on interventions for adolescent disruptive behavior problems in school-based settings and in outpatient mental health settings and makes recommendations around working with adolescents with disruptive behaviors in school-based settings. Many types of interventions are effective; effective implementation is key to good results.

  4. A Pilot Study of a Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety and Depression in Patients With Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleo, Jessica S; Amspoker, Amber B; Sarwar, Aliya I; Kunik, Mark E; Jankovic, Joseph; Marsh, Laura; York, Michele; Stanley, Melinda A

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety and depression often remain unrecognized or inadequately treated in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is effective, but limited evidence supports its use for anxiety and depression in patients with PD. Sixteen patients with PD having significant anxiety and/or depressive symptoms were assigned to CBT or enhanced usual care. Assessments occurred at baseline, posttreatment, and 1-month follow-up. The CBT intervention included tools for anxiety, depression, and healthy living with PD symptoms. Individual sessions were delivered by telephone or in person, based on patient preference. Treatment was feasible with participants choosing 67% of sessions by telephone and 80% completed treatment. The between-group effect sizes for change scores from baseline to posttreatment and baseline to 1-month follow-up were large (posttreatment: d = 1.49 for depression and 1.44 for anxiety; 1-month follow-up: d = .73 for depression and 1.24 for anxiety), although only the posttreatment effect size for depression was significant. This pilot CBT program is feasible for treatment of anxiety and depression in patients with PD.

  5. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD – a randomized controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing. PMID:20856608

  6. Intervention Effects on Safety Compliance and Citizenship Behaviors: Evidence from the Work, Family, and Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Leslie B.; Johnson, Ryan C.; Crain, Tori L.; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Davis, Kelly; Kelly, Erin L.; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Karuntzos, Georgia; Chosewood, L. Casey; Berkman, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We tested the effects of a work-family intervention on employee reports of safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors in 30 healthcare facilities using a group-randomized trial. Based on Conservation of Resources theory and the Work-Home Resources Model, we hypothesized that implementing a work-family intervention aimed at increasing contextual resources via supervisor support for work and family and employee control over work time would lead to improved personal resources and increased employee performance on the job in the form of self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors. Multilevel analyses used survey data from 1,524 employees at baseline, 6-month and 12-month post-intervention follow-ups. Significant intervention effects were observed for safety compliance at the 6-month and organizational citizenship behaviors at the 12-month follow-ups. More specifically, results demonstrate that the intervention protected against declines in employee self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behaviors, compared to employees in the control facilities. The hypothesized mediators of perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors, control over work time, and work-family conflict (work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict) were not significantly improved by the intervention. However, baseline perceptions of family supportive supervisor behaviors, control over work time, and work-family climate were significant moderators of the intervention effect on the self-reported safety compliance and organizational citizenship behavior outcomes. PMID:26348479

  7. Positive Family Intervention for Severe Challenging Behavior I: A Multisite Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, V. Mark; Hieneman, Meme; Clarke, Shelley; Wang, Mo; Rinaldi, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was a multisite randomized clinical trial assessing the effects of adding a cognitive-behavioral intervention to positive behavior support (PBS). Fifty-four families who met the criteria of (a) having a child with a developmental disability, (b) whose child displayed serious challenging behavior (e.g., aggression, self-injury,…

  8. Improving Classroom Engagement among High School Students with Disruptive Behavior: Evaluation of the Class Pass Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tai A.; Cook, Clayton R.; Dart, Evan H.; Socie, Diana G.; Renshaw, Tyler L.; Long, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Off-task and disruptive classroom behaviors have a negative impact on the learning environment and present a unique challenge for teachers to address. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Class Pass Intervention (CPI) as a behavior management strategy for secondary students with disruptive classroom behavior. The CPI consists of providing…

  9. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  10. Promoting Personal Recovery in People with Persisting Psychotic Disorders: Development and Pilot Study of a Novel Digital Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Farhall, John; Foley, Fiona; Leitan, Nuwan Dominic; Villagonzalo, Kristi-Ann; Ladd, Emma; Nunan, Cassy; Farnan, Sue; Frankish, Rosalie; Smark, Tara; Rossell, Susan L; Sterling, Leon; Murray, Greg; Castle, David Jonathon; Kyrios, Michael

    2016-01-01

    For people with persisting psychotic disorders, personal recovery has become an important target of mental health services worldwide. Strongly influenced by mental health service consumer perspectives, personal recovery refers to being able to live a satisfying and contributing life irrespective of ongoing symptoms and disability. Contact with peers with shared lived experience is often cited as facilitative of recovery. We aimed to develop and pilot a novel recovery-based digitally supported intervention for people with a psychotic illness. We developed a website to be used on a tablet computer by mental health workers to structure therapeutic discussions about personal recovery. Central to the site was a series of video interviews of people with lived experience of psychosis discussing how they had navigated issues within their own recovery based on the Connectedness-Hope-Identity-Meaning-Empowerment model of recovery. We examined the feasibility and acceptability of an 8-session low intensity intervention using this site in 10 participants with persisting psychotic disorders and conducted a proof-of-concept analysis of outcomes. All 10 participants completed the full course of sessions, and it was possible to integrate use of the website into nearly all sessions. Participant feedback confirmed that use of the website was a feasible and acceptable way of working. All participants stated that they would recommend the intervention to others. Post-intervention, personal recovery measured by the Questionnaire for the Process of Recovery had improved by an average standardized effect of d = 0.46, 95% CI [0.07, 0.84], and 8 of the 10 participants reported that their mental health had improved since taking part in the intervention. In-session use of digital resources featuring peer accounts of recovery is feasible and acceptable and shows promising outcomes. A randomized controlled trial is the next step in evaluating the efficacy of this low intensity intervention

  11. Developing and implementing a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in prison-based drug treatment: Project BRITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdon, William M; St De Lore, Jef; Prendergast, Michael L

    2011-09-01

    Within prison settings, the reliance on punishment for controlling inappropriate or noncompliant behavior is self-evident. What is not so evident is the similarity between this reliance on punishment and the use of positive reinforcements to increase desired behaviors. However, seldom do inmates receive positive reinforcement for engaging in prosocial behaviors or, for inmates receiving drug treatment, behaviors that are consistent with or support their recovery. This study provides an overview of the development and implementation of a positive behavioral reinforcement intervention in male and female prison-based drug treatment programs. The active involvement of institutional staff, treatment staff, and inmates enrolled in the treatment programs in the development of the intervention along with the successful branding of the intervention were effective at promoting support and participation. However, these factors may also have ultimately impacted the ability of the randomized design to reliably demonstrate the effectiveness of the intervention.

  12. Evaluation of a positive psychotherapy group intervention for people with psychosis: pilot randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Aims. Third-wave psychological interventions have gained relevance in mental health service provision but their application to people with psychosis is in its infancy and interventions targeting wellbeing in psychosis are scarce. This study tested the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of positive psychotherapy adapted for people with psychosis (WELLFOCUS PPT) to improve wellbeing. Methods. WELLFOCUS PPT was tested as an 11-week group intervention in a convenience sample of people w...

  13. Finding Balance : self-regulation in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes: from theory to a pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Sasja Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The central focus of this thesis was to examine the role of self-regulation principles in predicting and changing self-care behaviors of diabetes type 2 patients. Overall, the results in this thesis indicate that self-regulation cognitions and skills might be important intervention targets of future

  14. Improving Social Competence in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders through a Combined-Strategy Group Intervention: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated whether a combined-strategy group intervention improved social competence among children with autism spectrum disorders. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders exhibit deficits in social behaviors that may negatively impact all aspects of their lives. Social competence for individuals with autism spectrum…

  15. Finding Balance : self-regulation in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes: from theory to a pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Sasja Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The central focus of this thesis was to examine the role of self-regulation principles in predicting and changing self-care behaviors of diabetes type 2 patients. Overall, the results in this thesis indicate that self-regulation cognitions and skills might be important intervention targets of future

  16. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Theoretically-Based Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders: Lessons Learned from the Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders Study

    OpenAIRE

    Locher, JL; Vickers, KS; Buys, DR; Ellis, A; Lawrence, JC; Newton, LE; Roth, DL; Ritchie, CS; Bales, CW

    2013-01-01

    Older adults with multiple comorbidities are often undernourished or at high risk for becoming so, especially after a recent hospitalization. Randomized controlled trials of effective, innovative interventions are needed to support evidence-based approaches for solving nutritional problems in this population. Self-management approaches where participants select their own behavioral goals can enhance success of interventions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and effica...

  17. Is there life after DEBI? Examining health behavior maintenance in the diffusion of effective behavioral interventions initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Matthew B; Silapaswan, Andrew; Schaefer, Nathan; Schermele, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The evidence-based interventions that are identified, packaged, and disseminated by the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as part of the Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBI) initiative-commonly referred to the "DEBIs"-currently represent a primary source of HIV prevention interventions for community-based providers. To date, little attention has focused on whether the intended outcomes of the DEBIs, i.e., reductions in HIV-related risk behaviors, are maintained over time. This review summarized evidence for the sustainability of the effects of the DEBIs on HIV sexual risk behavior and intravenous drug use from studies of original and adapted DEBIs. Evidence of intervention decay or a lack of any intervention effect was identified in several original and adapted versions of the DEBIs included in this review. Recommendations include modifications to current criteria for inclusion in the DEBI portfolio, in addition to the development of remediation strategies to address intervention decay. Further, theoretical models that specify the processes that underlie the maintenance of health behaviors over time should be used in developing HIV prevention interventions.

  18. Effects of Video Weather Training Products, Web-Based Preflight Weather Briefing, and Local Versus Non-Local Pilots on General Aviation Pilot Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior, Phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior, Phase 3 DOT/FAA/AM-10/17 Office of Aerospace Medicine Washington, DC 20591 OK-11-0024-JAH Federal Aviation...Vs. Non-Local Pilots on General Aviation Pilot Weather Knowledge and Flight Behavior, Phase 3 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s...behavior in Phase 2; (2) Whole-group (N=50) weather knowledge test scores were significantly lower (19%, p<.001) than average FAA certification exam

  19. Point-of-purchase nutrition information influences food-purchasing behaviors of college students: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Marjorie R; Connors, Rachel

    2011-05-01

    The goal of point-of-purchase (POP) nutrition information is to help consumers make informed, healthful choices. Despite limited evaluation, these population-based approaches are being advocated to replace traditional, more expensive, individual behavior-change strategies. Few studies have examined the effect of POP information on buying patterns of college students, a group with high obesity rates and poor eating habits. This quasi-experimental pilot project sought to determine whether the "Eat Smart" POP program affected food-purchasing habits of multiethnic college students shopping at an on-campus convenience store. Baseline sales data of foods in the cereal, soup, cracker, and bread categories were collected for 6 weeks during Fall 2008. After Winter break, a few food items within each of these food categories were labeled as healthful using a "Fuel Your Life" shelf tag, and sales data were then collected for 5 weeks. In each of the four food categories, nontagged foods were available at the identical price as tagged items. Following intervention, there were increased sales of tagged items (measured as a percentage of total sales) in the cereal, soup, and cracker categories, while sales of bread decreased. Although none of these changes were statistically significant, the intervention resulted in a 3.6%±1.6% (P=0.082) increase in the percentage of sales from tagged items. Thus, providing POP nutrition information in a college campus convenience store may promote healthful food choices. A longer study examining the effect of POP on sales of items in other food categories is warranted. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A randomized, controlled, pilot study of dialectical behavior therapy skills in a psychoeducational group for individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Sheri; Jeffrey, Janet; Katz, Mark R

    2013-03-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques have been shown to effectively treat borderline personality disorder, a condition also marked by prominent affective disturbances. The utility of DBT techniques in treating BD has been largely unexplored. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study of a DBT-based psychoeducational group (BDG) in treating euthymic, depressed, or hypomanic Bipolar I or II patients. In this experiment, 26 adults with bipolar I or II were randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups and completed the Beck depression inventory II, mindfulness-based self-efficacy scale, and affective control scale at baseline and 12 weeks. The BDG intervention consisted of 12 weekly 90-min sessions which taught DBT skills, mindfulness techniques, and general BD psychoeducation. Using RM-ANOVA, subjects in BDG demonstrated a trend toward reduced depressive symptoms, and significant improvement in several MSES subscales indicating greater mindful awareness, and less fear toward and more control of emotional states (ACS). These findings were supported with a larger sample of patients who completed the BDG. Furthermore, group attendees had reduced emergency room visits and mental health related admissions in the six months following BDG. The small sample size in RCT affects power to detect between group differences. How well improvements after the12-week BDG were maintained is unknown. There is preliminary evidence that DBT skills reduce depressive symptoms, improve affective control, and improve mindfulness self-efficacy in BD. Its application warrants further evaluation in larger studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Divorced Women for Depression, Anxiety and Loneliness symptoms: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilgun ONGIDER

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, it is aimed to investigate efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT in divorced women. For this aim, it was evaluated levels of depression, anxiety and loneliness by pre and post therapy. Method: Study sample was obtained from a special family consulting center. The sample of the study consisted of 7 divorced women. The participants was selected from women whom was divorced between 0-2 years. Among divorced women a CBT intervention program was used. This study was a pilot study about divorced women in Turkey. In this study, sociodemographic data questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and UCLA loneliness were administered. For the aim of evaluating the CBT intervention among divorced women before and after CBT sessions all the questionnaires was applied. Results: For the data analyse Wilcoxon non-parametric test was used. All the study questionnaires was compared pre and post therapy. It was found that, both depression (z= -2,64 p<0,01, anxiety (z= -2,08 p<0,05 and loneliness levels (z= -3,34 p<0,001 were significantly reduced after CBT sessions in the study sample of divorced women. Conclusion: Depression, anxiety and loneliness levels were reduced significantly after CBT sessions therefore it is interpreted that CBT was effective in divorced women. Many research in the literature highlights that divorce effected negatively on women and many common psychological problems like depression, anxiety and loneliness were been occured. So intervantion programs like CBT have been effective on the negative effects of divorce

  2. Homosexuality And The Ethics Of Behavioral Intervention: Paper 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begelman, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    The author recommends that behavior therapists abandon the administration of sexual reorientation techniques to homosexuals because he believes homosexuality is not a behavior disorder or a form of mental illness. This paper was presented at the annual convention of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy, San Francisco, 13 December…

  3. Emerging Approaches to Counseling Intervention: Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neacsiu, Andrada D.; Ward-Ciesielski, Erin F.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2012-01-01

    Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a comprehensive, multimodal cognitive behavioral treatment originally developed for individuals who met criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD) who displayed suicidal tendencies. DBT is based on behavioral theory but also includes principles of acceptance, mindfulness, and validation. Since its…

  4. Individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Fiorentino

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lavinia Fiorentino1, John R McQuaid2, Lianqi Liu3, Loki Natarajan4, Feng He4, Monique Cornejo3, Susan Lawton3, Barbara A Parker6, Georgia R Sadler5, Sonia Ancoli-Israel31Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, 5Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA; 6Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USAPurpose: Estimates of insomnia in breast cancer patients are high, with reports of poor sleep lasting years after completion of cancer treatment. This randomized controlled crossover pilot study looked at the effects of individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (IND-CBT-I on sleep in breast cancer survivors.Patients and methods: Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions followed by six weeks of follow up or a delayed treatment control group (no treatment for six weeks followed by six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions. Of these, 14 participants completed the pilot study (six in the treatment group and eight in the delayed treatment control group.Results: Self-rated insomnia was significantly improved in the treatment group compared to the waiting period in the delayed treatment control group. The pooled pre–post-IND-CBT-I analyses revealed improvements in self-rated insomnia, sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep.Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that IND-CBT-I is appropriate for improving sleep in breast cancer survivors. Individual therapy in a clinic or private practice may be a more practical option for this population as it is more easily accessed and readily available in an outpatient setting.Keywords: insomnia, breast cancer, cognitive behavioral therapy

  5. Evidence that implementation intentions reduce drivers' speeding behavior: testing a new intervention to change driver behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, Sarah E; Elliott, Mark A; Kelly, Steve W

    2015-01-01

    Implementation intentions have the potential to break unwanted habits and help individuals behave in line with their goal intentions. We tested the effects of implementation intentions in the context of drivers' speeding behavior. A randomized controlled design was used. Speeding behavior, goal intentions and theoretically derived motivational pre-cursors of goal intentions were measured at both baseline and follow-up (one month later) using self-report questionnaires. Immediately following the baseline questionnaire, the experimental (intervention) group (N=117) specified implementation intentions using a volitional help sheet, which required the participants to link critical situations in which they were tempted to speed with goal-directed responses to resist the temptation. The control group (N=126) instead received general information about the risks of speeding. In support of the hypotheses, the experimental group reported exceeding the speed limit significantly less often at follow-up than did the control group. This effect was specific to 'inclined abstainers' (i.e., participants who reported speeding more than they intended to at baseline and were therefore motivated to reduce their speeding) and could not be attributed to any changes in goal intentions to speed or any other measured motivational construct. Also in line with the hypotheses, implementation intentions attenuated the past-subsequent speeding behavior relationship and augmented the goal intention - subsequent speeding behavior relationship. The findings imply that implementation intentions are effective at reducing speeding and that they do so by weakening the effect of habit, thereby helping drivers to behave in accordance with their existing goal intentions. The volitional help sheet used in this study is an effective tool for promoting implementation intentions to reduce speeding.

  6. The effects of risk perception and flight experience on airline pilots' locus of control with regard to safety operation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xuqun; Ji, Ming; Han, Haiyan

    2013-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to integrate two research traditions, social cognition approach and individual state approach, and to understand the relationships between locus of control (LOC), risk perception, flight time, and safety operation behavior (SOB) among Chinese airline pilots. The study sample consisted of 193 commercial airline pilots from China Southern Airlines Ltd. The results showed that internal locus of control directly affected pilot safety operation behavior. Risk perception seemed to mediate the relationship between locus of control and safety operation behaviors, and total flight time moderated internal locus of control. Thus, locus of control primarily influences safety operation behavior indirectly by affecting risk perception. The total effect of internal locus of control on safety behaviors is larger than that of external locus of control. Furthermore, the safety benefit of flight experience is more pronounced among pilots with high internal loci of control in the early and middle flight building stages. Practical implications for aviation safety and directions for future research are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bidirectional Effects between Parenting and Aggressive Child Behavior in the Context of a Preventive Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Brinke, Lysanne W; Deković, Maja; Stoltz, Sabine E M J; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2016-10-27

    Over time, developmental theories and empirical studies have gradually started to adopt a bidirectional viewpoint. The area of intervention research is, however, lagging behind in this respect. This longitudinal study examined whether bidirectional associations between (changes in) parenting and (changes in) aggressive child behavior over time differed in three conditions: a child intervention condition, a child + parent intervention condition and a control condition. Participants were 267 children (74 % boys, 26 % girls) with elevated levels of aggression, their mothers and their teachers. Reactive aggression, proactive aggression and perceived parenting were measured at four measurement times from pretest to one-year after intervention termination. Results showed that associations between aggressive child behavior and perceived parenting are different in an intervention context, compared to a general developmental context. Aggressive behavior and perceived parenting were unrelated over time for children who did not receive an intervention. In an intervention context, however, decreases in aggressive child behavior were related to increases in perceived positive parenting and decreases in perceived overreactivity. These findings underscore the importance of addressing child-driven processes in interventions aimed at children, but also in interventions aimed at both children and their parents.

  8. The development of an educational intervention to address workplace bullying: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, Esther Maria; McRury, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research on workplace bullying which addresses the detrimental consequences of bullying in nursing has emerged. This quasi-experimental pilot study was aimed at examining the effect of an educational program provided to nursing staff on workplace bullying. The development of an educational program and use of a registered nurse educator in a group setting is an effective method for addressing workplace bullying.

  9. A systematic review of behavioral interventions to promote intake of fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Ravia, Jennifer

    2011-10-01

    Fruit and vegetable (F/V) intake in the United States remains below recommended levels despite evidence of the health benefits of regular consumption. Efforts to increase F/V intake include behavior-based interventions. A systematic review of MEDLINE PubMed and PsycINFO databases (2005-2010) was conducted to identify behavior-based intervention trials designed to promote F/V intake. Using predetermined limits and selection criteria, 34 studies were identified for inclusion. Behavior-based interventions resulted in an average increase in F/V intake of +1.13 and +0.39 servings per day in adults and children, respectively. Interventions involving minority adults or low-income participants demonstrated average increases in daily F/V consumption of +0.97 servings/day, whereas worksite interventions averaged +0.8 servings/day. Achieving and sustaining F/V intake at recommended levels of intake across the population cannot be achieved through behavior-based interventions alone. Thus, efforts to combine these interventions with other approaches including social marketing, behavioral economics approaches, and technology-based behavior change models should be tested to ensure goals are met and sustained.

  10. A community-based behavior modification intervention for childhood obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, David; Brauner, Michal; Granot, Esther

    2007-02-01

    Childhood obesity, caused by reduced physical activity and increased food consumption, has reached epidemic proportions. We hypothesized that a single practitioner could enable a child to reduce BMI by educating towards a healthier lifestyle and then reinforcing the message in a structured manner. In this study, intervention group participants and their parents received a half-hour talk on exercise and diet, repeated after 3 months. They were instructed to fill weekly diaries and were called weekly by telephone. Controls received the initial instruction only. Twenty-seven (14 intervention) obese children were recruited. Anthropometric parameters, fitness and biochemical data were collected before intervention and after 6 months in both groups. Sustained but not statistically significant improvements in attitude, BMI SDS and LDL-cholesterol were noted in the intervention group. These promising results support a need for further work to evaluate the efficacy and applicability of our approach in the population at large.

  11. Developing, implementing and evaluating OSH interventions in SMEs: a pilot, exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Donato; Cagno, Enrico; Micheli, Guido J L

    2014-01-01

    The literature on occupational safety and health (OSH) interventions contains many debates on how interventions should work, but far less attention has been paid to how they actually do work, and to the contextual factors that influence their implementation, development and effect. The need of improving the understanding of the OSH interventions issue is particularly relevant for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), since they experience worse OSH conditions, and have fewer physical, economic and organizational resources if compared to larger enterprises; thus, SMEs strongly need to focus their few resources in the decision-making process so as to select and put in place only the most proper interventions. This exploratory study is based on interviews with safety officers of 5 SMEs, and it gives an overview of the key features of the actual intervention process in SMEs and of the contextual factors making this actual intervention process similar or dissimilar to the ideal case. The results show how much qualitative and experience driven the actual intervention process is; they should be used to direct the future research towards an increasingly applicable one, to enable practitioners from SMEs to develop, implement and evaluate their OSH interventions in an "ideal" way.

  12. Pilot European Regional Interventions for Smart Childhood Obesity Prevention in Early age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansolios, Sanne; Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg

    2010-01-01

    The intervention carried out in Denmark included a foodintervention in four kindergartens over at four weeks baseline period and a two weeks intervention period, also a tasteworkshop were carried out introducing a new boardgame using the Sapere method and finally a foodtale book and an activity f...

  13. Perspectives of Occupational Therapists on the Challenges of Early Intervention Practice: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Patricia; Moore, Cary C.; Tiongco, Cynthia G.; Tkach, Melanie M.; Thom, Carly

    2017-01-01

    Occupational therapists in the field of early intervention (EI) are challenged with limited opportunities for communication and collaboration with colleagues and other EI team members. One hundred and two occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants with early intervention experience completed a descriptive survey. Questions on the…

  14. Internet-Based Parent-Implemented Intervention for Young Children with Autism: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadan, Hedda; Snodgrass, Melinda R.; Meyer, Lori E.; Fisher, Kim W.; Chung, Moon Y.; Halle, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Both naturalistic communication and parent-implemented interventions are evidence-based practices for young children with disabilities, but demonstrations of effective methods for teaching parents to implement naturalistic interventions successfully with their children are still warranted. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a…

  15. Outcomes of a pilot obesity prevention plus intervention targeting children and parenting practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevention-Plus interventions for primary care offer a venue to intervene with both children and parents for child obesity treatment. Such interventions can promote effective parenting practices that encourage healthy eating, physical activity (PA), and lower TV use among children. Test for feasibil...

  16. An on-the-job mindfulness-based intervention for pediatric ICU nurses: a pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Tina; Meyer, Rika M L; Grefe, Dagmar; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of a 5-minute mindfulness meditation for PICU nurses before each work-shift to investigate change in nursing stress, burnout, self-compassion, mindfulness, and job satisfaction was explored. Thirty-eight nurses completed measures (Nursing Stress Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale and Self-Compassion Scale) at baseline, post-intervention and 1 month after. The intervention was found to be feasible for nurses on the PICU. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant decreases in stress from baseline to post intervention and maintained 1 month following the intervention. Findings may inform future interventions that support on-the-job self-care and stress-reduction within a critical care setting.

  17. Student Academic Performance Outcomes of a Classroom Physical Activity Intervention: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather ERWIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity is beneficial to children’s health, yet academic pressures limit opportunities for students throughout the school day. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a classroom PA intervention on student academic performance outcomes. Intervention participants (n=15 received daily PA breaks. Reading and mathematics fluency, PA, grades, and standardized test scores were collected. Effects of the intervention were examined using mixed-design ANOVAs. Intervention students had significantly higher reading fluency and mathematics scores post-intervention and higher means for standardized reading and mathematics scores as well as grades. Short bouts of PA are important for improving CBM math and reading fluency scores. Classroom teachers should be encouraged to devote time during academic learning to incorporate PA

  18. Functions of behavior change interventions when implementing multi-professional teamwork at an emergency department: a comparative case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background While there is strong support for the benefits of working in multi-professional teams in health care, the implementation of multi-professional teamwork is reported to be complex and challenging. Implementation strategies combining multiple behavior change interventions are recommended, but the understanding of how and why the behavior change interventions influence staff behavior is limited. There is a lack of studies focusing on the functions of different behavior change interventions and the mechanisms driving behavior change. In this study, applied behavior analysis is used to analyze the function and impact of different behavior change interventions when implementing multi-professional teamwork. Methods A comparative case study design was applied. Two sections of an emergency department implemented multi-professional teamwork involving changes in work processes, aimed at increasing inter-professional collaboration. Behavior change interventions and staff behavior change were studied using observations, interviews and document analysis. Using a hybrid thematic analysis, the behavior change interventions were categorized according to the DCOM® model. The functions of the behavior change interventions were then analyzed using applied behavior analysis. Results The two sections used different behavior change interventions, resulting in a large difference in the degree of staff behavior change. The successful section enabled staff performance of teamwork behaviors with a strategy based on ongoing problem-solving and frequent clarification of directions. Managerial feedback initially played an important role in motivating teamwork behaviors. Gradually, as staff started to experience positive outcomes of the intervention, motivation for teamwork behaviors was replaced by positive task-generated feedback. Conclusions The functional perspective of applied behavior analysis offers insight into the behavioral mechanisms that describe how and why behavior

  19. Weight loss reduces breast ductal fluid estrogens in obese postmenopausal women: a single arm intervention pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter Catherine L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of excess body fat increases breast cancer risk after menopause. Whether the localized breast is differently influenced by adipose tissue compared to the rest of the body, has not been well studied. Our purpose was to demonstrate feasibility and preliminarily evaluate serum-based and localized breast biomarker changes resulting from a weight loss intervention among obese postmenopausal women. Methods We conducted a 12-week pilot controlled dietary and exercise intervention among healthy obese postmenopausal women, collected serum and breast ductal fluid before and after the intervention, and estimated the association with systemic and localized biomarker changes. We recruited 7 obese (mean body mass index = 33.6 kg/m2 postmenopausal women. We collected samples at baseline and the 12th week for: anthropometry; phlebotomy; dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (lean and fat mass; exercise fitness (maximum oxygen consumption (VO2Max; 1-repetition strength maximum; and breast ductal lavage. Results Changes from baseline occurred in body composition and exercise performance including fat mass loss (14% average drop, VO2Max (+36% increase and strength improvement (+26%. Breast ductal fluid markers declined from baseline with estradiol showing a 24% reduction and IL-6 a 20% reduction. We also observed serum biomarker reductions from baseline including leptin (36% decline, estrone sulfate (−10%, estradiol (−25%, and Il-6 (−33%. Conclusions Conduct of the diet and exercise intervention, collection of ductal fluid, and measurement of hormones and cytokines contained in the ductal fluid were all feasible. We preliminarily demonstrated estradiol and IL-6 reductions from baseline in both serum and breast ductal fluid among obese postmenopausal women who participated in the 12-week weight loss diet and exercise intervention.

  20. Evaluation of a planned behavior theory-based intervention programme to promote healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention program based on the theoretical framework of the Theory of Planned Behavior, with the addition of attitude strength and role identity. The aim was to alter adolescents' healthy eating attitudes and behaviour. In the sample were 335 high school students, who were divided into intervention and control groups. The intervention lasted 12 weeks and included posters and lectures promoting healthy eating. The measures included a questionnaire assessing the hypothesis and a food frequency questionnaire which measured eating habits. Analysis showed the intervention was effective in proving attitudes toward healthy eating and attitude strength, intention, perceived behavioral control, and healthy eating behaviour, but not effective in predicting subjective norms and role identity. Results provide evidence that intervention changed attitudes toward a behavior in a school setting.

  1. An emotion regulation intervention to reduce risk behaviors among at-risk early adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Christopher D.; Hadley, Wendy; Barker, David; Brown, Larry K.; Hancock, Evan; Almy, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate an intervention designed to enhance early adolescents’ emotion regulation skill use and to decrease risk behaviors. Adolescents 12 to 14 years old (N = 420; 53% male) with mental health symptoms were referred for participation in either an Emotion Regulation (ER) or Health Promotion (HP) intervention consisting of twelve after-school sessions. Participants completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires on laptop computers. Using a generalized analysis of covariance controlling for baseline scores, participants in the ER intervention were less likely to be sexually active and engage in other risk behaviors, such as fighting, at the conclusion of the program. Additionally, participants in the ER intervention reported greater use of emotion regulation strategies and more favorable attitudes toward abstinence. Interventions directly targeting emotion regulation may be useful in addressing health risk behaviors of adolescents with mental health symptoms. PMID:26297499

  2. A pilot study of a randomized controlled trial of yoga as an intervention for PTSD symptoms in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Karen S; Dick, Alexandra M; DiMartino, Dawn M; Smith, Brian N; Niles, Barbara; Koenen, Karestan C; Street, Amy

    2014-04-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that affects approximately 10% of women in the United States. Although effective psychotherapeutic treatments for PTSD exist, clients with PTSD report additional benefits of complementary and alternative approaches such as yoga. In particular, yoga may downregulate the stress response and positively impact PTSD and comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms. We conducted a pilot study of a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-session Kripalu-based yoga intervention with an assessment control group. Participants included 38 women with current full or subthreshold PTSD symptoms. During the intervention, yoga participants showed decreases in reexperiencing and hyperarousal symptoms. The assessment control group, however, showed decreases in reexperiencing and anxiety symptoms as well, which may be a result of the positive effect of self-monitoring on PTSD and associated symptoms. Between-groups effect sizes were small to moderate (0.08-0.31). Although more research is needed, yoga may be an effective adjunctive treatment for PTSD. Participants responded positively to the intervention, suggesting that it was tolerable for this sample. Findings underscore the need for future research investigating mechanisms by which yoga may impact mental health symptoms, gender comparisons, and the long-term effects of yoga practice.

  3. Group intervention for siblings of children with disabilities: a pilot study in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granat, Tina; Nordgren, Ingrid; Rein, George; Sonnander, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of a group intervention in a clinical setting designed to increase knowledge of disability and improve sibling relationship among siblings of children with disabilities. A self-selected sample of 54 younger and older siblings with typical development (ages 8-12 years) of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (9), Asperger syndrome (7), autistic disorder (13), physical disability (8) and intellectual disability (17) participated in collateral sibling groups. The Sibling Knowledge Interview (SKI) and Sibling Relationship Questionnaire (SRQ) were administered pre- and post-intervention. SKI scores increased (p < 0.001) from pre- to post-intervention when merged diagnostic groups were compared. Comparisons of SRQ pre- and post-intervention scores across diagnostic sibling groups showed significantly different (p < 0.05) score patterns. The results were encouraging and contribute to further development of interventions meeting the needs of siblings of children with disabilities. In view of the limited empirical research on group interventions for siblings of children with disabilities future work is needed to investigate the effectiveness of such interventions. Particular attention should be given to siblings of children with autism and siblings of children with intellectual disability.

  4. Caregiver preference for reinforcement-based interventions for problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Anne M; Fritz, Jennifer N; Roath, Christopher T; Rothe, Brittany R; Gourley, Denise A

    2016-06-01

    Social validity of behavioral interventions typically is assessed with indirect methods or by determining preferences of the individuals who receive treatment, and direct observation of caregiver preference rarely is described. In this study, preferences of 5 caregivers were determined via a concurrent-chains procedure. Caregivers were neurotypical, and children had been diagnosed with developmental disabilities and engaged in problem behavior maintained by positive reinforcement. Caregivers were taught to implement noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA), and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), and the caregivers selected interventions to implement during sessions with the child after they had demonstrated proficiency in implementing the interventions. Three caregivers preferred DRA, 1 caregiver preferred differential reinforcement procedures, and 1 caregiver did not exhibit a preference. Direct observation of implementation in concurrent-chains procedures may allow the identification of interventions that are implemented with sufficient integrity and preferred by caregivers.

  5. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosario Josefa Marrero; Mónica Carballeira; Sabrina Martín; Miriam Mejías

    2016-01-01

      The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning...

  6. Tactical Versus Strategic Behavior: General Aviation Piloting in Convective Weather Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorella, Kara A.; Chamberlain, James P.

    2002-01-01

    We commonly describe environments and behavioral responses to environmental conditions as 'tactical' and 'strategic.' However theoretical research defining relevant environmental characteristics is rare, as are empirical investigations that would inform such theory. This paper discusses General Aviation (GA) pilots' descriptions of tactical/strategic conditions with respect to weather flying, and evaluates their ratings along a tactical/strategic scale in response to real convective weather scenarios experienced during a flight experiment with different weather information cues. Perceived risk was significantly associated with ratings for all experimental conditions. In addition, environmental characteristics were found to be predictive of ratings for Traditional IMC (instrument meteorological conditions), i.e., aural weather information only, and Traditional VMC (visual meteorological conditions), i.e., aural information and an external view. The paper also presents subjects' comments regarding use of Graphical Weather Information Systems (GWISs) to support tactical and strategic weather flying decisions and concludes with implications for the design and use of GWISs.

  7. Modeling Pilot Behavior for Assessing Integrated Alert and Notification Systems on Flight Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, Mathew; Schnell, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Numerous new flight deck configurations for caution, warning, and alerts can be conceived; yet testing them with human-in-the-Ioop experiments to evaluate each one would not be practical. New sensors, instruments, and displays are being put into cockpits every day and this is particularly true as we enter the dawn of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). By modeling pilot behavior in a computer simulation, an unlimited number of unique caution, warning, and alert configurations can be evaluated 24/7 by a computer. These computer simulations can then identify the most promising candidate formats to further evaluate in higher fidelity, but more costly, Human-in-the-Ioop (HITL) simulations. Evaluations using batch simulations with human performance models saves time, money, and enables a broader consideration of possible caution, warning, and alerting configurations for future flight decks.

  8. Translation of a tailored nutrition and resistance exercise intervention for elderly people to a real-life setting: adaptation process and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Ellen Ji; Leerlooijer, Joanne N; Steijns, Jan M; Tieland, Michael; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; Haveman-Nies, Annemien

    2017-01-18

    Combining increased dietary protein intake and resistance exercise training for elderly people is a promising strategy to prevent or counteract the loss of muscle mass and decrease the risk of disabilities. Using findings from controlled interventions in a real-life setting requires adaptations to the intervention and working procedures of healthcare professionals (HCPs). The aim of this study is to adapt an efficacious intervention for elderly people to a real-life setting (phase one) and test the feasibility and potential impact of this prototype intervention in practice in a pilot study (phase two). The Intervention Mapping approach was used to guide the adaptation in phase one. Qualitative data were collected from the original researchers, target group, and HCPs, and information was used to decide whether and how specified intervention elements needed to be adapted. In phase two, a one-group pre-test post-test pilot study was conducted (n = 25 community-dwelling elderly), to elicit further improvements to the prototype intervention. The evaluation included participant questionnaires and measurements at baseline (T0) and follow-up (T1), registration forms, interviews, and focus group discussions (T1). Qualitative data for both phases were analysed using an inductive approach. Outcome measures included physical functioning, strength, body composition, and dietary intake. Change in outcomes was assessed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The most important adaptations to the original intervention were the design of HCP training and extending the original protein supplementation with a broader nutrition programme aimed at increasing protein intake, facilitated by a dietician. Although the prototype intervention was appreciated by participants and professionals, and perceived applicable for implementation, the pilot study process evaluation resulted in further adaptations, mostly concerning recruitment, training session guidance, and the nutrition programme

  9. Antenatal mindfulness intervention to reduce depression, anxiety and stress: a pilot randomised controlled trial of the MindBabyBody program in an Australian tertiary maternity hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Woolhouse, Hannah; Mercuri, Kristine; Judd, Fiona; Brown, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    Background Mindfulness interventions to reduce psychological distress are well-suited to pregnancy, due to their brief and non-pharmacological nature, but there is a need for more robust evidence determining their usefulness. This pilot study was designed to explore the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial of a mindfulness intervention to reduce antenatal depression, anxiety and stress. Methods The study was designed in two parts 1) a non-randomised trial targeting women at risk of me...

  10. Efficacy of internet and group-administered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in adolescents: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Oort, F.J.; Bögels, S.M.; Meijer, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that adolescents are at risk for insomnia, but are reluctant to seek help. Treatment of insomnia has been extensively examined in adults, but studies with adolescents are sparse. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess feasibility and efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy

  11. HIV/AIDS Behavioral Interventions in China: A Literature Review and Recommendation for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Yan; Li, Xiaoming

    2008-01-01

    In the past two decades, China has witnessed an alarming increase of HIV/AIDS epidemic. Meanwhile, a number of HIV prevention interventions have been conducted. This study reviews existing studies in literature on behavioral interventions on HIV/AIDS in China. Of 25 studies we identified, most have been concentrated in South and South–West China, mainly targeting injection drug users and female sex workers. The most commonly used intervention strategy was individual-oriented HIV-related knowl...

  12. Characteristic market behaviors caused by intervention in a foreign exchange market

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuno, T; Takayasu, H; Watanabe, T

    2005-01-01

    In foreign exchange markets monotonic rate changes can be observed in time scale of order of an hour on the days that governmental interventions took place. We estimate the starting time of an intervention using this characteristic behavior of the exchange rates. We find that big amount of interventions can shift the averaged rate about 1 yen per 1 dollar in an hour, and the rate change distribution becomes asymmetric for a few hours.

  13. Interest in Health Behavior Intervention Delivery Modalities Among Cancer Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Emily C.; Basen-Engquist, Karen M.; Cox, Matthew G.; Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Carmack, Cindy L.; Blalock, Janice A.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Background Effective, broad-reaching channels are important for the delivery of health behavior interventions in order to meet the needs of the growing population of cancer survivors in the United States. New technology presents opportunities to increase the reach of health behavior change interventions and therefore their overall impact. However, evidence suggests that older adults may be slower in their adoption of these technologies than the general population. Survivors? interest for more...

  14. Assessing the Impact of De Novo Social Ties within Health Intervention Settings: New Questions for Health Behavior Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesdahl, Eric; Gesell, Sabina B

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in the study of health and social networks have focused on linkages between health outcomes and naturally occurring social relations, such as friendship or kinship. Based on findings in this area, a new generation of health behavior intervention programs have been implemented that rely on the formation of new social relations among program participants. However, little is known about the qualities of these de novo social relations. We examined the social networks of 59 participants within a randomized controlled trial of an intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain. We employed exponential random graph modeling techniques to analyze supportive relationships formed between participants in the intervention arm, to detect unique effects of program participation on the likelihood of forming ties. Program participation had a positive effect on the likelihood of forming supportive social relations, however, in this particular timeframe we did not detect any additional effect of such relations on the health behaviors or outcomes of interest. Our findings raise two critical questions: do short-term group-level programs reliably lead to the formation of new social relations among participants; and do these relations have a unique effect on health outcomes relative to standard methods of health behavior intervention?

  15. The Effects of a Pilot Intervention for Community-Dwelling Adults with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Wuhan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfang eDeng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a pilot educational intervention program on knowledge, perceived self-efficacy and health-related quality of life of community-dwelling adults with rheumatoid arthritis. A convenience sample of 16 participants with rheumatoid arthritis completed the program in Wuhan, China. Data were collected in face-to-face interviews using questionnaires at baseline, post-test and 1 month follow-up. Knowledge scores were significantly increased over time. Significant differences were found in pain self-efficacy, symptoms self-efficacy, bodily pain, social functioning and role emotional functions. Community health providers should provide educational programs to improve health-related quality of life for adults with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. A randomized controlled trial of a theoretically-based behavioral nutrition intervention for community elders: lessons learned from the Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Julie L; Vickers, Kristin S; Buys, David R; Ellis, Amy; Lawrence, Jeannine C; Newton, Laura Elizabeth; Roth, David L; Ritchie, Christine S; Bales, Connie W

    2013-12-01

    Older adults with multiple comorbidities are often undernourished or at high risk for becoming so, especially after a recent hospitalization. Randomized controlled trials of effective, innovative interventions are needed to support evidence-based approaches for solving nutritional problems in this population. Self-management approaches where participants select their own behavioral goals can enhance success of interventions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a multilevel self-management intervention to improve nutritional status in a group of high-risk older adults. The Behavioral Nutrition Intervention for Community Elders (B-NICE) trial used a prospective randomized controlled design to determine whether the intervention, compared to standard care, maintained or increased caloric intake (depending on baseline body mass index) and, consequently, stabilized or increased body weight. Participants were 34 Medicare-eligible, age 65 years old or older, homebound adults who were consuming insufficient calories and/or had a history of weight loss ≥2.5% over 6 months. The intervention took place within participants' homes. Outcome measures, including energy intake (based on collection of three 24-hour dietary recalls) and body weights were assessed at baseline and at 60 days post randomization. The primary analyses included analyses of covariance and Pearson's χ(2). We hypothesized that the intervention would result in increased caloric intake and weight gain in underweight older adults and increased or stabilized caloric intake and weight for everyone else. The intervention was feasible; however, it did not result in differences between groups for desired outcomes of either caloric intake or body weight. Future interventions might either deliberately involve caregivers or reduce burden for both patients and caregivers.

  17. Utilizing Cognitive Behavioral Interventions to Positively Impact Academic Achievement in Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyromski, Brett; Joseph, Arline Edwards

    2008-01-01

    Empirical research suggests a correlation between Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) interventions and increased academic achievement of students in middle schools. An argument was presented for utilizing CBT intervention within the delivery system of comprehensive school counseling programs in middle schools; specifically in individual…

  18. Long-Term Post-Intensive Behavioral Intervention Outcomes for Five Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Anne B.; Healy, Olive

    2010-01-01

    Research clearly indicates that early intensive behavioral intervention is an effective intervention for young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However little is known about the longitudinal development of these children. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes for a number of children with ASD following intensive…

  19. Influence of behavioral theory on fruit and vegetable intervention effectiveness among children: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Cassandra S; Chen, Tzu-An; Davies, Vanessa F; Baranowski, Janice C; Baranowski, Tom

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that interventions clearly based on theory, multiple theories, or a formal intervention planning process will be more effective in changing fruit and vegetable consumption among children than interventions with no behavioral theoretical foundation. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Identification of articles in PubMed, PsycInfo, Medline, Cochrane Collaborative database, and existing literature reviews and meta-analyses. Children aged 2-18 years. Change in fruit and/or vegetable consumption in dietary change interventions. Meta-analysis, meta-regression analysis, and summary reporting for articles. Predicating an intervention on behavioral theory had a small to moderate enhancement (P theory and non-theory interventions were 0.232 for fruit, 0.043 for vegetables, and 0.333 for fruit and vegetables combined. There was mixed support, however, for enhanced dietary change with multiple theories or a formal planning process. After controlling for study quality, theory use was related only to vegetable consumption (β = 0.373; P theory's influences on dietary behaviors to guide future interventions among children. More research is also needed to identify what may be effective practical- or experience-based procedures that complement theory, to incorporate into interventions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Theory-Driven Intervention for Changing Personality: Expectancy Value Theory, Behavioral Activation, and Conscientiousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Roberts, Brent W.; Collado-Rodriguez, Anahi; Lejuez, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that personality traits may be changeable, raising the possibility that personality traits most linked to health problems can be modified with intervention. A growing body of research suggests that problematic personality traits may be altered with behavioral intervention using a bottom-up approach. That is, by…

  1. Systematic Review of Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Patricia; Magiati, Iliana; Charman, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews highlight limitations in the evidence base for early interventions for children with autism. We conducted a systematic review of controlled studies of early intensive behavioral interventions (EIBI) for young children with autism. Eleven studies met inclusion criteria (including two randomized controlled trials). At group level,…

  2. Train the Trainer Effectiveness Trials of Behavioral Intervention for Individuals with Autism: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Yoshiko; Kasari, Connie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines train the trainer (TTT) effectiveness trials of behavioral interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Published methodological quality scales were used to assess studies including participant description, research design, intervention, outcomes, and analysis. Twelve studies including 9 weak…

  3. Developing an Early Reading Intervention Aligned with the Down Syndrome Behavioral Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Puranik, Cynthia S.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A.; Partanen, Jane; Fidler, Deborah J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an early reading intervention for children with Down syndrome based on the related behavioral phenotype. The intervention targeted learning of letter-sound correspondences, reading of decodable and high frequency words, and phonological awareness. We evaluated the feasibility and potential efficacy of the…

  4. Interventions to Mitigate the Psychological Effects of Media Violence on Aggressive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Leonard D.

    1986-01-01

    Describes and evaluates attempts to mitigate effect that watching television violence has on young children. Most relevant studies have been laboratory experiments, and there is no reported evidence that any intervention has been effective over long-term. Concludes that interventions combining cognitive and behavioral approaches have most promise,…

  5. Development of an internet intervention to address behaviors associated with skin cancer risk among young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Heckman

    2015-09-01

    Major conclusions: Development of an acceptable intervention intended to have a significant public health impact requires a relatively large investment in time, money, expertise, and ongoing user input. Lessons learned and recommendations are discussed. The comprehensive process used may help prepare others interested in creating similar behavioral health interventions.

  6. Increasing the Social Skills of a Student with Autism through a Literacy-Based Behavioral Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Grace L.; McMullen, Victoria B.; Blue-Banning, Martha; Haines, Shana

    2013-01-01

    Social skills instruction is as important for many students with disabilities as instruction in core academic subjects. Frequently, students with autism require individualized social skills instruction to experience success in general education settings. Literacy-based behavioral Interventions (LBBIs) are an effective intervention that instructors…

  7. Theory-Driven Intervention for Changing Personality: Expectancy Value Theory, Behavioral Activation, and Conscientiousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Roberts, Brent W.; Collado-Rodriguez, Anahi; Lejuez, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that personality traits may be changeable, raising the possibility that personality traits most linked to health problems can be modified with intervention. A growing body of research suggests that problematic personality traits may be altered with behavioral intervention using a bottom-up approach. That is, by…

  8. A Function-Based Intervention to Decrease Disruptive Behavior and Increase Academic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Smither, Rachel; Huseman, Rachel; Guffey, Jennifer; Fox, James

    2007-01-01

    A range of interventions exist to prevent and respond to disruptive classroom behavior. This study documents the efficacy of a function-based intervention conducted using a multiple baseline across settings design. Despite moderately variable levels of treatment fidelity, results suggest a functional relation between the introduction of a package…

  9. Effectiveness of individually delivered indicated school-based interventions on externalizing behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoltz, S.E.M.J.; Londen, M. van; Dekovic, Maja; Orobio de Castro, B.; Prinzie, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the results of two meta-analyses on the effectiveness of individually delivered indicated school-based interventions for externalizing behavior problems at elementary schools are presented. A distinction was made between studies that evaluated effects of interventions with only

  10. Effectiveness of Individually Delivered Indicated School-Based Interventions on Externalizing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Sabine; van Londen, Monique; Dekovic, Maja; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Prinzie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the results of two meta-analyses on the effectiveness of "individually" delivered indicated school-based interventions for externalizing behavior problems at elementary schools are presented. A distinction was made between studies that evaluated effects of interventions with only an individual component (k = 11 studies, n =…

  11. Using Self-Management Interventions to Address General Education Behavioral Needs: Assessment of Effectiveness and Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briesch, Amy M.; Daniels, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive self-management intervention was utilized to increase the on-task behavior of three African American students within an urban middle-school setting. The intervention was designed to necessitate minimal management on the part of the general education classroom teacher by utilizing an electronic prompting device, as well as a…

  12. Multilevel Factorial Experiments for Developing Behavioral Interventions: Power, Sample Size, and Resource Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziak, John J.; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Collins, Linda M.

    2012-01-01

    Factorial experimental designs have many potential advantages for behavioral scientists. For example, such designs may be useful in building more potent interventions by helping investigators to screen several candidate intervention components simultaneously and to decide which are likely to offer greater benefit before evaluating the intervention…

  13. Behavioral and Emotional Outcomes of an In-Home Parent Training Intervention for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Griffith, Annette K.; Casey, Kathryn J.; Ingram, Stephanie; Simpson, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the Boys Town In-Home Family Program on improving child behavior and parenting skills. The three-month parenting intervention was delivered to parents in their homes. All children were referred to the program by school personnel. Of the 107 families that enrolled in the study, 79% completed the intervention.…

  14. Supportive and cognitive behavioral group interventions on Bam earthquake related PTSD symptoms in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mahmoudi-Gharaei

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychological debriefing has been widely advocated for routine use following major traumatic events. Cognitive Behavioral Interventions, art supportive therapies, and sport and recreational support activities are other interventions for reducing posttraumatic stress disorder. We assessed the effects of theses methods individually and in combination on reduction posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in adolescents who had experienced Bam earthquake. Methods: In a field trial, we evaluated the efficacy of psychological debriefing, group cognitive-behavioral therapy, art and sport supportive interventions in 200 adolescents with PTSD symptoms who survived of Bam earthquake and compare it with a control group. Patients were randomly assigned to one of intervention programs including: group cognitive-behavioral therapy; group CBT plus art and sport interventions; art and sport interventions without group CBT; and control group. Results: Thirty one individuals were excluded because of migration. A statistically significant reduction in overall PTSD symptoms as well as in avoidance symptoms was observed after group cognitive-behavioral therapy. There was no significant difference in reduction of overall PTSD and avoidance symptoms between the other groups. Conclusion: Psychological interventions in form of group cognitive behavioral therapy can reduce the symptoms of PTSD symptoms but we couldn't find the art and sport supportive therapy alone or in combination with group CBT to be useful in this regard.

  15. Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Type A Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Christopher W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the use of cognitive behavioral techniques (cognitive restructuring, rational emotive therapy, and anger management) among college faculty. Each was successfully used in a treatment program for faculty at North Texas State University which emphasized reducing unnecessary expressions of Type A behavior while remaining productive and…

  16. Student Academic Performance Outcomes of a Classroom Physical Activity Intervention: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather ERWIN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A Physical activity is beneficial to children’s health, yet academic pressures limit opportunities forstudents throughout the school day. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aclassroom PA intervention on student academic performance outcomes. Intervention participants(n=15 received daily PA breaks. Reading and mathematics fluency, PA, grades, and standardized testscores were collected. Effects of the intervention were examined using mixed-design ANOVAs.Intervention students had significantly higher reading fluency and mathematics scores postinterventionand higher means for standardized reading and mathematics scores as well as grades.Short bouts of PA are important for improving CBM math and reading fluency scores. Classroomteachers should be encouraged to devote time during academic learning to incorporate PA.

  17. Piloting a mobile health intervention to increase physical activity for adolescents with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Schoenfelder

    2017-06-01

    Results indicate that this mHealth intervention is engaging and promising for increasing PA among adolescents with ADHD, and warrant further study. Implications for improving ADHD symptoms and overall functioning for this undertreated population are discussed.

  18. Targeting Feeding and Eating Behaviors: Development of the Feeding Dynamic Intervention for Caregivers of 2- to 5-Year-Old Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihuoma U. Eneli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting feeding dynamics, a concept centered on the roles and interaction of the caregiver and child in a feeding relationship, may have significant potential for obesity intervention. The aim of this paper is to describe the 3-phase development of the Feeding Dynamics Intervention (FDI, an acceptability and feasibility study on implementing the feeding dynamic roles (Study 1, development of the FDI content (Study 2, and a pilot study on use of the 6-lesson FDI to promote behaviors consistent with a feeding dynamic approach (Study 3. Sample population was mothers with young children, 2–5 years old. An effect size (Hedges’ g greater than 0.20 was seen in more than half (57% of maternal feeding behaviors, with the largest effect sizes (Hedges’ g≥0.8 occurring with behaviors that represent the mother adopting her roles of determining what food is served, not using food as a reward, and not controlling her child’s intake. There was a significant decline in Pressure to Eat behaviors (2.9 versus 2.2, p<0.01 and Monitoring (4.1 versus 3.5, p<0.001. The FDI emerged as an acceptable and implementable intervention. Future studies need to investigate effects of the FDI on the child’s eating behaviors, self-regulation of energy intake, and anthropometrics.

  19. Targeting Feeding and Eating Behaviors: Development of the Feeding Dynamic Intervention for Caregivers of 2- to 5-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneli, Ihuoma U.; Watowicz, Rosanna P.; Hummel, Jessica; Ritter, Jan; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2015-01-01

    Targeting feeding dynamics, a concept centered on the roles and interaction of the caregiver and child in a feeding relationship, may have significant potential for obesity intervention. The aim of this paper is to describe the 3-phase development of the Feeding Dynamics Intervention (FDI), an acceptability and feasibility study on implementing the feeding dynamic roles (Study 1), development of the FDI content (Study 2), and a pilot study on use of the 6-lesson FDI to promote behaviors consistent with a feeding dynamic approach (Study 3). Sample population was mothers with young children, 2–5 years old. An effect size (Hedges' g) greater than 0.20 was seen in more than half (57%) of maternal feeding behaviors, with the largest effect sizes (Hedges' g ≥ 0.8) occurring with behaviors that represent the mother adopting her roles of determining what food is served, not using food as a reward, and not controlling her child's intake. There was a significant decline in Pressure to Eat behaviors (2.9 versus 2.2, p FDI emerged as an acceptable and implementable intervention. Future studies need to investigate effects of the FDI on the child's eating behaviors, self-regulation of energy intake, and anthropometrics. PMID:26199741

  20. Factors related to health outcomes and health risk behaviors of adolescents with lead exposure. A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study was an approach to determine the health outcomes (nutritional status, cognitive status, mental health and educational status), and the presence of health risk behaviors (aggressive behavior/ delinquency, hazardous/harmful drinking, substance use/abuse and tobacco use) of adolescents who have been exposed all their lives to lead. Besides, we could identify individual, familial and social factors, such as lead exposure, that were related to them. The sample included 40 adolesce...

  1. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales

    OpenAIRE

    Sivle, L. D.; Kvadsheim, P. H.; Fahlman, A.; Lam, F. P. A.; Tyack, P. L.; Miller, P. J. O.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1–2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6–7 kHz] during three field seasons (2...

  2. A pilot study of an emotional intelligence training intervention for a paediatric team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Ellen; Genizi, Jacob; Kerem, Nogah; Reuven-Lalung, Ayalla; Dolev, Niva; Srugo, Isaac; Rofe, Amnon

    2017-02-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the individual's ability to perceive, understand and manage emotion and to understand and relate effectively to others. We examined the degree to which EI training may be associated with a change in EI among different medical personnel and patient satisfaction. The EI of 17 physicians and 10 nurses in paediatric ward was prospectively evaluated with Bar-On's EI at baseline and after 18 months. 11 physicians who did not undergo the intervention served as controls. The intervention consisted of a training programme comprising group discussions, simulations and case studies. Pre-emotional quotient inventory (EQ-i) and post-EQ-i scores and patient satisfaction surveys of nurse and physicians pre-intervention and post-intervention were analysed. The mean overall EI score of the study sample rose from 99.0±9.6 (both plus and minus mathematical operations standing for SD) at baseline to 105.4±10 (p<0.000) after 18 months, with the most robust increase (nearly 6%; p<0.003) manifested among physicians. In contrast, the control group's EI scores did not change over this period. Within the intervention group, physicians displayed a statistically significant increase in three of the five EI dimensions, compared with only one of the five EI dimensions for nurses. Patient satisfaction scores relating to physician care rose from 4.4 pre-intervention to 4.7 post-intervention (p=0.03). An EI intervention led to an overall increase in EI scores, with a significant improvement in patient satisfaction. These findings suggest important potential benefits for both staff and their patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Jarrib Baleha--a pilot nutrition intervention to increase water intake and decrease soft drink consumption among school children in Beirut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Haidar, Gina; Lahham Salameh, Nina; Afifi, Rema A

    2011-01-01

    The Global School-based Student Health Survey (2005) indicated that in Lebanon, 33% of students in grades 7-9 drink carbonated soft drinks two or more times per day. Observational evidence suggests that students do not drink enough water. A pilot project called Jarrib Baleha ['try without it'] was implemented with 110 students in grades 3 and 4 in two schools in Lebanon to promote drinking water instead of soft drinks. Specific objectives included increasing knowledge about the benefits of water and the harms of soft drinks, increasing confidence in choosing water over soft drinks, and increasing actual water drinking behavior while decreasing soft drink consumption. Four 50-minute theory-informed, interactive and participatory sessions were implemented --by a graduate student in partial fulfillment of requirements for a MPH degree--over a period of two weeks. The intervention sessions--based on the Health Belief Model--took place during a class period. Process evaluation measured satisfaction of the students with the sessions. Impact evaluation measured changes in knowledge, attitudes including self-efficacy, and behavior, using a self-administered questionnaire completed prior to and after the intervention. Bivariate analysis using crosstabs was carried out to compare pretest and posttest scores on knowledge, attitudes, and behavior. Comparison of the knowledge index between pretest and posttest indicated that, overall, knowledge increased from 6.0769 to 9.1500 (p = 0.000). Compared to pretest, students at posttest also felt more confident to drink less soft drinks and more water (p drink water when thirsty (p soft drinks when going to a restaurant (p drinking 6 or more cups of water increased from 27.7% to 59.1% (p = 0.000); and those drinking less than one can of soft drink/day increased from 25.5% to 57.6% (p = 0.000). These results are encouraging and suggest the Jarrib Baleha intervention could be implemented on a wider scale with students from both public

  4. Technology-enhanced program for child disruptive behavior disorders: development and pilot randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Deborah J; Forehand, Rex; Cuellar, Jessica; Parent, Justin; Honeycutt, Amanda; Khavjou, Olga; Gonzalez, Michelle; Anton, Margaret; Newey, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    Early onset disruptive behavior disorders are overrepresented in low-income families; yet these families are less likely to engage in behavioral parent training (BPT) than other groups. This project aimed to develop and pilot test a technology-enhanced version of one evidence-based BPT program, Helping the Noncompliant Child (HNC). The aim was to increase engagement of low-income families and, in turn, child behavior outcomes, with potential cost-savings associated with greater treatment efficiency. Low-income families of 3- to 8-year-old children with clinically significant disruptive behaviors were randomized to and completed standard HNC (n = 8) or Technology-Enhanced HNC (TE-HNC; n = 7). On average, caregivers were 37 years old; 87% were female, and 80% worked at least part-time. More than half (53%) of the youth were boys; the average age of the sample was 5.67 years. All families received the standard HNC program; however, TE-HNC also included the following smartphone enhancements: (a) skills video series, (b) brief daily surveys, (c) text message reminders, (d) video recording home practice, and (e) midweek video calls. TE-HNC yielded larger effect sizes than HNC for all engagement outcomes. Both groups yielded clinically significant improvements in disruptive behavior; however, findings suggest that the greater program engagement associated with TE-HNC boosted child treatment outcome. Further evidence for the boost afforded by the technology is revealed in family responses to postassessment interviews. Finally, cost analysis suggests that TE-HNC families also required fewer sessions than HNC families to complete the program, an efficiency that did not compromise family satisfaction. TE-HNC shows promise as an innovative approach to engaging low-income families in BPT with potential cost-savings and, therefore, merits further investigation on a larger scale.

  5. Decreasing Risky Behavior on Social Network Sites: The Impact of Parental Involvement in Secondary Education Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoven, Ellen; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Teenagers face significant risks when using increasingly popular social network sites. Prevention and intervention efforts to raise awareness about these risks and to change risky behavior (so-called "e-safety" interventions) are essential for the wellbeing of these minors. However, several studies have revealed that while school interventions often affect awareness, they have only a limited impact on pupils' unsafe behavior. Utilizing the Theory of Planned Behavior and theories about parental involvement, we hypothesized that involving parents in an e-safety intervention would positively influence pupils' intentions and behavior. In a quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-test measures involving 207 pupils in secondary education, we compared the impact of an intervention without parental involvement with one that included active parental involvement by means of a homework task. We found that whereas parental involvement was not necessary to improve the intervention's impact on risk awareness, it did change intentions to engage in certain unsafe behavior, such as posting personal and sexual information on the profile page of a social network site, and in reducing existing problematic behavior. This beneficial impact was particularly evident for boys. These findings suggest that developing prevention campaigns with active parental involvement is well worth the effort. Researchers and developers should therefore focus on other efficient strategies to involve parents.

  6. A theory-based online health behavior intervention for new university students: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epton Tracy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Too few young people engage in behaviors that reduce the risk of morbidity and premature mortality, such as eating healthily, being physically active, drinking sensibly and not smoking. The present research developed an online intervention to target these health behaviors during the significant life transition from school to university when health beliefs and behaviors may be more open to change. This paper describes the intervention and the proposed approach to its evaluation. Methods/design Potential participants (all undergraduates about to enter the University of Sheffield will be emailed an online questionnaire two weeks before starting university. On completion of the questionnaire, respondents will be randomly assigned to receive either an online health behavior intervention (U@Uni or a control condition. The intervention employs three behavior change techniques (self-affirmation, theory-based messages, and implementation intentions to target four heath behaviors (alcohol consumption, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and smoking. Subsequently, all participants will be emailed follow-up questionnaires approximately one and six months after starting university. The questionnaires will assess the four targeted behaviors and associated cognitions (e.g., intentions, self-efficacy as well as socio-demographic variables, health status, Body Mass Index (BMI, health service use and recreational drug use. A sub-sample of participants will provide a sample of hair to assess changes in biochemical markers of health behavior. A health economic evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the intervention will also be conducted. Discussion The findings will provide evidence on the effectiveness of online interventions as well as the potential for intervening during significant life transitions, such as the move from school to university. If successful, the intervention could be employed at other universities to promote

  7. The pilot study of radiology nursing intervention in abdominal 3-T Magnetic Resonance examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-qing Dong

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiology nursing intervention in abdominal examination at 3-T MRI. METHOD 60 patients with abdominal diseases were divided into two groups randomly: MR nursing intervention group and control group. All the patients underwent abdominal MR examination at 3-T. The MR nursing interventions were performed in nursing intervention group. The outcomes, including one-time success rate, the ratio of diagnosable MR images and the points of image quality, were compared between these two groups. RESULTS The one-time success rates in control group and MR nursing intervention group were 66.67% and 96.67% with significant difference ( χ2 =9.017, P<0.05. The ratios of diagnosable images in the two groups were 76.67% and 96.67% with significant difference (χ2 =5.192, P<0.05. The points of MR image quality in the two groups were 1.87±0.86 and 2.33±0.55, respectively. There was significant difference between these two groups (t=-2.508, P<0.05. CONCLUSION The effective nursing intervention can make the patients cooperation better in abdominal MR examination and improve the image quality significantly.

  8. An Educational Intervention to Train Professional Nurses in Promoting Patient Engagement: A Pilot Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Serena; Graffigna, Guendalina; Pitacco, Giuliana; Mislej, Maila; Cortale, Maurizio; Provenzi, Livio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Growing evidence recognizes that patients who are motivated to take an active role in their care can experience a range of health benefits and reduced healthcare costs. Nurses play a critical role in the effort to make patients fully engaged in their disease management. Trainings devoted to increase nurses' skills and knowledge to assess and promote patient engagement are today a medical education priority. To address this goal, we developed a program of nurse education training in patient engagement strategies (NET-PES). This paper presents pilot feasibility study and preliminary participants outcomes for NET-PES. Methods: This is a pilot feasibility study of a 2-session program on patient engagement designed to improve professional nurses' ability to engage chronic patients in their medical journey; the training mainly focused on passing patient engagement assessment skills to clinicians as a crucial mean to improve care experience. A pre-post pilot evaluation of NET-PES included 46 nurses working with chronic conditions. A course specific competence test has been developed and validated to measure patient engagement skills. The design included self-report questionnaire completed before and after the training for evaluation purposes. Participants met in a large group for didactic presentations and then they were split into small groups in which they used role-play and case discussion to reflect upon the value of patient engagement measurement in relation to difficult cases from own practice. Results: Forty-six nurses participated in the training program. The satisfaction questionnaire showed that the program met the educational objectives and was considered to be useful and relevant by the participants. Results demonstrated changes on clinicians' attitudes and skills in promoting engagement. Moreover, practitioners demonstrated increases on confidence regarding their ability to support their patients' engagement in the care process. Conclusions

  9. Een sociaal-cognitief interventieprogramma voor gedragsgestoorde kinderen, een vooronderzoek. / A social cognitive intervention program for children with a conduct disorder, a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, T.; Prins, P.J.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Conducted a pilot study on the efficacy of a social-cognitive group intervention program based on social information-processing theory (K. A. Dodge, 1986) for children with a conduct disorder. Human Ss: 16 Dutch school-age children and adolescents (aged 10-13 yrs) (conduct disorder). Ss participated

  10. Evaluating the Possibilities and Actualities of the Learning Process: How a School Pilot Wellbeing Programme Worked as an Organisational Learning Process Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane; Sice, Petia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to reflect on the opportunities and challenges of the learning process in practice and explores the case of a local authority school Pilot Wellbeing Programme (PWP) intervention. The aim of the PWP was to create the best workplace conditions and circumstances for people to flourish and mature, both individually and…

  11. Craving Behavior Intervention in Ameliorating College Students' Internet Game Disorder: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lin-Yuan; Liu, Lu; Xia, Cui-Cui; Lan, Jing; Zhang, Jin-Tao; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Craving, as a central feature of addiction and a precursor of relapse, is targeted recently in addiction intervention. While Internet gaming disorder (IGD), conceptualized as a behavioral addiction, is lack of effective treatment practice and exploration of its mechanism. This research aims to test the effectiveness and detect the active ingredients of craving behavior intervention (CBI) in mitigation of IGD among young adults. A total of 63 male college students with IGD were assigned into the intervention group (six-session CBI intervention) or the waiting-list control group. Structured questionnaires were administered at pre-intervention (T1), post-intervention (T2), 3-month follow-up (T3), and 6-month follow-up (T4). Compared to the control group, a significant decrease in the severity of IGD in intervention group was found at post-intervention and lasting to 6 months after intervention. The value changes of craving could partially mediate the relationship between intervention and changes of IGD among all effects tests (immediate, T2-T1; short-term, T3-T1; and long-term effects, T4-T1). Further, explorations of the active ingredients of intervention found depression relief and shift of psychological needs from Internet to real life significantly predict craving amelioration at both post-intervention and 6-month follow-up. Although preliminary, the current study provides evidence for the value of craving-aimed intervention practice in IGD treatment and identifies two potential active ingredients for mitigation of craving, and the long-term therapeutic benefits are further conferred. Registry name: The behavioral and brain mechanism of IGD; URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02550405; Registration number: NCT02550405. PMID:28443046

  12. Credible knowledge: A pilot evaluation of a modified GRADE method using parent-implemented interventions for children with autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Adrienne

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision-making in child and youth mental health (CYMH care requires recommendations that are developed through an efficient and effective method and are based on credible knowledge. Credible knowledge is informed by two sources: scientific evidence, and practice-based evidence, that reflects the "real world" experience of service providers. Current approaches to developing these recommendations in relation to CYMH will typically include evidence from one source or the other but do not have an objective method to combine the two. To this end, a modified version of the Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE approach was pilot-tested, a novel method for the CYMH field. Methods GRADE has an explicit methodology that relies on input from scientific evidence as well as a panel of experts. The panel established the quality of evidence and derived detailed recommendations regarding the organization and delivery of mental health care for children and youth or their caregivers. In this study a modified GRADE method was used to provide precise recommendations based on a specific CYMH question (i.e. What is the current credible knowledge concerning the effects of parent-implemented, early intervention with their autistic children?. Results Overall, it appeared that early, parent-implemented interventions for autism result in positive effects that outweigh any undesirable effects. However, as opposed to overall recommendations, the heterogeneity of the evidence required that recommendations be specific to particular interventions, based on the questions of whether the benefits of a particular intervention outweighs its harms. Conclusions This pilot project provided evidence that a modified GRADE method may be an effective and practical approach to making recommendations in CYMH, based on credible knowledge. Key strengths of the process included separating the assessments of the quality of the evidence and

  13. Reading interventions with behavioral and social skill outcomes: a synthesis of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Garrett J; Solis, Michael; Ciullo, Stephen; McKenna, John W; Vaughn, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Research findings have suggested that reading deficits and problem behaviors are positively related. This synthesis investigated how reading interventions impact behavioral/social skill outcomes by reviewing studies that included (a) a reading intervention without behavioral/social skill components, (b) behavioral/social skill dependent variables, and (c) students in Grades K-12. Fifteen articles were evaluated by the type of reading intervention, associations between positive reading effects and behavioral/social skill outcomes, and The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) determinants of study ratings. Findings suggested that reading interventions tended to have positive reading outcomes, while behavioral/social skill outcomes were small or negative. Research did not suggest an association between improved reading and behavioral performance, regardless of the WWC study determinants rating. Implications include reading instruction may not be sufficient to improve behavioral and social skill outcomes. Additional research is warranted to investigate the long-term impact of reading on behavioral and social skill outcomes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Parent-directed intervention for children with cancer-related neurobehavioral late effects: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sunita K; Ross, Paula; Cuevas, Michelle; Turk, Anne; Kim, Heeyoung; Lo, Tracy T Y; Wong, Lennie F; Bhatia, Smita

    2014-10-01

    OBJECTIVE : To evaluate feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an intervention directed at parents of childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) with neurobehavioral late effects to improve targeted parenting skills, and thus to indirectly benefit the child's educational functioning.  METHODS : 44 CCSs and their parents were randomized. Intervention-arm parents participated in eight individual training sessions augmented by a 3-month telephone support period. Pre- and postparent measures and child performance on Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-II and School Motivation and Learning Strategies Inventory assessed intervention effects.  RESULTS : 90% of intervention parents completed the program with high adherence/perceived benefit. Between-group effect sizes ranged from d = 0.77 to d = 1.45 for parent knowledge, efficacy, frequency of pro-learning behaviors, and d = 0.21 to d = 0.76 for child academic scores. Parental time spent in intervention activities was associated with academic change.  CONCLUSIONS : A parent-directed intervention to indirectly promote academic functioning in CCSs appears feasible and effective in improving targeted parenting outcomes and for selected child academic outcomes.

  15. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivle, L D; Kvadsheim, P H; Fahlman, A; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Miller, P J O

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1-2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6-7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006-2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals.

  16. Structural language, pragmatic communication, behavior, and social competence in children adopted internationally: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petranovich, Christine L; Walz, Nicolay Chertkoff; Staat, Mary Allen; Chiu, Chung-Yiu Peter; Wade, Shari L

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the association of structural language and pragmatic communication with behavior problems and social competence in girls adopted internationally. Participants included girls between 6-12 years of age who were internationally adopted from China (n = 32) and Eastern-Europe (n = 25) and a control group of never-adopted girls (n = 25). Children completed the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Parents completed the Child Communication Checklist- second edition, the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Home and Community Social Behavior Scales. Compared to the controls, parents in the Eastern European group reported more problems with social competence, externalizing behaviors, structural language, and pragmatic communication. The Chinese group evidenced more internalizing problems. Using generalized linear regression, interaction terms were examined to determine if the associations of pragmatic communication and structural language with behavior problems and social competence varied across groups. Controlling for general intellectual functioning, poorer pragmatic communication was associated with more externalizing problems and poorer social competence. In the Chinese group, poorer pragmatic communication was associated with more internalizing problems. Post-adoption weaknesses in pragmatic communication are associated with behavior problems and social competence. Internationally adopted children may benefit from interventions that target pragmatic communication.

  17. What is the benefit of the biomedical and behavioral interventions in preventing HIV transmission?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Kuchenbecker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Scientific evidence supports the sinergy between biomedical and behavioral interventions aimed at preventing the transmission of HIV as a strategy to eradicate AIDS.Objective:To characterize comparatively the benefits from biomedical and behavioral interventions to prevent HIV transmission.Methods:Narrative review. We performed a comparative analysis of the benefits of studied interventions by means of estimating the number needed to treat (NNT. Evaluated interventions: counseling activities for behavior change to prevent exposure to HIV; antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and antiretroviral post-exposure prophylasis (PEP for HIV and treatment of serodiscordant couples as a strategy for prevention of HIV transmission (TasP.Results:counseling interventions and TasP have smaller NNTs, equal to, respectively, 11 (95%CI 9 - 18 at 12 months and 34 (95%CI 23 - 54 in 42 months comparatively to PrEP interventions, that resulted in 41 (95%CI 28 - 67 individuals receiving antiretrovirals in order to prevent one case of HIV infection at 36 months for men and serodiscordant couples. PEP interventions are associated with protective effects estimated at 81%. Lack of trials evaluating PEP prevents estimate of NNT.Conclusion:The estimate of the NNT can be a helpful parameter in the comparison between the effectiveness of different behavioral and biomedical HIV prevention strategies. Studies evaluating the benefit and safety of combined behavioral and biomedical interventions are needed, especially considering the attributable fraction of each component. Integration of behavioral and biomedical interventions is required to achieve complete suppression of the virus, and thus reducing viral replication, infectivity and the number of cases.

  18. Sleep hygiene intervention for youth aged 10 to 18 years with problematic sleep: a before-after pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Evan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current study aimed to examine the changes following a sleep hygiene intervention on sleep hygiene practices, sleep quality, and daytime symptoms in youth. Methods Participants aged 10–18 years with self-identified sleep problems completed our age-appropriate F.E.R.R.E.T (an acronym for the categories of Food, Emotions, Routine, Restrict, Environment and Timing sleep hygiene programme; each category has three simple rules to encourage good sleep. Participants (and parents as appropriate completed the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC, Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS, and wore Actical® monitors twice before (1 and 2 weeks and three times after (6, 12 and 20 weeks the intervention. Anthropometric data were collected two weeks before and 20 weeks post-intervention. Results Thirty-three youths (mean age 12.9 years; M/F = 0.8 enrolled, and retention was 100%. ASHS scores significantly improved (p = 0.005 from a baseline mean (SD of 4.70 (0.41 to 4.95 (0.31 post-intervention, as did PSQI scores [7.47 (2.43 to 4.47 (2.37; p  Conclusions Our findings suggest the F.E.R.R.E.T sleep hygiene education programme might be effective in improving sleep in children and adolescents. However because this was a before and after study and a pilot study with several limitations, the findings need to be addressed with caution, and would need to be replicated within a randomised controlled trial to prove efficacy. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12612000649819

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