WorldWideScience

Sample records for behavior therapy-based psychotherapy

  1. [FUNCTIONAL ANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY: APPROACHES AND SCOPE OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY BASED ON CHANGES IN THE THERAPEUTIC CONTEXT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Amanda M; Coletti, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a therapeutic approach developed in context. FAP is characterized by use therapeutic relationship and the behaviors emit into it to improve clients daily life functioning. This therapeutic model is supported in behavior analysis principles and contextual functionalism philosophy. FAP proposes that clients behavior in session are functional equivalent with those out of session; therefore, when therapists respond to clients behaviors in session contingently, they promote and increase improvements in the natural setting. This article poses main features of FAP, its philosophical roots, achievements and research challenges to establish FAP as an independent treatment based on the evidence.

  2. Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapies: History and Development

    OpenAIRE

    M. Hakan TÜRKÇAPAR; A. Emre Sargın

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapies are one of the most leading theories between current psychotherapies. As a psychotherapy school, besides sharing the common points reached collectively by the humanity throughout the history, it also achieved in integrating scientific and ampirical experiences into the psychotherapy practice. Having included mainstreams like Stoicism, Kantian philosopy in its historical roots, this approach has similarities with eastern philosophies, budism and s...

  3. Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy with Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Bob G.; Satre, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral psychotherapy is readily adaptable to use with older adults. This review integrates discussion of cognitive and behavioral intervention techniques with recent research and clinical observations in the field of gerontology. Cognitive changes with aging, personality and emotional development, cohort effects, and the social environment of older adults are discussed in relation to psychotherapy. Applications of cognitive behaivor therapy to specific late life problems such as...

  4. Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapies: History and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapies are one of the most leading theories between current psychotherapies. As a psychotherapy school, besides sharing the common points reached collectively by the humanity throughout the history, it also achieved in integrating scientific and ampirical experiences into the psychotherapy practice. Having included mainstreams like Stoicism, Kantian philosopy in its historical roots, this approach has similarities with eastern philosophies, budism and sufism. Apart from its historical and cultural roots, cognitive approach integrated with behaviorism which applied scientific method in human psychology for the first time, and also implemented the scientific method in the cognitive field. Cognitive behavioral approaches shall make important contributions in the pathway that psychotherapies will cover.

  5. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy for Interpersonal Process Groups: A Behavioral Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Renee

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an adaptation of Kohlenberg and Tsai's work, Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (1991), or FAP, to group psychotherapy. This author applied a behavioral rationale for interpersonal process groups by illustrating key points with a hypothetical client. Suggestions are also provided for starting groups, identifying goals, educating…

  6. Psychotherapy and Behavior Change with the Non-Institutionalized Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bob

    1979-01-01

    A summary of the literature on the goals, content, and techniques of psychotherapy with the elderly client is presented, and supports the conclusion that this therapy is different from similar work with the younger adult, only in terms of a focus on different content areas. (Author)

  7. Compliments and accounts : Positive evaluation of reported behavior in psychotherapy for adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Margot; De Winter, Andrea F.; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Huiskes, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Based on conversation analysis (CA) of video-recorded therapy sessions, the article explicates a particular interactional project of positively evaluating client-reported behavior in psychotherapy. The analysis focuses on the therapist's actions that convey a positive evaluation of client-reported b

  8. Case Management as a Significant Component of Usual Care Psychotherapy for Youth with Disruptive Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffness, Rachel; Garland, Ann; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Roesch, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Youth with disruptive behavior problems (DBPs) represent the majority of youth served in usual care (UC) psychotherapy, and are at high risk for maladaptive outcomes. Little is known about UC psychotherapeutic strategies utilized with this population. Researchers and clinicians suggest that case management (CM) is a major activity occurring in…

  9. Comparative Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral and Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapies for Depressed Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Steffen, Ann M.

    1994-01-01

    Randomly assigned depressed family caregivers (n=66) of frail elderly relatives to 20 sessions of cognitive-behavioral (CB) or brief psychodynamic (PD) individual psychotherapy. At posttreatment, 71% of caregivers were no longer clinically depressed, with no differences found between two treatments. Found interaction between treatment modality and…

  10. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: An efficacy and partial effectiveness trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bögels; P. Wijts; F.J. Oort; S.J.M. Sallaerts

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Design: Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted o

  11. What Works for People with Mental Retardation? Critical Commentary on Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beail, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews what is known about the effectiveness of the more controversial use of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy with people who have mental retardation. It examines self-management approaches (problem solving, anger management, and cognitive therapy) and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The paper concludes that there has…

  12. Trauma and Psychotherapy: Implications from a Behavior Analysis Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Attachment theory provides a useful conceptual framework for understanding trauma and the treatment of abuse in children. This article examines attachment theory and traditional models of family therapy from the perspective of behavior analysis, and provides a rationale for a behavioral treatment approach for abused children and their foster or…

  13. Videotaping Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    ALPERT, MICHAEL C.

    1996-01-01

    The use of videotapes of psychotherapy sessions by patients, therapists, and supervisors is discussed. The review of videotape helps patients see themselves and their therapists more realistically. As patients become familiar with their behavior and expressions, they begin to see how behavior is linked to underlying feelings. Therapists similarly learn about their own behaviors and defenses as well as those of their patients through the review of tapes. Session videotapes pr...

  14. Mobile technology boosts the effectiveness of psychotherapy and behavioral interventions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B; Rosen, Dana; Silk, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of mobile technology on treatment outcome for psychotherapy and other behavioral interventions. Our search of the literature resulted in 26 empirical articles describing 25 clinical trials testing the benefits of smartphone applications, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or text messaging systems either to supplement treatment or substitute for direct contact with a clinician. Overall, mobile technology use was associated with superior treatment outcome across all study designs and control conditions, effect size (ES) = .34, p Treatment" versus "Treatment + Mobile" design, effect sizes were only slightly more modest (ES = .27) and still significant (p interventions.

  15. Comparative efficacy of the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy versus Supportive Psychotherapy for early onset chronic depression: design and rationale of a multisite randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Mathias

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective treatment strategies for chronic depression are urgently needed since it is not only a common and particularly disabling disorder, but is also considered treatment resistant by most clinicians. There are only a few studies on chronic depression indicating that traditional psycho- and pharmacological interventions are not as effective as in acute, episodic depression. Current medications are no more effective than those introduced 50 years ago whereas the only psychotherapy developed specifically for the subgroup of chronic depression, the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP, faired well in one large trial. However, CBASP has never been directly compared to a non-specific control treatment. Methods/Design The present article describes the study protocol of a multisite parallel-group randomized controlled trial in Germany. The purpose of the study is to estimate the efficacy of CBASP compared to supportive psychotherapy in 268 non-medicated early-onset chronically depressed outpatients. The intervention includes 20 weeks of acute treatment with 24 individual sessions followed by 28 weeks of continuation treatment with another 8 sessions. Depressive symptoms are evaluated 20 weeks after randomisation by means of the 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale of Depression (HRSD. Secondary endpoints are depressive symptoms after 12 and 48 weeks, and remission after 12, 20, and 48 weeks. Primary outcome will be analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA controlled for pre-treatment scores and site. Analyses of continuous secondary variables will be performed using linear mixed models. For remission rates, chi-squared tests and logistic regression will be applied. Discussion The study evaluates the comparative effects of a disorder-specific psychotherapy and a well designed non-specific psychological approach in the acute and continuation treatment phase in a large sample of early-onset chronically

  16. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  17. Future perspectives in psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schnyder, U.

    2009-01-01

    To date, the effectiveness of psychotherapy for the treatment of most mental disorders is empirically well documented. From an "evidence-based medicine" viewpoint, psychotherapy, as compared to other treatments in medicine, can be regarded as one of the most effective therapeutic approaches. The superiority of psychotherapy over pharmacotherapy is particularly pronounced in long-term treatment outcome studies. It is especially cognitive behavioral approaches, such as exposure response managem...

  18. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Other forms of therapy for BPD ... STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of ...

  19. Neuroimaging mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for addictive behaviors: Emerging translational approaches that bridge biology and behavior: Introduction to the Special Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W.; Chung, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Research on mechanisms of behavior change provides an innovative method to improve treatment for addictive behaviors. An important extension of mechanisms of change research involves the use of translational approaches, which examine how basic biological (i.e., brain-based mechanisms) and behavioral factors interact in initiating and sustaining positive behavior change as a result of psychotherapy. Articles in this special issue include integrative conceptual reviews and innovative empirical ...

  20. Ethical Considerations for Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists in Psychotherapy Research Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haman, Kirsten L.; Hollon, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Psychotherapy research studies, which balance the pursuit of knowledge with the provision of treatment, can place unique demands on clinicians, patients, and research staff. However, the literature on ethical considerations in psychotherapy trials is minimal. The current paper depicts CBT community standards of practice in the context of two…

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... therapy appears to be dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). This type of therapy focuses on the concept of ... therapy for BPD include: Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) This form of therapy is rooted in the patient’s ...

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Other forms of therapy for BPD include: ... than acting out these emotions impulsively. Schema-Focused Therapy (SFT) This type of therapy focuses on reframing “ ...

  3. Social Problem Solving and Depressive Symptoms over Time: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy, Brief Supportive Psychotherapy, and Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daniel N.; Leon, Andrew C.; Li, Chunshan; D'Zurilla, Thomas J.; Black, Sarah R.; Vivian, Dina; Dowling, Frank; Arnow, Bruce A.; Manber, Rachel; Markowitz, John C.; Kocsis, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Depression is associated with poor social problem solving, and psychotherapies that focus on problem-solving skills are efficacious in treating depression. We examined the associations between treatment, social problem solving, and depression in a randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy of psychotherapy augmentation for…

  4. Advanced Psychotherapy Training: Psychotherapy Scholars' Track, and the Apprenticeship Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert E.; Yager, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective: Guided by ACGME's requirements, psychiatric residency training in psychotherapy currently focuses on teaching school-specific forms of psychotherapy (i.e., cognitive-behavioral, supportive, and psychodynamic psychotherapy). On the basis of a literature review of common factors affecting psychotherapy outcomes and…

  5. Analysis of therapeutic effect of psychotherapy and behavioral therapy in the treatment of chronic prostatitis%心理、行为疗法治疗慢性前列腺炎的效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘贺亮; 余斌; 康福霞

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of psychotherapy and behavioral therapy in the treatment of chronic prostatitis(CP).Method Psychotherapy and regulation of vegetative nerves were employed for various CP.Result Total effective rate of study group was 91.4% ,which was significantly higher than that of control group(78.4% ,P< 0.05).Conclusion Psychotherapy and behavioral therapy besides pathogenesis treatment can improve efficacy.

  6. Behavioral Management of Medical Compliance: Its Role in the History of Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ben; Lightner, Jean

    Most histories of psychology and psychiatry attribute the first group psychotherapy to Joseph Pratt's 1905 class for tuberculosis patients. Pratt's actual treatment procedures are examined. They are shown to have consisted primarily of operant and social-learning techniques, aimed at increasing patient compliance with a demanding therapeutic…

  7. Changes in neurotic personality profile associated with reduction of suicidal ideation in patients who underwent psychotherapy in the day hospital for the treatment of neurotic and behavioral disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Rodziński

    2015-12-01

    The results confirm effectiveness of intensive psychotherapy as a treatment method that leads to comprehensive improvement encompassing reduction of neurotic personality disorders (neuroticism and of majority of neurotic personality traits, as well as SI reduction. The revealed associations weigh in favor of hypothesis on neuroticism as SI predisposing factor in patients with neurotic, behavioral and personality disorders.

  8. Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Sullivan; Briggs, Wanda P.; Magnus, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the prevalence of sex offenders; multiple treatment modalities; and implications of the use of hypnotic psychotherapy, coupled with cognitive behavioral treatment programs, for treating sex offenders. (Contains 2 tables.)

  9. The Comparison of Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy Based on Coping Skills and Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Improvement of Emotional Regulation Strategies and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghorbany

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy based on coping skills (CBT and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT in improvement of emotional regulation strategies and prevention of relapse. Method: The method of the present study was semi-experimental research design (pre-test-post-test with witness group. For sampling 45 substance abuse people who had referred to addiction treatment centers were selected and assigned to three groups of cognitive behavior therapy, methadone maintenance treatment and witness group randomly. The participants in all three groups completed the emotional intelligence questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by covariance method. Results: The results showed that cognitive-behavior therapy in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and witness group led to significant improvement of emotional regulation in substance abusers, but there was no significant difference between the methadone maintenance treatment group and control group. Also, the rate of relapse in individuals who assigned to cognitive-behavior therapy group in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and the witness group was significantly lower, but there was no significant difference between methadone therapy and witness. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavior therapy was an effective treatment that can change the cognitive and behavioral variables related to substance abuse, such as emotional regulation strategies. Thus, results suggested that drug abuse treatment programs must target these mediator variables.

  10. Improvement of psychosocial adjustment to HIV-1 infection through a cognitive-behavioral oriented group psychotherapy program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousaud, Araceli; Blanch, Jordi; Hautzinger, Martin; De Lazzari, Elisa; Peri, Josep Maria; Puig, Olga; Martinez, Esteban; Masana, Guillem; De Pablo, Joan; Gatell, Josep Maria

    2007-03-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a group therapy program in improving psychosocial adjustment to HIV infection, and tried to identify variables predictive of greater improvement. The outcome of 47 completing patients was analyzed, comparing the measures between T1 (1 month before therapy), and T2 (first session), and between T2 and T3 (last session) using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test for each dimension of the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS). The therapy consisted of 16 weekly 2-hour sessions following a structured time-limited cognitive-behavioral group psychotherapy program. During the intervention (between T2 and T3) a significant improvement was observed in health care orientation, vocational environment, domestic environment, sexual relation, extended family relationships, social environment, and total PAIS. There were no changes during baseline (between T1 and T2) in any of the PAIS subscales, or in the total PAIS score. Sexual route of transmission was independently associated with an improvement in health care orientation (beta = 2.525). Time since HIV diagnosis (beta = 0.022) and being employed (beta = 2.548) were independently associated with an improvement in adjustment to vocational environment. Men who have sex with men showed a poorer improvement in adjusting to family relations after the intervention (beta = -2.548). Finally, a lower CD4 count (beta = -0.005) and being employed (beta = 3.054) were independently associated with an improvement in adjustment to social environment. Our psychotherapy program improved psychosocial functioning in a heterogeneous sample of HIV-1-infected patients referred to a consultation-liaison psychiatry unit. PMID:17428189

  11. 'Usual Care' psychotherapy outcomes associated with therapist use of case management in the treatment of youths who have disruptive behavior problems

    OpenAIRE

    Zoffness, Rachel Jentry

    2011-01-01

    Children with disruptive behavior problems (DBPs) represent the majority of youth patients in community- based, usual care (UC) psychotherapy, and are at high risk for maladaptive adolescent and adult outcomes (Copeland et al., 2007; Earls, 1994a). Improved knowledge about effective treatments for this population is essential. Although there is movement towards implementing evidence- based practices (EBPs) into UC, there are numerous barriers. Among these is a lack of knowledge regarding psyc...

  12. Transpersonal psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorstein, S

    2000-01-01

    The history, theory, and practice of Transpersonal (or Spiritual) Psychotherapy are presented. The author describes his own evolution from a traditional psychoanalyst to a psychotherapist who uses the tools and wisdom from spiritual traditions to enhance traditional psychotherapy while, at the same time, improving the self system of the therapist. Dangers as well as benefits of the spiritual approach are outlined. The creation and holding of a spiritual or transpersonal context is described and ways to ascertain, in the clinical situation, the appropriateness of such an approach are explained. The use of bibliotherapy to help transform and expand the worldview of the patient is outlined. Prayer and meditational systems also have a healing role in this approach. To illustrate the uses of Transpersonal Psychotherapy in practice, four cases are presented: 1) a paranoid schizophrenic man, 2) a well-functioning borderline person, 3) a very poorly functioning borderline person, and 4) a high-functioning neurotic man who had been in psychoanalysis.

  13. [General psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymetal, J

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays a theoretical psychotherapeutical thinking develops from the eclectic practice and uses particularly the research of the effective factors of the therapy. Best they can be characterized as differentiate, synthetic, integrative and exceeding other approaches. The development in question goes on with attempts of creating a general model of the psychotherapy that could be a basis for models of special psychotherapies. The aim of such a model is to describe all that is present as important factor for inducing a desirable change of a human in all psychotherapeutical approaches. Among general models we can mention the generic model of D. E. Orlinski and K. I. Howard, Grawe's cube (the author is K. Grawe) and the equation of the psychotherapy.

  14. Promoting Efficacy Research on Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Daniel W. M.; Gaynor, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a form of therapy grounded in behavioral principles that utilizes therapist reactions to shape target behavior. Despite a growing literature base, there is a paucity of research to establish the efficacy of FAP. As a general approach to psychotherapy, and how the therapeutic relationship produces change,…

  15. Cognitive behavior therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder delivered via smartphone and computer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagöö, Jesper; Asplund, Robert Persson; Bsenko, Helene Andersson; Hjerling, Sofia; Holmberg, Anna; Westh, Susanne; Öberg, Louise; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Carlbring, Per; Furmark, Tomas; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a previously evaluated guided Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was adapted for mobile phone administration (mCBT). The treatment was compared with a guided self-help treatment based on interpersonal psychotherapy (mIPT). The treatment platform could be accessed through smartphones, tablet computers, and standard computers. A total of 52 participants were diagnosed with SAD and randomized to either mCBT (n=27) or mIPT (n=25). Measures were collected at pre-treatment, during the treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. On the primary outcome measure, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - self-rated, both groups showed statistically significant improvements. However, mCBT performed significantly better than mIPT (between group Cohen's d=0.64 in favor of mCBT). A larger proportion of the mCBT group was classified as responders at post-treatment (55.6% versus 8.0% in the mIPT group). We conclude that CBT for SAD can be delivered using modern information technology. IPT delivered as a guided self-help treatment may be less effective in this format.

  16. Positive Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  17. Verhaltensmedizin, Psychotherapie und Zahnheilkunde

    OpenAIRE

    Meinlschmidt, G; Bolt, O.

    2006-01-01

    Biological, psychological and social processes are of relevance in the development and treatment of dental disorders. However, knowledge about interactions among these factors has only few implications for clinical practice. Hence, the goal of this article is to provide an overview of the links between behavioral medicine, psychotherapy and dentistry. The biobehavioral implications of different dental illnesses and disorders (caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, burning-mouth syndrome, and hali...

  18. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Clinical Trials News Multimedia About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Treatment Psychotherapy Taking ...

  19. Psychotherapy in India

    OpenAIRE

    Manickam, L.S.S.

    2010-01-01

    The articles that appeared in Indian Journal of Psychiatry were related to different areas of psychotherapy. Case reports dealt with a wide variety of cases. The review papers focused on the suitability of psychotherapy in the Indian context, different approaches in psychotherapy, psychotherapy training and supervision. Psychotherapy has been viewed very close to faith orientation. There were attempts to identify the indigenous concepts that are applicable to psychotherapy. Empirical studies ...

  20. The Neighboring Field of Brief Individual Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jim

    1987-01-01

    Presents field of brief individual psychotherapy as coherent set of conventions, despite its diverse origins in schools of dynamic, behavioral, interpersonal or cognitive, and strategic psychotherapy. Proposes advantages and drawbacks of shared conventions and discusses how neighboring field could help field of family therapy reduce its errors.…

  1. Group Psychotherapy in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Göran

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents an overview of the national developments of group psychotherapy (GPS) in Sweden during the period from World War II until the present time. Methods and concepts, imported primarily from England and the United States, inspired trainings and widespread psychodynamic and group analytic applications in schools, health treatment, and social care. Education in psychotherapy and GPS at universities opened new therapeutic and vocational areas during the period 1970-2005. Increasing criticism of psychodynamics, as in other Western societies, but more radical in Sweden, has in the last decades made group analytic GPS diminish in favor of cognitive behavioral therapy models. Prospects for GPS further development may presently look bleak but, in a longer perspective, are promising. PMID:26401795

  2. Hypnosis as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Obesity: A Meta-analytic Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, David B.; Faith, Myles S.

    1996-01-01

    A meta-analysis for six weight-loss studies comparing the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) alone to CBT plus hypnotherapy. Notes that "the addition of hypnosis substantially enhanced treatment outcome." Concludes that the addition of hypnosis to CBT for weight loss results in, at most, a small enhancement of treatment outcome. (KW)

  3. Hypnosis as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Irving; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Performed a meta-analysis on 18 studies in which a cognitive-behavioral therapy was compared with the same therapy supplemented by hypnosis. Results indicated that hypnosis substantially enhanced treatment outcome, even though there were few procedural differences between the hypnotic and nonhypnotic treatments. Effects seemed particularly…

  4. Persuasion criteria in research and practice: Gathering more meaningful psychotherapy data

    OpenAIRE

    Cordova, James V.; Koerner, Kelly

    1993-01-01

    Psychotherapy research should ultimately benefit the psychotherapy client. Unfortunately, traditional psychotherapy research continues to have little influence on practicing clinicians and, therefore, does not benefit psychotherapy clients. As behavior analysts begin to show interest in this area of research, they may be in a position to improve its quality. We argue that traditional psychotherapy researchers have become prematurely wedded to a methodology that does not address the concerns o...

  5. Psychotherapy of Mood Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Picardi, Angelo; Gaetano, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, psychotherapy has gained increasing acceptance as a major treatment option for mood disorders. Empirically supported treatments for major depression include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioural therapy and, to a lesser extent, short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. Meta-analytic evidence suggests that psychotherapy has a significant and clinically relevant, though not large, effect on chronic forms of depression. Psychothera...

  6. Positive psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Martin E P; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C

    2006-11-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported them to be "life-changing." Delivered on the Web, positive psychology exercises relieved depressive symptoms for at least 6 months compared with placebo interventions, the effects of which lasted less than a week. In severe depression, the effects of these Web exercises were particularly striking. This address reports two preliminary studies: In the first, PPT delivered to groups significantly decreased levels of mild-to-moderate depression through 1-year follow-up. In the second, PPT delivered to individuals produced higher remission rates than did treatment as usual and treatment as usual plus medication among outpatients with major depressive disorder. Together, these studies suggest that treatments for depression may usefully be supplemented by exercises that explicitly increase positive emotion, engagement, and meaning. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115810

  7. Client attachment security predicts alliance in a randomized controlled trial of two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Sofie; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig Bernt;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relation between clients’ attachment patterns and the therapeutic alliance in two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa. Method: Data derive from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bulimia...

  8. Justice in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocilová, Jana; Hruby, Radovan; Slepecky, Milos; Latalova, Klara; Prasko, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Justice is one of the fundamental concepts of right ordering of human relationships. Justice is a regulative idea for the arrangement of society preceding the law and already seen in animals; the sense of justice is observed as early as in young children. The ability to altruistic behavior, sense of fairness, reciprocity and mutual help are probably genetically determined as a disposition, which may further develop or be deformed by education. Although justice issues are common in psychotherapy, they may not be reflected and processed in the course of therapy. In psychotherapy, justice issues appear directly in what the client says (mostly about injustice), but more frequently the issues are implicitly contained in complaints and stories against a background of conflicts and problems. They may be related to the client's story, his or her problems with other people, and the therapeutic process itself, including client´s selection of therapy, therapeutic relationship, and therapeutic change strategies. By increasing receptiveness to the issue of justice, the therapist may help improve the therapeutic process. Problems with justice between the therapist and the client may be revealed by honest therapist self-reflection or high-quality supervision. PMID:26812291

  9. Emotional Control in Psychotherapy Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Mardi

    2016-01-01

    Emotional control may be observed to be (1) too excessive as in avoidant behaviors during psychotherapy, (2) suitable to a frank expression of feelings, or (3) lacking in regulation causing too intense affective experiences. This article offers a theory that may help clinicians make observations about this range of possible states, formulate the patient's defensive processes, and choose if, how, and when to act. The observations and formulations presented focus on specific and present moment situations rather than habitual defense mechanisms.

  10. [Psychotherapy of suicidality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, R; Schneider, B

    2016-05-01

    Psychotherapy is an important therapeutic option in the treatment of suicidality. Irrespective of the different treatment settings the psychotherapeutic attitudes, strategies and techniques are presented as they were developed on the basis of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychoanalysis. Starting from the common basic attitude of an active, approachable and for the patient recognizable therapist, the cognitive behavioral attitude is defined by the concept of a "team" involving patient and therapist, which fights against suicidality. The problems that led to suicidal ideation have to be exactly defined and specific behavioral strategies should aim at a modification of the behavioral repertoire and of cognitive strategies. A psychodynamic strategy starting from the analysis of the therapist's inner reaction, the countertransference comes from a primary involvement of both patient and therapist, which the therapist has to recognize and interpret to the patient in a "digestible" way. The experience of an approachable therapist who unexpectedly behaves differently than usual or feared, enables the patient to come to insights and new relational patterns which make suicidal destruction unnecessary. Finally, empirical evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic treatment of suicidality is presented. PMID:27056189

  11. Experimenting with Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Andri Steinþór Björnsson

    2014-01-01

    There are two major shortcomings in current psychotherapy outcome research: The standards that are used to evaluate psychotherapy (especially the way control conditions are set up in outcome research) are often not acceptable, and non-specific factors have been largely neglected, in part because of the “psychological placebo” metaphor. I argue that theories of psychotherapy need to specify further the role of non-specific factors in the development and maintenance of different disorders, and ...

  12. Psychotherapy in Antidepressant Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Regina H. Powers; Kniesner, Thomas J.; Thomas J. Croghan

    2002-01-01

    December 2002 (Revised from October 2002). Depression is a condition with various modes of treatment, including pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and some combination of each. The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of depression relative to the role of pharmacotherapy is not well understood, and guidelines for psychotherapy in the primary care setting differ from guidelines for specialty care. There is little evidence about the circumstances in actual practice that affect the use of psychot...

  13. Conceptual Frame for Selecting Individual Psychotherapy in the Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tammy L.; Theodore, Lea A.

    2009-01-01

    Psychotherapy is a service-delivery that is provided for both general and special education students. This manuscript examines a conceptual framework for determining when to employ psychotherapy within the school-based setting. Decisions are informed by the relationship between problem behavior, therapeutic techniques, short-term outcomes, and…

  14. Advances in Study on Behavioral Psychotherapy for Irritable Bowel Syndrome%行为心理学疗法治疗肠易激综合征的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕洪钟

    2012-01-01

    The role of psychological factors in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has attracted more and more attention in clinical practice. With the increasing of the social pressure, symptoms in IBS patients could not be completely ameliorated by drug treatment only, and behavioral psychotherapy has some efficacy for the treatment of IBS. The aim of behavioral psychotherapy is not for complete cure of disease but to alleviate clinical symptoms of IBS patients, save medical expenditure and improve the quality of life. This article reviewed the advances in study on behavioral psychotherapy for IBS.%精神心理因素在肠易激综合征(IBS)发病机制中的作用越来越引起广大临床医师的重视.随着社会竞争压力的增大,仅靠药物治疗已无法完全改善IBS患者的临床症状,行为心理学疗法的疗效目前已得到认可.行为心理学疗法的目的并不是为了完全治愈疾病,而是为了缓解临床症状,节省医疗开支,提高患者生活质量.本文就行为心理学疗法治疗IBS的研究进展作一综述.

  15. Psychotherapy for Delinquents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ian; Sullivan, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Presents the results of a psychotherapy consultation service for delinquents (n=47). Based on data obtained from this program and a review of relevant literature, a working model of individual psychotherapy related to attachment theory as it applies to this population is presented. Discusses difficulties that warrant resolution. (JPS)

  16. Psychotherapy and Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley, Peter F.; LYS, CHRISTINE

    1996-01-01

    Psychotherapy for patients with schizophrenia, although almost universally practiced in some form with clinical management of schizophrenia, has not been the present focus of such rigorous scientific inquiry as has been afforded to other current treatment modalities. This review highlights areas of potential progress and opportunities for clearer definition of psychotherapies for schizophrenia.

  17. Prescribing Brief Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schuyler, Dean

    2000-01-01

    Brief psychotherapy has demonstrated its effectiveness in treating emotional disorders and helping with problems that typically present to primary care physicians. Because practitioners receive little instruction about this treatment option and often have erroneous preconceived ideas about it, psychotherapy remains underprescribed. Effective brief therapy enables the patient to problem-solve, facilitates the relationship with the provider, and ultimately clarifies the patient's situation. Ref...

  18. The Play of Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  19. Translating the Theoretical into Practical: A Logical Framework of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Interactions for Research, Training, and Clinical Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Cristal E.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Bonow, Jordan T.; Landes, Sara J.; Busch, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) provides a behavioral analysis of the psychotherapy relationship that directly applies basic research findings to outpatient psychotherapy settings. Specifically, FAP suggests that a therapist's in vivo (i.e., in-session) contingent responding to targeted client behaviors, particularly positive reinforcement…

  20. Client attachment in a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa: Outcome moderation and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig; Lunn, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    In the context of a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PPT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN), this study performed secondary analyses of (a) the relation between attachment and pretreatment symptom levels, (b) whether client pretreatment attachment moderated treatment outcome, (c) whether change in client attachment was associated with symptomatic change, and (d) whether client attachment changed differently in the 2 treatments. Sixty-nine women and 1 man of a mean age of 25.8 years diagnosed with BN were randomly assigned to either 2 years of weekly PPT or 5 months of CBT. Assessments at intake, after 5 months, and after 2 years included the Eating Disorder Examination to assess eating disorder symptoms, the Adult Attachment Interview to assess client attachment, and the Symptom Checklist 90-R to assess general psychiatric distress. Repeated measures were analyzed using multilevel analysis. Higher scores on attachment insecurity and attachment preoccupation were associated with more frequent binging pretreatment. Pretreatment attachment did not predict treatment outcome. In PPT, but not in CBT, reduction of binging was associated with an increase in attachment security. The 2 treatment types were not associated with significantly different patterns of attachment-related change. Degree and type of attachment insecurity is related to the frequency of binging in BN. Increase in attachment security may be a treatment-specific mechanism of change in PPT for BN. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Client attachment in a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa: Outcome moderation and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig; Lunn, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    In the context of a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PPT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN), this study performed secondary analyses of (a) the relation between attachment and pretreatment symptom levels, (b) whether client pretreatment attachment moderated treatment outcome, (c) whether change in client attachment was associated with symptomatic change, and (d) whether client attachment changed differently in the 2 treatments. Sixty-nine women and 1 man of a mean age of 25.8 years diagnosed with BN were randomly assigned to either 2 years of weekly PPT or 5 months of CBT. Assessments at intake, after 5 months, and after 2 years included the Eating Disorder Examination to assess eating disorder symptoms, the Adult Attachment Interview to assess client attachment, and the Symptom Checklist 90-R to assess general psychiatric distress. Repeated measures were analyzed using multilevel analysis. Higher scores on attachment insecurity and attachment preoccupation were associated with more frequent binging pretreatment. Pretreatment attachment did not predict treatment outcome. In PPT, but not in CBT, reduction of binging was associated with an increase in attachment security. The 2 treatment types were not associated with significantly different patterns of attachment-related change. Degree and type of attachment insecurity is related to the frequency of binging in BN. Increase in attachment security may be a treatment-specific mechanism of change in PPT for BN. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26950692

  2. [Psychotherapy with the unwilling patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madert, K K

    1984-05-01

    By means of the residential motivation therapy of addicts we discuss ways of dealing with the specific problems, that arise in psychotherapy of character disordered, who are not suffering psychically. The - in the view of the addict patient - often unvoluntary referral to the hospital provokes the patient's refusal of cooperation. The greatest therapeutic challenge is the ego-syntonicity of the character disorder and the rigid defense structure of overcompensation, projection and denial, covered up by rationalizations. This defense system serves to avoid closeness and contact with the original emotions. In our group setting we use mini-contracts, reality-oriented confrontation of behavioral issues in order to make the addict aware of his desperation and lack of fullfilment in life, and offer attractive models of living and the experience of warmth and bondedness in the group. Our main techniques are non-verbal. Body experience and full-body-expression of emotions mediate self-experience which is then integrated verbally. The goal of this psychoanalytically based psychotherapy is to bring about by working through resistances, the attitudes which are a precondition for continuing with a personality-changing psychotherapy.

  3. An Immediate and Long-Term Study of a Temperament and Parent-Child Interaction Therapy Based Community Program for Preschoolers with Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pade, Hadas; Taube, Daniel O.; Aalborg, Annette E.; Reiser, Paul J.

    2006-01-01

    The immediate and long-term effects of a Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) derived program offered at a Kaiser Permanente facility were evaluated. There were 73 participants in the initial sample and 23 in the 5-6 year follow-up sample. Child behaviors improved significantly immediately following treatment and some improvements were…

  4. [Psychotherapy for schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böker, W

    2001-09-01

    Based on different theoretical concepts, psychotherapeutic methods in the treatment of schizophrenia reach from clinical pragmatism, psychoanalysis, learning theory, cognition and communication psychology to concepts of systems-theory. Both the German (DGPPN) and the American (APA) practice guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenic patients don't separate psychotherapy, social and rehabilitation measures strictly. So a specific psychotherapy for psychotic patients seems to be missing. A better relationship between patient and expert is fundamental for building up a ??? therapeutic liaison. For that purpose, the disease concepts of both sides must be carefully explained and integrated ("Basic psychotherapy"). PMID:11533865

  5. The self in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, J M

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents Kohut's position regarding the use of introspection and empathy as the predominant tools of observation for any approach to be called psychological. This translates into the need to maintain a consistent focus on the patient's self experience, and for interpretations to be "experience near." The concept of selfobject and the specific selfobject transferences are reviewed, and the model of Muslin and Val is used to differentiate supportive psychotherapy, psychoanalytic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. A case illustration is presented demonstrating psychoanalytic psychotherapy where the therapeutic work focused on the patient's relationship outside the treatment, the "extra-transference object." The indications for and therapeutic value of this approach are discussed. PMID:7928295

  6. 从认知行为治疗的发展看心理治疗的疗效评估%Evaluation of psychotherapy outcome: A perspective from cognitive behavioral therapy development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建平; 王晓菁; 唐苏勤

    2011-01-01

    Whether the outcome of psychological counseling and psychotherapy can be evaluated or not has always been a controversial debate among psychological scholars. Being able to evaluate the outcome is also the aim of different psychotherapy schools. In all schools of psychological counseling and therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is considered to be the only evidence-based psychotherapy. The author, being a CBT therapist herself, combined with her many years of practical experience of psychotherapy, as well as a lot of literature review, put forward her opinions on the origin, development and characteristics of CBT. The author believed that CBT follows the real " scientist-practitioner" model, and the effect of CBT can be evaluated with evidence support.%心理咨询与治疗的效果能否评估以及如何评估一直是学者们争议的话题,也是各心理咨询治疗流派努力的方向.在心理咨询与治疗各流派中,认知行为治疗(CBT)被认为是唯一循证的心理咨询治疗方法.本文作者是CBT治疗师,结合自己多年心理咨询治疗的实践经验和回顾相关文献,从CBT的起源、发展和特点,提出了自己的观点和看法,认为CBT是真正遵循和体现了“科学家-实践家”的模式,其效果是可以评价的,是有证据支持的.

  7. Premature conclusions about psychotherapy for dysthymia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.

    2009-01-01

    3.0.CO;2-F 5. McCullough JP. Psychotherapy for dysthymia: a naturalistic study of ten patients. J Nerv Ment Dis. 1991;179(12):734–740. PubMed doi:10.1097/00005053-199112000-00004 6. Keller MB, McCullough JP, Klein DN, et al. A comparison of nefazodone, the cognitive behavioral-analysis system of psy

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Psychotherapies for Depressed Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Larry W.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Treated 91 elders with a major depressive disorder (MDD) using behavioral, cognitive, or brief psychodynamic psychotherapy. By the end of six weeks patients in all three treatment conditions showed improvement equally, whereas controls did not. Overall, 52 percent of the treatment sample attained remission by termination. The remainder still met…

  9. Values in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J

    1996-01-01

    There is a tension between those who hold that psychotherapy is a scientific discipline and therefore "value-free," and those who believe that values are inherent in the nature of psychotherapy. Psychoanalysis has moved from a science-based ideology, through the ethical concerns of Melanie Klein, to a recognition of the "aesthetic" dimension--the creation of suitable forms that can contain psychological distress. From this latter perspective, the antagonism between religion and psychotherapy, initiated by Freud, becomes less acute. Action-based ethical systems, which ignore the inner world, are critically scrutinized. The evidence suggesting there is a relationship between good outcome in psychotherapy and shared values between therapist and client is reviewed. It is posited that through examination of the "ethical countertransference," therapists should become aware of their own value systems and how they influence practice.

  10. [Models of inpatient psychotherapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tölk, Anton

    2007-12-01

    A modern & professional psychotherapy has existed since 1900. Yet it took a long time before it found a place in the psychiatric therapy concepts. Next in addition to psychopharmaceutical drugs, psycho- & sociotherapeutic measures are integral elements of a general therapy standard. Some psychotherapeutic intervention technics, such as supportive psychotherapy, have been able to establish themselves in an inpatient psychiatric setting. It is important that the entire multiprofessional team members of an inpatient psychiatric unit take a psychotherapeutic stance, and work together to achieve the therapy goal. According to international experts, psychiatric-psychosomatic Consultation Liaison Service should be available in every general hospital. This Liaison principle also applies to psychotherapy in a psychiatric ward. Further, an exact definition of the therapy goals is necessary. A checklist, as an orientation tool, has always proved itself of assistance in psychiatric psychotherapy. PMID:18000485

  11. Characteristics of Patients Involved in Psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Alispahić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the demographic and clinical characteristics of Bosnian and Herzegovinian patients involved in psychotherapeutic treatments in order to explore the current situation of psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: The study included 213 patients (154 women and 47 men undergoing diverse psychotherapeutic treatments. Data about demographic and clinical characteristics were collected by questionnaire. Following characteristics were documented: age, sex, education, employment status, marital status, specific problem that got the client involved in psychotherapy, type of psychotherapy, and use of psychopharmacology.Results: Majority of the patients undergoing psychotherapy are age up to 40 and female. They are by vast majority holding a university degree and are employed. Nearly equal number of patients is living in partnership or marriage compared to single or never been married. Most frequent reasons for getting involved in the psychotherapy treatment are of the intrapersonal nature (depression, anxiety and panic attacks. Majority of the patients were involved in gestalt and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, and at the same time majority of those were not prescribed medicaments.Conclusions: We point out and overview some of the most prominent socio-demographic traits of patients undergoing psychotherapy, the ones that could be important in the future research with the higher degree of control. In the terms of personal initiative, psychotherapy stops being a taboo in Bosnia and Herzegovina. However, there is still a long path until it reaches integration in daily life of the people.

  12. The Ramayana and psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, K.S.; Krishna, Gopala S.

    2003-01-01

    Techniques of psychotherapy commonly used in the west may be difficult to employ in their purest form for Indian patients, especially in those who are not educated and those who are not westernized. Anecdotes from the Ramayana can be used in psychotherapy to show the similarity of the issues facing the patient with the aim of increasing insight. They are powerful examples and can be used to suggest alternate modes of coping. This article discusses anecdotes, themes and possible situations for...

  13. Psychotherapy as entropy management

    OpenAIRE

    McKenzie, Karen; Murray, George

    2013-01-01

    We present the hypothesis that the laws of thermodynamics can be usefully applied to psychotherapy. In this model psychotherapy is presented as a means of entropy management, whereby the patient trades entropy (in this case the expressed symptoms of mental disorder) with the therapist. The therapist serves to increase the capacity of the patient, both through developing a shared understanding of the challenges the patient faces and through generating shared solutions. This process can be unde...

  14. PSYCHOTHERAPY SUPPORT ON SCIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Widyawati Suhendro

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disease that causes varying descriptions. The symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into two groups, the primary and secondary symptoms. Treatment should be done as soon as possible, because a state of psychotic periods raises the possibility to suffer mental decline. The treatment is carried out must be comprehensive, multimodal, empirically and can be applied to the patient. One therapy that is given is psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is usually combined with pharmacologica...

  15. Psychotherapy and Neuroimaging

    OpenAIRE

    Fournier, Jay C.; Price, Rebecca B.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in neuroimaging have enabled researchers to examine, in vivo, the relationship between psychotherapeutic interventions and markers of brain activity. This review focuses on two kinds of neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy: those that examine the patterns of brain activity associated with response to treatments and those that examine the changes that occur in brain activity during treatment. A general, hypothetical neural model of psychotherapy is presented, and suppor...

  16. Psychotherapy and brain plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Collerton, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I will review why psychotherapy is relevant to the question of how consciousness relates to brain plasticity. A great deal of the research and theorizing on consciousness and the brain, including my own on hallucinations for example (Collerton and Perry, 2011) has focused upon specific changes in conscious content which can be related to temporal changes in restricted brain systems. I will argue that psychotherapy, in contrast, allows only a focus on holistic aspects of conscio...

  17. Is Rational and Emotive Behavior Therapy a Scientific Psychotherapy?%理性情绪行为疗法理论之科学方法论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚艳

    2013-01-01

      理性情绪行为疗法(REBT)是当代认知心理治疗理论的重要分支。该理论先后将方法论建立在逻辑经验主义和批判理性主义之上并最终在批判理性主义的视野下找到了其理论科学性之立足点——可证伪性。但由于REBT理论是心理治疗理论,它与经验科学毕竟存在着一定的区别,有学者对该理论以科学的心理治疗理论自居提出了质疑。文章认为,在波普的划界标准下,REBT理论是一种科学的心理治疗理论,它的基本概念具有逻辑一致性,其核心假设也具有可证伪性,它在经验的检验中不断修正与重构自身的理论体系,以开放、严谨的理论态度为其科学地位奠定了基础。%Rational and emotive behavior therapy (REBT) is an important branch of contemporary psychotherapy. Its methodology was first built on logical empiricism, and then critical rationalism. In this article, it is held that REBT is a scientific therapy under Popper’s standard of demarcation. Its basic concepts are consistent with each other and its core hypotheses are falsifiable. The system of REBT has been kept modifying and reconstructing during empirical testing. The opening and rigorous theory attitude has set a strong foundation for its scientific status.

  18. Weight loss is coupled with improvements to affective state in obese participants engaged in behavior change therapy based on incremental, self-selected "small changes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxman, Jenny R; Hall, Anna C; Harden, Charlotte J; O'Keeffe, Jean; Simper, Trevor N

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a group behavior change intervention involving self-selected, contextualized, and mediated goal setting on anthropometric, affective, and dietary markers of health. It was hypothesized that the intervention would elicit changes consistent with accepted health recommendations for obese individuals. A rolling program of 12-week "Small Changes" interventions during 24 months recruited 71 participants; each program accommodated 10 to 13 adults (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m²). Fifty-eight participants completed Small Changes. Repeated measures were made at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Anthropometric measures included height and weight (to calculate BMI), body composition, waist circumference, and blood pressure. Affective state was monitored using relevant validated questionnaires. Dietary assessment used 3-day household measures food diaries with Schofield equations to monitor underreporting. Relevant blood measures were recorded throughout. Across the measurement period, Small Changes elicited a significant reduction in body weight (baseline, 102.95 ± 15.47 vs 12 weeks 100.09 ± 16.01 kg, P affective state including general well-being (baseline, 58.92 ± 21.22 vs 12 weeks 78.04 ± 14.60, P < .0005) and total mood disturbance (baseline, 31.19 ± 34.03 vs 12 weeks 2.67 ± 24.96, P < .0005). Dietary changes that occurred were largely consistent with evidenced-based recommendations for weight management and included significant reductions in total energy intake and in fat and saturated fat as a proportion of energy. The Small Changes approach can elicit a range of health-orientated benefits for obese participants, and although further work is needed to ascertain the longevity of such effects, the outcomes from Small Changes are likely to help inform health professionals when framing the future of weight management. Long-term follow-up of Small Changes is warranted. PMID:21636010

  19. Outcome of Brief Cathartic Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Michael P.

    1974-01-01

    This comparison (with University Health Service patients) between emotive psychotherapy and insight oriented analytic therapy confirmed effectiveness of emotive psychotherapy in producing catharsis leading to therapeutic improvement. (Author/EK)

  20. Psychotherapy of Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Gaetano, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, psychotherapy has gained increasing acceptance as a major treatment option for mood disorders. Empirically supported treatments for major depression include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioural therapy and, to a lesser extent, short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. Meta-analytic evidence suggests that psychotherapy has a significant and clinically relevant, though not large, effect on chronic forms of depression. Psychotherapy with chronic patients should take into account several important differences between patients with chronic and acute depression (identification with their depressive illness, more severe social skill deficits, persistent sense of hopelessness, need of more time to adapt to better circumstances). Regarding adolescent depression, the effectiveness of IPT and CBT is empirically supported. Adolescents require appropriate modifications of treatment (developmental approach to psychotherapy, involvement of parents in therapy). The combination of psychotherapy and medication has recently attracted substantial interest; the available evidence suggests that combined treatment has small but significant advantages over each treatment modality alone, and may have a protective effect against depression relapse or recurrence. Psychobiological models overcoming a rigid brain-mind dichotomy may help the clinician give patients a clear rationale for the combination of psychological and pharmacological treatment. In recent years, evidence has accumulated regarding the effectiveness of psychological therapies (CBT, family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, psychoeducation) as an adjunct to medication in bipolar disorder. These therapies share several common elements and there is considerable overlap in their actual targets. Psychological interventions were found to be useful not only in the treatment of bipolar depressive episodes, but in all phases of the disorder. PMID

  1. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Theory and Application in a Single Case Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Prins, Annabel; Nguyen, Hong; Tsai, Mavis

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be enhanced by Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP; Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991; Tsai et al., 2009). As PTSD can include a variety of problems with interpersonal relationships (e.g., trust of others), manualized treatments may not afford clinicians enough time and flexibility to…

  2. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress. PMID:26401793

  3. Alliance: a common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    OpenAIRE

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Haken, Hermann; Kyselo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorically different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, s...

  4. Alliance: A common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang eTschacher; Hermann eHaken; Miriam eKyselo

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorially different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, st...

  5. Psychotherapy in older adults with major depression in psychogeriatric ward

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Mateusz Rachel; Agnieszka Turkot

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Psychotherapy of the elderly appears to be a very important part of comprehensive treatment, and its character should be based on a holistic vision of the patient. The effectiveness of the individual Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy (CBT) and Problem Solving Therapy (PST) is well establish in clinical trial. In treating patients at the psycho geriatric ward, on account of the described clinical state placed in the article, we apply Supportive Therapy (ST) and existential approa...

  6. Gratitude in cognitive psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia C. Moyano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gratitude is a cognitive-affective state caused by the recognition that one has received a benefit from an external agent, due to the good intentions of this agent. Despite the evidence that associate gratitude with subjective well being, psychological well being, physical health and copping with stressful events, it is not enough taken in consideration in an academic level and in its interaction with psychotherapy instruments as well. In this article, the central concepts and information provided by the research are revised, intending to analyze possible ways to include gratitude into Cognitive Psychotherapy

  7. Psychotherapy in Contemporary Psychiatric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjipavlou, George; Hernandez, Carlos A Sierra; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: American data suggest a declining trend in the provision of psychotherapy by psychiatrists. Nevertheless, the extent to which such findings generalize to psychiatric practice in other countries is unclear. We surveyed psychiatrists in British Columbia to examine whether the reported decline in psychotherapy provision extends to the landscape of Canadian psychiatric practice. Method: A survey was mailed to the entire population of fully licensed psychiatrists registered in British Columbia (n = 623). The survey consisted of 30 items. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and psychotherapy practice patterns. Associations between variables were evaluated using nonparametric tests. Results: A total of 423 psychiatrists returned the survey, yielding a response rate of 68%. Overall, 80.9% of psychiatrists (n = 342) reported practicing psychotherapy. A decline in the provision of psychotherapy was not observed; in fact, there was an increase in psychotherapy provision among psychiatrists entering practice in the last 10 years. Individual therapy was the predominant format used by psychiatrists. The most common primary theoretical orientation was psychodynamic (29.9%). Regarding actual practice, supportive psychotherapy was practiced most frequently. Professional time constraints were perceived as the most significant barrier to providing psychotherapy. The majority (85%) of clinicians did not view remuneration as a significant barrier to treating patients with psychotherapy. Conclusions: Our findings challenge the prevailing view that psychotherapy is in decline among psychiatrists. Psychiatrists in British Columbia continue to integrate psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in clinical practice, thus preserving their unique place in the spectrum of mental health services. PMID:26175328

  8. Psychotherapy, a concept for the nonpsychiatric physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KAHN, J P

    1962-05-01

    Patients tend to repeat with their physician, as with other significant people in their lives, their earlier previous patterns of behavior. The physician as well as the patient is involved in the physician-patient relationship. He will tend to respond to his patients in accordance with his earlier life experiences and his characteristic repetitive behavioral pattern. For both physician and patient, the relationship between them extends beyond the immediate reality situation. Psychotherapy is the utilization of psychological measures in the treatment of sick persons and the deliberate utilization by the physician of the physician-patient relationship for the benefit of the patient. The kind of psychotherapy that is practical and utilizable by the nonpsychiatric physician is that which uses education, reassurance, support and the management of the patient's problems either directly or indirectly or through the intermediary of other people or agencies. The symbolic aspect of the physician-patient relationship is based essentially on the fact that a sick person, because of his anxiety and because of the threat to his physical and psychic integrity, is more dependent and more anxious than he would be if he were well, and therefore he has a correspondingly greater need for the authoritative and protective figure he finds in the physician. Psychotherapy is not directed exclusively to the treatment of flagrantly or obviously neurotic or psychotic patients. It should be and is directed to all sick persons. Limitations in psychotherapy are set by various determinants, among which are the nature of the precipitating factor in the illness, the nature of the sick person, the skill, knowledge and abilities of the physician, and the nature of the physician-patient relationship. In psychotherapy, as in all medicine, the physician should not do anything which may disturb the patient if the disturbance is of no value or if it cannot be followed through with special skills.

  9. Constructivism and psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    MAHONEY, MICHAEL J.; GRANVOLD, DONALD K.

    2005-01-01

    Constructivism is a metatheoretical perspective that embraces diverse traditions in medicine, philosophy, psychology, and spiritual wisdom. Constructive psychotherapy emphasizes complex cycles in the natural ordering and reorganizing processes that characterize all development in living systems. Individuals are encouraged to view themselves as active participants in their lives. Within rich contexts of human relationship and symbol systems, people make new meanings as they d...

  10. Psychotherapy of Personality Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    GABBARD, GLEN O.

    2000-01-01

    Although personality disorders are often regarded as “untreatable” by third-party payers, there is actually a growing empirical literature suggesting that Axis II conditions may be eminently treatable by psychotherapy. This literature is critically reviewed, the implications for length of treatment are discussed, and cost-effectiveness issues are examined.

  11. Intensive psychotherapy of schizophrenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Keats, C. J.; McGlashan, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    The literature on strategies of investigative psychotherapy of schizophrenia is selectively reviewed, and a case history is presented. The format is modelled on the authors' research technique of contrasting theory with practice. While long-term observation of single cases does not address cause and effect, descriptions of cases with a variety of known outcomes can help to build a typology of treatment processes.

  12. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  13. What Makes Psychotherapy Humanistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdale, John R.

    Based on an earlier list of characteristics, ten assertions were derived about the nature of psychotherapy upon which it was believed that humanistic therapists would agree. These assertions were then submitted to three groups of therapists (111 returns) listed in the "National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology": behaviorists,…

  14. Personality Theory and Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Joen; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This group of articles discusses various aspects of Gestalt Therapy including its major contributions, role in psychotherapy, and contributions of Gestalt psychology in general. There is some discussion of the philosophical background of Gestalt therapy along with Gestalt theory of emotion. A case study and an annotated bibliography are included…

  15. Brief Psychotherapy in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Peter J.; Brown, Alan

    1986-01-01

    A large number of patients with psychosocial or psychiatric disorders present to family physicians, and the family physician needs a model of psychotherapy with which to cope with their problems. A model of brief psychotherapy is presented which is time limited, goal directed and easy to learn. It consists of four facets drawn from established areas of psychotherapy: characteristics of the therapist; characteristics of the patient; Eriksonian developmental stages; and the process of therapy a...

  16. Psychotherapy Integration in Modern China

    OpenAIRE

    LI, MING-GAO; DUAN, CHANGMING; DING, BAO - KUENG; Yue, Dong-mei; BEITMAN, BERNARD D.

    1994-01-01

    Since the end of the cultural revolution (1966-78), China has opened itself to Western influence and ideas, including those of Western psychotherapy theory and practice. The faster pace of life under the new market economies has been associated with increased psychological problems and a greater need for psychotherapy. Psychotherapy integration, which fits well both with basic Chinese beliefs and the collectivist orientation, is likely to continue to grow in influen...

  17. Quantum change and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Thomas H

    2004-05-01

    Deep change in psychotherapy more typically comes slowly rather than suddenly, but this difference between therapeutic change and quantum change may be one of perspective rather than substance. Psychotherapy may be understood as a kind of mindfulness practice similar to working with koans in that the client presents a life dilemma incapable of rational solution. While quantum change cannot be engineered, the psychotherapist can create an environment conducive to such transformation by producing true presence and modeling calm, concerned, sustained attention to the dilemma that precipitated treatment. Psychotherapists who also maintain a sense of their work as a high art and a way of being, and who in consequence cultivate their own emotional and spiritual development, may be more likely to create such an environment.

  18. Mind, brain and psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheth Hitesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is long-standing debate about superiority of mind over brain, in other words about superiority of mind over matter. And outcome of this debate is going to decide future of psychiatry. The psychiatrists believing in materialism may say that brain is all and by changing neurotransmitters level with new molecules of drugs would cure all illnesses. On the other hand, antipsychiatry activists and some psychotherapists oppose all types of treatment despite of convincing evidence that drug therapy is effective (although sometimes it is not as effective as it claims to be. However, truth lies somewhere in between. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy are like two legs of psychiatry and psychiatry cannot walk into a future on one leg. The studies have shown that judicious use of pharmacotherapy along with psychotherapy gives better outcome than any one of them used alone. We must heal dichotomy between mind and brain before we heal the patients.

  19. Constructivism and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Michael J; Granvold, Donald K

    2005-06-01

    Constructivism is a metatheoretical perspective that embraces diverse traditions in medicine, philosophy, psychology, and spiritual wisdom. Constructive psychotherapy emphasizes complex cycles in the natural ordering and reorganizing processes that characterize all development in living systems. Individuals are encouraged to view themselves as active participants in their lives. Within rich contexts of human relationship and symbol systems, people make new meanings as they develop. Techniques from many different traditions can help people find and refine their sense of balance as they develop.

  20. Computer-assisted psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Jesse H.; Wright, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The rationale for using computers in psychotherapy includes the possibility that therapeutic software could improve the efficiency of treatment and provide access for greater numbers of patients. Computers have not been able to reliably duplicate the type of dialogue typically used in clinician-administered therapy. However, computers have significant strengths that can be used to advantage in designing treatment programs. Software developed for computer-assisted therapy gen...

  1. Healthcare Consulting: Institutional Psychotherapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Craven, Nancy H.; Covvey, H. Dominic

    1984-01-01

    Health care computing consultants are often brought in to assist institutions in solving their computing problems. Not unlike the disturbed client seeking psychotherapy, the problems the institution has with the introduction of computers are symptoms of deeper problems. Consultants and institutions must learn to identify and address underlying disorders first, before attacking the computing problems, or the outcome will more likely be failure - if not in the short term, then certainly in the ...

  2. Gratitude in cognitive psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia C. Moyano

    2015-01-01

    Gratitude is a cognitive-affective state caused by the recognition that one has received a benefit from an external agent, due to the good intentions of this agent. Despite the evidence that associate gratitude with subjective well being, psychological well being, physical health and copping with stressful events, it is not enough taken in consideration in an academic level and in its interaction with psychotherapy instruments as well. In this article, the central concepts and information pro...

  3. Effect of positive psychotherapy on the mental health and behaviors of patients with psoriasis%积极心理治疗对银屑病患者心理状况及行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金娜; 高晓敏; 王明旭; 王亮琪; 张茹

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨积极心理治疗对银屑病患者心理状况及社交回避、苦恼行为的效果。方法 将59例银屑病惠者,采用简单随机抽样方法分为干预组30例和对照组29例。干预组进行积极心理治疗;对照组按常规护理及健康教育;干预前后采用症状自评量表(SCL-90)、社交回避及苦恼量表,对两组患者心理状况和行为状态进行评定。结果 干预后,两组在躯体化、强迫症状、人际关系敏感、抑郁、焦虑、敌对、恐怖、精神病性因子等方面差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),干预后两组患者社交回避及苦恼情绪得分差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 积极心理疗法对提高银屑病患者的心理健康水平、增加其社交行为有积极的作用。%Objective To evaluate the effect of positive psychotherapy on the mental health,behaviors of social avoidance and distress in psoriasis patients. Methods Fifty-nine patients with psoriasis were randomly assigned to two groups. The patint in the experiment group received positive psychotherapy while the patients in the control group receiving routine nursing care. The patients were investigated with Symptom Checklist-90(SCL-90) and Social Avoidance and Distress Scale before and after intervention. Results After the intervention,there were significant differences between the two groups in the factor scores of somatization, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, terrorism, and psychiatric symptoms (P<0.05). Conclusion Positive psychotherapy can improve the mental health and increase social behaviors of patients with psoriasis.

  4. Principles in the Psychotherapy of Self-Destructive Borderline Patients

    OpenAIRE

    PLAKUN, ERIC M.

    1994-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder often exhibit lethal or nonlethal self-destructive behavior. The author offers seven principles for establishing and maintaining a therapeutic alliance in the insight-oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder patients with self-destructive behavior serious enough to threaten the continuity of the therapy.

  5. Research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Wilkinson's (1) critique of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy is weakened by inconsistent use of crucial terms, a systematically biased selectivity in reviewing empirical evidence and prior debates, and a failure to address issues crucial for a scientific understanding of psychotherapy.

  6. The future of interpersonal psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Markowitz, John C.

    1997-01-01

    This article briefly reviews the past and present and speculates on the future of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), a time-limited, empirically supported treatment for depression and other psychiatric syndromes. IPT and other psychotherapies face a role transition in adjusting to an economically and otherwise turbulent future. The author speculates on the outcome in clinical, research, and other domains.

  7. Values in Counseling and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    Considers various ways that values enter into counseling or psychotherapy, with particular attention to goals of the process and methods or procedures by which counselor or therapist implements process. Suggests approach to counseling and psychotherapy that recognizes and incorporates values basic to democratic philosophy and the goal of…

  8. Psychotherapy with Older Dying Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Carol J.

    Psychotherapy with older dying patients can lead to problems of countertransference for the clinician. Working with dying patients requires flexibility to adapt basic therapeutics to the institutional setting. Goals of psychotherapy must be reconceptualized for dying clients. The problems of countertransference arise because clinicians themselves…

  9. Psychotherapy, consciousness, and brain plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel eCollerton

    2013-01-01

    Purely psychological treatments for emotional distress produce lasting, measureable, and reproducible changes in cognitive and emotional consciousness and brain function. How these changes come about illustrates the interplay between brain and consciousness. Studies of the effects of psychotherapy highlight the holistic nature of consciousness. Pre and post treatment functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging localises the brain changes following psychotherapy to frontal, cingulate, and limbic cir...

  10. Power Politics of Family Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Carl A.

    It is postulated that the standard framework for psychotherapy, a cooperative transference neurosis, does not validly carry over to the successful psychotherapy of a two-generation family group. In many disturbed families, the necessary and sufficient dynamics for change must be initiated, controlled, and augmented by a group dynamic power-play,…

  11. Psychotherapy: The Humanistic (and Effective) Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well established that psychotherapy is remarkably effective, the change process in psychotherapy is not well understood. Psychotherapy is compared with medicine and cultural healing practices to argue that critical aspects of psychotherapy involve human processes that are used in religious, spiritual, and cultural healing practices.…

  12. Social Psychotherapy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Heloisa J; Marra, Marlene M; Knobel, Anna M

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes the practice of sociodrama, a method created by J. L. Moreno in the 1930s, and the Brazilian contemporary socio-psychodrama. In 1970, after the Fifth International Congress of Psychodrama was held in Brazil, group psychotherapy began to flourish both in private practice and hospital clinical settings. Twenty years later, the Brazilian health care system added group work as a reimbursable mental health procedure to improve social health policies. In this context, socio-psychodrama became a key resource for social health promotion within groups. Some specific conceptual contributions by Brazilians on sociodrama are also noteworthy. PMID:26401805

  13. Effectiveness of intensive psychotherapy in a day hospital evaluated with Neurotic Personality Inventory KON-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy A. Sobański

    2015-10-01

    The Neurotic Personality Inventory KON-2006 appears to be an adequate tool to assess the results of intensive, comprehensive psychotherapy, conducted in the day hospital for neurotic and behavioral disorders.

  14. Grundprinzipien der existenziellen Psychotherapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Längle A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Die existenzielle Psychotherapie hat mit der humanistischen Psychotherapie zentrale Themen gemeinsam: personale Freiheit, Verantwortung, Sinnsuche, Authentizität. Die therapeutische Vorgangsweise ist primär phänomenologisch, d. h. auf den Einzelnen und die Einmaligkeit der Situation ausgerichtet. Begegnung der Person und Interesse an dem, was sie bewegt, steht vor der Anwendung von allgemeinen Techniken. Damit kommt die Person mit ihrer zentralen Fähigkeit, das für sie Wesentliche zu erfassen und der Entscheidung zuzuführen, in den Mittelpunkt des Geschehens. Das Auffinden der inneren Zustimmung zu dem, was man tut oder unterlässt, gilt als zentral in der Vorgangsweise der existenziellen Psychotherapie. So liegt das Interesse weniger in der Symptomfreiheit als im Erreichen persönlicher Erfüllung im Leben. Die Therapie beginnt darum meist mit der Arbeit an der Annahme, am Verstehen und an der Stellungnahme zu den Problemen und Erfahrungen, die das Leid verursachen. Diese dialogische Haltung ist auch bei chronischen Krankheiten von grundlegender Bedeutung. Psychische Störungen bzw. Krankheiten wirken sich hemmend auf den Vollzug dieser Fähigkeiten der authentischen Person aus, mit Auswirkungen vor allem auf die Qualität des (inneren und äußeren Dialogs. Dadurch entsteht neben dem spezifischen Leiden, das Bezug auf die jeweils gestörte existenzielle Struktur nimmt, ein Mangel an innerer Erfüllung im Leben, der als existenzielles Hauptsymptom gilt. Dem erfüllenden Dialog geht eine Offenheit des Menschen voraus, in der er sich vom Leben und von der Lebenssituation befragen lässt hinsichtlich dessen, was seine geeignete Antwort auf die Situation wäre. Nicht ausreichend gelebte Pflege und Sorge um die Grundstrukturen der Existenz wirken sich hemmend auf die Voraussetzungen für erfüllendes Leben aus: auf die personalen Fähigkeiten der Wahrnehmung, des Fühlens, Entscheidens und sich mit den Kontexten Abstimmens. Ein verminderter

  15. Psychodrama: group psychotherapy through role playing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipper, D A

    1992-10-01

    The theory and the therapeutic procedure of classical psychodrama are described along with brief illustrations. Classical psychodrama and sociodrama stemmed from role theory, enactments, "tele," the reciprocity of choices, and the theory of spontaneity-robopathy and creativity. The discussion focuses on key concepts such as the therapeutic team, the structure of the session, transference and reality, countertransference, the here-and-now and the encounter, the group-as-a-whole, resistance and difficult clients, and affect and cognition. Also described are the neoclassical approaches of psychodrama, action methods, and clinical role playing, and the significance of the concept of behavioral simulation in group psychotherapy.

  16. Toward a renewal of personology in psychotherapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolorow, Robert D

    2012-12-01

    The articles by Elkins (D. N. Elkins, 2012, Toward a common focus in psychotherapy research, Psychotherapy, 49, pp. 450-454) and Hayes (S. C. Hayes, 2012, Humanistic psychology and contextual behavioral perspectives, Psychotherapy, 49, pp. 455-460) serve as a springboard for a call for a renewal of personological methods in studies of the psychotherapeutic relationship-methods that can investigate the emotional worlds of patient and psychotherapist as well as the relational systems constituted by the interplay between them. I believe only such idiographic research can illuminate the nexus of humanistic elements in which the psychotherapeutic process takes form. The beginnings of the author's own phenomenological-contextualist psychoanalytic perspective hark back to a series of personological studies of the subjective origins of psychoanalytic theories.

  17. Humor and creativity in psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Martín Camacho

    2015-01-01

    In the current article principal theories on humor are analyzed, relating them to different conceptions of creativity. Finally, some indications for the use of humor in psychotherapy are introduced, highlighting their positive and negative aspects. 

  18. Humor and creativity in psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martín Camacho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current article principal theories on humor are analyzed, relating them to different conceptions of creativity. Finally, some indications for the use of humor in psychotherapy are introduced, highlighting their positive and negative aspects. 

  19. Uses of humor in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmer, S A; Carroll, J L; Wyatt, G K

    1990-06-01

    Given demonstrated usefulness in facilitating learning, aiding healing, and reducing stress, humor has gained recognition as a clinical tool. This article reviews some uses and potential misuses of humor in psychotherapy and suggests directions for practice and research.

  20. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postpartum Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Perinatal depression is prevalent and has a great impact on both mother and infant. There are empirically validated treatments for both postpartum depression and depression during pregnancy. Primary among these is interpersonal psychotherapy, which has been shown to be effective for postpartum women across the spectrum from mild to severe depression. At present, interpersonal psychotherapy is the best validated treatment for postpartum depression and should be considered first-line treatment,...

  1. Personality functioning and psychotherapy outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Lindfors, Olavi

    2014-01-01

    Personality functioning and psychotherapy outcome Personality dysfunction is manifested in interpersonal interactions and self-concept. It generates vulnerability to psychopathology and increases the risk of recurring symptoms and impaired work ability. Change in personality functioning is considered a major goal of psychotherapy, but published studies comparing different psychotherapeutic treatments on the subject are scarce. Likewise, the suitability of short-term and long-term therapy...

  2. The (dramatic) process of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeig, Jeffrey K

    2008-07-01

    Psychotherapy can be conceived as a symbolic drama in which patients can experientially realize their capacity to change. Methods derived from hypnosis can empower therapy without the use of formal trance. A case conducted by Milton Erickson is presented and deconstructed in order to illuminate Erickson's therapeutic patterns. A model is offered for adding drama to therapy, and the model is placed into a larger model of choice points in psychotherapy.

  3. PSYCHOTHERAPY SUPPORT ON SCIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyawati Suhendro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Schizophrenia is a disease that causes varying descriptions. The symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into two groups, the primary and secondary symptoms. Treatment should be done as soon as possible, because a state of psychotic periods raises the possibility to suffer mental decline. The treatment is carried out must be comprehensive, multimodal, empirically and can be applied to the patient. One therapy that is given is psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is usually combined with pharmacological actions in order to increase the level of maximum healing. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. PHYSICAL THERAPY AS A SUPPORT FOR PSYCHOTHERAPY IN TREATING BODY DYSMORPHIC DISORDER (BDD - CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mârza-Dănilă Doina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (or dysmorphophobia includes antidepressant medication, cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy, psychoanalytical psychotherapy, hypnosis and others [2].Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy was used for a patient with Body Dysmorphic Disorder, without any remarkable results, because even if the patient could bring himself to imagine the anxiogenic scenes, he could not manage to confront his fears. The psychotherapist called upon the services of physical therapy and over the course of three months, the patient's phobia regressed almost completely from his daily life. In conclusion, physical therapy can be considered, in Body Dysmorphic Disorder cases that are hard to manage through behavioral and cognitive therapies, as a support for psychotherapy.

  5. A Single-Case Experimental Demonstration of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy with Two Clients with Severe Interpersonal Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Claudia Kami Bastos; Kanter, Jonathan; Meyer, Sonia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is emerging as an effective psychotherapy for psychiatric clinical cases. However, there is little research demonstrating the process of change of FAP. The present study evaluated the introduction and withdrawal of FAP interventions on therapy-interfering verbal behaviors of two participants who were in…

  6. [Psychotherapy: Legally recognized in Quebec].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudeau, Jean-Bernard; Desjardins, Pierre; Dion, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, Quebec was the first to have regulated the practice of psychotherapy through law adopted in 2009. The law emerged following 30 years of efforts and inter-professional discussions that led to a consensus by an expert committee presided by Dr Jean-Bernard Trudeau in 2005. In this essay, Dr Jean-Bernard Trudeau, general practitioner, and two psychiatrist and psychologist colleagues, who have participated to the expert committee or have been involved more recently in the implementation of law no 21 in Quebec, relate the main landmarks and moments in the regulation of the practice in psychotherapy following this inter-professional consensus that was translated in the law 21. They relate particularly the last ten years that have led to the adoption of law 21 in 2009, following two parliamentary commission after the Trudeau report. They underline how the practice of psychotherapy is integrated in the professional system and submitted to strict regulation. It includes regulations for obtaining the license of psychotherapist and for maintaining competence. Guidelines emerging from continuous inter-professional discussions for the application of the law and of its regulation in the public and private sectors are produced by the Quebec Professions Office. The definition of psychotherapy that was reached by consensus is not limited to the treatment of mental disorders and is distinguished from other intervention in the area of human relations. Continuous training is mandatory and is implemented on one hand by the Order of the psychologists for the psychologists and other professionals practicing psychotherapy and on the other hand the College of physicians for physician practicing psychotherapy. The authors finally described the interdisciplinary advisory council for the practice of psychotherapy that the legislator has foreseen as an external mechanism to insure the conformity of regulation with the spirit of the law and to give opinions to the various

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships ... BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy (DDT) DDT aims ...

  8. Child Psychotherapy Dropout: An Empirical Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Elisabeth; Gastaud, Marina; Nunes, Maria Lucia Tiellet

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the most recent data about child psychotherapy dropout, especially child psychoanalytical psychotherapy. The authors also try to offer some possible alternatives to prevent such a phenomenon. The definition of "child psychotherapy dropout" is extensively discussed. The goal has been to attempt to create a standardised…

  9. WELLFOCUS PPT: modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Riches, Simon James; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike Dominic

    2016-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline which has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying wellbeing rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g. strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savouring) are not emphasised in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The ...

  10. Combining Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with depression, anxiety disorders, and other psychiatric disorders are treated with combinations of psychodynamic psychotherapy and medication. Whether this is better than monotherapy is an empirical question that requires much more extensive research than is currently available. When medications were first introduced to treat psychiatric illnesses, some psychopharmacologists insisted that it heralded a new area of "biological psychiatry" that would ultimately render psychotherapy obsolete. Psychodynamic theorists and practitioners, on the other hand, argued that psychopharmacology offered only a superficial approach to treatment. Fortunately, these battles are now largely supplanted by the belief that whatever treatment offers the patient the best outcome should be employed, regardless of the therapist's theoretical outlook. This should motivate more extensive study of the value of combination treatment. So far, the few studies that have been done suggest that the combination of psychodynamic psychotherapy and medication may be superior for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders, but most of these studies have small sample sizes and involve only short-term psychotherapy. An examination of the neuroscience of mood and anxiety disorders and of the mechanism of action of psychodynamic psychotherapy and of antidepressant medication suggests several routes by which the two treatment modalities could be synergistic: stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis; epigenetic regulation of gene expression; dendritic remodeling; enhanced prefrontal cortical control of limbic system activity; and action at specific neurohormonal and neurotransmitter targets. The evidence for each of these mechanisms is reviewed with an eye toward potential experiments that might be relevant to them. PMID:27200462

  11. [Is pastoral care psychotherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettnitzer, A

    1999-01-01

    Whilst pastoral work is aimed at the consciousness of men, the duty of the psychotherapist is to turn the subconscious into the conscious. After clarifying the situation in his inner world the patient should be able to take free decisions. The psychotherapist is not responsible for the decision made by the person, which means that the conscious area is the responsibility of the individual. The psychotherapist must not manipulate the conscious parts just as the clergy must not manipulate the subconscious. So whilst there is a difference in both areas that must be maintained, that difference is less than the two have in common. The common aim or goal is: 1. The basis of both areas is a 'Socratic optimism' rooted in the fact that pastoral work and psychotherapy want the person to discover his or her own truth which cannot be told to him or her. However, it can be found by the person with assistance. 2. Both are characterised by a pragmatic individualism that says that it is worth listening to a single person for days, weeks, months or years until it is ascertained what the soul suffers from. 3. Both are convinced that the truth of a person cannot be described in moral categories. Social and ethical standards don't help but they may reflect the symptoms and the distress of the person. 4. Taking into consideration the dimension of the subconscious in pastoral duty as well, human decisions and activity can be understood much better. PMID:10544459

  12. The mind-body relationship in psychotherapy: Grounded cognition as an explanatory framework

    OpenAIRE

    Nuwan Dominic Leitan; Greg eMurray

    2014-01-01

    As a discipline, psychology is defined by its location in the ambiguous space between mind and body, but theories underpinning the application of psychology in psychotherapy are largely silent on this fundamental metaphysical issue. This is a remarkable state of affairs, given that psychotherapy is typically a real-time meeting between two embodied agents, with the goal of facilitating behavior change in one party. The overarching aim of this paper is to problematize the mind–body relationshi...

  13. With Doug: an Eastern Orthodox--Gestalt framework for pastoral psychotherapy in the armed forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David

    2013-01-01

    In military behavioral healthcare, a short-term, solutions-focused system often privileges cognitive techniques over existential, affective, or psychodynamic approaches to care. Pastoral psychotherapy, which often privileges existential and person-centered care, has the potential to prove a pivotal complement in treating the whole person. This article offers an existential approach to pastoral psychotherapy in the military using integrated concepts and applications from Gestalt Therapy and Eastern Orthodox pastoral care. PMID:24720246

  14. With Doug: an Eastern Orthodox--Gestalt framework for pastoral psychotherapy in the armed forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David

    2013-01-01

    In military behavioral healthcare, a short-term, solutions-focused system often privileges cognitive techniques over existential, affective, or psychodynamic approaches to care. Pastoral psychotherapy, which often privileges existential and person-centered care, has the potential to prove a pivotal complement in treating the whole person. This article offers an existential approach to pastoral psychotherapy in the military using integrated concepts and applications from Gestalt Therapy and Eastern Orthodox pastoral care.

  15. Child, caregiver, and therapist perspectives on therapeutic alliance in usual care child psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Accurso, Erin C.; Garland, Ann F

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the temporal stability and cross-informant agreement on multiple perspectives of child and caregiver alliance with therapists in usual care psychotherapy. Baseline predictors of alliance were also examined. Children with disruptive behavior problems (n=209) and their caregivers were followed for up to 16 months after initiating psychotherapy at a community-based clinic. Alliance was rated by children, caregivers, and therapists every four months for as long as families par...

  16. Disappointed Love and Suicide: A Randomized Controlled Trial of "Abandonment Psychotherapy" Among Borderline Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A; Burnand, Y; Cochennec, M-F; Ohlendorf, P; Frambati, L; Gaudry-Maire, D; Di Clemente, Th; Hourton, G; Lorillard, S; Canuto, A; Frances, A

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether ambulatory psychotherapy targeted to abandonment experiences and fears can reduce suicidality and improve outcome in borderline patients referred to the emergency room with major depressive disorder and self-destructive behavior severe enough to require medical/surgical treatment and a brief psychiatric hospitalization. A total of 170 subjects were randomized at hospital discharge into three treatment groups: treatment as usual (TAU), abandonment psychotherapy delivered by certified psychotherapists, and abandonment psychotherapy delivered by nurses. Assessments were performed before randomization and at 3-month follow-up. Continued suicidality and other outcome measures were significantly worse in the treatment-as-usual as compared to both abandonment psychotherapy groups, but there were no differences between the two psychotherapy groups. These results suggest the efficacy of manualized psychotherapy that specifically targets the abandonment fears and experiences that are so common as precipitants to suicidal and self-destructive acts in borderline patients. It does not appear that formal psychotherapy training is associated with better outcomes.

  17. Disappointed Love and Suicide: A Randomized Controlled Trial of "Abandonment Psychotherapy" Among Borderline Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A; Burnand, Y; Cochennec, M-F; Ohlendorf, P; Frambati, L; Gaudry-Maire, D; Di Clemente, Th; Hourton, G; Lorillard, S; Canuto, A; Frances, A

    2016-04-01

    To determine whether ambulatory psychotherapy targeted to abandonment experiences and fears can reduce suicidality and improve outcome in borderline patients referred to the emergency room with major depressive disorder and self-destructive behavior severe enough to require medical/surgical treatment and a brief psychiatric hospitalization. A total of 170 subjects were randomized at hospital discharge into three treatment groups: treatment as usual (TAU), abandonment psychotherapy delivered by certified psychotherapists, and abandonment psychotherapy delivered by nurses. Assessments were performed before randomization and at 3-month follow-up. Continued suicidality and other outcome measures were significantly worse in the treatment-as-usual as compared to both abandonment psychotherapy groups, but there were no differences between the two psychotherapy groups. These results suggest the efficacy of manualized psychotherapy that specifically targets the abandonment fears and experiences that are so common as precipitants to suicidal and self-destructive acts in borderline patients. It does not appear that formal psychotherapy training is associated with better outcomes. PMID:26111250

  18. Psychotherapy, consciousness, and brain plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eCollerton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purely psychological treatments for emotional distress produce lasting, measureable, and reproducible changes in cognitive and emotional consciousness and brain function. How these changes come about illustrates the interplay between brain and consciousness. Studies of the effects of psychotherapy highlight the holistic nature of consciousness. Pre and post treatment functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging localises the brain changes following psychotherapy to frontal, cingulate, and limbic circuits, but emphasise that these areas support a wide range of conscious experiences. Multivoxel Pattern Analysis of distributed changes in function across these brain areas may be able to provide the ability to distinguish between different states of consciousness.

  19. Psychotherapy patient transfer: secondhand rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederer, L

    1975-10-01

    The author uses the analogy of the marketplace to examine the dynamics of the transfer of psychotherapy patients in university clinic settings. The outgoing therapist is the seller, the prospective therapist the buyer, and the patient the commodity--the secondhand Rose. Marketing techniques that are used in this buyers' market allow no active patient participation and are therefore antithetical to the tenets of psychotherapy. The author suggests early clarification of therapeutic goals, assignment of therapists on the basis of patient choice, and explanation of time frames and limits as means for ameliorating the problems he describes.

  20. Existential issues in group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Bernard

    2002-04-01

    Existential issues in group psychotherapy derive from existential thought both as a philosophy and as a value system. Its origins derive from the weakening of traditional values and the growing alienation of man from himself. The unique features of existentialism can be applied to all forms of therapy. These features are universal to humankind. They are finiteness, aloneness, guilt, responsibility, and freedom. In including existential concerns as part of group psychotherapy, therapist and patients move more closely to bilateral relationships and subjective interactions. PMID:11928200

  1. Momentary assessment of interpersonal process in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Katherine M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Woody, Erik; Ethier, Nicole; Sadler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate how a novel computer joystick coding method can illuminate the study of interpersonal processes in psychotherapy sessions, we applied it to Shostrom's (1966) well-known films in which a client, Gloria, had sessions with 3 prominent psychotherapists. The joystick method, which records interpersonal behavior as nearly continuous flows on the plane defined by the interpersonal dimensions of control and affiliation, provides an excellent sampling of variability in each person's interpersonal behavior across the session. More important, it yields extensive information about the temporal dynamics that interrelate clients' and therapists' behaviors. Gloria's 3 psychotherapy sessions were characterized using time-series statistical indices and graphical representations. Results demonstrated that patterns of within-person variability tended to be markedly asymmetric, with a predominant, set-point-like interpersonal style from which deviations mostly occurred in just 1 direction (e.g., occasional submissive departures from a modal dominant style). In addition, across each session, the therapist and client showed strongly cyclical variations in both control and affiliation, and these oscillations were entrained to different extents depending on the therapist. We interpreted different patterns of moment-to-moment complementarity of interpersonal behavior in terms of different therapeutic goals, such as fostering a positive alliance versus disconfirming the client's interpersonal expectations. We also showed how this method can be used to provide a more detailed analysis of specific shorter segments from each of the sessions. Finally, we compared our approach to alternative techniques, such as act-to-act lagged relations and dynamic systems and pointed to a variety of possible research and training applications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24001123

  2. [From some experiences in pharmaco-psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizono, Masahisa

    2003-01-01

    The author had developed the anaclitic pharmaco-psychotherapy as an integrated treatment of levomepromazine (a phenothiazine derivate), psychoanalytic interviewing and intensive nursing care for severe cases. Nevertheless the author had good results by the new therapy, some severe cases were still non-responded. The author found some differences of personality pattern between responder and non-responder. Responders had hyperkinetic pattern with good verbal expression and dependent behavior. Non-responders had hypersensory pattern with holding their tongue and keeping tension. The author had tried psychotherapy under using LSD for hypersensory pattern cases and gotten good results by it. But using LSD was prohibited by legal reason, now. The author could get significant development of three areas of psychiatric treatment through our development of the pharmacopsychotherapy as follows. 1) Significance of some biological factors for personality The author has clarified that two different response types to drug, hyperkinetic-visual dominant type and hypersensory-auditory dominant type. Assessments of such personality pattern or trait are useful for selection of appropriate drug. 2) Some changes in psychoanalytic stance. The author could find some therapeutic significances of object relationship in therapeutic process. These findings have stimulated the author to shift from classic drive oriented psychoanalysis to object relation psychoanalysis. 3) Significance of psychiatric nursing, team approach and therapeutic environment. The author has convinced of importance of role of psychiatric nursing and team approach. And the author has found importance of making and maintaining of appropriate psychiatric milieu and environment. PMID:12701206

  3. Depressed patients’ preferences for type of psychotherapy: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrondi A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antoine Yrondi,1 Julie Rieu,1 Claire Massip,1 Vanina Bongard,2 Laurent Schmitt1 1Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, 2Public Health Service, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France Background: The treatment recommendations for depressed patients by the American Psychiatric Association encourage a focus on the patient’s preferences. The focus of this study was the preference of depressed inpatients for the type of psychotherapy. Methods: Twenty-nine subjects of both sexes who were hospitalized with a major depressive episode were interviewed at 5-day intervals with the same questions after the depressive episode resolved, as indicated by a score less than 7 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS. The selection of items was performed by expert consensus. Results: The supportive psychotherapy scores were the highest, followed by psychodynamic psychotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. The two sessions conducted at 5-day intervals showed no significant difference, which reflected the stability of choices and preferences of patients. Conclusion: In this study, the patients preferred supportive psychotherapy as first-line therapy compared to psychodynamic psychotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy. Keywords: depression, depressive disorder, psychodynamic psychotherap, supportive psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy

  4. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accepting BPD and changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive ... BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy (DDT) DDT aims ...

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, ... concrete things they can do to manage their emotions when certain challenging situations arise and they are ...

  6. Substance use disorder patients’ attitude towards treatment with psychotherapy and self-help groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velga Sudraba

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Substance use disorders are considered as Mental and behavioral disorders therefore people with addictions should receive help that is oriented towards personal growth and enhancement of functioning. Such help cannot be provided using only medications, therefore psychotherapeutic interference is necessary. Objectives: The Aim – to find out the point of view of substance use disorders patients regarding number of visits, duration of treatment and efficacy of self-help groups, individual and group psychotherapy. Methods: Quantitative research method using research authors’ designed questionnaire was used in this study. The questionnaire was pilot tested in order to be validated. It consists of 24 questions and it consists from two parts – socio-demographic data collection and basic information collection.Results: 587 substance use disorders patients were interviewed, 66.4% male, 33.6% female, mean age – 39.6 (SD±11.3. 26.2% (154 respondents have attended self-help groups, 18.5% (109 – individual psychotherapy, 7.0% (41 – group psychotherapy. From those who attended self-help groups 52 respondents (33.7% report remission for one year or more. From those who attended individual psychotherapy – 27 (24.8% respondents, but from those who attended group psychotherapy 15 (36.6% report remission for one year or more. Conclusions: Respondents choose self-help groups more often than group psychotherapy. Half of the SUD patients stop psychotherapy in the first half a year of the treatment. Group psychotherapy provides remission that lasts for more than 5 years for most of the respondents comparing to individual psychotherapy and self-help groups.

  7. Does Acceptance and Relationship Focused Behavior Therapy Contribute to Bupropion Outcomes? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Elizabeth V.; Kohlenberg, Barbara S.; Hayes, Steven C.; Pierson, Heather M.; Piasecki, Melissa P.; Antonuccio, David O.; Palm, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a treatment combining bupropion with a novel acceptance and relationship focused behavioral intervention based on the acceptance and relationship context (ARC) model. Three hundred and three smokers from a community sample were randomly assigned to bupropion, a widely used smoking cessation medication, or bupropion plus…

  8. Treatment Differences in the Therapeutic Relationship and Introject during a 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy versus Nonbehavioral Psychotherapy Experts for Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedics, Jamie D.; Atkins, David C.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study explored the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method: Women meeting "DSM-IV" criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community…

  9. Brief Psychotherapy: The Multimodal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Arnold A.

    1989-01-01

    Outlines tenets of multimodal therapy (MMT) and argues for its cost-effective yet comprehensive value as a brief psychotherapy model. Describes MMT as an integrated, seven-modality model of personality and provides clinical examples of its use. Argues that MMT approach will be an important future alternative to more expensive, time-consuming, and…

  10. Psychotherapy via Videoconferencing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Research into the use of videoconferencing for clinical purposes, in particular psychotherapy, is gradually expanding. A number of case studies and case series have suggested that videoconferencing can be clinically effective and acceptable to patients. Nevertheless, there is a lack of methodologically rigorous studies with adequate sample sizes…

  11. Culture and demoralization in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, John M; Gostoli, Sara

    2013-01-01

    In most societies, members of a culture have attempted to help each other in times of trouble with various types of healing methods. Demoralization - an individual experience related to a group phenomenon - responds to certain elements shared by all psychotherapies. This article has three objectives: (1) to review the theoretical background leading to our current views on culture and demoralization in psychotherapy, (2) to discuss the methodological challenges faced in the cross-cultural study of demoralization and psychotherapy, and (3) to describe the clinical applications and research prospects of this area of inquiry. Demoralization follows a shattering of the individual's assumptive world and it is different from homeostatic responses to a stressful situation or from depressive disorders. Only a few comparative studies of this construct across cultures have been undertaken. The presentation of distress may vary widely from culture to culture and even within the same culture. To avoid 'category fallacy', it is important to understand the idioms of distress peculiar to a cultural group. A cultural psychiatrist or psychotherapist would have to identify patient's values and sentiments, reconstruct his/her personal and collective ambient worlds, and only then study demoralization. The limitations of our current diagnostic systems have resulted in methodological challenges. Cultural clinicians should consider using a combination of both 'clinimetric' and 'perspectivistic' approaches in order to arrive at a diagnosis and identify the appropriate intervention. The presenting problem has to be understood in the context of the patient's individual, social and cultural background, and patients unfamiliar with Western-type psychotherapies have to be prepared to guide their own expectations before the former are used. Future research should identify the gaps in knowledge on the effectiveness of cultural psychotherapy at reversing or preventing demoralization.

  12. [Integrative approach in the psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritárné Szabó, Ildikó

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years six psychotherapy methods have been developed specifically for borderline personality disorder. Solid RCT evidences suggests the efficacy of all the methods. Roughly equivalent improvement was obtained from the different types of psychotherapies. Today we have reached a new phase of the borderline "psychotherapy boom", the integrative approach. According to the integrative treatment advocates we should not choose among these effective treatments but we can incorporate in the therapy all the components that work. The integrative approach uses general factors common to all effective therapies, combined with specific treatment techniques taken from different therapies in order to treat the given patient's psychopathology. These common factors are: coherent framework; attention to strategies for building strong positive alliance and maintaining patient motivation; creating a safe and structured therapeutic environment; clear treatment frame; transparency of the goals and roles; focus upon presenting problems; higher level therapeutic activity; here-and-now focus; and facilitating self-reflection. Treatment focuses on change while maintaining a validating and supportive stance. General strategies can be supplemented by more specific techniques such as cognitive-behavioral interventions for reducing maladaptive behavior, training for developing emotion regulation skills and interpersonal skills coming from dialectical behavior therapy. Methods drawn from psychodynamic approaches can be used for the modification of underlying interpersonal cognitive-emotional schemas.

  13. The Art of Psychotherapy: Selecting Patients for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rueve, Marie E.; Correll, Terry L.

    2006-01-01

    A preliminary challenge in learning the art of psychotherapy is mastering how to choose appropriate patients. This skill goes far beyond performing a symptom inventory and matching up those results to a diagnosis. A psychodynamic evaluation explores various innate characteristics that predict a patient's ability to participate fully in and benefit greatly from this mode of therapy. Ignoring this critical first step in the process may create unnecessary stumbling blocks in the road of treatmen...

  14. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn ... the patient distorts his or her sense of self and images of other people. Therapy addresses intense ...

  15. Is IPT Time-Limited Psychodynamic Psychotherapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Markowitz, John C.; Svartberg, Martin; Swartz, Holly A.

    1998-01-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has sometimes but not always been considered a psychodynamic psychotherapy. The authors discuss similarities and differences between IPT and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP), comparing eight aspects: 1) time limit, 2) medical model, 3) dual goals of solving interpersonal problems and syndromal remission, 4) interpersonal focus on the patient solving current life problems, 5) specific techniques, 6) termination, 7) therapeutic stance, and 8) empir...

  16. Integrating self-help books into psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Linda F; Smith, Thomas P

    2003-02-01

    This article describes a systematic and integral method of incorporating self-help books into psychotherapy as a collaborative function. We address the distinctions between self-help and bibliotherapy, consider bibliotherapy as adjunctive or integrative to psychotherapy, and outline the multiple uses of bibliotherapy for clinical purposes. How to apply self-help books in psychotherapy and ways to select books are illustrated by a case example. Indications and contraindications for bibliotherapy in therapy are outlined.

  17. Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Straker, Norman

    1998-01-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective as an approach to understanding the psychological conflicts and the psychiatric symptoms of cancer patients as well as to planning useful psychological interventions. The author recommends that the psychotherapist who treats cancer patients be familiar with the following: 1) the natural course and treatment of the illness, 2) a flexible approach in accord with the medical status of the patient, 3) a common sense approach to defenses, 4) a concern with ...

  18. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Champion, Lorna; Power, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a leading evidence-based treatment for those eating disorders in which binge eating is a feature. This article begins with a consideration of the rationale for using IPT to treat patients with eating disorders. This is followed by a review of the evidence supporting its use and a brief description of treatment including an illustrative clinical case vignette. The article closes with a discussion of possible future directions for research on IPT for eating ...

  19. Videoconferencing psychotherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, Autumn; Agha, Zia; Maglione, Melissa L; Repp, Andrea; Ross, Bridgett; Zuest, Danielle; Rice-Thorp, Natalie M; Lohr, James; Thorp, Steven R

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with mental health problems may face barriers to accessing effective psychotherapies. Videoconferencing technology, which allows audio and video information to be shared concurrently across geographical distances, offers an alternative that may improve access. We conducted a systematic literature review of the use of videoconferencing psychotherapy (VCP), designed to address 10 specific questions, including therapeutic types/formats that have been implemented, the populations with which VCP is being used, the number and types of publications related to VCP, and available satisfaction, feasibility, and outcome data related to VCP. After electronic searches and reviews of reference lists, 821 potential articles were identified, and 65 were selected for inclusion. The results indicate that VCP is feasible, has been used in a variety of therapeutic formats and with diverse populations, is generally associated with good user satisfaction, and is found to have similar clinical outcomes to traditional face-to-face psychotherapy. Although the number of articles being published on VCP has increased in recent years, there remains a need for additional large-scale clinical trials to further assess the efficacy and effectiveness of VCP.

  20. The Challenge of Developing a Universal Case Conceptualization for Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Jordan T.; Maragakis, Alexandros; Follette, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) targets a client's interpersonal behavior for change with the goal of improving his or her quality of life. One question guiding FAP case conceptualization is, "What interpersonal behavioral repertoires will allow a specific client to function optimally?" Previous FAP writings have suggested that a therapist…

  1. Therapists' continuations following I don't know-responses of adolescents in psychotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Margot; Huiskes, Mike; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J; De Winter, Andrea F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In psychotherapy clients' I don't know-responses (IDK-responses) to therapists' questions are typically considered to be non-cooperating behaviors. How therapists actually handle these behaviors remains unclear. This study therefore aims to assess client-therapist interactions following I

  2. Learning from traumatic experiences with brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold P. R. Gersons

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD (BEPP is an evidence-based therapeutic approach that combines and integrates elements from psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and directive psychotherapy. Psychoeducation is done jointly with the patient and his or her partner. Exposure, a structured writing task, and memorabilia are used to help patients accessing, feeling and expressing their suppressed emotions related to the traumatic experience. In the domain of meaning stage, patients will learn how they and their view of the world have changed, and that they have become “sadder but wiser”. Much emphasis is put on the vulnerability of human beings. Finally, an individually tailored farewell ritual is done to end treatment, to reunite with loved ones, and to go on with life.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online

  3. Nonverbal Communication in Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Gretchen N.; Gentile, Julie P.

    2010-01-01

    The mental status examination is the objective portion of any comprehensive psychiatric assessment and has key diagnostic and treatment implications. This includes elements such as a patient's baseline general appearance and behavior, affect, eye contact, and psychomotor functioning. Changes in these parameters from session to session allow the psychiatrist to gather important information about the patient. In psychiatry, much emphasis is placed on not only listening to what patients communic...

  4. The cost-effectiveness of psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Susan G.; GABBARD, GLEN O.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that psychotherapy can be cost-effective, especially for certain patient populations. These patients include, among others, those with schizophrenia, those with borderline personality disorder, and certain child patients, as well as certain medical patients with concomitant psychiatric illness. In addition, several surveys and actuarial studies suggest better outcomes and cost savings are attained when psychotherapy is available as medically necessary ...

  5. Practice Parameter for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy with Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicus, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This Practice Parameter describes the principles of psychodynamic psychotherapy with children and is based on clinical consensus and available research evidence. It presents guidelines for the practice of child psychodynamic psychotherapy, including indications and contraindications, the setting, verbal and interactive (play) techniques, work with…

  6. Brief Psychotherapy Methods in Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Mary P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    After a concise overview of the technical characteristics that define brief psychotherapy, the current use and misuse of these methods in clinical research on the outcome and process of treatment is examined. Suggests that brief psychotherapy methods possess unique technical advantages to the researcher. (Author/BL)

  7. Practice Parameter for psychodynamic psychotherapy with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, Paulina F; Ritvo, Rachel; Keable, Helene

    2012-05-01

    This Practice Parameter describes the principles of psychodynamic psychotherapy with children and is based on clinical consensus and available research evidence. It presents guidelines for the practice of child psychodynamic psychotherapy, including indications and contraindications, the setting, verbal and interactive (play) techniques, work with the parents, and criteria for termination. PMID:22525961

  8. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  9. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a client with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Susanne; Daniel, Sarah I F; Poulsen, Stig

    2016-06-01

    This case study presents the progress of one patient with bulimia nervosa who was originally very compromised in psychological domains that are the focus of analytic treatment, and includes in-session therapeutic process and a range of outcomes, for example, eating disorder symptoms, attachment status, and reflective functioning. Nested in a study showing more rapid behavioral improvement in subjects receiving cognitive behavior therapy than in subjects receiving psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the case highlights the importance of supplementing RCTs with single case studies and the need of adapting the therapeutic approach as well as the current therapeutic dialogue to the individual client. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27267505

  10. Reduction of suicidal ideation in patients undergoing psychotherapy in the day hospital for the treatment of neurotic and behavioral disorders and neurotic symptoms reported by them before the hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Rodziński

    2015-08-01

    Patients initially reporting SI constituted approximately 1/3 in both genders and were characterized by greater intensity of neurotic disorders. Among those, women with particularly higher intensity of Obsessive-compulsive symptoms, Neurasthenia and Autonomic disorders and women reporting episodes of uncontrollable hunger seemed to suffer from SI that were more resistant to the psychotherapy. As such, those subgroups of women require special attention and diligent selection of the therapeutic methods.

  11. Individual psychotherapy as an adjunct to group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranto, E A; Bender, S S

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a form of combined psychotherapy in which the individual sessions are used as an adjunct to group therapy. Each group member is seen regularly in individual sessions to focus primarily on the member's ongoing group work. The individual sessions are scheduled on a rotating basis. Typically, each group member is seen in an individual session once every four weeks. Additional individual sessions are available only when immediate attention is appropriate and necessary. The group is viewed as the primary therapeutic component. A cost-effective therapeutic approach that uses both individual and group methods, this modality lends itself well to a clinic and to a private practice setting.

  12. A review of Boyne, E. (1993) Psychotherapy in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    CARR, ALAN

    1993-01-01

    Up until now there has been no consumer's guide to psychotherapy in Ireland. Nor has there been a psychotherapy textbook with a uniquely Irish orientation. Edward Boyne's new volume, therefore, is an important book for both prospective psychotherapy clients and students of psychotherapy.

  13. Integrating Psychotherapy Research with Public Health and Public Policy Goals for Incarcerated Women and other Vulnerable Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jennifer E

    2013-01-01

    In this article, I review my research applying interpersonal treatments and interpersonal principles from psychotherapy for major depression and substance use to broader public health goals for incarcerated women and other vulnerable populations. A public health focus has led me to expand the boundaries of psychotherapy research to include partners such as prisons, parole officers, and bachelor's level providers; behaviors like risky sex; service delivery challenges; and ultimately to researc...

  14. The role of scripts in psychological maladjustment and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Amy P

    2013-12-01

    This article considers the value of script theory for understanding psychological maladjustment and psychotherapy. Scripts are implicit expectations that individuals develop to understand and deal with emotionally significant life experiences. Script theory provides a way to understand the complex patterns of thinking, feeling, and behavior that characterize personal consistency, as well as a way to address personality development and change. As such it is a vital model for understanding both personality and clinical phenomena. The article begins by describing script theory and noting similar models in personality and clinical psychology. It then outlines both idiographic and nomothetic methods for assessing scripts and discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each. A survey of the author's program of research follows, using a nomothetic method to examine the role of interpersonal scripts in psychological maladjustment and psychotherapy. The article concludes by presenting a promising method for future research synthesizing idiographic and nomothetic approaches and raising important questions for future research on the role of scripts in psychological maladjustment and psychotherapy. PMID:22924968

  15. Relationship-focused psychotherapies for eating disorders come of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A

    2016-06-01

    This is a commentary on 3 case studies of relationship-focused therapies for eating disorders. The 3 approaches vary along a number of dimensions, but nevertheless share important similarities especially related to the role played by variables such as interpersonal problems and affect dysregulation. I briefly review research on interpersonal- and attachment-based models of eating disorders that provide the evidence-base for theories of therapy that are relationship-focused. The Interpersonal Psychotherapy case presented by Tanofsky-Kraff, Shomaker, Young, and Wilfley (2016) illustrates how a group context can facilitate change in key role disputes and role transitions in an adolescent at risk of developing an eating disorder later in her life. The Integrative-Dynamic Therapy case presented by Richards, Shingleton, Goldman, Siegel, and Thompson-Brenner (2016) is a novel sequential combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy followed by dynamic psychotherapy for a young adult with bulimia nervosa that likely reflects what most clinicians do in everyday practice. The Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy case presented by Lunn, Poulsen, and Daniel (2016) of a patient with severe personality pathology demonstrates how treatments for eating disorders sometimes must address complex attachment dysfunction, self-organization, and therapist countertransference in order to provide a useful therapeutic experience. Relationship-focused theories and therapies for eating disorders have come a long way over the past decades, thus providing therapists with a wider range of approaches that can be truly personalized to their clients. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27267506

  16. Psychotherapy in older adults with major depression in psychogeriatric ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Mateusz Rachel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Psychotherapy of the elderly appears to be a very important part of comprehensive treatment, and its character should be based on a holistic vision of the patient. The effectiveness of the individual Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy (CBT and Problem Solving Therapy (PST is well establish in clinical trial. In treating patients at the psycho geriatric ward, on account of the described clinical state placed in the article, we apply Supportive Therapy (ST and existential approach. An important element of therapy is a holistic approach to the needs of the patient, an attempt to understand their internal conflicts, a focus on long-term therapy and the setting of realistic goals tailored to the patient's abilities. A positive change in thinking can bear fruit in the patient’s everyday life, their functioning, and in their relationships with other people. It seems, that at elderly people, choice of the psychotherapeutic method should adapt individually to the clinical state, therapeutic readiness to work and one's situation in life of the patient In this article, the authors share their own experiences and reflections from the use of individual and group psychotherapy with elderly patients in the psychogeriatric ward.

  17. [Body-centered psychotherapy IKP (Institute of Body-Centered Psychotherapy): holistic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Groeli, Y

    1996-03-01

    Body centered Psychotherapy IKP is treated in this article under the aspect of a holistic approach. First the theory and the system of science are summarised and shown as to which amount they are changing concerning knowledge of details and wholeness. It is pointed out that the actual paradigma "to the depth" has to be completed by that of "wideness". The way of holistic-multirelational thinking, stating a diagnosis and doing therapy is demonstrated along a case study going on at the background of a therapeutic encounter-relationship which is emotionally warm (Gestalt-approach). PMID:8900884

  18. [Body-centered psychotherapy IKP (Institute of Body-Centered Psychotherapy): holistic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Groeli, Y

    1996-03-01

    Body centered Psychotherapy IKP is treated in this article under the aspect of a holistic approach. First the theory and the system of science are summarised and shown as to which amount they are changing concerning knowledge of details and wholeness. It is pointed out that the actual paradigma "to the depth" has to be completed by that of "wideness". The way of holistic-multirelational thinking, stating a diagnosis and doing therapy is demonstrated along a case study going on at the background of a therapeutic encounter-relationship which is emotionally warm (Gestalt-approach).

  19. Dialogical relationship and cultural imagination: a hermeneutic approach to intercultural psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adil

    2005-01-01

    Effective intercultural psychotherapy generally has been conceptualized in terms of a specific knowledge and skills base, combined with relevant attention to the practitioner's cultural attitudes and beliefs. Although such an approach continues to be the gold standard in the field, it has yet to be demonstrated that these components are either necessary or sufficient for effective treatment. This paper presents an approach to intercultural therapy based on Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics. Humans are always in the process of making sense of the world around them, a process which is predicated on culturally given preunderstandings. Cultural difference means that the preunderstandings are rarely mutual, and therefore, communication and psychotherapy are often problematic. These preunderstandings often show up in the form of racial and ethnic prejudice and the therapist is rarely aware of this. Therapist preunderstanding influences all aspects of the psychotherapy process, such as treatment planning, interventions chosen, and the therapeutic relationship. Recommendations are given for improving the intercultural therapy process, and draw strongly on the twin notions of the dialogical relationship and cultural imagination. PMID:16170917

  20. Spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viftrup, Dorte Toudal; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Buus, Niels

    2013-01-01

    WE SYSTEMATICALLY REVIEWED THE RESEARCH LITERATURE ON SPIRITUALLY AND RELIGIOUSLY INTEGRATED GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING THREE QUESTIONS: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group......, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from...... for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded....

  1. A Model of Therapist Competencies for the Empirically Supported Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Mufson, Laura H.; Schniering, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to treat adolescent depression, a number of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) have been developed from both the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) frameworks. Research has shown that in order for these treatments to be implemented in routine clinical practice (RCP), effective therapist…

  2. Outcome Effects of Eclectic Interpersonal-Learning-Based Group Psychotherapy with College Student Neurotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarr, Ralph R.; Ewing, Thomas N.

    1977-01-01

    A focused 5-year research program used a large number of clients (45), groups (10), and co-therapists (20) to assess group psychotherapy outcome in a homeogeneous diagnostic population (severly disturbed college student neurotics) and therapist-treatment modality (eclectic, interpersonal learning based, with insight and behavior change goals).…

  3. Group Psychotherapy with Mentally Retarded Adults: Issues Related to Design, Implementation, and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfadt, Al

    1991-01-01

    This article describes how a social systems approach to psychopathology can be applied to treatment goals in group psychotherapy with mentally retarded individuals. Treatment models blending behavioral and psychodynamic interventions are covered. Suggestions for maintaining cost-effective linkages between mental health and mental retardation…

  4. Impact of Cluster C Personality Disorders on Outcomes of Contrasting Brief Psychotherapies for Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Gillian E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Study compares 27 depressed clients diagnosed with Cluster C personality disorder (PD) with 87 depressed clients without the diagnosis. All clients completed cognitive-behavioral or psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy. Treatment length did not influence outcome for PD clients. PD clients whose depression was also relatively severe showed…

  5. Comparative Psychotherapy: Rational-Emotive Therapy Versus Systematic Desensitization in the Treatment of Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleski, Richard; Tosi, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of rational-emotive psychotherapy and systematic desensitization in the treatment of stuttering. Both therapies, making extensive use of in vivo behavioral assignments, were examined under the presence and absence of in vivo tasks. Results show that rational-emotive therapy was more effective in reducing…

  6. Long-Term Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy for Eating Disorders: A Descriptive Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J. Kelly

    1998-01-01

    Fifteen women with long-standing histories of eating disorders and other disordered behavior participated in a psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy group over a three-year period. Provides several observations on the group and describes how a variety of variables combined to help, as well as, hinder favorable outcomes in group members.…

  7. Marital Role Dynamics during Brief Group Psychotherapy: Assessment of Verbal Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbergeld, Sam; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examined impacts of brief group psychotherapy on the marital and sex roles of five volunteer couples. Results show interactional correlates of traditional marital and sex role variations are attenuated, that communication between spouses is improved, and that the therapeutic quality of verbal behavior is enhanced over the course of therapy.…

  8. Relation of Patient Pretreatment Characteristics to the Therapeutic Alliance in Diverse Psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Louise; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated prediction of therapeutic alliance from patient pretreatment characteristics among 60 elderly depressed outpatients treated in behavioral, cognitive, and brief dynamic psychotherapy. Found that higher degree of patient defensiveness was related to lower patient contribution to alliance as reflected in patient commitment and working…

  9. Evidence-Based Psychotherapies and Nutritional Interventions for Children With Bipolar Spectrum Disorders and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristad, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Treatment guidelines recommend that psychotherapy be used in conjunction with pharmacotherapy in children with bipolar disorder. A well-established category of psychotherapy is family skill-building plus psychoeducation; 3 examples of this are family-focused treatment, psychoeducational psychotherapy, and child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy. These treatments share several common elements that are important in pediatric populations, including being family-based, providing psychoeducation on symptoms and their management, and training patients and families in emotion regulation, communication, and problem-solving skills. Clinicians may also wish to explore nutritional interventions; multinutrient complexes are experimental, and omega-3 fatty acid supplements are possibly efficacious. Nutritional interventions are particularly attractive in this patient population because of their favorable safety profile. PMID:27570930

  10. The future orientation of constructive memory: an evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest; Erickson-Klein, Roxanna; Rossi, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    We explore a new distinction between the future, prospective memory system being investigated in current neuroscience and the past, retrospective memory system, which was the original theoretical foundation of therapeutic hypnosis, classical psychoanalysis, and psychotherapy. We then generalize a current evolutionary theory of sleep and dreaming, which focuses on the future, prospective memory system, to conceptualize a new evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy. The implication of current neuroscience research is that activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity are the psychobiological basis of adaptive behavior, consciousness, and creativity in everyday life as well as psychotherapy. We summarize a case illustrating how this evolutionary perspective can be used to quickly resolve problems with past obstructive procrastination in school to facilitate current and future academic success. PMID:18524301

  11. PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH THE PARENT EGO STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruša Zaletel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In their article, the authors present the findings of the study in which they conceptualized the method of psychotherapy with the Parent ego state. Their aim was to explore whether this method could be divided into individual, content-wise separate chronological phases which can be observed with the majority of clients. By using a modified method of content analysis of five psychotherapy transcripts and a video recording of a psychotherapy session, nine chronological phases were identified. In order to illustrate the individual phases, excerpts from the transcripts and the video recording of psychotherapy have been included. The article proposes under what conditions can this method be used, and presents some of its limitations.

  12. Succession and survival in psychotherapy organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleelee, Olya

    2008-11-01

    This paper examines the world of psychotherapy by applying a systemic and psychodynamic understanding of the family business as a way of understanding the dilemmas and challenges of leadership succession. Oedipal factors are explored as an important theme within the succession process. This exploration is set within the context of what function psychotherapy has performed in society over the last thirty years. The hypothesis is that the first generation of leaders aimed to provide containment for the individual citizen at a time of failed dependency in society. The suggestion is that this gave way to the primary task for the second generation, which has been to focus on the therapist in training. The challenge for the third generation is to develop a meaningful role for psychotherapy today and to ensure survival at a time when other shorter therapies such as CBT are gaining ascendancy over longer term psychoanalytic psychotherapy. PMID:19012582

  13. Vietnamese Amerasians: Psychosocial Adjustment and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the literature on Amerasians and offers suggestions for directions in psychotherapy. Provides a brief chronology of Amerasian emigration and associated psychological issues, followed by a discussion of myths and generalizations about Amerasians, research findings, and adjustment issues. (RJM)

  14. Glucocorticoids enhance extinction-based psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Bentz, Dorothée; Michael, Tanja; Bolt, Olivia C; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Margraf, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2011-04-19

    Behavioral exposure therapy of anxiety disorders is believed to rely on fear extinction. Because preclinical studies have shown that glucocorticoids can promote extinction processes, we aimed at investigating whether the administration of these hormones might be useful in enhancing exposure therapy. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 40 patients with specific phobia for heights were treated with three sessions of exposure therapy using virtual reality exposure to heights. Cortisol (20 mg) or placebo was administered orally 1 h before each of the treatment sessions. Subjects returned for a posttreatment assessment 3-5 d after the last treatment session and for a follow-up assessment after 1 mo. Adding cortisol to exposure therapy resulted in a significantly greater reduction in fear of heights as measured with the acrophobia questionnaire (AQ) both at posttreatment and at follow-up, compared with placebo. Furthermore, subjects receiving cortisol showed a significantly greater reduction in acute anxiety during virtual exposure to a phobic situation at posttreatment and a significantly smaller exposure-induced increase in skin conductance level at follow-up. The present findings indicate that the administration of cortisol can enhance extinction-based psychotherapy.

  15. Structuring Training Goals for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, David A.

    1998-01-01

    A multiaxial model that structures educational goals for psychodynamic psychotherapy has been developed. It specifies core aspects of psychodynamic psychotherapy, clusters them in categories that further define and link related areas, and presents a sequence that enables educators and students to focus on training goals in a consistent progression. This model has been used by the Director of Education as a basis for developing the curriculum, by students as a way of focusing learning and givi...

  16. The significance of hermeneutics to child psychotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Mook, B

    1991-01-01

    Increasingly the philosophical discipline of hermeneutics is being applied to a systematic study of the human sciences. Yet a hermeneutic approach to psychotherapy has barely been considered. In this paper, the possible significance of a hermeneutic approach to the field of child psychotherapy is explored. Despite the fundamental differences between the two disciplines, both are faced with the task of understanding and interpreting the meaning of human expressions through words and images. Bo...

  17. Psychotherapy in the Internet age society

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Drath

    2015-01-01

    The article regards a number of challenges for psychotherapy, posed by the dynamic development of the Internet and changes in the functioning of individuals and societies this causes. The author analyses the social role of psychotherapy - its tasks, the needs it fulfils, and the expectations it tries to meet. Subsequently, he refers to cultural changes related to the communication revolution, and points at areas which will require special attention in the coming years, so that psychotherapist...

  18. NONVERBAL STORIES: THE BODY IN PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Erskine

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional experience is stored within the amygdala and the limbic system of the brain as affect, visceral, and physiological sensation without symbolization and language. These significant memories are expressed in affect and through our bodily movements and gestures. Such body memories are unconscious non-symbolized patterns of self-in-relationship. Several methods of a body centered psychotherapy are described and clinical case examples illustrate the use of expressive methods within a relational psychotherapy.

  19. Treatment failure in humanistic and experiential psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeanne C

    2011-11-01

    In this article, treatment failure in humanistic experiential psychotherapy is defined and explored. I outline several markers that indicate when treatment is not going well. Factors that contribute to failure include client factors, for example, emotional processing capacities, shame, and impoverished narratives, as well as therapist factors including lack of empathic attunement and inflexibility. Treatment failure is illuminated with a case example drawn from humanistic/experiential psychotherapy, and clinical strategies for dealing with failures are recommended.

  20. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy: toward an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, T B

    1982-09-01

    The author reviews historical trends, hypotheses, and problems in the application of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy and uses research findings to develop an integrative model. He portrays a chronology of models over three decades; an "additive" relationship represents the decade of 1970 to 1980. He presents factors that must be considered in determining the effects of pharmacotherapy plus psychotherapy and recommends refinement of these variables in future research.

  1. Psychotherapy - insights from bhagavad gita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M S

    2012-01-01

    Spoken and written commentary on Bhagavad Gita, the distilled spiritual essence of Vedas and Upanishads, is aplenty. Mahatma Gandhi was quoted as saying that whenever he had a problem Bhagavad Gita offered an answer and the solution. For a student of psychology Bhagavad Gita offers a valuable case study for lessons in psychotherapy - resolution of conflict and successful resumption of action from a state of acute anxiety and guilt laden depression that precipitated inaction. This presentation makes a humble attempt to discuss the therapy process involved in Bhagavad Gita in which Lord Krishna helped the grief-stricken Arjuna through dialogue and discussion. The focus would be on the conflict and diagnosis of patient, the background setting of the situation, personality of patient, technique of therapy, underlying psychological concepts/ principles/theories, the Guru - Sishya concept, etc.

  2. Psychotherapies: An Integration of Eastern Cultural Thoughts and Western Therapeutic Skills in the Chinese Practice%心理治疗在中国:西方治疗技术与东方文化思想的结合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季建林

    2001-01-01

    Psychotherapies were introduced into China and developed quite well in the past two decades.The author suggests that the development of psychotherapies for the Chinese should be integrated the traditional cultural issues with the different schools of Western psychotherapies. This article reviews the traditional cultures,which deeply influenced the people's mind and behavioral patterns; and the common kinds of modern psychotherapies practiced in China now.Particularly, the author suggests that the therapeutic skills to learn and experiments to collect, as well as cultural issues to concern will be focused on more by the Chinese therapists.

  3. Psychotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology . 2008 Jan; 37(1): 105-130. 16 Mufson ... for child and adolescent depression. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology . 2008 Jan; 37(1):62-104. 18 Eyberg ...

  4. Does Psychotherapy Help Some Students? An Overview of Psychotherapy Outcome Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Kelly C.; Whiston, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the outcome research on psychotherapy with children and adolescents. Outcome research indicates that psychotherapy can be effective with both children and adolescents, with meta-analyses indicating that youth who participated in this type of intervention tended to score on the outcome measures half of a…

  5. First Steps in FAP: Experiences of Beginning Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Therapist with an Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduchi, Katia; Schoendorff, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Practicing Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) for the first time can seem daunting to therapists. Establishing a deep and intense therapeutic relationship, identifying FAP's therapeutic targets of clinically relevant behaviors, and using contingent reinforcement to help clients emit more functional behavior in the therapeutic relationship all…

  6. PERSONALITY THEORY IN INTEGRATIVE PERSONALITY-ORIENTED RECONSTRUCTIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Kurpatov

    2010-01-01

    approaches. V.N. Myasishchev's theory of personality relations in association with its universality, as well as pathogenetic psychotherapy may be the basis for the integration of other methods of psychotherapy

  7. A Cognitive-Developmental Model of Emotional Awareness and Its Application to the Practice of Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatwal, Jasleen; Lane, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to be aware of one's own emotional states has been a time-honored ingredient of successful psychodynamic psychotherapy. With the rise of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), however, the utility of experiencing and reflecting upon emotional experience has become less certain, and a quantifiable measure of emotional awareness for clinicians has not been previously available. Several recent advances cast the role of emotional awareness in psychotherapy in a different light: (1) a new theory of change in psychotherapy has been formulated that highlights emotional experience as an important ingredient of change in a variety of modalities; (2) new evidence shows that individual differences in the capacity for emotional awareness predict successful psychotherapeutic outcome in the treatment of panic disorder both by manualized psychodynamic psychotherapy and CBT; and (3) a new online version of the electronic Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (eLEAS) has been created that can be used with individual patients as a guide to psychotherapy treatment. Here we review evidence of a reliable and valid measure of emotional awareness that has been used in both normative and clinical contexts. The psychotherapeutic treatment of three patients is described to illustrate the clinical manifestations of the different levels of emotional awareness and the ways the eLEAS can be useful in the clinical context, including (1) assessment of the patient's current level of emotional functioning and his or her potential for higher levels of functioning, (2) the targeting of interventions to facilitate functioning at the next level, and (3) a possible marker of treatment progress. These observations suggest that the eLEAS has the potential to be a clinically useful tool that may assist clinicians in guiding psychotherapy treatment. PMID:27200467

  8. Change mechanisms of schema-centered group psychotherapy with personality disorder patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Tschacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study addressed the temporal properties of personality disorders and their treatment by schema-centered group psychotherapy. It investigated the change mechanisms of psychotherapy using a novel method by which psychotherapy can be modeled explicitly in the temporal domain. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: 69 patients were assigned to a specific schema-centered behavioral group psychotherapy, 26 to social skills training as a control condition. The largest diagnostic subgroups were narcissistic and borderline personality disorder. Both treatments offered 30 group sessions of 100 min duration each, at a frequency of two sessions per week. Therapy process was described by components resulting from principal component analysis of patients' session-reports that were obtained after each session. These patient-assessed components were Clarification, Bond, Rejection, and Emotional Activation. The statistical approach focused on time-lagged associations of components using time-series panel analysis. This method provided a detailed quantitative representation of therapy process. It was found that Clarification played a core role in schema-centered psychotherapy, reducing rejection and regulating the emotion of patients. This was also a change mechanism linked to therapy outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The introduced process-oriented methodology allowed to highlight the mechanisms by which psychotherapeutic treatment became effective. Additionally, process models depicted the actual patterns that differentiated specific diagnostic subgroups. Time-series analysis explores Granger causality, a non-experimental approximation of causality based on temporal sequences. This methodology, resting upon naturalistic data, can explicate mechanisms of action in psychotherapy research and illustrate the temporal patterns underlying personality disorders.

  9. Analyses of therapist variables in a series of psychotherapy sessions with two child clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, B

    1982-01-01

    Studied the process of child psychotherapy by means of an analyses of therapist verbal behaviors. Audio-video recordings were made of nine intermittent psychotherapy sessions with 2 child clients, aged 8 and 12. A randomized mastertape of 4-minute segments was rated for empathic understanding and respect by means of the Carkhuff scales. Transcripts were categorized by means of the Hill Counselor Verbal Response Category System, and a preliminary set of 12 grammatical variables. Transcripts were minutized, and all the therapist variables were intercorrelated and factor-analyzed. According to the research expectations, high levels of interrater reliabilities for the Carkhuff scales and relatively high agreement levels for Hill's system were found. Analyses of the therapist variables demonstrated the nature of the therapeutic interventions as well as the pattern of change across successive psychotherapy sessions. The overall verbal response behavior of each therapist was summarized best through the factor analyses. Communalities and individual differences between the therapists were discussed. Future directions for the study of therapist variables in child psychotherapy process research were indicated.

  10. Vanderbilt Psychotherapy Process Scale: A Replication with Adult Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windholz, Michael J.; Silberschatz, George

    1988-01-01

    Replicated two earlier studies undertaken by the Vanderbilt Psychotherapy Research Group to investigate relation between process and outcome of brief psychotherapy. Rated audiotaped segments of 38 brief psychodynamic psychotherapies with adult outpatients. Found significant correlations between therapist ratings of outcome and two process…

  11. Effects of Psychotherapy Training and Intervention Use on Session Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, James F.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Wasserman, Rachel H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was an investigation of the relationships among therapist training variables, psychotherapy process, and session outcome in a psychotherapy training clinic. The aims were to assess the relationship between "training as usual" and intervention use in individual psychotherapy, to investigate the relationship between therapist…

  12. Psychotherapy for subclinical depression: meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Pim; Koole, Sander L.; van Dijke, Annemiek; Roca, Miquel; Li, Juan; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is controversy about whether psychotherapies are effective in the treatment of subclinical depression, defined by clinically relevant depressive symptoms in the absence of a major depressive disorder. Aims To examine whether psychotherapies are effective in reducing depressive symptoms, reduce the risk of developing major depressive disorder and have comparable effects to psychological treatment of major depression. Method We conducted a meta-analysis of 18 studies comparing a psychological treatment of subclinical depression with a control group. Results The target groups, therapies and characteristics of the included studies differed considerably from each other, and the quality of many studies was not optimal. Psychotherapies did have a small to moderate effect on depressive symptoms against care as usual at the post-test assessment (g = 0.35, 95% CI 0.23-0.47; NNT = 5, 95% CI 4-8) and significantly reduced the incidence of major depressive episodes at 6 months (RR = 0.61) and possibly at 12 months (RR = 0.74). The effects were significantly smaller than those of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder and could be accounted for by non-specific effects of treatment. Conclusions Psychotherapy may be effective in the treatment of subclinical depression and reduce the incidence of major depression, but more high-quality research is needed. PMID:25274315

  13. Obstacles to early career psychiatrists practicing psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A; Plakun, Eric M; Lazar, Susan G; Mellman, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Though psychiatric residents are expected to be competent psychotherapists on graduation, further growth in skill and versatility requires continued experience in their ongoing career. Maturity as a psychotherapist is essential because a psychiatrist is the only mental health provider who, as a physician, can assume full responsibility for biopsychosocial patient care and roles as supervisor, consultant, and team leader. Graduating residents face an environment in which surveys show a steady and alarming decline in practice of psychotherapy by psychiatrists, along with a decline in job satisfaction. High educational debts, practice structures, intrusive management, and reimbursement policies that devalue psychotherapy discourage early career psychiatrists from a practice style that enables providing it. For the early-career psychiatrist there is thus the serious risk of being unable to develop a critical mass of experience or a secure identity as a psychiatric psychotherapist. Implementation of parity laws and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect the situation in unpredictable ways that call for vigilance and active response. Additional service and administrative demands may result from the ACA, creating ethical dilemmas about meeting urgent patient needs versus biopsychosocial standards of care. The authors recommend 1) vigorous advocacy for better payment levels for psychotherapy and freedom from disruptive management; 2) aggressive action against violations of the parity act, 3) active preparation of psychiatric residents for dealing with career choices and the environment for providing psychotherapy in their practice, and 4) post-graduate training in psychotherapy through supervision/consultation, continuing education courses, computer instruction, and distance learning. PMID:25211434

  14. The ABCDE-Model of counseling and psychotherapy: An integrative approach developed from clinical practice at a counseling service for students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutsoukou-Argyrak Asimina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive model of integrative psychotherapy that has been derived from clinical practice at the Counseling Service for Students of the University of Heidelberg is outlined. The ABCDE-model of integrative psychotherapy is based on established therapeutic methods and is composed of the dimensions of Alliance, Behavior, Cognitions, Dynamics and Existentials. Based on the therapeutic alliance and the general principles of understanding and communication, it comprises cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and existential elements and employs hermeneutics as a meta-theoretical framework. The evaluation of integrative counseling according to the ABCDE-model in a naturalistic single-group pre-post design demonstrated a clinically significant improvement within a rather short number of sessions. Therefore, the integrative model of psychotherapy is an important contribution to evidence-based practice. Moreover, models of training in psychotherapy and counseling for the better education of future therapists can be developed on the basis of the ABCDE-model.

  15. WELLFOCUS PPT: Modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Simon; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline that has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying well-being rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g., strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savoring) are not emphasized in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The goal in modifying PPT is to develop a new clinical approach to helping people experiencing psychosis. An evidence-based theoretical framework was therefore used to modify 14-session standard PPT into a manualized intervention, called WELLFOCUS PPT, which aims to improve well-being for people with psychosis. Informed by a systematic review and qualitative research, modification was undertaken in 4 stages: qualitative study, expert consultation, manualization, and stake-holder review. The resulting WELLFOCUS PPT is a theory-based 11-session manualized group therapy. PMID:25961372

  16. THE FEMINIST APPROACH TO PSYCHOTHERAPY INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Božac Deležan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of Integrative Psychotherapy is to establish full inner and external contact (Moursund & Erskine, 2004. The most important goal in feminist therapy is the transformation of an individual as well as the transformation of the society as a whole (Herlihy & Corey, 2004. In my work I attempt to integrate both: to help the client establish inner and external contact, but also help him/her to become aware and recognize inner messages connected with his/her gender and replace them with constructive beliefs of his/her own, as well as for him/her to learn, regardless of his/her gender, to trust his/her intuition and experience. In this article I present my approach to integration in psychotherapy and the way I use feminist principles in Integrative Psychotherapy.

  17. Using Animal-assisted Therapy to Enrich Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Jeanne Louise; Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of many psychological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). AAT can be used as an adjunct to other forms of psychotherapy. With AAT, the animal becomes a part of the treatment plan. Outcomes for clients that are associated with the use of AAT include (1) increased sense of comfort and safety, (2) increased motivation, (3) enhanced self-esteem, (4) increased prosocial behaviors, and (5) decreased behavioral problems. AAT provides a bridge for the therapist to develop a therapeutic relationship with a client, and the animal can provide supportive reassurance for the therapist. The amount of data that supports the benefits of AAT for the treatment of those with mental illnesses is growing, but evidence-based research that supports its use is lacking. Further research is needed. PMID:27541053

  18. Psychotherapy Techniques for Patients Diagnosed with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotterman, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes how standard psychotherapy techniques need to be modified to suit the specialized needs of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Patients with psychosis often have lost their ability to use words to describe their inner states. As a result, traditional forms of psychotherapy which depend so crucially on the use of language are compromised. The goal of treatment at the start is to help the patient recover his ability to use language to describe his inner life. Eventually, this enables the patient to make use of more traditional forms of psychodynamic treatment. PMID:27052606

  19. [The development of evidence-based psychotherapy for use in alcoholism. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeber, S; Mann, K

    2006-05-01

    Past decades have seen enormous advances in the development and validation of evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy for alcoholism. While psychoanalytic and early behavioral techniques were the original basis of psychotherapy in this field, evidence-based approaches are now built up on the principles of motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavior therapy. Different techniques have been developed to modify preceding and persisting conditions favoring problem behavior, e.g., training in coping/social skills and the community reinforcement approach. According to the results of the project MATCH, one of the largest treatment trials, "cognitive-behavioral intervention" combines motivational enhancement therapy, the 12-step approach, and cognitive-behavior therapy, with the aim of providing new and even more efficacious psychotherapy for alcohol dependent patients. These very promising developments are beset with huge problems, however, insofar as few of the new evidence-based treatment approaches are accepted as standard treatment in Germany, in addition to which only a fraction of all alcohol-dependent persons in the country find their way into the care system, for various reasons. Early diagnosis and facilitation of access to the various treatment options available could be a future task for general practitioners and also for company / industrial medical schemes. PMID:16374642

  20. Alliance: A common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang eTschacher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorially different approaches, the experiential (first-person perspective and the behavioral (third-person perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, structural approach. Dynamical systems theory and synergetics on the one hand and enactivist theory on the other together can provide this structural approach, which contributes in specific ways to a clarification of the alliance factor. Systems theory offers concepts and tools for the modeling of the individual self and, building on this, of alliance processes. In the enactive perspective, the self is conceived as a socially enacted autonomous system that strives to maintain identity by observing a two-fold goal: to exist as an individual self in its own right (distinction while also being open to others (participation. Using this conceptualization, we formalized the therapeutic alliance as a phase space whose potential minima (attractors can be shifted by the therapist to approximate therapy goals. This mathematical formalization is derived from probability theory and synergetics. Our conclusions say that structural theory provides powerful tools for the modeling of how therapeutic change is staged by the formation, utilization, and dissolution of the therapeutic alliance. In addition, we point out novel testable hypotheses and future applications.

  1. Psychotherapy in Australia: clinical psychology and its approach to depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, David J; Littlefield, Lyn; Dooley, Roger; O'Donovan, Analise

    2007-08-01

    In Australia, clinical psychology training is dominated by cognitive and behavioral treatments (CBTs), although there is exposure to other theoretical orientations. Since 2001, over 20% of general medical practitioners (GPs) have received training in CBT, and psychiatry training increasingly incorporates CBT elements. Psychotherapy by medical practitioners is financially supported by universal health care funding with supplementation by patients and their private health insurance. Federally funded health benefits for up to 12 psychology consultations per year are provided on referral from GPs and psychiatrists, and initial takeup has been very strong. Mrs. A would be a typical patient for such a referral. However, she would not fulfill criteria for priority access from state-funded mental health services. Mrs. A would probably consult a GP and receive antidepressants, although she may also access a range of other community support programs. Access to and acceptance of psychotherapy would be greater in urban areas, and if she were of Anglo-Saxon and non-indigenous origin.

  2. The Mathematics of Psychotherapy: A Nonlinear Model of Change Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiepek, Gunter; Aas, Benjamin; Viol, Kathrin

    2016-07-01

    Psychotherapy is a dynamic process produced by a complex system of interacting variables. Even though there are qualitative models of such systems the link between structure and function, between network and network dynamics is still missing. The aim of this study is to realize these links. The proposed model is composed of five state variables (P: problem severity, S: success and therapeutic progress, M: motivation to change, E: emotions, I: insight and new perspectives) interconnected by 16 functions. The shape of each function is modified by four parameters (a: capability to form a trustful working alliance, c: mentalization and emotion regulation, r: behavioral resources and skills, m: self-efficacy and reward expectation). Psychologically, the parameters play the role of competencies or traits, which translate into the concept of control parameters in synergetics. The qualitative model was transferred into five coupled, deterministic, nonlinear difference equations generating the dynamics of each variable as a function of other variables. The mathematical model is able to reproduce important features of psychotherapy processes. Examples of parameter-dependent bifurcation diagrams are given. Beyond the illustrated similarities between simulated and empirical dynamics, the model has to be further developed, systematically tested by simulated experiments, and compared to empirical data.

  3. The Mathematics of Psychotherapy: A Nonlinear Model of Change Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiepek, Gunter; Aas, Benjamin; Viol, Kathrin

    2016-07-01

    Psychotherapy is a dynamic process produced by a complex system of interacting variables. Even though there are qualitative models of such systems the link between structure and function, between network and network dynamics is still missing. The aim of this study is to realize these links. The proposed model is composed of five state variables (P: problem severity, S: success and therapeutic progress, M: motivation to change, E: emotions, I: insight and new perspectives) interconnected by 16 functions. The shape of each function is modified by four parameters (a: capability to form a trustful working alliance, c: mentalization and emotion regulation, r: behavioral resources and skills, m: self-efficacy and reward expectation). Psychologically, the parameters play the role of competencies or traits, which translate into the concept of control parameters in synergetics. The qualitative model was transferred into five coupled, deterministic, nonlinear difference equations generating the dynamics of each variable as a function of other variables. The mathematical model is able to reproduce important features of psychotherapy processes. Examples of parameter-dependent bifurcation diagrams are given. Beyond the illustrated similarities between simulated and empirical dynamics, the model has to be further developed, systematically tested by simulated experiments, and compared to empirical data. PMID:27262423

  4. Psychotherapy and medication management strategies for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDougle CJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Kelda H Walsh, Christopher J McDougleDepartment of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a chronic anxiety disorder. While medication and psychotherapy advances have been very helpful to patients, many patients do not respond adequately to initial trials of serotonergic medication or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT and require multiple treatment trials or combination therapies. Comorbidity may also influence treatment response. The role of streptococcal infections in pediatric OCD has become an area of intense scrutiny and controversy. In this article, current treatment methods for OCD will be reviewed, with special attention to strategies for treating OCD in children and in patients with comorbid tic disorders. Alternative psychotherapy strategies for patients who are highly anxious about starting CBT, such as cognitive therapy or augmentation with D-cycloserine, will be reviewed. Newer issues regarding use of antibiotics, neuroleptics, and glutamate modulators in OCD treatment will also be explored.Keywords: OCD, exposure/response prevention therapy, PANDAS, tic disorder

  5. Meaning-Centered Psychotherapy: A Form of Psychotherapy for Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Emily A.; Irwin, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed “meaning-centered psychotherapy.” In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas. PMID:25182513

  6. [SOPHO-NET - a research network on psychotherapy for social phobia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Salzer, Simone; Beutel, Manfred E; von Consbruch, Katrin; Herpertz, Stephan; Hiller, Wolfgang; Hoyer, Jürgen; Hüsing, Johannes; Irle, Eva; Joraschky, Peter; Konnopka, Alexander; König, Hans-Helmut; de Liz, Therese; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Ruhleder, Mirjana; Schauenburg, Henning; Stangier, Ulrich; Strauss, Bernhard; Subic-Wrana, Claudia; Vormfelde, Stefan V; Weniger, Godehard; Willutzki, Ulrike; Wiltink, Jörg; Leibing, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network (SOPHO-NET). SOPHO-NET is among the five research networks on psychotherapy funded by "Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung". The research program encompasses a coordinated group of studies of social phobia. In the central project (Study A), a multi-center randomized controlled trial, refined models of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and manualized short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) are compared in the treatment of social phobia. A sample of n=512 outpatients will be randomized to either CBT, STPP or wait list. For quality assurance and treatment integrity, a specific project has been established (Project Q). Study A is complemented by four interrelated projects focusing on attachment style (Study B1), cost-effectiveness (Study B2), polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter gene (Study C1) and on structural and functional deviations of hippocampus and amygdala (Study C2). Thus, the SOPHO-NET program allows for a highly interdisciplinary research of psychotherapy in social phobia.

  7. Changing views of emotion regulation and neurobiological models of the mechanism of action of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Irene; Sambin, Marco; Beschoner, Petra; Viviani, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Influential neurobiological models of the mechanism of action of psychotherapy attribute its success to increases of activity in prefrontal areas and decreases in limbic areas, interpreted as the successful and adaptive recruitment of controlled processes to achieve emotion regulation. In this article, we review the behavioral and neuroscientific evidence in support of this model and its applicability to explain the mechanism of action of psychotherapy. Neuroimaging studies of explicit emotion regulation, evidence on the neurobiological substrates of implicit emotion regulation, and meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of the effect of psychotherapy consistently suggest that areas implicated in coding semantic representations play an important role in emotion regulation not covered by existing models based on controlled processes. We discuss the findings that implicate these same areas in supporting working memory, in encoding preferences and the prospective outcome of actions taken in rewarding or aversive contingencies, and show how these functions may be integrated into process models of emotion regulation that depend on elaborate semantic representations for their effectiveness. These alternative models also appear to be more consistent with internal accounts in the psychotherapeutic literature of how psychotherapy works. PMID:27351671

  8. A dynamic systems approach to psychotherapy: A meta-theoretical framework for explaining psychotherapy change processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelo, Omar Carlo Gioacchino; Salvatore, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Notwithstanding the many methodological advances made in the field of psychotherapy research, at present a metatheoretical, school-independent framework to explain psychotherapy change processes taking into account their dynamic and complex nature is still lacking. Over the last years, several authors have suggested that a dynamic systems (DS) approach might provide such a framework. In the present paper, we review the main characteristics of a DS approach to psychotherapy. After an overview of the general principles of the DS approach, we describe the extent to which psychotherapy can be considered as a self-organizing open complex system, whose developmental change processes are described in terms of a dialectic dynamics between stability and change over time. Empirical evidence in support of this conceptualization is provided and discussed. Finally, we propose a research design strategy for the empirical investigation of psychotherapy from a DS approach, together with a research case example. We conclude that a DS approach may provide a metatheoretical, school-independent framework allowing us to constructively rethink and enhance the way we conceptualize and empirically investigate psychotherapy. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27177027

  9. A dynamic systems approach to psychotherapy: A meta-theoretical framework for explaining psychotherapy change processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelo, Omar Carlo Gioacchino; Salvatore, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Notwithstanding the many methodological advances made in the field of psychotherapy research, at present a metatheoretical, school-independent framework to explain psychotherapy change processes taking into account their dynamic and complex nature is still lacking. Over the last years, several authors have suggested that a dynamic systems (DS) approach might provide such a framework. In the present paper, we review the main characteristics of a DS approach to psychotherapy. After an overview of the general principles of the DS approach, we describe the extent to which psychotherapy can be considered as a self-organizing open complex system, whose developmental change processes are described in terms of a dialectic dynamics between stability and change over time. Empirical evidence in support of this conceptualization is provided and discussed. Finally, we propose a research design strategy for the empirical investigation of psychotherapy from a DS approach, together with a research case example. We conclude that a DS approach may provide a metatheoretical, school-independent framework allowing us to constructively rethink and enhance the way we conceptualize and empirically investigate psychotherapy. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. A Delay Discounting Model of Psychotherapy Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Joshua K.; Callahan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Delay discounting (DD) procedures are emerging as an important new method for psychotherapy researchers. In this paper a framework for conceptualizing existing, seemingly discrepant, research findings on termination is introduced and new directions for research are described. To illustrate the value of a DD framework, the common psychotherapy…

  11. Play and the Art of Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Journal of Play, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Terry Marks-Tarlow is a clinical and consulting psychologist and psychotherapist and a member of the teaching faculty at the Reiss Davis Child Study Center in Los Angeles. She is the author of "Awakening Clinical Intuition: An Experiential Workbook for Psychotherapists"; "Psyche's Veil: Psychotherapy, Fractals, and…

  12. Toward a Neurobiology of Child Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jerald

    2009-01-01

    Brain imaging studies have demonstrated that psychotherapy alters brain structure and function. Learning and memory, both implicit and explicit, play central roles in this process through the creation of new genetic material that leads to increased synaptic efficiency through the creation of new neuronal connections. Although there is substantial…

  13. Multicultural Approaches in Psychotherapy: A Rejoinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Leach, Mark M.; Wampold, Bruce; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors address several issues raised by R. L. Worthington and F. R. Dillon (2011) and C. R. Ridley and M. Shaw-Ridley (2011) regarding (a) the measurement of multicultural competencies (MCCs), (b) sampling considerations in multicultural research, and (c) the conceptual frame of multicultural psychotherapy research. The…

  14. Therapist Spiritual and Religious Values in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Donald W.

    1994-01-01

    Examines nature of therapist spiritual and religious values and impact of these values on psychotherapy practice. Suggests that integration of therapist spiritual and religious values with therapist epistemic values to accommodate spiritual and religious needs of both client and counselor should be goal of effective treatment. Includes 28…

  15. Group Counseling and Psychotherapy with Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Beryce W.; Felsenfeld, Naomi

    Intended as an aid in conceptualizing group programs for adolescents and as a basic text on group methods, the book examines the goals and processes of socialization and rehabilitation. Areas treated include the group as an agent of change, the adolescent and his culture, general considerations in group counseling and group psychotherapy, process…

  16. Group Psychotherapy For Men Who Are Homosexual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Lee

    1974-01-01

    Homosexual or bisexual men, dissatisfied with, or indirectly because of, their sexual orientation, were treated in a psychotherapy group led by a male-female cotherapy team. Of the 66 patients in this series, almost half made heterosexuality an explicit treatment goal. Of these, 85 percent experienced at least partial heterosexual shifts. (Author)

  17. The Use of Photography in Family Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entin, Alan D.

    Photographs and family albums are helpful in marriage and family psychotherapy to aid in the understanding of family processes, relationship patterns, goals, expectations, values, traditions, and ideals. Based on the assumption that a photograph is a form of communication, photography can be used to: (1) examine typical family picture-taking…

  18. Counseling and Psychotherapy: A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Leo

    Counseling and psychotherapy are not the same, but rather represent two modalities with different theoretical premises which use different techniques and pursue different goals. Counseling always focuses on a specific subject and the interaction between the counselor and the client is generally goal-directed. The counselor focuses on the acute…

  19. Reflections on Psychotherapy and Aerobic Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Wade

    This document provides a series of reflections by a practicing psychologist on the uses of aerobic workouts in psychotherapy. Two case histories are cited to illustrate the contention that the mode of exercise, rather than simply its presence or absence, is the significant indicator of a patient's emotional well-being or psychopathology. The first…

  20. Existential psychotherapy of students as learning strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dræby, Anders

    According to parts of the existential psychology and psychotherapy the individual's exploration and compliance of his or her life project is central to the experience of living a meaningful life. In many ways, becoming a fully adult individual is about identifying and taking responsibility for th...

  1. Psychotherapy: The Listening Voice. Rogers and Erickson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leva, Richard A.

    The views of Carl Rogers and Milton H. Erickson are combined in this book on psychotherapy. The first section focuses on belief systems, views of man, new views of the unconscious, and a philosophy for change. Erickson and his relationship to myth, the nature of man and the goal of counseling, trance, and a radical view of the unconscious are…

  2. Interventions and Strategies in Counseling and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard E., Ed.; Carlson, Jon, Ed.

    This book acknowledges the contributions of Alfred Adler and illustrates the many ways in which Adlerian ideas underpin and influence contemporary therapeutic approaches. It brings together today's leading thinkers to address the practice of counseling and psychotherapy from a social-cognitive perspective. Contributors apply the basic ideas of…

  3. Attrition in Psychotherapy: A Survival Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseborough, David John; McLeod, Jeffrey T.; Wright, Florence I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Attrition is a common problem in psychotherapy and can be defined as clients ending treatment before achieving an optimal response. Method: This longitudinal, archival study utilized data for 3,728 clients, using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2. A Cox regression proportional hazards (hazard ratios) model was used in order to better…

  4. Innovative uses of psychodynamic group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, B J

    1994-01-01

    Psychodynamic group psychotherapy is gaining renewed attention as an effective form of treatment, due in part to increasing economic constraints that make other forms of treatment less accessible. The author highlights some innovative applications of both extended and time-limited groups. She also describes specific issues that can be addressed effectively in homogeneous time-limited group therapy.

  5. Supervision of Psychotherapy: Models, Issues, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westefeld, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Current models and issues related to psychotherapy supervision are examined. These include ethical and legal issues, problems of interpersonal competence, and multicultural issues. As a part of this analysis, interviews about supervision with five prominent counseling psychologists are included to provide their perspectives. Implications for the…

  6. More than Medication—Achieving Goals through Psychotherapy in Patients with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J. Scott; Roman, Brenda JB

    2007-01-01

    There are numerous variables to consider when planning treatment for a psychiatric disorder as complex as obsessive compulive disorder (OCD). Beyond the efficacy of the medications, one must take into account patient preferences and beliefs, as well as the impact of the disease and treatment on social and occupational functioning. Psychotherapy, specifically cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), can serve as an addition to pharmacotherapy or as an alternative treatment, if necessary, for OCD. H...

  7. Telephone-administered psychotherapy for depression in MS patients: moderating role of social support

    OpenAIRE

    Beckner, Victoria; Howard, Isa; Vella, Lea; Mohr, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Depression is common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). While psychotherapy is an effective treatment for depression, not all individuals benefit. We examined whether baseline social support might differentially affect treatment outcome in 127 participants with MS and depression randomized to either Telephone-administered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (T-CBT) or Telephone-administered Emotion-Focused Therapy (T-EFT). We predicted that those with low social support would improve more ...

  8. How treatment affects the brain: meta-analysis evidence of neural substrates underpinning drug therapy and psychotherapy in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The idea that modifications of affect, behavior and cognition produced by psychotherapy are mediated by biological underpinnings predates the advent of the modern neurosciences. Recently, several studies demonstrated that psychotherapy outcomes are linked to modifications in specific brain regions. This opened the debate over the similarities and dissimilarities between psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis to investigate the effects of psychotherapy (PsyTh) and pharmacotherapy (DrugTh) on brain functioning in Major Depression (MD). Our results demonstrate that the two therapies modify different neural circuits. Specifically, PsyTh induces selective modifications in the left inferior and superior frontal gyri, middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus and middle cingulate cortex, as well as in the right middle frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus. Otherwise, DrugTh selectively affected brain activation in the right insula in MD patients. These results are in line with previous evidence of the synergy between psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy but they also demonstrate that the two therapies have different neural underpinnings. PMID:26164169

  9. Aaron Temkin BECK: After Cricitical Thinking to A Creative Psychotherapy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet DİNÇ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the cognitive psychotherapy all around the world including Turkey. According to American Institute of Cognitive Therapy; cognitive psychotherapy is the fastest growing and most rigorously studied kind of talk therapy and it is practiced around the world, taking hold in places from the Middle East to Japan. Cognitive psychotherapy was designed first by Aaron Temkin Beck in 1950’s. He has published over 450 articles and authored or co-authored seventeen books and he has been listed as one of the “10 individuals who shaped the face of American Psychiatry” and one of the 5 most influential psychotherapists of all time since then. Beck’s groundbreaking systematic research established for the first time the efficacy of any psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Moreover he not only developed and tested an effective short-term treatment (cognitive therapy for depression, but he and his former students have successfully adapted cognitive therapy to a wide range of other psychiatric disorders as well. Numerous controlled clinical trials have now demonstrated that cognitive therapy is effective in a variety of psychiatric conditions including depression, bulimia nervosa, hypochondriasis, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, substance abuse, body dysmorphic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore knowing the father of cognitive therapy and his journey from 1950’s to 2010’s will help to understand cognitive therapy and its development during these years. This article aims to give an overview of the historical background to contemporary cognitive and cognitive-behavioral approaches to psychotherapy by focusing on Beck’s life, characteristics and works.

  10. The mind-body relationship in psychotherapy: Grounded cognition as an explanatory framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuwan Dominic Leitan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a discipline, psychology is defined by its location in the ambiguous space between mind and body, but theories underpinning the application of psychology in psychotherapy are largely silent on this fundamental metaphysical issue. This is a remarkable state of affairs, given that psychotherapy is typically a real-time meeting between two embodied agents, with the goal of facilitating behavior change in one party. The overarching aim of this paper is to problematize the mind-body relationship in psychotherapy in the service of encouraging advances in theory and practice. The paper briefly explores various psychotherapeutic approaches to help explicate relationships between mind and body from these perspectives. Themes arising from this analysis include a tendency toward dualism (separation of mind and body from the conceptualization of human functioning, exclusivism (elimination of either mind or body from the conceptualization of human functioning, or mind-body monism (conceptualization of mind and body as a single, holistic system. We conclude that the literature, as a whole, does not demonstrate consensus, regarding the relationship between mind and body in psychotherapy. We then introduce a contemporary, holistic, psychological conceptualization of the relationship between mind and body, and argue for its potential utility as an organizing framework for psychotherapeutic theory and practice. The holistic approach we explore, grounded cognition, arises from a long philosophical tradition, is influential in current cognitive science, and presents a coherent empirically testable framework integrating subjective and objective perspectives. Finally, we demonstrate how this grounded cognition perspective might lead to advances in the theory and practice of psychotherapy.

  11. Groups as a part of integrated treatment plans : Inpatient psychotherapy for outpatients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, H

    2005-01-01

    Group psychotherapy in Germany is well established as part of an integrative treatment plan in inpatient treatment. Outpatient group psychotherapy, however, is conceptualized as a separate treatment option in competition with individual therapy. German guidelines for outpatient psychotherapy exclude

  12. INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY AND MINDFULNESS: THE CASE OF SARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Černetič

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the relationship between Integrative Psychotherapy and mindfulness on a theoretical as well as practical level. Although mindfulness is not an explicit constituent of Integrative Psychotherapy, the two are arguably a natural fit. Mindfulness has the potential to enhance internal and external contact, a central concept in Integrative Psychotherapy, as well as strengthen a client’s Adult ego state. This article presents a case study whereby Integrative Psychotherapy is analysed from the perspective of mindfulness. Within the course of therapy, parallels were observed between the client's increased mindfulness, improved internal and external contact, strengthened Adult ego state, mastery of introjections, as well as diminished feelings of guilt, improved mood, self care and ability to engage in appropriate separation and individuation. These gains support the conclusion that Integrative Psychotherapy and mindfulness are inherently related and that explicit incorporation of mindfulness may enhance the therapeutic process of Integrative Psychotherapy.

  13. RELATIONAL GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY: THE HEALING OF STRESS, NEGLECT AND TRAUMA

    OpenAIRE

    Richard G. Erskine

    2010-01-01

    This article is the Keynote Address given at the 4th International Integrative Psychotherapy Association Conference, April 17, 2009. In speaking to the conference theme of “Acute Trauma, Cumulative Neglect, and Chronic Stress” the article describes some of the principles of Relational Group Psychotherapy. The theory of methods is based on the concept that the healing of trauma, neglect and stress occurs through a contactful therapeutic relationship. Relational group psychotherapy draws from s...

  14. The care and feeding of a psychotherapy research team.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrer, A R; Gagnon, R.

    1991-01-01

    Although psychotherapy research teams have been in existence since the 1940s, one of the reasons they are not more popular is the absence of literature on how they operate. There is essentially no literature on the organization and administration of psychotherapy research teams, on the management of their everyday practical issues, decisions, and problems. In order to open the way for a dialogue on these matters, an inside view is provided of one relatively productive psychotherapy research t...

  15. Applied philosophy and psychotherapy: Heraclitus as case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Beukes

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates a recent attempt to apply philosophy within the discipline of psychotherapy and to investigate the somewhat undefined realm of philosophical counselling. After introducing the claims of this interdisciplinary exercise and after addressing the problems involved in crossing the boundaries between philosophy and psychotherapy, the article elaborates on  Alex Howard’s (2000 [Philosophy for counselling and psychotherapy: Pythagoras to post-modernism. London: Macmillan] attempt to make explicit use of philosophy in psychotherapy, using his interpretation and application of Heraclitus’ philosophy as case study.

  16. [Forensic psychotherapy research - status quo, scope, and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, T; Fontao, M I

    2006-05-01

    In the last two decades, forensic psychotherapy has become a specialised area of scholarship, predominantly in the UK and Germany. However, scientific research with respect to set goals, methods and the application of treatments has been heterogeneous and not very extensive. Focussing on offender treatment, the status quo of research schemes based on clinical experience is discussed, and a strategy is suggested as how to develop a research framework for forensic psychotherapy which makes use of the specific methods and treatment interventions applied in this field. It is concluded that forensic psychotherapy research will greatly benefit from the methodological framework of general psychotherapy research, especially when competing for scarce financial resources. PMID:16758539

  17. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy: a contemporary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Larry S; Busch, Fredric N

    2012-09-01

    A contemporary perspective on psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy views both treatments as somatic in nature. Abandoning Cartesian dualism frees the clinician to consider therapeutic options based on the best available evidence rather than falsely dichotomizing approaches as biological or psychological. Evidence-based medicine is a helpful though limited paradigm upon which to base treatment decisions. Instead, clinicians should strive for an evidence-informed approach that is patient centered. This approach is illustrated in relation to depressive illness where moderators of outcome are examined (illness severity, history of trauma, personality disorders, patient preference) that will influence clinical recommendations on combining treatment. Psychotherapy is increasingly proving to be a valuable therapeutic modality across the severity spectrum, a finding at odds with current treatment practices.

  18. DFP: Psychotherapie der Angststörungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doering S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Die Psychotherapie stellt eine wirksame Behandlung für alle Angststörungen dar. Die Kombination mit einer (antidepressiven Pharmakotherapie dürfte oft sinnvoll sein, ist jedoch nur bei der Panikstörung empirisch untermauert. Bei allen Angststörungen sind verhaltenstherapeutische Ansätze am besten in ihrer Wirksamkeit belegt. Inzwischen sind – außer für die spezifischen Phobien – auch psychodynamische Ansätze manualisiert und empirisch evaluiert. Entspannungsverfahren werden bei der sozialen Phobie und der Panikstörung empfohlen und sind oft Bestandteil umfassender Behandlungsprogramme. Komorbide Störungen – insbesondere Persönlichkeitsstörungen – verschlechtern den Outcome der Angstbehandlung. Für die Zukunft sind weitere Untersuchungen zur langfristigen Wirksamkeit der Psychotherapie sowie zur Behandlung von Angstpatienten mit komorbiden Störungen notwendig.

  19. Attachment theory: a biological basis for psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J

    1993-10-01

    John Bowlby bemoaned the separation between the biological and psychological approaches in psychiatry, and hoped that attachment theory, which brings together psychoanalysis and the science of ethology, would help bridge the rift between them. Recent findings in developmental psychology have delineated features of parent-infant interaction, especially responsiveness, attunement, and modulation of affect, which lead to either secure or insecure attachment. Similar principles can be applied to the relationship between psychotherapist and patient--the provision of a secure base, the emergence of a shared narrative ('autobiographical competence'), the processing of affect, coping with loss--these are common to most effective psychotherapies and provide the basis for a new interpersonal paradigm within psychotherapy. Attachment theory suggests they rest on a sound ethological and hence biological foundation.

  20. PSYCHOANALYSIS, PSYCHOTHERAPY AND SELF-HELP

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Franco de Carvalho; Laéria Fontenele

    2010-01-01

    Our main goal on this study was to reflect about the return of the suggestive practice nowadays - which have been already criticized by Freud as being inefficient and dangerous, and therefore, were abandoned even by him since the psychoanalysis foundation. In this sense, we are going to work with a comparative analysis on the speech present on the psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and Self-Help, taking into account its contents and effects

  1. Mathematical model of the dynamics of psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Larry S. Liebovitch; Peluso, Paul R.; Norman, Michael D.; Su, Jessica; Gottman, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The success of psychotherapy depends on the nature of the therapeutic relationship between a therapist and a client. We use dynamical systems theory to model the dynamics of the emotional interaction between a therapist and client. We determine how the therapeutic endpoint and the dynamics of getting there depend on the parameters of the model. Previously Gottman et al. used a very similar approach (physical-sciences paradigm) for modeling and making predictions about husband–wife relationshi...

  2. PSYCHOANALYSIS, PSYCHOTHERAPY AND SELF-HELP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Franco de Carvalho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Our main goal on this study was to reflect about the return of the suggestive practice nowadays - which have been already criticized by Freud as being inefficient and dangerous, and therefore, were abandoned even by him since the psychoanalysis foundation. In this sense, we are going to work with a comparative analysis on the speech present on the psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and Self-Help, taking into account its contents and effects

  3. Domestic violence. Risk factors, diagnostic & psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Degtyaryov A.V.

    2012-01-01

    In this article theme of domestic violence & sexual abuse against children is being considered from the cultural-historical, social-economic & psychological paradigms. Foreign authors approaches specialized on the work with children’s abuse & their practical results are presented herein. The risk factors of impact of cruel treatment & different forms of child’s mental development abuse are analyzed. The examples of prevention & psychotherapy work with the abused children are given. The articl...

  4. Psychotherapy in the Internet age society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Drath

    2015-06-01

    In the light of contemporary research, the Internet appears to be both a source of danger to mental health, but equally - a space for utilising new methods of help. Making use of these possibilities, as the author claims, goes far beyond remote psychotherapy. It requires something more from help providers: understanding and considering the new types of human relationships which develop in communication facilitated by new media.

  5. Psychotherapy for pregnant women with psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Müldner-Nieckowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a major life change for many women. The related biological changes, especially complications in its course and in the course of delivery, carry a risk of developing a variety of psychological problems and mental disorders. However, their treatment is challenging due to the teratogenic effects of most psychoactive drugs and specific requirements for entering different psychotherapeutic programs. Mental disorders during pregnancy are undoubtedly an important issue for both gynecology and psychiatry. There is still a discussion considering the question whether psychotherapy during pregnancy is safe, although no scientifically valid data contradicting the safety of psychotherapy during pregnancy has been published so far. Together with psychotherapy – as a treatment of choice – clinicians approve some other relatively safe treatment methods for psychiatric disorders in pregnant women. Light therapy, limited pharmacotherapy, ECT are included. The goal of this paper is to review current opinions of clinicians and researches concerning possibilities, indications and outcome of psychological treatments as a way to help pregnant women who suffer from different psychiatric conditions, and also because this subject is not yet present in Polish psychiatric journals.

  6. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients. PMID:22955493

  7. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients.

  8. Clients' and therapists' stories about psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Jonathan M

    2013-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the emerging field of research on clients' stories about their experiences in psychotherapy. The theory of narrative identity suggests that individuals construct stories about their lives in order to provide the self with a sense of purpose and unity. Psychotherapy stories serve both psychological functions. Focusing on the theme of agency as a vehicle for operationalizing purpose and coherence as a way of operationalizing unity, this article will describe the existing scholarship connecting psychotherapy stories to clients' psychological well-being. Results from cross-sectional qualitative and quantitative studies as well as longitudinal research indicate a connection between the stories clients tell about therapy and their psychological well-being, both over the course of treatment and after it is over. In addition, a preliminary analysis of therapists' stories about their clients' treatment is presented. These analyses reveal that the way therapists recount a particular client's therapy does not impact the relationships between clients' narratives and their improvement. The article concludes with a discussion of how this body of scholarship might be fruitfully applied in the realm of clinical practice. PMID:22812587

  9. Analyses of client variables in a series of psychotherapy sessions with two child clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, B

    1982-04-01

    Studied the process of child psychotherapy by means of analyses of client verbal behaviors. Audio-video recordings were made of nine intermittent psychotherapy sessions with 2 child clients, aged 8 and 12. A randomized mastertape of 4-minute segments was rated for self-exploration by means of the Carkhuff scale. Transcripts were categorized by means of an extended Snyder system and a preliminary set of grammatical variables. Transcripts then were minutized, and all client variables were intercorrelated and factor-analyzed. According to the research expectations, a high level of interrater reliability for the Carkhuff scale and high levels of interjudge agreement for the extended Snyder system were found. Analyses of the client variables demonstrated the nature of each client's verbal responding as well as their pattern of change across successive therapy sessions. The overall verbal response behavior of each client was summarized best through the factor analyses. Communalities and individual differences between the clients were discussed. Future directions for the study of client variables in child psychotherapy process research were suggested.

  10. Mechanism Underlying Rheological Psychotherapy%流变心理治疗发生机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林雅嫱; 李林森; 杨军

    2013-01-01

    流变心理治疗是以开放性和自适应性为背景的个性化的、自组织的行为.这一行为是通过激活机体组织自身的自律性运动来实现的.自律性运动是以实现传感通信、能量输配和结构调整,达到组织修复、疾病治疗等为目的的一种内源性的自组织运动.把运动感觉作为心理治疗的一个参量,应用于心理治疗,势必引发心理治疗观念的变革.%Rheological psychotherapy is a personalized and self-organizing behavior in the openness and self-adaptive context. This behavior is achieved by activating the body's automaticity movement. The automatici-ty movement is an endogenous self-organizing movement with the purpose of sensing communication, energy transmission and distribution, structural adjustment, tissue repair and disease treatment. Feeling as a factor in the introduction of psychotherapy, it may bring the concept of change in psychotherapy.

  11. [Psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder: critical factors and proposals of intervention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Silvio; Brunetti, Chiara; Bozzatello, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) represents a significant therapeutic challenge. Critical factors in psychotherapeutic treatment of patients with BPD are noticeable and strictly related to the psychopathological dimensions of this disorder: affective and relational instability, behavioral impulsivity and precarious definition of identity. These features are emphasized by therapeutic intervention and become evident during the course of the treatment. Psychotherapeutic setting induces BPD patient to actualize the dysfunctional relational patterns that have been acquired during childhood. Specific critical factors concern the characteristics of the patient (risk of suicide, aggressive behaviors, chronic course of the disorder, disorganized attachment style), of the therapist (therapeutic skills, training, countertransference, risk of burnout) and of the setting of psychotherapy (patients selection, therapeutic alliance, need to set limits, duration and end of therapy). In Otto Kernberg's and Marsha Linehan's models of psychotherapy specific for DBP the authors identify substantially overlapping objectives and modalities of intervention. In particular, therapists should take care of patient safety, maintain boundaries of therapeutic setting and promote the development of psychotherapeutic process. The aim of this article is to analyze the main critical factors affecting psychotherapeutic process in patients with BPD. Objectives and priorities that therapist should consider to address these issues will be discussed. We will also try to make clear why interpersonal psychotherapy adapted to DBP can represent one of the therapeutic models that may be useful to manage and resolve these difficulties. PMID:27030345

  12. Unwitting self-disclosures in psychodynamic psychotherapy: deciphering their meaning and accessing the pain within.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Jerome S

    2011-04-01

    Unwitting self-disclosures (USDs), unconscious yet observable parts of personality, are often behavioral relics of past suffering and, as such, constitute valuable though frequently underutilized clinical information. While ego-syntonic aspects of personality can be commented on with impunity, dealing therapeutically with patients' USDs--manifestations of their blind spots--requires sensitivity, empathy, and timing. Providing many clinical examples of patient and therapist USDs from individual and group psychotherapy, this report discusses the origins, possible meanings, and the countertransference and empathic challenges encountered in the handling of these blind spots. The importance of establishing a narcissistic alliance and of employing the methods of the existential school of psychotherapy in processing USDs is described. Self-aware therapists can minimize the clinical impasse that may result when therapist-patient blind spots overlap. PMID:21463095

  13. [Diagnosis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy for personality disordered persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakawa, Kuninao

    2011-01-01

    The author uses PubMed searches on clinical studies on personality disorders and finds that the borderline personality disorder is most extensively researched. Mary Zanarini summeries there are four kinds of psychotherapies that are proved to be effective in the treatment of BPD patients, including mentalization based treatment, transference focused therapy, dialectic behavior therapy and schema focused therapy. They are all effective to improve the severity of impulsivity and self-destructiveness. The author then reviews McGlashan's series of extensive follow-up studies on BPD and other mental disorders at Chestnut Lodge back in 1980's. The data tells us that both symptomatic stability and level of social adaptation in the long term outcome of BPDs varied to be very poor to recovered. The outcome seem to be heavily relied on the intimate relationship BPDs could enjoy or not. This finding was also noted in a five year Tokyo BPDs follow-up studies by Moriya, Ikuta and Minakawa in 1990's. Both impulsivity and self-destructiveness get always worse along with loss or threatened loss of love object. Therefore all psychotherapies for BPDs should be directed to improve their pathological object relations although it would be extremely difficult to attain. The author finally points it out that the primary prevention of BPDs should be designed and begin a program on a trial basis in a community soon because there are many empirical studies to show the mothers with BPD tend to be frightened by her baby and/or frighten her baby and this pattern of communication is the first epigenetic expression of BPDs.

  14. Psychotherapy Augmentation through Preconscious Priming

    OpenAIRE

    Borgeat, François; O’Connor, Kieron; Amado, Danielle; St-Pierre-Delorme, Marie-Ève

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that repeated preconscious (masked) priming of personalized positive cognitions could augment cognitive change and facilitate achievement of patients’ goals following a therapy. Methods: Twenty social phobic patients (13 women) completed a 36-weeks study beginning by 12 weeks of group behavioral therapy. After the therapy, they received 6 weeks of preconscious priming and 6 weeks of a control procedure in a randomized cross-over design. The Priming conditi...

  15. Psychotherapy for chronic major depression and dysthymia: A meta analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Straten, van A.; Schuurmans, J.; Oppen, van P.C.; Hollon, S.D.; Andersson, G.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Although several studies have examined the effects of psychotherapy on chronic depression and dysthymia, no meta-analysis has been conducted to integrate results of these studies. We conducted a meta-analysis of 16 randomized trials examining the effects of psychotherapy on chronic depressi

  16. The Grandmaternal Transference in Parent-Infant/Child Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugmore, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The psychic significance of the figure of the grandmother in psychodynamic psychotherapy has received scant attention. This paper develops the concept of the "grandmaternal transference" in parent-infant psychotherapy and explores its identification, its possible functions and its therapeutic significance. The grandmaternal transference has…

  17. Using Media to Teach How Not to Do Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Glen; Horowitz, Mardi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article describes how using media depictions of psychotherapy may help in teaching psychiatric residents. Methods: Using the HBO series "In Treatment" as a model, the authors suggest how boundary transgressions and technical errors may inform residents about optimal psychotherapeutic approaches. Results: The psychotherapy vignettes…

  18. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  19. Is There Room for Criticism of Studies of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Jewett, Lisa R.; Bassel, Marielle

    2011-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy," by J. Shedler. Shedler declared unequivocally that "empirical evidence supports the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy" (p. 98). He did not mention any specific criticisms that have been made of evidence on psychodynamic psychotherapies or address possible distinctions…

  20. Rorschach and MMPI-2 Indices of Early Psychotherapy Termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenroth, Mark J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigates the differences between 97 patients who had prematurely terminated psychotherapy and 81 who had participated in individual psychotherapy for at least 6 months and 24 sessions on selected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and Rorschach variables. Theoretical implications of interpersonal variables are discussed in…

  1. Teaching the Teachers: A Model Course for Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Helen; Herman, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: There are no standard training programs for teaching psychotherapy supervisors effective, ethical, and legal aspects of supervision. This article describes an eight session training course containing essential information for supervisors. Methods: The literature on psychotherapy supervision was reviewed and an evening seminar series was…

  2. Solicited diary studies of psychotherapy in qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackrill, Thomas Edward

    2008-01-01

    Diary studies are scarce within the field of qualitative psychotherapy research. In this article arguments for and against the employment of solicited diaries studies in qualitative psychotherapy research are investigated. The strengths of diary studies are presented along with arguments concerning...

  3. On the Integration of Science and Practice in Brief Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Responds to previous article by Steenbarger on science-practice integration in brief counseling and therapy. Focuses specifically on the integration of science and practice in brief psychotherapy. Elaborates on agreements and disagreements concerning Steenbarger's analysis of brief psychotherapy. Muses over what is lost as well as gained in brief…

  4. Use of Psychotherapy by Rural and Urban Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A.; Jameson, John P.; Phillips, Laura L.; Kunik, Mark E.; Fortney, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine whether differences exist between rural and urban veterans in terms of initiation of psychotherapy, delay in time from diagnosis to treatment, and dose of psychotherapy sessions. Methods: Using a longitudinal cohort of veterans obtained from national Veterans Affairs databases (October 2003 through September 2004), we extracted…

  5. Exploring Psychotherapy Clients' Independent Strategies for Change While in Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrill, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Psychotherapy research usually describes how client change is caused by therapist interventions. This article describes how clients change by continuing to use and revising the strategies for change that they bring with them when they first enter therapy. This article presents data from a qualitative diary study of psychotherapy. Three cases…

  6. Psychiatric Residents' Views of Quality of Psychotherapy Training and Psychotherapy Competencies: A Multisite Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Christina; Sciolla, Andres; Zisook, Sidney; Bitner, Robin; Tuttle, Jeffrey; Dunn, Laura B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Few studies of residents' attitudes toward psychotherapy training exist. The authors examined residents' perceptions of the quality of their training, support for training, their own competence levels, and associations between self-perceived competence and perceptions of the training environment. Methods: An anonymous, web-based…

  7. Humanistic-existential psychotherapy competencies and the supervisory process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Eugene W

    2010-03-01

    There has been an increasing focus in recent years on articulating foundational and functional competencies for practice in professional psychology and how a competency-based approach might inform psychology training. With the aim of contributing to the dialogue in this area, the discussion herein explores psychotherapy competencies through the lens of a humanistic-existential perspective and describes implications for psychotherapy training and supervision. Specifically, competencies pertaining to facilitating the client's experiential awareness and use of the psychotherapy relationship to engender client change are described. Next, the foundational and functional competencies within professional psychology that are particularly salient to a humanistic-existential psychotherapy framework are discussed. Finally, the ways in which a humanistic-existential supervision framework contributes to the development of psychotherapy competencies in trainees is considered. A brief vignette is presented to illustrate the supervision process.

  8. Uncovering Interaction Structures in a Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Barcellos Serralta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interaction structures refers to the repetitive ways of interaction between the patient-therapist dyad over the course of treatment. This construct is operationalized by the repeated application of the Psychotherapy Process Q-Set (PQS to psychotherapy sessions. Studies in this line of research have so far focused only on long-term treatment. The present study examines whether interaction structures can be detected empirically in short-term psychotherapies. All sessions (N = 31 of a successful case of brief psychodynamic psychotherapy were coded with the Psychotherapy Process Q-Set (PQS. The application of Q type factor analysis procedures with varimax rotation revealed five interaction structures: resistance, alliance, facing depression, expectation of change, and introspection and hearing. The analysis of variation of these structures over the course of the treatment showed that these interactions are nonlinear, may be positively or negatively protruding in different sessions, or be predominant at some treatment phase.

  9. Movement Coordination in Psychotherapy: Synchrony of Hand Movements is Associated with Session Outcome. A Single-Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that nonverbal behavior was associated with both session-level outcome and global outcome in psychotherapy. Nonverbal synchrony--here the coordination between patient's and psychotherapist's movement behavior--is a facet of nonverbal behavior that has recently been studied with video-based motion energy analysis (MEA). The present study aimed to replicate and extend these findings by using direct acquisition of movement data. In a single-case analysis, we monitored patient's and therapist's hand movements with a high-resolution accelerometric measurement system (Vitaport (r)). In addition to these behavioral data, both patient and therapist provided session-level ratings of various factors relevant to the psychotherapy process, which were assessed with post-session questionnaires. The patient-therapist coordination of hand movements, i.e. nonverbal synchrony, in (N = 27) sessions of this dyadic psychotherapy was positively associated with progress reported in post-session questionnaires. Sessions with good evaluations concerning the quality of therapeutic alliance were characterized by high movement coordination. Thus, accelerometric data of this therapy dyad confirmed previous findings gained through video analyses: The coordination of nonverbal behavior shown by patient and therapist was an indicator of beneficial processes occurring within sessions. This replication study showed that nonverbal synchrony embodies important aspects of the alliance. Its assessment and quantification may provide therapists important additional information on processes that usually occur outside conscious awareness, but that nevertheless influence core aspects of the therapy.

  10. THE FEMINIST APPROACH TO PSYCHOTHERAPY INTEGRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Lorena Božac Deležan

    2011-01-01

    The goal of Integrative Psychotherapy is to establish full inner and external contact (Moursund & Erskine, 2004). The most important goal in feminist therapy is the transformation of an individual as well as the transformation of the society as a whole (Herlihy & Corey, 2004). In my work I attempt to integrate both: to help the client establish inner and external contact, but also help him/her to become aware and recognize inner messages connected with his/her gender and replace them with con...

  11. Review of Psychotherapy as a human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Psychotherapy as a human science by Daniel Burston and Roger Frie (see record 2006-12980-000). In this book, the authors show how philosophical assumptions pervade therapeutic praxis. "In our view, philosophy is inherent to the very practice of psychotherapy" (p. 2). There is a "common ground that unites the therapists of today with the philosophers of the past" (p. 17). Their effort succeeds brilliantly in reconnecting psychology and philosophy and, by that homecoming, to ground psychotherapy (including contemporary psychoanalysis) as a "human science." The book begins by sketching ideas about truth we inherit from the Greeks, then shows how Descartes and Pascal helped launch the Enlightenment with their thinking about truth and the limits of reason. Kant, Hegel, and Marx broaden the scope to include reason, the unconscious, and the course of history. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche interject angst and authenticity. Dilthey proposes a human science neither scientistic nor irrational. Husserl launches phenomenology as the proper study of experience; Scheler, Jaspers and Heidegger react in their particular ways. Freud and Jung come to loggerheads over the unconscious. Buber, Binswanger, and Boss further develop existential-phenomenological perspectives in terms of human interrelatedness. Confrontation with the other and the limits of reciprocity engage Sartre, Lacan, and Laing. Psychoanalysis grows intersubjectively through the work of Sullivan, Fromm, Merleau-Ponty, Benjamin, and Stolorow. Postmodernism's excess, Frie and Burston conclude, requires acknowledgment of an authentic self answerable for choices in life: '...[W]e are both determined by, and exercise our agency in determining, the communicative contexts in which we exist" (p. 262). Psychotherapy from this existential-phenomenological perspective becomes "a rigorous exploration of our ways of making meaning--both consciously and unconsciously" (p. 263). The book ends, then, with an affirmation

  12. Analytic and Systemic Specialized Incest Group Psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjaer, Henriette Kiilsholm; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Poulsen, Stig Bernt;

    PURPOSE: Women with long-term sequalae of child sexual abuse (CSA) were randomly assigned to analytic (Group A) or systemic group psychotherapy (Group S). Pre-post-analysis indicated that both therapies led to significant improvement, but overall Group S had significantly better outcome than Group...... A. This study investigates if gains are maintained one and five years following termination, and if the groups differ in gains. METHOD: 106 women started on allocated intervention. Psychological distress (GSI from SCL-90R), psycho-social functioning (GAF), and global life quality (GLQ), were...

  13. DFP: Psychotherapie der Angststörungen

    OpenAIRE

    Doering S

    2011-01-01

    Die Psychotherapie stellt eine wirksame Behandlung für alle Angststörungen dar. Die Kombination mit einer (antidepressiven) Pharmakotherapie dürfte oft sinnvoll sein, ist jedoch nur bei der Panikstörung empirisch untermauert. Bei allen Angststörungen sind verhaltenstherapeutische Ansätze am besten in ihrer Wirksamkeit belegt. Inzwischen sind außer für die spezifischen Phobien auch psychodynamische Ansätze manualisiert und empirisch evaluiert. Entspannungsverfahren werden bei der s...

  14. Near-death experiences and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda J

    2009-10-01

    Psychiatrists are likely to come into contact with patients who have had near-death experiences, who may have a variety of reactions to the experience, and who may benefit from psychotherapy. We may also have opportunities to work with individuals who are reacting to others who have had such experiences. There is much a psychiatrist can offer to these people, including listening respectfully, being nonjudgemental, normalizing the experience, providing education, and assisting with integrating the experience into their lives to develop or maintain the best possible functioning.

  15. Review of Psychotherapy as a human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Psychotherapy as a human science by Daniel Burston and Roger Frie (see record 2006-12980-000). In this book, the authors show how philosophical assumptions pervade therapeutic praxis. "In our view, philosophy is inherent to the very practice of psychotherapy" (p. 2). There is a "common ground that unites the therapists of today with the philosophers of the past" (p. 17). Their effort succeeds brilliantly in reconnecting psychology and philosophy and, by that homecoming, to ground psychotherapy (including contemporary psychoanalysis) as a "human science." The book begins by sketching ideas about truth we inherit from the Greeks, then shows how Descartes and Pascal helped launch the Enlightenment with their thinking about truth and the limits of reason. Kant, Hegel, and Marx broaden the scope to include reason, the unconscious, and the course of history. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche interject angst and authenticity. Dilthey proposes a human science neither scientistic nor irrational. Husserl launches phenomenology as the proper study of experience; Scheler, Jaspers and Heidegger react in their particular ways. Freud and Jung come to loggerheads over the unconscious. Buber, Binswanger, and Boss further develop existential-phenomenological perspectives in terms of human interrelatedness. Confrontation with the other and the limits of reciprocity engage Sartre, Lacan, and Laing. Psychoanalysis grows intersubjectively through the work of Sullivan, Fromm, Merleau-Ponty, Benjamin, and Stolorow. Postmodernism's excess, Frie and Burston conclude, requires acknowledgment of an authentic self answerable for choices in life: '...[W]e are both determined by, and exercise our agency in determining, the communicative contexts in which we exist" (p. 262). Psychotherapy from this existential-phenomenological perspective becomes "a rigorous exploration of our ways of making meaning--both consciously and unconsciously" (p. 263). The book ends, then, with an affirmation

  16. Efficacy of Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy : Past, Present, and Future

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Jacques P.

    1994-01-01

    The author outlines the history of brief dynamic psychotherapy, describes some of its characteristics, and addresses methodological requirements for assessing the efficacy of psychotherapy. Review of two major meta-analyses suggests that manual-based brief dynamic psychotherapy by trained therapists is likely to be as effective as other forms of psychotherapy and more effective than no treatment. More studies are needed that 1) compare brief dynamic psychotherapy with other for...

  17. A systematic review of depression psychotherapies among Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Anahí; Lim, Aaron C; MacPherson, Laura

    2016-04-01

    For decades, the literature has reported persistent treatment disparities among depressed Latinos. Fortunately, treatment development and evaluation in this underserved population has expanded in recent years. This review summarizes outcomes across 36 unique depression treatment studies that reported treatment outcomes for Latinos. Results indicated that there was significant variability in the quality of RCT and type/number of cultural adaptations. The review suggested that there might a relation between cultural adaptations with treatment outcomes; future studies are warranted to confirm this association. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was the most evaluated treatment (CBT; n=18, 50% of all evaluations), followed by Problem Solving Therapy (PST; n=4), Interpersonal Therapy (IPT; n=4), and Behavioral Activation (BA; n=3). CBT seems to fare better when compared to usual care, but not when compared to a contact-time matched control condition or active treatment. There is growing support for PST and IPT as efficacious depression interventions among Latinos. IPT shows particularly positive results for perinatal depression. BA warrants additional examination in RCT. Although scarce, telephone and in-home counseling have shown efficacy in reducing depression and increasing retention. Promotora-assisted trials require formal assessment. Limitations and future directions of the depression psychotherapy research among Latinos are discussed.

  18. Effects of group interpersonal psychotherapy and group cognitive behavioral therapy on social anxiety in college students%团体人际心理干预与团体认知行为干预对社交焦虑的疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄慧兰; 刘新民

    2011-01-01

    目的:比较团体人际心理干预和团体认知行为干预对大学生社交焦虑的疗效.方法:方便选取1314 名大学生,采用交往焦虑量表(Interaction Anxiousness Scale,IAS)进行测试,筛取IAS 总分≥49 分(高焦虑者)275人.参照美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第四版(Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,DSM-IV)关于社交焦虑障碍诊断标准的症状学描述,根据自愿的原则,选取社交焦虑程度较重的大学生45 名,随机分为3组,每组15人:IPT 组,采用团体人际心理干预,每周1次,共8周;CBT 组,实施认知行为干预,每周1 次,共8 周;对照组,实验过程中不予干预.各组在干预前测定社交回避及苦恼量表(Social Avoidance and Distress Scale,SADS),干预后再进行IAS和SADS的测定,比较IPT 组、CBT 组干预前后的疗效及其差别.结果:干预前3 组间IAS 总分、SADS 总分、回避因子分、苦恼因子分差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);干预后IPT 组与CBT 组的社交焦虑水平均低于对照组,而IPT 组与CBT 组间各项指标差异无统计学意义.IPT 组干预后各项指标得分均低于干预前;CBT 组干预后SADS 总分、回避因子分、苦恼因子分低于干预前;对照组各项指标前后差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论:团体人际心理干预与团体认知行为干预均能有效缓解社交焦虑水平,人际心理干预可作为治疗社交焦虑的一个重要手段.%Objective: To compare the effects of group interpersonal psychotherapy (IRT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on social anxiety in college students.Methods: Totally 1314 students were selected by convenience sampling.They were assessed with the Interaction Anxiousness Scale (IAS) and 275 students whose scores ≥49 were chosen.Then 45 students with more serious symptoms were chosen according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-Ⅳ) diagnostic criteria on social anxiety disorder.They were randomly

  19. Assessing levels of similarity to a "psychodynamic prototype" in psychodynamic psychotherapy with children: a case study approach (preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bento Gastaud

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To analyze the degree of similarity to a "psychodynamic prototype" during the first year of two children's once-weekly psychodynamic psychotherapy.Methods: This study used a longitudinal, descriptive, repeated-measures design based on the systematic case study method. Two male school children (here referred to as Walter and Peter and their therapists took part in the study. All sessions were video and audio recorded. Ten sessions from each case were selected for analysis in this preliminary study. Trained examiners (randomly selected in pairs independently and blindly evaluated each session using the Child Psychotherapy Q-Set (CPQ. Experts in psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy from several countries rated each of the 100 CPQ items with regard to how well it characterized a hypothetical ideal session of either treatment modality. A series of paired t tests comparing analogous adherence scores within each session were conducted.Results:There were no significant correlations between time elapsed and adherence to the prototypes. Walter's treatment adhered to both prototypes and Peter's treatment did not adhere to either prototype.Conclusion:Child psychotherapy theory and practice are not absolutely coincident. Real psychotherapy sessions do not necessarily resemble the ideal prototypes.

  20. Religious Cognitive-Emotional Therapy :A New Form of Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Rajaei

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available "nFrom the ancient times up to this date, it has been thought that religion and spirituality have important effects on human being's mental life. However, some psychologists and psychotherapists have ignored this role ,and thus neglected to study the effects of applying religion and spirituality in psychotherapy. However, many psychologists and psychotherapists have recently studied the relationship between religion or spirituality and mental health ; or used religious interventions in psychotherapies . Although different kinds of religious psychotherapies have been proposed, no comprehensive theory has been presented in this area. In this article a scientific ,comprehensive and applied spiritual method of psychotherapy is suggested . Religious Cognitive- Emotional Therapy (RCET is a new form of cognitive therapy that uses the basic religious beliefs and insights in psychotherapy. RCET is a new integration of cognitive, humanistic, and existential psychotherapies that takes into account religious beliefs and insights of the clients. RCET is an effective method of psychotherapy for the treatment of those who suffer from identity crisis , depression , and anxiety ; and it can be developed to address other psychological disorders as well . Because RCET is a new approach, practically is needed to do further theoretical research in this area.

  1. Religious cognitive-emotional therapy: a new form of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Ali Reza

    2010-01-01

    From the ancient times up to this date, it has been thought that religion and spirituality have important effects on human being's mental life. However, some psychologists and psychotherapists have ignored this role, and thus neglected to study the effects of applying religion and spirituality in psychotherapy. However, many psychologists and psychotherapists have recently studied the relationship between religion or spirituality and mental health; or used religious interventions in psychotherapies. Although different kinds of religious psychotherapies have been proposed, no comprehensive theory has been presented in this area. In this article a scientific, comprehensive and applied spiritual method of psychotherapy is suggested. Religious Cognitive- Emotional Therapy (RCET) is a new form of cognitive therapy that uses the basic religious beliefs and insights in psychotherapy. RCET is a new integration of cognitive, humanistic, and existential psychotherapies that takes into account religious beliefs and insights of the clients. RCET is an effective method of psychotherapy for the treatment of those who suffer from identity crisis, depression, and anxiety; and it can be developed to address other psychological disorders as well. Because RCET is a new approach, practically is needed to do further theoretical research in this area.

  2. [New Developments in Video Games for Psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinka, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    A literature survey on new developments in the area of video games and psychotherapy of children and adolescents was conducted. Despite the omnipresence of computers and the internet, development of therapeutic games seems rather slow. The video game Treasure Hunt was introduced in 2008 to support treatment of children with internalizing and externalizing disorders. Camp Cope-A-Lot was developed for treatment of anxious children, whereas the self-help game SPARX is directed at depressed adolescents. Rage-Control is a biofeedback game for children with anger problems. The game Zoo U aims to assess and train social skills of primary school children. Ricky and the Spider for young children with obsessive compulsive disorder is meant to support the cognitive-behavioural treatment of these patients. Clash- Back is a French game for adolescents with externalizing problems. Possible reasons for the relatively slow development of therapeutic games are the high methodological demands concerning an evaluation as well as the high costs of game development. Nonetheless, computers and the internet are bound to influence psychotherapy with children and adolescents in the long run.

  3. Existential inquiry: Psychotherapy for crises of demoralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Griffith

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Existential inquiry is a focal psychotherapy tailored to address crises of demoralization. Demoralization refers to the helplessness, despair, and subjective incompetence that people feel when perceiving themselves to be failing their own or others´ expectations for coping with adversity. Methods: Existential inquiry revives a demoralized person´s capacity for coping by eliciting accounts for how the person has sustained hope, communion with others, purpose, agency, commitment, courage, and gratitude when threatened by losses, traumas, or insecurities. Existential questions reveal emotional postures of vulnerability and resilience. They ask both how a person has been impacted by adversities and how he or she has prevailed against them. Existential inquiry rebuilds morale by mobilizing emotional postures of resilience that are grounded in core identities: What are my deep desires and commitments? To whom am I accountable? Who do I know myself to be, or wish to be? Results: Clinical vignettes illustrate how these questions can open conversations that rebuild morale. Conclusions: Existential inquiry can serve as an effective brief psychotherapy for countering demoralization.

  4. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadda, Rakesh K; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India. PMID:23858272

  5. [New Developments in Video Games for Psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinka, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    A literature survey on new developments in the area of video games and psychotherapy of children and adolescents was conducted. Despite the omnipresence of computers and the internet, development of therapeutic games seems rather slow. The video game Treasure Hunt was introduced in 2008 to support treatment of children with internalizing and externalizing disorders. Camp Cope-A-Lot was developed for treatment of anxious children, whereas the self-help game SPARX is directed at depressed adolescents. Rage-Control is a biofeedback game for children with anger problems. The game Zoo U aims to assess and train social skills of primary school children. Ricky and the Spider for young children with obsessive compulsive disorder is meant to support the cognitive-behavioural treatment of these patients. Clash- Back is a French game for adolescents with externalizing problems. Possible reasons for the relatively slow development of therapeutic games are the high methodological demands concerning an evaluation as well as the high costs of game development. Nonetheless, computers and the internet are bound to influence psychotherapy with children and adolescents in the long run. PMID:26904927

  6. Comparing bona fide psychotherapies of depression in adults with two meta-analytical approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Braun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite numerous investigations, the question whether all bona fide treatments of depression are equally efficacious in adults has not been sufficiently answered. METHOD: We applied two different meta-analytical techniques (conventional meta-analysis and mixed treatment comparisons. Overall, 53 studies with 3,965 patients, which directly compared two or more bona fide psychotherapies in a randomized trial, were included. Meta-analyses were conducted regarding five different types of outcome measures. Additionally, the influence of possible moderators was examined. RESULTS: Direct comparisons of cognitive behavior therapy, behavior activation therapy, psychodynamic therapy, interpersonal therapy, and supportive therapies versus all other respective treatments indicated that at the end of treatment all treatments but supportive therapies were equally efficacious whereas there was some evidence that supportive therapies were somewhat less efficacious than all other treatments according to patient self-ratings and clinical significance. At follow-up no significant differences were present. Age, gender, comorbid mental disorders, and length of therapy session were found to moderate efficacy. Cognitive behavior therapy was superior in studies where therapy sessions lasted 90 minutes or longer, behavior activation therapy was more efficacious when therapy sessions lasted less than 90 minutes. Mixed treatment comparisons indicated no statistically significant differences in treatment efficacy but some interesting trends. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that there might be differential effects of bona fide psychotherapies which should be examined in detail.

  7. A Case Study of Adult Examination Anxiety Disorder by Eclectic Psychotherapy%运用综合心理疗法治疗一例成人考试焦虑症的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓旭阳; 何家声; 郭晋林

    2002-01-01

    Objective:This is a case study in which a 30-year-old male suffering from Examination Anxiety Disorder was treated by Eclectic Psychotherapy. Methods: Using Eclectic Psychotherapy, an approach that combines principles of Client Centeed Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, Rational Emotion Therapy (RET),and Behavior Therapy, the patient was treated for a total of 22 sessions.Results: The study showed obvious therapeutic effect for Eclectic Psychotherapy. The patient reported complete relief of his examination anxiety symptoms at conclusion of treatment. Follow-up by telephone at 1 month and 6 months after treatment showed that the patient remained stable and well.Conclusion: Eclectic Psychotherapy is an efficient way for treating symptoms of severe Examination Anxiety Disorder, both in terms of permanent cure and temporary relief.

  8. [Acceptance and mindfulness-based cognitive-behavioral therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngô, Thanh-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the main approaches in psychotherapy. It teaches the patient to examine the link between dysfunctional thoughts and maladaptive behaviors and to re- evaluate the cognitive biases involved in the maintenance of symptoms by using strategies such as guided discovery. CBT is constantly evolving in part to improve its' effectiveness and accessibility. Thus in the last decade, increasingly popular approaches based on mindfulness and acceptance have emerged. These therapies do not attempt to modify cognitions even when they are biased and dysfunctional but rather seek a change in the relationship between the individual and the symptoms. This article aims to present the historical context that has allowed the emergence of this trend, the points of convergence and divergence with traditional CBT as well as a brief presentation of the different therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. Hayes (2004) described three successive waves in behavior therapy, each characterized by "dominant assumptions, methods and goals": traditional behavior therapy, cognitive therapy and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. The latter consider that human suffering occurs when the individual lives a restricted life in order avoid pain and immediate discomfort to the detriment of his global wellbeing. These therapies combine mindfulness, experiential, acceptance strategies with traditional behavior principles in order to attain lasting results. There are significant points of convergence between traditional CBT and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. They are both empirically validated, based upon a theoretical model postulating that avoidance is key in the maintenance of psychopathology and they recommend an approach strategy in order to overcome the identified problem. They both use behavioral techniques in the context of a collaborative relationship in order to identify precise problems and to

  9. Ideas of cure related to psychotherapy outcome : Young adults in psychoanalytic psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Philips, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Background: Ideas of cure within the psychoanalytical movement have mainly focused on 'insight' or 'interpersonal relationship'. Patients' ideas of curative factors during and after therapy have been studied previously, as well as their expectancies and preferences prior to treatment. Aims: This project aimed at studying psychoanalytic psychotherapy with young adults from the viewpoints of ideas of cure among patients, and outcome, and how these two aspects are related t...

  10. The Psychotherapy Process with Adolescents: A First Pilot Study and Preliminary Comparisons between Different Therapeutic Modalities Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkova, Tetyana; Hillman, Saul; Midgley, Nick; Schneider, Celeste

    2011-01-01

    An innovative methodology is presented for describing the therapeutic processes involved in five types of adolescent treatments: psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mentalisation-based treatment and interpersonal psychotherapy. Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set" (APQ), 18 experienced clinicians…

  11. Motivation for Psychotherapy in Patients With Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Ute; Enck, Paul; Matheis, Anna; Klosterhalfen, Sibylle; Ruehl, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Sammet, Isa; Herzog, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The motivation of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders to accept psychotherapy (PT) as a treatment option is not known. Objective: The authors investigated motivation for patients' refusal to participate and dropout from PT/medical management programs. Method: Consecutive

  12. Psychotherapy and the cultural concept of the person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2007-06-01

    Psychotherapies are distinguished from other forms of symbolic healing by their emphasis on explicit talk about the self. Every system of psychotherapy thus depends on implicit models of the self, which in turn, are based on cultural concepts of the person. The cultural concept of the person that underwrites most forms of psychotherapy is based on Euro-American values of individualism. This individualistic and egocentric concept of the person can be contrasted with more sociocentric, ecocentric or cosmocentric views, which understand the person in relation to the social world, the environment, and the cosmos. Intercultural psychotherapy must consider the cultural concept of the person implicit in therapeutic discourse and practice to determine how well it fits or conflicts with the concepts, values and way of life of the patient. PMID:17576727

  13. College Psychotherapy at a Hong Kong Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Eugenie Y.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an online interview about college psychotherapy at a Hong Kong counseling center. The interview discusses how students generally feel about going for counseling or therapy and how common it is in Hong Kong.

  14. Issues in teaching and learning time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, J L

    1999-09-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy training is briefly reviewed, with particular attention to short-term forms of treatment and to empirical investigations of therapy training. There have been relatively few investigations of actual psychotherapy training, and the prospect is for even fewer in the future. The traditional pedagogic strategy for conceptualizing and developing psychodynamic training programs has been to adapt psychoanalytic clinical theory for instructional purposes. It is proposed that concepts, principles, and instructional strategies from the area of the cognitive sciences concerned with the development of generic expertise offers a potentially more fruitful theoretical/empirical framework for understanding therapeutic expertise and can be applied to developing improved psychotherapy teaching methods. The mental processes of therapists are discussed from this perspective. A teaching format based on multimedia computer technology and designed to fill a gap between didactic course work and actual therapy supervision is briefly described. In addition, recommendations are offered for improving psychotherapy training using existing methods. PMID:10421953

  15. Qualitative psychotherapy research: the journey so far and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Heidi M

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the evolution of qualitative psychotherapy research over the past 3 decades. Clients' and therapists' accounts of their experiences in psychotherapy provide a window into the psychotherapy relationship and its mechanisms of change. A sizable body of literature has been generated that uses qualitative methods to collect and analyze these accounts and to shed light on the psychotherapy process. It notes changes in the field such as growing numbers of dissertations and publications using qualitative methods as well as a strengthening emphasis on qualitative research within graduate education and research funding bodies. Future recommendations include developing principles for practice from qualitative methods and conducting qualitative meta-analyses. Other recommendations include forming journal review policies that support the publication of qualitative research and that focus on coherence in adapting methods to meet research goals, in light of a study's characteristics and epistemological framework, rather than focusing on sets of procedures.

  16. The body in therapy: experiences of Sensorimotor Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Dinas, Sharonjit

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sensorimotor Psychotherapy is an approach for working with people who have experienced trauma (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) that is based on contemporary philosophies of embodiment and the expanse of neurobiological evidence for the effect of psychological trauma on the physical body. Thus, Sensorimotor Psychotherapy places central importance on working with the body in therapy. Method: This study explored the experiences of 10 therapists and 2 clients who have...

  17. Developing an Inpatient Group Psychotherapy Program: Challenges and Lessons Learnt

    OpenAIRE

    Razaghi, Emran Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Pourramzani, Ali; Shirali Mohammadpour, Reza; Mousazade Moghaddam, Arezou; Yahyavi, Seyyed Taha

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, inpatient group psychotherapy has been limited to transient practices for research purposes or fulfilling personal interest of therapists. The goal of this paper is to share and explain the experience of developing an inpatient group psychotherapy program in Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. After theoretical delineation and preparation of a draft of the program guideline, two pilot sessions were held. Based on this initial experience a final treatment guideline was prepare...

  18. Professional non-neutrality: criticising the third party in psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Voutilainen, Liisa; PerÀkylÀ, Anssi; Ruusuvuori, Johanna Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Using audio-recorded data from cognitive-constructivist psychotherapy, the article shows a particular institutional context in which successful professional action does not adhere to the pattern of affective neutrality which Parsons saw as an inherent component of medicine and psychotherapy. In our data, the professional’s non-neutrality functions as a tool for achieving institutional goals. The analysis focuses on the psychotherapist’s actions that convey a critical stance towards a thir...

  19. Psychotherapy research: do we know what works for whom?

    OpenAIRE

    Fonagy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical decision-making about suitability for psychological therapies is hampered by limitations of psychotherapy research and our lack of understanding of therapeutic mechanisms. Watzke et al's important randomised controlled study offers apparent validation for clinical judgement in relation to suitability for psychodynamic psychotherapy but also highlights the negative effects of unselected assignment to this type of treatment. Here, I consider why systematic selection for this form of tr...

  20. Shame-Related States of Mind in Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Zaslav, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Current theory on self-conscious emotions emphasizes the importance of shame-related phenomena in psychopathology and psycho- therapy. An appreciation of manifestations of shame in psychotherapy greatly deepens our ability to connect with and understand our patients' experience. The relative salience of the shame-prone patient's devalued-self or devaluing-other internalizations will have critical importance in the psychotherapy setting, guiding the types of interventions and stances that are ...

  1. The right brain is dominant in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schore, Allan N

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses how recent studies of the right brain, which is dominant for the implicit, nonverbal, intuitive, holistic processing of emotional information and social interactions, can elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the relational foundations of psychotherapy. Utilizing the interpersonal neurobiological perspective of regulation theory, I describe the fundamental role of the early developing right brain in relational processes, throughout the life span. I present interdisciplinary evidence documenting right brain functions in early attachment processes, in emotional communications within the therapeutic alliance, in mutual therapeutic enactments, and in therapeutic change processes. This work highlights the fact that the current emphasis on relational processes is shared by, cross-fertilizing, and indeed transforming both psychology and neuroscience, with important consequences for clinical psychological models of psychotherapeutic change. PMID:25068194

  2. Analysis of transference in Gestalt group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, J E

    1990-04-01

    In Gestalt therapy, transference is viewed as a contact boundary disturbance which impairs the patient's ability to accurately perceive the present therapy situation. The boundary disturbances in Gestalt therapy most closely related to the analytic notion of transference are projection, introjection, and confluence. In Gestalt group psychotherapy, group members interfere with the process of need identification and satisfaction by distorting their contact with each other through projecting, introjecting, and being confluent. The Gestalt group therapist uses interventions directed to individuals and to the group to increase participants' awareness of these boundary disturbances and of the present contact opportunities available to them when these disturbances are resolved. In formulating interventions, the leader is mindful of the function of boundary disturbances to the group-as-a-whole as well as to individuals.

  3. Changes in Reflective Functioning during Psychoanalytic Psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörz-Sagstetter, Susanne; Mertens, Wolfgang; Isphording, Sybille; Buchheim, Anna; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-06-01

    This study examines how reflective functioning (RF) can be assessed in analytic sessions and throughout psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The goals are to replicate in part a study by Josephs and colleagues (2004) by applying the RF Scale to analytic sessions and to study fluctuations of RF within each session. Additionally, RF based on sessions was compared with the RF ratings based on the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) during the course of two psychoanalytic psychotherapies with a duration of 240 hours. RF changes based on 10 sessions per patient, assessed at baseline and after 80, 160, and 240 hours of therapy, and RF changes based on AAI ratings measured at baseline and after 240 hours of therapy, and in one case at follow-up, were related to changes of symptoms and attachment classifications over time. Results showed that in both cases RF fluctuated within sessions. The average RF rating per session increased over the course of treatment, while the AAI-based RF rating needed longer to increase. Rather good correspondence was found between session-based RF ratings and independent AAI-based RF ratings. In both cases, changes in RF over time were compared to changes in attachment classification based on the AAI and to symptomatic change. Better correspondence between symptomatic and attachment changes was found with the AAI-based RF rating. It was tentatively interpreted that session-based RF ratings may represent a state of RF that is strongly influenced by the therapist-patient interaction, whereas AAI-based RF can be considered to have more trait characteristics. PMID:26185290

  4. [Brief psychotherapy in clinical medicine patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, M

    1992-01-01

    The criteria that "illness is biographical crisis od the individual" and that the only medicine is "personal medicine" is stressed. Clinical medicine, which covers medicine in its entirety, demands conceptual and doctrinal reaffirmations so that gradually the patient can come to be dealt with as a human being fron a holistic point of view, which commences with his complaint and consultation, continues with the interview and semiology, to finish with the diagnosis and therapy which, although in some cases it may be surgical, is still medical and integral. All the steps mentioned are bio-socio-cultural thus, whether in the practice of general clinical medicine or in the most specialized and technologically sophisticated clinical medicine, the animist component is not lacking and demands a minimum degree of "psychosomatic" Knowledge. The use of a psychotherapeutic technique is proposed which, while based on the psychoanalysis theory, is distanced technically from it as a "psychotherapy on limited time and goals", which abbreviates the disease, and is projected not as the "focus" of therapeutic work, but as a re-evaluation of the "life style" of each individual, and tends to help to develop a "project for life" suited to the possible personal, familiar and social well-being of the "patient". Technically speaking, this modality of brief psychotherapy is based on the nonuse of transferential interpretations, on impeding the regression od the patient, on facilitating a cognitice-affective development of his conflicts and thus obtain an internal object mutation which allows the transformation of the "past" into true history, and the "present" into vital perspectives. This technique is within reach of every health professional.

  5. Psychotherapy of gambling — how to effectively treat gamblers? The effectivenes of applied therapeutic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelonkiewicz, Irena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to indicate efficacy of various psychological therapies for pathological and problem gambling. The literature on psychotherapy of gambling (1983–2012 was reviewed and particular attention carried out to meta-analysis studies during the period in question. The definition and the place of pathological gambling in the international classifications of diseases DSM-IV and ICD-10, and the prevalence of this disorder was briefly explained. This article provides information about the therapeutic approaches applied for the treatment of the pathological gambling problem: Gamblers Anonymous groups, the psychodynamic approach, behavioral therapy, cognitive approach, cognitive-behavioral therapy, marriage and family therapy, motivational interviewing therapy, multimodal treatment. This review provides an assessment of the effectiveness of therapeutic approaches used to treat people suffering from addiction to gambling. The cognitive behavioral approach is currently rated as the most effective in the treatment of gambling addicts. A meta-analysis performed on the previous study of gambling psychotherapy are the source of two types of recommendations. The first recommendations relate to methodological rigour. The second recommendations set the following research problems e.g. finding a common factor of different therapeutic approaches, gender as a moderator or an issue of dual diagnosis in treating gamblers.

  6. HELPFUL ASPECTS OF THE THERAPEUTIC RELATIONSHIP IN INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Urška Modic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a qualitative study of helpful aspects of the therapeutic relationship in Integrative Psychotherapy. Participants of the study were sixteen clients who were in the process of Integrative Psychotherapy for at least a year. Participants were interviewed with the adapted version of the Change Interview (Elliott, 1999, which involves a semi-structured empathic exploration of the client's experience in therapy. The analysis of the clients’ experience of Integrative Psychotherapy revealed six categories of helpful aspects of therapeutic relationship: the therapist’s empathic attunement, the therapist’s acceptance, the match between the client and the therapist, feelings of trust and safety, feeling of connection, and experience of a new relational experience. Based on results of the research, we developed a model of the healing relationship in integrative psychotherapy. This model describes the interrelatedness of these six helpful aspects of the therapeutic relationship. The categories of empathic attunement and acceptance proved to be the most important categories relating to the therapist’s contribution to the healing therapeutic relationship. Clients described that the therapist’s empathic attunement and acceptance influenced the development of safety and trust, feelings of connection and promotion of new relational experiences. The results of this study are discussed in relation to the theories of Integrative Psychotherapy and research regarding the therapeutic relationship in psychotherapy.

  7. Spiritually and Religiously Integrated Group Psychotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

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    Dorte Toudal Viftrup

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We systematically reviewed the research literature on spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy to answer the following three questions: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded.

  8. Segmented assimilation and attitudes toward psychotherapy: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers-Sirin, Lauren

    2013-07-01

    The present study examines the relations between acculturative stress, mental health, and attitudes toward psychotherapy, and whether these relations are the same for immigrants of color and White immigrants. This study predicted that acculturative stress would have a significant, negative relation with attitudes toward psychotherapy and that this relation would be moderated by race (immigrants of color and White immigrants) so that as acculturative stress increases, attitudes toward psychotherapy become more negative for immigrants of color but not White immigrants. Finally, mental health was predicted to mediate the relation between acculturative stress and attitudes toward psychotherapy for immigrants of color, but not White immigrants. Participants were 149 first-generation, immigrant, young adults, between the ages of 18 and 29, who identified as White, Black, Latino, or Asian. A significant negative correlation was found between acculturative stress and attitudes toward psychotherapy. A moderated mediation analysis demonstrated that the negative relation between acculturative stress and attitudes toward psychotherapy was mediated by mental health symptoms for immigrants of color but not White immigrants. PMID:23544838

  9. Quality Assessment Study of Brief Psychotherapy at a University HMO Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poey, Kent

    1981-01-01

    The results of a short-term psychotherapy quality assessment study, conducted at a university mental health service, are described. The outcome indicates that high-quality brief psychotherapy can be provided by university counseling services. (JN)

  10. Gay affirmative psychotherapy with lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals: implications for contemporary psychotherapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Although a fair amount has been written about gay affirmative psychotherapy, there has not been a clear consensus on what actually constitutes gay affirmative therapy. Because there are no real theoretical framework, operational definitions, or outcome measures, pychotherapists are left unsure about how to incorporate it into their practice and researchers are unsure how best to investigate it. This article offers recommendations to identify gay affirmative therapy as a culturally competent approach for working with lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and offers future research directions including how to utilize the "coming out" narrative in gay affirmative therapy. PMID:23039349

  11. Experience with non-drug therapies (psychotherapy, phytotherapy, reflexotherapy) for neurasthenia

    OpenAIRE

    Bozhko, S. A.; N.A. Tyuvina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to study the efficiency of treating neurasthenia by psychotherapy in combination with reflexotherapy (acupuncture) and phytotherapy. Patients and methods. Psychotherapy or combination treatment (psychotherapy + reflexotherapy, psychotherapy + phytotherapy) was performed in 96 neurasthenic patients (65 men and 31 women) aged 18 to 40 years. Therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated by psychometric testing using the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI), the Spielberger-Hanin test, an...

  12. Nonverbal synchrony of head- and body-movement in psychotherapy: different signals have different associations with outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eRamseyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The coordination of patient’s and therapist’s bodily movement – nonverbal synchrony – has been empirically shown to be associated with psychotherapy outcome. This finding was based on dynamic movement patterns of the whole body. The present paper is a new analysis of an existing dataset (Ramseyer & Tschacher, 2011, which extends previous findings by differentiating movements pertaining to head and upper-body regions. Method: In a sample of 70 patients (37 female, 33 male treated at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic, we quantified nonverbal synchrony with an automated objective video-analysis algorithm (Motion Energy Analysis, MEA. Head- and body-synchrony was quantified during the initial 15 minutes of video-recorded therapy sessions. Micro-outcome was assessed with self-report post-session questionnaires provided by patients and their therapists. Macro-outcome was measured with questionnaires that quantified attainment of treatment goals and changes in experiencing and behavior at the end of therapy. Results: The differentiation of head- and body-synchrony showed that these two facets of motor coordination were differentially associated with outcome. Head-synchrony predicted global outcome of therapy, while body-synchrony did not, and body-synchrony predicted session outcome, while head-synchrony did not. Conclusions: The results pose an important amendment to previous findings, which showed that nonverbal synchrony embodied both outcome and interpersonal variables of psychotherapy dyads. The separation of head- and body-synchrony suggested that distinct mechanisms may operate in these two regions: Head-synchrony embodied phenomena with a long temporal extension (overall therapy success, while body-synchrony embodied phenomena of a more immediate nature (session-level success. More explorations with fine-grained analyses of synchronized phenomena in nonverbal behavior may shed additional light on the embodiment of

  13. Reflections on Individual Psychotherapy with University Students: What Seems to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, Rolffs; Talley, Joseph E.; Cooper, Stacie L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors offer reflections on what seems to work in individual psychotherapy with university students. Discussion centers around the topics of triage and disposition, referral, crisis intervention, stress management, open-ended psychotherapy, extratherapeutic factors, and the psychotherapy relationship. These observations are not intended to be…

  14. A New Language for Child Psychotherapy: A Response to Jerald Kay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, James J.; Borden, William

    2009-01-01

    Jerald Kay's article in this issue reviews important research in the areas of adult psychotherapy and neuroscience, and their implications for child psychotherapy. We respond by exploring some of the strengths and limitations of these lines of research and their implications for child psychotherapy development and research. The paper closes with…

  15. The Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy Strategies Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Bryce D.; Weisz, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Most everyday child and adolescent psychotherapy does not follow manuals that document the procedures. Consequently, usual clinical care has remained poorly understood and rarely studied. The Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy-Strategies scale (TPOCS-S) is an observational measure of youth psychotherapy procedures…

  16. Culturally Adapted Psychotherapy and the Legitimacy of Myth: A Multilevel Model, Direct Comparison Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benish, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    Culturally adapted psychotherapy has potential to improve psychotherapy outcomes for ethnic and racial minorities and solve a decades-long conundrum that alteration of specific ingredients does not improve psychotherapy outcomes. Adaptation of the cultural explanation of illness, known as the anthropological Myth in universal healing practices…

  17. Report of the Psychotherapy Task Force of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Ritvo, Rachel; Al-mateen, Cheryl; Ascherman, Lee; Beardslee, William; Hartmann, Lawrence; LEWIS, OWEN; Papilsky, Shirley; Sargent, John; Sperling, Eva; Stiener, Gregory; Szigethy, Eva

    1999-01-01

    In this task force report, the authors define the field of child and adolescent psychotherapy; review the state of the field with respect to advocacy, training, research, and clinical practice; and recommend steps to ensure that psychotherapy remains a core competence of child and adolescent psychiatrists. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:93–102)

  18. Psychotherapy as a healing practice, scientific endeavor, and social justice action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Diaz, Lillian

    2012-12-01

    The author discusses the evolution of psychotherapy as a healing practice, a scientific endeavor, and a multicultural empowering process. Social justice, the next force in psychotherapy, is presented. The author predicts that psychotherapy will embrace its sociopolitical nature by subscribing to social justice action. Within this framework, psychotherapists can work toward the promotion of political, social, economic, and cultural rights of oppressed individuals.

  19. Applications of Mindfulness in Psychotherapy – Contemporary Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut ŠKODLAR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness has without doubt been the fastest spreading and most popular concept in psychotherapy in the last two decades. Its influence exceeds that of any other individual concept or approach in modern psychotherapy. However, there are many dilemmas, open questions and controversies related to this rapid, almost fanatic spread, which obviously compensates for a certain lack in modern Euro- and Americo-centric societies. Similarly, we are witnessing in the West a lack of reflection, a process of limitless idealization, and the search for a panacea. This all flows with a tint of colonialism, presumptuously taking over ideas, concepts and techniques without a proper study of the primary sources, and with all the accompanying negative side-effects: profiteering, self-promotion, unethical conduct, empty promises of instant rewards, and so on. In the present paper, the development of interest in mindfulness in psychotherapy, as well as the research findings and dilemmas, and concepts and mechanisms of applying mindfulness in psychotherapy, will be reviewed. The main purpose of the paper is to contribute to the critical reflection in studying and applying mindfulness in psychotherapy.

  20. Plasticity-augmented psychotherapy for refractory depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2016-10-01

    Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy have been the mainstays of treatment for depression and anxiety disorders during the last century. However, treatment response has not improved in the last few decades, with only half of all patients responding satisfactorily to typical antidepressants. To fulfill the needs of the remaining patients, new treatments with better efficacy are in demand. The addition of psychotherapy to antidepressant treatment has been shown to be superior to pharmacotherapy alone. However, the time costs of psychotherapy limit its use for clinicians and patients. Advancements in neuroscience have contributed to an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of depressive and anxiety disorders. In particular, recent advances in the field of fear conditioning have provided valuable insight into the treatment of refractory depressive and anxiety disorders. In this review, we studied the reconsolidation-updating paradigm and the concept of epigenetic modification, which has been shown to permanently attenuate remote fear memory. This has implications for drug-augmented, e.g. antidepressant and valproic acid, psychotherapy. Future research on more sophisticated psychotherapy techniques will increase the desirability of this treatment modality for both clinicians and patients. PMID:27072378

  1. Problems of process-efficiency studies in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A E

    1996-01-01

    Three areas of psychotherapy research can be delimited of which differential efficiency research promises to be the most fruitful, because it will eventually inform us which interventions with what kind of patient and what kind of problem will be the most constructive. One problem it can solve is the so-called equivalence paradox. This epitheton designates the fact, that in spite of the enormous differences in theory and interventions between the different kinds of psychotherapies, their results are not remarkably divergent. One quite popular hypothesis is that this is due to common factors, commun to any and every kind of psychotherapy. Our results indicate that this explanation is too simplistic because it uses a monosubstance-doses-effect-relationship model and disregards interaction. One other avenue is the relevant events approach. Our examples yield equivocal results. Nevertheless this remains a promising field of investigation. Finally there are time series analyses which are probably most germane to the field of psychotherapies. One illustration with a case of negative psychotherapy outcome is presented. Time series analysis is able to show that the patient changed to a negativistic attitude in the middle of session, whereas the psychoanalyst only changed at the beginning of session 10 respectively in its middle.

  2. Group psychotherapy for patients with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, J A; Ingram, T A; Johnson, W

    1993-09-01

    Some of the goals of our group psychotherapy sessions on the inpatient unit include (1) creation of an emotional climate of acceptance and warmth that helps patients learn to accept themselves and their feelings, (2) frequent intervention by the group facilitator/therapist to help facilitate social interaction for patients whose communication ability is impaired, (3) opportunity for patients to experience the feeling of belonging, of being part of a group, (4) opportunity for patients to ventilate feelings and rediscover mutual kinds of experience, (5) opportunity for patients to reminisce about past accomplishments and give new meaning to their current lives, and (6) creation of a platform for patients to achieve a sense of self by expressing personal opinions in an environment of respect and acceptance. The outcome of group therapy for demented as well as nondemented patients should be increased ability to cope with losses at several levels, promotion of new skills, increased adaptation skills, and increased ability to accept change. We also want patients to learn to express feelings and to realize that the expression of feelings can have a positive outcome (relief from repression, clarification of ambivalence, solutions, etc). PMID:8367749

  3. The psychotherapy of core borderline psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, G

    1993-01-01

    A psychodynamic formulation of borderline psychopathology includes the understanding of the borderline patient's aloneness problems, need-fear dilemma issues, and difficulties with primitive guilt. The aloneness problems are at the core of the disorder, and involve an inability to maintain an evocative memory, and holding and soothing introjects of significant people when under stress of separation. The possible childhood origins of these difficulties are explored and related to the ways these issues emerge in psychotherapy. The psychodynamic formulation is crucial in the psychotherapeutic approach to the aloneness problems. It helps the therapist work with the aloneness difficulties and understand the options as the therapy continues. Since rapid therapeutic decisions are often necessary with borderline patients, the formulation provides the necessary framework, and helps the therapist process and utilize countertransference feelings. Projective identification is an important concept that helps explain the complex transference/countertransference experiences, and is used in defining the resolution of the aloneness problems of borderline patients. Finally, limit-setting and the use of transitional objects are explored, utilizing the psychodynamic framework that has been defined. PMID:8517469

  4. Harm reduction psychotherapy: an innovative alternative to classical addictions theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Patt

    2002-05-01

    Harm Reduction Psychotherapy is an innovative treatment for people with alcohol and other drug problems. Unlike the traditional disease model of addiction, HRP uses a biopsychosocial approach to understand the complexities of drug use, abuse, and addiction. In other words, in the context of HRP, addiction is not the primary issue. Rather, it is an interactive phenomenon in which the relative weight of biology, psychology, and social factors varies for each person and for each drug he or she uses. HRP allows us to assess each person individually and to plan treatment that is tailored to the individual's relationship with alcohol and other drugs. It also incorporates other important problems: emotional disorders, family problems, social alienation, and medical complications. These issues are discussed at the beginning of consultation, without patients having to focus solely on their alcohol or drug problem. The unique aspect to HRP is that patients do not have to commit to abstinence as a condition of, or even necessarily as a goal of, treatment. HRP seeks to identify and work with the barriers to treatment adherence in any patient. It is clear that most medical patients have some difficulty understanding and adhering to medical recommendations and treatment protocols. However, drug users have particular problems that must be identified. HRP helps people create individual strategies to decrease harmful alcohol and drug use. It uses a nonjudgmental and collaborative approach to actively encourage individuals to explore their own barriers to change and to choose among a range of options such as abstinence, moderation, or other short-term goals. Motivational interviewing can be used to motivate behavioral change with the goal of reducing the effects of adverse consequences.

  5. [What place is there for psychotherapy in public psychiatry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, U; Ambresin, G; de Roten, Y; Fassassi, S; Hedjal, A; Herrera, F; Kolly, S; Pomini, V; Preisig, M; Despland, J-N

    2010-09-22

    The question of the place of psychotherapy in psychiatric public care is posed in this article. We will address this question first by presenting two clinical and research programmes which were implemented in a clinical psychiatric unit, section Karl Jaspers (Service of General Psychiatry) of the Department of Psychiatry CHUV, in Lausanne with the collaboration of the University Institute of Psychotherapy. The first one puts forward psychodynamic psychotherapy of depressed inpatients; the clinical programme and the research questions on efficacy of this treatment are discussed. The second focuses on the early treatment of patients with Borderline Personality Disorder, in particular in its research question on the effect of the motive-oriented therapeutic relationship in this process. We conclude by underlining the convergences of the two programmes. PMID:20963958

  6. Psychotherapy training: Suggestions for core ingredients and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, James F; Castonguay, Louis G

    2007-12-01

    Despite our considerable depth and breadth of empirical knowledge on psychotherapy process and outcome, research on psychotherapy training is somewhat lacking. We would argue, however, that the scientist-practitioner model should not only guide practice, but also the way our field approaches training. In this paper we outline our perspective on the crucial elements of psychotherapy training based on available evidence, theory, and clinical experience, focusing specifically on the structure, key components, and important skills to be learned in a successful training program. In addition, we derive specific research directions based on the crucial elements of our proposed training perspective, and offer general considerations for research on training, including method and measurement issues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Interpersonal Psychotherapy in the Treatment of Perinatal Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Ergil Altin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal depression is a psychiatric disorder that is not sufficiently diagnosed and directed to treatment. Its acute and chronic outcomes influence not only the mother but also the infant and the relationship between them. Both pregnancy and the postpartum periods are the times of significant physiological and emotional changes which also influence interpersonal relationships. Interpersonal risk factors like insufficient social support and increased social conflict can have an important impact on the women’s mental and physiological health during this period. Studies have shown that women prefer psychological and social management over drugs during this period. Interpersonal psychotherapy is a time-limited treatment approach, especially focusing on interpersonal difficulties with the goal of reducing depressive symptoms and improving interpersonal functioning. Such distressing factors which can occur during pregnancy and delivery are compatible with the four main problem areas that interpersonal psychotherapy addresses so that the therapist can easily use interpersonal psychotherapy in order to solve such difficulties.

  8. Parent-Infant Psychotherapy and Postpartum Depression: The Fathers Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena da Rosa Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the specificities of postpartum maternal depression, the literature recommends that fathers become involved in psychological interventions within this context. This study presents an investigation of the participation of fathers in parent-infant psychotherapy in the context of maternal postpartum depression. Two families participated in this study, both with a child aged between 7 and 8 months old, whose mothers showed depressive symptoms. These families participated in parent-infant psychotherapy lasting approximately 12 sessions. Analysis of the fathers’ participation in psychotherapy showed that their presence during sessions enables the therapy to address aspects of parenthood, and also reduce the feeling of mothers as being the only ones responsible for the family’s process of change. In regard to the technique, the presence of fathers during sessions allows the therapist to see and address the issues concerning mother-father-infant during sessions.

  9. Learning how to ask in ethnography and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Inga-Britt

    2003-01-01

    To social anthropologists an affinity with psychotherapy lies in the view that this discipline is a social science. Increasingly, social anthropologists offer comments and analyse their own data using psychotherapeutic or psychoanalytic frames of reference. At the same time, a methodological crisis has developed in ethnography. This is a crisis of how to carry out an ethnographic enquiry in a disciplined manner without either claiming to be a detached observer on the one hand or explaining away the subjective experiences of informants or clients with too much interpretation on the other. The aim of this paper is to address this crisis and to suggest ways in which ethnographers can use techniques from one type of psychotherapy, namely systemic or family psychotherapy in order to access social and psychological aspects of the lives of their informants. The paper achieves this by describing systemic psychotherapy and its theoretical foundations in the ethnographic work of Gregory Bateson. It then reviews the mainly medical anthropology literature in which the connection between psychotherapy and anthro pology has been discussed. While this literature has suggested a narrative and a performative approach to ethnographic data and, therefore, to informants, it has not extended the analytic frame to include the ethnographer him/herself within these frames. Clinical case material is presented to demonstrate how such an inclusion is central to the practice of systemic psychotherapy and to show that this type of material is ethnographic. The techniques of double description, hypothesising and circular questioning are described and demonstrated, and it is argued that adapting these to an ethnographic enquiry will enhance the validity of the anthropological project.

  10. DYNAMICS OF THE ANXIETY DISORDERS IN THE COURSE OF SHORT-TERM PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Hmylova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The tendency of psychotherapy modern concepts referring to the short-term forms having been taken into account, we carried out the research aimed at the study of short-term form personality-oriented psychotherapy effect on the anxiety disorder dynamics. 103 patients with neurotic disorders were examined in the neurosis and psychotherapy department of the Bekhterev Psychoneurological Research Institute. The findings revealed the situational and personal anxiety level to be objectively decreased in the short-term group psychotherapy course. The short-term group psychotherapy was proved to bean effective method in anxiety disorders treatment considering indications and limitations.

  11. [Institutional psychotherapy, caring for patients and the place of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogoul, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Institutional psychotherapy was developed in the specific context of the "assassination" of the Spanish revolution. There are two distinct movements or two periods. The first, based around Georges Daumézon and Henri Ey gave birth to the sector. The second, around FrançoisTosquelles and Jean Oury emphasised the asylum as the place of care. The function of institutional psychotherapy is to care not only for the patients but also the place of treatment. To fulfil this function, it has a tool box: transfer, the fight against the overvaluation of hierarchy as well as the function of the therapeutic club.

  12. Opportunities and challenges for promoting psychotherapy in contemporary China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xudong

    2014-01-01

    Summary China’s first mental health law, which went into effect last year, envisages a world in which psychotherapy is an integral part of all levels of medical care. There are many obstacles to achieving this goal. The new law empowers psychiatrists to provide psychotherapy but few of them have the time or inclination to do so because of the lower incomes generated by non-biological treatments. Trained clinical psychologists are in very short supply partly because of the lack of supervised t...

  13. Psychotherapy research: do we know what works for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonagy, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Clinical decision-making about suitability for psychological therapies is hampered by limitations of psychotherapy research and our lack of understanding of therapeutic mechanisms. Watzke et al's important randomised controlled study offers apparent validation for clinical judgement in relation to suitability for psychodynamic psychotherapy but also highlights the negative effects of unselected assignment to this type of treatment. Here, I consider why systematic selection for this form of treatment may be important and suggest how the limited effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy for an unselected group of patients may be addressed by more systematic treatment delivery and the ongoing monitoring of intermediate treatment outcomes. PMID:20679254

  14. Psychotherapy: Adaptation or Walking Together? (A Roadside Conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bychkova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns psychotherapeutic work in the perspective of existential approach. Two trends are discerned in modern psychotherapy regardless of the known division into different schools – the adaptation therapy, and the one viewing a person in the context of his Personal being in the world. Therapy here is understood as the Way of mutual personal growth of both the therapist and the client. Distinction is singled out as one of the central points in forming the meanings, essential for both the normal development of a child and in psychotherapy, and remaining significant for spiritual growth in adults. 

  15. Beyond Mindfulness: Buddha Nature and the Four Postures in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacamano, James; Altman, Jennifer K

    2016-10-01

    We propose to incorporate the contextual view of the Buddhist teachings of the Three Turnings into applications of mindfulness in psychotherapy; specifically by applying the teaching of the Four Postures, which are expressions of innate health in ordinary life activities. This practice may expand understanding of the core mechanisms of different modalities of mindfulness and psychotherapy, thereby supporting clinicians in guiding clients on a healing path that is in natural alignment with each individual. By its allegiance to inherent wakefulness (Buddha Nature), this teaching supports clients in appreciating their own inherent health and the health of the world around them. PMID:26661827

  16. The renewal of humanism in European psychotherapy: developments and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Längle, Alfried A; Kriz, Jürgen

    2012-12-01

    In Europe, humanistic psychotherapy is becoming increasingly widespread. Not only are the explicitly "humanistic" psychotherapies being robustly used, they are increasingly being integrated into approaches not traditionally viewed as humanistic. One can therefore observe a progression in the personalization of methodology within European modes of practice. In the past several decades, humanistic psychology has inspired the expanding use of existential-phenomenological modes of practice. This theoretical base, coupled with recent trends in person-centered systems theory, points toward an invigorating future for humanistic forms of practice in Europe, despite the political trends toward psychotherapeutic practice in Germany.

  17. Psychosis and the dynamics of the psychotherapy process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment of the 's......The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment...

  18. Misuse of statistical test in three decades of psychotherapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, R; Serlin, R C; Omer, H

    1994-02-01

    This article reviews the misuse of statistical tests in psychotherapy research studies published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology in the years 1967-1968, 1977-1978, and 1987-1988. It focuses on 3 major problems in statistical practice: inappropriate uses of null hypothesis tests and p values, neglect of effect size, and inflation of Type I error rate. The impressive frequency of these problems is documented, and changes in statistical practices over the past 3 decades are interpreted in light of trends in psychotherapy research. The article concludes with practical suggestions for rational application of statistical tests.

  19. Changes in personality functioning as a result of group psychotherapy with elements of individual psychotherapy in persons with neurotic and personality disorders – MMPI-2

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Cyranka; Krzysztof Rutkowski; Michał Mielimąka; Jerzy A. Sobański; Bogna Smiatek-Mazgaj; Katarzyna Klasa; Edyta Dembińska; Łukasz Müldner-Nieckowski; Paweł Rodziński

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study of group psychotherapy influence on the personality functioning of patients on treatment for neurotic disorders and selected personality disorders (F4-F6 under ICD-10). Methods The study concerned 82 patients (61 women and 21 men) who underwent intensive short-term group psychotherapy in a day ward. A comprehensive assessment of the patients’ personality functioning was carried out at the outset and the end of the psychotherapy utilising the MMPI-2 questionnaire...

  20. Der Einfluss emotionaler Unterstützung in Beziehungen und deren Fluktuation auf den Erfolg einer Psychotherapie : Synergetik in der Psychotherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Zillgens, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The present paper is part of the project „Synergetik in der Psychotherapie“ (synergetics in psychotherapy) which checks whether the system of a psychotherapy can be analyzed by synergetics or systems science. This dissertation examines the validity of some specific synergetic hypotheses about psychotherapy and suggests the following links: Emotional support in relationships enhances therapy outcome, occuring throughout the whole length of therapy as well as at times of personal change. Comple...

  1. Effectiveness of Spiritually Augmented Psychotherapy on Dysfunctional Attitudes in Patients with Dysthymic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrollah Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of spiritually augmented psychotherapy (SAPT on the dysfunctional attitudes of patients with dysthymic disorder. Methods: A mixed qualitative and quantitative method was used in the present study. SAPT model was prepared in the first phase, and in the second phase, a double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed. The study subjects consisted of 62 patients with dysthymic disorder selected from several clinical centers of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Isfahan, Iran. The participants were randomly assigned to 3 experimental groups and 1 control group. The first group received 8 sessions of SAPT treatment, the second group also had 8 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT which was specific to dysthymic disorder, and third group were under antidepressant treatment. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale was used to evaluate all the participants in 4 measurement stages. The data were analyzed using repeated measures MANCOVA. Results: Findings showed that SAPT had higher efficacy on the modification of dysfunctional attitudes than CBT and medication (p < 0.05. Conclusion: These findings supported the efficacy of psychotherapy enriched with cultural structures and spiritual teachings.

  2. Child, caregiver, and therapist perspectives on therapeutic alliance in usual care child psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurso, Erin C.; Garland, Ann F.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the temporal stability and cross-informant agreement on multiple perspectives of child and caregiver alliance with therapists in usual care psychotherapy. Baseline predictors of alliance were also examined. Children with disruptive behavior problems (n=209) and their caregivers were followed for up to 16 months after initiating psychotherapy at a community-based clinic. Alliance was rated by children, caregivers, and therapists every four months for as long as families participated in treatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine whether child and caregiver alliance differed across time, as well to examine factors associated with each perspective on alliance. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) between child, caregiver, and therapist reports of alliance were also examined. Alliance was rated relatively high overall across perspectives. Clients (children and caregivers) tended to report the strongest and most stable alliance, while therapists reported the weakest alliance and perceived deteriorations in child alliance over time. Inter-informant agreement was variable for child and caregiver alliance; agreement was moderate between clients and therapists. Several predictors of alliance emerged, including child gender, anxiety diagnosis, caregiver race/ethnicity, and therapist experience. This study provides methodological information about reports of therapeutic alliance across time and informants that can inform current efforts to understand the alliance-outcome association. PMID:25314097

  3. Process and technique factors associated with patient ratings of session safety during psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah F; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between patient ratings of in-session safety with psychotherapeutic techniques and process. Ninety-four participants received Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy (STDP) at a university-based clinic. Patient experiences of therapeutic process were self-assessed early in treatment using the Session Evaluation Questionnaire (SEQ Stiles, 1980). Techniques implemented in session were identified using the Comparative Psychotherapy Process Scale (CPPS: Hilsenroth et al., 2005). Alliance was evaluated with the Combined Alliance Short Form-Patient Version (CASF-P; Hatcher and Barends, 1996). Safety significantly correlated with session depth, smoothness, and positivity. Safety was significantly related to the interaction of psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive-behavioral techniques, but to neither individual subscale Safety significantly correlated with CASF-P Total, Confident Collaboration, and Bond. Patient experiences of safety are consistent with exploration and depth of session content. Integration of some CB techniques within a psychodynamic model may facilitate a sense of safety. Safety is notably intertwined with the therapeutic relationship.

  4. Impact of a CBT psychotherapy group on post-operative bariatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulac, Julie; Sandre, Daniella

    2015-01-01

    Psychological difficulties for patients seeking bariatric surgery are greater and in the post-operative phase, a significant minority go on to experience significant psychosocial difficulties, increasing their risk of poorer post-operative adjustment and associated weight regain. 17 post-operative patients participated in an eight-week cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) based psychotherapy group at the Ottawa Hospital. A pre-post design with a 3-month follow-up investigated the impact of the group on emotional eating, general as well as obesity-specific adjustment, psychological distress, and attachment. There were significant and meaningful improvements in patients' level of psychological distress, perceived difficulties in their lives, and weight-related adjustment that were maintained at a 3-month follow-up period. Although statistical change was not significant, there were also meaningful improvements in emotional overeating and relationship anxiety and avoidance. The intervention also appeared to be acceptable to patients in that attendance and satisfaction were good. Findings suggest that a short-term CBT psychotherapy group led to significant and meaningful benefits in psychological wellbeing for post-surgical bariatric patients.

  5. 心理咨询与心理治疗%Psychological counseling and psychotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范青; 陈涵; 陈珏

    2014-01-01

    Psychological counseling is to solve the problem of the patients in the process of negotiation and help, while the purpose of psychotherapy is the treatment with modulation and correction. This paper elaborates the suitable individuals for psychological counseling/psychotherapy as well as psychological treatment including the psychoanalytic therapy, behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, clients center therapy, family therapy and Morita therapy.%心理咨询是在协商与帮助患者过程中达到解决问题的目的,心理治疗则是按治疗方法对患者进行调治和矫正,本文阐述适合心理咨询/心理治疗的人群以及主要的心理治疗方法,包括精神分析治疗、行为治疗、认知治疗、咨客中心疗法、家庭治疗和森田治疗。

  6. Neuroimaging of psychotherapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsen, Anders Lillevik; van den Heuvel, Odile A; Hansen, Bjarne; Kvale, Gerd

    2015-09-30

    The symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) include intrusive thoughts, compulsive behavior, anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility, which are associated with dysfunction in dorsal and ventral corticostriato-thalamocortical (CSTC) circuits. Psychotherapy involving exposure and response prevention has been established as an effective treatment for the affective symptoms, but the impact on the underlying neural circuits is not clear. This systematic review used the Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO databases to investigate how successful therapy may affect neural substrates of OCD. Sixteen studies measuring neural changes after therapy were included in the review. The studies indicate that dysfunctions in neural function and structure are partly reversible and state-dependent for affective symptoms, which may also apply to cognitive symptoms. This is supported by post-treatment decreases of symptoms and activity in the ventral circuits during symptom provocation, as well as mainly increased activity in dorsal circuits during cognitive processing. These effects appear to be common to both psychotherapy and medication approaches. Although neural findings were not consistent across all studies, these findings indicate that people with OCD may experience functional, symptomatic, and neural recovery after successful treatment. PMID:26228566

  7. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and psychotherapy in depression: Results from a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grande da Silva, Giovanna; Wiener, Carolina David; Barbosa, Luana Porto; Gonçalves Araujo, Jaciana Marlova; Molina, Mariane Lopez; San Martin, Pedro; Oses, Jean Pierre; Jansen, Karen; Dias de Mattos Souza, Luciano; Azevedo da Silva, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Depression is a serious condition that is associated with great psychic suffering and major impairments on the patient's general health, quality of life, and social and occupational activities. In some cases, it may lead to suicide. Regardless of the innumerous research works that have already addressed depression in wide and specific facets, there is still a lot to grasp in order to effectively help preventing and treating depression. This work presents data from a randomized clinical trial that sought to evaluate the effectiveness of two brief psychotherapeutic for Depression: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Supportive-Expressive Dynamic Psychotherapy (SEDP). This was a convenience sample composed of 46 individuals that were evaluated using a structured diagnostic interview and then randomly allocated to the SEDP group. We examined baseline and post-intervention serum levels of the Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α) in addition to the severity of depressive symptoms according to the Outcome Questionnaire - 45.2 (OQ-45.2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results show that serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels, as well as the scores from the OQ-45.2 and the BDI significantly decreased after 16 sessions of SEDP (p brief psychodynamic psychotherapy in the reduction of depressive symptoms and serum inflammatory levels that are associated with depression. PMID:26802811

  8. Effectiveness of Positive Psychotherapy in Improving Opiate Addicts’ Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Porzoor

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed to assess the effectiveness of positive psychotherapy based on quality of life in improving opiate addicts’ quality of life. Method: A quasi experimental research design long with control group and pre-test, post-test and follow-up was employed for the conduct of this study. All the opiate addicts referring to treatment centers of Ardebil city in 2013 constituted the statistical population of the study and the number of 36 participants was selected as the sample via purposive sampling and randomly assigned into experimental and control groups. Quality-of-life-based psychotherapy was conducted on the experimental group in 8 sessions while the control group received no intervention. Quality of life questionnaire was used for data collection purposes. Results: The results suggested the effectiveness of the intervention in quality of life. Conclusion: This intervention, which is formed from the combination positive psychology and cognitive-behavioral approach, can be used as an effective treatment method.

  9. The Emergence of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy for Treatment Resistant Patients: Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbass, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) was developed out of the need for relatively short psychodynamic psychotherapeutic treatment approaches to complex and resistant patient populations so common in public health systems. Based on extensive study of video recordings, Habib Davanloo discovered, and other researchers have validated, some important clinical ingredients that align the therapist with healthy aspects of the patient striving for resolution of chronic neurotic disorders and fragile character structure. In the case of character neurotic highly resistant patients, these approaches including "pressure," "clarification," "challenge to defenses," and "head on collision" can be used in a tailored and properly timed way to help the chronically suffering patient to overcome his or her own resistance and access core drivers of these pathologies. In this article the meta-psychological basis of ISTDP is reviewed and illustrated with an extended case vignette. PMID:27200465

  10. Growth in Emotional Intelligence. Psychotherapy with a Learning Disabled Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrell, Sue

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the once-weekly psychoanalytic psychotherapy of a girl, called Ellie, aged eight at the start of her treatment. Ellie had a learning disability and displayed difficult behaviour at school and at home. In her therapy, Ellie grew in emotional intelligence, more in touch with and able to express her feelings. Her behaviour…

  11. Effectiveness of Child Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy in a Clinical Outpatient Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Elisabeth Kuhn; Tiellet Nunes, Maria Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of child psychoanalytic psychotherapy in a clinical outpatient setting in a city in southern Brazil. Three psychological tests (Rorschach, Bender and WISC III) were administered to 23 children, aged 6-11 years old, and the Child Behaviour Check List (CBCL) was completed by the parents. All…

  12. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postpartum Depression : A Treatment Program

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Scott; O’Hara, Michael W.

    1995-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a frequent complication of childbirth. Postpartum depression is associated with disruptions in interpersonal relationships, and the puerperium is a period of major role transition. In contrast to other subtypes of depression, however, postpartum depression often is not treated with medication, which is relatively contraindicated for women who are breastfeeding. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) focuses specifically on the effects of depression on interp...

  13. Neurocognitive psychotherapy for adult attention deficit hyperactive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Halder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously thought as a childhood disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is reported to be spreading at an increasing rate and affecting 4% to 5% of the adult population. It is characterized by persistent problems of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. We present the case of an adult ADHD patient intervened with neurocognitive psychotherapy.

  14. Methods and Mechanisms in the Efficacy of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Dean

    2011-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy," by J. Shedler. Shedler summarized a large body of research that shows psychodynamic therapy to have a substantial effect size, comparable to that for many empirically supported treatments. This is an important finding, in part refuting the concerns raised by Bornstein…

  15. Changes in Studying Abilities as Perceived by Students Attending Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härkäpää, Kristiina; Junttila, Outi; Lindfors, Olavi; Järvikoski, Aila

    2014-01-01

    In rehabilitative psychotherapy, the goal is to support and improve the person's working and studying capacity and to secure his/her staying in or entering the workforce. In this qualitative study, the aim was to describe the changes students experienced in their studying ability and the advancement of their studies as a result of the therapy…

  16. Teaching Pragmatic Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to Graduate Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan-Daston, Rana; Schneller, Debora

    2016-01-01

    Evolving developments in psychodynamic theory have strengthened it as an evidence-based approach and have made it concordant with social work's strengths-based, multicultural perspective. An elective focused on teaching fundamental concepts of psychodynamic psychotherapy was developed for graduate social work students based on Kolb's theory of…

  17. Psychotherapy with College Student Survivors of War and Political Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kathryn; Seeman, David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to bring to the fore a topic that has received little mention in the college student literature: conducting psychotherapy with survivors of war and political trauma who seek treatment at college and university counseling centers. Following a discussion of political trauma in relation to typical developmental…

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome and vocational stress: individual psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Anita D. Stuart; H Gertie Pretorius; Patricia K Nel

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide individualised psychotherapy for a sample suffering from IBS and vocational stress. Opsomming Die doelstelling van hierdie studie was om eïndividualiseerde psigoterapie te verskaf aan ’n steekproef van lyers met Prikkelbare Dermsindroom (PDS) en beroepspanning. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  19. Self-Cultivation: Culturally Sensitive Psychotherapies in Confucian Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kwang-Kuo; Chang, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    This article describes self-cultivation practices originating from the cultural traditions of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. It delineates the therapeutic implications of the three states of self pursued by these three traditions: namely, the "relational self", the "authentic self", and the "nonself". Several psychotherapy techniques derived…

  20. Brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy: theoretical issues and process indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassino, S; Amianto, F; Ferrero, A

    2008-06-01

    Brief psychotherapy is gaining interest worldwide, because of its good cost/effectiveness ratio and proved efficacy. The aim of the paper was to describe the brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy (B-APP): a brief, psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy referring to the individual psychology (IP). The B-APP theory refers to the following paradigms: 1) the individual represents a psychosomatic unity integrated in the social context; 2) the individual needs to build and regulate the image of the self; 3) bond patterns regulate human relationships and represent the symbolic ''fil rouge'' connecting the elements of the life-style. Its objectives are: 1) an at least partial resolution of the focus problem; 2) a decrease or a non-increase of symptoms; 3) a global increase of quality of life. The results depend on intrapsychic and relational changes. Indications are more relative than absolute. The possibility of identifying a meaningful focus is fundamental. The treatment scheme includes 15 sessions subdivided into 5 phases. B-APP offers a technical approach to brief psychotherapy which is suitable in many fields of psychiatry and liaison medicine such as preventive interventions in at-risk subjects, somatopsychic disorders and liaison psychiatry, personality and eating disorders, and treatment of emotionally disturbed children. It was applied as psychotherapeutic approach in some clinical outcome studies about eating disorders and severe personality disorders displaying a good efficacy.

  1. Inherent Self, Invented Self, Empty Self: Constructivism, Buddhism, and Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Spencer A.

    2010-01-01

    Constructivist and Buddhist approaches to counseling and psychotherapy share increasing popularity as well as similar epistemological assumptions and understanding of human dysfunction and its amelioration. These approaches can be seen as consistent with postmodern psychology, which is distinguished from a realist or foundationalist view. This…

  2. The Selection of Patients for Psychotherapy by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Wolfgang G.; Abston, Nathaniel, Jr.

    Research on the cognitive activity of clinicians during the initial interview has revealed that mental health professionals are often guided by social stereotypes of attractiveness in their choice of patients for intensive individual or group psychotherapy. Specifically, YAVIS patients (young, attractive, verbal, intelligent, successful) are…

  3. The Practice of Psychotherapy in Mexico: Past and Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Marcella D.; Frels, Rebecca K.; Chavez, Rafael Reyes; Sharma, Bipin

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the history of psychotherapy in Mexico and describes past and current practices of psychological services, training, and supervision for Mexican international students in the United States. Sample curricula, texts, and universities in Mexico are listed. Implications for training underscore the importance of collaboration and…

  4. Integrating Spirituality into Counselling and Psychotherapy: Theoretical and Clinical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Carla; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, spirituality has become a prominent focus of psychological inquiry. As research begins to elucidate the role of spiritual beliefs and behaviours in mental health and the influences of spirituality in psychotherapy, developing therapist competency in this domain has increased in importance. This article will first situate…

  5. Benchmarks for Psychotherapy Efficacy in Adult Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Kircher, John C.; Brown, George S.

    2007-01-01

    This study estimates pretreatment-posttreatment effect size benchmarks for the treatment of major depression in adults that may be useful in evaluating psychotherapy effectiveness in clinical practice. Treatment efficacy benchmarks for major depression were derived for 3 different types of outcome measures: the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression…

  6. A Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy Approach for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the need for university counseling centers (UCCs) to implement brief therapies and describes one such treatment, intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP), as a particularly viable therapeutic approach in this setting. Because ISTDP is not appropriate for all students seeking therapy, a careful assessment of the…

  7. The Development of a Psychotherapy Service at Amherst College

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    This description of counseling and psychotherapy services at Amherst College begins with our heritage from the "mental hygiene" movement of the nineteenth century, the founding of the first university mental health services and the later development of a counseling center tradition. By tracing the evolution at Amherst, from a brief counseling and…

  8. Effects of Therapist Response Modes in Brief Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined therapist response modes in 127 sessions of eight cases of brief psychotherapy with experienced therapists and anxious-depressed clients. Response modes had significant effect on immediate outcome, with self-disclosure, interpretation, approval, and paraphrase being the most helpful response modes. Found large individual differences in…

  9. Implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy in a Psychiatry Residency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtmacher, Jonathan; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Haller, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression is a brief, well researched treatment for acute major depression. This article describes the implementation of IPT as an evidence-based treatment for depression in a psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors tracked the implementation process over 5 years as interpersonal…

  10. Stigma of Psychotherapy: It's Not OK To Get Help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavet, James D.; Parker, Lisa; Kitowicz, Jennifer M.; MacDonald, Marian L.

    This paper describes two studies conducted to determine whether there is a stigma associated with being in psychotherapy and if so, how that stigma compares with the well-documented stigma associated with mental illness (Wahl, 1995). In the first study, community members (n=89) were asked to listen to an audiotaped statement from a young man. All…

  11. Counselling and Psychotherapy in Dialogue with Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John

    2011-01-01

    Counselling and psychotherapy is attracting government interest and intervention, for instance the proposal to regulate the profession by the Health Professions Council. Many therapists see this as a threat to its fundamental principles due to the fact that government policy is influenced by the medical model and managerialism. This article looks,…

  12. The Use of Digital Narratives to Enhance Counseling and Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Yegan

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances have impinged on every aspect of contemporary phenomenological experiences, including counseling and psychotherapy. The author explores the intersection of narrative therapy, specifically the traditional memory book, with the advances in information technology in the formulation of the digital memory book. The digital memory…

  13. The role of hope in psychotherapy with older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, L; Walsh, S

    2005-01-01

    The positive impact of psychotherapy upon the mental health problems of older people is increasingly accepted. However little attention has been paid to the role of hope in working therapeutically with older adults. Three relevant bodies of literature, namely adult psychotherapy, hope in older adulthood, and coping with chronic and terminal illness, provide a starting point for examining the therapeutic uses of hope. However, it is argued that these literatures cannot provide a sufficiently comprehensive conceptualisation of hope in psychotherapy with elders. Firstly, it is considered that hope in therapy is directly affected by key experiences of ageing, namely: facing physical and/or cognitive deterioration and facing death. Also, these three bodies of literature have tended to dichotomise hope as either beneficial and adaptive or dysfunctional and maladaptive. A developmental perspective is used to critique this dichotomy and a clinical framework is provided which examines the role and utility of hope in older adult psychotherapy from a more integrated viewpoint embedded in the client's life history. The framework is comprised of three types of 'hope work': 'facilitating realistic hope,' 'the work of despair' and 'surviving not thriving'. Suggestions are made about how this work may be carried out and with whom.

  14. Changing Attitudes in Underprivileged Adolescents Participating in Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, Julia

    Group psychotherapy was used with socio-economically deprived adolescents whose capacity for self-expression was promising. Non-psychotic acting out characters and passive inadequate personalities participated, and discussion, role playing, and psychodrama were the techniques utilized. After one year the following changes were seen: (1) increased…

  15. Addressing Anger Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    A young woman initiated counselling services at a community agency to address her explosive anger that was a remnant of childhood physical and emotional abuse. Sensorimotor psychotherapy was used to help this client learn how to monitor and regulate her sensorimotor processes. In conjunction with this approach, Cognitive behavioural therapy was…

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Didem Behice ÖZTOP; Emel KARAKAYA

    2013-01-01

    Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents....

  17. Abnormal Sexual Behavior in an Adult Male with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Raguraman, Janakiraman; Priyadharshini, Kothai R.; Chandrasekaran, R.; Vijaysagar, John

    2004-01-01

    A male patient with homosexual obsession in obsessive compulsive disorder shows a better outcome following a combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. This case report emphasizes the importance of combination therapy in obsessive compulsive disorder with abnormal sexual impulses and behavior.

  18. Psychotherapy Participants Show Increased Physiological Responsiveness to a Lab Stressor Relative to Matched Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R Steffen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that psychotherapy participants show increased physiological responsiveness to stress. The purpose of the present study was to examine differences between individuals participating in outpatient psychotherapy and matched controls using an experimental design. Forty-two psychotherapy participants and forty-eight matched controls were assessed on cardiovascular and cortisol functioning at baseline, during the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST, and during a twenty-minute recovery period. Psychotherapy participants and matched controls did not differ at baseline or during the TSST on the physiological measures but psychotherapy participants had higher cortisol and heart rate during the recovery period. In regards to reactivity, cortisol increased during the recovery period for the psychotherapy participants but decreased for those in the matched control group. Psychotherapy participants experiencing clinically significant levels of distress displayed elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate during the TSST when compared to psychotherapy participants not experiencing clinically significant levels of distress. Overall, physiological reactivity to stress appears to be an important issue for those in psychotherapy and directly addressing this issue may help improve psychotherapy outcomes.

  19. A randomized controlled dismantling trial of post-workshop consultation strategies to increase effectiveness and fidelity to an evidence-based psychotherapy for Posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Wiltsey Stirman, Shannon; Shields, Norman; Deloriea, Josh; Landy, Meredith SH; Belus, Jennifer M; Maslej, Marta M; Monson, Candice M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a serious mental health condition with substantial costs to individuals and society. Among military veterans, the lifetime prevalence of PTSD has been estimated to be as high as 20%. Numerous research studies have demonstrated that short-term cognitive-behavioral psychotherapies, such as Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), lead to substantial and sustained improvements in PTSD symptoms. Despite known benefits, only a minority of clinicians pr...

  20. Impulsivity and Stillness: NADA, Pharmaceuticals, and Psychotherapy in Substance Use and Other DSM 5 Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Carter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals and psychotherapy are commonly used in the management of impulsivity.  The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA protocol is an adjunctive therapy that involves the bilateral insertion of 1 to 5 predetermined ear needle points. One of the main benefits reported by patients, providers, and programs utilizing NADA is the sense of stillness, centering, and well-being. The induction of this attitude is seen as contributing to improved clinical outcomes including engagement and retention.  The attitude of stillness is also suggestive of a pathway to mitigating impulsivity. Impulsivity is associated with substance use disorders and other DSM 5 diagnoses.  Impulsivity has characteristics that are manifested clinically in behaviors such as disinhibition, poor self-control, lack of deliberation, thrill seeking, risk-taking. NADA holds promise as a useful treatment adjunct in the comprehensive management of disorders for which impulsivity is a prominent component.

  1. Measuring Patients’ Attachment Avoidance in Psychotherapy: Development of the Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale (AATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Láng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new scale measuring patient-therapist attachment avoidance was developed. Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale is a new measure based on the Bartholomew model of adult attachment (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991 and the Experience in Close Relationships Scale (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 to measure patients’ attachment avoidance towards therapists. With 112 patient-therapist dyads participating in the study, validation of a preliminary scale – measuring both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance in therapy – took place using therapists’ evaluations of patients’ relational behavior and patients’ self-reports about their attitude toward psychotherapy. Analysis of the data revealed six underlying scales. Results showed all six scales to be reliable. Validation of scales measuring attachment anxiety failed. The importance of Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale and its subscales is discussed.

  2. An Integrative Psychotherapy Approach to Foster Community Engagement and Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Study Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Whitesel, Frankie; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    This case study illustrates the use of a long-term integrative psychotherapy approach with a middle- aged man with chronic schizophrenia and a mood disorder. The case of "Holst" describes a man with a history of insecure attachment and trauma who later went on to contract a serious chronic illness, precipitating the onset of psychotic symptoms, depression, and chronic suicidal ideation, resulting in multiple hospitalizations. Combining metacognition-oriented therapy with elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychiatric rehabilitation, this approach fostered significantly improved community functioning and attainment of personal goals over time. Through the journey of therapy, the patient also developed a more coherent narrative about his life, established a stable sense of self, and became an active agent in the world. This case illustration demonstrates that these three different approaches can be used in a sequential and complementary fashion to foster recovery in the midst of serious physical and mental illness. PMID:26636563

  3. Impulsivity and Stillness: NADA, Pharmaceuticals, and Psychotherapy in Substance Use and Other DSM 5 Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kenneth; Olshan-Perlmutter, Michelle

    2015-11-26

    Pharmaceuticals and psychotherapy are commonly used in the management of impulsivity.  The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol is an adjunctive therapy that involves the bilateral insertion of 1 to 5 predetermined ear needle points. One of the main benefits reported by patients, providers, and programs utilizing NADA is the sense of stillness, centering, and well-being. The induction of this attitude is seen as contributing to improved clinical outcomes including engagement and retention.  The attitude of stillness is also suggestive of a pathway to mitigating impulsivity. Impulsivity is associated with substance use disorders and other DSM 5 diagnoses.  Impulsivity has characteristics that are manifested clinically in behaviors such as disinhibition, poor self-control, lack of deliberation, thrill seeking, risk-taking. NADA holds promise as a useful treatment adjunct in the comprehensive management of disorders for which impulsivity is a prominent component.

  4. Using Movement to Regulate Emotion: Neurophysiological Findings and Their Application in Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Emotion regulation is a person’s active attempt to manage their emotional state by enhancing or decreasing specific feelings. Peripheral theories of emotion argue that the origins of emotions stem from bodily responses. This notion has been reformulated in neurophysiological terms by Damasio, who claimed that emotions are generated by conveying the current state of the body to the brain through interoceptive and proprioceptive afferent input. The resulting brain activation patterns represent unconscious emotions and correlate with conscious feelings. This proposition implies that through deliberate control of motor behavior and its consequent proprioception and interoception, one could regulate his emotions and affect his feelings. This concept is used in dance/movement (psycho)therapy where, by guiding to move in a certain way, the therapist helps the client to evoke, process, and regulate specific emotions. Exploration and practice of new and unfamiliar motor patterns can help the client to experience new unaccustomed feelings. The idea that certain motor qualities enhance specific emotions is utilized by the therapist also when she mirrors the client’s movements or motor qualities in order to feel what the client feels, and empathize with them. Because of the mirror neurons, feeling what the client feels is enabled also through observation and imagination of their movements and posture. This principle can be used by verbal therapists as well, who should be aware of its bi-directionality: clients seeing the therapist’s motor behavior are unconsciously affected by the therapist’s bodily expressions. Additional implications for psychotherapy, of findings regarding mirror neurons activation, are discussed. PMID:27721801

  5. Common Errors in Conducting Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: Illustrative Vignettes and Alternative Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimboli, Frank; Keenan, Charles W; Marshall, Rycke L

    2016-01-01

    In this paper 12 common errors that occur in the course of psychodynamic psychotherapy are reviewed. Rationales for why we consider these to be errors are described, and vignettes are used to illustrate the errors, lastly, recommendations for alternate approaches consistent with effective psychodynamic psychotherapy are presented. The errors reviewed include concerns regarding the maintenance of appropriate limits and boundaries; decisions regarding the focus and form of treatment; no-suicide contracts; fee arrangements; missed sessions; psychological testing of psychotherapy patients; selecting appropriate patients for psychotherapy; and the importance of personal psychotherapy for the therapist. The suggestions provided are consistent with what we believe are the goals of psychodynamic psychotherapy: autonomy, insight, and self-determination. PMID:27329406

  6. Case sampling for psychotherapy practice, theory, and policy guidance: Qualities and quantities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Merton S

    2016-09-01

    Random sampling of cases is usually infeasible for psychotherapy research, so opportunistic and purposive sampling must be used instead. Such sampling does not justify generalizations from sample to population-distribution statistics, but does justify reporting what independent-variable value configurations are associated with what dependent-variable value configurations. This allows only the generalization that these associations occur at least that frequently in the population sampled from, which is enough for suggesting and testing some psychotherapy theories and informing some psychotherapy practice. Although psychotherapy practice is a longitudinal process, formal psychotherapy outcome research is so far most feasible and most widely done in the form of two-phase cross-sectional input-outcome studies. Thus, the analysis of sampling for psychotherapy research here will be in terms of the independent- and dependent-variable value configurations produced in such two-phase studies. PMID:26169591

  7. Psychotherapy as a healing practice, scientific endeavor, and social justice action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Diaz, Lillian

    2012-12-01

    The author discusses the evolution of psychotherapy as a healing practice, a scientific endeavor, and a multicultural empowering process. Social justice, the next force in psychotherapy, is presented. The author predicts that psychotherapy will embrace its sociopolitical nature by subscribing to social justice action. Within this framework, psychotherapists can work toward the promotion of political, social, economic, and cultural rights of oppressed individuals. PMID:23205834

  8. Clinical and No-Clinical Setting Specificities in First Session Short-Term Psychotherapy Psychodrama Group

    OpenAIRE

    Mindoljević Drakulić, Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Modern history of short-term group psychotherapy dates back to the late 1950-ies. From then to present day, this psychotherapeutic method has been used in various forms, from dynamic-oriented to cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Although it has always been considered rather controversial, due its cost-effectiveness, it has been capturing more and more popularity. This paper presents the specificities of first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group through session ...

  9. Psychotherapy participants show increased physiological responsiveness to a lab stressor relative to matched controls

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick R Steffen; Louise eFidalgo; Dominic eSchmuck; Yoko eTsui; Tracy eBrown

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that psychotherapy participants show increased physiological responsiveness to stress. The purpose of the present study was to examine differences between individuals participating in outpatient psychotherapy and matched controls using an experimental design. Forty-two psychotherapy participants and forty-eight matched controls were assessed on cardiovascular and cortisol functioning at baseline, during the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), and during a twenty-m...

  10. Exploration of the reasons for dropping out of psychotherapy: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaie, Habibolah; Rezaie, Leeba; Shahdipour, Niloofar; Weaver, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Elucidating the reasons for dropping out of psychotherapy can lead to the development of interventions aimed at reducing patient drop out. The present study aimed to explore patients' reasons for dropping out of psychotherapy in Kermanshah, Iran. The present qualitative study was performed using conventional content analysis. The current sample included 15 participants consisting of 7 patients who dropped out of psychotherapy and 8 psychotherapists who have previously experienced patient dropout. A semi-structured interview was used for data collection. All interviews were audio recorded and subsequently transcribed. Content analysis using constant comparisons was performed for transcribed interviews. Four main categories emerged as reasons for dropping out of psychotherapy: dissatisfaction with the quality of psychotherapy, financial problems in psychotherapy, unprepared socio-cultural context of psychotherapy, and psychotherapy as a non-user friendly treatment. Additionally, specific subcategories within each main category were documented. The results revealed distinct reasons for psychotherapy drop out in the current Iranian-based sample. These identified reasons should be considered and addressed at the onset of treatment as well as in the development of formal interventions aimed at reducing dropout. Further research investigating the antecedents leading to patient drop out is recommended. PMID:27010417

  11. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy on marriage adaptive and postpartum depression in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Hajiheidari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings of this research confirm marriage interpersonal psychotherapy on the depression recovery and the increasing marriage satisfaction of women suffering from postpartum depression.

  12. Social Integration as Professional Field: Psychotherapy in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Johnsson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes and analyses the emergence and development of a professional field called social integration. Ideas, theories, and occupational practices forming this field are explored, particularly those related to the development of a new discipline, that of psychotherapy. The development of three occupations (psychiatry, psychology and social work and their professionalisation is described through their qualitative and quantitative take‑offs in particular historical periods. Three periods are identified: formation, 1850-1920, when psychiatry was defined as a medical sub-discipline; consolidation, 1920-1945, with the institutionalisation of psychiatric care, and with psychoanalysis and mental hygiene as qualitatively new cognitive bases for practitioners; and professionalisation, 1945-1980, with the deinstitutionalisation of psychiatric care and the professionalisation of psychologists and social workers. New ideas on subjectivity and individualism, new welfare state institutions, as well as collaborative professionalism all favoured the creation of psychotherapy as professional knowledge, and a possible new profession of psychotherapists.

  13. Prediction of outcome of brief psychotherapy from therapist interpretive interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, E A

    1984-03-01

    This study replicated Malan's 1976 analysis of psychodynamic interpretations and corrected the major methodological fault in his work: the use of therapist notes for rating the interpretive elements. In this study, the sessions of 25 patients treated in brief dynamic psychotherapy were audiotaped and the ratings of the interpretive interventions were made directly from the audiotapes. Malan's findings were supported. There was a positive association between more favorable outcome, measured on five psychodynamic scales, and the frequency with which therapist interpretations referred to emotions experienced in the transference relationship that were similar to those experienced in relationships with parents and other important persons. The results of this replication indicate that these therapist-offered explanations about the meanings of significant current and past interpersonal relationships contribute to the outcome of brief psychotherapy.

  14. The role of personality in psychotherapy for anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinbarg, Richard E; Uliaszek, Amanda A; Adler, Jonathan M

    2008-12-01

    A trait approach to personality has many implications for psychotherapy. Given that traits contribute to the expression of symptoms of common psychiatric disorders, are moderately heritable, and relatively stable (yet also dynamic to some extent), long-term change in symptoms is possible but is likely to be limited. Analogous to the manner in which genes set the reaction range for phenotype, standing on certain traits may set the patient's "therapeutic range." On the other hand, some of the same traits that may limit the depth of therapeutic benefits might also increase their breadth. In addition, taking the patient's standing on different traits into account can inform the choice of therapeutic strategy and targets and can affect the formation of the therapeutic alliance and compliance with self-help exercises. Finally, other aspects of personality beyond traits, such as ego development and narrative identity, also appear to have important implications for psychotherapy. PMID:19012661

  15. Clients experience of video recordings of their psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Jensen, Karen Boelt; Madsen, Ninna Skov

    Background: Due to the development of technologies and the low costs video recording of psychotherapy sessions have gained ground in training and supervision. While some praise the advantages others decline to use this technological aid for ethical, theoretical or clinical reasons. Despite...... the current relatively widespread use video one finds only a very limited numbers empirical study of how these recordings is experienced by the clients. Aim: After a brief discussion of the pro and cons of the use of video recordings this paper presents a qualitative, explorative study of clients’ experiences...... of having their psychotherapy sessions video recorded and presented in supervision. Methods: In all 25 clients receiving brief psychodynamic outpatient treatment in a university clinic setting filled out a questionnaire containing eight open ended questions concerning the influence of the video recordings...

  16. Brain imaging and psychotherapy: methodological considerations and practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, David E J

    2008-11-01

    The development of psychotherapy has been based on psychological theories and clinical effects. However, an investigation of the neurobiological mechanisms of psychological interventions is also needed in order to improve indication and prognosis, inform the choice of parallel pharmacotherapy, provide outcome measures and potentially even aid the development of new treatment protocols. This neurobiological investigation can be informed by animal models, for example of learning and conditioning, but will essentially need the non-invasive techniques of functional neuroimaging in order to assess psychotherapy effects on patients' brains, which will be reviewed here. Most research so far has been conducted in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders and depression. Effects in OCD were particularly exciting in that both cognitive behavioural therapy and medication with a selective serotonin inhibitor led to a reduction in blood flow in the caudate nucleus. In phobia, brief courses of behavioural therapy produced marked reductions of paralimbic responses to offensive stimuli in line with the clinical improvement. Findings in depression are less consistent, with both increases and decreases in prefrontal metabolism being reported. However, they are important in pointing to different mechanisms for the clinical effects of pharmacotherapy (more "bottom up") and psychotherapy (more "top down"). For the future it would be desirable if the findings of psychotherapy changes to brain activation patterns were confirmed in larger groups with homogenous imaging protocols. Functional imaging has already made great contributions to the understanding of the neural correlates of psychopathology. For example, evidence converges to suggest that the subgenual cingulate is crucial for mood regulation. One current clinical application of these findings is deep brain stimulation in areas highlighted by such imaging studies. I will discuss their initial application in depression

  17. Towards a community psychotherapy for the contemporary mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Barone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors develop some reflections on the relationship between the emergence of new mental disorders and post-industrial society. They argue that the new social mandate of mental health professionals is to help the community to develop co-evolutionary practices for preventing and treating the fragmentation of psychic life that characterizes today's contexts of contemporary life.Keywords: Community psychotherapy; Contemporary mental disorders; Post-industrial society

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome and vocational stress: individual psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita D Stuart

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to provide individualised psychotherapy for a sample suffering from IBS and vocational stress. Opsomming Die doelstelling van hierdie studie was om eïndividualiseerde psigoterapie te verskaf aan ’n steekproef van lyers met Prikkelbare Dermsindroom (PDS en beroepspanning. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  19. Clinical Psychology, Health Psychology and Psychotherapy: a new Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence

    2009-01-01

    Conceptions in this paper themselves do not offer new facts and findings; instead; they are concerned with what we view as facts and as findings, how we organize existing facts and findings, and perhaps most important, what question we consider worthy of attention. The single most important contribution of positive psychology has been to provide a collective identity – a common voice and language for researchers and practitioners from clinical psychology, health psychology and psychotherapy. ...

  20. Psychotherapy after acquired brain injury: Is less more?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Coetzer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the challenges and dilemmas facing psychotherapists working with neurological patients, and in particular those who work in the context of under-resourced brain injury rehabilitation healthcare systems. Through the subjective process of reflective practice integral to clinical supervision, the author attempts to identify five core aspects of psychotherapy intended to augment post-acute long- term rehabilitation programmes and interventions after acquired brain injury.

  1. Clinical algorithms as a tool for psychotherapy with Latino clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoleas, Peter; Garcia, Betty

    2003-04-01

    Clinical algorithms have the advantage of being able to integrate clinical, cultural, and environmental factors into a unified method of planning and implementing treatment. A model for practice is proposed that uses 3 algorithms as guides for conducting psychotherapy with Latino clients, the uses of which are illustrated in a single, ongoing case vignette. The algorithm format has the additional advantage of easily adapting itself for data gathering for research purposes.

  2. New developments in transference focused psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, Otto F

    2016-04-01

    This paper will summarize recent clinical developments in the treatment of borderline patients at the Personality Disorders Institute at Cornell. The experiences under review will include the careful, ongoing monitoring of developments in the patient's life outside the sessions, and their consideration in diagnosing affective dominance during the hours. Other issues include the discussion of a 'second chance' approach to contract violations; the assessment and concern with the patient's assumption of responsibility for himself; the contradictions between actual behavior patterns and life goals, and between personality potentials and present functioning; the technical implications of particular constellations of regressive narcissistic features; drug dependence and antisocial behavior; and life goals and treatment goals. PMID:27112823

  3. Psychotherapie mit Videotelefon - Telemental Health by using Videoconferencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Reisinger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available All areas of life are covered by the technological development, the use of computer and Internet. This media world does not stop in front of the carefully protected, therapeutic areas. It seems to be necessary to examine the possibilities of psychotherapy or psychotherapeutic counseling with videophone. In this qualitative research, different kind of aspects by psyhotherapists will be presented of how to engage in psychotherapy by using videophone. Furthermore are shown the specifics of the therapeutic relationship, the limits shown in a screen-to-screen treatment and the expectations of the psychotherapists for the future. Examining this subject it became clear that the experts act very carefully when selecting the patients and keep staying within their self-imposed limits. In this area the development of a sound relationship and a successful therapy is possible. For the future, experts hope that the question of the legal general regulations and the protection of quality will be solved. Psychotherapy with videophone shall be offered in addition to mental health care but the presence-therapy should not be replaced.

  4. The future of psychotherapy outcome research: science or political rhetoric?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, J

    2000-11-01

    Although the relationship between research and clinical psychology has at times been conflicted, it has also been productive. Psychologists from both specialties have benefited from each others' work. The area of psychotherapy outcome research represents an important interface between the fields of clinical and research psychology. In an era of scarce resources and demands for accountability, there is pressure for researchers to justify the value of clinical practices. Recently, numerous articles have appeared recommending changes to the way psychotherapy research is conducted. The authors of these articles emphasize with urgency the importance of conducting and reporting research in a manner that will influence the decisions of policymakers and sanction funding for psychotherapy services. This article is an exploration of the impact of these recommendations, whose objective appears to be the promotion of psychological techniques for inclusion in clinical practice guidelines. It is argued that such recommendations may be in conflict with the philosophy and methods of science and may adversely affect public perception, perhaps leading psychologists to be seen as political lobbyists rather than clinicians and researchers. PMID:11092419

  5. AN INTEGRATIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN. THE WIZARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria Popescu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tendencies in child psychotherapy is the integration of various psychotherapeutic approaches and technical interventions belonging to different orientations. Based on the Harry Potter stories, the „Wizarding School” structured group therapy program is a 12-step integratively oriented program applicable in personal development, individual and group therapy for children aged 6 to 13 (at present being adapted for adult psychotherapy. The program takes place within a fairy tale, being therefore a type of informal hypnotic trance. The interventions are drawn from the lessons described in Harry Potter’s story at Hogwarts, based on the fundamental principles of child psychotherapy and including elements of play therapy, art therapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive- behavioural therapy, transactional analysis, supportive therapy, family therapy and person centred therapy. From a theoretical point of view the program is based on elements from a number of psychotherapeutic approaches, the main concept being that we need to create a therapeutic myth that is acceptable to a child. The program is not suitable for children with structural deficits, who have difficulties in making the difference between fantasy and reality.

  6. Physiologic evidence for the interpersonal role of laughter during psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marci, Carl D; Moran, Erin K; Orr, Scott P

    2004-10-01

    The role of laughter during psychotherapy is poorly understood. This study examined 10 unique sessions of psychodynamic psychotherapy with digital videotape and simultaneous measures of skin conductivity (SC) from patients and therapists. Independent observers coded laugh episodes using published criteria. Observers identified 167 laugh responses. Of the 119 patient laughs, 91 (76.5%) were patient as speaker, compared with 28 (23.4%) as nonspeaker audience. In contrast, of the 48 therapist laughs, only five (10.4%) were therapist as speaker, whereas 43 (90.3%) were as nonspeaker audience. The difference was highly significant (p < .001). Physiologic data showed that mean SC level increased regardless of role as patient, therapist, speaker, or audience (p < .001). Two-factor analysis of variance indicated that SC change scores were significantly larger when patients and therapists laughed together compared with laughing alone (p < .05). The results support an empirically based approach to the study of laughter and the use of psychophysiology as a measure of process during psychotherapy.

  7. A Meta-Analysis of Psychotherapy and Drug Therapy in the Treatment of Unipolar Depression with Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrueck, Susan M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Considered the relative effectiveness of drug therapy and psychotherapy in the treatment of unipolar depression in adults in a meta-analysis of 56 outcome studies. Evidence suggested that psychotherapy was superior to drug therapy. (Author/LLL)

  8. EMOTION REGULA TION AND PSYCHOTHERAPY: ADAPTATION AND ELA BORATION OF AN APPLICATION MANUAL OF THE OBSERVER MEASURE OF AFFECT REGULA TION (O-MAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Almeida

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to adapt and develop a Portuguese manual for the Observer Measure of Affect Regulation (O-MAR; Watson & Prosser, 2006, an observational measure of clients’ emotion regulation in psychotherapy. Since the scale has not yet been adapted to Portuguese, initially a translation was performed. Then, to elaborate the manual, the middle 20 minutes of 20 therapy sessions were observed and classified and 2 illustrative excerpts were selected by consensus for each level of analysis of the various domains of the scale. All these videotaped sessions were collected in a randomized clinical trial carried out in Portugal for the treatment of depression, comparing 2 empirically supported models for the treatment of this disorder – cognitive behavioral therapy and emotion-focused therapy. All the participants were initially evaluated and diagnosed with mild or moderate major depressive disorder, and they attended 16 sessions of psychotherapy.

  9. NICE recommendations for psychotherapy in depression: Of limited clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, D; Smith, P St John

    2015-01-01

    In 2009/10 NICE partially updated its guidelines on the treatment and management of depression in adults. Due to methodological shortcomings the recommendations for psychotherapy must be treated with caution. Despite recognising the heterogeneous and comorbid nature of depression, and the limitations of depression as a unitary diagnostic category, NICE treats depression as if it were a unitary entity differentiated only by severity. The guidance ignores important aetiological factors such as trauma, loss and maltreatment, personality and interpersonal difficulties. It excludes the largest naturalistic studies on clinical populations treated in the National Health Service on the grounds that they are observational studies conducted in heterogeneous groups with mixed neurotic disorders. It unquestioningly accepts that the "brand" of psychotherapy has construct validity, and ignores psychotherapy process research indicating significant commonalities, and overlap, between treatment modalities and evidence that individual practitioner effects are larger than the differences between treatment modalities. It fails to consider patient differences and preferences, which are known to influence uptake, completion and response. It takes an exclusively short-term perspective on a chronic relapsing disorder. It does not consider the evidence for longer-term treatments. It is of special concern that NICE misrepresents the findings of its own systematic review by implying that CBT and IPT are superior treatments. NICE's systematic review actually found no evidence of superiority between CBT, IPT, psychodynamic psychotherapy, or counselling. Based on the exclusion of much clinically relevant research demonstrating the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy and counselling many commentators have alleged a bias towards CBT in the guidance. With regard to service delivery NICE proposes the replacement of psychiatric assessment and individualised treatment plans, with an unproven

  10. NICE recommendations for psychotherapy in depression: Of limited clinical utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, D; Smith, P St John

    2015-01-01

    In 2009/10 NICE partially updated its guidelines on the treatment and management of depression in adults. Due to methodological shortcomings the recommendations for psychotherapy must be treated with caution. Despite recognising the heterogeneous and comorbid nature of depression, and the limitations of depression as a unitary diagnostic category, NICE treats depression as if it were a unitary entity differentiated only by severity. The guidance ignores important aetiological factors such as trauma, loss and maltreatment, personality and interpersonal difficulties. It excludes the largest naturalistic studies on clinical populations treated in the National Health Service on the grounds that they are observational studies conducted in heterogeneous groups with mixed neurotic disorders. It unquestioningly accepts that the "brand" of psychotherapy has construct validity, and ignores psychotherapy process research indicating significant commonalities, and overlap, between treatment modalities and evidence that individual practitioner effects are larger than the differences between treatment modalities. It fails to consider patient differences and preferences, which are known to influence uptake, completion and response. It takes an exclusively short-term perspective on a chronic relapsing disorder. It does not consider the evidence for longer-term treatments. It is of special concern that NICE misrepresents the findings of its own systematic review by implying that CBT and IPT are superior treatments. NICE's systematic review actually found no evidence of superiority between CBT, IPT, psychodynamic psychotherapy, or counselling. Based on the exclusion of much clinically relevant research demonstrating the effectiveness of psychodynamic psychotherapy and counselling many commentators have alleged a bias towards CBT in the guidance. With regard to service delivery NICE proposes the replacement of psychiatric assessment and individualised treatment plans, with an unproven

  11. Mirror neurons: their implications for group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Victor L

    2010-10-01

    Recently discovered mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the brain register the actions and intentions of both the organism and others in the environment. As such, they may play a significant role in social behavior and groups. This paper considers the potential implications of mirror neurons and related neural networks for group therapists, proposing that mirror neurons and mirror systems provide "hard-wired" support for the group therapist's belief in the centrality of relationships in the treatment process and exploring their value in accounting for group-as-a-whole phenomena. Mirror neurons further confirm the holistic, social nature of perception, action, and intention as distinct from a stimulus-response behaviorism. The implications of mirror neurons and mirroring processes for the group therapist role, interventions, and training are also discussed.

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pathological Gamblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Ammerman, Yola; Bohl, Jaime; Doersch, Anne; Gay, Heather; Kadden, Ronald; Molina, Cheryl; Steinberg, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated efficacy of psychotherapies for pathological gambling. Pathological gamblers (N = 231) were randomly assigned to (a) referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA), (b) GA referral plus a cognitive-behavioral (CB) workbook, or (c) GA referral plus 8 sessions of individual CB therapy. Gambling and related problems were assessed…

  13. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A): A Case Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elisabeth Baerg; Mufson, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a depressed adolescent (15 years of age) boy using Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). IPT-A is an empirically supported psychosocial intervention for adolescents suffering from a depressive episode. It is delivered as an individual psychotherapy with a minimum of parental…

  14. Culturally Adapted Psychotherapy and the Legitimacy of Myth: A Direct-Comparison Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benish, Steven G.; Quintana, Stephen; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychotherapy is a culturally encapsulated healing practice that is created from and dedicated to specific cultural contexts (Frank & Frank, 1993; Wampold, 2007; Wrenn, 1962). Consequently, conventional psychotherapy is a practice most suitable for dominant cultural groups within North America and Western Europe but may be culturally incongruent…

  15. Can Two Psychotherapy Process Measures Be Dependably Rated Simultaneously? A Generalizability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvenes, Pal G.; Berggraf, Lene; Hoffart, Asle; Levy, Raymon A.; Ablon, J. Stuart; McCullough, Leigh; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Observer ratings in psychotherapy are a common way of collecting information in psychotherapy research. However, human observers are imperfect instruments, and their ratings may be subject to variability from several sources. One source of variability can be raters' assessing more than 1 instrument at a time. The purpose of this research is to…

  16. A Review of Psychotherapy Outcome Research: Considerations for School-Based Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkelback, Emily A.; Reese, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating psychotherapeutic outcome is an important endeavor given psychology's focus on identifying effective treatments. There is ample evidence to suggest that psychotherapy interventions for children and adolescents are effective. Unfortunately, the child and adolescent psychotherapy outcome literature lags behind the adult-focused outcome…

  17. From cultural to existential diversity : the impossibility of psychotherapy integration within a traditional framework

    OpenAIRE

    Rigazio-DiGilio, Sandra A.; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; IVEY, Allen E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors build upon Castonguay and Goldfried's analysis regarding issues and directions central to advancing psychotherapy integration. They elaborate on two issues addressed only minimally in Castonguay and Goldfried's article. The first involves moving beyond traditional psychotherapy territory to include cultural, self-in-relationship, and interdisciplinary domains. The second concerns using more holistic and synergistic processes to coconstruct integrative theories and appr...

  18. Computer-Aided psychotherapy for anxiety disorders: A meta-analytic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Marks, I.M.; Straten, van A.; Cavanagh, K; Gega, L.; Andersson, G.

    2009-01-01

    Computer-aided psychotherapy (CP) is said to (1) be as effective as face-to-face psychotherapy, while requiring less therapist time, for anxiety disorder sufferers, (2) speed access to care, and (3) save traveling time. CP may be delivered on stand-alone or Internet-linked computers, palmtop compute

  19. Weighing the Evidence for Psychotherapy Equivalence: Implications for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmacott, Robin; Hunsley, John

    2007-01-01

    In the past two decades, numerous meta-analyses have been published that examine the question of psychotherapy equivalence. Hunsley and Di Giulio (2002) critically reviewed this literature and concluded that there was abundant evidence that the Dodo bird verdict of equivalence across psychotherapies is false. In this article, we summarize and…

  20. Does Adding Medication to Psychotherapy for Depression Improve or Worsen Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karon, Bertram P.

    2007-01-01

    That two-thirds of depressed adults are resistant to medication has led to the addition of psychotherapy to treatment, but is medication necessary? Results are at least as good with psychotherapy alone, and the relapse rate is less. Handling of suicidal danger, sleep disorders, and common depressing issues in college students are discussed along…

  1. Nonverbal Synchrony in Psychotherapy: Coordinated Body Movement Reflects Relationship Quality and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors quantified nonverbal synchrony--the coordination of patient's and therapist's movement--in a random sample of same-sex psychotherapy dyads. The authors contrasted nonverbal synchrony in these dyads with a control condition and assessed its association with session-level and overall psychotherapy outcome. Method: Using an…

  2. [Marketing of psychotherapy--small advertisements in the "market" of psychology today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzen, A; Hoffmann-Richter, U

    1996-02-01

    Beyond traditional psychotherapy many new psychotherapeutic schools and methods strive for recognition. Many of them offer psychotherapeutic training by advertisement in Psychologie heute, a popular psychological magazine. These advertisements are analysed. Possible consequences of this flouristing market of methods on social representation of psychotherapy are discussed. PMID:8851069

  3. Solicited Diary Studies of Psychotherapy in Qualitative Research - Pros and Cons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackrill, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Diary studies are scarce within the field of qualitative psychotherapy research. In this article arguments for and against the employment of solicited diaries studies in qualitative psychotherapy research are investigated. The strengths of diary studies are presented along with arguments concerning...

  4. Zen Buddhism and the Psychotherapy of Milton Erickson: A Transcendence of Theory and Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Susan Kelly; Forman, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Compares Zen Buddhism and psychotherapy of Milton Erickson. Explores their similarities with respect to theory, change relationship between teacher/student and therapist/client, and acceptance of nature. Compares Ericksonian psychotherapy with Zen-based Morita therapy to concretize philosophical underpinnings of both systems. (Author/ABL)

  5. Effects of Varying Session Length and Frequency in Brief Emotive Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierenbaum, Howard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study examined the role of emotional catharsis in brief emotive psychotherapy and its differential effects within three time frames. The findings are seen as supporting the contention that within a specific time frame emotional catharsis can lead to certain positive outcomes in brief emotive psychotherapy. (Author)

  6. Stress Reactivity Following Brief Treatment for Depression: Differential Effects of Psychotherapy and Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Lance L.; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Zuroff, David C.; Blatt, Sidney J.

    2007-01-01

    Psychotherapy and medication treatments are both effective in reducing depressive symptoms. However, only psychotherapy provides an enduring effect by reducing depressive vulnerability following treatment termination. This differential efficacy may reflect mode-specific effects on the longitudinal relationship between depression and stress. The…

  7. Client Self-Disclosure as a Predictor of Short-Term Outcome in Brief Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Apryl E.; Kahn, Jeffrey H.

    2005-01-01

    College students differ in their tendencies to self-disclose personal information. The goal of this study was to determine how differing disclosure tendencies among university counseling center clients affect psychotherapy outcomes. Among 22 clients in brief psychotherapy, client tendencies to self-disclose personal information predicted how…

  8. Recognizing Social Class in the Psychotherapy Relationship: A Grounded Theory Exploration of Low-Income Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mindi N.; Cole, Odessa D.; Nitzarim, Rachel S.

    2012-01-01

    The process of psychotherapy among 16 low-income clients was explored using grounded theory (Charmaz, 2006; Glaser & Strauss, 1967) in order to understand and identify their unique experiences and needs. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 women and 4 men who had attended at least 6 sessions of psychotherapy within 6 months of the…

  9. Individual psychotherapy for schizophrenia: trends and developments in the wake of the recovery movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamm JA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jay A Hamm,1 Ilanit Hasson-Ohayon,2 Marina Kukla,3 Paul H Lysaker11Richard L Roudebush VA Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2Bar-Ilan University, Department of Psychology, Ramat Gan, Israel; 3Health Services Research and Development Center of Excellence on Implementing Evidence-Based Practice, Richard L Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Although the role and relative prominence of psychotherapy in the treatment of schizophrenia has fluctuated over time, an analysis of the history of psychotherapy for schizophrenia, focusing on findings from the recovery movement, reveals recent trends including the emergence of the development of integrative psychotherapy approaches. The authors suggest that the recovery movement has revealed limitations in traditional approaches to psychotherapy, and has provided opportunities for integrative approaches to emerge as a mechanism for promoting recovery in persons with schizophrenia. Five approaches to integrative psychotherapy for persons with schizophrenia are presented, and a shared conceptual framework that allows these five approaches to be compatible with one another is proposed. The conceptual framework is consistent with theories of recovery and emphasizes interpersonal attachment, personal narrative, and metacognitive processes. Implications for future research on integrative psychotherapy are considered.Keywords: schizophrenia, psychotherapy, recovery, metacognition, psychosis, integrative psychotherapy

  10. Gestalt Therapy: Student Perceptions of Fritz Perls in "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joe; Jacobus, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" ("TAP") videotape series introduces students to three major schools of psychotherapy: client-centered therapy, Gestalt therapy, and rational-emotive therapy. A sample of undergraduate students viewed the "TAP" series. The students were surveyed about their observations of…

  11. A Pilot Use of Team-Based Learning in Psychiatry Resident Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchet, Bryan K.; Coon, Kim A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Demonstrating psychotherapy competency in trainees will test the resources of psychiatry training programs. The authors outline the phases of team-based learning (TBL). Methods: The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Tulsa (OUCM-T), Department of Psychiatry reorganized its psychodynamic psychotherapy didactic course using TBL.…

  12. Creative Uses of Factor Analysis in Psychotherapy Research: Past Examples and Future Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James M.

    Factor analysis is a statistical method of reducing a set number of variables by finding similarities between them. This paper reviews the potential of factor analysis, focusing on exploratory factor analysis, in research on psychotherapy. Within the field of psychotherapy, the use of factor analysis can be classified into three groups. The first…

  13. An expressive virtual audience with flexible behavioral styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, N.; Brinkman, W.P.; Riemsdijk, M.B. van; Neerincx, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, expressive virtual humans are used in psychological research, training, and psychotherapy. However, the behavior of these virtual humans is usually scripted and therefore cannot be modified freely at runtime. To address this, we created a virtual audience with parameterized behavioral sty

  14. An experience of group psychotherapy in the Brazilian Family Health Program

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    Roy Abrahamian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluated an experiment carried out at the Family Health Program with the establishment of a Mental Health Group, based on transactional analysis associated with the cognitive-behavioral therapy, describing the impact of this intervention in improving the quality of life of the population served by the public system. In the Cruz das Almas Health Basic Unit, from São Paulo City Hall, a group of Mental Health has been happening since January, 2007, with the frequency of once a week, during one hour. In it, participants discuss topics of interest and learn psychotherapy techniques to deal with daily events and to manage their emotions and behaviors in a constructive way. The group is open to all those interested in participating in therapy sessions, being constituted, in most cases, by patients followed by the Family Health Program teams and sent to the Mental Health Group. When patients join the group, they fill out a questionnaire known as Patient Health Questionnaire, Brazilian version, known by the acronym PHQ-9. After attending the group for at least 12 sessions, participants complete a self-assessment questionnaire, informing about feeling better on their health, improved self-esteem, and personal relationships, and about having a more positive view of life and of other people. Of the evaluated participants, 40 completed the questionnaire. From these, nine (22.5% had scores of zero to four (without depression; six (15% scored five to nine (mild depression; ten (25% had scores from 10 to 14 (moderate depression; seven (17.5% had a score of 15 to 19 (moderate to severe depression; and eight (20% had scores of 20 or more (severe depression. Of the 65 patients who completed the questionnaire for self-evaluation after at least 12 sessions of therapy, 51 (78% reported a more positive view of life and of other people; 44 (67% reported improved self-esteem; 52 (80% related improvement in relationships and 53 (81% improvement in relation

  15. 阿德勒心理治疗方法与当代心理治疗整合精神的契合%Adler Psychological Therapy's Link with the Spirit of Contemporary Psychotherapy Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    励骅; 郭本禹

    2012-01-01

    It is true that no single method of treatment from any schools can satisfy the needs of all ehents and apply to all psychological problems and situations. The rise of the integrative movement, to some extent, broke the individualistic manacles of the fractions, elimi- nated the discrimination among different schools, promoted their communications and dialogues. The study of Adler~ psychotherapy can help us discover those important contributions overlooked in the past that there has been a close relationship between Adler~ psychother- apy and contemporary practice. Adlerb psychotherapy, cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy share a great deal of common ground, such as attention to the conceptual framework of the client, with the present - -oriented method. All Adler~ psychotherapy and cognitive therapy lay great emphasis on it. It is important to understand the patients within their own conceptual framework. The view of Adler is that expectations and aspirations of future as a current center to a large extent determine the way people recall the past and act in the present. Cognitive therapy also concerns the feelings of the client. Adlerb psychotherapy, constructivist psychotherapy and social constructivist psychotherapy all have achieved apparent resonance in such aspects as view of reality, principles of treatment, and social cultural origin of psychological development. The Adlerian and the constructivist theories agree that human perception renders external reality or truth subjective and only approximately knowable. The Adler theory and constructivist theory assert that humans are to con- struct their own personality and subsequently the creative motivation for themselves and others and the perception and interpretation of the world. Adler and constructivism emphasize that it is important that a person, as an active and motivated agent, creatively and rou- tinely participates in the construction of her own psychological world. In addition, Adler is

  16. Psychotherapy in Sweden: historical background, current status, and future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, K; Lauren, K

    1984-01-01

    From medieval times, care of the emotionally disturbed in Sweden has shifted between moralistic and enlightened approaches. In this century through the 1960s, organic methods have predominated, with emphasis on description and precise diagnosis. Psychodynamic treatment has been only reluctantly accepted until the past decade, with child psychiatrists and psychologists at the forefront. Norway has typically been most progressive in the establishment of psychoanalytic and other psychodynamic movements in Scandinavia, with Sweden following and Denmark often lagging behind. In 1970, Norway became the first Scandinavian country to require training in psychotherapy for psychiatrists. Sweden remained more conservative for years, both in adherence to the organic model at one extreme, and in supporting one of the most orthodox psychoanalytic movements in the world, at the other. During the 1970s, however, it became increasingly more common for psychiatrists in Sweden to seek training in psychotherapy through a variety of organizations, established since the early 1930s and operating independently of each other. In 1978, a uniform state program in psychotherapy was developed with theoretical and practical requirements, and is scheduled in the near future to become obligatory for psychiatrists, psychologists, and various other mental health professionals. The paramedical personnel has become increasingly more involved in mental health care during the past decade. In delivery of care, the "sectorization" principle has become central, and is likely to set the tone for the future. With the entire country divided into local catchment areas, the direction will be toward psychodynamic approaches integrated with traditional organic models, open care, decentralization, planned prophylaxis, and full collaboration of all mental health professionals and social agencies. PMID:6369994

  17. [Experience in using ketamine preparations in the psychotherapy of alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolap, Iu P; Savchenkov, V A

    1994-01-01

    After careful clinical examination 64 alcoholics (48 males and 16 females) aged 21-52 were assigned to ketamin aversive psychotherapeutic procedure supposed to make the patients emotionally concerned with their disease and suggestible of alcohol intolerance. Ketamin caused in 55 patients (85.5%) oneiroid clouding of consciousness with occasional catatonic inclusions, 9 patients (14.5%) became delirious. Ketamin-induced high suggestibility created beneficial conditions for psychotherapy. A 2-year follow-up of 42 patients registered complete abstinence in 15 patients. The results obtained with ketamin are comparable to those achieved with conventional methods. This alternative approach needs further research, especially as analytical opportunities are concerned.

  18. The Perception of Changes Among Participants of Drug Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Opora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The positive changes among addicted people usually don’t happen by themselves, but they are results of the process which stays under the impact of the aspirations, values and priorities of the person at the moment. Enhancing the motivation of addicted people requires a huge effort from them what helps in making changes in the life style. The presented article contains results of the research. The main aim was describing critical events, which appeared among people addicted to drugs and made them to change their life styles. Additionally the article describes an classifies changes which were noticed by the participants of the stationary psychotherapy of drug addiction.

  19. Emotional regulation: implications for the psychobiology of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-03-01

    A range of studies have contributed to understanding the psychobiology of emotional regulation. Functional imaging studies have demonstrated that cortico-limbic circuitry plays an important role in mediating processes such as reappraisal and suppression. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be important in conscious reframing, while ventromedial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex may be particularly important in emotion evaluation. Gene variants and early environments impact underlying emotional regulation and its neurobiology. It may be hypothesized that during interventions such as psychotherapy there are improvements in emotional regulation, together with the normalization of related psychobiological mechanisms.

  20. The ethics of advertising, billing, and finances in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Samuel; Vandecreek, Leon

    2008-05-01

    Psychotherapists must deal with practical business matters such as advertising, billing, collecting fees, and other practice management topics. We review the enforceable standards of the American Psychological Association's (2002) Ethics Code that deal with advertising, fees, billing, and related business matters in psychotherapy. Using a principle-based perspective, we link each of the standards to overarching ethical values and illustrate the concerns with case vignettes. We argue that understanding the moral foundations of ethical standards helps psychotherapists to implement with greater integrity the spirit and the letter of the standards with regard to advertising and business practices. PMID:18386792

  1. Man-boy lovers: assessment, counseling, and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Naerssen, A

    1990-01-01

    Clinical experiences with 36 males, between the ages of 21 and 60 are described. All of them felt an enduring sexual attraction for boys. Sixteen males were treated for sexual identity conflicts. For eight of them this ended in a positive self-labeling as pedophile, the others had severe problems with accepting sexuality as positive and lustful. Twenty males were treated for identity management problems and counseled how to handle their relationships with boys. Several modalities of interpersonal interaction in man-boy relationships are proposed and the ways conflicts can arise within these frames of reference are explored in counseling and psychotherapy. PMID:2086630

  2. Man-boy lovers: assessment, counseling, and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Naerssen, A

    1990-01-01

    Clinical experiences with 36 males, between the ages of 21 and 60 are described. All of them felt an enduring sexual attraction for boys. Sixteen males were treated for sexual identity conflicts. For eight of them this ended in a positive self-labeling as pedophile, the others had severe problems with accepting sexuality as positive and lustful. Twenty males were treated for identity management problems and counseled how to handle their relationships with boys. Several modalities of interpersonal interaction in man-boy relationships are proposed and the ways conflicts can arise within these frames of reference are explored in counseling and psychotherapy.

  3. Transfer of manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP for social phobia into clinical practice: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leweke Frank

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychodynamic psychotherapy is frequently applied in the treatment of social phobia. Nevertheless, there has been a lack of studies on the transfer of manualized treatments to routine psychodynamic practice. Our study is the first one to examine the effects of additional training in a manualized Short Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (STPP procedure on outcome in routine psychotherapy for social phobia. This study is an extension to a large multi-site RCT (N = 512 comparing the efficacy of STPP to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT of Social Phobia. Methods/Design The manualized treatment is designed for a time limited approach with 25 individual sessions of STPP over 6 months. Private practitioners will be randomized to training in manualized STPP vs. treatment as usual without a specific training (control condition. We plan to enrol a total of 105 patients (84 completers. Assessments will be conducted before treatment starts, after 8 and 15 weeks, after 25 treatment sessions, at the end of treatment, 6 months and 12 months after termination of treatment. The primary outcome measure is the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale. Remission from social phobia is defined scoring with 30 or less points on this scale. Discussion We will investigate how the treatment can be transferred from a controlled trial into the less structured setting of routine clinical care. This question represents Phase IV of psychotherapy research. It combines the benefits of randomized controlled and naturalistic research. The study is genuinely designed to promote faster and more widespread dissemination of effective interventions. It will answer the questions whether manualized STPP can be implemented into routine outpatient care, whether the new methods improve treatment courses and outcomes and whether treatment effects reached in routine psychotherapeutic treatments are comparable to those of the controlled, strictly manualized treatment of the main study

  4. Prescribing Clinicians’ Perspectives on Evidence-Based Psychotherapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin R. Barnett

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based psychotherapies (EBP for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder are not utilized to their full extent within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA. VA provides care to many persons with PTSD and has been in the forefront of clinical practice guidelines and EBP training and dissemination. Yet VA continues to find EBP implementation difficult. Veterans with PTSD often initially present to prescribing clinicians, who then help make care decisions. It is therefore critical that these clinicians correctly screen and triage appropriate mental health care. The purpose of this study was to assess VA prescribing clinicians’ knowledge, perceptions, and referral behaviors related to EBPs for PTSD and to identify facilitators and barriers to implementing EBPs within VA. We conducted qualitative interviews with 26 VA prescribing clinicians. Limited access to EBPs was the most commonly noted barrier. The clinicians we interviewed also held specific beliefs and behaviors that may delay or deter EBPs. Strategies to improve utilization also emerged. Findings suggest the need for increased access to EBPs, training to optimize the role of prescribing clinicians in helping Veterans with PTSD make appropriate care decisions, and specific organizational changes to facilitate access and effective referral systems for EBPs.

  5. Novel activity-dependent approaches to therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy: the general waking trance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest; Erickson-Klein, Roxanna; Rossi, Kathryn

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a highly edited version of a videotape made in 1980 by Marion Moore, M.D., showing Milton H. Erickson and Moore demonstrating novel, activity-dependent approaches to hand-levitation and therapeutic hypnosis on their subject, Ernest Rossi. Erickson's naturalistic and utilization approach is described in his very direct and surprising induction in a trance challenged patient. These novel, and surprising inductions are examples of how Erickson was prescient in developing activity-dependent approaches to therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy several generations before modern neuroscience documented the activity-dependent molecular-genomic mechanisms of memory, learning, and behavior change. Erickson describes a case where he utilized what he called, "The General Waking Trance" when he "dared" not use an obvious hypnotic induction. It is proposed that the states of intense mental absorption and response attentiveness that are facilitated by the general waking trance are functionally related to the three conditions neuroscientists have identified as novelty, enrichment, and exercise (both mental and physical), which can turn on activity-dependent gene expression and activity-dependent brain plasticity, that are the molecular-genomic and neural basis ofmemory, learning, consciousness, and behavior change. We recommend that the next step in investigating the efficacy of therapeutic hypnosis will be in partnering with neuroscientists to explore the possibilities and limitations of utilizing the activity-dependent approaches to hypnotic induction and the general waking trance in facilitating activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity.

  6. Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of Patients attending Psychotherapy in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena Al-Sharbati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is significant evidence that psychotherapy is a pivotal treatment for persons diagnosed with Axis I clinical psychiatric conditions; however, a psychotherapy service has only recently been established in the Omani health care system. This study aimed to investigate the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of attendees at a psychotherapy clinic at a tertiary care hospital. Methods: An analysis was carried out of 133 new referrals to the Psychotherapy Service at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, a tertiary care hospital. Results: The majority of referrals were females (59%, aged 18–34 years, employed (38%, had ≤12 years of formal education (51%, and were single (54%. A total of 43% were treated for anxiety disorders (including obsessive compulsive disorder, while 22% were treated for depression. A total of 65% were prescribed psychotropic medications. The utilisation of the Psychotherapy Service and its user characteristics are discussed within the context of a culturally diverse Omani community which has unique personal belief systems such as in supernatural powers (Jinn, contemptuous envy (Hassad, evil eye (Ain and sorcery (Sihr which are often used to explain the aetiology of mental illness and influence personal decisions on utilising medical and psychological treatments. Conclusion: Despite the low number of referrals to the Psychotherapy Service, there is reason to believe that psychotherapy would be an essential tool to come to grips with the increasing number of mental disorders in Oman.

  7. Psychodramatic psychotherapy combined with pharmacotherapy in major depressive disorder: an open and naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Elisabeth Maria Sene

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVE: Recent literature has highlighted the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Combined therapies comprising both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy have presented the best results. Although several kinds of psychotherapies have been studied in the treatment of depressive disorders, there remains a lack of data on psychodramatic psychotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of psychodramatic psychotherapy (in a sample of major depressive disorder patients. METHOD: This is an open, naturalistic, controlled, non-randomized study. Twenty major depressive disorder patients (according to the DSM-IV criteria, under pharmacological treatment for depression, with Hamilton Depression Scale total scores between 7 and 20 (mild to moderate depression, were divided into two groups. Patients in the psychotherapeutic group took part in 4 individual and 24 structured psychodramatic group sessions, whilst subjects in the control group did not participate in this psychodramatic psychotherapy. Both groups were evaluated with the Social Adjustment Scale - Self Report and the Hamilton Depression Scale. RESULTS: Psychotherapeutic group patients showed a significant improvement according to the Social Adjustment Scale - Self Report and the Hamilton Depression Scale scores at endpoint, compared to those of the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that individual and group psychodramatic psychotherapy, associated to pharmacological treatment, provides good clinical benefits in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  8. Do Patients Look Up Their Therapists Online? An Exploratory Study Among Patients in Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of the Internet as a source of health information is growing among people who experience mental health difficulties. The increase in Internet use has led to questions about online information-seeking behaviors, for example, how psychotherapists and patients use the Internet to ascertain information about each other. The notion of psychotherapists seeking information about their patients online (patient-targeted googling, PTG) has been identified and explored. However, the idea of patients searching for information online about their psychotherapists (therapist-targeted googling, TTG) and the associated motives and effects on the therapeutic relationship remain unclear. Objective This study investigated former and current German-speaking psychotherapy patients’ behavior and attitudes relating to TTG. In addition, patients’ methods of information gathering, motives, and success in searching for information were examined. Furthermore, patients’ experiences and perceptions of PTG were explored. Methods Overall, 238 former and current psychotherapy patients responded to a new questionnaire specifically designed to assess the frequency, motives, use, and outcomes of TTG as well as experiences and perceptions of PTG. The study sample was a nonrepresentative convenience sample recruited online via several German-speaking therapy platforms and self-help forums. Results Of the 238 former and current patients who responded, 106 (44.5%) had obtained information about their therapists; most of them (n=85, 80.2%) had used the Internet for this. Besides curiosity, motives behind information searches included the desire to get to know the therapist better by attempting to search for both professional and private information. TTG appeared to be associated with phases of therapy in which patients felt that progress was not being made. Patients being treated for personality disorders appear to engage more frequently in TTG (rphi = 0.21; P=.004). In general

  9. Attachment-Focused Psychotherapy and the Wounded Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    The concept of the "wounded self" (Wolfe, 2005) offers an integrative theoretical framework for self-wounds and their developmental origins. Alladin (2013, 2014, 2016) integrated hypnotherapy into this model to comprehensively address the unconscious protective mechanisms and maladaptive conscious cognitive strategies of the wounded self. The purpose of this article is to propose how an attachment-focused psychotherapy could be utilized in working with the wounded self. With its emphasis on developmental maturation through the frame of the attachment relationship, attachment theory is well-positioned to offer conceptual and treatment insights in treating the wounded self. E. B. Spiegel's (2016) attunement, representation, and mentalization approach to attachment-focused psychotherapy described how hypnosis can be utilized across attachment processes of attunement, representation, and mentalization toward structural maturation and developmental repair of patients with histories of complex relational trauma. In this article, the attunement, representation, and mentalization attachment approach and associated interventions are further explicated in the treatment of self-wounds in the borderline and narcissistic spectrums of personality organization. These principles of conceptualization and treatment interventions are then applied in a case example.

  10. Attachment-Focused Psychotherapy and the Wounded Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Eric B

    2016-07-01

    The concept of the "wounded self" (Wolfe, 2005) offers an integrative theoretical framework for self-wounds and their developmental origins. Alladin (2013, 2014, 2016) integrated hypnotherapy into this model to comprehensively address the unconscious protective mechanisms and maladaptive conscious cognitive strategies of the wounded self. The purpose of this article is to propose how an attachment-focused psychotherapy could be utilized in working with the wounded self. With its emphasis on developmental maturation through the frame of the attachment relationship, attachment theory is well-positioned to offer conceptual and treatment insights in treating the wounded self. E. B. Spiegel's (2016) attunement, representation, and mentalization approach to attachment-focused psychotherapy described how hypnosis can be utilized across attachment processes of attunement, representation, and mentalization toward structural maturation and developmental repair of patients with histories of complex relational trauma. In this article, the attunement, representation, and mentalization attachment approach and associated interventions are further explicated in the treatment of self-wounds in the borderline and narcissistic spectrums of personality organization. These principles of conceptualization and treatment interventions are then applied in a case example. PMID:27196010

  11. Psychiatric evaluation and psychotherapy in the patient's second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, M A

    1996-06-01

    Use of a patient's second language in psychiatric evaluation and treatment has a variety of effects. Patients frequently undergo psychiatric evaluation in their second language, yet competence in a second language varies depending on the phase of illness. Evaluation of bilingual patients should ideally be done in both their languages, preferably by a bilingual clinician or by a monolingual clinician with the help of an interpreter trained in mental health issues. Cultural nuances may be encoded in language in ways that are not readily conveyed in translation, even when the patient uses equivalent words in the second language. The monolingual clinician may clarify these nuances through consultation with a clinician who shares the patient's first language and culture or with an interpreter. In psychotherapy, patients may use a second language as a form of resistance, to avoid intense affect. Therapists may use language switching to overcome this resistance and to decrease emotional intensity, if necessary. Psychotherapy can also be affected by the attitudes toward speaking that are part of the patient's culture. Discussions with bilingual and bicultural consultants can elucidate these effects for the therapist who is unfamiliar with the patient's culture.

  12. Intergenerational work as an adjunct to psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, S

    1995-01-01

    Psychotherapy and psychoanalysis are opportunities for individuals to repair faulty aspects of their development that have resulted in symptoms or other difficulties in living. Although transference is the major therapeutic tool in this work, it is not the only one. The potential resources for healing that exist in family relationships is great, especially as these relationships go on long after therapy has ended. We are all living longer; families of three and four generations are no longer uncommon. There are many adult patients who have one or both parents alive and well. Intergenerational work can be a useful adjunct where there is no severe narcissistic pathology or psychosis in either patient or parent. It is especially helpful in cases where there is severe resistance and insight is not effective in promoting change. "By focusing constantly on the patient's transference distortions and ignoring reality elements we undermine self-esteem and make him feel he is always wrong, sick or crazy" (Greenson, 1978b,p. 434). The addition of intergenerational work in the course of psychoanalysis/psychotherapy can shorten the time of therapy and be another tool for dealing with resistance. This work has theoretical implications for the modification of the place that transference has in psychoanalytic therapy. By placing greater emphasis on the patient's real relationships in influencing intrapsychic change we pave the way to exciting clinical and theoretical possibilities. PMID:8778077

  13. A Review of Schema Psychotherapy%图式心理疗法述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘将

    2011-01-01

    Schema Therapy is also properly called Schema- Focused Cognitive Therapy. Schema therapy integrates elements of cognitive therapy, behavior therapy, object relations, and gestalt therapy into one unified, systematic ,innovative approach of psychotherapy. Schema Therapy consists of two main stages. First is the assessment phase, in which schemas are identified during the initial sessions. Next is the behavioral change stage ,during which the client is actively involved in replacing negative, habitual thoughts and behaviors with new, healthy cognitive and behavioral options. Schema Therapy combines help people with long- term mental health problems including personality disorders and chronic depression.%图式疗法也称图式聚焦疗法,是在整合了认知疗法、行为疗法、客体关系、格式塔理论的有利元素基础上,而形成的一个统一性、系统性、创新性的心理疗法.图式疗法包括两个主要的阶段,一是评定阶段,这一阶段主要用来识别、评定来访者的图式;二是改变阶段,在这一阶段来访者由消极、适应不良的思维和行为习惯转变为积极、健康的认知和行动.图式疗法对治疗人格障碍、慢性抑郁症等长期的心理问题有很好的效果.

  14. 支持性心理疗法在老年抑郁症患者中的应用效果%The Effect of Supportive Psychotherapy in Elderly Patients With Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨对老年抑郁症患者实施支持性心理疗法的临床效果。方法随机选取本院2013年7月~2015年2月期间收治的老年抑郁症患者64例,对患者在常规抗抑郁药物治疗的基础上行支持性心理疗法,对患者治疗前后其汉密度焦虑量表(HAMA)、汉密顿抑郁量表(HAMD)评分的变化情况进行观察记录。结果患者经过治疗后,其抑郁、焦虑情绪均下降,差异具有显著性(P<0.05)。结论对老年抑郁症患者实施支持性心理治疗,能够有效改善患者的抑郁、焦虑情绪,有利于促进其生活质量的改善。%Objective To investigate elderly patients with depression implementation of clinical effect supportive psychotherapy.Methods From July 2013 to February 2015 Elderly patients with depression treated in during the 64 cases, patients in the conventional antidepressant therapy based on the uplink supportive psychotherapy for patients before and after treatment of their Chinese density Anxiety table (HAMA), Hamilton depression Scale (HAMD) score changes were observed and recorded.Results The patients after treatment, the depression and anxiety were significantly lower, the difference was significant (P<0.05).ConclusionElderly patients with depression implement supportive psychotherapy can effectively improve the patient's depression, anxiety, and promoting the improvement of their quality of life.

  15. Modern tendencies in psychotherapy: The specialisation of practice and knowledge integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilov-Jerković Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers chronological and theoretical development of psychotherapy with the aim of formulating psychotherapeutic paradigm as an expression of scientific improvement in this field, as well as methodological and empirical assumption of integrative models in the psychotherapy. Special attention is paid to the phenomena that have characterised the field of psychotherapy in recent time, such as, on one hand, the emphasis on the increased need for the empirical evaluation of practice and accompanied trend regarding specialisation, and, on the other hand, the strengthening of the trend towards defining and researching general change mechanisms from wider, more integrative and transtheoretical perspective.

  16. Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-B): Overview and Review of Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Swartz, Holly A.; Grote, Nancy K.; Graham, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Brief Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT-B) is an eight-session adaption of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), an evidence-based psychotherapy for depression. The rationale for developing a briefer form of IPT rests on the paucity of empirical evidence linking increased therapy “dose” to enhanced therapeutic effects. The goal of IPT-B is to allow individuals who are unlikely to attend 16 sessions of psychotherapy—because of external or internal constraints—to receive the full benefits of IPT in...

  17. Does Cognition Predict Treatment Response and Remission in Psychotherapy for Late-Life Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreau, Sherry A.; Rideaux, Tiffany; O'Hara, Ruth; Arean, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify cognitive predictors of geriatric depression treatment outcome. Method Older participants completed baseline measures of memory and executive function, health, and baseline and posttreatment Hamilton Depression Scales (HAM-D) in a 12-week trial comparing psychotherapies (problem-solving vs. supportive; n = 46). We examined cognitive predictors to identify treatment responders, i.e., HAM-D scores reduced by ≥50%, and remitters, i.e., posttreatment HAM-D score ≤ 10. Results Empirically-derived decision trees identified poorer performance on switching (i.e. Trails B), with a cut-score of ≥82” predicting psychotherapy responders. No other cognitive or health variables predicted psychotherapy outcomes in the decision trees. Conclusions Psychotherapies that support or improve the executive skill of switching may augment treatment response for older patients exhibiting executive dysfunction in depression. If replicated, Trails B has potential as a brief cognitive tool for clinical decision-making in geriatric depression. PMID:25441055

  18. Case report of a computer-assisted psychotherapy of a patient with ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Pérez, Ana Isabel; Dapueto, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    This case describes a psychotherapy intervention in a patient in advanced stages of ALS. The inability for verbal communication at these stages necessitated the inclusion of a computational system to favor augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) to provide psychological care. The association of this device and software with ongoing psychotherapy acted in a synergistic manner. AAC devices made it possible to maintain patient-therapist communication and provided material support for psychotherapy despite severe speech limitations. This bimodal protocol of intervention resulted in better symptom control, improved communication with the team and family, reduction of psychological distress, promotion of autonomy, dignity, and self-esteem. The novelty of this communication is to report how the regular psychological care could be adapted to the patient circumstances using a computer device. Clinical trials will be required to evaluate the effectiveness of this mode of psychotherapy for the general population of ALS patients. PMID:25492716

  19. Religious Transformation Among Danish Pentecostals Following Personal Crisis and Group Psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viftrup, Dorte Toudal; la Cour, Peter; Buus, Niels;

    2016-01-01

    was applied for generating and analyzing the data-material. The findings suggested that all participants encountered a secondary religious transformation following the personal crisis or religiously integrated group psychotherapy. From a religious development perspective, however, the transformations...

  20. Autopoiesis and nonlinear modeling methods: an empirical approach to psychotherapy process research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunátegui, L Felipe; Dowd, E Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Psychotherapy process research needs a paradigm capable of integrating activity across biological, affective, linguistic and social domains into one causal model. It also needs a methodology capable of measuring complex deterministic activity spontaneously generated by the therapy participants. Here we articulate a model based on Autopoietic theory and nonlinear quantitative analysis that stands to provide a method and a metric to explore how psychotherapy processes lead to a measurable outcome. Perturbations are the unit of study within the autopoietic framework. Lyapunov exponents are the quantitative tools for the analysis of phase portraits generated by cardiac activity. We propose that these phase portraits can be used to measure the perturbational activity of psychotherapy participants. We buttress this argument with results from a preliminary application of this method in a psychotherapy analogue situation. PMID:16519868

  1. Coming out of the sex therapy closet: using experiential psychotherapy with sexual problems and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinplatz, Peggy J

    2007-01-01

    Mahrer's Experiential Psychotherapy provides a valuable alternative to conventional sex therapy with individuals and couples. Experiential Psychotherapy uses the sexual complaint as it would any situation or scene described at the outset of therapy, as an entry point to the client's deeper experiencing. Several of the advantages of the methods employed are listed. Specifically, the ways in which Experiential Psychotherapy is ideally suited to dealing with forbidden, haunting, and disturbing sexual feelings, fantasies, and urges are highlighted. Clinical illustrations are presented of experiential dream work with a sexual assault survivor and of a couple referred for treatment of his erectile dysfunction and her low sexual desire. Experiential Psychotherapy effects profound changes in the person(s), connections within and with others, and in bodily phenomena. These outcomes, including freer choices, heightened pleasure and embodiment, extend beyond the predominant treatment paradigm's amelioration of sexual symptoms and disorder.

  2. Supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy versus treatment as usual for first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne; Knudsen, Per;

    2012-01-01

    manualized individual supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (SPP) in addition to treatment as usual or with treatment as usual alone (TaU). Symptoms and functional outcomes were measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF). The study......During recent decades, the field of treatment of schizophrenia has lacked empirical, systematic outcome studies that support psychodynamic psychotherapy as an evidence-based intervention for patients with schizophrenia. The Danish schizophrenia project (DNS) compared psychodynamic psychotherapy.......000) and GAF(symptom) (p = 0.010) significantly favored SPP in combination with TaU over TaU alone. In spite of limitations, this study speaks in favor of including supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy in the treatment for patients with schizophrenic first-episode psychoses....

  3. Examining the therapeutic relationship and confronting resistances in psychodynamic psychotherapy: a certified public accountant case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Christopher T; Gentile, Julie P; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2011-05-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective for a variety of mental health symptoms. This form of psychotherapy uses patient self reflection and self examination, as well as the therapeutic relationship between the patient and psychiatrist, to explore maladaptive coping strategies and relationship patterns of the patient. A thorough understanding of resistance and the core conflictual relationship theme afford the psychiatrist the ability to facilitate this work. In this article, the composite case illustrates some of the psychodynamic psychotherapy techniques that can be employed in a psychotherapy case. In this example, the case is about a certified public accountant that came to treatment because of an acute stressor that put her career goals at risk. An acute episode or event can bring to light chronic and ongoing symptoms, which have had a remitting and relapsing course, and leave the patient unable to compensate on his or her own.

  4. Effectiveness of intensive group psychotherapy in treatment of neurotic and personality disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Mielimąka

    2015-02-01

    Intensive, short-term group psychotherapy with elements of individual therapy is an effective treatment for neurotic disorders. The majority of treated persons obtains a significant symptomatic improvement and a reduction in the severity of neurotic personality traits.

  5. MAOA and mechanisms of panic disorder revisited: from bench to molecular psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, A; Richter, J; Straube, B; Höfler, M; Lueken, U; Gloster, A T; Weber, H; Domschke, K; Fehm, L; Ströhle, A; Jansen, A; Gerlach, A; Pyka, M; Reinhardt, I; Konrad, C; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Alpers, G W; Pauli, P; Lang, T; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Hamm, A; Kircher, T; Deckert, J

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG) is a prevalent mental disorder featuring a substantial complex genetic component. At present, only a few established risk genes exist. Among these, the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is noteworthy given that genetic variation has been demonstrated to influence gene expression and monoamine levels. Long alleles of the MAOA-uVNTR promoter polymorphism are associated with PD/AG and correspond with increased enzyme activity. Here, we have thus investigated the impact of MAOA-uVNTR on therapy response, behavioral avoidance and brain activity in fear conditioning in a large controlled and randomized multicenter study on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in PD/AG. The study consisted of 369 PD/AG patients, and genetic information was available for 283 patients. Carriers of the risk allele had significantly worse outcome as measured by the Hamilton Anxiety scale (46% responders vs 67%, P=0.017). This was accompanied by elevated heart rate and increased fear during an anxiety-provoking situation, that is, the behavioral avoidance task. All but one panic attack that happened during this task occurred in risk allele carriers and, furthermore, risk allele carriers did not habituate to the situation during repetitive exposure. Finally, functional neuroimaging during a classical fear conditioning paradigm evidenced that the protective allele is associated with increased activation of the anterior cingulate cortex upon presentation of the CS+ during acquisition of fear. Further differentiation between high- and low-risk subjects after treatment was observed in the inferior parietal lobes, suggesting differential brain activation patterns upon CBT. Taken together, we established that a genetic risk factor for PD/AG is associated with worse response to CBT and identify potential underlying neural mechanisms. These findings might govern how psychotherapy can include genetic information to tailor individualized treatment approaches

  6. Combined treatment of borderline personality disorder with interpersonal psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy: predictors of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Silvio; Bozzatello, Paola; Bogetto, Filippo

    2015-03-30

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by affective instability, impulsive behaviors, and disturbed interpersonal relationships. A previous study of our group found that combined therapy with interpersonal psychotherapy adapted to BPD (IPT-BPD) and fluoxetine was superior to single pharmacotherapy in BPD patients. The aim of the present study was to examine what clinical factors predicted response to combined therapy in patients evaluated in the previous efficacy study. The subgroup of 27 patients allocated to combined therapy was analyzed. Patients were treated for 32 weeks with fluoxetine 20-40 mg/day plus IPT-BPD. Patients were assessed at baseline and week 32 with an interview for demographic and clinical variables, CGI-S, HDRS, HARS, SOFAS, BPDSI, and SAT-P. Statistical analysis was performed with multiple regression. The difference of CGI-S score between baseline and week 32 (∆CGI-S) was the dependent variable. Factors significantly and independently related to ∆CGI-S were the BPDSI total score and the items abandonment, affective instability, and identity. Patients with more severe BPD psychopathology and with a higher degree of core symptoms such as fear of abandonment, affective instability, and identity disturbance have a better chance to improve with combined therapy with fluoxetine and IPT-BPD.

  7. Moral Dilemmas and Existential Issues Encountered Both in Psychotherapy and Philosophical Counseling Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice A. Popescu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper stems from clinical observations and empirical data collected in the therapy room over six years. It investigates the relationship between psychotherapy and philosophical counseling, proposing an integrative model of counseling. During cognitive behavior therapy sessions with clients who turn to therapy in order to solve their clinical issues, the author noticed that behind most of the invalidating symptoms classified by the DSM-5 as depression, anxiety, hypochondriac and phobic complaints, usually lies a lack of existential meaning or existential scope and clients are also tormented by moral dilemmas. Following the anamnestic interview and the psychological evaluation, rarely the depression or anxiety diagnosed on Axis I is purely just a sum of invalidating symptoms, which may disappear if treated symptomatically. When applying the Sentence Completion Test, an 80 items test of psychodynamic origin and high-face validity, most of the clients report an entire plethora of conscious or unconscious motivations, distorted cognitions or irrational thinking but also grave existential themes such as scope or meaning of life, professional identity, fear of death, solitude and loneliness, freedom of choice and liberty. Same issues are approached in the philosophical counseling practice, but no systematic research has been done yet in the field. Future research and investigation is needed in order to assess the importance of moral dilemmas and existential issues in both practices.

  8. Promoting psychosocial adaptation of youths in residential care through animal-assisted psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balluerka, Nekane; Muela, Alexander; Amiano, Nora; Caldentey, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP) on the psychosocial adaptation of a group of adolescents in residential care who had suffered traumatic childhood experiences and who presented with mental health problems. This study recruited 63 youths (mean age=15.27, SD=1.63) who were divided into two groups: a treatment group of 39 youths (19 female and 20 male; mean age=15.03, SD=0.51) and a control group of 24 (five female and 19 male; mean age=15.67, SD=1.63). The youths who underwent the AAP program had higher school adjustment in comparison to their peers who did not receive treatment. Their hyperactive behavior decreased, and they showed better social skills, more leadership, and fewer attention problems. They also showed a more positive attitude toward their teachers in comparison to controls. No differences were observed in other variables associated with clinical symptoms or personal adjustment. These results suggest that AAP can be effective with teenagers who have suffered childhood traumas and who present with problems of psychosocial adaptation. PMID:26443670

  9. Moral Dilemmas and Existential Issues Encountered Both in Psychotherapy and Philosophical Counseling Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Beatrice A

    2015-08-01

    This paper stems from clinical observations and empirical data collected in the therapy room over six years. It investigates the relationship between psychotherapy and philosophical counseling, proposing an integrative model of counseling. During cognitive behavior therapy sessions with clients who turn to therapy in order to solve their clinical issues, the author noticed that behind most of the invalidating symptoms classified by the DSM-5 as depression, anxiety, hypochondriac and phobic complaints, usually lies a lack of existential meaning or existential scope and clients are also tormented by moral dilemmas. Following the anamnestic interview and the psychological evaluation, rarely the depression or anxiety diagnosed on Axis I is purely just a sum of invalidating symptoms, which may disappear if treated symptomatically. When applying the Sentence Completion Test, an 80 items test of psychodynamic origin and high-face validity, most of the clients report an entire plethora of conscious or unconscious motivations, distorted cognitions or irrational thinking but also grave existential themes such as scope or meaning of life, professional identity, fear of death, solitude and loneliness, freedom of choice and liberty. Same issues are approached in the philosophical counseling practice, but no systematic research has been done yet in the field. Future research and investigation is needed in order to assess the importance of moral dilemmas and existential issues in both practices.

  10. Innovation in Psychotherapy Integration: A Possible Need for Practice-Based Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob Owusu Sarfo; Isaac Acheampong Sarfo; Michael Asiedu

    2014-01-01

    In the development of psychotherapy, the debate between opting for a specific model as opposed to systems integration has been a growing controversy. In addition, questions have been raised with regards to the consistency of integration approaches, the benchmark for choice of integration approach and the proficiency of practitioners. This article examines the reasons for integration using a systematic review to evaluate the triumphs made since the inception of psychotherapy integration. The a...

  11. Ideas for a phenomenological interpretation and elaboration of personal construct theory Part 3. Clinic, psychotherapy, research

    OpenAIRE

    Armezzani, Maria; Chiari, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In this part of our work about a comparison between Kelly's personal construct theory and phenomenology, we enter the fields of psychotherapy and research. The topic of intersubjectivity, meant as original recognition of the other's subjectivity, provides a backdrop for both phenomenological clinic and Kellyan psychotherapy. Though Kelly never used the term "intersubjectivity", his theory and the corollary of sociality in particular, reveals a view of interpersonal relationships as intercorpo...

  12. Early-Stage Psychotherapy Produces Elevated Frontal White Matter Integrity in Adult Major Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Wang; Xiaolan Huang; Peiyu Huang; Dan Li; Fajin Lv; Yong Zhang; Linke Zhou; Deyu Yang; Peng Xie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psychotherapy has demonstrated comparable efficacy to antidepressant medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Metabolic alterations in the MDD state and in response to treatment have been detected by functional imaging methods, but the underlying white matter microstructural changes remain unknown. The goal of this study is to apply diffusion tensor imaging techniques to investigate psychotherapy-specific responses in the white matter. METHODS: Twenty-one of forty...

  13. Unique and Common Mechanisms of Change across Cognitive and Dynamic Psychotherapies

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly Gibbons, Mary Beth; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Barber, Jacques P.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; GALLOP, ROBERT; Goldstein, Lizabeth A.; Temes, Christina M.; RING-KURTZ, SARAH

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to examine theoretically important mechanisms of change in psychotherapy outcome across different types of treatment. Specifically, the role of gains in self-understanding, acquisition of compensatory skills, and improvements in views of the self were examined. The University of Pennsylvania Center for Psychotherapy Research database that includes studies conducted from 1995 to 2002 evaluating the efficacy of cognitive and psychodynamic therapies for a variety of di...

  14. Self-Regulation and Mechanisms of Action in Psychotherapy: A Theory-Based Translational Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Strauman, Timothy J; Goetz, Elena L.; Detloff, Allison M; MacDuffie, Katherine E.; Zaunmüller, Luisa; Lutz, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Psychotherapy is a complex, multi-layered process with the potential to bring about changes at multiple levels of functioning, from the neurobiology of the brain to the individual’s role in the social world. Although studies of the mechanisms by which psychotherapy leads to change continue to appear, there remains much to be learned about how psychological interventions work. To guide explorations of how and for whom particular treatment approaches lead to change, researchers can rely on theo...

  15. Beginning and end of treatment of patients who dropped out of psychoanalytic psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Isabel Jung; Fernanda Barcellos Serralta; Maria Lucia Tiellet Nunes; Cláudio Laks Eizirik

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Even though it is expected that patients and therapist will agree on when to terminate psychotherapy, quite often patients discontinue treatment on their own. This study aims to better understand dropout in psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PP). Method: Baseline and post-treatment interviews were conducted with six adult women classified by their therapists as dropout patients at a PP outpatient clinic. Results were analyzed using Bardin's content analysis. Results: Content analysis...

  16. Examining the Therapeutic Relationship and Confronting Resistances in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: A Certified Public Accountant Case

    OpenAIRE

    Manetta, Christopher T.; Gentile, Julie P.; Gillig, Paulette Marie

    2011-01-01

    Psychodynamic psychotherapy is effective for a variety of mental health symptoms. This form of psychotherapy uses patient self reflection and self examination, as well as the therapeutic relationship between the patient and psychiatrist, to explore maladaptive coping strategies and relationship patterns of the patient. A thorough understanding of resistance and the core conflictual relationship theme afford the psychiatrist the ability to facilitate this work. In this article, the composite c...

  17. Integrating Pharmacotherapy and Psychotherapy for Paediatric Bipolar Disorder: Translating Science to Service

    OpenAIRE

    Smita, Kampani; Mani N., Pavuluri

    2005-01-01

    Objective: For comprehensive management of paediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), it is imperative to combine psychopharmacotherapy with specific psychotherapy. This article proposes a model that incorporates (1) an overview of psychopathology, (2) a review of outcomes in psychopharmacotherapy trials, and (3) a summary of evidence-based forms of psychotherapy to complement pharmacotherapy. Results: The psychopathology of PBD is unique compared to that of adult bipolar disorder with promi...

  18. Transference patterns and working alliance during the early phase of psychodynamic psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Samardžić Ljiljana; Nikolić Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim. Working alliance, as a collaborative part of the therapeutic relationship has been proven to be one of the most powerful therapeutic factors in psychotherapy in general, regardless many technical differences between numerous psychotherapeutic modalities. On the other hand, transference is the basic concept of psychodynamic psychotherapy, and, according to the psychoanalytic theory and practice, it forms a major part of the therapeutic relati...

  19. Group supervision in a private setting: Practice and method for theory and practice in psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziana Mangiacavallo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The report aims to tell the experience of a supervision group in a private setting. The group consists of professional psychotherapists driven by the more experienced practitioner, who shares a clinical reasoning on psychotherapy with younger colleagues. The report aims to present the supervision group as a methode and to showcase its features. The supervision group becomes a container of professional experiences that speak of the new way of doing psychotherapy

  20. Introduction to the special section "Big'er' Data": Scaling up psychotherapy research in counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Imel, Zac E

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the special section on utilizing large data sets to explore psychotherapy processes and outcomes. The increased use of technology has provided new opportunities for psychotherapy researchers. In particular, there is a rise in large databases of tens of thousands clients. Additionally, there are new ways to pool valuable resources for meta-analytic processes. At the same time, these tools also come with limitations. These issues are introduced as well as brief overview of the articles.