WorldWideScience

Sample records for behavior therapy-based psychotherapy

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapies: History and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapies are one of the most leading theories between current psychotherapies. As a psychotherapy school, besides sharing the common points reached collectively by the humanity throughout the history, it also achieved in integrating scientific and ampirical experiences into the psychotherapy practice. Having included mainstreams like Stoicism, Kantian philosopy in its historical roots, this approach has similarities with eastern philosophies, budism and sufism. Apart from its historical and cultural roots, cognitive approach integrated with behaviorism which applied scientific method in human psychology for the first time, and also implemented the scientific method in the cognitive field. Cognitive behavioral approaches shall make important contributions in the pathway that psychotherapies will cover. [JCBPR 2012; 1(1.000: 7-14

  2. Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapies: History and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapies are one of the most leading theories between current psychotherapies. As a psychotherapy school, besides sharing the common points reached collectively by the humanity throughout the history, it also achieved in integrating scientific and ampirical experiences into the psychotherapy practice. Having included mainstreams like Stoicism, Kantian philosopy in its historical roots, this approach has similarities with eastern philosophies, budism and sufism. Apart from its historical and cultural roots, cognitive approach integrated with behaviorism which applied scientific method in human psychology for the first time, and also implemented the scientific method in the cognitive field. Cognitive behavioral approaches shall make important contributions in the pathway that psychotherapies will cover.

  3. Psychotherapies

    OpenAIRE

    Ohk, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Psychotherapy can help people overcome emotional problems, relationship problems, anxiety, habits like smoking, eating disorders, depression and obsessional thinking, work-related problems and much more. There are a lot of different types of psychotherapy available. To shed some light on the choices, here are descriptions of several of the older established therapies that usually encompass a code of ethics. Professional associations also generally offer training progra...

  4. Relationship Processes in Youth Psychotherapy: Measuring Alliance, Alliance-Building Behaviors, and Client Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karver, Marc; Shirk, Stephen; Handelsman, Jessica B.; Fields, Sherecce; Crisp, Heather; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; McMakin, Dana

    2008-01-01

    This study explores hypothesized associations among therapist engagement strategies, therapeutic alliance, client involvement, and treatment outcome in a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral psychotherapy and nondirective supportive psychotherapy for adolescents with depressive symptoms who have attempted suicide. Ratings from…

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to Ask Your ... their experience and treatment options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Other forms of ...

  6. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy among Mothers with Children with Disruptive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Romero-Porras

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children’s mental problems remain one of the central topics in governments’ agendas because of their negative impact at social and economic levels. The present paper is a single case study, with A-B design with concurrent control through behaviors and participants, aimed to identify the effect of the Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP on four mothers who informed about their children’s disruptive behaviors in the school setting. A case-control who received psychoeducation-based intervention was included in order to observe outcome differences among participants regarding the implemented treatment. Using the FIAT-Q and functional analysis, participants’ problematic behaviors were identified. Mothers treated with FAP were expected to display behavioral changes within the sessions and generalized them to the natural context in the interaction with their children in order to promote children’s prosocial behaviors. Results indicated that FAP reduced the frequency of mothers’ problematic behaviors and, in turn, children reduced disruptive behaviors. Implications of the study results are discussed both at theoretical and applied levels.

  7. Intimacy Is a Transdiagnostic Problem for Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Is a Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterneck, Chad T.; Hart, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Problems with intimacy and interpersonal issues are exhibited across most psychiatric disorders. However, most of the targets in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy are primarily intrapersonal in nature, with few directly involved in interpersonal functioning and effective intimacy. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) provides a behavioral basis for…

  8. Compliments and accounts : Positive evaluation of reported behavior in psychotherapy for adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Margot; De Winter, Andrea F.; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Huiskes, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Based on conversation analysis (CA) of video-recorded therapy sessions, the article explicates a particular interactional project of positively evaluating client-reported behavior in psychotherapy. The analysis focuses on the therapist's actions that convey a positive evaluation of client-reported

  9. Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Group Psychotherapy in Treatment of Geriatric Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Joanne L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed whether depressed geriatric patients (N=33) would respond to group psychotherapy and, if they would respond differently to cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic modes. Results indicated that patients showed statistically and clinically significant reductions on observer-rated measures of depression and anxiety, as well as on self-report…

  10. Pretreatment and Process Predictors of Outcome in Interpersonal and Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Saelens, Brian E.; Stein, Richard I.; Mockus, Danyte S.; Welch, R. Robinson; Matt, Georg E.; Wilfley, Denise E.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined pretreatment and process predictors of individual nonresponse to psychological group treatment of binge eating disorder (BED). In a randomized trial, 162 overweight patients with BED were treated with either group cognitive-behavioral therapy or group interpersonal psychotherapy. Treatment nonresponse, which was defined…

  11. What Works for People with Mental Retardation? Critical Commentary on Cognitive-Behavioral and Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beail, Nigel

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews what is known about the effectiveness of the more controversial use of psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy with people who have mental retardation. It examines self-management approaches (problem solving, anger management, and cognitive therapy) and psychodynamic psychotherapy. The paper concludes that there has…

  12. Dynamic psychotherapy or dialectical behavioral therapy-- which is better for borderline personality disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tene, O; Har-Even, A; Dahan, E; Babokshin, Y; Reuveni, I; Ponarovsky, B; Rosman, V; Gluzman, L

    2011-01-01

    Clinical dilemma: A 20-year-old female patient, diagnosed as suffering from borderline personality disorder, is referred to your clinic. Her disorder is characterized by unstable personal relationships, impulsivity, suicidal behavior, emotional instability and pan-anxiety. After initiation of pharmacological treatment which you have chosen, you meet with her parents who ask you which is better for their daughter dynamic-analytic psychotherapy or dialectical behavioral therapy.

  13. Neuroimaging mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for addictive behaviors: emerging translational approaches that bridge biology and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W; Chung, Tammy

    2013-06-01

    Research on mechanisms of behavior change provides an innovative method to improve treatment for addictive behaviors. An important extension of mechanisms of change research involves the use of translational approaches, which examine how basic biological (i.e., brain-based mechanisms) and behavioral factors interact in initiating and sustaining positive behavior change as a result of psychotherapy. Articles in this special issue include integrative conceptual reviews and innovative empirical research on brain-based mechanisms that may underlie risk for addictive behaviors and response to psychotherapy from adolescence through adulthood. Review articles discuss hypothesized mechanisms of change for cognitive and behavioral therapies, mindfulness-based interventions, and neuroeconomic approaches. Empirical articles cover a range of addictive behaviors, including use of alcohol, cigarettes, marijuana, cocaine, and pathological gambling and represent a variety of imaging approaches including fMRI, magneto-encephalography, real-time fMRI, and diffusion tensor imaging. Additionally, a few empirical studies directly examine brain-based mechanisms of change, whereas others examine brain-based indicators as predictors of treatment outcome. Finally, two commentaries discuss craving as a core feature of addiction, and the importance of a developmental approach to examining mechanisms of change. Ultimately, translational research on mechanisms of behavior change holds promise for increasing understanding of how psychotherapy may modify brain structure and functioning and facilitate the initiation and maintenance of positive treatment outcomes for addictive behaviors. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Mobile technology boosts the effectiveness of psychotherapy and behavioral interventions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B; Rosen, Dana; Silk, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of mobile technology on treatment outcome for psychotherapy and other behavioral interventions. Our search of the literature resulted in 26 empirical articles describing 25 clinical trials testing the benefits of smartphone applications, personal digital assistants (PDAs), or text messaging systems either to supplement treatment or substitute for direct contact with a clinician. Overall, mobile technology use was associated with superior treatment outcome across all study designs and control conditions, effect size (ES) = .34, p mobile technology using a rigorous "Treatment" versus "Treatment + Mobile" design, effect sizes were only slightly more modest (ES = .27) and still significant (p mobile technology for the delivery of psychotherapy and other behavioral interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Hypnotherapy: A Combined Approach Using Psychotherapy and Behavior Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Discusses use of hypnosis in traditional psychoanalysis, compares use of hypnosis in behavior modification therapy versus psychoanalysis, and presents a hypno-behavioral model which combines both approaches using hypnosis as the medium. (Author/NB)

  16. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, Janna I; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral therapy training. Trainees from Sample 1 (N = 184) were asked to describe their interpersonal behavior in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from Sample 2 (N = 135) were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of healing involvement, while stress involvement was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behavior within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behavior. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees' interpersonal behavior with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behavior could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behavior in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  17. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, Janna I.; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees’ interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral therapy training. Trainees from Sample 1 (N = 184) were asked to describe their interpersonal behavior in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from Sample 2 (N = 135) were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Results: Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of healing involvement, while stress involvement was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees’ relationships with their patients. Social behavior within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behavior. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees’ interpersonal behavior with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behavior could only be found when comparing trainees’ level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Conclusion: Trainees’ interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behavior in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training. PMID:26106347

  18. Oniomania--successful treatment with fluvoxamine and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Darko; Karlović, Dalibor

    2005-06-01

    Compulsive buying (oniomania) is a disorder that has begun to receive attention from researchers in recent years. It has been estimated that disorder affects from 2 to 8% of the general adult population in the US (official data for Croatia are not available). About 90% of those affected are female. Onset occurs in the late teens or early twenties, and the disorder is generally chronic. Psychiatric comorbidity is frequent, particularly mood, anxiety, substance use, eating and personality disorders. Treatment has not been well delineated, but individual and group psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy and 12-step programmes may be helpful. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) re-uptake inhibitors may help some patients regulate their buying impulses. We have presented the case of a 32-year old woman with a history of excessive pathological buying treated successfully with combined therapy (fluvoxamine and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy).

  19. Design challenges in transdiagnostic psychotherapy research: Comparing Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT) to existing evidence-based psychotherapy in veterans with affective disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Daniel F

    2015-07-01

    To address the limitations of disorder-specific approaches, newer transdiagnostic approaches to psychotherapy have been developed to provide a single treatment that is capable of addressing several, related disorders. However, the recruitment of multiple diagnoses presents many challenges to the traditional design of psychotherapy randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The goal of the manuscript is to present the challenges and rationale for designing a RCT for transdiagnostic treatment to inform and aid in the development of future investigations. A recently funded and ongoing RCT for Transdiagnostic Behavior Therapy (TBT) is used as an example to discuss the related design challenges. The TBT study involves the recruitment of 96 veteran participants with any of the following eight principal diagnoses: posttraumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, major depressive disorder, or persistent depressive disorder. Within the TBT study, participants will complete a semi-structured diagnostic interview and a series of transdiagnostic self-report measures to determine eligibility and assess baseline symptomatology. Qualifying participants will be randomized to TBT or control psychotherapy. Additional assessments will be completed at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. Due to the transdiagnostic nature of the sample, adjustments to the recruitment and randomization procedures, selection of measures, selection of control psychotherapy, and analysis plan were required. These adjustments have implications to future trials on transdiagnostic psychotherapy protocols as well as future research in line with the transdiagnostic focus of the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) funding strategy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Animal-assisted therapy with chronic psychiatric inpatients: equine-assisted psychotherapy and aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurenberg, Jeffry R; Schleifer, Steven J; Shaffer, Thomas M; Yellin, Mary; Desai, Prital J; Amin, Ruchi; Bouchard, Axel; Montalvo, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT), most frequently used with dogs, is being used increasingly as an adjunctive alternative treatment for psychiatric patients. AAT with larger animals, such as horses, may have unique benefits. In this randomized controlled study, equine and canine forms of AAT were compared with standard treatments for hospitalized psychiatric patients to determine AAT effects on violent behavior and related measures. The study included 90 patients with recent in-hospital violent behavior or highly regressed behavior. Hospitalization at the 500-bed state psychiatric hospital was two months or longer (mean 5.4 years). Participants were randomly selected to receive ten weekly group therapy sessions of standardized equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP), canine-assisted psychotherapy (CAP), enhanced social skills psychotherapy, or regular hospital care. Participants' mean age was 44, 37% were female, 76% had diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, and 56% had been committed involuntarily for civil or forensic reasons. Violence-related incident reports filed by staff in the three months after study intake were compared with reports two months preintake. Interventions were well tolerated. Analyses revealed an intervention group effect (F=3.00, df=3 and 86, p=.035); post hoc tests showed specific benefits of EAP (p<.05). Similar AAT effects were found for the incidence of 1:1 clinical observation (F=2.70, df=3 and 86, p=.051); post hoc tests suggested benefits of CAP (p=.058) as well as EAP (p=.082). Covariance analyses indicated that staff can predict which patients are likely to benefit from EAP (p=.01). AAT, and perhaps EAP uniquely, may be an effective therapeutic modality for long-term psychiatric patients at risk of violence.

  1. Measuring psychotherapy outcomes with the Behavioral Health Measure-20: Efficient and comprehensive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopta, Mark; Owen, Jesse; Budge, Stephanie

    2015-12-01

    The Behavioral Health Measure-20 (BHM-20; Kopta & Lowry, 2002) through the computer-based CelestHealth System-MH (CHS-MH) has proven to be an effective and efficient instrument for assessing psychotherapy outcomes and providing feedback to psychotherapists. This article describes its features, the psychometric and research support of the measure, as well as its use in clinical training and practice. Additionally, we offer some hopes and possibilities for the future of clinical feedback systems. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people ... as medications or individual psychotherapy), STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of ...

  3. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  4. [M. Linehan dialectic behavioral psychotherapy. A new concept in the treatment of borderline personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohus, M; Berger, M

    1996-11-01

    M. Linehan developed "dialectical behavioral therapy" specifically to treat chronically suicidal borderline patients. It rests on a biosocial model that assumes a disorder in the regulation of emotions and in tolerance of stress. The numerous dysfunctional patterns of behavior such as self-destructive behavior, inability to govern impulses or severe dissociative phenomena are regarded as attempts at problem-solving. This concept of therapy focuses on the continuing balance between the necessity of accepting maladaptive behavior patterns in both an intrapsychic and an interactional context while still working to change them. A comprehensive manual outlines the clearly structured therapy and integrates a wide choice of therapeutic strategies. Parallel to development of the therapy itself, a method also was developed for testing therapist adherence to the manual's guidelines, thus providing a basis for empirical evaluation. An initial controlled, randomized study demonstrated the significant superiority of this method to methods of unspecific psychotherapy at various levels. In the current endeavor to develop disorder-specific approaches to the treatment of personality disorders, "dialectical behavioral therapy" is a noteworthy model.

  5. Assessing the distinctiveness of psychotherapies and examining change over treatment for anorexia nervosa with cognitive-behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, and specialist supportive clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Virginia V W; Jordan, Jennifer; Carter, Janet D; Luty, Suzanne E; Carter, Frances A; McKenzie, Janice M; Frampton, Christopher M A; Joyce, Peter R

    2016-10-01

    Therapist adherence to cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), and specialist supportive clinical management (SSCM) for anorexia nervosa (AN), was examined across three phases of therapy in a randomized clinical trial. Adherence in early, middle, and late phase therapy sessions from 53 of 56 participants in the trial was assessed using the CSPRS-AN by independent raters after listening to complete therapy sessions. The three forms of psychotherapy were distinguishable by blind raters. Subscale scores were higher for the corresponding therapy than the other therapy modalities. In CBT and SSCM, a phase-by-therapy effect was found, with the CBT subscale highest for CBT, intermediate for SSCM, lowest for IPT, and elevated in the middle phase of CBT and SSCM. The SSCM subscale was highest for SSCM, intermediate for CBT, lowest for IPT, and elevated in the middle phase of SSCM. Adherence to activities around normalizing eating, weight gain, and education about anorexia nervosa was higher in SSCM than in either CBT or IPT. Ensuring the distinctiveness of therapies in existing clinical trials with differential treatment outcome is essential. Research on adherence to therapy modalities has the potential to help understanding of the effective components of new and existing treatments for AN. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:958-962). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Other forms of therapy for BPD ... STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of ...

  7. The Effects of Psychodrama and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Group Work on Test Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Taspinar Goveci

    2017-04-01

    In the analyses relating to comparison; in terms of total exam anxiety, perception, delusion sublevel and trait anxiety points of the students, psychodrama techniques applied in the first group have been more affective with reference to the cognitive behavioral techniques applied in the second group. No meaningful difference has been detected when two experimental groups have been compared according to continuity anxiety points. [JCBPR 2017; 6(1.000: 22-30

  8. Advanced psychotherapy training: psychotherapy scholars' track, and the apprenticeship model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert E; Yager, Joel

    2013-07-01

    Guided by ACGME's requirements, psychiatric residency training in psychotherapy currently focuses on teaching school-specific forms of psychotherapy (i.e., cognitive-behavioral, supportive, and psychodynamic psychotherapy). On the basis of a literature review of common factors affecting psychotherapy outcomes and experience with empirically supported and traditional psychotherapies, the authors aimed to develop an advanced contemporary and pragmatic approach to psychotherapy training for eight residents (two per PGY year) enrolled in a specialized Psychotherapy Scholars' Track within an adult general-residency program. The authors developed core principles and clinical practices, and drafted year-by-year educational goals and objectives to teach the psychotherapy scholars. Based on experiential learning principles, we also developed an individualized form of psychotherapy training, which we call "The Apprenticeship Model." The Psychotherapy Scholars' Track, and "Apprenticeship Model" of training are now in their third year. To date, authors report that scholars are highly satisfied with the structure and curriculum in the track. Trainees appreciate the protected time for self-directed study, mentored scholarship, and psychotherapy rotations. Patients and the Psychotherapy Scholars experience the "Apprenticeship Model" of psychotherapy training as authentic and compatible with their needs and resources. The Psychotherapy Scholars' Track developed and piloted in our general psychiatry residency is based on common factors, empirically-supported treatments, and use of experiential learning principles. Whether the Psychotherapy Scholars' Track and "Apprenticeship Model" will ultimately increase residents' psychotherapy skills and positively affect their ability to sustain postgraduate psychotherapy practice in varied settings requires long-term evaluation. The developers welcome empirical testing of the comparative effectiveness of this psychotherapy teaching approach

  9. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, S P F; Huibers, M J H; Diels, L; Arntz, A

    2012-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) seems to be as effective as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of major depression. Because the onset of panic attacks is often related to increased interpersonal life stress, IPT has the potential to also treat panic disorder. To date, a preliminary open trial yielded promising results but there have been no randomized controlled trials directly comparing CBT and IPT for panic disorder. This study aimed to directly compare the effects of CBT versus IPT for the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Ninety-one adult patients with a primary diagnosis of DSM-III or DSM-IV panic disorder with agoraphobia were randomized. Primary outcomes were panic attack frequency and an idiosyncratic behavioral test. Secondary outcomes were panic and agoraphobia severity, panic-related cognitions, interpersonal functioning and general psychopathology. Measures were taken at 0, 3 and 4 months (baseline, end of treatment and follow-up). Intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses on the primary outcomes indicated superior effects for CBT in treating panic disorder with agoraphobia. Per-protocol analyses emphasized the differences between treatments and yielded larger effect sizes. Reductions in the secondary outcomes were equal for both treatments, except for agoraphobic complaints and behavior and the credibility ratings of negative interpretations of bodily sensations, all of which decreased more in CBT. CBT is the preferred treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia compared to IPT. Mechanisms of change should be investigated further, along with long-term outcomes.

  10. Psychotherapy: A 40-Year Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Sol L.

    1981-01-01

    Appraises selected issues and developments in the field of psychotherapy since 1940. Discusses increased participation of clinical psychologists in the area of psychotherapy, increased popularity of psychotherapy, declining influence of psychoanalysis and related views, emergence of behavioral and cognitive therapies, and recent emphasis on…

  11. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: an efficacy and partial effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögels, Susan M; Wijts, Paul; Oort, Frans J; Sallaerts, Steph J M

    2014-05-01

    Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted of up to 36 sessions (average PDT 31.4 and CBT 19.8 sessions). Assessments took place at waitlist: pretest, after 12 and 24 weeks for those who received longer treatment: posttest, 3-month and 1-year follow-up. Changes in the main outcome measure self-reported social anxiety composite, as well as in other psychopathology, social skills, negative social beliefs, public self-consciousness, defense mechanisms, personal goals, independent rater's judgments of SAD and general improvement, and approach behavior during an objective test, were analyzed using multilevel analysis. No improvement occurred during waitlist. Treatments were highly efficacious, with large within-subject effect sizes for social anxiety, but no differences between PDT and CBT on general and treatment-specific measures occurred. Remission rates were over 50% and similar for PDT and CBT. Personality disorders did not influence the effects of PDT or CBT. PDT and CBT are both effective approaches for SAD. Further research is needed on the cost-effectiveness of PDT versus CBT, on different lengths PDT, and on patient preferences and their relationship to outcome of PDT versus CBT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Development and Effects of a Cognitive-behavioral Therapy Based Program in Reducing Internalized Stigma in Patients with Schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Young; Jun, Seong Sook

    2016-06-01

    This study was done to develop a internalized stigma reducing program based on cognitive-behavioral therapy and appropriate for patients with schizophrenia and to evaluate its effectiveness. The study design was a mixed method research. Qualitative study, 13 patients with schizophrenia who had experience in overcoming stigma were purposively chosen for interviews and data were analyzed using Giorgi method. Quantitative study, 64 patients with schizophrenia (experimental group=32, control group=32) were recruited. The cognitive-behavioral therapy-based program for reducing internalized stigma in patients with schizophrenia was provided for 8 weeks (12 sessions). Data were collected from June. 20, 2013 to Feb. 14, 2014. Quantitative data were analyzed using χ²-test, t-test, repeated measures ANOVA with the SPSS program. Qualitative results, from the experience of coping with stigma in patients with schizophrenia seventeen themes and five themes-clusters were drawn up. Quantitative results showed that internalized stigma, self-esteem, mental health recovery and quality of life were significantly better in the experimental group compared to the control group. Study findings indicate that this program for reducing internalized stigma in patients with schizophrenia is effective and can be recommended as a rehabilitation program intervention to help patients with schizophrenia to cope with internalized stigma.

  13. [Differential group experiences of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic group psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzke, Birgit; Scheel, Sylvia; Bauer, Christina; Rüddel, Heinz; Jürgensen, Ralph; Andreas, Sylke; Koch, Uwe; Schulz, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Research concerning the question, whether and to what extent cognitive-behavioral (CB) and psychodynamic (PD) therapy consist of differing process components under clinical representative conditions, is relevant especially for a valid interpretation of comparative outcome research, for identifying differential beneficial factors of psychotherapy and for a systematic indication for, respectively assignment of, patients to the two treatments. In this study it is investigated whether PD and CB differ concerning the realisation of factors of group experience, respectively of beneficial group elements (e. g. cohesion, catharsis, learning by feedback). For this purpose, in a naturalistic design, a stratified sample (N = 36) of 104 videotaped sessions (PD groups, interactional CB groups and indicative CB groups; N = 171 patients with a broad spectrum of F-diagnoses of ICD-10, especially F3/F4) were rated by observers using the Kieler-Gruppenpsychotherapie-Prozess-Skala (KGPPS). Analyses of variance and a priori Helmert-contrasts reveal differences between PD and CB with at least medium effect sizes in 12 of the 16 factors of group experience. However, differences also were found between the two CB group treatments (9 factors of group experience with differences with large effect sizes). The results suggest that the different treatment approaches foster different qualities and quantities of group experience and that the latter seems not to evolve from the group context "per se" (i. e. by the plurality of the group).

  14. Social Problem Solving and Depressive Symptoms over Time: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy, Brief Supportive Psychotherapy, and Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Daniel N.; Leon, Andrew C.; Li, Chunshan; D'Zurilla, Thomas J.; Black, Sarah R.; Vivian, Dina; Dowling, Frank; Arnow, Bruce A.; Manber, Rachel; Markowitz, John C.; Kocsis, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Depression is associated with poor social problem solving, and psychotherapies that focus on problem-solving skills are efficacious in treating depression. We examined the associations between treatment, social problem solving, and depression in a randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy of psychotherapy augmentation for…

  15. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or stress. Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS) This treatment consists of 20 two- ... individual psychotherapy), STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve ...

  16. Advanced Psychotherapy Training: Psychotherapy Scholars' Track, and the Apprenticeship Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert E.; Yager, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective: Guided by ACGME's requirements, psychiatric residency training in psychotherapy currently focuses on teaching school-specific forms of psychotherapy (i.e., cognitive-behavioral, supportive, and psychodynamic psychotherapy). On the basis of a literature review of common factors affecting psychotherapy outcomes and…

  17. Towards Fully Automated Psychotherapy for Adults: BAS - Behavioral Activation Scheduling via web and mobile phone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, F.; Cuijpers, P.; Hoogendoorn, M.; Klein, M.C.A.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioural activation treatment has been found to be an effective psychological treatment for depression, also if delivered as self-administered psychotherapy via the internet. However, the role of supporting professionals remains important for successful application of the therapy. In this paper a

  18. How do patients with anorexia nervosa "process" psychotherapy between sessions? A comparison of cognitive-behavioral and psychodynamic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeck, A; Hartmann, A; Wild, B; De Zwaan, M; Herpertz, S; Burgmer, M; Von Wietersheim, J; Resmark, G; Friederich, H-C; Tagay, S; Dinkel, A; Loewe, B; Teufel, M; Orlinsky, D; Herzog, W; Zipfel, S

    2016-11-03

    Patients' processing of psychotherapy between sessions ("inter-session process" (ISP)) has been repeatedly shown to be related to outcome. The aim of this study was to compare ISP characteristics of cognitive-behavioral vs. psychodynamic psychotherapy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and their relation to outcome. Data of 106 patients participating in a randomized-controlled trial who received either 40 sessions of enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E) or focal psychodynamic therapy (FPT) were analyzed. The ISP was measured with the Inter-session Experience Questionnaire (IEQ). Three outcome classes were distinguished: full recovery, partial recovery, and still fulfilling all AN criteria. Patients receiving CBT-E reported more on "applying therapy" in the initial and the final treatment phase compared to FPT patients. In terms of process-outcome relations, higher levels of "recreating the therapeutic dialogue between sessions," "recreating the therapeutic dialogue with negative emotions" as well as "applying therapy with negative emotions" in the final phase of treatment predicted negative outcome in FPT, whereas overall higher levels of negative emotions predicted negative outcome in CBT-E. In outpatient treatment in AN, the processing of therapy as measured by the IEQ showed surprisingly few differences between CBT-E and FPT. However, different ISP patterns were predictive of outcome, pointing to different mechanisms of change.

  19. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    OpenAIRE

    Fincke, Janna I.; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI) and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA), psychodynamic (PD) and cognitive behavi...

  20. [Use of process and turning point in psychotherapy--significance of the theatrical aspect as a cooperative mode of behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, P; Stephan, E

    1987-02-01

    The paper presents observations respecting the contrast of playful and grim attitudes in the behavior of patients undergoing psychotherapeutic treatment. Playful correspondence to Erikson's Cooperative Stage of development and Freud's mature Genitality, while grim corresponds to Erikson's Autonomous and Assertive Stages and Freud's Anal and Phallic Stages. To be effective, theatrical performances have to be produced in a cooperative way; psychotherapy too must assist the patient to achieve a greater degree of cooperativeness and mature Genitality. Identifying with the therapist and adapting his style can enable the patient to acquire self-composure through playful behavior, and to overcome protracted grimnes. Play-matured Genitality Cooperative signifies that the patient incorporates his partner or opponent's intentions into his appreciation of events, enabling him to act more in accordance with the reality around him.

  1. Definition, operationalization and quality assurance of psychotherapy. An investigation with the behavior therapy-competence-checklist (btcc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Michael; Langhoff, C; Rotter, M

    2007-12-01

    Quality assurance is an important issue in psychotherapy research and practice, which is methodologically still in development. Apart from unstructured supervision, reliable assessment instruments are needed. A theoretical concept is outlined that allows to define the main techniques which constitute behavior therapy. An assessment instrument is introduced, which allows to measure whether a therapist applies these standards in therapy and to evaluate their quality. The development of the "Behavior Therapy-Competence-Checklist (BTCC)" is described. 182 tape-recorded therapy sessions of 14 behavioral therapists who were working full time in routine care were evaluated. The most often used behavior therapy techniques were preparation of homework assignments (71.4%) and modification of cognitions (41.6%). Most rare were macro-behavioral-analysis (19.5%) and problem solving (19.5%). The mean-total score of the BTCC was 3.4 on a scale that ranges from 1 (bad) to 7 (very good). The lowest scores were found for "problem solving" (2.7). The highest scores were found for "establishment of a therapeutic relationship" (5.2). Therapeutic competency can be operationalized and measured with the BTCC. The quality of behavior therapists under conditions of routine is moderate. They show the tendency to prefer certain therapeutic options and do not use the full spectrum of therapeutic options. Such findings point to areas in need of training.

  2. Outcomes of specific interpersonal problems for binge eating disorder: comparing group psychodynamic interpersonal psychotherapy and group cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Balfour, Louise; Presniak, Michelle D; Bissada, Hany

    2012-04-01

    We assessed whether an attachment-based treatment, Group Psychodynamic Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) had a greater impact compared to Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) on Cold/Distant and Intrusive/Needy interpersonal problems. Ninety-five individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) were randomized to GPIP or GCBT and assessed at pre-, post-, and six months post-treatment. Both therapies resulted in a significant decrease in all eight interpersonal problem subscales except the Nonassertive subscale. GPIP resulted in a greater reduction in the Cold/Distant subscale compared to GCBT, but no differences were found for changes in the Intrusive/Needy subscale. GPIP may be most relevant for those with BED who have Cold/Distant interpersonal problems and attachment avoidance.

  3. Psychotherapy and Social Change: Utilizing Principles of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Help Develop New Prejudice-Reduction Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtel, Michèle D; Crisp, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    We propose that key concepts from clinical psychotherapy can inform science-based initiatives aimed at building tolerance and community cohesion. Commonalities in social and clinical psychology are identified regarding (1) distorted thinking (intergroup bias and cognitive bias), (2) stress and coping (at intergroup level and intrapersonal level), and (3) anxiety (intergroup anxiety and pathological anxiety). On this basis we introduce a new cognitive-behavioral model of social change. Mental imagery is the conceptual point of synthesis, and anxiety is at the core, through which new treatment-based approaches to reducing prejudice can be developed. More generally, we argue that this integration is illustrative of broader potential for cross-disciplinary integration in the social and clinical sciences, and has the potential to open up new possibilities and opportunities for both disciplines.

  4. Psychotherapy and Social Change: Utilizing Principles of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Help Develop New Prejudice-Reduction Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birtel, Michèle D.; Crisp, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We propose that key concepts from clinical psychotherapy can inform science-based initiatives aimed at building tolerance and community cohesion. Commonalities in social and clinical psychology are identified regarding (1) distorted thinking (intergroup bias and cognitive bias), (2) stress and coping (at intergroup level and intrapersonal level), and (3) anxiety (intergroup anxiety and pathological anxiety). On this basis we introduce a new cognitive-behavioral model of social change. Mental imagery is the conceptual point of synthesis, and anxiety is at the core, through which new treatment-based approaches to reducing prejudice can be developed. More generally, we argue that this integration is illustrative of broader potential for cross-disciplinary integration in the social and clinical sciences, and has the potential to open up new possibilities and opportunities for both disciplines. PMID:26635678

  5. Superwellness Program: a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based group intervention to reduce weight gain in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura R. Magni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral therapy-based intervention (Superwellness Program on weight gain compared with a treatment-as-usual (TAU approach in patients treated with antipsychotics, and to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI variation and clinical variables. Method: Eighty-five patients treated with antipsychotics were allocated across two groups, experimental (n=59 and control (n=26. The Superwellness Program (experimental group consisted of 32 twice-weekly 1-hour sessions, conducted by a psychologist and a nutritionist/nurse, concurrently with moderate food intake and moderate physical activity plans. Sociodemographic, clinical, and biological variables were collected at baseline, at the end of intervention (16 weeks, and after 6 months. Results: BMI change from baseline differed significantly between the experimental and control groups, with a larger decrease in the experimental group (F = 5.5, p = 0.021. Duration of illness moderated the effect of treatment on BMI (p = 0.026. No significant (p = 0.499 effect of intervention during the follow-up period was found. Interestingly, the intervention indirectly induced a significant (p = 0.024 reduction in metabolic risk by reducing BMI. Conclusion: A cognitive-behavioral therapy-based intervention could be useful in reducing weight in a clinical population taking antipsychotics, with consequent benefit to physical and mental health.

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of Nurse-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Supportive Psychotherapy Telehealth Interventions for Chronic Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Atkinson, J Hampton; Holloway, Rachael; Chircop-Rollick, Tatiana; D'Andrea, John; Garfin, Steven R; Patel, Shetal; Penzien, Donald B; Wallace, Mark; Weickgenant, Anne L; Slater, Mark

    2018-04-16

    This study evaluated a nurse-delivered, telehealth intervention of cognitive behavioral therapy versus supportive psychotherapy for chronic back pain. Participants (N=61) had chronic back pain (pain "daily" ≥ 6 months at an intensity ≥4/10 scale) and were randomized to an 8-week, 12-session, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or to Supportive Care (SC) matched for frequency, format, and time, with each treatment delivered by a primary care nurse. The primary outcome was the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ). Secondary outcomes included the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and the Patient Global Impressions Scale (CGI). CBT participants (n=30) showed significant improvements on the RMDQ (means=11.4[5.9] vs. 9.4[6.1] at baseline and post-treatment, respectively, p.10). The results suggest that telehealth, nurse-delivered CBT and SC treatments for chronic back pain can offer significant and relatively comparable benefits. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00608530. This article describes the benefits of training primary care nurses to deliver evidence-based behavioral therapies for low back pain. Due to the high prevalence of chronic pain and the growing emphasis on non-opioid therapies, training nurses to provide behavior therapies could be a cost-effective way to improve pain management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Common factors affecting psychotherapy outcomes: some implications for teaching psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Robert; Heiman, Noa; Yager, Joel

    2015-05-01

    The number of psychotherapies classified as "empirically supported treatments" has increased significantly. As the number and scope of empirically supported treatments multiply, it has become impossible to train therapists in all of these specific modalities. Although the current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements for psychiatric residents follow an approach based on specific schools of psychotherapy (emphasizing competency in cognitive-behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and supportive treatments), evidence suggests that we are failing even in these efforts. In developing a specialized Psychotherapy Scholars Track in the residency program at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, we opted to focus initially on teaching the common factors in psychotherapy that positively affect psychotherapy outcomes. This article reviews 6 such broad common factors.

  8. Ethical reflection and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocilová, Jana; Prasko, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Theories of ethics and ethical reflection may be applied to both theory and practice in psychotherapy. There is a natural affinity between ethics and psychotherapy. Psychotherapy practice is concerned with human problems, dilemmas and emotions related to both one's own and other people's values. Ethics is also concerned with dilemmas in human thinking and with how these dilemmas reflect other individuals' values. Philosophical reflection itself is not a sufficient basis for the ethics of psychotherapy but it may aid in exploring attitudes related to psychotherapy, psychiatry and health care. PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched for articles containing the keywords "psychotherapy", "ethics", "therapeutic relationship" and "supervision". The search was conducted by repeating the terms in various combinations without language or time restrictions. Also included were data from monographs cited in reviews. The resulting text is a review with conclusions concerning ethical aspects of psychotherapy. The ability to behave altruistically, sense for justice and reciprocity and mutual help are likely to be genetically determined as dispositions to be later developed by upbringing or to be formed or deformed by upbringing. Early experiences lead to formation of ethical attitudes which are internalized and then applied to both one's own and other people's behavior. Altruistic behavior has a strong impact on an individual's health and its acceptance may positively influence the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying numerous diseases. Ethical theory and reflection, however, may be applied to both theory and practice of psychotherapy in a conscious, targeted and thoughtful manner. In everyday practice, psychotherapists and organizations must necessarily deal with conscious conflicts between therapeutic possibilities, clients' wishes, their own as well as clients' ideas and the real world. Understanding one's own motives in therapy is one of the aims of a

  9. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 20 two-hour sessions led by an experienced social worker. When used with other types of treatment (such as medications or individual psychotherapy), STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy ( ...

  10. Hypnotic Psychotherapy with Sex Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, Sullivan; Briggs, Wanda P.; Magnus, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the prevalence of sex offenders; multiple treatment modalities; and implications of the use of hypnotic psychotherapy, coupled with cognitive behavioral treatment programs, for treating sex offenders. (Contains 2 tables.)

  11. The Comparison of Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy Based on Coping Skills and Methadone Maintenance Treatment in Improvement of Emotional Regulation Strategies and Relapse Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ghorbany

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study compared the effectiveness of group cognitive-behavioral therapy based on coping skills (CBT and methadone maintenance therapy (MMT in improvement of emotional regulation strategies and prevention of relapse. Method: The method of the present study was semi-experimental research design (pre-test-post-test with witness group. For sampling 45 substance abuse people who had referred to addiction treatment centers were selected and assigned to three groups of cognitive behavior therapy, methadone maintenance treatment and witness group randomly. The participants in all three groups completed the emotional intelligence questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were analyzed by covariance method. Results: The results showed that cognitive-behavior therapy in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and witness group led to significant improvement of emotional regulation in substance abusers, but there was no significant difference between the methadone maintenance treatment group and control group. Also, the rate of relapse in individuals who assigned to cognitive-behavior therapy group in comparison to methadone maintenance therapy and the witness group was significantly lower, but there was no significant difference between methadone therapy and witness. Conclusion: Cognitive-behavior therapy was an effective treatment that can change the cognitive and behavioral variables related to substance abuse, such as emotional regulation strategies. Thus, results suggested that drug abuse treatment programs must target these mediator variables.

  12. Preventing childhood anxiety disorders: Is an applied game as effective as a cognitive behavioral therapy-based program?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoneveld, E.A.; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, A.; Granic, I.

    2018-01-01

    A large proportion of children experience subclinical levels of anxiety and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) aimed at preventing anxiety disorders is moderately effective. However, most at-risk children do not seek help or drop out of programs prematurely because of stigma, lack of motivation, and

  13. Using benzodiazepine detoxification and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy in the treatment of a patient with generalized anxiety disorder comorbid with high-dose zolpidem dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Hua Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, literature has shown that zolpidem dependence is not uncommon in the clinical practice, but there is no standard guideline for treatment of zolpidem dependence. Benzodiazepine detoxification has been widely used for alcohol detoxification, which is also an inhibitory substance. We would like to share the experience of benzodiazepine detoxification and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy in a patient with high-dose zolpidem dependence comorbid with generalized anxiety disorder.

  14. Psychotherapy of Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychotherapy is considered the primary treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Currently, there are four comprehensive psychosocial treatments for BPD. Two of these treatments are considered psychodynamic in nature: mentalization-based treatment and transference-focused psychotherapy. The other two are considered to be cognitive-behavioral in nature: dialectical behavioral therapy and schema-focused therapy. Method A review of the relevant literature was conducted. Results Each of these lengthy and complex psychotherapies significantly reduces the severity of borderline psychopathology or at least some aspects of it, particularly physically self-destructive acts. Conclusions Comprehensive, long-term psychotherapy can be a useful form of treatment for those with BPD. However, less intensive and less costly forms of treatment need to be developed. In addition, psychosocial treatments that are aimed at the quieter but psychosocially detrimental symptoms of BPD are needed. PMID:19807718

  15. Cognitive behavior therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder delivered via smartphone and computer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagöö, Jesper; Asplund, Robert Persson; Bsenko, Helene Andersson; Hjerling, Sofia; Holmberg, Anna; Westh, Susanne; Öberg, Louise; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Carlbring, Per; Furmark, Tomas; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a previously evaluated guided Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was adapted for mobile phone administration (mCBT). The treatment was compared with a guided self-help treatment based on interpersonal psychotherapy (mIPT). The treatment platform could be accessed through smartphones, tablet computers, and standard computers. A total of 52 participants were diagnosed with SAD and randomized to either mCBT (n=27) or mIPT (n=25). Measures were collected at pre-treatment, during the treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. On the primary outcome measure, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - self-rated, both groups showed statistically significant improvements. However, mCBT performed significantly better than mIPT (between group Cohen's d=0.64 in favor of mCBT). A larger proportion of the mCBT group was classified as responders at post-treatment (55.6% versus 8.0% in the mIPT group). We conclude that CBT for SAD can be delivered using modern information technology. IPT delivered as a guided self-help treatment may be less effective in this format. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. individual psychotherapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ...

    Disorder Severity Index (FBDSI) and the Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI) were used to determine the severity of their IBS ... of holistic individual psychotherapy combined with a synergistic stress management programme in response to the calls for more .... systems of the person into the story of the client's illness that ...

  17. Piaget and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, T L

    1978-04-01

    It is difficult to apply Piaget's theory to psychotherapy because the place of affect in it is ambiguous. When the alternatives are considered, it seems most consistent with Piaget's ideas to regard both cognitive and affective phenomena as problem-solving organizations. Piaget's remarkable discoveries in the cognitive sphere are a consequence of the easy access in that sphere to the kind of problems that need solving, and the phasic development of solutions. But the nature of the problems to be solved or the values to be guarded by a patient in psychotherapy are not knowable independently of the patient's actual behavior. In one respect all that is left from Piaget's approach for psychotherapy generally is the truism that therapy fosters differentiation and integration. However, even if we cannot frame a peculiarly Piagetian paradigm of psychotherapy, Piaget is valuable in posing a subsidiary question, namely, what in therapy fosters problem-solving activity. A reading of Piaget suggests that a patient learns by acting on his therapist and tacitly interpreting the results of his actions, that difficulties in therapy are the material from which therapy proceeds, and that in order to grasp the situation of the patient, the therapist himself may need to act on him and not just think about him. An implied lesson for training would be that supervision should instill a professional identity that is reinforced rather than challenged by therapy difficulties, and does not rely solely on theoretical categorizing.

  18. Types of psychotherapy for pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Timothy W

    2005-05-01

    Several types of psychotherapy are currently used to treat pathological gamblers. These include Gambler's Anonymous, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and family therapy. Research into which types of psychotherapy are the most effective for pathological gambling is limited but is a growing area of study. Group therapy, namely Gambler's Anonymous, provides peer support and structure. Cognitive behavior therapy aims to identify and correct cognitive distortions about gambling. Psychodynamic psychotherapy can help recovering gamblers address core conflicts and hidden psychological meanings of gambling. Family therapy is helpful by providing support and education and eliminating enabling behaviors. To date, no single type of psychotherapy has emerged as the most effective form of treatment. As in other addictive disorders, treatment retention of pathological gamblers is highly variable. Understanding the types of psychotherapy that are available for pathological gamblers, as well their underlying principles, will assist clinicians in managing this complex behavioral disorder.

  19. Comparative study of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and nutritional support in patients with different types of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Fluiters, Enrique; Docet, María F; Fernández Sastre, José Luis; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2014-09-09

    There are several psychological approaches to treat ED with efficacy being revealed by empirical research; however none of them are universally accepted. The objective was to compare response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in patients with different clinical forms of Eating Disorders. Seventy-four patients diagnosed with eating disorders, 32 with Anorexia nervosa (AN), 19 with Bulimia nervosa (BN) and 23 with Eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) were included. This is a prospective and comparative study. Patients were treated by psychotherapy, nutritional treatment and pharmacotherapy. The recovery rates in the groups of patients with AN, BN and EDNOS were 14 (43.7%), 8 (42.1%), 10 (43.4%), respectively, p>0.05. The rates of improvement were 14 (43.7%), 10 (52.6%), 12 (52.1%) for AN, BN and EDNOS, respectively, p>0.05. Finally, the rate of patients who had poor outcome were 3 (9.3%), 1 (5.2%), and 1 (4.3%), p>0.05, for AN, BN, and EDNOS, respectively. Cox regression analysis showed that the age of disease onset and no use of psychotropic drugs predicted a good response in patients with ED. The treatment response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, nutritional support and psychotropic drugs in the majority of patients was favorable and similar in most patients with different types of Eating Disorders. Furthermore, a young age and no use of psychotropic drugs predict a favorable outcome in patients with ED. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Combined pharmacotherapy-multimodal psychotherapy in children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Milone, Annarita; Manfredi, Azzurra; Brovedani, Paola; Pisano, Simone; Muratori, Pietro

    2016-04-30

    Although multi-component psychotherapeutic interventions are first-line treatments for Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBD), pharmacotherapy is often associated for more severe patients. Our aim was to explore effectiveness of an associated pharmacotherapy in referred children with DBD receiving a one-year psychotherapeutic intervention. Aggression, callous unemotional (CU) traits and emotional dysregulation were outcome measures. The sample included 144 children, aged 8-12 years, 41 (29%) with an ADHD comorbidity. Fifty-five (38%) patients received an additional pharmacotherapy with one medication, methylphenidate, a second generation antipsychotic, or a mood stabilizer. Data were collected before and after the one-year treatment. According to the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), aggressive behaviors, rule-breaking behaviors and emotional dysregulation improved in the whole group, as well as parent- and child-reported CU traits. The hierarchical regression model showed that additional pharmacotherapy significantly predicted lower scores at the CBCL aggressive behaviors and emotional dysregulation, but not CU traits at the end of the treatment. The interaction between methylphenidate and ADHD comorbidity predicted lower aggressive behaviors after the treatment. In summary, this naturalistic investigation suggest that an additional pharmacotherapy significantly improved aggression and emotional dysregulation, but not CU traits. When ADHD was comorbid, methylphenidate was more effective than antipsychotics or mood stabilizers in reducing aggression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preventing Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Is an Applied Game as Effective as a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneveld, Elke A; Lichtwarck-Aschoff, Anna; Granic, Isabela

    2018-02-01

    A large proportion of children experience subclinical levels of anxiety and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) aimed at preventing anxiety disorders is moderately effective. However, most at-risk children do not seek help or drop out of programs prematurely because of stigma, lack of motivation, and accessibility barriers. Applied games have received increased attention as viable alternatives and have shown promising results, but direct comparisons between applied games and the gold-standard CBT are lacking. Our aim was to investigate whether the applied game MindLight is as effective as CBT (i.e., Coping Cat) within an indicated prevention context. We conducted a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with a sample of 174 children (7- to 12-year olds) with elevated levels of anxiety, comparing MindLight to CBT. Anxiety was assessed with self- and parent-reports at pre- and post-program, and at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Intention-to-treat and completers-only confidence interval approach and latent growth curve modeling showed an overall significant quadratic decrease in child- and parent-reported anxiety symptoms over time and, as predicted, the magnitude of improvement was the same for MindLight and CBT. The within-group effect sizes were small to medium at post-test (- 0.32 to - 0.63), and medium to large (- 0.60 to - 1.07) at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Furthermore, MindLight and CBT were rated equally anxiety inducing, difficult, and appealing; CBT was rated as more relevant to daily life than MindLight. The current study adds to the growing research on applied games for mental health and shows that these games hold potential as alternative delivery models for evidence-based therapeutic techniques.

  2. Psychotherapy Integration via Theoretical Unification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren W. Tryon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Meaningful psychotherapy integration requires theoretical unification because psychotherapists can only be expected to treat patients with the same diagnoses similarly if they understand these disorders similarly and if they agree on the mechanisms by which effective treatments work. Tryon (in press has proposed a transtheoretic transdiagnostic psychotherapy based on an Applied Psychological Science (APS clinical orientation, founded on a BioPsychology Network explanatory system that provides sufficient theoretical unification to support meaningful psychotherapy integration. That proposal focused mainly on making a neuroscience argument. This article makes a different argument for theoretical unification and consequently psychotherapy integration. The strength of theories of psychotherapy, like all theory, is to focus on certain topics, goals, and methods. But this strength is also a weakness because it can blind one to alternative perspectives and thereby promote unnecessary competition among therapies. This article provides a broader perspective based on learning and memory that is consistent with the behavioral, cognitive, cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, pharmacologic, and Existential/Humanistic/Experiential clinical orientations. It thereby provides a basis for meaningful psychotherapy integration.

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to ...

  4. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to Ask Your BPD Treatment Provider There are different types of therapy for borderline ...

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Questions to ...

  6. Women's Internet Behavior: Providing Psychotherapy Offline and Online for Cyber-Infidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Marlene M.

    As women increasingly use the Internet, a variety of behaviors worthy of psychological study are emerging. Through e-mail discussion lists, newsgroups, and Web sites, women are exploring new ways of interacting. Asserting themselves, initiating bold conversations, experimenting with anger, involving themselves in furtive love affairs, and having…

  7. Hypnosis as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy for Obesity: A Meta-analytic Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, David B.; Faith, Myles S.

    1996-01-01

    A meta-analysis for six weight-loss studies comparing the efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) alone to CBT plus hypnotherapy. Notes that "the addition of hypnosis substantially enhanced treatment outcome." Concludes that the addition of hypnosis to CBT for weight loss results in, at most, a small enhancement of treatment…

  8. Clients' Emotional Processing in Psychotherapy: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral and Process-Experiential Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeanne C.; Bedard, Danielle L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors compared clients' emotional processing in good and bad outcome cases in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and process-experiential therapy (PET) and investigated whether clients' emotional processing increases over the course of therapy. Twenty minutes from each of 3 sessions from 40 clients were rated on the Experiencing Scale. A 2 *…

  9. Predictors and moderators of response to internet-delivered Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavior Therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, T; Batterham, P J; Warmerdam, L; Bennett, K; Bennett, A; Cuijpers, P; Griffiths, K M; Christensen, H

    2013-10-01

    By identifying which predictors and moderators lead to beneficial outcomes, accurate selection of the best initial treatment will have significant benefits for depressed individuals. An automated, fully self-guided randomized controlled internet-delivered noninferiority trial was conducted comparing two new interventions (Interpersonal Psychotherapy [IPT; n=620] and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy [CBT; n=610]) to an active control intervention (MoodGYM; n=613) over a period of 4 weeks to spontaneous visitors of an internet-delivered therapy website (e-couch). A range of putative predictors and moderators (socio-demographic characteristics [age, gender, marital status, education level], clinical characteristics [depression/anxiety symptoms, disability, quality of life, medication use], skills [mastery and dysfunctional attitudes] and treatment preference) were assessed using internet-delivered self-report measures at baseline and immediately following treatment and at six months follow-up. Analyses were conducted using Mixed Model Repeated Measures (MMRM). Female gender, lower mastery and lower dysfunctional attitudes predicted better outcome at post-test and/or follow-up regardless of intervention. No overall differential effects for condition on depression as a function of outcome were found. However, based on time-specific estimates, a significant interaction effect of age was found. For younger people, internet-delivered IPT may be the preferred treatment choice, whereas older participants derive more benefits from internet-delivered CBT programs. Although the sample of participants was large, power to detect moderator effects was still lacking. Different e-mental health programs may be more beneficial for specific age groups. The findings raise important possibilities for increasing depression treatment effectiveness and improving clinical practice guidelines for depression treatment of different age groups. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Interpersonal process and outcome in variants of cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchfield, Kenneth L; Henry, William P; Castonguay, Louis G; Borkovec, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Early sessions from three variants of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were examined to replicate work done in psychodynamic-interpersonal treatments linking interpersonal process to outcome (W. P. Henry, T. E. Schacht, & H. H. Strupp, 1986, 1990). Cases were available from a component study of CBT for generalized anxiety disorder (T. D. Borkovec, M. G. Newman, A. L. Pincus, & R. Lytle, 2002) and were selected to form good and poor outcome groups maintained through a 1-year follow-up. A third group was also examined that had initial positive outcomes and marked decline by follow-up (n = 8 for each). Structural analysis of social behavior (SASB) was used to identify interpersonal behaviors. Contrary to the authors' expectation, SASB variables were not strong predictors of outcome, and lower levels of interpersonal hostility were found than was the case in previous work. Findings are discussed in light of differences observed between treatment variants and the role that manuals may have in standardizing some aspects of the therapeutic relationship. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Principles of Supportive Psychotherapy for Perinatal Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Karen; Wenzel, Amy

    Although interpersonal psychotherapy and cognitive behavioral therapy have demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of perinatal distress, supportive psychotherapy has not been as widely studied by researchers. However, the principles of supportive psychotherapy are essential in the treatment of perinatal distress. The purpose of this article is to show that supportive psychotherapy is a plausible intervention that nurses and other maternity care providers can use with women who experience anxiety and depression in the perinatal period. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Interpersonal Psychotherapy in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, She-Gang; Hou, Yan-Fei; Liu, Ding; Zhang, Xiao-Yuan

    2017-12-05

    Practice guidelines have recommended cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) as the treatment of choice for major depression disorder (MDD). However, whether one therapy is better than the other remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to compare the treatment efficacy of the two treatment approaches for MDD. Using the terms "cognitive behavior therapy or cognitive therapy or CBT or CT or cognitive behavioral therapy" and "interpersonal psychotherapy or IPT," we systematically searched PubMed, Psyclnfo and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases up to February 2017. The language was restricted to be English and Chinese. Therapeutic outcomes, characteristics, and research quality were then extracted and analyzed independently. In accessing the included studies, we followed the criteria suggested by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Data for 946 patients from 10 randomized controlled trials were included in the study. Methodological quality was not optimal in most trials. Meta-analysis showed a mean difference (MD) of -1.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) (-2.49, -0.12) (P therapies (MD -0.82, 95% CI [-2.23, 0.59]) showed there was no significant difference between CBT and IPT according to BDI. Differences in treatment efficacy seem to vary according to different outcome measures. CBT shows an advantage over IPT for MDD according to BDI, and there is no significant difference between the two according to HRSD. These results should be interpreted with caution.

  13. Types of Psychotherapy for Pathological Gamblers

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Timothy W.

    2005-01-01

    Several types of psychotherapy are currently used to treat pathological gamblers. These include Gambler's Anonymous, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy, and family therapy. Research into which types of psychotherapy are the most effective for pathological gambling is limited but is a growing area of study. Group therapy, namely Gambler's Anonymous, provides peer support and structure. Cognitive behavior therapy aims to identify and correct cognitive distor...

  14. Insights into the Feelings, Thoughts, and Behaviors of Children with Visual Impairments: A Focus Group Study Prior to Adapting a Cognitive Behavior Therapy-Based Anxiety Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visagie, Lisa; Loxton, Helene; Stallard, Paul; Silverman, Wendy K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Anxiety is the most common psychological problem reported among children with visual impairments. Although cognitive behavior therapy interventions have proven successful in treating childhood anxiety, it is unclear whether they are suitable and accessible for children who have visual impairments. This study aimed to determine if and…

  15. Comparison of cognitive behavioral therapy and supportive psychotherapy for the treatment of depression following traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Teresa; Cantor, Joshua B; Tsaousides, Theodore; Spielman, Lisa; Gordon, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of 2 different interventions (cognitive behavioral therapy [CBT] and supportive psychotherapy [SPT]) to treat post-traumatic brain injury (TBI) depression. A sample of 77 community-dwelling individuals with a TBI, and a diagnosis of depression. Participants were randomized into treatment conditions either CBT or SPT and received up to 16 sessions of individual psychotherapy. Participants completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and self-report measures of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), perceived social support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List), stressful life events (Life Experiences Survey), and quality of life (QOL) before beginning and immediately following treatment. No significant differences were found at baseline between CBT and SPT groups on demographic factors (sex, age, education, race, and time since injury) or baseline measures of depression, anxiety, participation, perceived social support, stressful life events, or QOL. Analyses of variance revealed significant time effects for the Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and QOL outcome measures but no group effects. Intention-to-treat mixed effects analyses did not find any significant difference in patterns of scores of the outcome measures between the CBT and SPT intervention groups. Both forms of psychotherapy were efficacious in improving diagnoses of depression and anxiety and reducing depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that in this sample of individuals with TBI, CBT was not more effective in treating depression than SPT, though further research is needed with larger sample sizes to identify different components of these interventions that may be effective with different TBI populations. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00211835.

  16. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Diagnosis and ...

  17. The Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network

    OpenAIRE

    Leichsenring, Falk; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred; Herpertz, Sabine; Hiller, Wolfgang; Irle, Eva; Joraschky, Peter; König, Hans-Helmut; de Liz, Therese Marie; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Schauenburg, Henning; Stangier, Ulrich; Strauss, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network. The research program encompasses a coordinated group of studies adopting a standard protocol and an agreed-on set of standardized measures for the assessment and treatment of social phobia (SP). In the central project (study A), a multicenter randomized controlled trial, refined models of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy and manualized short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy are compared in the treatment of SP. A samp...

  18. Client attachment security predicts alliance in a randomized controlled trial of two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Sofie; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relation between clients’ attachment patterns and the therapeutic alliance in two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa. Method: Data derive from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bulimia...

  19. Psychoeducational Psychotherapy and Omega-3 Supplementation Improve Co-Occurring Behavioral Problems in Youth with Depression: Results from a Pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrea S; Arnold, L Eugene; Wolfson, Hannah L; Fristad, Mary A

    2017-07-01

    This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigated benefits of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation and Individual-Family Psychoeducational Psychotherapy (PEP; a family-focused, cognitive-behavioral therapy) for behavior problems among youth with depression. Participants aged 7-14 with DSM-IV-TR depressive disorders (N = 72; 56.9 % male) were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment conditions: PEP + omega-3, PEP monotherapy (with pill placebo), omega-3 monotherapy, or placebo (without active intervention). At screen, baseline, and 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 weeks post-baseline, parents completed the SNAP-IV, which assesses attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, oppositional defiant disorder symptoms, and overall behavior problems. At screen, baseline (randomization), 6 and 12 weeks, parents completed the Eyberg Child Behavior Inventory (ECBI), which includes Intensity and Problem scales for child behavior problems. Youth who had a completed SNAP-IV or ECBI for at least two assessments during treatment (n = 48 and 38, respectively) were included in analyses of the respective outcome. ClinicalTrials.gov.:NCT01341925. Linear mixed effects models indicated a significant effect of combined PEP + omega-3 on SNAP-IV Total (p = 0.022, d = 0.80) and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity trajectories (p = 0.008, d = 0.80), such that youth in the combined group saw greater behavioral improvement than those receiving only placebo. Similarly, youth in combined treatment had more favorable ECBI Intensity trajectories than youth who received no active treatment (p = 0.012, d = 1.07). Results from this pilot RCT suggest that combined PEP + omega-3 is a promising treatment for co-occurring behavior symptoms in youth with depression.

  20. Ayurvedic concepts related to psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, Prakash B; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P

    2013-01-01

    The perfect balance of mind, body and soul is considered as complete health in Ayurveda. Ayurveda has its own identity as most ancient and traditional System of Medicine in India. Even Ayurveda emphasizes its treatment modalities into three parts viz. Satwawajay Chikitsa, Yuktivyapashray and Daivyapashray Chikitsa. Sattvavajaya therapy mentioned in Charakasamhita and it used as new concept of psychotherapy in Ayurveda. The effectiveness of "traditional mental health promoting practices" was identified as health regimens (swasthvrtt), correct behavior (sadvrtt), and yoga. Sattvavajaya as psychotherapy, is the mental restraint, or a "mind control" as referred by Caraka, is achieved through "spiritual knowledge, philosophy, fortitude, remembrance and concentration. Ayurvedic psychotherapy would play a dual role: First, as a revival of authentic medical culture, the exercise of a practice with an assumed primordial dimension, and second as a discovery of authentic subjectivity, the revelation of a self with an assumed interior depth. When we integrate the contemporary art of psychotherapy with the ancient science of Ayurveda, it becomes a powerful combination that is called Psycho Veda. The integration of Psycho and Veda is motivated by the complete integration of the immense but fairly contemporary view of the mind, emotions and psyche and how this performs in our lives. Integrating Psychotherapy and Vedic principles teaches us how to rediscover critical knowledge and awareness of the natural forces and rhythms that compliment and strengthen our human experience, through the understanding of the psyche and what our inner experiences are and also involving practical daily activities with thorough attention to our total environment to bring about radical changes in our mental outlook and in physical health.

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy ...

  2. A translational approach to the functional analysis of language in psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Javier Virues-Ortega; María Xesús Froján-Parga

    2015-01-01

    The functional analysis of verbal behavior has been successful in establishing basic and advanced forms of language in individuals with developmental disabilities. The development of behavioral approaches to psychotherapy, such as the functional-analytic psychotherapy, have advanced the implementation of operant analyses of verbal behavior among typical adults. The field of behavior-analytic approaches to psychotherapy departs from the applied experimental research in behavior analysis in ...

  3. Teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to psychiatric residents: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Emily; Douglas, Carolyn J; Cabaniss, Deborah L

    2013-03-01

    There is enduring controversy in our field regarding the place for supportive interventions in psychodynamic psychotherapy. This controversy is reflected in the differing ways in which psychodynamic psychotherapy has been conceptualized and taught in psychiatric residency training programs. The authors propose an "integrated" approach for teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to trainees. In the integrated model, psychodynamic psychotherapy is conceptualized as a form of therapy designed to (a) uncover unconscious elements that influence thoughts, feelings, and behavior, and (b) support weakened psychological function. Using this model, residents learning psychodynamic psychotherapy are taught both uncovering and supporting techniques side by side in one course with specific guidelines for assessing when to use one set of interventions or the other. Teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to residents in this integrated way prepares them to become skilled clinicians who are able to move fluidly from supporting to uncovering in a pragmatic and flexible manner, matched to the particular moment-to-moment needs of the individual patient.

  4. Learning from traumatic experiences with brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD (BEPP) is an evidence-based therapeutic approach that combines and integrates elements from psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and directive psychotherapy. Psychoeducation is done jointly with the patient and his or her partner. Exposure, a structured writing

  5. Psychotherapy And Phenomenology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    What happens when two people meet and engage in a meaningful conversation, specifically in psycho- therapy? This question has perennially engaged psychology and psychotherapy since its beginnings. Ian Rory Owen's book entitled Psychotherapy and. Phenomenology: On Freud, Husserl and Heidegger is another ...

  6. Psychotherapy for Delinquents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ian; Sullivan, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Presents the results of a psychotherapy consultation service for delinquents (n=47). Based on data obtained from this program and a review of relevant literature, a working model of individual psychotherapy related to attachment theory as it applies to this population is presented. Discusses difficulties that warrant resolution. (JPS)

  7. Key process issues in Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP): translation of an evidence-based model into clinical practice and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivian, Dina; Salwen, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Our "desired outcome" in writing this article was to present not only key process issues stemming from the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP; McCullough, 2000), but to highlight those therapy maneuvers that we, a "seasoned" clinician/supervisor and a clinical trainee, find most useful in delivering treatment and in conducting supervision. We strongly believe that it is only through the translation of evidence-based therapeutic models, such as CBASP, into effective training that a true integration of science and practice can be obtained. Thus, the congruence of trainer's and trainee's views on what constitute top process issues in therapy is important in evaluating the reliability of a therapy model; with this in mind, we focus on three process issues, as follows: (1) problems are anchored to the "here and now" and to specific situational outcomes; (2) patients are encouraged to identify the role they play in affecting their distressing outcomes and to take responsibility for "fixing" them; and (3) the therapist planfully engages in the process of change via disciplined personal involvement. Research and theory supporting these maneuvers are presented, in conjunction with clinical examples. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  8. Change Mechanisms of Schema-Centered Group Psychotherapy with Personality Disorder Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Zorn, Peter; Ramseyer, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study addressed the temporal properties of personality disorders and their treatment by schema-centered group psychotherapy. It investigated the change mechanisms of psychotherapy using a novel method by which psychotherapy can be modeled explicitly in the temporal domain. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: 69 patients were assigned to a specific schema-centered behavioral group psychotherapy, 26 to social skills training as a control condition. The largest diagnostic subgroups were n...

  9. Ancient Greek psychotherapy for contemporary nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2002-08-01

    Ancient Greek physicians as well as philosophers were fully cognizant of a human being's psychological function and used their particular art to influence individual or social behavior in accordance with their pursuit. This art or technique favorably compares with several of the methods currently called supportive psychotherapy. This psychotherapy was the first form of care for people with mental health problems. Nurses who base their practice on ancient Greek psychotherapy see the patient as a whole, a person who creates meaning in life. Applying the philosophical principles of ancient Greeks helps nurses understand the behavior of people with mental health problems and recognize and facilitate adaptive satisfaction of these psychological needs. In addition, psychiatric nurses are able to help distressed individuals understand their fears and anxieties, so they are freed from the causes of their symptoms that led them to seek therapy in the first place. Consequently, this understanding can make psychiatric nurses' work a living experience and add meaning to their work.

  10. Translating the Theoretical into Practical: A Logical Framework of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Interactions for Research, Training, and Clinical Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Cristal E.; Kanter, Jonathan W.; Bonow, Jordan T.; Landes, Sara J.; Busch, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) provides a behavioral analysis of the psychotherapy relationship that directly applies basic research findings to outpatient psychotherapy settings. Specifically, FAP suggests that a therapist's in vivo (i.e., in-session) contingent responding to targeted client behaviors, particularly positive reinforcement…

  11. [Research in psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymĕtal, J

    1994-08-01

    Psychotherapy is an empirical discipline and is therefore open to exact investigations which is one of the prerequisites of its further development. The beginnings of exact research are associated with the names of H. J. Eysenck and C. R. Rogers. The contemporary research based frequently on the generic model of psychotherapy whose authors are D. E. Orlinsky and K. J. Howard is concerned in particular with the effectiveness of psychotherapy; it compares the action of different procedures, deals with differentiated indications and "mechanisms" inducing changes. The most frequent research strategies are an experimental approach, comparative (correlating) research and intensive research strategy. The most important source of information on research are meta-analyses which make it possible to summarize and compare an unlimited amount of mutually independent investigations. The hitherto most extensive meta-analytic processing of research projects was implemented in the Institute of Psychology of Bern University headed by K. Graw. It was revealed among others that psychotherapy exerts a very differentiated action and that in neurotic patients and patients with personality disorders cognitive behavioural psychotherapy, Rogers psychotherapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy, cca 100 sessions, proves definitely effective. Close to the criterium of objectively effective psychotherapy is also shape psychotherapy and systematically oriented family therapy. In the Czech Republic research is conducted on a small scale but the work is demanding as regards methods and is of a high standard. Exact research of the psychotherapeutic process and therapeutic results contributes to the gradual shaping of a psychotherapeutic model which is internally differentiated and which integrates verified findings of various psychotherapeutic schools and trends.

  12. Student Attitudes Toward Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Barry A.; Geller, Jesse D.

    1977-01-01

    Psychotherapy is viewed by college students as highly useful in dealing with living problems, yet--when given the availability of other treatment methods (peer interaction, yoga, meditation)-- it is frequently not the first choice of the student. (MJB)

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Diagnosis and Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Diagnosis and Treatment Psychotherapy ...

  14. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score <10). The dropout rate was significantly higher in CBT (40%; 19/47) compared to IPT (19%; 8/43). Statistically controlling for antidepressant medication use did not change the results. IPT was noninferior to CBT in a sample of depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Key constructs in "classical" and "new wave" cognitive behavioral psychotherapies: relationships among each other and with emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Ioana A; Montgomery, Guy H; Szamoskozi, Stefan; David, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    We aimed to relate key constructs from three forms of cognitive behavioral therapy that are often placed in competition: rational emotive behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. The key constructs of the underlying theories (i.e., irrational beliefs/unconditional self-acceptance, dysfunctional cognitions, experiential avoidance/psychological inflexibility) of these therapies have not been explicitly studied in their relationships to each other and with emotional distress. We used a cross-sectional design. The variables were selected to indicate key constructs of the three major forms of therapy considered. Study 1 used a sample of 152 students, who were assessed during a stressful period of their semester (mean age = 21.71; 118 females), while Study 2 used a clinical sample of 28 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (mean age = 26.67; 26 females). Results showed that these constructs, central in the therapies considered, had medium to high associations to each other and to distress. Experiential avoidance was found to mediate the relationship between the other, schema-type cognitive constructs and emotional distress. Moreover, multiple mediation analysis in Study 2 seemed to indicate that the influence of the more general constructs on distress was mediated by experiential avoidance, whose effect seemed to be carried on further by automatic thoughts that were the most proximal to distress. Although each of the cognitive constructs considered comes with its underlying theory, the relationships between them can no longer be ignored and cognitive behavioral therapy theoretical models reliably accounting for these relationships should be proposed and tested. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy based on the pain sustainment/exacerbation model in patients with tension-type headache: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoya, Ryo; Oda, Keiko; Ito, Eiji; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Sato, Taku; Watanabe, Tadashi; Sakuma, Jun; Saito, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Shin-Ichi; Yabe, Hirooki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to carry out a program of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) based on the pain sustainment/exacerbation model for tension-type headache (TTH) patients and to examine the effectiveness as a pilot study. The participants were 4 TTH patients who consulted the outpatient clinic of a university hospital. It consisted of 4 individualized sessions as CBT program (including psychological education, self-monitoring, relaxation technique, cognitive restricting and exposure), and a follow-up examination was carried out 1 month after its completion. The sessions, each of which was 60 minutes long, were executed at weekly intervals. As a result, the score of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) decreased after program compared with before program in all patients. The score of escape/avoidance was also reduced at the post-program and follow-up (1 month later) compared with the score of pre-program in patients except Case 2, in whom the score was 0 throughout the study. The degree of the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) improved by program and changed to "mild" or "none" in all participants. These findings show that in patients with TTH this short CBT program has effect on pain catastrophizing, escape/avoidance and daily disability.

  17. Characteristics of Patients Involved in Psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Alispahić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the demographic and clinical characteristics of Bosnian and Herzegovinian patients involved in psychotherapeutic treatments in order to explore the current situation of psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: The study included 213 patients (154 women and 47 men undergoing diverse psychotherapeutic treatments. Data about demographic and clinical characteristics were collected by questionnaire. Following characteristics were documented: age, sex, education, employment status, marital status, specific problem that got the client involved in psychotherapy, type of psychotherapy, and use of psychopharmacology.Results: Majority of the patients undergoing psychotherapy are age up to 40 and female. They are by vast majority holding a university degree and are employed. Nearly equal number of patients is living in partnership or marriage compared to single or never been married. Most frequent reasons for getting involved in the psychotherapy treatment are of the intrapersonal nature (depression, anxiety and panic attacks. Majority of the patients were involved in gestalt and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, and at the same time majority of those were not prescribed medicaments.Conclusions: We point out and overview some of the most prominent socio-demographic traits of patients undergoing psychotherapy, the ones that could be important in the future research with the higher degree of control. In the terms of personal initiative, psychotherapy stops being a taboo in Bosnia and Herzegovina. However, there is still a long path until it reaches integration in daily life of the people.

  18. Psychotherapy of Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Gaetano, Paola

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, psychotherapy has gained increasing acceptance as a major treatment option for mood disorders. Empirically supported treatments for major depression include cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioural therapy and, to a lesser extent, short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. Meta-analytic evidence suggests that psychotherapy has a significant and clinically relevant, though not large, effect on chronic forms of depression. Psychotherapy with chronic patients should take into account several important differences between patients with chronic and acute depression (identification with their depressive illness, more severe social skill deficits, persistent sense of hopelessness, need of more time to adapt to better circumstances). Regarding adolescent depression, the effectiveness of IPT and CBT is empirically supported. Adolescents require appropriate modifications of treatment (developmental approach to psychotherapy, involvement of parents in therapy). The combination of psychotherapy and medication has recently attracted substantial interest; the available evidence suggests that combined treatment has small but significant advantages over each treatment modality alone, and may have a protective effect against depression relapse or recurrence. Psychobiological models overcoming a rigid brain-mind dichotomy may help the clinician give patients a clear rationale for the combination of psychological and pharmacological treatment. In recent years, evidence has accumulated regarding the effectiveness of psychological therapies (CBT, family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, psychoeducation) as an adjunct to medication in bipolar disorder. These therapies share several common elements and there is considerable overlap in their actual targets. Psychological interventions were found to be useful not only in the treatment of bipolar depressive episodes, but in all phases of the disorder. PMID

  19. Long-term effects of psychotherapy on moderate depression: a comparative study of narrative therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rodrigo T; Gonçalves, Miguel M; Fassnacht, Daniel B; Machado, Paulo P P; Sousa, Inês

    2014-01-01

    In a previous clinical controlled trial (Lopes et al., 2014), narrative therapy (NT) showed promising results in ameliorating depressive symptoms with comparable outcomes to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) when patients completed treatment. This paper aims to assess depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in this clinical sample at follow-up. Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 Interpersonal Relations Scale, naturalistic prospective follow-up assessment was conducted at 21 and 31 months after the last treatment session. At follow-up, patients kept improving in terms of depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems. The odds that a patient maintained recovery from depressive symptoms at follow-up were five times higher than the odds that a patient maintained recovery from interpersonal problems. In the same way, the odds of a patient never recovering from interpersonal problems were five times higher than the odds of never recovering from depressive symptoms. The study did not control for the natural course of depression or treatment continuation. For depressed patients with greater interpersonal disabilities, longer treatment plans and alternative continuation treatments should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy as an Adjunct to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Theory and Application in a Single Case Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric R.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Prins, Annabel; Nguyen, Hong; Tsai, Mavis

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be enhanced by Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP; Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991; Tsai et al., 2009). As PTSD can include a variety of problems with interpersonal relationships (e.g., trust of others), manualized treatments may not afford clinicians enough time and flexibility to…

  1. Equifinality in Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: Different Strokes for Different Folks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Sabrina M.; Dalto, Georgia; Follette, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is an interpersonal behavior therapy that relies on a therapist's ability to contingently respond to in-session client behavior. Valued behavior change in clients results from the therapist shaping more effective client interpersonal behaviors by providing effective social reinforcement when these behaviors…

  2. Introduction: attachment theory and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Kenneth N

    2013-11-01

    In this introduction to the JCLP: In Session 69(11) issue on attachment theory and psychotherapy, the key points of attachment theory (Bowlby, , , 1981) and its relevance to psychotherapy are briefly described. The aim of this issue is to provide case illustrations of how an attachment theory perspective and principles can expand our understanding of psychotherapy practice. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Internet-delivered interpersonal psychotherapy versus internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with depressive symptoms: randomized controlled noninferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donker, Tara; Bennett, Kylie; Bennett, Anthony; Mackinnon, Andrew; van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim; Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen M

    2013-05-13

    Face-to-face cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) are both effective treatments for depressive disorders, but access is limited. Online CBT interventions have demonstrated efficacy in decreasing depressive symptoms and can facilitate the dissemination of therapies among the public. However, the efficacy of Internet-delivered IPT is as yet unknown. This study examines whether IPT is effective, noninferior to, and as feasible as CBT when delivered online to spontaneous visitors of an online therapy website. An automated, 3-arm, fully self-guided, online noninferiority trial compared 2 new treatments (IPT: n=620; CBT: n=610) to an active control treatment (MoodGYM: n=613) over a 4-week period in the general population. Outcomes were assessed using online self-report questionnaires, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ-8) completed immediately following treatment (posttest) and at 6-month follow-up. Completers analyses showed a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at posttest and follow-up for both CBT and IPT, and were noninferior to MoodGYM. Within-group effect sizes were medium to large for all groups. There were no differences in clinical significant change between the programs. Reliable change was shown at posttest and follow-up for all programs, with consistently higher rates for CBT. Participants allocated to IPT showed significantly lower treatment satisfaction compared to CBT and MoodGYM. There was a dropout rate of 1294/1843 (70%) at posttest, highest for MoodGYM. Intention-to-treat analyses confirmed these findings. Despite a high dropout rate and lower satisfaction scores, this study suggests that Internet-delivered self-guided IPT is effective in reducing depressive symptoms, and may be noninferior to MoodGYM. The completion rates of IPT and CBT were higher than MoodGYM, indicating some progress in refining Internet-based self

  4. Serious Games for Psychotherapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberg, Christiane; Schott, Markus

    2017-06-01

    In the evolving digital age, media applications are increasingly playing a greater role in the field of psychotherapy. While the Internet is already in the phase of being established when it comes to the care of mental disorders, experimentation is going on with other modern media such as serious games. A serious game is a game in which education and behavior change is the goal, alongside with entertainment. The objective of the present article was to provide a first empirical overview of serious games applied to psychotherapy and psychosomatic rehabilitation. Therefore, a systematic literature search, including the terms "serious game" or "computer game" and "psychotherapy" or "rehabilitation" or "intervention" or "mental disorders" in the databases Medline and PsycINFO, was performed. Subsequently, an Internet search was conducted to identify studies not published in journals. Publications not providing empirical data about effectiveness were excluded. On the basis of this systematic literature review, the results of N = 15 studies met inclusion criteria. They utilized primarily cognitive behavioral techniques and can be useful for treating a range of mental disorders. Serious games are effective both as a stand-alone intervention or part of psychotherapy and appeal to patients independent of age and sex. Included serious games proved to be an effective therapeutic component. Nonetheless, findings are not conclusive and more research is needed to further investigate the effectiveness of serious games for psychotherapeutic purposes.

  5. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  6. [Psychotherapy in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbe, H

    1980-01-01

    Present conditions in Brazil are characterized by sharp contrasts and rapid social changes. Modern Brazilian civilisation has its roots in Indian, Portuguese and African cultures, which have grown together in the course of many years to form a harmonious union of civilisations. The Indian and Afro-Brazilian elements of this civilisation in particular have brought about a great number of syncretistic cults, hitherto scarcely explored; such as Candomblé, Umbanda, Macumba and Spiritualism, all of which, together with a vigorously active folklore, exert an important psychohygienic function. The institutions created within these cults provide a ritualized therapeutic treatment of psychiatric conditions supplementing the professional psychiatric care available to the population. The variety of forms of the Brazilian psychotherapy stretches from the pre-scientifical methods of the Indian medicine man through the seemingly medieval forms of exorcisme and spiritualism right to the scientifically founded psychotherapy in all its lines. Integrative endeavours towards a culture-anthropological psychotherapy are becoming evident.

  7. Patterns of psychotherapy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, K I; Davidson, C V; O'Mahoney, M T; Orlinsky, D E; Brown, K P

    1989-06-01

    Epidemiologic research indicates that a small minority of patients make the great majority of outpatient mental health visits. This small group of long-term patients constitutes the bulk of psychotherapeutic practice and creates a disproportionate impression on mental health professionals. The authors confirmed this finding by studying 405 patients in a clinical setting with an orientation toward long-term psychotherapy: 68% of the patients attended 26 or fewer psychotherapy sessions, representing 23.3% of the total number of sessions used by all patients; 32% attended more than 26 sessions, representing 77% of the total number of sessions used by all patients.

  8. Group Psychotherapy in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Rainer; Strauss, Bernhard

    2015-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the development of group psychotherapies in Germany originating from a psychodynamic tradition. The German health system provides access to inpatient and outpatient psychotherapy for all of its citizens. Whereas groups are common in inpatient settings, the provision of outpatient group treatment still could be improved, as it is the case for the general training of group psychotherapists. Group research in Germany largely reflects clinical practice, with more studies coming from the inpatient field. It is stated that the general image of group treatment seems to be largely positive, which could provide a basis for political initiatives to improve the dissemination of group therapy in this country.

  9. [Healthier after Psychotherapy? Analysis of Claims Data (Lower Saxony, Germany) on Sickness Absence Duration before and after Outpatient Psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epping, Jelena; de Zwaan, Martina; Geyer, Siegfried

    2017-11-17

    Introduction In employed populations sickness absence can be used as a good indicator of health status. In the present study, it was examined how periods of sickness absence are developing within one year before and after psychotherapy under comparison of three types of psychotherapy (behavior therapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, and psychoanalysis), all fully covered by statutory health insurance. Methods and data The analyses were performed with pseudonymized claims data from the AOK Niedersachsen, a statutory health insurance (N=2,900,065 insured). Certified sickness absences before and after psychotherapy were examined for 9,916 patients. Parallelized controls were used to build a comparison of the length of sickness absences. Analyses were performed separately for women and for men. Results Within one year before starting psychotherapy, patients had longer sickness absences than controls on average. There was a reduction in the length of sickness absence of 20 days (median) within one year before to 12 days (median) within one year after the psychotherapy. The obtained differences between types of psychotherapy were considerable. Discussion Differences in terms of sickness absences may in part be explained by socio-demographic differences. Patients who underwent psychoanalysis were younger and had higher educational levels. However, it remains unclear why the differences of sickness absence periods were that high. It has to be discussed whether self-selection of patients with better health into psychoanalysis had occurred. Conclusions Patients undergoing psychoanalysis differ from patients who underwent other types of psychotherapy in terms of their duration of sickness absence as well as socio-demographic profile. Thus, due to differences in the composition of patients future research in psychotherapy will have to differentiate by type of psychotherapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Synchrony in Dyadic Psychotherapy Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    Synchrony is a multi-faceted concept used in diverse domains such as physics, biology, and the social sciences. This chapter reviews some of the evidence of nonverbal synchrony in human communication, with a main focus on the role of synchrony in the psychotherapeutic setting. Nonverbal synchrony describes coordinated behavior of patient and therapist. Its association with empathy, rapport and the therapeutic relationship has been pointed out repeatedly, yet close evaluation of empirical studies suggests that the evidence remains inconclusive. Particularly in naturalistic studies, research with quantitative measures of synchrony is still lacking. We introduce a new empirical approach for the study of synchrony in psychotherapies under field conditions: Motion Energy Analysis (MEA). This is a video-based algorithm that quantifies the amount of movement in freely definable regions of interest. Our statistical analysis detects synchrony on a global level, irrespective of the specific body parts moving. Synchrony thus defined can be considered as a general measure of movement coordination between interacting individuals. Data from a sequence of N = 21 therapy sessions taken from one psychotherapy dyad shows a high positive relationship between synchrony and the therapeutic bond. Nonverbal synchrony can thus be considered a promising concept for research on the therapeutic alliance. Further areas of application are discussed.

  11. The Subject in Cognitive Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Caro-Gabalda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the various subjects embedded in cognitive psychotherapy. The cognitive model developed by Beck, considered as a rationalist and modernist model, will exemplify these subjects. Cognitive therapy should be placed in the modernist historical context and related to a subject characterized as having rationality and the ability to observe and detect cognitions, emotions and behaviors. The paper develops this background introducing three main subject types. The first is the introspective and conscious subject, who is able to observe what is within oneself, has free access, and is conscious of one's cognitive world. The second is the cognitive miser that describes the subject who enters into therapy. The final subject identified, is the trained scientist who is able to develop a more objective knowledge, changing faulty schemas and cognitive distortions. This subject is the one most looked for in cognitive therapy. We could connect these subjects to some of the main elements of cognitive therapy such as the concept of ABC, assessment procedures, cognitive techniques or the relevance of schemas. Finally, the paper suggests some issues for study that could contribute to the theoretical and clinical evolution of cognitive psychotherapy.

  12. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  13. Psychotherapy and Women's Liberation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean

    1976-01-01

    Personality theories and scientific data on women frequently contribute negatively to the psychotherapy of female clients. This paper examines some of the background factors which have shaped our information about women, and then reviews some contemporaneous approaches to the therapy of women. (Author)

  14. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when people with BPD realize others understand their experience and treatment options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) ... self-image – possibly brought on by negative childhood experiences – that affects how people react to their environment, ...

  15. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  16. Personality Theory and Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Joen; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This group of articles discusses various aspects of Gestalt Therapy including its major contributions, role in psychotherapy, and contributions of Gestalt psychology in general. There is some discussion of the philosophical background of Gestalt therapy along with Gestalt theory of emotion. A case study and an annotated bibliography are included…

  17. Multidimensional Change in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Enrico E.

    1980-01-01

    Assessed psychotherapy outcome for 177 patients who were seen for an average of 31 therapy hours with the rating scales for outcome of therapy and a therapist questionnaire. Results of a components analysis did not support Storrow's rationale groupings of the rating scales into five dimensions. (Author)

  18. [Anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, A; Fydrich, T

    2018-03-01

    According to the Federal Healthcare Survey (Bundesgesundheitssurvey), approximately 15% of the German population fulfil the diagnostic criteria for at least one anxiety disorder within (any) 1 year. Women are affected approximately twice as often as men. The study by the Robert Koch Institute included the systematic assessment of panic disorder, agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and specific phobias; therefore, the question for both those affected and the treating therapist is "anxiety disorders: which psychotherapy for whom?" is of great clinical and healthcare political importance. We therefore review the available literature for answering three more specific questions: 1) what are the most suitable forms of psychotherapy, 2) which psychotherapy is most promising for an individual patient and diagnosis (differential evaluation of indications) and 3) what is the best approach to nonresponse or avoidance of the treatment offered? National and international guidelines agree that cognitive behavioral therapy is the psychotherapy of first choice in most patients with anxiety disorders. In cases of nonresponse or lack of availability of the appropriate therapy, psychodynamic therapy or pharmacotherapy can also be recommended. For individualized treatment recommendations we do not have empirical evidence. Also, no evidence-based (individual) recommendations are available for non-responders;however, there are some preferred strategies based on a clinical consensus.

  19. Supportive Psychotherapy with the Dual Diagnosis Patient: Co-occurring Mental Illness/Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gentile, Julie P.; Jackson, Carroll S.

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals can offer much in the care of patients with intellectual disabilities, including state-of-the-art medication regimens, psychotherapy, and other behavior therapies. Individuals with intellectual disabilities experience the full range of mental illnesses, but are often thought to be incapable of participating in or responding to psychotherapy. The following composite cases illustrate some of the psychotherapy techniques employed in a community...

  20. Approche communicative et psychotherapie (The Communicative Approach and Psychotherapy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perramond, Daniel B.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews different principles and techniques proposed by psychotherapy concerning the facilitation of communication and learning, as they confirm the hypotheses and methodological choices of the communicative approach. (MSE)

  1. Development of Brazilian prototypes for short-term psychotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Barcellos Serralta

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The Psychotherapy Process Q-Set (PQS prototype method is used to measure the extent to which ideal processes of different psychotherapies are present in real cases, allowing researchers to examine how adherence to these models relates to or predicts change. Results from studies of short-term psychotherapies suggest that the original psychodynamic prototype is more suitable for studying psychoanalysis and long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy than its time-limited counterparts. Furthermore, culture probably influences how therapies are typically conducted in a given country. Therefore, it seems appropriate to develop Brazilian prototypes on which to base studies of short-term psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral processes in this country. Objective: To develop prototypes for studying processes of short-term psychotherapies and to examine the degree of adherence of two real psychotherapy cases to these models. Methods: Expert clinicians used the PQS to rate a hypothetical ideal session of either short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT. Ratings were submitted to Q-type factor analysis to confirm the two groups. Regressive factor scores were rank ordered to describe the prototypes. These ideal models were correlated with ratings of actual therapy processes in two complete psychotherapy cases, one STPP and the other CBT. Results: Agreement levels between expert ratings were high and the two ideal models were confirmed. As expected, the PQS ratings for actual STPP and CBT cases had significant correlations with their respective ideal models, but the STPP case also adhered to the CBT prototype. Conclusion: Overall, the findings reveal the adequacy of the prototypes for time-limited therapies, providing initial support of their validity.

  2. Brief Psychotherapy in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, Peter J.; Brown, Alan

    1986-01-01

    A large number of patients with psychosocial or psychiatric disorders present to family physicians, and the family physician needs a model of psychotherapy with which to cope with their problems. A model of brief psychotherapy is presented which is time limited, goal directed and easy to learn. It consists of four facets drawn from established areas of psychotherapy: characteristics of the therapist; characteristics of the patient; Eriksonian developmental stages; and the process of therapy a...

  3. Gestalttheorie in der Psychotherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Kästl, Rainer; Stemberger, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Der vorliegende Beitrag gliedert sich in zwei Abschnitte. Der erste stellt eine Spurensuche zur Geschichte der Anwendung der Gestalttheorie auf das psychotherapeutische Arbeitsfeld ohne Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit dar. Im zweiten Abschnitt werden einige metatheoretische Grundkonzepte der Gestalttheoretischen Psychotherapie vorgestellt, einem von H.-J. P. Walter begründeten, auf der Gestalttheorie der Berliner Schule aufbauenden psychotherapeutischen Ansatz, der während der letzten 30 Jahre i...

  4. Psychotherapie und Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Barthel, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden Hintergründe und Möglichkeiten internetbasierter Therapie- und Beratungsmöglichkeiten aufgezeigt. Darüber hinaus wird ein vom Autor selbst durchgeführtes Projekt internetbezogener Beratung vorgestellt. Neben der Geschichte des Internets werden verschiedene Kommunikationstheorien vorgestellt und mit dem heutigen Status Quo verglichen. Ferner wird die Rolle des Internets in der Psychotherapie beleuchtet, sowie die sich hieraus ergebenen Qualitätsstandards...

  5. Constructivism and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Michael J; Granvold, Donald K

    2005-06-01

    Constructivism is a metatheoretical perspective that embraces diverse traditions in medicine, philosophy, psychology, and spiritual wisdom. Constructive psychotherapy emphasizes complex cycles in the natural ordering and reorganizing processes that characterize all development in living systems. Individuals are encouraged to view themselves as active participants in their lives. Within rich contexts of human relationship and symbol systems, people make new meanings as they develop. Techniques from many different traditions can help people find and refine their sense of balance as they develop.

  6. Ambivalence Resolution in Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Braga, Cátia Sofia Macedo

    2017-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Psicologia Aplicada The present dissertation explores the process of ambivalence resolution in psychotherapy through a narrative-dialogical lens. Ambivalence is herein defined as the conflictual relationship between two opposed positions: one expressed in a narrative novelty (i.e., distinct from the problematic pattern: an innovative moment (IM)) and another one representing the problematic pattern which impelled the client to therapy. Ambivalence mar...

  7. Psychotherapy with people with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zafošnik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available People with developmental disabilities can experience any psychological abnormalitiy and psychiatric illness as do people without developmental disabilities. Due to different diagnostic criteria, assessment procedures and instruments, we lack definite prevalence rates for people with developmental disabilities, also suffering from mental health problems, eventhough most studies place the rate at 20 to 40%. One of the possible treatment alternatives for augmenting psychological well-being is psychotherapy, but is extremely rarely used for people with severe and profound disabilities, where speech cannot be the main therapeutic medium. So, those that are included in the psychotherapuetic process are predominantly clients with mild developmental disabilities, and they are mostly in cognitive-behavioral therapy. Recently, two models of (psychotherapy for persons with severe and profound developmental disabilities were developed: developmental-dynamic relationship therapy and attachment-based behaviour therapy for children. Conceptually, they both originate form developmental psychoanalytic theories.

  8. Breaking through to Teens: Psychotherapy for the New Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffel, Ron

    2005-01-01

    This book presents groundbreaking strategies for psychotherapy with today's teens, for whom high-risk behavior, lack of adult guidance, and intense anxiety and stress increasingly come with the territory. Ron Taffel addresses the key challenge of building a therapeutic relationship that is strong enough to promote real behavioral and emotional…

  9. Is Exposure Necessary? A Randomized Clinical Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, John C.; Petkova, Eva; Neria, Yuval; Van Meter, Page E.; Zhao, Yihong; Hembree, Elizabeth; Lovell, Karina; Biyanova, Tatyana; Marshall, Randall D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to trauma reminders has been considered imperative in psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). No treatment benefits all patients, however. We tested Interpersonal Psychotherapy, which has demonstrated antidepressant efficacy and showed promise in pilot PTSD research, as a non-exposure-based, non-cognitive behavioral PTSD treatment. Methods A randomized, fourteen-week trial compared Interpersonal Psychotherapy; Prolonged Exposure, an exposure-based exemplar; and Relaxation Therapy, an active control psychotherapy. Subjects were 110 unmedicated patients having DSM-IV chronic PTSD and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) score >50. Randomization stratified for comorbid major depression. We hypothesized Interpersonal Psychotherapy would be no more than minimally inferior (CAPS difference therapies had large within-group pre/post effect sizes (d=1.32–1.88). Response rates (>30% CAPS improvement) were: Interpersonal Psychotherapy 63%, Prolonged Exposure 47%, Relaxation Therapy 38% (n.s.). Interpersonal psychotherapy and Prolonged Exposure CAPS outcome differed by 5.5 points (n.s.); the null hypothesis of more than minimal Interpersonal Psychotherapy inferiority was rejected (p=0.035). Patients with comorbid major depression dropped out from Prolonged Exposure nine times more than non-depressed Prolonged Exposure patients. Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Prolonged Exposure improved quality of life and social functioning more than Relaxation Therapy. Conclusions This first controlled study of individual Interpersonal Psychotherapy for PTSD demonstrated non-inferiority to the “gold standard” PTSD treatment. Interpersonal Psychotherapy had (non-significantly) lower attrition and higher response rates than Prolonged Exposure. Contradicting a widespread clinical belief, PTSD treatment may not require cognitive behavioral exposure to trauma reminders. Moreover, as differential therapeutics, patients with comorbid major depression

  10. Trainee Therapists' Views on the Alliance in Psychotherapy and Supervision: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybrandt, H.; Sundin, E. C.; Capone, G.

    2016-01-01

    The shape of alliance in psychotherapy and supervision using growth curve modeling was examined for clinically inexperienced trainee therapists, who were engaged in long-term cognitive behavioral--or psychodynamic individual psychotherapy at a Psychology Clinic in Sweden. Trainee therapists rated their view of the alliance with their clients and…

  11. Can Independent Judges Recognize Different Psychotherapies? An Experience with Manual-Guided Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luborsky, Lester; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Tested whether independent judges could recognize three different manual-guided psychotherapies, drug counseling, supportive-expressive psychotherapy, and cognitive-behavioral using a special rating form containing scales for the characteristic aspects of each type. Results indicated that manual-guided therapies can be reliably recognized.…

  12. The Vanderbilt Psychotherapy Studies: Synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupp, Hans H.

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on psychotherapy studies completed at Vanderbilt University which had their antecedents in research begun by Strupp in 1950s. Notes that Vanderbilt I focused on relative contribution of specific and nonspecific factors in therapy, while Vanderbilt II sought to study the effects of training in time-limited dynamic psychotherapy on process…

  13. Research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, David A

    1986-01-01

    Wilkinson's (1) critique of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy is weakened by inconsistent use of crucial terms, a systematically biased selectivity in reviewing empirical evidence and prior debates, and a failure to address issues crucial for a scientific understanding of psychotherapy.

  14. Group Psychotherapy in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lars Bo; Thygesen, Bente; Aagaard, Søren

    2015-10-01

    This is a short article on the history and training standards in the Institute of Group Analysis in Copenhagen (IGA-CPH). We describe theoretical orientations and influences in the long-term training program and new initiatives, like courses in mentalization-based group treatment and a dynamic short-term group therapy course, as well as research in group psychotherapy in Denmark. Some group analytic initiatives in relation to social issues and social welfare are presented, as well as initiatives concerning the school system and unemployment.

  15. The Ghent Psychotherapy Study (GPS) on the differential efficacy of supportive-expressive and cognitive behavioral interventions in dependent and self-critical depressive patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meganck, Reitske; Desmet, Mattias; Bockting, Claudi; Inslegers, Ruth; Truijens, Femke; De Smet, Melissa; De Geest, Rosa; Van Nieuwenhove, Kimberly; Hennissen, Vicky; Hermans, Goedele; Loeys, Tom; Norman, Ufuoma Angelica; Baeken, Chris; Vanheule, Stijn

    2017-03-14

    Major depressive disorder is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide, indicating the importance of effective therapies. Outcome studies have shown overall efficacy of different types of psychotherapy across groups, yet large variability within groups. Although patient characteristics are considered crucial in understanding outcome, they have received limited research attention. This trial aims at investigating the interaction between therapeutic approach (pre-structured versus explorative) and the personality style of patients (dependent versus self-critical), which is considered a core underlying dimension of depressive pathology. This study is a pragmatic stratified (dependent and self-critical patients) parallel trial with equal randomization (allocation 1:1) conducted in Flanders, Belgium. One hundred and four patients will be recruited and randomized to either 16-20 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (pre-structured approach) or 16-20 sessions of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression (explorative approach) conducted by trained psychotherapists in private practices. The primary outcome is the severity of depression as measured by the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at completion of therapy. Secondary outcome measures include self-reported depressive and other symptoms, interpersonal functioning, idiosyncratic complaints, and the presence of the diagnosis of depression. Additional measures include biological measures, narrative material (sessions, interviews), and health care costs. This trial presents the test of an often-described, yet hardly investigated interaction between important personality dimensions and therapeutic approach in the treatment of depression. Results could inform therapists on how to match psychotherapeutic treatments to specific personality characteristics of their patients. Isrctn.com, ISRCTN17130982 . Registered on 2 February 2015.

  16. Psychotherapy: The Humanistic (and Effective) Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well established that psychotherapy is remarkably effective, the change process in psychotherapy is not well understood. Psychotherapy is compared with medicine and cultural healing practices to argue that critical aspects of psychotherapy involve human processes that are used in religious, spiritual, and cultural healing practices.…

  17. Removing pathogenic memories: a neurobiology of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze, Diego; Siracusano, Alberto; Calabresi, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2005-10-01

    Experimental research examining the neural bases of nondeclarative memory has offered intriguing insight into how functional and dysfunctional implicit learning affects the brain. Long-term modifications of synaptic transmission, in particular, are currently considered the most plausible mechanism underlying memory trace encoding and compulsions, addiction, anxiety, and phobias. Therefore, an effective psychotherapy must be directed to erase maladaptive implicit memories and aberrant synaptic plasticity. This article describes the neurobiological bases of pathogenic memory disruption to provide some insight into how psychotherapy works. At least two mechanisms of unwanted memory erasing appear to be implicated in the effects of psychotherapy: inhibition of memory consolidation/reconsolidation and extinction. Behavioral evidence demonstrated that these two ways to forget are profoundly distinct in nature, and it is increasingly clear that their cellular, synaptic, and molecular underpinnings are different. Accordingly, the blockade of consolidation/reconsolidation erases memories by reversing the plasticity associated with memory maintenance, whereas extinction is a totally new form of plasticity that, similar to the plasticity underlying the old memory, requires protein synthesis-dependent synaptic remodeling.

  18. Of God and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, T Byram

    2015-01-01

    Psychotherapy is an instrument for remediation of psychological deficits and conflict resolution, as well as an instrument for growth and self-cultivation. In fact, psychotherapy is the finest form of life education. All of this is done without psychotherapists' playing a teacher, a minister, a priest, a rabbi, an imam, or a Buddhist monk, but by being familiar with what they know and more. That "more" is about understanding "the attributes" of gods and religions as they serve the all-too-human needs of believing and belonging. It is about the distillation of common psychological, sociological, moral, and philosophical attributes of religions, and the recognition that the attributes themselves are faith and God. Attributes that serve the affiliative needs define faith, for example, belonging is faith; attributes that serve the divine needs define God, for example, compassion is God. Those who have recovered from their primitive innocence need to formulate their ideas of God and religion, regardless of their affiliation with a religious community. One may need to resonate emotionally with the God of his or her religion, but intellectually need to transcend all its dogma and cultivate a personal concept of divinity free from any theological structure. Such an enlightened person achieves enduring equanimity by striving to own the attributes of Gods--to be godly. This is equally true for psychotherapists as it is for their patients.

  19. THE EFFICACY OF PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran Burgal Juanmartí

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this investigation is the efficacy comparison of the different psychotherapies for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD, with the aim of analyzing and understanding which therapies obtain better results and why. To this end, a systematic review was carried out on the current psychotherapies for BPD. First of all, the results showed that the psychotherapies most used for BPD were Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT, Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT and Schema-Based Therapy (SBT, among others, and all of them were efficacious. It should be noted that each of these therapies, as shown in the results, was efficacious in treating various symptoms, such as parasuicidal behavior control, however, some aspects such as emotional regulation were still resistant to treatment in many cases. Therefore, further investigations should be carried out to include elements of emotional regulation and measuring their efficacy.

  20. Should psychotherapy consider reincarnation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Julio F P

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing recognition of the need to take into account the cultural environment and belief systems of psychotherapy patients because these values reflect basic assumptions about man's nature and the cognitive references used to cope with psychological difficulties. Currently accepted psychotherapeutic approaches take no account of the belief in life after death held by most of the world's population. The World Values Survey (http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org) showed that there are large numbers of reincarnationists around the world, and whatever the reasons for believing in reincarnation, psychotherapeutic approaches should not ignore this significant group of people. Respect for patient opinions and subjective realities is a therapeutic need and an ethical duty, even though therapists may not share the same beliefs. Guidelines are suggested for professionals to develop collaborative models that help patients mobilize their intrinsic intelligence to find solutions to their complaints.

  1. PSYCHOTHERAPY SUPPORT ON SCIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyawati Suhendro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Schizophrenia is a disease that causes varying descriptions. The symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into two groups, the primary and secondary symptoms. Treatment should be done as soon as possible, because a state of psychotic periods raises the possibility to suffer mental decline. The treatment is carried out must be comprehensive, multimodal, empirically and can be applied to the patient. One therapy that is given is psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is usually combined with pharmacological actions in order to increase the level of maximum healing. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  2. Humor and creativity in psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martín Camacho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current article principal theories on humor are analyzed, relating them to different conceptions of creativity. Finally, some indications for the use of humor in psychotherapy are introduced, highlighting their positive and negative aspects. 

  3. Group Psychotherapy with Deaf Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, H. E. Eugene; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The process and outcome of group psychotherapy with deaf adolescents from a Texas public school is reported to illustrate the medium's use in managing normal adolescent adjustment problems at home and at school. (CL)

  4. "A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and a group version of cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy for chronically depressed patients": Correction to Michalak et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Reports an error in "A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and a group version of cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy for chronically depressed patients" by Johannes Michalak, Martin Schultze, Thomas Heidenreich and Elisabeth Schramm (Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 2015[Oct], Vol 83[5], 951-963). In the article there was an error in the Method section in the Statistical Analysis subsection. The last sentence in the seventh paragraph should read "A remitter was defined as a participant with a HAM-D score of 8 or less at posttreatment." (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2015-36864-001.) Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has recently been proposed as a treatment option for chronic depression. The cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only approach specifically developed to date for the treatment of chronically depressed patients. The efficacy of MBCT plus treatment-as-usual (TAU), and CBASP (group version) plus TAU, was compared to TAU alone in a prospective, bicenter, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and six patients with a current DSM-IV defined major depressive episode and persistent depressive symptoms for more than 2 years were randomized to TAU only (N = 35), or to TAU with additional 8-week group therapy of either 8 sessions of MBCT (n = 36) or CBASP (n = 35). The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (24-item HAM-D, Hamilton, 1967) at the end of treatment. Secondary outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and measures of social functioning and quality of life. In the overall sample as well as at 1 treatment site, MBCT was no more effective than TAU in reducing depressive symptoms, although it was significantly superior to TAU at the other treatment site. CBASP was significantly more effective than TAU in reducing depressive

  5. Neuroimaging of psychotherapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, A.L.; van den Heuvel, O.A.; Hansen, B.; Kvale, G.

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) include intrusive thoughts, compulsive behavior, anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility, which are associated with dysfunction in dorsal and ventral corticostriato-thalamocortical (CSTC) circuits. Psychotherapy involving exposure and response

  6. Mobile Phone-Based Mood Ratings Prospectively Predict Psychotherapy Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruehlman-Senecal, Emma; Aguilera, Adrian; Schueller, Stephen M

    2017-09-01

    Psychotherapy nonattendance is a costly and pervasive problem. While prior research has identified stable patient-level predictors of attendance, far less is known about dynamic (i.e., time-varying) factors. Identifying dynamic predictors can clarify how clinical states relate to psychotherapy attendance and inform effective "just-in-time" interventions to promote attendance. The present study examines whether daily mood, as measured by responses to automated mobile phone-based text messages, prospectively predicts attendance in group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression. Fifty-six Spanish-speaking Latino patients with elevated depressive symptoms (46 women, mean age=50.92years, SD=10.90years), enrolled in a manualized program of group CBT, received daily automated mood-monitoring text messages. Patients' daily mood ratings, message response rate, and delay in responding were recorded. Patients' self-reported mood the day prior to a scheduled psychotherapy session significantly predicted attendance, even after controlling for patients' prior attendance history and age (OR=1.33, 95% CI [1.04, 1.70], p=.02). Positive mood corresponded to a greater likelihood of attendance. Our results demonstrate the clinical utility of automated mood-monitoring text messages in predicting attendance. These results underscore the value of text messaging, and other mobile technologies, as adjuncts to psychotherapy. Future work should explore the use of such monitoring to guide interventions to increase attendance, and ultimately the efficacy of psychotherapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Behavior Therapy for Tourette Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wile, Daryl J; Pringsheim, Tamara M

    2013-08-01

    When tics caused by Tourette Syndrome cause meaningful impairment for patients, a comprehensive treatment approach includes education of patients, peers, and family, treatment of comorbid behavioral disorders if present, and consideration of behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy for tics themselves. This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that behavior therapies based on Habit Reversal Therapy, including the Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics are effective in reducing tic severity when compared with supportive psychotherapy. When these behavior therapies are unavailable, Exposure with Response Prevention may also be effective. Both face-to-face and telehealth delivery methods for behavior therapy improve tic severity, and broader distribution of behavior therapy through increased training or telehealth methods is encouraged. High-quality randomized trials comparing behavior therapies for tics with pharmacotherapy are needed.

  8. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships ... BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy (DDT) DDT aims ...

  9. The Effects of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy added to Treatment as Usual on suicidal ideation in chronic depression: Results of a randomized-clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkmann, Thomas; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Teismann, Tobias; Schramm, Elisabeth; Michalak, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    Suicidal ideation (SI) is common in chronic depression, but only limited evidence exists for the assumption that psychological treatments for depression are effective for reducing SI. In the present study, the effects of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; group version) plus treatment-as-usual (TAU: individual treatment by either a psychiatrist or a licensed psychotherapist, including medication when indicated) and Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP; group version) plus TAU on SI was compared to TAU alone in a prospective, bi-center, randomized controlled trial. The sample consisted of 106 outpatients with chronic depression. Multivariate regression analyses revealed different results, depending on whether SI was assessed via self-report (Beck Depression Inventory suicide item) or via clinician rating (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale suicide item). Whereas significant reduction of SI emerged when assessed via clinician rating in the MBCT and CBASP group, but not in the TAU group while controlling for changes in depression, there was no significant effect of treatment on SI when assessed via self-report. SI was measured with only two single items. Because all effects were of small to medium size and were independent of effects from other depression symptoms, the present results warrant the application of such psychotherapeutical treatment strategies like MBCT and CBASP for SI in patients with chronic depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Applying the Collaborative Study Psychotherapy Rating Scale to Rate Therapist Adherence in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, Interpersonal Therapy, and Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Clara E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Studied adherence of therapists to behaviors specified in cognitive-behavior therapy, interpersonal therapy, and clinical management manuals. Rated therapist adherence in each of 4 sessions from 180 patients in treatment phase of National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program. Therapists exhibited more…

  11. Ego-structuring psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemoes, Palle

    2002-01-01

    Psychoanalysis regards psychosis as an early disturbance in the development of the personality, specifically, of the ego. The disturbance occurs during that period prior to the castration complex and thus before the phase when the ordering of relations becomes oedipal. Responsible for this disturbance is, according to Freud, foreclosure (verwerfung) of an important factor that normally accomplishes the primal repression (urverdrängung) and which renders repression proper (verdrängung) out of the question. According to Lacan this factor is the Name of the Father, which instigates the metaphorical dimension as such and, thereby, makes language come into action through a pact between the subject and the Other. In psychosis, Lacan postulates a foreclosure of the Name of the Father, which hinders the unconscious, structured as a language, from safeguarding the ego and the world, that is, the imaginary. Ego-structuring psychotherapy brings the Name of the Father into effect, enabling the psychotic person to become linguistically structured; consequently, a world view develops in the person and he or she becomes a historically determined person engaged in fulfilling a plan for life.

  12. The effects of psychotherapy treatment on outcome in bulimia nervosa: Examining indirect effects through emotion regulation, self-directed behavior, and self-discrepancy within the mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carol B; Berg, Kelly C; Crosby, Ross D; Lavender, Jason M; Accurso, Erin C; Ciao, Anna C; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the indirect effects of Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy (ICAT-BN) and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E) on bulimia nervosa (BN) treatment outcome through three hypothesized maintenance variables: emotion regulation, self-directed behavior, and self-discrepancy. Eighty adults with BN were randomized to 21 sessions of ICAT-BN or CBT-E. A regression-based bootstrapping approach was used to test the indirect effects of treatment on outcome at end of treatment through emotion regulation and self-directed behavior measured at mid-treatment, as well as the indirect effects of treatment at follow-up through emotion regulation, self-directed behavior, and self-discrepancy measured at end of treatment. No significant differences in outcome between treatment conditions were observed, and no significant direct or indirect effects were found. Examination of the individual paths within the indirect effects models revealed comparable treatment effects. Across treatments, improvements in emotion regulation and self-directed behavior between baseline and mid-treatment predicted improvements in global eating disorder scores but not binge eating and purging frequency at end of treatment. Baseline to end of treatment improvements in emotion regulation and self-directed behavior also predicted improvements in global eating disorder scores at follow-up. Baseline to end of treatment improvements in emotion regulation predicted improvements in binge eating and baseline to end of treatment increases in positive self-directed behavior predicted improvements in purging at follow-up. These findings suggest that emotion regulation and self-directed behavior are important treatment targets and that ICAT-BN and CBT-E are comparable in modifying these psychological processes among individuals with BN. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn tools, exercises, and concrete things they can do to manage ... symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy ( ...

  14. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... attentive to the current situation. DBT seeks a balance between accepting BPD and changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, ...

  15. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accepting BPD and changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn tools, exercises, and concrete things they can do to ...

  16. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, ... concrete things they can do to manage their emotions when certain challenging situations arise and they are ...

  17. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... BPD and changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors ... 20 two-hour sessions led by an experienced social worker. When used with other types of treatment ( ...

  18. Conducting psychotherapy with an interpreter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuay, Justin; Chopra, Prem; Kaplan, Ida; Szwarc, Josef

    2015-06-01

    This qualitative study assessed how clinicians prepared and used interpreters during psychotherapeutic sessions and investigated the strategies they used to manage the dynamics of this process. Ten therapists were interviewed at the Victorian Foundation for the Survivors of Torture (VFST). A semi-structured interview format was used. Thematic analysis was conducted on transcripts of recorded interviews to identify key themes. Factors affecting the provision of psychotherapy with interpreters agreed with general guidelines for working with interpreters but there were exceptions. The possible roles of the interpreter as a cultural consultant, community advocate and co-therapist were explored. Specific troubleshooting strategies were identified for improving empathy, redefining roles, and adjusting interactions with interpreters. Working with interpreters in psychotherapy is a complex process. These findings may benefit clinicians providing psychotherapy to patients using interpreters. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  19. Group Analytic Psychotherapy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Carla; Castanho, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    Group analytic practice in Brazil began quite early. Highly influenced by the Argentinean Pichon-Rivière, it enjoyed a major development from the 1950s to the early 1980s. Beginning in the 1970s, different factors undermined its development and eventually led to its steep decline. From the mid 1980s on, the number of people looking for either group analytic psychotherapy or group analytic training decreased considerably. Group analytic psychotherapy societies struggled to survive and most of them had to close their doors in the 1990s and the following decade. Psychiatric reform and the new public health system have stimulated a new demand for groups in Brazil. Developments in the public and not-for-profit sectors, combined with theoretical and practical research in universities, present promising new perspectives for group analytic psychotherapy in Brazil nowadays.

  20. [Method of existence analytic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Längle, A

    1990-01-01

    Introducing questions of individual purpose and meaning into psychotherapy was an important contribution of Viktor Frankl and a necessary supplement to traditional psychotherapy. V. Frankls "Logotherapy" (logos = meaning) however has found its main application in counselling (especially bereavement and grief processes) and prophylactic endeavours (e.g. pedagogics). Suffering from meaninglessness, on the other hand, showed up to be a respectively rare indication for psychotherapeutic interventions in its proper sense. Thus the question was arising how to apply Frankl's valuable meaning-centered concept of man (which he called "Existential Analysis") in a genuine way to other neurosis and to personality disorders, so far "unspecific indications" to Logotherapy. This paper gives an outline and methodological foundation of "Existential Analysis Psychotherapy". A case study finally is illustrating its phenomenological proceeding.

  1. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  2. Computer addiction: implications for nursing psychotherapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Diane M

    2005-01-01

    Nurse psychotherapists will encounter the impact of today's technology on the daily lives of people including computer addiction. Computer addiction may also present with comorbidities such as depression, gambling, substance abuse, and marital infidelity and divorce. This overview article presents what is currently documented in the literature regarding the incidence, symptomatology, and nursing psychotherapy interventions relevant to computer addiction and its treatment. Issues presented include computer addiction, virtual relationships, online marital infidelity, and compulsive online sexual behavior. Review of literature from Medline, Psychoinfo, CINAHL, and current texts. Given the increased use of computers in today's society, there is the potential for overuse of technology and neglect of others and self as a result of computer addiction. Computer disorders also present themselves as marital or couple discord with the potential for online extramarital affairs and compulsive sexual online behavior. A summary and an assessment tool are provided to guide the nurse psychotherapist in practice.

  3. Psychotherapy, consciousness, and brain plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eCollerton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purely psychological treatments for emotional distress produce lasting, measureable, and reproducible changes in cognitive and emotional consciousness and brain function. How these changes come about illustrates the interplay between brain and consciousness. Studies of the effects of psychotherapy highlight the holistic nature of consciousness. Pre and post treatment functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging localises the brain changes following psychotherapy to frontal, cingulate, and limbic circuits, but emphasise that these areas support a wide range of conscious experiences. Multivoxel Pattern Analysis of distributed changes in function across these brain areas may be able to provide the ability to distinguish between different states of consciousness.

  4. [Reality of treatment in psychotherapy: Results of a survey of German psychiatric hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, G; Sander, K; Artmann, S; Dreher, J; Lenz, J; Hauth, I

    2015-05-01

    Since the introduction of the qualification as specialist for psychiatry and psychotherapy, in addition to psychopharmacotherapy psychotherapy is an integral component of the treatment of mentally ill people. A survey was carried out to evaluate the reality of clinical routine use of psychotherapy in German psychiatric hospitals. Between October 2011 and March 2012 German hospitals of psychiatry and psychotherapy were contacted by the head organization, the conference of national directors (Bundesdirektorenkonferenz), to participate in a survey regarding the application of psychotherapy in the real clinical world of daily treatment. With an anonymous questionnaire, data were requested as either a printed form or online version. Data from 25 psychiatric hospitals in the year 2010 could be analysed (average number of beds 300 of which 53 were for psychosomatic/psychotherapeutic patients) and a total of 87,000 inpatients were treated whereby 34 % were diagnosed as F1 addictive disorders and 24 % as F3 affective disorders. More than 80 % of the hospitals applied group therapies of relaxation, cognitive behavior therapy, social competence training and specific techniques, such as dialectic-behavior therapy. As individual treatment methods, patients with depressive disorders were treated with cognitive behavior therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy in more than 50 % of the cases. Relaxation techniques were offered in most cases by the nursing staff, behavior therapy by psychologists and physicians and psychodynamic therapy mainly by psychiatrists.

  5. Momentary assessment of interpersonal process in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Katherine M; Hopwood, Christopher J; Woody, Erik; Ethier, Nicole; Sadler, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate how a novel computer joystick coding method can illuminate the study of interpersonal processes in psychotherapy sessions, we applied it to Shostrom's (1966) well-known films in which a client, Gloria, had sessions with 3 prominent psychotherapists. The joystick method, which records interpersonal behavior as nearly continuous flows on the plane defined by the interpersonal dimensions of control and affiliation, provides an excellent sampling of variability in each person's interpersonal behavior across the session. More important, it yields extensive information about the temporal dynamics that interrelate clients' and therapists' behaviors. Gloria's 3 psychotherapy sessions were characterized using time-series statistical indices and graphical representations. Results demonstrated that patterns of within-person variability tended to be markedly asymmetric, with a predominant, set-point-like interpersonal style from which deviations mostly occurred in just 1 direction (e.g., occasional submissive departures from a modal dominant style). In addition, across each session, the therapist and client showed strongly cyclical variations in both control and affiliation, and these oscillations were entrained to different extents depending on the therapist. We interpreted different patterns of moment-to-moment complementarity of interpersonal behavior in terms of different therapeutic goals, such as fostering a positive alliance versus disconfirming the client's interpersonal expectations. We also showed how this method can be used to provide a more detailed analysis of specific shorter segments from each of the sessions. Finally, we compared our approach to alternative techniques, such as act-to-act lagged relations and dynamic systems and pointed to a variety of possible research and training applications. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Treatment Differences in the Therapeutic Relationship and Introject during a 2-Year Randomized Controlled Trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy versus Nonbehavioral Psychotherapy Experts for Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedics, Jamie D.; Atkins, David C.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study explored the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method: Women meeting "DSM-IV" criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community…

  7. Does Acceptance and Relationship Focused Behavior Therapy Contribute to Bupropion Outcomes? A Randomized Controlled Trial of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Smoking Cessation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Elizabeth V.; Kohlenberg, Barbara S.; Hayes, Steven C.; Pierson, Heather M.; Piasecki, Melissa P.; Antonuccio, David O.; Palm, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated a treatment combining bupropion with a novel acceptance and relationship focused behavioral intervention based on the acceptance and relationship context (ARC) model. Three hundred and three smokers from a community sample were randomly assigned to bupropion, a widely used smoking cessation medication, or bupropion plus…

  8. Humanism as a common factor in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    There are many forms of psychotherapies, each distinctive in its own way. From the origins of psychotherapy, it has been suggested that psychotherapy is effective through factors that are common to all therapies. In this article, I suggest that the commonalities that are at the core of psychotherapy are related to evolved human characteristics, which include (a) making sense of the world, (b) influencing through social means, and (c) connectedness, expectation, and mastery. In this way, all psychotherapies are humanistic. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Redefining Outcome Measurement: A Model for Brief Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinty, Everett; Nelson, John; Carlson, Alain; Crowther, Eric; Bednar, Dina; Foroughe, Mirisse

    2016-05-01

    The zeitgeist for short-term psychotherapy efficacy has fundamentally shifted away from evidence-based practices to include evidence-informed practices, resulting in an equally important paradigm shift in outcome measurement designed to reflect change in this short-term modality. The present article delineates a short-term psychotherapy structure which defines four fundamental stages that all brief therapies may have in common, and are represented through Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, Narrative Therapy, and Emotion-Focused Therapy. These four theoretical approaches were analyzed via a selected literature review through comparing and contrasting specific and common tasks as they relate to the process of psychotherapy and change. Once commonalities were identified within session, they were categorized or grouped into themes or general stages of change within the parameters of a four to six session model of short-term therapy. Commonalities in therapeutic stages of change may more accurately and uniformly measure outcome in short-term work, unlike the symptom-specific psychometric instruments of longer-term psychotherapy. A systematic framework for evaluating the client and clinician adherence to 20 specific tasks for these four short-term therapies is presented through the newly proposed, Brief Task Acquisition Scale (BTAS). It is further proposed that the client-clinicians' adherence to these tasks will track and ultimately increase treatment integrity. Thus, when the client-clinician relationship tracks and evaluates the three pillars of (1) stage/process change, (2) task acquisition, and (3) treatment integrity, the culmination of these efforts presents a new way of more sensitively measuring outcome in short-term psychotherapy. Data collection is suggested as a first step to empirically evaluate the testable hypotheses suggested within this current model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Key Practitioner Message The

  10. Neuroimaging for psychotherapy research: current trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Carol P; Strauman, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews neuroimaging studies that inform psychotherapy research. An introduction to neuroimaging methods is provided as background for the increasingly sophisticated breadth of methods and findings appearing in psychotherapy research. We compiled and assessed a comprehensive list of neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, along with selected examples of other types of studies that also are relevant to psychotherapy research. We emphasized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) since it is the dominant neuroimaging modality in psychological research. We summarize findings from neuroimaging studies of psychotherapy outcome, including treatment for depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. The increasing use of neuroimaging methods in the study of psychotherapy continues to refine our understanding of both outcome and process. We suggest possible directions for future neuroimaging studies in psychotherapy research.

  11. [Body integrity identity disorder--first success in long-term psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Aylin; Ehni, Franziska J F; Oddo, Silvia; Stirn, Aglaja

    2011-07-01

    The Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID) is a fairly unknown and unexplored psychic illness. Very little cases underwent a psychotherapeutic treatment. We report on the two-and-a-half year psychotherapy with a 37 years old man, who wants an amputation of his two legs. Origin and meaning of the amputation desire were uncovered in psychotherapy. The psychodynamic oriented therapy with cognitive-behavioral elements can be used to develop further treatment approaches. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. With Doug: an Eastern Orthodox--Gestalt framework for pastoral psychotherapy in the armed forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, David

    2013-01-01

    In military behavioral healthcare, a short-term, solutions-focused system often privileges cognitive techniques over existential, affective, or psychodynamic approaches to care. Pastoral psychotherapy, which often privileges existential and person-centered care, has the potential to prove a pivotal complement in treating the whole person. This article offers an existential approach to pastoral psychotherapy in the military using integrated concepts and applications from Gestalt Therapy and Eastern Orthodox pastoral care.

  13. Palmistry, tarot cards, and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejic, Nicholas G

    2008-01-01

    The author summarizes his experience with palm and Tarot card readers in New Orleans. The history, practice, and psychodynamics of palmistry and Tarot are explored. It's postulated that these practices are forms of archaic psychotherapy, which employ supportive treatment and placebo. These tactics are used to elicit hope for its clients.

  14. Brief Psychotherapy: The Multimodal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Arnold A.

    1989-01-01

    Outlines tenets of multimodal therapy (MMT) and argues for its cost-effective yet comprehensive value as a brief psychotherapy model. Describes MMT as an integrated, seven-modality model of personality and provides clinical examples of its use. Argues that MMT approach will be an important future alternative to more expensive, time-consuming, and…

  15. Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy Based on Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen-Yang; Cheng, Rui; Yang, Zhe; Tian, Zhong-Min

    2018-04-04

    Chemotherapy has been widely applied in clinics. However, the therapeutic potential of chemotherapy against cancer is seriously dissatisfactory due to the nonspecific drug distribution, multidrug resistance (MDR) and the heterogeneity of cancer. Therefore, combinational therapy based on chemotherapy mediated by nanotechnology, has been the trend in clinical research at present, which can result in a remarkably increased therapeutic efficiency with few side effects to normal tissues. Moreover, to achieve the accurate pre-diagnosis and real-time monitoring for tumor, the research of nano-theranostics, which integrates diagnosis with treatment process, is a promising field in cancer treatment. In this review, the recent studies on combinational therapy based on chemotherapy will be systematically discussed. Furthermore, as a current trend in cancer treatment, advance in theranostic nanoparticles based on chemotherapy will be exemplified briefly. Finally, the present challenges and improvement tips will be presented in combination therapy and nano-theranostics.

  16. Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy Based on Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yang Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy has been widely applied in clinics. However, the therapeutic potential of chemotherapy against cancer is seriously dissatisfactory due to the nonspecific drug distribution, multidrug resistance (MDR and the heterogeneity of cancer. Therefore, combinational therapy based on chemotherapy mediated by nanotechnology, has been the trend in clinical research at present, which can result in a remarkably increased therapeutic efficiency with few side effects to normal tissues. Moreover, to achieve the accurate pre-diagnosis and real-time monitoring for tumor, the research of nano-theranostics, which integrates diagnosis with treatment process, is a promising field in cancer treatment. In this review, the recent studies on combinational therapy based on chemotherapy will be systematically discussed. Furthermore, as a current trend in cancer treatment, advance in theranostic nanoparticles based on chemotherapy will be exemplified briefly. Finally, the present challenges and improvement tips will be presented in combination therapy and nano-theranostics.

  17. Culture and demoralization in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, John M; Gostoli, Sara

    2013-01-01

    In most societies, members of a culture have attempted to help each other in times of trouble with various types of healing methods. Demoralization - an individual experience related to a group phenomenon - responds to certain elements shared by all psychotherapies. This article has three objectives: (1) to review the theoretical background leading to our current views on culture and demoralization in psychotherapy, (2) to discuss the methodological challenges faced in the cross-cultural study of demoralization and psychotherapy, and (3) to describe the clinical applications and research prospects of this area of inquiry. Demoralization follows a shattering of the individual's assumptive world and it is different from homeostatic responses to a stressful situation or from depressive disorders. Only a few comparative studies of this construct across cultures have been undertaken. The presentation of distress may vary widely from culture to culture and even within the same culture. To avoid 'category fallacy', it is important to understand the idioms of distress peculiar to a cultural group. A cultural psychiatrist or psychotherapist would have to identify patient's values and sentiments, reconstruct his/her personal and collective ambient worlds, and only then study demoralization. The limitations of our current diagnostic systems have resulted in methodological challenges. Cultural clinicians should consider using a combination of both 'clinimetric' and 'perspectivistic' approaches in order to arrive at a diagnosis and identify the appropriate intervention. The presenting problem has to be understood in the context of the patient's individual, social and cultural background, and patients unfamiliar with Western-type psychotherapies have to be prepared to guide their own expectations before the former are used. Future research should identify the gaps in knowledge on the effectiveness of cultural psychotherapy at reversing or preventing demoralization. Copyright

  18. Nanotechnology for Cancer Therapy Based on Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen-Yang Zhao; Rui Cheng; Zhe Yang; Zhong-Min Tian

    2018-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been widely applied in clinics. However, the therapeutic potential of chemotherapy against cancer is seriously dissatisfactory due to the nonspecific drug distribution, multidrug resistance (MDR) and the heterogeneity of cancer. Therefore, combinational therapy based on chemotherapy mediated by nanotechnology, has been the trend in clinical research at present, which can result in a remarkably increased therapeutic efficiency with few side effects to normal tissues. Moreover,...

  19. The therapeutic alliance as a predictor of outcome in dialectical behavior therapy versus nonbehavioral psychotherapy by experts for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedics, Jamie D; Atkins, David C; Harned, Melanie S; Linehan, Marsha M

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore facets of the client- and therapist-rated therapeutic alliance as predictors of suicide attempts, nonsuicidal self-injury, depression, and introject during the course of 2 psychosocial treatments for borderline personality disorder. A total of 101 women meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder participated in a randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) versus community treatment by experts. Clients and therapists rated the therapeutic alliance at 4 time points during 1 year of treatment. Multilevel models showed no significant differences in client ratings of the alliance by treatment condition. DBT therapists reported greater working strategy consensus early in treatment and an overall greater alliance during treatment. Client ratings of commitment and working capacity were associated with fewer suicide attempts in DBT. Client ratings of commitment were also associated with reduced nonsuicidal self-injury in DBT only. Therapist ratings of the alliance were predictive of reduced suicide attempts in both treatments. Therapist ratings of the alliance in community treatment by experts were predictive of increased nonsuicidal self-injury. Client and therapist ratings of the alliance were not significantly associated with changes in depression or introject across both treatments. The study supported theoretically predicted relationships between facets of the therapeutic alliance in DBT and suicidal behavior. Results are discussed in the context of recommendations for developing the therapeutic alliance in DBT. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Treatment differences in the therapeutic relationship and introject during a 2-year randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy versus nonbehavioral psychotherapy experts for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedics, Jamie D; Atkins, David C; Comtois, Katherine A; Linehan, Marsha M

    2012-02-01

    The present study explored the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Women meeting DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community treatment by experts. The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (Benjamin, 1974) was used to measure both the therapeutic relationship and introject. Relative to community treatment by experts, DBT participants reported the development of a more positive introject, including significantly greater self-affirmation, self-love, self-protection, and less self-attack, during the course of treatment and 1-year follow-up. The therapeutic relationship did not have an independent effect on intrapsychic or symptomatic outcome but did interact with treatment. DBT participants who perceived their therapist as affirming and protecting reported less frequent occurrences of nonsuicidal self-injury. The study showed positive intrapsychic change during DBT and emphasized the importance of affirmation and control in the therapeutic relationship. Results are discussed in the context of understanding the mechanisms of change in DBT. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. The Effect of Contingent Reinforcement on Target Variables in Outpatient Psychotherapy for Depression: A Successful and Unsuccessful Case Using Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W.; Landes, Sara J.; Busch, Andrew M.; Rusch, Laura C.; Brown, Keri R.; Baruch, David E.; Holman, Gareth I.

    2006-01-01

    The current study investigated a behavior-analytic treatment, functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP), for outpatient depression utilizing two single-subject A/A+B designs. The baseline condition was cognitive behavioral therapy. Results demonstrated treatment success in 1 client after the addition of FAP and treatment failure in the 2nd. This…

  2. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn ... the patient distorts his or her sense of self and images of other people. Therapy addresses intense ...

  3. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn ... sense of identity associated with emotionally intense mental images of themselves and others. The therapist helps the ...

  4. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... accepting BPD and changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense emotions Reduce self-destructive ... others, and cope with problems or stress. Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving (STEPPS) This ...

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn tools, exercises, and concrete things they can do ... Therapy addresses intense shifts in emotions as patients learn to reflect and verbalize what they’re feeling, ...

  6. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one-on-one and through support groups, enabling people with BPD to interact with others. The most ... Reduce self-destructive behaviors Improve relationships With DBT, people learn tools, exercises, and concrete things they can ...

  7. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... DBT). This type of therapy focuses on the concept of mindfulness, or being aware of and attentive ... symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of life. Dynamic Deconstructive Therapy ( ...

  8. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seeks a balance between accepting BPD and changing beliefs and behaviors by teaching skills to: Control intense ... to the ability to focus and reflect on beliefs, intentions, feelings, and thoughts in oneself and in ...

  9. “Gold Standards,” Plurality and Monocultures: The Need for Diversity in Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falk Leichsenring

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available For psychotherapy of mental disorders, presently several approaches are available, such as interpersonal, humanistic, systemic, psychodynamic or cognitive behavior therapy (CBT. Pointing to the available evidence, proponents of CBT claim that CBT is the gold standard. Some authors even argue for an integrated CBT-based form of psychotherapy as the only form of psychotherapy. CBT undoubtedly has its strengths and CBT researchers have to be credited for developing and testing treatments for many mental disorders. A critical review, however, shows that the available evidence for the theoretical foundations of CBT, assumed mechanisms of change, quality of studies, and efficacy is not as robust as some researchers claim. Most important, there is no consistent evidence that CBT is more efficacious than other evidence-based approaches. These findings do not justify regarding CBT as the gold standard psychotherapy. They even provide less justification for the idea that the future of psychotherapy lies in one integrated CBT-based form of psychotherapy as the only type of psychotherapy. For the different psychotherapeutic approaches a growing body of evidence is available. These approaches have their strengths because of differences in their respective focus on interpersonal relationships, affects, cognitions, systemic perspectives, experiential, or unconscious processes. Different approaches may be suitable to different patients and therapists. As generally assumed, progress in research results from openness to new ideas and learning from diverse perspectives. Thus, different forms of evidence-based psychotherapy are required. Plurality is the future of psychotherapy, not a uniform “one fits all” approach.

  10. Practical tips for sexual counseling and psychotherapy in premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, David; Cooper, Stewart

    2011-10-01

    A number of milestones in the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) have occurred over the past five decades, including the development of various behavioral and cognitive techniques as well as pharmacotherapies that modify neurophysiological processes involved in ejaculation. Nevertheless, the notion that sexual responses such as PE are influenced by physiological, psychobehavioral, cultural, and relationship factors is as valid now as it was 50 years ago, and therefore, interventions should consider all such domains in the development of effective treatment strategies. Provide an overview of which patients with PE are suitable to receive psychosexual treatment and the psychological approaches for managing this disorder. Review of the literature. Psychosexual treatments that integrate behavioral, psychological, and relationship functioning. PE is typically a couple's problem and, therefore, psychotherapy is best when the partner is involved. Before embarking on psychotherapy, the clinician should obtain a medical history pertaining to sexual-, psychological-, and relationship-related factors, so that the treatment strategy can be tailored to the needs of the individual. General strategies underpinning integrative, "process-oriented" elements of psychotherapy most relevant to PE are: developing the therapist-patient relationship; expressing empathy, genuineness, and positive regard; motivational interviewing, i.e., developing motivation to change; developing discrepancy; working through resistance; identifying PE-related affect, cognitions, and behaviors (including interaction with partners); and supporting self-efficacy. The four main domains that encompass psychotherapy techniques specific to the treatment of PE are: behavioral; cognitive; affective; and relational. Sustained positive outcomes in PE may be obtained using a combination treatment strategy that addresses all elements of PE, including psychological and biological factors. Psychosexual treatments

  11. [Personality disorders and psychoanalytic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The author review object-relational theories of personality disorders as well as current standard psychotherapies borderline personality disorder, several of them. Although psychoanalytic approach theoretical understanding patients with borderline personality disorder, in practice applicability. With other types of personality disorders, however, psychoanalytic approach offered a variety of personality models that are pertinent and useful yet relatively unutilized in present day psychiatrynotion "basic fault" (M. Balint), "false self" (D.W. Winnicott), and "the psychotic part of the personality" (W.R. Bion). The last has developed into more complicated personality models in one of which the destructive part was idealized and worshiped the dependent part with the potential of growth was captured (H. Rosenfeld). This model is a forerunner of the idea of "pathological organization" (J. Steiner). Bion has also a universal therapeutic factor in psychotherapy. The author suggests that psychoanalytic approach based on emotional contact and transference-countertransference relationship has research value and can provide therapeutic models.

  12. Implementing Dynamic Assessments in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Thomas, Katherine M; Luo, Xiaochen; Bernard, Nicola; Lin, Yanli; Levendosky, Alytia A

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we organize multimethod, multitimescale data around the interpersonal situation, a conceptual framework that can be used to integrate personality, psychopathology, and psychotherapy constructs in order to guide the assessment of clinical dynamics. We first describe the key variables of the interpersonal situation model and articulate methods for assessing those variables as they manifest (a) across different levels of personality, (b) across situations, and (c) within situations. We next use a case to demonstrate how to assess aspects of the interpersonal situation in a manner that enhances case conceptualization and facilitates the evaluation of clinical hypotheses. We also use this case to highlight challenges and decisions involved in implementing dynamic assessment in psychotherapy. We conclude by outlining areas in need of further exploration toward a more sophisticated approach to clinical practice that involves the routine assessment of dynamic processes.

  13. Spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viftrup, Dorte Toudal; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Buus, Niels

    2013-01-01

    WE SYSTEMATICALLY REVIEWED THE RESEARCH LITERATURE ON SPIRITUALLY AND RELIGIOUSLY INTEGRATED GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING THREE QUESTIONS: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group...... for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded....... psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total...

  14. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postnatal Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J P Y

    2015-06-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy is one of two evidence-based formal psychotherapies for perinatal mood disorders. It is a time-limited, non-transference / cognitive-based therapy that focuses on communication and social support and can be easily conducted in a perinatal clinic setting. There is limited patient access to interpersonal psychotherapy in Hong Kong because the therapy is not widely disseminated. This case report aimed to illustrate the principles and techniques of interpersonal psychotherapy in perinatal psychiatry, and to raise interest among mental health professionals in Hong Kong in this evidence-based treatment.

  15. Learning from traumatic experiences with brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthold P. R. Gersons

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD (BEPP is an evidence-based therapeutic approach that combines and integrates elements from psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and directive psychotherapy. Psychoeducation is done jointly with the patient and his or her partner. Exposure, a structured writing task, and memorabilia are used to help patients accessing, feeling and expressing their suppressed emotions related to the traumatic experience. In the domain of meaning stage, patients will learn how they and their view of the world have changed, and that they have become “sadder but wiser”. Much emphasis is put on the vulnerability of human beings. Finally, an individually tailored farewell ritual is done to end treatment, to reunite with loved ones, and to go on with life.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online

  16. Therapists' continuations following I don't know-responses of adolescents in psychotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Margot; Huiskes, Mike; Metselaar, Janneke; Knorth, Erik J; De Winter, Andrea F; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In psychotherapy clients' I don't know-responses (IDK-responses) to therapists' questions are typically considered to be non-cooperating behaviors. How therapists actually handle these behaviors remains unclear. This study therefore aims to assess client-therapist interactions following

  17. Behavior Modification in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Mryon; Whitman, Joan

    1971-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical rationale for behavior modification, principally through its comparison with traditional psychotherapies, and suggests some behavior modification techniques for the classroom management of maladaptive behavior. (Author)

  18. Individual psychotherapy as an adjunct to group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranto, E A; Bender, S S

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a form of combined psychotherapy in which the individual sessions are used as an adjunct to group therapy. Each group member is seen regularly in individual sessions to focus primarily on the member's ongoing group work. The individual sessions are scheduled on a rotating basis. Typically, each group member is seen in an individual session once every four weeks. Additional individual sessions are available only when immediate attention is appropriate and necessary. The group is viewed as the primary therapeutic component. A cost-effective therapeutic approach that uses both individual and group methods, this modality lends itself well to a clinic and to a private practice setting.

  19. Evolution, Shame, and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Medea, the title character in Euripides' play, murdered her two sons in response to her husband Jason's abandonment. If her behavior can be understood, it is best understood in the context of shame. In an evolutionary context, shame is the affective response to the loss of one's place in the group. This response is related to the neurobiology of pain-not the acute pain experienced through the post-central gyrus, but the chronic, lingering pain that is experienced through the insular and cingulate cortices where homeostasis is regulated "from above." Shame is thus a fall in self-esteem, but shame is also a crisis of homeostasis, a crisis that can lead to drastic and, as in the case of Medea, violent attempts to "repair" the imbalance. Shame is a primitive, evolutionarily preserved response to the loss of one's place in the group.

  20. The Effectiveness of Western Psychotherapy in treating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psychotherapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mental disorders in the western world but viewed as an alien method of treatment to Africans. Aim: To review the literature on the effectiveness of psychotherapy in sub- Saharan Africa. Method: A systematic search of Medline, PsychINFO, ...

  1. Effectiveness of intensive psychotherapy in a day hospital evaluated with Neurotic Personality Inventory KON-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobański, Jerzy A; Klasa, Katarzyna; Cyranka, Katarzyna; Mielimąka, Michał; Dembińska, Edyta; Müldner-Nieckowski, Łukasz; Smiatek-Mazgaj, Bogna; Rutkowski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    AIM : The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of intensive psychotherapy in the day hospital for neurotic and behavioral disorders as well as the assessment of the usefulness of the Neurotic Personality Inventory KON-2006 for routine evaluation of psychotherapy effectiveness. The results of the questionnaires KON-2006 completed by 690 patients (women - 69%, men - 31%, mean age 29 years, SD 8 years) were analyzed. All persons have received comprehensive, mainly psychodynamic psychotherapy (group with elements of individual therapy), in the years 2004-2009 in the Day Hospital for Neurotic and Behavioral Disorders in Krakow. The vast majority of patients achieved after the end of psychotherapy beneficial changes in personality corresponding to various degrees of improvements in terms of the questionnaire KON-2006. Only a few patients deteriorated, somewhat more numerous group did not achieve significant changes or the effects are not possible for unambiguous interpretation. These results are highly correlated with those obtained in the personality questionnaire NEO-PI-R. The Neurotic Personality Inventory KON-2006 appears to be an adequate tool to assess the results of intensive, comprehensive psychotherapy, conducted in the day hospital for neurotic and behavioral disorders.

  2. [Body-centered psychotherapy IKP (Institute of Body-Centered Psychotherapy): holistic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Groeli, Y

    1996-03-01

    Body centered Psychotherapy IKP is treated in this article under the aspect of a holistic approach. First the theory and the system of science are summarised and shown as to which amount they are changing concerning knowledge of details and wholeness. It is pointed out that the actual paradigma "to the depth" has to be completed by that of "wideness". The way of holistic-multirelational thinking, stating a diagnosis and doing therapy is demonstrated along a case study going on at the background of a therapeutic encounter-relationship which is emotionally warm (Gestalt-approach).

  3. [Effect of using an interpreter in psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke Sander; Nørregaard, Trine Maria; Carlsson, Jessica

    2017-05-22

    An evaluation of the effect of using an interpreter in psychotherapy is quite complex. In the few existing studies on the use of interpreters in psychotherapy no significant difference was found in treatment outcome related to whether an interpreter was used or not. On the other hand, the inclusion of an interpreter affects the therapeutic alliance and the relationships between the parties. The role of the interpreter in psychotherapy is characterized by diversity, and the included studies indicate the need for training to improve the cooperation between the interpreter and the therapist.

  4. Psychotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapist have experience in diagnosing and treating the age group (for example, a child) and the specific condition ... Health Service Psychologists Society of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology Society of Clinical Psychology National advocacy organizations have ...

  5. Psychotherapy - insights from bhagavad gita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M S

    2012-01-01

    Spoken and written commentary on Bhagavad Gita, the distilled spiritual essence of Vedas and Upanishads, is aplenty. Mahatma Gandhi was quoted as saying that whenever he had a problem Bhagavad Gita offered an answer and the solution. For a student of psychology Bhagavad Gita offers a valuable case study for lessons in psychotherapy - resolution of conflict and successful resumption of action from a state of acute anxiety and guilt laden depression that precipitated inaction. This presentation makes a humble attempt to discuss the therapy process involved in Bhagavad Gita in which Lord Krishna helped the grief-stricken Arjuna through dialogue and discussion. The focus would be on the conflict and diagnosis of patient, the background setting of the situation, personality of patient, technique of therapy, underlying psychological concepts/ principles/theories, the Guru - Sishya concept, etc.

  6. John Bowlby and couple psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clulow, Christopher

    2007-12-01

    The centenary of John Bowlby's birth provides a context for considering the policy, research and practice legacies that he left for practitioners working in many different fields supporting couples and families. Part historical, and part forwardlooking, this paper considers the links between attachment in the infant-parent dyad that was at the heart of Bowlby's concern and the nature of the affective ties that bind couples together in adult romantic relationships. An overview of the influence of his theory on family policy and adult attachment research is followed by an appreciation of its significance for the practice of couple psychotherapy. The paper concludes with a comment on the implications of current neuroscience knowledge for therapeutic technique.

  7. [Ethical foundations of institutional psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, N

    2006-01-01

    The idea behind this work is to have an ethical examination of the institutional psychotherapy movement which has long influenced French public psychiatry and which has progressively, since the 80s, been subject to growing doubts. In the first part, institutional psychotherapy is presented. It is a model for theoretical development and practice in psychiatric care. It came into being just following the end of the Second World War at the same time as modern medical ethics. Its principles come on the one hand, from recognition of asylums' pathogenic effects--which led to the crushing of the patient's being--and on the other, through recognition of the uniqueness of each person and the subjectivity of mental suffering. These elements gave rise to creativity within the world of medicine and, in the sector, generated the science of psychiatry which advocated for continuity in care (both inpatient and outpatient) and preventive work directed at the population. This movement called for the use of the institution in its dynamic aspect which promotes exchanges and allows patients to situate or resituate themselves in historic and symbolic dimensions. It privileges a high level of transversality, maximum communication, favouring speaking out loud and responsibility. It requires a permanent analysis of the institutional counter transference (emotional reactions of the caregivers involved, their interrelations and the social and material organization of the institution) which determines the therapeutic action itself. THEORICAL BASIS: In a second part, its theoretical foundations and its practice shall be investigated in light of the guiding concepts of medical ethics (justice, autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance). Institutional psychotherapy responds to the need for justice by considering the patient as a whole and by conceiving each patient as being like oneself despite the differences (associated with the mode of hospitalization, the social or diagnostic category). The

  8. Psychotherapy: from exorcism to cognitive theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durval Mazzei Nogueira Filho

    Full Text Available The author discusses aspects of psychotherapeutic action. He defends the rationality of the procedure, comments on the splintering of the field of psychotherapy and discusses the usefulness of applying the scientific methodology to this field of knowledge.

  9. PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH THE PARENT EGO STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maruša Zaletel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In their article, the authors present the findings of the study in which they conceptualized the method of psychotherapy with the Parent ego state. Their aim was to explore whether this method could be divided into individual, content-wise separate chronological phases which can be observed with the majority of clients. By using a modified method of content analysis of five psychotherapy transcripts and a video recording of a psychotherapy session, nine chronological phases were identified. In order to illustrate the individual phases, excerpts from the transcripts and the video recording of psychotherapy have been included. The article proposes under what conditions can this method be used, and presents some of its limitations.

  10. NONVERBAL STORIES: THE BODY IN PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Erskine

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Emotional experience is stored within the amygdala and the limbic system of the brain as affect, visceral, and physiological sensation without symbolization and language. These significant memories are expressed in affect and through our bodily movements and gestures. Such body memories are unconscious non-symbolized patterns of self-in-relationship. Several methods of a body centered psychotherapy are described and clinical case examples illustrate the use of expressive methods within a relational psychotherapy.

  11. Coaching und Psychotherapie: Grenzen und Gemeinsamkeiten

    OpenAIRE

    Grimmer, B; Neukom, M

    2010-01-01

    Zu den Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschieden von Coaching und Psychotherapie gab es bisher keine wissenschaftlichen Studien. Vor allem in der Coaching-Literatur wird zwar immer wieder eine klare Abgrenzung beider Verfahren gefordert und ihre Unterschiedlichkeit und Eigenständigkeit betont. Dabei wird argumentiert, dass die Trennungslinie zwischen gesund (Coaching) und krank (Psychotherapie) verläuft, aber ohne diese Gegenüberstellung weiter zu problematisieren oder wissenschaftlich zu analysie...

  12. Treatment failure in humanistic and experiential psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeanne C

    2011-11-01

    In this article, treatment failure in humanistic experiential psychotherapy is defined and explored. I outline several markers that indicate when treatment is not going well. Factors that contribute to failure include client factors, for example, emotional processing capacities, shame, and impoverished narratives, as well as therapist factors including lack of empathic attunement and inflexibility. Treatment failure is illuminated with a case example drawn from humanistic/experiential psychotherapy, and clinical strategies for dealing with failures are recommended. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A Model of Therapist Competencies for the Empirically Supported Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Mufson, Laura H.; Schniering, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to treat adolescent depression, a number of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) have been developed from both the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT-A) frameworks. Research has shown that in order for these treatments to be implemented in routine clinical practice (RCP), effective therapist…

  14. A tripartite learning conceptualization of psychotherapy: the therapeutic alliance, technical interventions, and relearning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaturo, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    One problem in conceptualizing the various explanatory factors in psychotherapy has been the lack of a common theoretical language by which to construe these various aspects of treatment. This article integrates a broad range of theoretical contributions within the wider context of a learning theory perspective of essential psychotherapeutic processes. A tripartite model of psychotherapy is outlined that incorporates the contributions of the emotional learning that takes place in the therapeutic alliance, the cognitive aspects of the therapist's technical interventions that are intended to accelerate change, and the behavioral elements of relearning that take place in the patient's world beyond the consulting room.

  15. Treatment differences in the therapeutic relationship and introject during a 2-year randomized controlled trial of dialectical behavior therapy versus non-behavioral psychotherapy experts for borderline personality disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedics, Jamie D.; Atkins, David C.; Comtois, Katherine A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to explore the role of the therapeutic relationship and introject during the course of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993) for the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Method Women meeting DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder (N = 101) were randomized to receive DBT or community treatment by experts. The Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB; Benjamin, 1974) was used to measure both the therapeutic relationship and introject. Results Using hierarchical linear modeling, DBT patients reported the development of a more positive introject including significantly greater self-affirmation, self-love, self-protection, and less self-attack during the course of treatment and one-year follow-up relative to community treatment by experts. The therapeutic relationship did not have an independent effect on intrapsychic or symptomatic outcome but did interact with treatment. DBT patients who perceived their therapist as affirming and protecting reported less frequent occurrences of non-suicidal self-injury. Conclusions The study showed positive intrapsychic change during DBT while emphasizing the importance of affirmation and control in the therapeutic relationship. Results are discussed in the context of understanding the mechanisms of change in DBT. PMID:22061867

  16. Outcome in psychotherapy: the past and important advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Fifty years after the 1963 debate between Strupp and Eysenck, as recorded in their articles in Psychotherapy, it is clear that Eysenck overstated the case against psychoanalysis and dynamic psychotherapy (Bergin, 1971), while inflating the magnitude of improvement in untreated individuals (Lambert, 1976). Eysenck was probably correct about the beneficial effects of behavior therapies, but did not foresee that behavior therapy would be supplanted by cognitive behavior therapies (CBT) and eclectic mixtures of CBT that incorporate elements of eastern religion, humanistic interventions, and psychodynamic constructs. Fortunately, most of the treatments that have been tested in rigorous investigations have been found to be effective, but few have distinguished themselves as uniquely superior. Many of the problems of how to measure the effects of treatment have been solved and suggest that about two thirds of treated individuals improve or recover. This leaves a sizable portion of nonresponding individuals, but emerging methods involving in tracking treatment response are being used to decrease deterioration and enhance positive outcomes.

  17. The future orientation of constructive memory: an evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest; Erickson-Klein, Roxanna; Rossi, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    We explore a new distinction between the future, prospective memory system being investigated in current neuroscience and the past, retrospective memory system, which was the original theoretical foundation of therapeutic hypnosis, classical psychoanalysis, and psychotherapy. We then generalize a current evolutionary theory of sleep and dreaming, which focuses on the future, prospective memory system, to conceptualize a new evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy. The implication of current neuroscience research is that activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity are the psychobiological basis of adaptive behavior, consciousness, and creativity in everyday life as well as psychotherapy. We summarize a case illustrating how this evolutionary perspective can be used to quickly resolve problems with past obstructive procrastination in school to facilitate current and future academic success.

  18. PERSONALITY THEORY IN INTEGRATIVE PERSONALITY-ORIENTED RECONSTRUCTIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Kurpatov

    2010-01-01

    approaches. V.N. Myasishchev's theory of personality relations in association with its universality, as well as pathogenetic psychotherapy may be the basis for the integration of other methods of psychotherapy

  19. First Steps in FAP: Experiences of Beginning Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Therapist with an Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduchi, Katia; Schoendorff, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Practicing Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) for the first time can seem daunting to therapists. Establishing a deep and intense therapeutic relationship, identifying FAP's therapeutic targets of clinically relevant behaviors, and using contingent reinforcement to help clients emit more functional behavior in the therapeutic relationship all…

  20. Analytic group psychotherapy; for wives and husbands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUSKIN, I W

    1952-08-01

    The practice of group psychotherapy has its roots in Freudian dynamics and concepts, and varies from play group psychotherapy to analytic group psychotherapy, using the dynamics of transference, catharsis, interpretation, insight, ego building, reality, and sublimation.This presentation is based on the experience of the author with about 40 women patients formed in groups at a sanatorium. The majority were neurotic, psychoneurotic or manic-depressive. Several were psychotic. Some of the patients were treated in groups that included their husbands, after discharge from the sanatorium. Analytic group psychotherapy is a concept of an attenuated mobile and uncensored societal setting, where persons who have failed in the larger and harsher social reality may again attempt resocialization in a permissive, friendly, and protected environment. It is not to be considered the poor man's makeshift for individual psychoanalysis. Group dynamics facilitate the regression and catharsis necessary to produce insight and ego strength, leading to more rapid recovery. Husband and wife participation in the same group led to a more tolerant acceptance by the husband of the concept of mental ailment, and empathy for the spouse. The role of the psychiatrist in group psychotherapy is very similar to that in individual psychoanalysis. He represents the reality to the patient and the group. He is objective but permissive, and not passive. Therapeutic goals are the same as in individual therapy, and may focus on the resolution of pre-oedipal conflicts or on situational maladjustments.

  1. [Summary: Scientific evaluation of EMDR psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haour, F; de Beaurepaire, C

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of psychotherapy methods is made difficult by their practical and theoretical diversities as well as the increasing number of available therapies. Evaluation based on scientific criteria in randomized control trials is providing the highest level of proof and recognition by Health Agencies. A recently described integrative psychotherapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), developed by F. Shapiro since 1989, has been confronted with the validation procedure used in pharmacological treatment. It was of interest to review the scientific validation steps carried out for this EMDR psychotherapy and for its mechanisms of action. The practical and methodological protocol of the EMDR psychotherapy for trauma integration is reviewed as well as clinical results and mechanisms. This EMDR therapy, focused on the resolutions of traumas, was started by treating patients with post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). The integrative EMDR protocol obtained the highest level of efficiency, for PTSD treatment, twenty years after its first publication. The efficiency of the protocol is now under study and scientific evaluation for troubles in which the trauma experiences are triggers or factors of maintenance of the troubles: anxiety, depression, phobia, sexual troubles, schizophrenia, etc. This new integrative psychotherapy follows the pathways and the timing observed for the evaluation and the validation of other therapies. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. From medicine to psychotherapy: the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    If placebos have been squeezed out of medicine to the point where their official place in in clinical trials designed to identify their own confounding effect, the placebo effect nevertheless thrives in psychotherapy. Not only does psychotherapy dispose of placebo effects that are less available to medicine as it becomes increasingly technological and preoccupied with body parts, but factors of the sort inhibiting the use of placebos in medicine have no equivalent in psychology. Medicine today is disturbed by the placebo effect in a way psychotherapy is not. Psychotherapy does not have to grapple with such a disconcerting paradox as successful sham surgery, and unlike those physicians who once pretended to treat the patient's body while actually attempting to treat the mind, the psychotherapist can treat the mind in all frankness. Perhaps it is because psychotherapy is less burdened by doubts about the placebo effect that it was able to come to its aid when it was orphaned by medicine. It is vain to expect something with so long a history as the placebo effect to disappear from the practices of healing.

  3. Psychotherapy Is Chaotic-(Not Only) in a Computational World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiepek, Günter K; Viol, Kathrin; Aichhorn, Wolfgang; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Sungler, Katharina; Pincus, David; Schöller, Helmut J

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this article is to outline the role of chaotic dynamics in psychotherapy. Besides some empirical findings of chaos at different time scales, the focus is on theoretical modeling of change processes explaining and simulating chaotic dynamics. It will be illustrated how some common factors of psychotherapeutic change and psychological hypotheses on motivation, emotion regulation, and information processing of the client's functioning can be integrated into a comprehensive nonlinear model of human change processes. Methods: The model combines 5 variables (intensity of emotions, problem intensity, motivation to change, insight and new perspectives, therapeutic success) and 4 parameters into a set of 5 coupled nonlinear difference equations. The results of these simulations are presented as time series, as phase space embedding of these time series (i.e., attractors), and as bifurcation diagrams. Results: The model creates chaotic dynamics, phase transition-like phenomena, bi- or multi-stability, and sensibility of the dynamic patterns on parameter drift. These features are predicted by chaos theory and by Synergetics and correspond to empirical findings. The spectrum of these behaviors illustrates the complexity of psychotherapeutic processes. Conclusion: The model contributes to the development of an integrative conceptualization of psychotherapy. It is consistent with the state of scientific knowledge of common factors, as well as other psychological topics, such as: motivation, emotion regulation, and cognitive processing. The role of chaos theory is underpinned, not only in the world of computer simulations, but also in practice. In practice, chaos demands technologies capable of real-time monitoring and reporting on the nonlinear features of the ongoing process (e.g., its stability or instability). Based on this monitoring, a client-centered, continuous, and cooperative process of feedback and control becomes possible. By contrast, restricted

  4. Psychotherapy Is Chaotic—(Not Only in a Computational World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter K. Schiepek

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this article is to outline the role of chaotic dynamics in psychotherapy. Besides some empirical findings of chaos at different time scales, the focus is on theoretical modeling of change processes explaining and simulating chaotic dynamics. It will be illustrated how some common factors of psychotherapeutic change and psychological hypotheses on motivation, emotion regulation, and information processing of the client's functioning can be integrated into a comprehensive nonlinear model of human change processes.Methods: The model combines 5 variables (intensity of emotions, problem intensity, motivation to change, insight and new perspectives, therapeutic success and 4 parameters into a set of 5 coupled nonlinear difference equations. The results of these simulations are presented as time series, as phase space embedding of these time series (i.e., attractors, and as bifurcation diagrams.Results: The model creates chaotic dynamics, phase transition-like phenomena, bi- or multi-stability, and sensibility of the dynamic patterns on parameter drift. These features are predicted by chaos theory and by Synergetics and correspond to empirical findings. The spectrum of these behaviors illustrates the complexity of psychotherapeutic processes.Conclusion: The model contributes to the development of an integrative conceptualization of psychotherapy. It is consistent with the state of scientific knowledge of common factors, as well as other psychological topics, such as: motivation, emotion regulation, and cognitive processing. The role of chaos theory is underpinned, not only in the world of computer simulations, but also in practice. In practice, chaos demands technologies capable of real-time monitoring and reporting on the nonlinear features of the ongoing process (e.g., its stability or instability. Based on this monitoring, a client-centered, continuous, and cooperative process of feedback and control becomes possible. By

  5. Effects of Psychotherapy Training and Intervention Use on Session Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, James F.; Castonguay, Louis G.; Wasserman, Rachel H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was an investigation of the relationships among therapist training variables, psychotherapy process, and session outcome in a psychotherapy training clinic. The aims were to assess the relationship between "training as usual" and intervention use in individual psychotherapy, to investigate the relationship between therapist…

  6. A Cognitive-Developmental Model of Emotional Awareness and Its Application to the Practice of Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatwal, Jasleen; Lane, Richard D

    The ability to be aware of one's own emotional states has been a time-honored ingredient of successful psychodynamic psychotherapy. With the rise of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), however, the utility of experiencing and reflecting upon emotional experience has become less certain, and a quantifiable measure of emotional awareness for clinicians has not been previously available. Several recent advances cast the role of emotional awareness in psychotherapy in a different light: (1) a new theory of change in psychotherapy has been formulated that highlights emotional experience as an important ingredient of change in a variety of modalities; (2) new evidence shows that individual differences in the capacity for emotional awareness predict successful psychotherapeutic outcome in the treatment of panic disorder both by manualized psychodynamic psychotherapy and CBT; and (3) a new online version of the electronic Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (eLEAS) has been created that can be used with individual patients as a guide to psychotherapy treatment. Here we review evidence of a reliable and valid measure of emotional awareness that has been used in both normative and clinical contexts. The psychotherapeutic treatment of three patients is described to illustrate the clinical manifestations of the different levels of emotional awareness and the ways the eLEAS can be useful in the clinical context, including (1) assessment of the patient's current level of emotional functioning and his or her potential for higher levels of functioning, (2) the targeting of interventions to facilitate functioning at the next level, and (3) a possible marker of treatment progress. These observations suggest that the eLEAS has the potential to be a clinically useful tool that may assist clinicians in guiding psychotherapy treatment.

  7. Change mechanisms of schema-centered group psychotherapy with personality disorder patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Tschacher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study addressed the temporal properties of personality disorders and their treatment by schema-centered group psychotherapy. It investigated the change mechanisms of psychotherapy using a novel method by which psychotherapy can be modeled explicitly in the temporal domain. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: 69 patients were assigned to a specific schema-centered behavioral group psychotherapy, 26 to social skills training as a control condition. The largest diagnostic subgroups were narcissistic and borderline personality disorder. Both treatments offered 30 group sessions of 100 min duration each, at a frequency of two sessions per week. Therapy process was described by components resulting from principal component analysis of patients' session-reports that were obtained after each session. These patient-assessed components were Clarification, Bond, Rejection, and Emotional Activation. The statistical approach focused on time-lagged associations of components using time-series panel analysis. This method provided a detailed quantitative representation of therapy process. It was found that Clarification played a core role in schema-centered psychotherapy, reducing rejection and regulating the emotion of patients. This was also a change mechanism linked to therapy outcome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The introduced process-oriented methodology allowed to highlight the mechanisms by which psychotherapeutic treatment became effective. Additionally, process models depicted the actual patterns that differentiated specific diagnostic subgroups. Time-series analysis explores Granger causality, a non-experimental approximation of causality based on temporal sequences. This methodology, resting upon naturalistic data, can explicate mechanisms of action in psychotherapy research and illustrate the temporal patterns underlying personality disorders.

  8. Change Mechanisms of Schema-Centered Group Psychotherapy with Personality Disorder Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Zorn, Peter; Ramseyer, Fabian

    2012-01-01

    Background This study addressed the temporal properties of personality disorders and their treatment by schema-centered group psychotherapy. It investigated the change mechanisms of psychotherapy using a novel method by which psychotherapy can be modeled explicitly in the temporal domain. Methodology and Findings 69 patients were assigned to a specific schema-centered behavioral group psychotherapy, 26 to social skills training as a control condition. The largest diagnostic subgroups were narcissistic and borderline personality disorder. Both treatments offered 30 group sessions of 100 min duration each, at a frequency of two sessions per week. Therapy process was described by components resulting from principal component analysis of patients' session-reports that were obtained after each session. These patient-assessed components were Clarification, Bond, Rejection, and Emotional Activation. The statistical approach focused on time-lagged associations of components using time-series panel analysis. This method provided a detailed quantitative representation of therapy process. It was found that Clarification played a core role in schema-centered psychotherapy, reducing rejection and regulating the emotion of patients. This was also a change mechanism linked to therapy outcome. Conclusions/Significance The introduced process-oriented methodology allowed to highlight the mechanisms by which psychotherapeutic treatment became effective. Additionally, process models depicted the actual patterns that differentiated specific diagnostic subgroups. Time-series analysis explores Granger causality, a non-experimental approximation of causality based on temporal sequences. This methodology, resting upon naturalistic data, can explicate mechanisms of action in psychotherapy research and illustrate the temporal patterns underlying personality disorders. PMID:22745811

  9. Technology-enhanced human interaction in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Zac E; Caperton, Derek D; Tanana, Michael; Atkins, David C

    2017-07-01

    Psychotherapy is on the verge of a technology-inspired revolution. The concurrent maturation of communication, signal processing, and machine learning technologies begs an earnest look at how these technologies may be used to improve the quality of psychotherapy. Here, we discuss 3 research domains where technology is likely to have a significant impact: (1) mechanism and process, (2) training and feedback, and (3) technology-mediated treatment modalities. For each domain, we describe current and forthcoming examples of how new technologies may change established applications. Moreover, for each domain we present research questions that touch on theoretical, systemic, and implementation issues. Ultimately, psychotherapy is a decidedly human endeavor, and thus the application of modern technology to therapy must capitalize on-and enhance-our human capacities as counselors, students, and supervisors. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Models of group psychotherapy: sifting through confusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dies, R R

    1992-01-01

    This editorial introduces a series of articles by leading proponents of the ten major models of group psychotherapy to appear in the International Journal of Group Psychotherapy. These theoretical contributions will be published throughout 1992 as a dedication to the American Group Psychotherapy Association's (AGPA) 50th anniversary. In the present article, the author reports results from a recent survey of senior clinicians within AGPA who expressed their opinions about the central issues that practitioners should understand during the working phase of group treatments. Statistical comparisons among action-oriented, interpersonal, and psychodynamic respondents to the questionnaire revealed striking differences in how therapeutic interventions were conceptualized. These findings are outlined as a preface to the first three articles in the series.

  11. [Psychotherapy of depression in old age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wächtler, C

    2013-02-01

    Depression in old age is common and also dangerous due to somatic comorbidity and suicide; however, it is often not recognized and not adequately treated. Psychotherapy is almost never offered to the elderly. However, clinical experience, single-case studies and some controlled trials show effectiveness--at least to the age of 75. The psychotherapist must be aware of unusual transference and countertransference between a younger therapist and elderly patient. Psychotherapy in old age requires some modifications, especially concerning special interest in biography and history, strong empathy, "container function", and focusing. In the future, psychotherapy for the elderly should be both investigated and educated more. In addition, it is hoped that psychotherapists offer to treat elderly people with depression and that more older patients accept this professional help.

  12. The influence of psychotherapy on marriage typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staniszewski Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the influence of psychotherapeutic group work on matrimonial relations. Such questions are put up in the research as if participating of one of the married couples in a group psychotherapy could indirectly influence the other partner, and also if the type of matrimony could change under the influence of psychotherapy, for example from hierarchical to the partner’s. The article generalizes the classification of marriage types and pays special attention on the types that can be subject to the positive changes as a result of psychotherapeutic influence. Actuality and value of this research lay in estimation of the ability of psychotherapy to influence the matrimony on the whole in case when only one of the partners takes part in the therapy.

  13. [The future of psychotherapy in psychosomatic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Manfred E; Kruse, Johannes; Michal, Matthias; Herzog, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    To review the current perspectives and trends of psychotherapy as a key area of psychosomatic medicine with regard to both societal and scientific challenges as well as patient health care services. Also, to draw conclusions regarding the future training and practice of psychosomatic medicine and psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is confronted with many new challenges because of the high prevalence of mental and psychosomatic disorders, because of their increasing recognition as major health problems and because of the rapid technological and demographic changes going on in modern society. Despite its growth, psychotherapeutic care is still limited in many, especially rural, regions and for patients with complex psychosomatic and somatopsychic disorders. New models of training as well as integrated and multimodal care are needed in order to provide both, rapid, low-threshold and specialized, disorder-specific care.

  14. Impact of therapist emotional intelligence on psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplowitz, Matthew J; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, Chris J

    2011-02-01

    The concept of emotional intelligence (EI) describes a set of emotional skills that may comprise efficacious therapist variables. The present study is the first to investigate EI among psychotherapists. Based on conceptual overlaps between the EI model and psychotherapy models, as well as a review of empirical evidence from both literatures, we make several predictions of how therapist EI impacts treatment. In a small pilot study, we assessed psychotherapist EI to determine its relation to psychotherapy outcome and process. Therapists with higher ratings of EI achieved better therapist-rated outcome results and lower drop-out rates compared with therapists with lower ratings of EI. Though not hypothesized, higher therapist EI was significantly associated with increased patient assessment compliance. There was no relationship between early working alliance ratings and therapist EI. Findings offer preliminary support for the relevance of therapist EI to psychotherapy.

  15. Emotion suppression, not reappraisal, predicts psychotherapy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Anne; Boecker, Maren; Pawelzik, Markus; Gauggel, Siegfried; Forkmann, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify whether trait emotion regulation strategies predict successful or unsuccessful psychotherapy outcomes in cognitive behaviour therapy. Three emotion regulation strategies (reappraisal, suppression, and externalizing behaviour) were assessed in 358 in- and outpatients. Patients were then grouped by therapy outcome. Emotion regulation strategies and confounding variables were entered as predictors in multinomial logistic regression analyses. Emotion suppression, but not reappraisal, was found to predict therapy outcomes for in- and outpatients, with patients high in suppression experiencing worse outcomes. Externalizing behaviour was only relevant in inpatient treatment. High suppression might be detrimental to psychotherapy outcome and should be assessed early on. Further research should investigate the influence of suppression on the mechanisms that facilitate change in psychotherapy.

  16. Using Animal-assisted Therapy to Enrich Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Jeanne Louise; Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of many psychological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). AAT can be used as an adjunct to other forms of psychotherapy. With AAT, the animal becomes a part of the treatment plan. Outcomes for clients that are associated with the use of AAT include (1) increased sense of comfort and safety, (2) increased motivation, (3) enhanced self-esteem, (4) increased prosocial behaviors, and (5) decreased behavioral problems. AAT provides a bridge for the therapist to develop a therapeutic relationship with a client, and the animal can provide supportive reassurance for the therapist. The amount of data that supports the benefits of AAT for the treatment of those with mental illnesses is growing, but evidence-based research that supports its use is lacking. Further research is needed.

  17. The ABCDE-Model of counseling and psychotherapy: An integrative approach developed from clinical practice at a counseling service for students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutsoukou-Argyrak Asimina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive model of integrative psychotherapy that has been derived from clinical practice at the Counseling Service for Students of the University of Heidelberg is outlined. The ABCDE-model of integrative psychotherapy is based on established therapeutic methods and is composed of the dimensions of Alliance, Behavior, Cognitions, Dynamics and Existentials. Based on the therapeutic alliance and the general principles of understanding and communication, it comprises cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and existential elements and employs hermeneutics as a meta-theoretical framework. The evaluation of integrative counseling according to the ABCDE-model in a naturalistic single-group pre-post design demonstrated a clinically significant improvement within a rather short number of sessions. Therefore, the integrative model of psychotherapy is an important contribution to evidence-based practice. Moreover, models of training in psychotherapy and counseling for the better education of future therapists can be developed on the basis of the ABCDE-model.

  18. Psychotherapy and medication management strategies for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDougle CJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Kelda H Walsh, Christopher J McDougleDepartment of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a chronic anxiety disorder. While medication and psychotherapy advances have been very helpful to patients, many patients do not respond adequately to initial trials of serotonergic medication or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT and require multiple treatment trials or combination therapies. Comorbidity may also influence treatment response. The role of streptococcal infections in pediatric OCD has become an area of intense scrutiny and controversy. In this article, current treatment methods for OCD will be reviewed, with special attention to strategies for treating OCD in children and in patients with comorbid tic disorders. Alternative psychotherapy strategies for patients who are highly anxious about starting CBT, such as cognitive therapy or augmentation with D-cycloserine, will be reviewed. Newer issues regarding use of antibiotics, neuroleptics, and glutamate modulators in OCD treatment will also be explored.Keywords: OCD, exposure/response prevention therapy, PANDAS, tic disorder

  19. Star Wars in psychotherapy: video games in the office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceranoglu, Tolga Atilla

    2010-01-01

    Video games are used in medical practice during psycho-education in chronic disease management, physical therapy, rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury, and as an adjunct in pain management during medical procedures or cancer chemotherapy. In psychiatric practice, video games aid in social skills training of children with developmental delays and in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). This most popular children's toy may prove a useful tool in dynamic psychotherapy of youth. The author provides a framework for using video games in psychotherapy by considering the characteristics of video games and describes the ways their use has facilitated various stages of therapeutic process. Just as other play techniques build a relationship and encourage sharing of emotional themes, sitting together in front of a console and screen facilitates a relationship and allows a safe path for the patient's conflict to emerge. During video game play, the therapist may observe thought processes, impulsivity, temperament, decision-making, and sharing, among other aspects of a child's clinical presentation. Several features inherent to video games require a thoughtful approach as resistance and transference in therapy may be elaborated differently in comparison to more traditional toys. Familiarity with the video game content and its dynamics benefits child mental health clinicians in their efforts to help children and their families.

  20. [The development of evidence-based psychotherapy for use in alcoholism. A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeber, S; Mann, K

    2006-05-01

    Past decades have seen enormous advances in the development and validation of evidence-based approaches to psychotherapy for alcoholism. While psychoanalytic and early behavioral techniques were the original basis of psychotherapy in this field, evidence-based approaches are now built up on the principles of motivational interviewing and cognitive-behavior therapy. Different techniques have been developed to modify preceding and persisting conditions favoring problem behavior, e.g., training in coping/social skills and the community reinforcement approach. According to the results of the project MATCH, one of the largest treatment trials, "cognitive-behavioral intervention" combines motivational enhancement therapy, the 12-step approach, and cognitive-behavior therapy, with the aim of providing new and even more efficacious psychotherapy for alcohol dependent patients. These very promising developments are beset with huge problems, however, insofar as few of the new evidence-based treatment approaches are accepted as standard treatment in Germany, in addition to which only a fraction of all alcohol-dependent persons in the country find their way into the care system, for various reasons. Early diagnosis and facilitation of access to the various treatment options available could be a future task for general practitioners and also for company / industrial medical schemes.

  1. A dynamic systems approach to psychotherapy: A meta-theoretical framework for explaining psychotherapy change processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelo, Omar Carlo Gioacchino; Salvatore, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Notwithstanding the many methodological advances made in the field of psychotherapy research, at present a metatheoretical, school-independent framework to explain psychotherapy change processes taking into account their dynamic and complex nature is still lacking. Over the last years, several authors have suggested that a dynamic systems (DS) approach might provide such a framework. In the present paper, we review the main characteristics of a DS approach to psychotherapy. After an overview of the general principles of the DS approach, we describe the extent to which psychotherapy can be considered as a self-organizing open complex system, whose developmental change processes are described in terms of a dialectic dynamics between stability and change over time. Empirical evidence in support of this conceptualization is provided and discussed. Finally, we propose a research design strategy for the empirical investigation of psychotherapy from a DS approach, together with a research case example. We conclude that a DS approach may provide a metatheoretical, school-independent framework allowing us to constructively rethink and enhance the way we conceptualize and empirically investigate psychotherapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Interventions and Strategies in Counseling and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard E., Ed.; Carlson, Jon, Ed.

    This book acknowledges the contributions of Alfred Adler and illustrates the many ways in which Adlerian ideas underpin and influence contemporary therapeutic approaches. It brings together today's leading thinkers to address the practice of counseling and psychotherapy from a social-cognitive perspective. Contributors apply the basic ideas of…

  3. Premature conclusions about psychotherapy for dysthymia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.

    2009-01-01

    Dr Cuijpers and Colleagues Reply To the Editor: We thank Dr Gaudiano and colleagues for their contribution to the discussion about psychotherapy for dysthymia. We agree very much with Gaudiano et al that we should be careful about drawing definite conclusions about the comparative efficacy of

  4. Shared Therapeutic Components of Some Psychotherapy Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychotherapy hasbeen defined as an emotionally charged and planned interaction between a trained socially accepted healer and someone with psychological difficulties. There are four basic elements shared by all psychotherapeutic modalities. These are 1) an emotionally charged, confiding relationship with a helping ...

  5. Individual Psychotherapy for the Sexually Abused Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David P. H.

    1986-01-01

    One approach to individual psychotherapy includes a five-part conceptualization of the traumatic experience: trauma, threat to ontogeny, neglect and emotional unavailability by the caregiver, child's feeling of exploitation, and the child's adaptation. Some common problems which occur are guilt, loss and anger, as well as alterations in the…

  6. The Role of Effort Justification in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axsom, Danny; Cooper, Joel

    The possible influence of cognitive dissonance in psychotherapy was examined by conceptualizing therapy as an effort justification process. It was predicted that freely choosing to undergo a highly effortful procedure would aid in positive therapeutic change. Subjects (N=52) participated in a weight-reduction experiment in which the degree of…

  7. Combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy - the example of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... refined. Practices and techniques are no longer applied with. “religious fervor” but rather grounded in empirical evidence collected through well designed research protocols. • The neurobiological effects of psychotherapy have been demonstrated in several excellent near-imaging studies. Correspondence:.

  8. Combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy - the example of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The studies looking at the neurobiological effects of psychotherapy is reviewed and discussed. The practical aspects of combination therapy are presented and problems inherent are indicated and the effectiveness presented. Finally the Canadian Psychiatric Association's comprehensive evidence based clinical guideline ...

  9. Supervision of Psychotherapy: Models, Issues, and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westefeld, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Current models and issues related to psychotherapy supervision are examined. These include ethical and legal issues, problems of interpersonal competence, and multicultural issues. As a part of this analysis, interviews about supervision with five prominent counseling psychologists are included to provide their perspectives. Implications for the…

  10. The ethics of providing hope in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, Justine Sarah; Clemens, Norman A

    2013-07-01

    The instillation of hope is a common factor in most psychotherapies. A considerable literature exists on the ethics of providing false or positively biased hope in non-psychiatric medical settings, and ethicists have generally concluded that this practice is unethical. However, the literature on the ethics of encouraging hope in psychotherapy, especially in the case of treatment-resistant mental illness, is sparse. The author explores two clinical cases with the intention of examining the nature of hope, false hope, positive illusions, and denial, as they relate to our definitions of mental health and psychotherapy. The cases highlight the ethics of balancing an acknowledgment of likely treatment futility with a desire to hope. Clinical psychological studies on depressive realism and optimistic bias indicate that some degree of positive bias, referred to by some authors as "the optimal margin of illusion," is in fact necessary to promote what we define as "good mental health;" conversely, stark realism is correlated with mild to moderate depression. An examination of the existential literature, including Ernest Becker's work, The Denial of Death, indicates that without the defense mechanism of denial, human beings tend to experience paralytic despair as a result of being fallible, mortal creatures in a frightening world. The combination of these diverse bodies of literature, along with the surprising outcomes of our case examples, leads to an unexpected conclusion: it may occasionally be ethical to encourage some degree of optimistic bias, and perhaps even positive illusion, when treating patients in psychotherapy.

  11. Humanising Forces: Phenomenology in Science; Psychotherapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    The Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology (IPJP) can be found at www.ipjp.org. The IPJP is a joint project of Rhodes ... The present paper examines how the findings of a phenomenological study of psychotherapy reflects a movement by people in .... the particular in the general; the dance of the unique and the shared.

  12. Ethical Issues in Research on Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Sol L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the increasing concern regarding ethical matters in psychotherapy research. Whereas institutional review procedures are required to protect human subjects, there has been inaction regarding ethics for other issues: psychotherapeutic treatment, particularly the use of no-treatment control groups and the termination of patients at the end…

  13. Breath psychotherapy | Edwards | Inkanyiso: Journal of Humanities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breath psychotherapy is an approach that makes direct use of the breath in healing. There are many forms of breathbased healing: basic breathing and relaxation methods, with or without the practice of psychological skills such as imagery, centring and concentration; expressive physical and emotional techniques; ...

  14. The Use of Photography in Family Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entin, Alan D.

    Photographs and family albums are helpful in marriage and family psychotherapy to aid in the understanding of family processes, relationship patterns, goals, expectations, values, traditions, and ideals. Based on the assumption that a photograph is a form of communication, photography can be used to: (1) examine typical family picture-taking…

  15. Psychotherapy Outcome in a Private Practice Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkhart, Kathryn A.; And Others

    Although almost one-third of licensed psychologists who work in health care settings are employed primarily in private practice, no major study of outcomes in this setting has been undertaken. Outcomes in a private practice were investigated with 33 adult clients who planned to pursue psychotherapy until release by their therapist. The clients…

  16. Multicultural Approaches in Psychotherapy: A Rejoinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Leach, Mark M.; Wampold, Bruce; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-01-01

    In this rejoinder, the authors address several issues raised by R. L. Worthington and F. R. Dillon (2011) and C. R. Ridley and M. Shaw-Ridley (2011) regarding (a) the measurement of multicultural competencies (MCCs), (b) sampling considerations in multicultural research, and (c) the conceptual frame of multicultural psychotherapy research. The…

  17. A Delay Discounting Model of Psychotherapy Termination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Joshua K.; Callahan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Delay discounting (DD) procedures are emerging as an important new method for psychotherapy researchers. In this paper a framework for conceptualizing existing, seemingly discrepant, research findings on termination is introduced and new directions for research are described. To illustrate the value of a DD framework, the common psychotherapy…

  18. Changing views of emotion regulation and neurobiological models of the mechanism of action of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Irene; Sambin, Marco; Beschoner, Petra; Viviani, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Influential neurobiological models of the mechanism of action of psychotherapy attribute its success to increases of activity in prefrontal areas and decreases in limbic areas, interpreted as the successful and adaptive recruitment of controlled processes to achieve emotion regulation. In this article, we review the behavioral and neuroscientific evidence in support of this model and its applicability to explain the mechanism of action of psychotherapy. Neuroimaging studies of explicit emotion regulation, evidence on the neurobiological substrates of implicit emotion regulation, and meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies of the effect of psychotherapy consistently suggest that areas implicated in coding semantic representations play an important role in emotion regulation not covered by existing models based on controlled processes. We discuss the findings that implicate these same areas in supporting working memory, in encoding preferences and the prospective outcome of actions taken in rewarding or aversive contingencies, and show how these functions may be integrated into process models of emotion regulation that depend on elaborate semantic representations for their effectiveness. These alternative models also appear to be more consistent with internal accounts in the psychotherapeutic literature of how psychotherapy works.

  19. What Is the Efficacy of Teaching Psychotherapy to Psychiatry Residents and Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Anh; Wu, Peter; Diez-Barroso, Ramon; Coverdale, John

    2015-10-01

    Because there are no formal reviews, the authors set out to identify and evaluate studies on teaching psychotherapy to psychiatry residents and medical students. PubMed, Embase, and PsycINFO were searched for papers with outcomes on teaching psychotherapy. Search terms included psychotherapy, teaching, residents, medical students, supportive, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, learning, training, skills, competency, and mentalization. Nine studies were found that met inclusion criteria. There were seven studies of psychiatry residents and two of medical students. Only two of the research designs had comparison groups, and these were both randomized controlled trials, while seven of the other designs were pretest and posttest. Teaching methods, course content, and outcome measures varied widely across studies. Common methodological problems included a lack of control, low numbers of subjects as learners, and a lack of validity of the outcome measures. Only one of the studies was judged to be methodologically rigorous. These findings establish a priority for undertaking additional rigorously designed studies in evaluating the teaching of psychotherapy to psychiatry residents and medical students.

  20. When worlds collide: blending the divergent traditions of pharmacotherapy and-psychotherapy outcome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R; Locastro, Joseph S; Longabaugh, Richard; O'Malley, Stephanie; Zweben, Allen

    2005-07-01

    The multisite COMBINE Study brought together a team of alcoholism investigators who varied in whether their expertise was primarily in pharmacotherapy research or in studying psychotherapy. The process of designing a single trial that tested combinations of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy highlighted the differences in these two research traditions and necessitated a number of compromises that are the focus of this article. The COMBINE trial was designed to investigate the efficacy, separately and in combination, of two medications (i.e., naltrexone, acamprosate) with Medical Management and a state-of-the-art psychotherapy, known as the Combined Behavioral Intervention. Pharmacotherapy researchers favored studying outcome during the treatment period when medications were administered, viewing behavioral intervention as a means for minimizing variance during treatment and providing ethical care in placebo-controlled studies. In contrast, psychotherapy researchers focused on assessment of outcomes after treatment, regarding the behavioral intervention as a source of long-lasting change, necessitating careful training and monitoring of its implementation. The two traditions also differed on variables of interest in studying treatment process and secondary outcomes and methods of data collection and analysis. Some of the solutions reached by the COMBINE Study Research Group included studying both the short-term and long-term effects of treatment and selective inclusion of measures designed to evaluate processes specific to medications and to behavioral interventions. The successful compromises reached by the COMBINE Study Research Group may be helpful to other transdisciplinary research teams undertaking a combined evaluation of promising medications and behavioral interventions for alcoholism.

  1. Social problem solving among depressed adolescents is enhanced by structured psychotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Laura J.; Marshal, Michael P.; Burton, Chad M.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kolko, David; Duffy, Jamira N.; Brent, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Changes in adolescent interpersonal behavior before and after an acute course of psychotherapy were investigated as outcomes and mediators of remission status in a previously described treatment study of depressed adolescents. Maternal depressive symptoms were examined as moderators of the association between psychotherapy condition and changes in adolescents’ interpersonal behavior. Method Adolescents (n = 63, mean age = 15.6 years, 77.8% female, 84.1% Caucasian) engaged in videotaped interactions with their mothers before randomization to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), systemic behavior family therapy (SBFT), or nondirective supportive therapy (NST), and after 12–16 weeks of treatment. Adolescent involvement, problem solving and dyadic conflict were examined. Results Improvements in adolescent problem solving were significantly associated with CBT and SBFT. Maternal depressive symptoms moderated the effect of CBT, but not SBFT, on adolescents’ problem solving; adolescents experienced increases in problem solving only when their mothers had low or moderate levels of depressive symptoms. Improvements in adolescents’ problem solving were associated with higher rates of remission across treatment conditions, but there were no significant indirect effects of SBFT on remission status through problem solving. Exploratory analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of CBT on remission status through changes in adolescent problem solving, but only when maternal depressive symptoms at study entry were low. Conclusions Findings provide preliminary support for problem solving as an active treatment component of structured psychotherapies for depressed adolescents and suggest one Pathway by which maternal depression may disrupt treatment efficacy for depressed adolescents treated with CBT. PMID:24491077

  2. Do Comorbid Anxiety Disorders Moderate the Effects of Psychotherapy for Bipolar Disorder? Results From STEP-BD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Peters, Amy T.; Sylvia, Louisa; Urdahl, Anna; Magalhães, Pedro V.S.; Otto, Michael W.; Frank, Ellen; Miklowitz, David J.; Berk, Michael; Kinrys, Gustavo; Nierenberg, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objective At least 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder have a lifetime anxiety disorder. Individuals with both bipolar disorder and a co-occurring anxiety disorder experience longer illness duration, greater illness severity, and poorer treatment response. The study explored whether comorbid lifetime anxiety in bipolar patients moderates psychotherapy treatment outcome. Method In the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program randomized controlled trial of psychotherapy for bipolar depression, participants received up to 30 sessions of intensive psychotherapy (family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, or cognitive-behavioral therapy) or collaborative care, a three-session comparison treatment, plus pharmacotherapy. Using the number needed to treat, we computed effect sizes to analyze the relationship between lifetime anxiety disorders and rates of recovery across treatment groups after 1 year. Results A total of 269 patients (113 women) with a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=177) or without a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=92) were included in the analysis. Participants with a lifetime anxiety disorder were more likely to recover with psychotherapy than with collaborative care (66% compared with 49% recovered over 1 year; number needed to treat=5.88, small to medium effect). For patients without a lifetime anxiety disorder, there was no difference between rates of recovery in psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (64% compared with 62% recovered; number needed to treat=50, small effect). Participants with one lifetime anxiety disorder were likely to benefit from intensive psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (84% compared with 53% recovered; number needed to treat=3.22, medium to large effect), whereas patients with multiple anxiety disorders exhibited no difference in response to the two treatments (54% compared with 46% recovered; number needed to treat=12.5, small effect). Conclusions Depressed patients

  3. Do comorbid anxiety disorders moderate the effects of psychotherapy for bipolar disorder? Results from STEP-BD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Peters, Amy T; Sylvia, Louisa; Urdahl, Anna; Magalhães, Pedro V S; Otto, Michael W; Frank, Ellen; Miklowitz, David J; Berk, Michael; Kinrys, Gustavo; Nierenberg, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    At least 50% of individuals with bipolar disorder have a lifetime anxiety disorder. Individuals with both bipolar disorder and a co-occurring anxiety disorder experience longer illness duration, greater illness severity, and poorer treatment response. The study explored whether comorbid lifetime anxiety in bipolar patients moderates psychotherapy treatment outcome. In the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program randomized controlled trial of psychotherapy for bipolar depression, participants received up to 30 sessions of intensive psychotherapy (family-focused therapy, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, or cognitive-behavioral therapy) or collaborative care, a three-session comparison treatment, plus pharmacotherapy. Using the number needed to treat, we computed effect sizes to analyze the relationship between lifetime anxiety disorders and rates of recovery across treatment groups after 1 year. A total of 269 patients (113 women) with a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=177) or without a comorbid lifetime anxiety disorder (N=92) were included in the analysis. Participants with a lifetime anxiety disorder were more likely to recover with psychotherapy than with collaborative care (66% compared with 49% recovered over 1 year; number needed to treat=5.88, small to medium effect). For patients without a lifetime anxiety disorder, there was no difference between rates of recovery in psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (64% compared with 62% recovered; number needed to treat=50, small effect). Participants with one lifetime anxiety disorder were likely to benefit from intensive psychotherapy compared with collaborative care (84% compared with 53% recovered; number needed to treat=3.22, medium to large effect), whereas patients with multiple anxiety disorders exhibited no difference in response to the two treatments (54% compared with 46% recovered; number needed to treat=12.5, small effect). Depressed patients with bipolar disorder and comorbid

  4. Fostering new relational experience: clinical process in couple psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L

    2014-03-01

    One of the most critical goals for couple psychotherapy is to foster a new relational experience in the session where the couple feels safe enough to reveal more vulnerable emotions and to explore their defensive withdrawal, aggressive attacking, or blaming. The lived intimate experience in the session offers the couple an opportunity to gain integrative insight into their feelings, expectations, and behaviors that ultimately hinder intimacy. The clinical processes that are necessary include empathizing with the couple and facilitating safety within the session, looking for opportunities to explore emotions, ruptures, and unconscious motivations that maintain distance in the relationship, and creating a new relational experience in the session that has the potential to engender integrative insight. These clinical processes will be presented with empirical support. Experts from a session will be used to highlight how these processes influence the couple and promote increased intimacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Focusing on dreams. A preparation program for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, R D; Tipton, L W; Wicklund, J

    1980-03-01

    Forty-eight patients selected as potential early dropouts from insight-oriented psychotherapy were offered a two-week program to prepare them for treatment. Thirty-two were sleep-monitored for eight nights; half were given access to their dreams by awakening them from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep periods; the other half were awakened as often, but only from non-FEM (NREM) stages. A third group of 16 subjects went directly into treatment. All laboratory subjects were asked each morning to recall and discuss the reports they had given during the night. The effect of these discussions was measured on the drop-out rate during the first ten treatment hours and on the development of treatment-appropriate behaviors. Those who successfully retrieved and discussed dreams as opposed to other content stayed in therapy at a significantly higher rate and used the hours more productively.

  6. Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy: An Emerging Trauma-Informed Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Walker Buck

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP has emerged as a promising, evidence-based intervention for the treatment of trauma and stressor-related disorders. This experiential therapy offers an option for clients whose traumatic experiences render traditional talk therapies ineffective. Initial research on the most robust model of EAP, developed by the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA, indicates strong, positive effects for children, adolescents and adults who have experienced trauma. EAGALA was designed to allow for rigorous evaluation of efficacy, a clear theoretical base, standardized implementation, and ongoing training for practitioners. As the primary providers of mental and behavioral health services in the United States, social workers are keenly aware of the need for a portfolio of treatment methods to manage the increasing demand for services. EAP has emerged as an important addition to this portfolio, providing options for some the most vulnerable client populations.

  7. The role of self-image as a predictor of psychotherapy outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Walderhaug, Eirik P.

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between self-image and outcome of psychotherapy. Self-image was measured with Benjamin’s Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) introject construct. The sample consisted of 170 outpatients with heterogenous disorders, who completed treatment at a university clinic. Using multiple regression analyses, we found that pre-treatment self-image was not significantly related to post-treatment symptom level, but it weakly related to post-...

  8. Telephone-administered psychotherapy for depression in MS patients: moderating role of social support

    OpenAIRE

    Beckner, Victoria; Howard, Isa; Vella, Lea; Mohr, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Depression is common in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). While psychotherapy is an effective treatment for depression, not all individuals benefit. We examined whether baseline social support might differentially affect treatment outcome in 127 participants with MS and depression randomized to either Telephone-administered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (T-CBT) or Telephone-administered Emotion-Focused Therapy (T-EFT). We predicted that those with low social support would improve more ...

  9. Aaron Temkin BECK: After Cricitical Thinking to A Creative Psychotherapy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet DÝNÇ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the cognitive psychotherapy all around the world including Turkey. According to American Institute of cognitive Therapy; cognitive psychotherapy is the fastest growing and most rigorously studied kind of talk therapy and it is practiced around the world, taking hold in places from the Middle East to Japan. Cognitive psychotherapy was designed first by Aaron Temkin Beck in 1950’s. He has published over 450 articles and authored or co-authored seventeen books and he has been listed as one of the “10 individuals who shaped the face of American Psychiatry” and one of the 5 most influential psychotherapists of all time since then. Beck’s groundbreaking systematic research established for the first time the efficacy of any psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Moreover he not only developed and tested an effective short-term treatment (cognitive therapy for depression, but he and his former students have successfully adapted cognitive therapy to a wide range of other psychiatric disorders as well. Numerous controlled clinical trials have now demonstrated that cognitive therapy is effective in a variety of psychiatric conditions including depression, bulimia nervosa, hypochondriasis, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, substance abuse, body dysmorphic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore knowing the father of cognitive therapy and his journey from 1950’s to 2010’s will help to understand cognitive therapy and its development during these years. This article aims to give an overview of the historical background to contemporary cognitive and cognitive-behavioral approaches to psychotherapy by focusing on Beck’s life, characteristics and works. [JCBPR 2012; 1(2.000: 70-76

  10. Aaron Temkin BECK: After Cricitical Thinking to A Creative Psychotherapy Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet DİNÇ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the cognitive psychotherapy all around the world including Turkey. According to American Institute of Cognitive Therapy; cognitive psychotherapy is the fastest growing and most rigorously studied kind of talk therapy and it is practiced around the world, taking hold in places from the Middle East to Japan. Cognitive psychotherapy was designed first by Aaron Temkin Beck in 1950’s. He has published over 450 articles and authored or co-authored seventeen books and he has been listed as one of the “10 individuals who shaped the face of American Psychiatry” and one of the 5 most influential psychotherapists of all time since then. Beck’s groundbreaking systematic research established for the first time the efficacy of any psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Moreover he not only developed and tested an effective short-term treatment (cognitive therapy for depression, but he and his former students have successfully adapted cognitive therapy to a wide range of other psychiatric disorders as well. Numerous controlled clinical trials have now demonstrated that cognitive therapy is effective in a variety of psychiatric conditions including depression, bulimia nervosa, hypochondriasis, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, substance abuse, body dysmorphic disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore knowing the father of cognitive therapy and his journey from 1950’s to 2010’s will help to understand cognitive therapy and its development during these years. This article aims to give an overview of the historical background to contemporary cognitive and cognitive-behavioral approaches to psychotherapy by focusing on Beck’s life, characteristics and works.

  11. The mind-body relationship in psychotherapy: Grounded cognition as an explanatory framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuwan Dominic Leitan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As a discipline, psychology is defined by its location in the ambiguous space between mind and body, but theories underpinning the application of psychology in psychotherapy are largely silent on this fundamental metaphysical issue. This is a remarkable state of affairs, given that psychotherapy is typically a real-time meeting between two embodied agents, with the goal of facilitating behavior change in one party. The overarching aim of this paper is to problematize the mind-body relationship in psychotherapy in the service of encouraging advances in theory and practice. The paper briefly explores various psychotherapeutic approaches to help explicate relationships between mind and body from these perspectives. Themes arising from this analysis include a tendency toward dualism (separation of mind and body from the conceptualization of human functioning, exclusivism (elimination of either mind or body from the conceptualization of human functioning, or mind-body monism (conceptualization of mind and body as a single, holistic system. We conclude that the literature, as a whole, does not demonstrate consensus, regarding the relationship between mind and body in psychotherapy. We then introduce a contemporary, holistic, psychological conceptualization of the relationship between mind and body, and argue for its potential utility as an organizing framework for psychotherapeutic theory and practice. The holistic approach we explore, grounded cognition, arises from a long philosophical tradition, is influential in current cognitive science, and presents a coherent empirically testable framework integrating subjective and objective perspectives. Finally, we demonstrate how this grounded cognition perspective might lead to advances in the theory and practice of psychotherapy.

  12. The mind-body relationship in psychotherapy: grounded cognition as an explanatory framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitan, Nuwan D; Murray, Greg

    2014-01-01

    As a discipline, psychology is defined by its location in the ambiguous space between mind and body, but theories underpinning the application of psychology in psychotherapy are largely silent on this fundamental metaphysical issue. This is a remarkable state of affairs, given that psychotherapy is typically a real-time meeting between two embodied agents, with the goal of facilitating behavior change in one party. The overarching aim of this paper is to problematize the mind-body relationship in psychotherapy in the service of encouraging advances in theory and practice. The paper briefly explores various psychotherapeutic approaches to help explicate relationships between mind and body from these perspectives. Themes arising from this analysis include a tendency toward dualism (separation of mind and body from the conceptualization of human functioning), exclusivism (elimination of either mind or body from the conceptualization of human functioning), or mind-body monism (conceptualization of mind and body as a single, holistic system). We conclude that the literature, as a whole, does not demonstrate consensus, regarding the relationship between mind and body in psychotherapy. We then introduce a contemporary, holistic, psychological conceptualization of the relationship between mind and body, and argue for its potential utility as an organizing framework for psychotherapeutic theory and practice. The holistic approach we explore, "grounded cognition," arises from a long philosophical tradition, is influential in current cognitive science, and presents a coherent empirically testable framework integrating subjective and objective perspectives. Finally, we demonstrate how this "grounded cognition" perspective might lead to advances in the theory and practice of psychotherapy.

  13. The mind-body relationship in psychotherapy: grounded cognition as an explanatory framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitan, Nuwan D.; Murray, Greg

    2014-01-01

    As a discipline, psychology is defined by its location in the ambiguous space between mind and body, but theories underpinning the application of psychology in psychotherapy are largely silent on this fundamental metaphysical issue. This is a remarkable state of affairs, given that psychotherapy is typically a real-time meeting between two embodied agents, with the goal of facilitating behavior change in one party. The overarching aim of this paper is to problematize the mind–body relationship in psychotherapy in the service of encouraging advances in theory and practice. The paper briefly explores various psychotherapeutic approaches to help explicate relationships between mind and body from these perspectives. Themes arising from this analysis include a tendency toward dualism (separation of mind and body from the conceptualization of human functioning), exclusivism (elimination of either mind or body from the conceptualization of human functioning), or mind–body monism (conceptualization of mind and body as a single, holistic system). We conclude that the literature, as a whole, does not demonstrate consensus, regarding the relationship between mind and body in psychotherapy. We then introduce a contemporary, holistic, psychological conceptualization of the relationship between mind and body, and argue for its potential utility as an organizing framework for psychotherapeutic theory and practice. The holistic approach we explore, “grounded cognition,” arises from a long philosophical tradition, is influential in current cognitive science, and presents a coherent empirically testable framework integrating subjective and objective perspectives. Finally, we demonstrate how this “grounded cognition” perspective might lead to advances in the theory and practice of psychotherapy. PMID:24904486

  14. INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY AND MINDFULNESS: THE CASE OF SARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Černetič

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the relationship between Integrative Psychotherapy and mindfulness on a theoretical as well as practical level. Although mindfulness is not an explicit constituent of Integrative Psychotherapy, the two are arguably a natural fit. Mindfulness has the potential to enhance internal and external contact, a central concept in Integrative Psychotherapy, as well as strengthen a client’s Adult ego state. This article presents a case study whereby Integrative Psychotherapy is analysed from the perspective of mindfulness. Within the course of therapy, parallels were observed between the client's increased mindfulness, improved internal and external contact, strengthened Adult ego state, mastery of introjections, as well as diminished feelings of guilt, improved mood, self care and ability to engage in appropriate separation and individuation. These gains support the conclusion that Integrative Psychotherapy and mindfulness are inherently related and that explicit incorporation of mindfulness may enhance the therapeutic process of Integrative Psychotherapy.

  15. Groups as a part of integrated treatment plans : Inpatient psychotherapy for outpatients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, H

    2005-01-01

    Group psychotherapy in Germany is well established as part of an integrative treatment plan in inpatient treatment. Outpatient group psychotherapy, however, is conceptualized as a separate treatment option in competition with individual therapy. German guidelines for outpatient psychotherapy exclude

  16. USING BACH FLOWER IN HOLISTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Ferreira do Nascimento

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This is a narrative review from scientific literature that aimed to describe concepts and approaches for indications of the therapeutic use of Bach flower remedies in holistic psychotherapy. The review was developed in February 2016 from books, official documents and articles indexed in Lilacs and Scielo databases. Bach flower remedies is a therapeutic method that aims to restore the balance of human being, restoring its vital energy through holistic care. Because the flower essences act on psychic and emotional dimension of individual, when employed in holistic psychotherapy can provide greater autonomy, self-care and effectiveness compared to other alternative methods. The literature indicated that flower essence therapy is a safe practice and can be used in a complementary to health care, but should be performed by qualified professionals. It has also shown to be a promising and important area for nursing professional, but it still requires greater investment in research in the area to support the practice.

  17. [Indikationsfragen zur psychotherapie bei psychosomatischen patientinnen.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithner, Katharina; Eder, Anselm; Springer-Kremser, Marianne

    2003-12-01

    The diagnostic process of psychosomatic patients finally arriving at an indication for psychotherapy is an important point of reference in the present discussion concerning the introduction of special clinics for psychosomatic patients in Austria: equippment of such clinics and standards for the personnel has to relate to the needs of these patients. The Etiology of psychosomatic disturbances includes psychological influences, which, via psychoneuroendocrinolgical mechanisms interact with somatic factors, and individual coping styles, shaped by the social environment and gender-related factors. The initial interview, besides physical complaints, has to assess the patient's reality sense, the affective competence, the cognitive competence, the nature and quality of relations with important others, the subjective illness-theories and the motivation for psychotherapy. The therapeutic method/setting finally choosen has to offer a scientifically based concept of psychosomatic disturbances, according to the different operationalisations of Psychosomatic.

  18. Attachment theory: a biological basis for psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J

    1993-10-01

    John Bowlby bemoaned the separation between the biological and psychological approaches in psychiatry, and hoped that attachment theory, which brings together psychoanalysis and the science of ethology, would help bridge the rift between them. Recent findings in developmental psychology have delineated features of parent-infant interaction, especially responsiveness, attunement, and modulation of affect, which lead to either secure or insecure attachment. Similar principles can be applied to the relationship between psychotherapist and patient--the provision of a secure base, the emergence of a shared narrative ('autobiographical competence'), the processing of affect, coping with loss--these are common to most effective psychotherapies and provide the basis for a new interpersonal paradigm within psychotherapy. Attachment theory suggests they rest on a sound ethological and hence biological foundation.

  19. The outcome problem in psychotherapy: a reply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysenck, H J

    2013-03-01

    This reprinted article originally appeared in Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, & Practice, 1964(MONTH), 1(3), 97-100. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 1966-01631-001). Comments on the original article by H. H. Strupp (see record 1965-15636-001). In his recent article in this journal, Strupp (1963) has this to say in relation to the outcome problem in psychotherapy: "A brief review of Eysenck's (1952) widely quoted survey, which capitalized upon and added considerably to the existing confusion may be instructive." In reply I would like to suggest that Strupp's review is, in the lawyer's phrase, irrelevant, incompetent and immaterial. Fortunately, the points I wish to make are so simple that they will not take up much space.

  20. A semiotic approach to suitability for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, J D

    1978-11-01

    At the beginning of my career as a psychotherapist I interviewed a number of patients in an effort to find one who seemed to be a good prospect for long-term psychotherapy. While interviewing with this purpose in mind, I was struck by the fact that a number of the people I spoke with gave me a sense of being extremely suitable for this sort of therapy, but that others seemed quite unsuitable. An informal survey among my peers as well as among more senior therapists revealed that they were not unfamiliar with the phenomenon. The present empirical study of the semiotic aspects of suitability for psychotherapy grew out of this early experience.

  1. The many secure knowledge bases of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Raymond M

    2006-01-01

    Psychotherapeutic practice, while it has benefited greatly from scientific research, rests on many further secure epistemic foundations. In the present article, this thesis is argued in two stages. First, a brief review of some elementary epistemological findings is presented. In this review, the generally acknowledged degree of certainty attributed to different knowledge sources, and thus the confidence with which we may believe and act upon them, are recounted. Second, an extended analysis of the ways in which each of these knowledge sources enter into the practice of psychotherapy is developed. In the end, what is proffered here is a demonstration that well conducted psychotherapy is an activity whose judgments and decisions rest on many secure foundations.

  2. Therapists' interventions in different psychotherapy approaches: category and temporal aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Koemeda-Lutz, Margit; Crameri, Aureliano; Tschuschke, Volker; Schulthess, Peter; von Wyl, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    This study describes and compares the in-session interventional behaviour of therapists who were clearly affiliated with five different types of psychotherapy: psychoanalysis, Gestalt, transactional analysis, bioenergetic analysis and systemic therapy. To determine the relative occurrence of elements specific to therapists’ own, specific to other or common to all types of psychotherapy under investigation, audio-recorded psychotherapy sessions were analysed. A second aim was to investigate if...

  3. Ethics and aims in psychotherapy: a contribution from Kant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, J S

    1998-08-01

    Psychotherapy is an activity which takes many forms and which has many aims. The present paper argues that it can be viewed as a form of moral suasion. Kant's concepts of free will and ethics are described and these are then applied to the processes and outcome of psychotherapy. It is argued that his ideas, by linking rationality, free will and ethics into a single philosophical system, offer a valuable theoretical framework for thinking about aims and ethical issues in psychotherapy.

  4. Recognition of psychotherapy effectiveness: the APA resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Linda F; Norcross, John C; Vasquez, Melba J T; Kaslow, Nadine J

    2013-03-01

    In August 2012, the American Psychological Association (APA) Council of Representatives voted overwhelmingly to adopt as APA policy a Resolution on the Recognition of Psychotherapy Effectiveness. This invited article traces the origins and intentions of that resolution and its protracted journey through the APA governance labyrinth. We summarize the planned dissemination and projected results of the resolution and identify several lessons learned through the entire process.

  5. Heidegger's "authenticity" in the psychotherapy of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, R D

    1996-01-01

    Those aspects of Heidegger's thought culminating in his notion of "authenticity" are described, and the use of his concepts in the psychotherapy of certain adolescents is suggested. This paper offers some details of Heidegger's position and its applicability to psychotherapy. Heidegger attempted to get around the scientistic attitude of our time by use of a phenomenological description of how we actually live our lives. He described what he called our inauthentic immersion in the "they" or the everyday of life, which he argued generates self-forgetfulness, self-centeredness, an anxious sense of life having no meaning or value, and the convinction that nothing really matters. In that situation only peak experiences or "thrills" such as sexual ecstasy, dangerous exploits, fights, or drugs are used to "make it all worthwhile." These are typical complaints and descriptions from adolescent (as well as borderline) patients, of course, and represent self pathology or a possibly temporary state of identity diffusion. Heidegger's solution, one which can be used with certain intellectually inclined adolescents who are not judged suitable for uncovering psychotherapy at the time, is a kind of self-focussing. In this procedure one stands back and reviews options and possibilities in the attempt to shape one's life in accordance with ideals and values that are determined by actual focus on them rather than by a mindless immersion in everyday practices. I suggest that this kind of intellectual exchange with certain adolescents, especially if it is accompanied by a proper idealizing relationship, has as its value the development of an increased sense of cohesiveness of the self, and a sense of meaningful and authentic living in which life begins to attain a unified flow characterized by cumulativeness and direction that can be articulated in a temporal narrative. The encouragement of such a narrative is a worthwhile tactic to consider in the psychotherapy of certain adolescents.

  6. Validation of the body in psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Leijssen, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Psychotherapists can improve verbal psychotherapy by adding a bodily perspective. Different approaches can be situated on a continuum from verbal to nonverbal, and body-oriented interventions can be directed to different aspects of the body. The body as sensed from inside is one source of information. This is different from working with the body as perceived from outside and paying attention to nonverbal communication. In the next stage, major methods are working with the body in action and i...

  7. Cognitive behvioral psychotherapy of a severe anorexia nervosa case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selcuk ASLAN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia Nervosa is a chronic, severe psychiatric illness characterized with life threatening weight loss. Patients with eating disorder almost devote their lives to lose weight. In the course of disorder, patients hold irrational fears of becoming overweight and are committed to lose weight with/without engaging bulimic behaviors. The effectiveness of drug treatment and psychotherapy is scant. Therefore, in this paper, treatment process of a 28 y.o patient with anorexia nervosa whom hospitalized to inpatient unit with 33kg is presented to discuss the effectiveness CBT treatment. After two weeks of intense psychiatric care, 10 sessions of CBT is delivered in inpatient unit resulting with significant improvements in her weight control behavior. She completed 6-week inpatient treatment and followed by this, she completed her treatment process as an outpatient client. By the end of treatment, she reached 50kg and sustained her weight afterwards. The records revealed that she manages to cope with her fears of gaining weights and stopped using safety behaviors. Moreover, it is reported that her maintaining behaviors like excessive exercising habits, purging and restrictive dieting abated. Exposure intervention is combined with CBT treatment introduced to help her to first accommodate an imaginary acceptance to idea of gaining weight and tolerating to reach her healthy targeted weight. This followed by using exposure interventions as a preventative instrument to help her overcome her fears of gaining weights, during the 6 months followup she maintained the healthy weight. [JCBPR 2016; 5(2.000: 94-103

  8. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients.

  9. Empathy in group psychoanalytic psychotherapy: questionnaire development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, Slavica; Vlastelica, Mirela

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a questionnaire that can observe empathy in group psychoanalytic psychotherapy and examine the structure of its factors. A questionnaire comprised of 160 items in five-point Likert-type scale was developed through analysis of communication and interaction related to empathizing during group sessions. The questionnaire was applied on 256 patients from 40 therapy groups in 9 cities in Croatia. All 20 group analysts are trained in the Institute for Group Analysis in Zagreb. The patients were selected based on group analysis criteria. After item discrimination and principal component analysis limited to five factors were assessed, 80 items were isolated, 20 of which made a control scale for socially desirable responses. Two parallel questionnaire forms were developed: Group-Analysis-Empathy 1 (GA-Em1) and Group-Analysis-Empathy 2 (GA-Em2). A new, reliable and valid questionnaire for empathy observation employable in group psychotherapy was designed. The following factors were isolated by means of factor analysis: 1. Emotional disclosure and sensibility; 2. Containing and metabolizing; 3. Immersion; 4. Resonance and responsiveness; 5. Insight. A new questionnaire on empathy in group-analytical psychotherapy can measure the capacity for emotional communication among group members and between the group and the group analyst - conductor.

  10. Multimedia psychodynamic psychotherapy: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Domenico Arturo

    2009-05-01

    Mourning the death of a beloved person is one of life's most stressful events. This psychotherapy case study describes a form of psychodynamic psychotherapy that the author developed in working with a patient who suffered from complicated grief after the death of her father from lung cancer. During sessions, the therapist worked with the patient to collect pictures and organize a "strip of life" of her father's most meaningful moments. The patient then wrote a short text associated with each picture. Finally, she chose music to be added to this "slide show" or "psychodynamic montage" as its soundtrack. The resulting multimedia presentation was finally posted on the Internet on a website to which only the patient and her relatives and friends had access via a password. This therapeutic strategy was effective in helping this patient resolve her symptoms of complicated grief. The author suggests that this new approach to psychodynamic psychotherapy may be a cost-effective and well-received tool for use in institutions such as hospices and general hospitals.

  11. The Arts, Crafts, and Sciences of Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Lorna Smith

    2015-11-01

    Contemporary training and practice of psychotherapy and the research that supports it is the subject of this review. I discuss it in the light of what I value most from my own professional training, which was, in my opinion, highly privileged by comparison with what is offered today. A minimal hoped-for outcome is that younger readers will find valuable tidbits here and there that will be useful in their own versions of psychotherapy. A maximal hope is that a few individuals who choose to maintain clinical skills as well as emphasize psychotherapy research might be encouraged to follow their instincts toward excellence. They would allow their curiosity to bloom and their work to be creative and more adherent to the rules of natural science than time allows in these days of dashboards that count funding associated with numbers of publications, grants, teaching, and service hours. Admittedly, that path less well traveled would be risky, because what truly is new takes time to develop and implement and the outcomes when research truly can disconfirm hypotheses (as distinct from fail to confirm them) are, well, uncertain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Applied philosophy and psychotherapy: Heraclitus as case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Beukes

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates a recent attempt to apply philosophy within the discipline of psychotherapy and to investigate the somewhat undefined realm of philosophical counselling. After introducing the claims of this interdisciplinary exercise and after addressing the problems involved in crossing the boundaries between philosophy and psychotherapy, the article elaborates on  Alex Howard’s (2000 [Philosophy for counselling and psychotherapy: Pythagoras to post-modernism. London: Macmillan] attempt to make explicit use of philosophy in psychotherapy, using his interpretation and application of Heraclitus’ philosophy as case study.

  13. Psychotherapy in long-term care: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Ashok J; Dew, Mary Amanda; Miller, Mark D; Borson, Soo; Reynolds, Charles

    2006-11-01

    Psychological distress in long-term care (LTC) settings is highly prevalent and crosses many conventional psychiatric diagnostic boundaries. Mental health professionals who consult in LTC facilities have experienced firsthand the impact of a variety of nonpharmacological therapeutic approaches on individual residents, yet these are rarely investigated in a systematic fashion, and even less commonly reported in the literature. The present report summarizes the state-of-evidence of "talk therapies" for depression and psychological well-being in LTC facilities by reviewing controlled trials of psychotherapy for LTC residents published in English-language peer-reviewed journals. We excluded studies of nonpharmacological approaches designed primarily to curb behavioral disturbances of dementia, and those psychosocial interventions using an approach other than "talk therapy" in individual or group format since they have been reviewed in detail elsewhere. A majority of the 18 studies that met our inclusion criteria reported significant short- and, in some cases, longer-term benefits on instruments measuring depression, hopelessness, self-esteem, perceived control, and a host of other psychological variables. However, these findings must be interpreted within the severe methodological limitations of many studies, including small sample sizes, variable study entry criteria, short duration of trials, heterogeneous outcome assessment methods, and lack of detail on intervention methods. Nevertheless, the positive efficacy of these approaches, when understood within the framework of potential serious complications of pharmacotherapy for frail elders with multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, and a narrow therapeutic index, suggests a strong need for methodologically rigorous trials of psychotherapy in the LTC setting, especially in combination with pharmacotherapy.

  14. Psychotherapy in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: implications for treatment and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a risk factor for co-occurring psychiatric disorders and negative psychosocial consequences in adulthood. Previous trials of psychotherapeutic programs for adult ADHD were based on cognitive behavioral psychotherapeutic approaches and showed significant effects. Targets of psychotherapeutic interventions include not only coping with the core symptoms and associated problems such as depression and anxiety, but also probable consequences such as low self-esteem. Improvements in ADHD symptomatology and associated symptoms have been reported after psychotherapeutic treatment. The support of other participants is strongly regarded as helpful by patients in group therapy. This manuscript provides an overview of psychotherapy approaches and results of studies evaluating programs developed to treat adults with ADHD. Finally, the specific requirements of psychotherapy for adult ADHD as well as further research questions will be discussed.

  15. The power of subtle interpersonal hostility in psychodynamic psychotherapy: a speech acts analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Timothy; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Stiles, William B; Ordoñez, Tatiana; Heckman, Bernadette D

    2012-01-01

    This study compared participants' speech acts in low-hostile versus moderate-hostile interpersonal episodes in time-limited psychodynamic psychotherapy. Sixty-two cases from the Vanderbilt II psychotherapy project were categorized as low or moderate in interpersonal hostility based on ratings of interpersonal process using Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (Benjamin, 1996). Representative episodes were coded using a taxonomy of speech acts (Stiles, 1992), and speech acts were compared across low- and moderate-hostile episodes. Therapists in moderate-hostility episodes used more interpretations and edifications, and fewer questions and reflections. Patients in moderate-hostility episodes used more disclosures and fewer edifications. Content coding showed that therapist interpretations with a self/intrapsychic self focus were more characteristic of moderate-hostility than low-hostility episodes, whereas the two types of episodes contained similar levels of interpretations focused on the patient's interpersonal relationships and the therapeutic relationship.

  16. The current status of psychotherapy | Gureje | West African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fundamental understanding about the mechanisms of action of psychotherapy is a promising new development that is emanating from modern techniques of neurosciences and neuroimaging. Whether such understanding will lead to a renaissance in the clinical utility of psychotherapy is still early to say. However, there is ...

  17. Effectiveness of attitude psychotherapy in enhancing self-esteem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Attitudinize Psychotherapy; is a complete psychotherapy dealing effectively with all the six vital aspects concerning an emotional problem of a human being. In order to test the five hypotheses, the sample comprised of NO THERAPY GROUP; the Fifty-two Male and Twenty-three Female Adult Students on which NO ...

  18. Counselling and Psychotherapy: Is There Any Difference? | Osagu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Counselling and psychotherapy are two fields that are often viewed to be the same and used interchangeably. The different definitions on both counselling and psychotherapy are evidences to this fact. Efforts will be made in this paper to highlight the different definitions, show the differences and similarities between the two.

  19. Solicited diary studies of psychotherapy in qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackrill, Thomas Edward

    2008-01-01

    Diary studies are scarce within the field of qualitative psychotherapy research. In this article arguments for and against the employment of solicited diaries studies in qualitative psychotherapy research are investigated. The strengths of diary studies are presented along with arguments concerning...

  20. Self-concept and quality of object relations as predictors of outcome in short- and long-term psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Olavi; Knekt, Paul; Heinonen, Erkki; Virtala, Esa

    2014-01-01

    Quality of object relations and self-concept reflect clinically relevant aspects of personality functioning, but their prediction as suitability factors for psychotherapies of different lengths has not been compared. This study compared their prediction on psychiatric symptoms and work ability in short- and long-term psychotherapy. Altogether 326 patients, 20-46 years of age, with mood and/or anxiety disorder, were randomized to short-term (solution-focused or short-term psychodynamic) psychotherapy and long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy. The Quality of Object Relations Scale (QORS) and the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) self-concept questionnaire were measured at baseline, and their prediction on outcome during the 3-year follow-up was assessed by the Symptom Check List Global Severity Index and the Anxiety Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and by the Work Ability Index, Social Adjustment Scale work subscale and the Perceived Psychological Functioning scale. Negative self-concept strongly and self-controlling characteristics modestly predicted better 3-year outcomes in long-term therapy, after faster early gains in short-term therapy. Patients with a more positive or self-emancipating self-concept, or more mature object relations, experienced more extensive benefits after long-term psychotherapy. The importance of length vs. long-term therapy technique on the differences found is not known. Patients with mild to moderate personality pathology, indicated by poor self-concept, seem to benefit more from long-term than short-term psychotherapy, in reducing risk of depression. Long-term therapy may also be indicated for patients with relatively good psychological functioning. More research is needed on the relative importance of these characteristics in comparison with other patient-related factors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Trajectories of Change in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Jesse; Adelson, Jill; Budge, Stephanie; Wampold, Bruce; Kopta, Mark; Minami, T; Miller, Scott

    2015-09-01

    The current study used multilevel growth mixture modeling to ascertain groups of patients who had similar trajectories in their psychological functioning over the course of short-term treatment. A total of 10,854 clients completed a measure of psychological functioning before each session. Psychological functioning was measured by the Behavioral Health Measure, which is an index of well-being, symptoms, and life-functioning. Clients who attended 5 to 25 sessions at 46 different university/college counseling centers and one community mental health center were included in this study. Client diagnoses and the specific treatment approaches were not known. A 3-class solution was a good fit to the data. Clients in classes 1 and 3 had moderate severity in their initial psychological functioning scores, and clients in class 2 had more distressed psychological functioning scores. The trajectory for clients in class 1 was typified by early initial change, followed by a plateau, and then another gain in psychological functioning later in treatment. The trajectory for clients in class 2 demonstrated an initial decrease in functioning, followed by a rapid increase, and then a plateau. Last, the clients in class 3 had a steady increase of psychological functioning, in a more linear manner. The trajectories of change for clients are diverse, and they can ebb and flow more than traditional dose-effect and good-enough level models may suggest. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Humanistic-existential psychotherapy competencies and the supervisory process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Eugene W

    2010-03-01

    There has been an increasing focus in recent years on articulating foundational and functional competencies for practice in professional psychology and how a competency-based approach might inform psychology training. With the aim of contributing to the dialogue in this area, the discussion herein explores psychotherapy competencies through the lens of a humanistic-existential perspective and describes implications for psychotherapy training and supervision. Specifically, competencies pertaining to facilitating the client's experiential awareness and use of the psychotherapy relationship to engender client change are described. Next, the foundational and functional competencies within professional psychology that are particularly salient to a humanistic-existential psychotherapy framework are discussed. Finally, the ways in which a humanistic-existential supervision framework contributes to the development of psychotherapy competencies in trainees is considered. A brief vignette is presented to illustrate the supervision process. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  3. The state of psychotherapy supervision: recommendations for future training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Priyanthy

    2013-06-01

    This paper reviews the current state of psychotherapy supervision in psychiatric training programmes. A focused literature search was carried out that examined three questions concerning the content, process and outcome of psychotherapy supervision. Results indicate that although requirements for training have broadened somewhat, methods of instruction in supervision have remained the same for many decades. In addition, there is a lack of discussion on what supervision outcomes should be assessed. This paper explores these areas and provides some suggestions for the future of psychotherapy supervision that are evidence-based and generalizable to an international audience. It is time to arrive at an international consensus about guidelines for psychotherapy supervision in psychiatry training programmes. This paper attempts to provide a starting place for psychotherapy supervisors and educators so that we can advance the field forward.

  4. Predicting Psychotherapy Dropouts: A Multilevel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Alexander F; Flückiger, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The role of therapeutic processes in predicting premature termination of psychotherapy has been a particular focus of recent research. The purpose of this study was to contrast outpatients who completed therapy and those who dropped out with respect to their self-reported in-session experiences of self-esteem, mastery, clarification and the therapeutic alliance. The 296 patients with mixed disorders were treated with an integrative form of cognitive-behavioural therapy without pre-determined time limit (M = 20.2 sessions). Multilevel analyses indicated that patients who did not completetreatment reported, on average, lower levels of self-esteem, mastery and clarification and lower ratings of their therapeutic alliance in treatment in contrast to patients who completed therapy. Patient-reported change in self-esteem experiences over the course of treatment turned out to be the strongest predictor of dropout from psychotherapy or successful completion. When dropout occurred before the average treatment length was reached, patients reported fewer clarifying experiences as early as the first session and their ratings of the therapeutic alliance were characterized by an absence of positive development. Both of these aspects seem to be involved in patients' decisions to leave treatment early. The findings underscore the importance of the therapeutic process in understanding the mechanisms behind treatment dropout. Analyses data from 296 patients at a private outpatient clinic in a routine practice setting (CBT). Completer/dropout definition: presence or absence of measurement battery at post-assessment. Focuses on change in therapy processes by investigating post-session reports. Finds that positive changes in self-esteem experiences is the most robust predictor of dropout, followed by ratings of clarification experiences and the global alliance. In line with recent dropout research, these process indicators might help to detect therapeutic situations that are

  5. Review of Psychotherapy as a human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Psychotherapy as a human science by Daniel Burston and Roger Frie (see record 2006-12980-000). In this book, the authors show how philosophical assumptions pervade therapeutic praxis. "In our view, philosophy is inherent to the very practice of psychotherapy" (p. 2). There is a "common ground that unites the therapists of today with the philosophers of the past" (p. 17). Their effort succeeds brilliantly in reconnecting psychology and philosophy and, by that homecoming, to ground psychotherapy (including contemporary psychoanalysis) as a "human science." The book begins by sketching ideas about truth we inherit from the Greeks, then shows how Descartes and Pascal helped launch the Enlightenment with their thinking about truth and the limits of reason. Kant, Hegel, and Marx broaden the scope to include reason, the unconscious, and the course of history. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche interject angst and authenticity. Dilthey proposes a human science neither scientistic nor irrational. Husserl launches phenomenology as the proper study of experience; Scheler, Jaspers and Heidegger react in their particular ways. Freud and Jung come to loggerheads over the unconscious. Buber, Binswanger, and Boss further develop existential-phenomenological perspectives in terms of human interrelatedness. Confrontation with the other and the limits of reciprocity engage Sartre, Lacan, and Laing. Psychoanalysis grows intersubjectively through the work of Sullivan, Fromm, Merleau-Ponty, Benjamin, and Stolorow. Postmodernism's excess, Frie and Burston conclude, requires acknowledgment of an authentic self answerable for choices in life: '...[W]e are both determined by, and exercise our agency in determining, the communicative contexts in which we exist" (p. 262). Psychotherapy from this existential-phenomenological perspective becomes "a rigorous exploration of our ways of making meaning--both consciously and unconsciously" (p. 263). The book ends, then, with an affirmation

  6. Equine-assisted psychotherapy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Angela

    2010-10-01

    Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) is an approach in which horses are an integral part of the therapeutic process. This article provides an overview of EAP, including a brief historical perspective, key definitions, and review of pertinent literature. Benefits of the approach are presented, from the standpoint of field observations, client self-reports, and formal research articles. Rather than offer a comprehensive literature review, this article is intended to help non-EAP practitioners become more familiar with the approach. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Relationships among alexithymia, therapeutic alliance, and psychotherapy outcome in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Lena C; Taylor, Graeme J; McBride, Carolina; Bagby, R Michael

    2017-08-01

    Previous studies have found that alexithymia predicts process and outcome of psychodynamic psychotherapy across a range of psychiatric disorders. There is preliminary evidence that alexithymia may exert its effects on outcome through the therapist. Other studies have found that alexithymia does not influence outcome of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The aim of the current study was to investigate the capacity of alexithymia to predict therapist- and patient-rated therapeutic alliance and response to CBT and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for major depressive disorder. A total of 75 adults with major depressive disorder were randomized to receive weekly sessions of manualized individual CBT or IPT for a period of 16 weeks. Pre-treatment alexithymia exhibited a positive direct effect on depression change, and a negative indirect effect on depression change via patient-rated alliance at week 13. There was no mediating role of therapist-rated alliance. Although these findings are preliminary, they suggest that pre-treatment alexithymia has meaningful links to psychotherapy process and outcome, and that nuanced analyses incorporating intervening variables are necessary to elucidate the nature of these links. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD: Are memory reconsolidation and fear extinction underlying mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduccia, Allison A; Mithoefer, Michael C

    2018-06-08

    MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for treatment of PTSD has recently progressed to Phase 3 clinical trials and received Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA. MDMA used as an adjunct during psychotherapy sessions has demonstrated effectiveness and acceptable safety in reducing PTSD symptoms in Phase 2 trials, with durable remission of PTSD diagnosis in 68% of participants. The underlying psychological and neurological mechanisms for the robust effects in mitigating PTSD are being investigated in animal models and in studies of healthy volunteers. This review explores the potential role of memory reconsolidation and fear extinction during MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. MDMA enhances release of monoamines (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine), hormones (oxytocin, cortisol), and other downstream signaling molecules (BDNF) to dynamically modulate emotional memory circuits. By reducing activation in brain regions implicated in the expression of fear- and anxiety-related behaviors, namely the amygdala and insula, and increasing connectivity between the amygdala and hippocampus, MDMA may allow for reprocessing of traumatic memories and emotional engagement with therapeutic processes. Based on the pharmacology of MDMA and the available translational literature of memory reconsolidation, fear learning, and PTSD, this review suggests a neurobiological rationale to explain, at least in part, the large effect sizes demonstrated for MDMA in treating PTSD. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Indian family systems, collectivistic society and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadda, Rakesh K; Deb, Koushik Sinha

    2013-01-01

    Indian society is collectivistic and promotes social cohesion and interdependence. The traditional Indian joint family, which follows the same principles of collectivism, has proved itself to be an excellent resource for the care of the mentally ill. However, the society is changing with one of the most significant alterations being the disintegration of the joint family and the rise of nuclear and extended family system. Although even in today's changed scenario, the family forms a resource for mental health that the country cannot neglect, yet utilization of family in management of mental disorders is minimal. Family focused psychotherapeutic interventions might be the right tool for greater involvement of families in management of their mentally ill and it may pave the path for a deeper community focused treatment in mental disorders. This paper elaborates the features of Indian family systems in the light of the Asian collectivistic culture that are pertinent in psychotherapy. Authors evaluate the scope and effectiveness of family focused psychotherapy for mental disorders in India, and debate the issues and concerns faced in the practice of family therapy in India.

  10. [New Developments in Video Games for Psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinka, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    A literature survey on new developments in the area of video games and psychotherapy of children and adolescents was conducted. Despite the omnipresence of computers and the internet, development of therapeutic games seems rather slow. The video game Treasure Hunt was introduced in 2008 to support treatment of children with internalizing and externalizing disorders. Camp Cope-A-Lot was developed for treatment of anxious children, whereas the self-help game SPARX is directed at depressed adolescents. Rage-Control is a biofeedback game for children with anger problems. The game Zoo U aims to assess and train social skills of primary school children. Ricky and the Spider for young children with obsessive compulsive disorder is meant to support the cognitive-behavioural treatment of these patients. Clash- Back is a French game for adolescents with externalizing problems. Possible reasons for the relatively slow development of therapeutic games are the high methodological demands concerning an evaluation as well as the high costs of game development. Nonetheless, computers and the internet are bound to influence psychotherapy with children and adolescents in the long run.

  11. Psychotherapy, psychoanalysis and urban poverty in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epele, Maria Esther

    2016-12-01

    Based on ethnographic research carried out in the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area, this paper examines the views of social actors on the psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy focused on marginalized populations. From Foucault's perspective on the forms of truth-telling, the aim of this paper is to analyze, as a preliminary research report, treatments according to the native ways of speaking and listening, which dominate the description of therapeutic experiences of patients who come to the treatment without any professional intermediation. The neoliberal transformations of the past decades in Argentina changed both the landscape of the public health system and the daily lives of marginalized people. Considering such changes, this paper examines the ways in which verbal actions (speaking and listening) take place in psychotherapy and mark the course not only of treatments but also the temporal rhythms of their development, and their various levels of efficacy. Finally, the discussion focuses on how ways of speaking and listening in treatments are modeled not only by institutional dynamics but also by the characteristics these verbal activities take in everyday life under the logics of power that prevail over them.

  12. Use of psychotherapy by rural and urban veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cully, Jeffrey A; Jameson, John P; Phillips, Laura L; Kunik, Mark E; Fortney, John C

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether differences exist between rural and urban veterans in terms of initiation of psychotherapy, delay in time from diagnosis to treatment, and dose of psychotherapy sessions. Using a longitudinal cohort of veterans obtained from national Veterans Affairs databases (October 2003 through September 2004), we extracted veterans with a new diagnosis of depression, anxiety, or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n = 410,923). Veterans were classified as rural (categories 6-9; n = 65,044) or urban (category 1; n = 149,747), using the US Department of Agriculture Rural-Urban Continuum Codes. Psychotherapy encounters were identified using Current Procedural Terminology codes for the 12 months following patients' initial diagnosis. Newly diagnosed rural veterans were significantly less likely (P Urban veterans were roughly twice as likely as rural veterans to receive 4 or more (9.46% vs 5.08%) and 8 or more (5.59% vs 2.35%) psychotherapy sessions (P Rural veterans are significantly less likely to receive psychotherapy services, and the dose of the psychotherapy services provided for rural veterans is limited relative to their urban counterparts. Focused efforts are needed to increase access to psychotherapy services provided to rural veterans with depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

  13. Religious Cognitive–Emotional Therapy: A New Form of Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    From the ancient times up to this date, it has been thought that religion and spirituality have important effects on human being's mental life. However, some psychologists and psychotherapists have ignored this role, and thus neglected to study the effects of applying religion and spirituality in psychotherapy. However, many psychologists and psychotherapists have recently studied the relationship between religion or spirituality and mental health; or used religious interventions in psychotherapies. Although different kinds of religious psychotherapies have been proposed, no comprehensive theory has been presented in this area. In this article a scientific, comprehensive and applied spiritual method of psychotherapy is suggested. Religious Cognitive- Emotional Therapy (RCET) is a new form of cognitive therapy that uses the basic religious beliefs and insights in psychotherapy. RCET is a new integration of cognitive, humanistic, and existential psychotherapies that takes into account religious beliefs and insights of the clients. RCET is an effective method of psychotherapy for the treatment of those who suffer from identity crisis, depression, and anxiety; and it can be developed to address other psychological disorders as well. Because RCET is a new approach, practically is needed to do further theoretical research in this area. PMID:22952497

  14. Assessing levels of similarity to a "psychodynamic prototype" in psychodynamic psychotherapy with children: a case study approach (preliminary findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bento Gastaud

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To analyze the degree of similarity to a "psychodynamic prototype" during the first year of two children's once-weekly psychodynamic psychotherapy.Methods: This study used a longitudinal, descriptive, repeated-measures design based on the systematic case study method. Two male school children (here referred to as Walter and Peter and their therapists took part in the study. All sessions were video and audio recorded. Ten sessions from each case were selected for analysis in this preliminary study. Trained examiners (randomly selected in pairs independently and blindly evaluated each session using the Child Psychotherapy Q-Set (CPQ. Experts in psychodynamic therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy from several countries rated each of the 100 CPQ items with regard to how well it characterized a hypothetical ideal session of either treatment modality. A series of paired t tests comparing analogous adherence scores within each session were conducted.Results:There were no significant correlations between time elapsed and adherence to the prototypes. Walter's treatment adhered to both prototypes and Peter's treatment did not adhere to either prototype.Conclusion:Child psychotherapy theory and practice are not absolutely coincident. Real psychotherapy sessions do not necessarily resemble the ideal prototypes.

  15. Is brief psychodynamic psychotherapy in primary fibromyalgia syndrome with concurrent depression an effective treatment? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt, Carl Eduard; Waller, Elisabeth; Endorf, Katharina; Schmidt, Stefan; König, Ralf; Zeeck, Almut; Joos, Andreas; Lacour, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There are no studies investigating the efficacy of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy in primary fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). We conducted a randomized controlled trial evaluating an adapted form of individual short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (ASTPP) versus primary care management (TAU). The study focused on FMS patients with psychiatric comorbidity. Forty-six female patients with FMS and an International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnosis of a comorbid depression or anxiety disorder were recruited in a hospital setting. Participants were randomized to receive either ASTPP (25 sessions, 1 session/week) or TAU (4 consultations/6 months). Outcome measures included the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Pain Disability Index, the Symptom Checklist 27 and the health-related quality of life. Primary endpoints of the outcome assessment were the FIQ total score and the HADS depression scale at 12-month follow-up. Both treatments were effective in reducing the FIQ total score (ES=0.56 and ES=0.75, respectively). Intent-to-treat analyses failed to provide evidence suggesting a marked superiority of individual psychodynamic psychotherapy as compared to TAU. A high-standard routine treatment focusing on the improvement of health behavior and including antidepressant and analgesic medication is equally effective as a short-term individual psychodynamic psychotherapy in improving fibromyalgia-related symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychotherapy following traumatic brain injury: integrating theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    Psychotherapy is now an approach used within several models of neurorehabilitation. However, a core theoretical model to guide psychotherapeutic practice is lacking. This article attempts to illustrate how the Generic Model of Psychotherapy of Orlinsky and Howard, which emphasizes the common factors shared by many psychotherapies, can be applied in neurorehabilitation settings. A case report is presented to illustrate how this model can potentially inform psychotherapeutic practice. The use of a theoretical model to underpin psychotherapeutic interventions in neurorehabilitation settings has the potential to facilitate our understanding of the psychotherapeutic process following traumatic brain injury in this evolving area of professional practice.

  17. Emotion in short-term psychotherapy: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, Jeffrey J

    2006-05-01

    Our understanding of the importance of emotion in psychopathology, personality, and psychotherapy has been rapidly advancing. New findings from neuroscience support the centrality of emotion as a convergent force in shaping individuals and relationships. Emotion-focused short-term psychotherapy capitalizes on the power of emotion to accelerate the course of treatment. This article provides a brief historical background on the development of affective science, offers some ways in which emotion can enhance clinical utility, and introduces the Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session issue devoted to emotion-focused, short-term psychotherapy. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 62: 517-522, 2006.

  18. Neuropsychologically informed strategic psychotherapy in teenagers and adults with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Larry J

    2014-10-01

    Stimulants are the primary treatment for ADHD. Psychotherapy may augment pharmacologic treatment. In this article, we discuss strategies psychotherapists may use in working with teenagers and adults, including individuals who reject medications or take them suboptimally. Individuals with ADHD often have other psychiatric issues, including affective or cognitive comorbidities. Having ADHD does not protect people from the difficulties of life, and psychotherapy can help to disentangle "ADHD" from other issues. A psychotherapist knowledgeable about ADHD assessment can improve diagnostic precision. Psychotherapy can integrate forms of treatment in which the central goal is increasing mastery and competence of the individual. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The self is an illusion: a conceptual framework for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankevicius, Steve

    2017-06-01

    To explain the illusory nature of the self and explore its implications for psychotherapy. Our usual experience of the self is an illusion. Rather than a discrete entity, it is a network of processes that maintains apparent irreducible unity via alterations of perceptions, beliefs, intentions and memories. By providing an efficient summary of an individual and its surroundings, the self-illusion allows one to predict, experience and interact with the world efficiently. Targeting mechanisms that preserve the self-illusion could provide a focus for psychotherapy. Viewing the self as a complex network offers a valuable conceptual framework for psychotherapy.

  20. How important are the common factors in psychotherapy? An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2015-10-01

    The common factors have a long history in the field of psychotherapy theory, research and practice. To understand the evidence supporting them as important therapeutic elements, the contextual model of psychotherapy is outlined. Then the evidence, primarily from meta-analyses, is presented for particular common factors, including alliance, empathy, expectations, cultural adaptation, and therapist differences. Then the evidence for four factors related to specificity, including treatment differences, specific ingredients, adherence, and competence, is presented. The evidence supports the conclusion that the common factors are important for producing the benefits of psychotherapy. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  1. Comparing bona fide psychotherapies of depression in adults with two meta-analytical approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Braun

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite numerous investigations, the question whether all bona fide treatments of depression are equally efficacious in adults has not been sufficiently answered. METHOD: We applied two different meta-analytical techniques (conventional meta-analysis and mixed treatment comparisons. Overall, 53 studies with 3,965 patients, which directly compared two or more bona fide psychotherapies in a randomized trial, were included. Meta-analyses were conducted regarding five different types of outcome measures. Additionally, the influence of possible moderators was examined. RESULTS: Direct comparisons of cognitive behavior therapy, behavior activation therapy, psychodynamic therapy, interpersonal therapy, and supportive therapies versus all other respective treatments indicated that at the end of treatment all treatments but supportive therapies were equally efficacious whereas there was some evidence that supportive therapies were somewhat less efficacious than all other treatments according to patient self-ratings and clinical significance. At follow-up no significant differences were present. Age, gender, comorbid mental disorders, and length of therapy session were found to moderate efficacy. Cognitive behavior therapy was superior in studies where therapy sessions lasted 90 minutes or longer, behavior activation therapy was more efficacious when therapy sessions lasted less than 90 minutes. Mixed treatment comparisons indicated no statistically significant differences in treatment efficacy but some interesting trends. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that there might be differential effects of bona fide psychotherapies which should be examined in detail.

  2. Responding to gender and sexual minority stress with functional analytic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinta, Matthew D; Hoeflein, Brandon; Muñoz-Martínez, Amanda M; Rincón, C Lucía

    2018-03-01

    Despite an overwhelming literature detailing the impact of societal bias on the well-being and relationships of gender and sexual minority clients, as well as greater rates of help-seeking from mental health professionals, recent advances in minority stress research have not been fully incorporated into clinical practice. Minority stress factors such as internalized stigma, rejection sensitivity, and concealment interfere with vulnerable and intimate relationships, and likely contribute to the transdiagnostic challenges that GSM clients report, such as loneliness and social isolation (Mereish & Poteat, 2015). Further, behavioral patterns emphasizing inauthentic self-presentation are common interpersonal styles of stigma management (Pachankis & Hatzenbuehler, 2013). Functional analytic psychotherapy is interpersonal therapy grounded in a behavior analytic approach to the therapeutic relationship, which was developed to promote generalizable change in intimate and vulnerable behaviors with meaningful others (Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991). Functional analytic psychotherapy emphasizes the role of contingent responding by the therapist to clinically relevant behaviors, to increase vulnerable, interpersonal risks that can be responded to in a warm and compassionate way. FAP is ideal for adaptation to target the interpersonal aspects of minority stress on gender and sexual minority clients that often include histories of punishment in response to vulnerable authenticity, possibly even by past therapists (e.g., Flentje, Heck, & Cochran, 2014; Garnets, Hancock, Cochran, Goodchilds, & Peplau, 1991). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Group psychotherapy for persons with traumatic brain injury: management of frustration and substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonico, R L; Hanley-Peterson, P; Englander, J

    1998-12-01

    Residual emotional and behavioral difficulties in individuals who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been well documented in the literature. The issues are complex, interdependent, and often include substance abuse, depression, anxiety, chronic suicidal or homicidal ideation, poor impulse control, and significant degrees of frustration and anger. Often, preexisting psychological conditions and poor coping strategies are exacerbated by the trauma. Emotional and behavioral difficulties can interfere with the neurorehabilitation process at all levels. In acute rehabilitation, these issues have traditionally been addressed on an individual basis. However, in postacute settings, an interpersonal group format can be effectively implemented. The majority of individuals with TBI have minimal funding for long-term cognitive and behavioral remediation; often the only avenue available is support groups. This article will describe group psychotherapy models used with individuals with acute or postacute TBI within a comprehensive rehabilitation center. Interdisciplinary treatment of frustration and substance abuse and a continuum of care will be emphasized. Education, social support, skills development, interpersonal process, and cognitive-behavioral approaches will also be discussed. The psychotherapy groups focus on treatment of substance abuse and frustration management through education, social support, and development of interpersonal skills. Practical considerations of running such groups are presented.

  4. PsychotherapyPlus: augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in major depressive disorder-study design and methodology of a multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajbouj, Malek; Aust, Sabine; Spies, Jan; Herrera-Melendez, Ana-Lucia; Mayer, Sarah V; Peters, Maike; Plewnia, Christian; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Frase, Lukas; Normann, Claus; Behler, Nora; Wulf, Linda; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Padberg, Frank

    2017-12-06

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide. About 20-30% of patients do not respond to the standard psychopharmacological and/or psychotherapeutic interventions. Mounting evidence from neuroimaging studies in MDD patients reveal altered activation patterns in lateral prefrontal brain areas. Successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is associated with a recovery of these neural alterations. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is capable of influencing prefrontal cortex activity and cognitive functions such as working memory and emotion regulation. Thus, a clinical trial investigating the effects of an antidepressant intervention combining CBT with tDCS seems promising. The present study investigates the antidepressant efficacy of a combined CBT-tDCS intervention as compared to CBT with sham-tDCS or CBT alone. A total of 192 patients (age range 20-65 years) with MDD (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale Score ≥ 15, 21-item version) will be recruited at four study sites across Germany (Berlin, Munich, Tuebingen, and Freiburg) and randomly assigned to one of the following three treatment arms: (1) CBT + active tDCS; (2) CBT + sham-tDCS; and (3) CBT alone. All participants will attend a 6-week psychotherapeutic intervention comprising 12 sessions of CBT each lasting 100 min in a closed group setting. tDCS will be applied simultaneously with CBT. Active tDCS includes stimulation with an intensity of 2 mA for 30 min with the anode placed over F3 and the cathode over F4 according to the EEG 10-20 system, if assigned. The primary outcome measure is the change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores from baseline to 6, 18, and 30 weeks after the first session. Participants also undergo pre- and post-treatment neuropsychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess changes in prefrontal functioning and connectivity

  5. [Transference Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline-Adolescents in a Day Clinic Treatment Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Maya; Ponton-Rodriguez, Tamara; Gooran, Ghazal Rostami; Bender, Stephan

    2017-07-01

    Transference Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline-Adolescents in a Day Clinic Treatment Program This paper focuses on the concept of transference focused psychotherapy (TFP) modified for juvenile borderline patients. Adolescents with borderline developmental personality disorder (bpd) have an essential deficit in their personality structure that leads to oscillations in their self-esteem and in a "split" perception of the world. They suffer from a variety of symptoms and severe impairments on their own and their families' quality of life. Their fragmented perception of themselves and others make relationships almost unbearable for them. Relationships are mostly marked by severe anxiety of resentment and rejection. For these patients this causes intolerable trouble at school where every day conflicts take place. Self-mutilation and suicidal thoughts often seem the only way out. By now, there is an agreement that an early specialized assessment and treatment is necessary in order to stop the typical consequences of their self-mutilative and dysfunctional behavior. Still, in contrast to adult age, empirical evidence is missing which proves the effectiveness of treating adolescent borderline patients. In this paper we present a research project on the effectiveness of transference focused psychotherapy with adolescent borderline patients (TFP-A) in a day clinic setting, combining TFP with group skills training as known from dialectic behavior therapy (DBT). Furthermore, we give first results on analyzing the effectiveness of our day clinic treatment program based on TFP-A, focusing on improving core symptoms such as affective problems, aggressive behavior against self and others and interpersonal problems.

  6. Analytic and Systemic Specialized Incest Group Psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjaer, Henriette Kiilsholm; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    A. This study investigates if gains are maintained one and five years following termination, and if the groups differ in gains. METHOD: 106 women started on allocated intervention. Psychological distress (GSI from SCL-90R), psycho-social functioning (GAF), and global life quality (GLQ), were......PURPOSE: Women with long-term sequalae of child sexual abuse (CSA) were randomly assigned to analytic (Group A) or systemic group psychotherapy (Group S). Pre-post-analysis indicated that both therapies led to significant improvement, but overall Group S had significantly better outcome than Group...... assessed before and after treatment and one and five years following termination. FINDINGS: 86 patients (81%) completed group therapy, 68 (64%) completed the one-year follow-up and 64 (60%) the five-year follow-up. At five year follow-up ANOVA was performed using treatment group as a between factor...

  7. The use of autobiography in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Robert

    2003-02-01

    First-person narratives may have advantages as adjuncts in psychotherapy. They provide an inside view of mental disorders expressed in the person's own words, emphasize issues that the person deems important, are interesting to read with strong story lines, are less didactic than self-help books, and offer identification with a protagonist. Recent trends in published autobiographies are described. There has been an increase in the number of published autobiographies describing mood disorder relative to schizophrenia, of psychotherapists going public with personal experiences of mental disorder, and of books expressing a positive view of treatment. The article includes case vignettes and a practitioner-recommended list of autobiographies on addictive disorders, death and grieving, and mood disorders. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The new psychotherapies: the courage to be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, F W

    1977-08-01

    The past decade has seen the emergence of popular "new psychotherapies" such as Gestalt Therapy, Transactional Analysis, and Primal Therapy, each with substantial followings. This paper puts forward a hypothesis about what these divergent systems may possess in common. Certain aspects of these therapy systems, in particular the induction of new patients and trainees, are examined in terms of Paul Tillich's concepts of the universal necessity of a rationale for courage. The significance of Tillich's analysis of courage for various historical movements is reviewed. In each system an element of unconditional commitment to a particular world view is required, as evidenced in the writings of the proponents of these systems, for the patient to be accepted into the particular system. These theoretically divergent systems possess, in common, a factor of an initial commitment to and induction into a collective belief system comparable to what Tillich describes as "the courage to be as a part".

  9. Feedback in group psychotherapy for eating disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Poulsen, Stig; Lindschou, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of client feedback in group psychotherapy on attendance and treatment outcome for patients with eating disorders. Method: We conducted a randomized clinical trial with central randomization stratified for diagnosis and treatment type according to a computer...... outcome was rate of attendance to treatment sessions; the secondary outcome was severity of eating disorder symptoms measured with the Eating Disorder Examination interview. Exploratory outcomes were psychological distress measured with the Symptom Checklist-90-R and the Outcome Rating Scale, social......-generated allocation sequence concealed to the investigators. One-hundred and 59 adult participants, diagnosed with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or eating disorder not otherwise specified according to DSM-IV, were included. Eighty participants were allocated to the experimental group, and 79 participants...

  10. Analysis of transference in Gestalt group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, J E

    1990-04-01

    In Gestalt therapy, transference is viewed as a contact boundary disturbance which impairs the patient's ability to accurately perceive the present therapy situation. The boundary disturbances in Gestalt therapy most closely related to the analytic notion of transference are projection, introjection, and confluence. In Gestalt group psychotherapy, group members interfere with the process of need identification and satisfaction by distorting their contact with each other through projecting, introjecting, and being confluent. The Gestalt group therapist uses interventions directed to individuals and to the group to increase participants' awareness of these boundary disturbances and of the present contact opportunities available to them when these disturbances are resolved. In formulating interventions, the leader is mindful of the function of boundary disturbances to the group-as-a-whole as well as to individuals.

  11. Preferences for behavioural, analytic and gestalt psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, H J

    1979-09-01

    This study investigated preferences for behavioural, analytic and gestalt psychotherapy among a sample of 40 SES class III and IV adult females and 67 college freshmen who had never been actual therapy patients. A scaled survey assessed general preference, preference given an imagined long-standing depressive disorder, preference given an imagined specific phobia, and preference for the therapist-patient relationship. Three audio tapes were designed, each describing one of the modalities. High inter-rater reliability and agreement were determined by three independent judges. Results showed that young females had a general preference for gestalt therapy. Young and old females, but not young males, significantly preferred behavioural therapy for a specific phobia. Under forced-choice conditions the group as a whole significantly preferred gestalt therapy. No differences were found for the relationship or preference given a depressive disorder. Preference was hypothesized as a cognitive structure with potential use in therapist-client matching.

  12. Expertise in psychotherapy: an elusive goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Terence J G; Wampold, Bruce E; Lichtenberg, James W; Goodyear, Rodney K

    2014-04-01

    It has been argued that psychotherapy is a profession without any expertise (Shanteau, 1992). We examine the validity of this claim, reviewing the literature on expertise, clinical decision making, and psychotherapeutic outcome assessment, and find it a reasonable assessment. There is no demonstration of accuracy and skill that is associated with experience as a therapist. We posit that this absence of an expertise-experience relation is attributable to therapists' lack of access to quality outcome information regarding their interventions and an overreliance on fallible information-processing strategies even when such outcome information is available. The research on providing outcome feedback is reviewed, and although it does relate to client improvement, it has not been shown to be associated with any gains in therapist skill or expertise. We propose a model of outcome information usage and specific a priori hypothesis testing as a means of developing expertise. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. The Psychotherapy Process with Adolescents: A First Pilot Study and Preliminary Comparisons between Different Therapeutic Modalities Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkova, Tetyana; Hillman, Saul; Midgley, Nick; Schneider, Celeste

    2011-01-01

    An innovative methodology is presented for describing the therapeutic processes involved in five types of adolescent treatments: psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mentalisation-based treatment and interpersonal psychotherapy. Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set" (APQ), 18 experienced clinicians…

  14. College Psychotherapy at a Hong Kong Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Eugenie Y.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an online interview about college psychotherapy at a Hong Kong counseling center. The interview discusses how students generally feel about going for counseling or therapy and how common it is in Hong Kong.

  15. Effectiveness of psychotherapy for severe somatoform disorder: meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelen, Jurrijn; Houtveen, J.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/21422841X; Abbass, A.; Eurelings-Bontekoe, L.H.M.; van Broeckhuysen, S.; Luyten, P.; Bühring, M.E.F.; Geenen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087017571

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with severe somatoform disorder (in secondary and tertiary care) typically experience functional impairment associated with physical symptoms and mental distress. Although psychotherapy is the preferred treatment, its effectiveness remains to be demonstrated. AIMS: To examine

  16. Training Psychiatry Residents in Psychotherapy: The Role of Manualized Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Joshua; Kyle, Brandon N; Johnson, Toni L; Saeed, Sy Atezaz

    2017-06-01

    Evidence-based treatment and manualized psychotherapy have a recent but rich history. As interest and research have progressed, defining the role of treatment manuals in resident training and clinical practice has become more important. Although there is not a universal definition of treatment manual, most clinicians and researchers agree that treatment manuals are an essential piece of evidence-based therapy, and that despite several limitations, they offer advantages in training residents in psychotherapy. Requirements for resident training in psychotherapy have changed over the years, and treatment manuals offer a simple and straightforward way to meet training requirements. In a search limited to only depression, two treatment manuals emerged with the support of research regarding both clinical practice and resident training. In looking toward the future, it will be important for clinicians to remain updated on further advances in evidence based manualized treatment as a tool for training residents in psychotherapy, including recent developments in online and smartphone based treatments.

  17. The Effects of Brief Psychotherapy of Coping with Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCaul, Kevin

    1997-01-01

    .... Our novel approach tested the effects of brief psychotherapy provided by phone. The final sample included 61 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer who were randomly assigned to either the phone treatment or a "standard treatment" condition...

  18. Qualitative psychotherapy research: the journey so far and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Heidi M

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the evolution of qualitative psychotherapy research over the past 3 decades. Clients' and therapists' accounts of their experiences in psychotherapy provide a window into the psychotherapy relationship and its mechanisms of change. A sizable body of literature has been generated that uses qualitative methods to collect and analyze these accounts and to shed light on the psychotherapy process. It notes changes in the field such as growing numbers of dissertations and publications using qualitative methods as well as a strengthening emphasis on qualitative research within graduate education and research funding bodies. Future recommendations include developing principles for practice from qualitative methods and conducting qualitative meta-analyses. Other recommendations include forming journal review policies that support the publication of qualitative research and that focus on coherence in adapting methods to meet research goals, in light of a study's characteristics and epistemological framework, rather than focusing on sets of procedures. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Approaches to psychotherapy for borderline personality: demonstrations by four master clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Christopher J; Swenson, Charles; Bateman, Anthony; Yeomans, Frank E; Gunderson, John G

    2014-01-01

    Several efficacious therapies for borderline personality disorder (BPD) now exist despite longstanding skepticism in the field regarding amenability to treatment. In this article, 4 master clinicians describe a brief interaction with an actress playing the part of a patient with BPD that occurred at the First Annual Meeting of the North American Society for the Study of Personality Disorders in Boston, April 2013. The approaches include dialectical behavior therapy, transference focused psychotherapy, mentalization based therapy, and good psychiatric management. The paper concludes with a discussion of what these approaches have in common, how they differ, and future directions for the treatment of BPD.

  20. Efficacy of Psychotherapies for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Ioana A; Gentili, Claudio; Cotet, Carmen D; Palomba, Daniela; Barbui, Corrado; Cuijpers, Pim

    2017-04-01

    , 0.09-0.54), suicide (g = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.15-0.74), health service use (g = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.22-0.58), and general psychopathology (g = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.09-0.55), with no differences between design types. There were no significant differences in the odds ratios for treatment retention (1.32; 95% CI, 0.87-2.00 for stand-alone designs and 1.01; 95% CI, 0.55-1.87 for add-on designs). Thirteen trials reported borderline-relevant outcomes at follow-up (g = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.15-0.75). Dialectical behavior therapy (g = 0.34; 95% CI, 0.15-0.53) and psychodynamic approaches (g = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.12-0.69) were the only types of psychotherapies more effective than control interventions. Risk of bias was a significant moderator in subgroup and meta-regression analyses (slope β = -0.16; 95% CI, -0.29 to -0.03; P = .02). Publication bias was persistent, particularly for follow-up. Psychotherapies, most notably dialectical behavior therapy and psychodynamic approaches, are effective for borderline symptoms and related problems. Nonetheless, effects are small, inflated by risk of bias and publication bias, and particularly unstable at follow-up.

  1. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hong; He, Ri-Hui; Zheng, Yun-Rong; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the main method of psychotherapy generally accepted in the field of substance addiction and non-substance addiction. This chapter mainly introduces the methods and technology of cognitive-behavior therapy of substance addiction, especially in order to prevent relapse. In the cognitive-behavior treatment of non-substance addiction, this chapter mainly introduces gambling addiction and food addiction.

  2. The gestalt of emptiness/receptivity: Christian spirituality and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, J V

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on Christian Spirituality and Object Relations theory as one among many possible integrations of a religious tradition and a theory of psychotherapy. Develops an epistemology of gestalt as a method for understanding the Christian myth. Specifies emptiness/receptivity as an inclusive gestalt-first, of the divinity (following Philippians 2:6-11), then of humanity (integrating Object Relations with Paul's great hymn). Amplifies the Christ gestalt in the practice of pastoral psychotherapy.

  3. Systematic review of studies about countertransference in adult psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Machado,Diogo de Bitencourt; Coelho,Fábio Monteiro da Cunha; Giacomelli,Augusto Dutra; Donassolo,Mariana Almeida Lopes; Abitante,Morgana Sonza; Dall'Agnol,Tatiane; Eizirik,Cláudio Laks

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Countertransference, the emotional reaction of a psychotherapist toward a patient, is an important technical element of psychotherapy. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify and describe the main findings of studies that evaluated countertransference in adult psychotherapy.METHODS: A search was conducted of the databases Embase, PubMed, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge to retrieve data published in any language at any time.RESULTS:Of the 1,081 studies found in the da...

  4. How important are the common factors in psychotherapy? An update

    OpenAIRE

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    The common factors have a long history in the field of psychotherapy theory, research and practice. To understand the evidence supporting them as important therapeutic elements, the contextual model of psychotherapy is outlined. Then the evidence, primarily from meta-analyses, is presented for particular common factors, including alliance, empathy, expectations, cultural adaptation, and therapist differences. Then the evidence for four factors related to specificity, including treatment diffe...

  5. [Acceptance and mindfulness-based cognitive-behavioral therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngô, Thanh-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the main approaches in psychotherapy. It teaches the patient to examine the link between dysfunctional thoughts and maladaptive behaviors and to re- evaluate the cognitive biases involved in the maintenance of symptoms by using strategies such as guided discovery. CBT is constantly evolving in part to improve its' effectiveness and accessibility. Thus in the last decade, increasingly popular approaches based on mindfulness and acceptance have emerged. These therapies do not attempt to modify cognitions even when they are biased and dysfunctional but rather seek a change in the relationship between the individual and the symptoms. This article aims to present the historical context that has allowed the emergence of this trend, the points of convergence and divergence with traditional CBT as well as a brief presentation of the different therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. Hayes (2004) described three successive waves in behavior therapy, each characterized by "dominant assumptions, methods and goals": traditional behavior therapy, cognitive therapy and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. The latter consider that human suffering occurs when the individual lives a restricted life in order avoid pain and immediate discomfort to the detriment of his global wellbeing. These therapies combine mindfulness, experiential, acceptance strategies with traditional behavior principles in order to attain lasting results. There are significant points of convergence between traditional CBT and therapies based on mindfulness meditation and acceptance. They are both empirically validated, based upon a theoretical model postulating that avoidance is key in the maintenance of psychopathology and they recommend an approach strategy in order to overcome the identified problem. They both use behavioral techniques in the context of a collaborative relationship in order to identify precise problems and to

  6. Spiritually and Religiously Integrated Group Psychotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the research literature on spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy to answer the following three questions: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded. PMID:24288557

  7. Abandono de psicoterapia com crianças Child psychotherapy dropout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Kuhn Deakin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar uma amostra de 24 crianças que completaram 12 meses de psicoterapia psicanalítica com uma amostra de 38 crianças que interromperam prematuramente o tratamento. MÉTODO: Trata-se de um estudo quantitativo em dois grupos de crianças; tratamento quase-experimental de medida única antes do início da psicoterapia psicanalítica individual. RESULTADOS: Foram encontradas diferenças estatisticamente significantes nas seguintes variáveis: sexo, sintomas, frequência dos atendimentos, capacidade da criança de controlar as emoções e os impulsos, medida pelo teste Rorschach e nas escalas de sociabilidade, queixas somáticas e comportamentos internalizantes, tais como ansiedade e depressão, medidas pelo Child Behavior Checklist. CONCLUSÕES: Este estudo revelou que a psicoterapia psicanalítica é efetiva no tratamento da criança do sexo feminino que apresenta transtornos internalizantes, tais como ansiedade e depressão, tem maior descontrole de emoções e impulsos e recebe atendimento com uma frequência de duas vezes por semana por pelo menos 12 meses.OBJECTIVE: To compare a sample of 24 children who completed 12 months of psychoanalytical psychotherapy with a sample of 38 children who dropped out from treatment before 12 months of intervention. METHOD: Quantitative study involving two groups of children. Quasi-experimental treatment of single measure before the beginning of individual psychoanalytical psychotherapy. RESULTS: Statistically significant differences were found in the following variables: gender, symptoms, frequency of sessions, child's impulse and emotion control (measured using the Rorschach test and sociability scales, somatic complaints and internalizing behaviors, such as anxiety and depression (measured using the Child Behavior Checklist. CONCLUSIONS: CThe results revealed that child psychoanalytical psychotherapy is effective in the treatment of female children with internalizing disorders, such as

  8. Psychotherapy Knowledge Translation and Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Using Best-Education Practices to Transform Mental Health Care in Canada and Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravitz, Paula; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Pain, Clare; Araya, Mesfin; Alem, Atalay; Baheretibeb, Yonas; Hanlon, Charlotte; Fekadu, Abebaw; Park, Jamie; Fefergrad, Mark; Leszcz, Molyn

    2014-01-01

    Psychotherapies, such as Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), that have proven effective for treating mental disorders mostly lie dormant in consensus-treatment guidelines. Broadly disseminating these psychotherapies by training trainers and front-line health workers could close the gap between mental health needs and access to care. Research in continuing medical education and knowledge translation can inform the design of educational interventions to build capacity for providing psychotherapy to those who need it. This paper summarizes psychotherapy training recommendations that: adapt treatments to cultural and health organizational contexts; consider implementation barriers, including opportunity costs and mental health stigma; and engage local opinion leaders to use longitudinal, interactive, case-based teaching with reflection, skills-coaching, simulations, auditing and feedback. Community-based training projects in Northern Ontario, Canada and Ethiopia illustrate how best-education practices can be implemented to disseminate evidence-supported psychotherapies, such as IPT, to expand the therapeutic repertoire of health care workers and improve their patients' clinical outcomes.

  9. Psychotherapy: Playing the Three Monkeys in Mental Health Service Provision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereboy, Çiğdem; Şenel, Hakan; Şafak Öztürk, Cennet; Şakiroğlu, Mehmet; Eskin, Mehmet

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of sociodemographic variables on the knowledge of, demand for, and reception of psychotherapy as a treatment modality among psychiatric outpatients. Participants of the study were 240 psychiatric outpatients (170 females and 70 males). Data for mental health services were collected from a subgroup of 103 "experienced" patients (42.9%) having had received psychiatric help previously. All participants were administered a questionnaire containing questions about various forms of psychiatric services. Of all participants, 40.83% reported having heard of psychotherapy a few of times before, mostly (44.58%) from the media and only 3.33% from a mental health professional. Most participants with previous applications to psychiatric outpatient clinic had first received mental health service from a psychiatrist (93.2%) and at a state hospital (72.8%), and a small minority (17.4%) had subsequently received care from a psychologist. None had demanded to, but 5 patients (4.86%) had been recommended to receive psychotherapy by mental health professionals. Of these experienced patients, 20 (19.41%) have an idea that the interviews they had previously at the outpatient clinics were sort of psychotherapeutic interviews; yet, only 7 (6.79%) retained the same idea after reading the definition of appropriate psychotherapy written on the questionnaire. All of these patients declared that they have received both their medication and psychotherapy at the same time. Thus, only 2.91% of 240 participants received psychotherapy that corresponds to the given definition. Findings from this study suggest that mental health care is mostly performed by psychiatrists alone, with a limited contribution by psychologists. Consequently, the choice of treatment is solely pharmacotherapy for most patients, while psychotherapy as a treatment modality is neither offered nor demanded in routine practice.

  10. Corrective relational experiences in psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy: Antecedents, types, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teresa Chen-Chieh; Hill, Clara E; Strauss, Nicole; Heyman, Michelle; Hussain, Mahum

    2016-03-01

    In posttherapy interviews with 31 clients who had recently terminated from individual open-ended psychodynamic-interpersonal psychotherapy, 18 reported having had at least 1 corrective relational experience (CRE) during psychotherapy, whereas 13 did not report any CREs. CREs typically occurred in the context of therapeutic relationships that were primarily positive but also had minor difficulties. Therapists typically facilitated CREs by identifying or questioning client behavior patterns and conveying trustworthiness. Corrective shifts for clients typically involved a new understanding of the therapy experience and variantly involved gaining a new understanding of behavior patterns. Consequences generally included improvements in the therapy relationship and intrapersonal well-being. Qualitatively, the 13 non-CRE clients more frequently reported wishing the therapist's theoretical orientation was a better match than did the 18 CRE clients. Quantitatively, the CRE clients rated themselves as having more interpersonal problems at intake on the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-32 (Barkham, Hardy, & Startup, 1996), had marginally significant improvements in interpersonal functioning over time, rated their therapy alliances higher on the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Revised (Hatcher & Gillaspy, 2006) midtherapy, and rated their therapy alliances higher over time compared with the non-CRE clients. Implications for practice and research are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Peer review of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Experimental studies of the American Psychological Association/CHAMPUS program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L H; Pizzirusso, D

    1982-12-01

    Two factorial experiments examined the effects of reviewer theoretical orientation, documented treatment progress, and patient concurrence data on the peer review of clinical treatment reports that described long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy with a depressed, female outpatient. The experiments employed an unobtrusive methodology; peer reviewers believed that their evaluations would affect the disposition of actual mental health insurance claims. Subjects (n = 105) were American Psychological Association/Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS) peer reviewers of a psychodynamic, behavioral, or eclectic theoretical orientation. The psychodynamic reviewers, compared with the behavioral and eclectic reviewers, were more positive in their ratings of treatment and more generous in their future care reimbursement recommendations. Additionally, the data demonstrated that APA/CHAMPUS peer review was sensitive to reported treatment progress, and that reviewers of diverse orientations were equally responsive to documented progress in psychodynamic psychotherapy. The patient concurrence manipulation had little effect on the dependent measures. Implications for mental health quality assurance programs are discussed.

  12. Using Movement to Regulate Emotion: Neurophysiological Findings and Their Application in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    Emotion regulation is a person's active attempt to manage their emotional state by enhancing or decreasing specific feelings. Peripheral theories of emotion argue that the origins of emotions stem from bodily responses. This notion has been reformulated in neurophysiological terms by Damasio, who claimed that emotions are generated by conveying the current state of the body to the brain through interoceptive and proprioceptive afferent input. The resulting brain activation patterns represent unconscious emotions and correlate with conscious feelings. This proposition implies that through deliberate control of motor behavior and its consequent proprioception and interoception, one could regulate his emotions and affect his feelings. This concept is used in dance/movement (psycho)therapy where, by guiding to move in a certain way, the therapist helps the client to evoke, process, and regulate specific emotions. Exploration and practice of new and unfamiliar motor patterns can help the client to experience new unaccustomed feelings. The idea that certain motor qualities enhance specific emotions is utilized by the therapist also when she mirrors the client's movements or motor qualities in order to feel what the client feels, and empathize with them. Because of the mirror neurons, feeling what the client feels is enabled also through observation and imagination of their movements and posture. This principle can be used by verbal therapists as well, who should be aware of its bi-directionality: clients seeing the therapist's motor behavior are unconsciously affected by the therapist's bodily expressions. Additional implications for psychotherapy, of findings regarding mirror neurons activation, are discussed.

  13. Clinical Thanatology and Psychotherapy: Some Reflections on Caring for the Dying Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenberg, Loma; Shneidman, Edwin S.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the relationship between psychotherapy and clinical thanatology relative to working with dying patients and their survivors. Eight special characteristics of thanatological exchanges are explained including comments on time, transference, aspirations, and empathy. Conversation, heirarchical exchange, psychotherapy, and thanatological…

  14. Was ist eine erfolgreiche Psychotherapie? Was ist erfolgreich in der Psychotherapie?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fäh

    1998-01-01

    What Is Successful Treatment? What Is Success in Therapy? - Observations on Psychotherapy ResearchThe author raises the following questions: What are the criteria for the evaluation of successful psychotherapeutic treatment? Which are the suitable research methods for the assessment of psychotherapeutic success? He proposes a research paradigm based on multiple criteria and multiple methods. Psychotherapeutic treatment success must be assessed on different levels: aetiology of disease, disease as nosologic category (e. g. depression), symptomatology, consequences (psychic, physical, social, economical) of disease. He further develops a research logic that is multimethodical: Results from different research methods must be aggregated on the basis of convergent findings. The three 'key research methods' in psychotherapy research are: single-case studies, controlled trials, naturalistic catamnestic research. Statements about any psychotherapeutic method or intervention strategy are only valid when results from these different study types converge. It may be a very severe bias when findings from only one study type (e. g. controlled trials) are generalised as a final verdict on certain psychotherapeutic methods.

  15. [Outpatient Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stünkel-Grees, Nora; Clausen, Jens; Wünsch, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Outpatient Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability The psychiatric morbidity risk for people with intellectual disability is considerably increased. Psychotherapy is considered as one possible treatment. Among experts the caresituation is described as substantial insufficient. This study investigated the perspective of psychotherapists for children and adolescents in the German state North Rhine-Westphalia regarding the care situation of outpatient psychotherapy for children and adolescents with intellectual disability. The participants received a questionnaire (a) about the care situation, (b) how they consider their training to treat these patients and (c) the possibility for free answers. In this cross-section study 185 licensed psychotherapists for children and adolescents filled out a semi-standardized online-questionnaire. The data were analyzed descriptively; free answers were categorized according to Mayring. Additionally, group differences were tested. (a) The psychotherapeutic supply situation for children and adolescents with intellectual disability was rated as insufficient. Clients with learning disability or minor intellectual disability are mainly treated. This group of people benefits from psychotherapy. (b) The training for treating these clients was rated as inadequate. (c) Qualitative analysis refers that request for psychotherapy is seen as difficult; cognitive orientated treatments need modification. The psychotherapeutic care situation for children and adolescents with intellectual disability appears insufficient. This topic should be part of the training curriculum for psychotherapists.

  16. Applications of Mindfulness in Psychotherapy – Contemporary Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut ŠKODLAR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mindfulness has without doubt been the fastest spreading and most popular concept in psychotherapy in the last two decades. Its influence exceeds that of any other individual concept or approach in modern psychotherapy. However, there are many dilemmas, open questions and controversies related to this rapid, almost fanatic spread, which obviously compensates for a certain lack in modern Euro- and Americo-centric societies. Similarly, we are witnessing in the West a lack of reflection, a process of limitless idealization, and the search for a panacea. This all flows with a tint of colonialism, presumptuously taking over ideas, concepts and techniques without a proper study of the primary sources, and with all the accompanying negative side-effects: profiteering, self-promotion, unethical conduct, empty promises of instant rewards, and so on. In the present paper, the development of interest in mindfulness in psychotherapy, as well as the research findings and dilemmas, and concepts and mechanisms of applying mindfulness in psychotherapy, will be reviewed. The main purpose of the paper is to contribute to the critical reflection in studying and applying mindfulness in psychotherapy.

  17. [Group psychotherapy of neuroses and personality disorders in regular soldiers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araszkiewicz, A; Florkowski, A; Lucki, Z

    1994-01-01

    Environmental conditions cause neuroses and symptoms of personality disorders in regular soldiers. Military service in highly formalized and hierarchical conditions makes it impossible to: express emotions (particularly negative ones), to arrange one's own time, to choose the position and place of work. Another important psychotraumatic factor is excessive load of work and responsibility for the sake of "the service". Psychotherapy is the main part of neurotic and personality disorder therapy in regular soldiers. The social context is the bass for theoretical assumptions of psychotherapy carried out by the authors. Based on the theory of learning, the aims of the applied psychotherapy are: eagerness for the elimination of symptoms and changing the mode of behaviour. Group psychotherapy is carried out in stationary conditions, in groups of 8 to 13 patients, for 8-9 weeks. The applied methods are: debating psychotherapy, interaction-communicative methods, psychodrawing, musicotherapy, choreotherapy and relaxation techniques. As the result of the therapy, about 89% of symptomatic improvement and about 81% of the change of attitude and behaviour were obtained.

  18. A cost-utility analysis of psychoanalysis versus psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghout, Caspar C; Zevalkink, Jolien; Hakkaart-van Roijen, Leona

    2010-01-01

    Despite the considerable and growing body of research about the clinical effectiveness of long-term psychoanalytic treatment, relatively little attention has been paid to economic evaluations, particularly with reference to the broader range of societal effects. In this cost-utility study, we examined the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of psychoanalysis versus psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Incremental costs and effects were estimated by means of cross-sectional measurements in a cohort design (psychoanalysis, n = 78; psychoanalytic psychotherapy, n = 104). Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were estimated for each treatment strategy using the SF-6D. Total costs were calculated from a societal perspective (treatment costs plus other societal costs) and discounted at 4 percent. Psychoanalysis was more costly than psychoanalytic psychotherapy, but also more effective from a health-related quality of life perspective. The ICER--that is, the extra costs to gain one additional QALY by delivering psychoanalysis instead of psychoanalytic psychotherapy--was estimated at 52,384 euros per QALY gained. Our findings show that the cost-utility ratio of psychoanalysis relative to psychoanalytic psychotherapy is within an acceptable range. More research is needed to find out whether cost-utility ratios vary with different types of patients. We also encourage cost-utility analyses comparing psychoanalytic treatment to other forms of (long-term) treatment.

  19. Integrative Treatment of Personality Disorder. Part I: Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Mirjana Divac; Svrakic, Dragan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we outline the concept of integrative therapy of borderline personality, also referred to as fragmented personality, which we consider to be the core psychopathology underlying all clinical subtypes of personality disorder. Hence, the terms borderline personality, borderline disorder, fragmented personality, and personality disorder are used interchangeably, as synonyms. Our integrative approach combines pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, each specifically tailored to accomplish a positive feedback modulation of their respective effects. We argue that pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of personality disorder complement each other. Pharmacological control of disruptive affects clears the stage, in some cases builds the stage, for the psychotherapeutic process to take place. In turn, psychotherapy promotes integration of personality fragments into more cohesive structures of self and identity, ultimately establishing self-regulation of mood and anxiety. We introduce our original method of psychotherapy, called reconstructive interpersonal therapy (RIT). The RIT integrates humanistic-existential and psychodynamic paradigms, and is thereby designed to accomplish a deep reconstruction of core psychopathology within the setting of high structure. We review and comment the current literature on the strategies, goals, therapy process, priorities, and phases of psychotherapy of borderline disorders, and describe in detail the fundamental principles of RIT.

  20. Affirmative LGBT psychotherapy: Outcomes of a therapist training protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepping, Christopher A; Lyons, Anthony; Morris, Eric M J

    2018-03-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people seek psychotherapy at high rates, and the importance of providing culturally appropriate and LGBT-affirmative psychotherapy has been widely acknowledged. Despite this, remarkably little research has investigated the effects of therapist training in LGBT-affirmative psychotherapy. Here we examined the effectiveness of a training protocol for LGBT-affirmative psychotherapy with 96 mental health professionals, ranging in therapeutic experience from outcomes, therapists reported increased knowledge and skills related to working with LGBT clients following the training. Therapists also displayed reductions in homo-negativity and trans-negativity. Therapists' characteristics did not influence the extent to which they benefited from training. Specifically, years of clinical experience, therapist religiosity, and therapist psychological flexibility were unrelated to changes in attitudes, knowledge, and skills. The results of this study clearly suggest that providing training in LGBT-affirmative psychotherapy can enhance therapists' attitudes, knowledge, and skills. Of particular importance is that the benefits associated with such training appear to hold regardless of therapists' characteristics. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Benefits of Combining Massage Therapy with Group Interpersonal Psychotherapy in Prenatally Depressed Women

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Tiffany; Deeds, Osvelia; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Gauler, Andy; Sullivan, Susan; Wilson, Donna; Nearing, Graciela

    2009-01-01

    One hundred twelve pregnant women who were diagnosed depressed were randomly assigned to a group who received group Interpersonal Psychotherapy or to a group who received both group Interpersonal Psychotherapy and massage therapy. The group Interpersonal Psychotherapy (one hour sessions) and massage therapy (30 minute sessions) were held once per week for six weeks. The data suggested that the group who received psychotherapy plus massage attended more sessions on average, and a greater perce...

  2. Nonverbal synchrony of head- and body-movement in psychotherapy: different signals have different associations with outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eRamseyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The coordination of patient’s and therapist’s bodily movement – nonverbal synchrony – has been empirically shown to be associated with psychotherapy outcome. This finding was based on dynamic movement patterns of the whole body. The present paper is a new analysis of an existing dataset (Ramseyer & Tschacher, 2011, which extends previous findings by differentiating movements pertaining to head and upper-body regions. Method: In a sample of 70 patients (37 female, 33 male treated at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic, we quantified nonverbal synchrony with an automated objective video-analysis algorithm (Motion Energy Analysis, MEA. Head- and body-synchrony was quantified during the initial 15 minutes of video-recorded therapy sessions. Micro-outcome was assessed with self-report post-session questionnaires provided by patients and their therapists. Macro-outcome was measured with questionnaires that quantified attainment of treatment goals and changes in experiencing and behavior at the end of therapy. Results: The differentiation of head- and body-synchrony showed that these two facets of motor coordination were differentially associated with outcome. Head-synchrony predicted global outcome of therapy, while body-synchrony did not, and body-synchrony predicted session outcome, while head-synchrony did not. Conclusions: The results pose an important amendment to previous findings, which showed that nonverbal synchrony embodied both outcome and interpersonal variables of psychotherapy dyads. The separation of head- and body-synchrony suggested that distinct mechanisms may operate in these two regions: Head-synchrony embodied phenomena with a long temporal extension (overall therapy success, while body-synchrony embodied phenomena of a more immediate nature (session-level success. More explorations with fine-grained analyses of synchronized phenomena in nonverbal behavior may shed additional light on the embodiment of

  3. Drop-out from a psychodynamic group psychotherapy outpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2014-11-01

    BACKGROUND. Drop-out from psychotherapy is common and represents a considerable problem in clinical practice and research. Aim. To explore pre-treatment predictors of early and late drop-out from psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient unit for non-psychotic disorders in Denmark. Methods. Naturalistic design including 329 patients, the majority with mood, neurotic and personality disorders referred to 39-session group therapy. Predictors were socio-demographic and clinical variables, self-reported symptoms (Symptom Check List-90-Revised) and personality style (Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II). Drop-out was classified into early and late premature termination excluding patients who dropped out for external reasons. Results. Drop-out comprised 20.6% (68 patients) of the sample. Logistic regression revealed social functioning, vocational training, alcohol problems and antisocial behavior to be related to drop-out. However, early drop-outs had prominent agoraphobic symptoms, lower interpersonal sensitivity and compulsive personality features, and late drop-outs cognitive and somatic anxiety symptoms and antisocial personality features. Clinical and psychological variables accounted for the major part of variance in predictions of drop-out, which ranged from 15.6% to 19.5% (Nagelkerke Pseudo R-Square). Conclusion. Social functioning was consistently associated with drop-out, but personality characteristics and anxiety symptoms differentiated between early and late drop-out. Failure to discriminate between stages of premature termination may explain some of the inconsistencies in the drop-out literature. Clinical implications. Before selection of patients to time-limited psychodynamic groups, self-reported symptoms should be thoroughly considered. Patients with agoraphobic symptoms should be offered alternative treatment. Awareness of and motivation to work with interpersonal issues may be essential for compliance with group therapy.

  4. [The effects of psychotherapy as a result of the relation of therapeutic availability and acceptance by the client].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambühl, H; Grawe, K

    1988-01-01

    The connection assumed in the "Generic Model of Psychotherapy" of Orlinsky and Howard (1986) between therapeutic interventions and the openness of the client, on one hand, and the short and long-term therapeutic outcome, on the other hand, is tested. Three different treatment conditions, namely, interactional behavior therapy, broad-spectrum-behavior therapy, and client-centered therapy were compared in a controlled study with reference to the relation between these variables. The results confirm the central role of the client's openness in the therapy process, but also show the connection assumed in the Generic Model is not equally present in all therapy forms.

  5. Eriksonian personality research and its implications for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcia, James; Josselson, Ruthellen

    2013-12-01

    Erikson's comprehensive theory of human development has been empirically validated by personality researchers who have taken a status approach to the adult stages of the life cycle: Identity, Intimacy, Generativity, and Integrity. An understanding of these stages has implications for psychotherapy. Erikson's theory provides a descriptive language for where the individual stands currently within a psychosocial developmental context, where he/she might have gotten "stuck" in the past, and where she/he is heading in terms of developmental goals. This article attempts to link the empirical research on Erikson's developmental theory with an approach to therapeutic intervention that could be utilized by therapists from an array of therapeutic approaches. The authors, who are developmental, personality and clinical psychologists, illustrate the use of Eriksonian personality theory in psychotherapy by discussing case examples from their own psychotherapy practices. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Making a case for case studies in psychotherapy training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackrill, Thomas Edward; Iwakabe, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The evidence debate in psychotherapy pays little attention to developing an evidence base for training practices. Understanding effective training requires an examination of what makes training work. This article examines the role of case studies in psychotherapy training. This has not been...... articulated explicitly or researched systematically in spite of its cardinal importance. An analysis of the role of case studies in psychotherapy training is presented. Reading, watching, or hearing about cases can offer novice psychotherapists access to a closed world; access to psychological theory...... or presenting cases offer students the opportunity of: learning to integrate information into a relevant whole; being in the ‘hot seat’; learning to give appropriate feedback; assessing the validity of interpretations, inferences, and interventions; adapting methods to suit the client; and learning...

  7. Criteria of Progress in Child Psychotherapies According to Psychotherapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Pereira de Medeiros Guimarães

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to perform a survey with psychotherapists, regarding the criteria they consider relevant to measure the progress of children in psychotherapy and whether the criteria indicated by them differ according to the therapist’s theoretical approach. Therapists were contacted electronically and answered a questionnaire composed of items with criteria of positive change present in the literature. Participants were 154 child therapists from different regions of Brazil. The analysis regarding the criteria of positive change that the participants indicated and their theoretical approach suggested that, despite the theoretical differences, in practice psychotherapists seem to adopt similar criteria to interpret progress in child psychotherapies. The criteria mentioned may be useful for a better systematization of the psychotherapy techniques for children. However, due to the lack of elements to evaluate the sample’s representativeness, caution is advised in generalizing the results.

  8. Parent-Infant Psychotherapy and Postpartum Depression: The Fathers Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena da Rosa Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the specificities of postpartum maternal depression, the literature recommends that fathers become involved in psychological interventions within this context. This study presents an investigation of the participation of fathers in parent-infant psychotherapy in the context of maternal postpartum depression. Two families participated in this study, both with a child aged between 7 and 8 months old, whose mothers showed depressive symptoms. These families participated in parent-infant psychotherapy lasting approximately 12 sessions. Analysis of the fathers’ participation in psychotherapy showed that their presence during sessions enables the therapy to address aspects of parenthood, and also reduce the feeling of mothers as being the only ones responsible for the family’s process of change. In regard to the technique, the presence of fathers during sessions allows the therapist to see and address the issues concerning mother-father-infant during sessions.

  9. Psychotherapy with women who have worked in the "sex industry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anklesaria, Ariz; Gentile, Julie P

    2012-10-01

    Psychotherapy is effective for a myriad of mental health symptoms, with the clinical situation dictating the most applicable method. For episodes of severe stress including acute depression and anxiety, supportive mechanisms (crisis interventions and shoring up existing coping skills and strategies) may be the best fit. During periods of relatively milder symptomatology a psychodynamic approach may be utilized with the same patient (focusing on self-reflection and a more in-depth exploration). This article focuses on the use of psychotherapy with women working in the sex industry, whether indoor (such as strip clubs and cabarets) or outdoor (such as prostitution and escort services). These women frequently experience violence in various forms, and most report multiple traumatic experiences, both during their developmental years and while working in the industry. A composite case is included that illustrates some of the supportive and psychodynamic psychotherapy techniques that can be applied when treating these individuals.

  10. Systematic review of studies about countertransference in adult psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo de Bitencourt Machado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Countertransference, the emotional reaction of a psychotherapist toward a patient, is an important technical element of psychotherapy. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify and describe the main findings of studies that evaluated countertransference in adult psychotherapy.METHODS: A search was conducted of the databases Embase, PubMed, PsycINFO and Web of Knowledge to retrieve data published in any language at any time.RESULTS:Of the 1,081 studies found in the databases, 25 were selected. Most were about psychodynamic psychotherapy, and results indicated that positive countertransference, that is, feelings of closeness to the patient, are associated with positive outcomes, such as symptom improvement and good therapeutic alliance.CONCLUSIONS: Although few studies were found in the literature, countertransference seems to be an important source of knowledge about several aspects, such as treatment outcomes, attachment style, therapeutic alliance, patient symptoms and diagnoses.

  11. Interpersonal Psychotherapy in the Treatment of Perinatal Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Ergil Altin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal depression is a psychiatric disorder that is not sufficiently diagnosed and directed to treatment. Its acute and chronic outcomes influence not only the mother but also the infant and the relationship between them. Both pregnancy and the postpartum periods are the times of significant physiological and emotional changes which also influence interpersonal relationships. Interpersonal risk factors like insufficient social support and increased social conflict can have an important impact on the women’s mental and physiological health during this period. Studies have shown that women prefer psychological and social management over drugs during this period. Interpersonal psychotherapy is a time-limited treatment approach, especially focusing on interpersonal difficulties with the goal of reducing depressive symptoms and improving interpersonal functioning. Such distressing factors which can occur during pregnancy and delivery are compatible with the four main problem areas that interpersonal psychotherapy addresses so that the therapist can easily use interpersonal psychotherapy in order to solve such difficulties.

  12. Supervisor variance in psychotherapy outcome in routine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousmaniere, Tony G; Swift, Joshua K; Babins-Wagner, Robbie; Whipple, Jason L; Berzins, Sandy

    2016-01-01

    Although supervision has long been considered as a means for helping trainees develop competencies in their clinical work, little empirical research has been conducted examining the influence of supervision on client treatment outcomes. Specifically, one might ask whether differences in supervisors can predict/explain whether clients will make a positive or negative change through psychotherapy. In this naturalistic study, we used a large (6521 clients seen by 175 trainee therapists who were supervised by 23 supervisors) 5-year archival data-set of psychotherapy outcomes from a private nonprofit mental health center to test whether client treatment outcomes (as measured by the OQ-45.2) differed depending on who was providing the supervision. Hierarchical linear modeling was used with clients (Level 1) nested within therapists (Level 2) who were nested within supervisors (Level 3). In the main analysis, supervisors explained less than 1% of the variance in client psychotherapy outcomes. Possible reasons for the lack of variability between supervisors are discussed.

  13. Psychotherapy: Adaptation or Walking Together? (A Roadside Conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bychkova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns psychotherapeutic work in the perspective of existential approach. Two trends are discerned in modern psychotherapy regardless of the known division into different schools – the adaptation therapy, and the one viewing a person in the context of his Personal being in the world. Therapy here is understood as the Way of mutual personal growth of both the therapist and the client. Distinction is singled out as one of the central points in forming the meanings, essential for both the normal development of a child and in psychotherapy, and remaining significant for spiritual growth in adults. 

  14. Beyond Mindfulness: Buddha Nature and the Four Postures in Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacamano, James; Altman, Jennifer K

    2016-10-01

    We propose to incorporate the contextual view of the Buddhist teachings of the Three Turnings into applications of mindfulness in psychotherapy; specifically by applying the teaching of the Four Postures, which are expressions of innate health in ordinary life activities. This practice may expand understanding of the core mechanisms of different modalities of mindfulness and psychotherapy, thereby supporting clinicians in guiding clients on a healing path that is in natural alignment with each individual. By its allegiance to inherent wakefulness (Buddha Nature), this teaching supports clients in appreciating their own inherent health and the health of the world around them.

  15. Clients experience of video recordings of their psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Jensen, Karen Boelt; Madsen, Ninna Skov

    Background: Due to the development of technologies and the low costs video recording of psychotherapy sessions have gained ground in training and supervision. While some praise the advantages others decline to use this technological aid for ethical, theoretical or clinical reasons. Despite...... of having their psychotherapy sessions video recorded and presented in supervision. Methods: In all 25 clients receiving brief psychodynamic outpatient treatment in a university clinic setting filled out a questionnaire containing eight open ended questions concerning the influence of the video recordings...

  16. Studies on neurobiological effects of psychotherapy in anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Bruehl Annette Beatrix; Herwig Uwe; Rufer Michael; Weidt Steffi

    2015-01-01

    In dieser Übersicht werden Studien zusammengefasst die neurobiologische Effekte der Psychotherapie oder neurobiologische Prädiktoren der Therapieresponse bei Angststörungen und Zwangsstörungen untersucht haben. Die Haupteffekte therapeutischer Interventionen bestanden in einer Aktivitäts Normalisierung von zuvor meist überaktiven Hirnregionen. Bei den Angststörungen reduzierte bzw. normalisierte Psychotherapie die zunächst erhöhte Aktivität in der Amygdala sowie in präfrontalen Regionen. Bei ...

  17. Psychosis and the dynamics of the psychotherapy process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Bent; Harder, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment of the 's......The role of psychotherapy in the treatment of psychoses remains controversial but there is improving acceptance that an understanding of the dynamics of the psychological processes involved in treatment and in the disorder itself may be important. Psychosis is understood as a detachment...

  18. [Effect of group psychotherapy on changes in symptoms and personality traits in patients with anxiety syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, R

    2001-01-01

    Psychotherapy remains the most efficient form of treatment in neurotic and personality disorders. It is a process whereby the therapist can influence and change the patient's personality. As a result, patients are able to better understand their experiences and behavior and are given a chance to be freed from symptoms. The goal of the present study was to establish the relationship between group psychotherapy and specific symptom clusters, and to follow changes in the personality structure of patients of both genders diagnosed according to ICD-10 classification. The Symptoms Questionnaire and the Personality Factor test were used to determine the severity of symptoms and study personality traits. The study group consisted of 115 patients (76 women and 39 men) with neurotic or personality disorders, participating in group therapy at the Day Care Unit of the Department of Psychiatry, Pomeranian Academy of Medicine in Szczecin between 1992 and 1998. Four groups were formed depending on the diagnosis according to ICD-10 classification: anxiety disorders--F41; somatic disorders--F45; neurotic disorders--F48; and personality disorders--F60 (Table 1). Treatment started and ended with a CV Questionnaire, Symptoms Questionnaire and Personality Factor test. Group psychotherapy was in the open form and the duration of treatment was 12 weeks with 2 sessions per day. In order to detect any improvement in mental health and symptoms, patients were given the Symptoms Questionnaire on a weekly basis. Statistics were done with the SPSS software package. It was found that the global intensity of symptoms before treatment was highest in patients with somatic form of the disorder. In this group after therapy, the intensity of symptoms was lowest, probably because of conversion of primary to secondary anxiety. A considerable decrease in the intensity of symptoms may also be explained by stronger motivation of these patients to benefit from therapy because of their severe symptoms. A

  19. DYNAMICS OF THE ANXIETY DISORDERS IN THE COURSE OF SHORT-TERM PSYCHOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Hmylova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The tendency of psychotherapy modern concepts referring to the short-term forms having been taken into account, we carried out the research aimed at the study of short-term form personality-oriented psychotherapy effect on the anxiety disorder dynamics. 103 patients with neurotic disorders were examined in the neurosis and psychotherapy department of the Bekhterev Psychoneurological Research Institute. The findings revealed the situational and personal anxiety level to be objectively decreased in the short-term group psychotherapy course. The short-term group psychotherapy was proved to bean effective method in anxiety disorders treatment considering indications and limitations.

  20. Der Einfluss emotionaler Unterstützung in Beziehungen und deren Fluktuation auf den Erfolg einer Psychotherapie : Synergetik in der Psychotherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Zillgens, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The present paper is part of the project „Synergetik in der Psychotherapie“ (synergetics in psychotherapy) which checks whether the system of a psychotherapy can be analyzed by synergetics or systems science. This dissertation examines the validity of some specific synergetic hypotheses about psychotherapy and suggests the following links: Emotional support in relationships enhances therapy outcome, occuring throughout the whole length of therapy as well as at times of personal change. Comple...

  1. Development and implementation of a psychotherapy tracking database in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craner, Julia R; Sawchuk, Craig N; Mack, John D; LeRoy, Michelle A

    2017-06-01

    Although there is a rapid increase in the integration of behavioral health services in primary care, few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these services in real-world clinical settings, in part due to the difficulty of translating traditional mental health research designs to this setting. Accordingly, innovative approaches are needed to fit the unique challenges of conducting research in primary care. The development and implementation of one such approach is described in this article. A continuously populating database for psychotherapy services was implemented across 5 primary care clinics in a large health system to assess several levels of patient care, including service utilization, symptomatic outcomes, and session-by-session use of psychotherapy principles by providers. Each phase of implementation revealed challenges, including clinician time, dissemination to clinics with different resources, and fidelity of data collection strategy across providers, as well as benefits, including the generation of useful data to inform clinical care, program development, and empirical research. The feasible and sustainable implementation of data collection for routine clinical practice in primary care has the potential to fuel the evidence base around integrated care. The current project describes the development of an innovative approach that, with further empirical study and refinement, could enable health care professionals and systems to understand their population and clinical process in a way that addresses essential gaps in the integrated care literature. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Effectiveness of Spiritually Augmented Psychotherapy on Dysfunctional Attitudes in Patients with Dysthymic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrollah Ebrahimi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of spiritually augmented psychotherapy (SAPT on the dysfunctional attitudes of patients with dysthymic disorder. Methods: A mixed qualitative and quantitative method was used in the present study. SAPT model was prepared in the first phase, and in the second phase, a double-blind randomized clinical trial was performed. The study subjects consisted of 62 patients with dysthymic disorder selected from several clinical centers of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Isfahan, Iran. The participants were randomly assigned to 3 experimental groups and 1 control group. The first group received 8 sessions of SAPT treatment, the second group also had 8 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT which was specific to dysthymic disorder, and third group were under antidepressant treatment. The Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale was used to evaluate all the participants in 4 measurement stages. The data were analyzed using repeated measures MANCOVA. Results: Findings showed that SAPT had higher efficacy on the modification of dysfunctional attitudes than CBT and medication (p < 0.05. Conclusion: These findings supported the efficacy of psychotherapy enriched with cultural structures and spiritual teachings.

  3. A Four-Component Model of Sexual Orientation & Its Application to Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowins, Brad

    Distress related to sexual orientation is a common focus in psychotherapy. In some instances the distress is external in nature as with persecution, and in others it is internal as with self-acceptance issues. Complicating matters, sexual orientation is a very complex topic producing a great deal of confusion for both clients and therapists. The current paper provides a four component model-sexual orientation dimensions, activation of these dimensions, the role of erotic fantasy, and social construction of sexual orientation-that in combination provide a comprehensive perspective. Activation of dimensions is a novel contribution not proposed in any other model. With improved understanding of sexual orientation issues, and utilization of this knowledge to guide interventions, psychotherapists can improve outcomes with their clients. Also described is how dimensions of sexual orientation relate to transgender. In addition to improving psychotherapy outcomes, the fourcomponent model presented can help reduce discrimination and persecution, by demonstrating that the capacity for both homoerotic and heteroerotic behavior is universal.

  4. The role of self-image as a predictor of psychotherapy outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryum, Truls; Vogel, Patrick A; Walderhaug, Eirik P; Stiles, Tore C

    2015-02-01

    The present study examined the relationship between self-image and outcome in psychotherapy. Patients (n = 170) received treatment-as-usual at a university clinic, and met diagnostic criteria for mostly anxiety and depression related disorders. Self-image was measured with the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB-I) introject pre and post-treatment. Using multiple regression analyses, higher levels of Self-ignore and Self-blame pre-treatment predicted a poorer treatment outcome in terms of symptoms (SCL-90-R) and interpersonal problems (IIP-64), respectively. Increase in Self-love and decrease in Self-blame (pre to post) predicted reduced symptoms at post-treatment, whereas decrease in Self-attack and Self-control, as well as increase in Self-affirm, predicted reduced interpersonal problems. The results suggest that self-image improvement may be important in order to achieve a good outcome in psychotherapy. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. CRITICAL REVIEW OF OUTCOME RESEARCH ON INTERPERSONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR ANXIETY DISORDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, John C.; Lipsitz, Joshua; Milrod, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has demonstrated efficacy in treating mood and eating disorders. This article critically reviews outcome research testing IPT for anxiety disorders, a diagnostic area where cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has dominated research and treatment. Methods A literature search identified six open and five controlled trials of IPT for social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Results Studies were generally small, underpowered, and sometimes methodologically compromised. Nonetheless, minimally adapted from its standard depression strategies, IPT for anxiety disorders yielded positive results in open trials for the three diagnoses. In controlled trials, IPT fared better than waiting list (N = 2), was equipotent to supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (N = 1), but less efficacious than CBT for SAD (N = 1), and CBT for panic disorder (N = 1) in a methodologically complicated study. IPT equaled CBT in a group residential format (N = 1). Conclusions IPT shows some promise for anxiety disorders but has thus far shown no advantages in controlled trials relative to other therapies. Methodological and ecological issues have complicated testing of IPT for anxiety disorders, clouding some findings. The authors discuss difficulties of conducting non-CBT research in a CBT-dominated area, investigator bias, and the probable need to further modify IPT for anxiety disorders. Untested therapies deserve the fairest possible testing. Depression and Anxiety 00:1–10, 2014. PMID:24493661

  6. Critical review of outcome research on interpersonal psychotherapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, John C; Lipsitz, Joshua; Milrod, Barbara L

    2014-04-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) has demonstrated efficacy in treating mood and eating disorders. This article critically reviews outcome research testing IPT for anxiety disorders, a diagnostic area where cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has dominated research and treatment. A literature search identified six open and five controlled trials of IPT for social anxiety disorder (SAD), panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Studies were generally small, underpowered, and sometimes methodologically compromised. Nonetheless, minimally adapted from its standard depression strategies, IPT for anxiety disorders yielded positive results in open trials for the three diagnoses. In controlled trials, IPT fared better than waiting list (N = 2), was equipotent to supportive psychodynamic psychotherapy (N = 1), but less efficacious than CBT for SAD (N = 1), and CBT for panic disorder (N = 1) in a methodologically complicated study. IPT equaled CBT in a group residential format (N = 1). IPT shows some promise for anxiety disorders but has thus far shown no advantages in controlled trials relative to other therapies. Methodological and ecological issues have complicated testing of IPT for anxiety disorders, clouding some findings. The authors discuss difficulties of conducting non-CBT research in a CBT-dominated area, investigator bias, and the probable need to further modify IPT for anxiety disorders. Untested therapies deserve the fairest possible testing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. What is the effect on comorbid personality disorder of brief panic-focused psychotherapy in patients with panic disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, John R; Milrod, Barbara L; Gallop, Robert; Barber, Jacques P; Chambless, Dianne L

    2018-03-01

    No studies of psychotherapies for panic disorder (PD) have examined effects on comorbid personality disorders (PersD), yet half such patients have a PersD. In a randomized trial for PD with and without agoraphobia comparing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Panic-Focused Psychodynamic Psychotherapy (PFPP), PersD was assessed pre-to-post treatment with the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnosis of Axis-II Disorders (SCID-II). For patients completing therapy (n = 118, 54 with PersD), covariance between panic and SCID-II criteria improvements was analyzed. SCID-II diagnostic remission and recovery were evaluated. Comparative efficacy of PFPP versus CBT for improving PersD was analyzed both for the average patient, and as a function of PersD severity. 37 and 17% of PersD patients experienced diagnostic PersD remission and recovery, respectively. Larger reductions in PersD were related to more panic improvement, with a modest effect size (r = 0.28). Although there was no difference between treatments in their ability to improve PersD for the average patient (d = 0.01), patients meeting more PersD criteria did better in PFPP compared to CBT (P = .007), with PFPP being significantly superior at 11 criteria and above (d = 0.66; 3 more criteria lost). PersD presenting in the context of primary PD rarely resolves during psychotherapies focused on PD, and change in PersD only moderately tracks panic improvements, indicating non-overlap of the constructs. Patients receiving panic-focused psychotherapies may require additional treatment for their PersD. PFPP may be superior at improving severe PersD, but replication of this finding is required. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. INTRANASAL ADMINSITRATION OF OXYTOCIN IN POSTNATAL DEPRESSION: IMPLICATIONS FOR PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY FROM A RANDOMIZED DOUBLE-BLIND PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eCLARICI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a neuropeptide that is active in the central nervous system and is generally considered to be involved in prosocial behaviors and feelings. In light of its documented positive effect on maternal behaviour, we designed a study to ascertain whether oxytocin exerts any therapeutic effects on depressive symptoms in women affected by maternal postnatal depression. A group of 16 mothers were recruited in a randomized double-blind study: the women agreed to take part in a brief course of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (12 sessions, once a week while also being administered, during the 12-week period, with a daily dose of intranasal oxytocin (or a placebo. The pre-treatment evaluation also included a personality assessment of the major primary-process emotional command systems described by Panksepp (1998 and a semi-quantitative assessment by the therapist of the mother’s depressive symptoms and on her personality. No significant effect on depressive symptomatology was found following the administration of oxytocin (as compared to a placebo during the period of psychotherapy. Nevertheless, a personality trait evaluation of the mothers, conducted in our overall sample group, showed a decrease in the narcissistic trait only within the group who took oxytocin. The depressive (dysphoric trait was in fact significantly affected by psychotherapy (this effect was only present in the placebo group so it may reflect a positive placebo effect enhancing the favorable influence of psychotherapy on depressive symptoms but not in the presence of oxytocin. Based on these results, we confirm our hypothesis that what is generally defined as postnatal depression may include disturbances of narcissistic affective balance, and oxytocin supplementation can counteract that type of affective disturbance.

  9. Getting our act together: lessons on meaningful psychotherapy research from the philosophy of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D L

    1999-12-01

    Psychotherapy research should concentrate on building up a scientifically validated, theoretical knowledge base by means of disciplined empirical research. The normal nested relationship between technology, theory, and research has not been the norm in the world of psychotherapy. Psychotherapy researchers should learn from the history of science and concentrate on building basic theory. Investigations into the causal relations underpinning psychotherapy is the best way that research can help us do psychotherapy better. These investigations must conform to the canons of inductive reasoning. Conventional use of clinical data to underwrite psychotherapeutic theory is vulnerable to Grünbaum's critique. A research proposal based on Langs' communicative approach to psychotherapy is presented predicting measurable unconscious responses to brief, time-limited psychotherapy.

  10. Brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy: theoretical issues and process indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassino, S; Amianto, F; Ferrero, A

    2008-06-01

    Brief psychotherapy is gaining interest worldwide, because of its good cost/effectiveness ratio and proved efficacy. The aim of the paper was to describe the brief Adlerian psychodynamic psychotherapy (B-APP): a brief, psychodynamically oriented psychotherapy referring to the individual psychology (IP). The B-APP theory refers to the following paradigms: 1) the individual represents a psychosomatic unity integrated in the social context; 2) the individual needs to build and regulate the image of the self; 3) bond patterns regulate human relationships and represent the symbolic ''fil rouge'' connecting the elements of the life-style. Its objectives are: 1) an at least partial resolution of the focus problem; 2) a decrease or a non-increase of symptoms; 3) a global increase of quality of life. The results depend on intrapsychic and relational changes. Indications are more relative than absolute. The possibility of identifying a meaningful focus is fundamental. The treatment scheme includes 15 sessions subdivided into 5 phases. B-APP offers a technical approach to brief psychotherapy which is suitable in many fields of psychiatry and liaison medicine such as preventive interventions in at-risk subjects, somatopsychic disorders and liaison psychiatry, personality and eating disorders, and treatment of emotionally disturbed children. It was applied as psychotherapeutic approach in some clinical outcome studies about eating disorders and severe personality disorders displaying a good efficacy.

  11. The Use of Digital Narratives to Enhance Counseling and Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Yegan

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances have impinged on every aspect of contemporary phenomenological experiences, including counseling and psychotherapy. The author explores the intersection of narrative therapy, specifically the traditional memory book, with the advances in information technology in the formulation of the digital memory book. The digital memory…

  12. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Postpartum Depression : A Treatment Program

    OpenAIRE

    STUART, SCOTT; O’HARA, MICHAEL W.

    1995-01-01

    Postpartum depression is a frequent complication of childbirth. Postpartum depression is associated with disruptions in interpersonal relationships, and the puerperium is a period of major role transition. In contrast to other subtypes of depression, however, postpartum depression often is not treated with medication, which is relatively contraindicated for women who are breastfeeding. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) focuses specifically on the effects of depression on interp...

  13. Creative arts in psychotherapy treatment protocol for children after trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westrhenen, Nadine van; Fritz, Elzette; Oosthuizen, Helen; Lemont, Suzan; Vermeer, A.; Kleber, R.J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we introduce a Creative Arts in Psychotherapy (CAP) treatment protocol for children who have been traumatized, aiming to enhance their psychological wellbeing and strengthening positive development. The protocol combines principles of group dynamics and multimodal arts activities in

  14. Psychotherapy: Unity In Diversity | Ofovwe | IFE PsychologIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While some psychotherapies are archeological in nature; exploring the unconscious for meaning for the conscious, others are active and problem focused, some are uncovering while some supportive, some uphold existential principles while some are empirically driven, the list seems endless. Despite these seemingly ...

  15. Impact of Bereavement-Oriented Group Psychotherapy for School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychological debriefing is widely applied for victims who encounter overwhelming trauma. This study aimed at assessing the anxiety levels and psychiatric morbidity of class mates of the victims of a plane crash and also to carry out bereavement-oriented group psychotherapy to alleviate observed psychopathology in the ...

  16. Psychotherapy: Unity In Diversity | Musu | IFE PsychologIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The emotional problems associated with African specific problems and those related to westernisation and underdevelopment, pose a great challenge to psychotherapists working in modern Africa. Many of the psychotherapists are cut in-between the western forms of psychotherapy, which in many cases do not properly ...

  17. Traditional Forms of Psychotherapy of the Fer People of Plateau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses the traditional forms of psychotherapy of the Fer people of plateau state, Nigeria. The paper also discusses the therapeutic and psychological significance of the methods. The four systems that are discussed have therapeutic significance such as relieving disturbed people of grief, anger, emotional ...

  18. HIV/AIDS counselling and psychotherapy — challenges to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to establish the needs of. HIV/AIDS counsellors working within economically disadvantaged communities and to explore the implications of these needs for counselling and psychotherapy. The sample used for the study consisted of ten HIV/AIDS counsellors from Pretoria, in Gauteng Province.

  19. Neurocognitive psychotherapy for adult attention deficit hyperactive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Halder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously thought as a childhood disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is reported to be spreading at an increasing rate and affecting 4% to 5% of the adult population. It is characterized by persistent problems of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. We present the case of an adult ADHD patient intervened with neurocognitive psychotherapy.

  20. Gestalt psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of borderline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is the most frequent and the most severe of all personality disorders in clinical practice. Although BPD bears the reputation of being “untreatable”, psychotherapy for patients with BPD has been the treatment of choice.1,2 A number of papers show the use and effectiveness of.

  1. Psychotherapy for Peace and Conflict Resolution | Olowu | IFE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychotherapy is any form of psychological treatment for behavioural or emotional problems. Peace and Conflict resolution are current and relevant issues in contemporary societies. This paper attempts to present psychotherapeutic techniques for dealing with hostility, resentment, manipulation, sexual harassment, ...

  2. [History of psychotherapy in Russia and the Soviet Union].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, H; Stern, G

    1977-10-01

    Previously, articles on and contributions to the history of psychotherapy proceeded on the assumption that the most essential sources were to be found in Anglo-Saxon and German literature. Developments in other civilizations were usually treated as undeserving of consideration. It is important to note that a large amount of specialized literature on psychotherapy has been published in the Soviet Union, and this shows that a great importance is attached in that country to the treatment of nervous and mental disorders by psychological methods. A review of the writings of S. S. Korsakov and V. M. Bekhterev shows that the essential principles of group psychotherapy had been recognized by those authors already in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, respectively. Results achieved by Makarenko appear valuable in the light of what we know today. The method of "collective psychotherapy", which was first described by Libch, is discussed in detail. This method is being widely used in the Soviet Union. The concern of this paper is to describe developments which have not so far been covered in our literature, thus attempting to make an addition to psychotherapeutic activity in this country.

  3. Integrating Spirituality into Counselling and Psychotherapy: Theoretical and Clinical Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Carla; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, spirituality has become a prominent focus of psychological inquiry. As research begins to elucidate the role of spiritual beliefs and behaviours in mental health and the influences of spirituality in psychotherapy, developing therapist competency in this domain has increased in importance. This article will first situate…

  4. Growth in Emotional Intelligence. Psychotherapy with a Learning Disabled Girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrell, Sue

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the once-weekly psychoanalytic psychotherapy of a girl, called Ellie, aged eight at the start of her treatment. Ellie had a learning disability and displayed difficult behaviour at school and at home. In her therapy, Ellie grew in emotional intelligence, more in touch with and able to express her feelings. Her behaviour…

  5. Logotherapy as a Bridge Between Religion and Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbaugh, James C.

    Frankl's logotherapy, a technique of searching for meaning in life, is presented as a counseling theory which borders religion but does not overlap, by taking both the mentally healthy individual and the patient in psychotherapy to this boundary, and challenging him/her to decide whether religion can be an integral part of life meaning and…

  6. Children in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: Changes in Global Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhammar, Fredrik; Sundin, Eva C.; Jonson, Mattias; Carlberg, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    This study was part of the Erica Process and Outcome Study. The aim was to investigate if children's global functioning improves after psychodynamic psychotherapy. Variables that may predict changes in global functioning were examined both statistically and qualitatively, for example, the child's age and gender; diagnosis and comorbidity;…

  7. Graduate Training in Psychotherapy: Are Therapy Outcomes Enhanced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David M.; Lambert, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews sources of indirect evidence supporting the value of graduate training in psychotherapy. Discusses training protocols that are known to enhance trainees' skills and summarizes a meta-analysis of therapy outcome studies involving within-study comparisons of psychotherapists of different levels of training and experience. Other research is…

  8. Implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy in a Psychiatry Residency Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtmacher, Jonathan; Eisendrath, Stuart J.; Haller, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) for depression is a brief, well researched treatment for acute major depression. This article describes the implementation of IPT as an evidence-based treatment for depression in a psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors tracked the implementation process over 5 years as interpersonal…

  9. Counselling and Psychotherapy in Dialogue with Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John

    2011-01-01

    Counselling and psychotherapy is attracting government interest and intervention, for instance the proposal to regulate the profession by the Health Professions Council. Many therapists see this as a threat to its fundamental principles due to the fact that government policy is influenced by the medical model and managerialism. This article looks,…

  10. Benchmarks for Psychotherapy Efficacy in Adult Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Kircher, John C.; Brown, George S.

    2007-01-01

    This study estimates pretreatment-posttreatment effect size benchmarks for the treatment of major depression in adults that may be useful in evaluating psychotherapy effectiveness in clinical practice. Treatment efficacy benchmarks for major depression were derived for 3 different types of outcome measures: the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression…

  11. What works for whom: Tailoring psychotherapy to the person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    This article introduces the issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session devoted to evidence-based means of adapting psychotherapy to the patient's (transdiagnostic) characteristics. Practitioners have long realized that treatment should be tailored to the individuality of the patient and the singularity of his or her context, but only recently has sufficient empirical research emerged to reliably guide practice. This article reviews the work of an interdivisional task force and its dual aims of identifying elements of effective therapy relationships (what works in general) and identifying effective methods of adapting treatment to the individual patient (what works in particular). The task force judged four patient characteristics (reactance/resistance, preferences, culture, religion/spirituality) to be demonstrably effective in adapting psychotherapy and another two (stages of change, coping style) as probably effective. Two more patient facets (expectations, attachment style) were related to psychotherapy outcome but possessed insufficient research as a means of adaptation. This special issue provides research-supported methods of individualizing psychotherapy to the person, in addition to his or her diagnosis. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Goethe's anxieties, depressive episodes and (self-)therapeutic strategies: a contribution to method integration in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Hadulla, Rainer M

    2013-01-01

    In psychiatry and psychotherapy, abstract scientific principles need to be exemplified by narrative case reports to gain practical precision. Goethe was one of the most creative writers, productive scientists, and effective statesmen that ever lived. His descriptions of feelings, emotions, and mental states related to anxieties, depressive episodes, dysthymia, and creativity are unique in their phenomenological precision and richness. His life and work can thus serve as an excellent example enhancing our understanding of the relationship between anxiety, depression and creativity. Furthermore, he described (self-)therapeutic strategies that reinforce and refine modern views. Goethe's self-assessments in his works and letters, and the descriptions by others are analyzed under the perspective of current psychiatric classification. His therapeutic techniques and recommendations are compared with cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and existential psychotherapy to amplify modern concepts of psychotherapy. From a scientific perspective, several distinctive depressive episodes can be diagnosed in Goethe's life. They were characterized by extended depressive moods, lack of drive, and loss of interest and self-esteem combined with social retreat. Goethe displayed diffuse and phobic anxieties as well as dysthymia. His (self-)therapeutic strategies were: (a) the systematic use of helping alliances, (b) behavioral techniques, (c) cognitive reflection on meanings and beliefs, (d) psychodynamic and psychoanalytic remembering, repeating, and working through, and (e) existential striving for self-actualization, social commitment, meaning, and creativity. In Goethe's life, creative incubation, illumination, and elaboration appear to have been associated with psychic instability and dysthymia, sometimes with depressive episodes in a clinical sense. On the one hand, his creative work was triggered by anxieties, dysthymia, and depressive moods. On the other hand, his creativity

  13. Scaling up the evaluation of psychotherapy: evaluating motivational interviewing fidelity via statistical text classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, David C; Steyvers, Mark; Imel, Zac E; Smyth, Padhraic

    2014-04-24

    Behavioral interventions such as psychotherapy are leading, evidence-based practices for a variety of problems (e.g., substance abuse), but the evaluation of provider fidelity to behavioral interventions is limited by the need for human judgment. The current study evaluated the accuracy of statistical text classification in replicating human-based judgments of provider fidelity in one specific psychotherapy--motivational interviewing (MI). Participants (n = 148) came from five previously conducted randomized trials and were either primary care patients at a safety-net hospital or university students. To be eligible for the original studies, participants met criteria for either problematic drug or alcohol use. All participants received a type of brief motivational interview, an evidence-based intervention for alcohol and substance use disorders. The Motivational Interviewing Skills Code is a standard measure of MI provider fidelity based on human ratings that was used to evaluate all therapy sessions. A text classification approach called a labeled topic model was used to learn associations between human-based fidelity ratings and MI session transcripts. It was then used to generate codes for new sessions. The primary comparison was the accuracy of model-based codes with human-based codes. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses of model-based codes showed reasonably strong sensitivity and specificity with those from human raters (range of area under ROC curve (AUC) scores: 0.62 - 0.81; average AUC: 0.72). Agreement with human raters was evaluated based on talk turns as well as code tallies for an entire session. Generated codes had higher reliability with human codes for session tallies and also varied strongly by individual code. To scale up the evaluation of behavioral interventions, technological solutions will be required. The current study demonstrated preliminary, encouraging findings regarding the utility of statistical text classification in

  14. [Psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic oriented psychotherapy: differences and similarities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rössler-Schülein, Hemma; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2013-01-01

    Psychoanalysis as well as Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy derived from Psychoanalysis are efficient methods offered by the Austrian health care system in the treatment for anxiety, depression, personality disorders, neurotic and somatoform disorders. In both methods similar basic treatment techniques are applied. Therefore differentiation between both treatment options often is made pragmatically by the frequency of sessions or the use of the couch and seems to be vague in the light of empirical studies. This overview focuses a potential differentiation-the objective and subjective dimensions of the indication process. Concerning the latter it is to investigate, if reflective functioning and ego-integration can be enhanced in the patient during the interaction process between patient and psychoanalyst. Empirical data underline the necessity to investigate to which extent externalizing defence processes are used and to integrate such factors into the decision and indication process. Differing treatment aims display another possibility to differentiate psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy aims for example more at circumscribed problem-foci, the capability for self-reflexion is one of the most prominent treatment effects in psychoanalysis that results in on-going symptom reduction and resilience. The most prominent differentiation lies in the utilization of technical neutrality. Within Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy neutrality has sometimes to be suspended in order to stop severe acting out. Empirical evidence is given concerning the differentiation between psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy, that treatment efficacy is not correlated with the duration of the treatment, but with the frequency of sessions. Results give support to the assumption that the dosage of specific and appropriate psychoanalytic techniques facilitates sustained therapeutic change.

  15. Effectiveness of Morita Therapy-Based Consultation for a School-Refusing Adolescent with Psychogenic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Morita therapy, developed by Shoma Morita (1874-1938) in Japan, is a type of psychotherapy that has been applied to deal with neurotic symptoms. This therapeutic approach is based on the conviction that neurotic symptoms are universal issues that eventually subside if the symptoms are accepted and everyday activities are carried out. By examining…

  16. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  17. Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.

    2014-01-01

    Health behaviors are people’s actions, some purposefully deployed to promote or protect health; some thoughtlessly undertaken without concern for their potential risk to health; some consciously, even defiantly, deployed regardless of consequences to health. Risk behaviors are specific forms of

  18. [Interpersonal psychotherapy from research to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahioui, H; Blecha, L; Bottai, T; Depuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rammouz, I; Ghachem, R

    2015-04-01

    Interpersonal therapy (IPT) is a brief, structured psychotherapy initially intended to treat adult depression that was developed in the 1970s and manualized in 1984 by G. Klerman and his team. Two main theories served as a basis for its design: Bowlby's attachment theory and communication theory. Klerman theorized that tensions and problems in interpersonal relationships (i.e. disputes) cause psychological distress in vulnerable individuals that may lead to a major depressive episode. Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that an insecure attachment style is strongly associated with lifetime depression. Severe depressive episodes have been correlated with avoidant attachment in women. IPT is based on the hypothesis that recent or ongoing disturbances in interpersonal relationships either trigger or follow the onset of mood disorder. In practice, IPT assists patients in analysing their interpersonal relationship modes, correlating their relational states with their mood and in learning to use better communication. Resolving difficulties in interpersonal relationships through the use of better communication skills promotes the improvement of depressive symptoms. Klerman identified four interpersonal areas that seem to be highly correlated with depressive episodes: grief (a close and important personal relation who has died), interpersonal disputes (conflicts with significant people such as a spouse or another close family member), role transition (significant life changes such as retirement, parenthood or chronic and invalidating illness) and interpersonal deficits (patients who have limited social contacts and few interpersonal relations). Classically, IPT is planned around 12-16 weekly sessions. During the initial sessions, the therapist will explore all existing interpersonal relations and any significant dysfunctions, both recent and ongoing. Following this interview, the area the patient considers as driving the current depressive episode will be

  19. An Integrative Psychotherapy Approach to Foster Community Engagement and Rehabilitation in Schizophrenia: A Case Study Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Whitesel, Frankie; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-02-01

    This case study illustrates the use of a long-term integrative psychotherapy approach with a middle- aged man with chronic schizophrenia and a mood disorder. The case of "Holst" describes a man with a history of insecure attachment and trauma who later went on to contract a serious chronic illness, precipitating the onset of psychotic symptoms, depression, and chronic suicidal ideation, resulting in multiple hospitalizations. Combining metacognition-oriented therapy with elements of cognitive behavioral therapy and psychiatric rehabilitation, this approach fostered significantly improved community functioning and attainment of personal goals over time. Through the journey of therapy, the patient also developed a more coherent narrative about his life, established a stable sense of self, and became an active agent in the world. This case illustration demonstrates that these three different approaches can be used in a sequential and complementary fashion to foster recovery in the midst of serious physical and mental illness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Measuring Patients’ Attachment Avoidance in Psychotherapy: Development of the Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale (AATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Láng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new scale measuring patient-therapist attachment avoidance was developed. Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale is a new measure based on the Bartholomew model of adult attachment (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991 and the Experience in Close Relationships Scale (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 to measure patients’ attachment avoidance towards therapists. With 112 patient-therapist dyads participating in the study, validation of a preliminary scale – measuring both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance in therapy – took place using therapists’ evaluations of patients’ relational behavior and patients’ self-reports about their attitude toward psychotherapy. Analysis of the data revealed six underlying scales. Results showed all six scales to be reliable. Validation of scales measuring attachment anxiety failed. The importance of Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale and its subscales is discussed.

  1. Impulsivity and Stillness: NADA, Pharmaceuticals, and Psychotherapy in Substance Use and Other DSM 5 Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Carter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceuticals and psychotherapy are commonly used in the management of impulsivity.  The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA protocol is an adjunctive therapy that involves the bilateral insertion of 1 to 5 predetermined ear needle points. One of the main benefits reported by patients, providers, and programs utilizing NADA is the sense of stillness, centering, and well-being. The induction of this attitude is seen as contributing to improved clinical outcomes including engagement and retention.  The attitude of stillness is also suggestive of a pathway to mitigating impulsivity. Impulsivity is associated with substance use disorders and other DSM 5 diagnoses.  Impulsivity has characteristics that are manifested clinically in behaviors such as disinhibition, poor self-control, lack of deliberation, thrill seeking, risk-taking. NADA holds promise as a useful treatment adjunct in the comprehensive management of disorders for which impulsivity is a prominent component.

  2. Psychotherapies provided for eating disorders by community clinicians: infrequent use of evidence-based treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ranson, Kristin M; Wallace, Laurel M; Stevenson, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the psychological interventions used for eating disorders (EDs) by community practitioners. Of 573 clinicians we screened across Alberta, 130 (22.7%) had treated EDs; 118 (90.8%) were interviewed. Clinicians reported varied reasons for psychotherapy choice and diverse training experiences; the primary approaches used varied by education and field. The most common primary approach was eclectic (43.2%), followed by cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT; 22.9%). However, self-reported CBT clinicians used specific CBT techniques infrequently. Half of clinicians incorporated addictions-based techniques. These results indicate that ED treatment provided by community clinicians is varied and generally does not align with evidence-based practice guidelines.

  3. Self-image patterns as predictors of change and outcome of trainee-led psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennhag, Inga; Ybrandt, Helene; Armelius, Kerstin

    2011-03-01

    This study investigated the outcome of undergraduate trainee-led psychotherapy and how different self-image patterns explain symptom change. Pre- and post-treatment data from 235 Swedish outpatients were used. Clients were assessed with Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) and the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). Outcome effect size was moderate and in line with earlier studies on trainees. Clinical significant change showed that 42% of all clients were recovered or improved after 18 sessions in either training condition PDT or CBT. Regression analysis showed that a more negative self-image and higher levels of self-control before treatment predicted improvement in both psychiatric symptoms and personality factors. A negative self-image, when observed before treatment, can be understood as an increased motivation for change.

  4. What is a suggestion? The neuroscience of implicit processing heuristics in therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest L; Rossi, Kathryn L

    2007-04-01

    Neuroscience and bioinformatics research on activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity in memory and learning are used to reconceptualize a fundamental question of therapeutic hypnosis, "What is a suggestion?" John Kihlstrom's cognitive-behavioral perspective of implicit (unconscious) and explicit (conscious) memory and Eric Kandel's Nobel Prize winning neurobiological research are integrated for a 30-year update of Milton H. Erickson's "neuro-psycho-physiology" of therapeutic hypnosis. Implicit processing heuristics are proposed as a more general framework for Erickson's concept of permissive indirect suggestions in therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy. These perspectives are illustrated by utilizing implicit processing heuristics to facilitate the four-stage creative process in converting implicit to explicit memory in a brain-damaged patient.

  5. Common factors of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy in the treatment of social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangier, Ulrich; Von Consbruch, Katrin; Schramm, Elisabeth; Heidenreich, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The comparison of active ingredients across different psychotherapeutic approaches is impeded by the specificity of the theoretical concepts explaining change mechanisms. This study aims to shed light on effective components of the therapeutic process in a trial comparing cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in the treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Sixty-two outpatients with SAD were included in the study. Patients and therapists rated common efficacy factors after each session according to the generic model developed by Grawe (2004). Results show significant differences between treatment conditions on several therapist-rated subscales. Therapist ratings revealed a significantly greater focus on behavioral coping strategies in CT as compared with IPT. In addition, CT therapists also reported greater use of resource activation and motivational clarification. No differences were found with regard to problem activation or the therapeutic relationship. Therapeutic outcome was predicted by resource activation and problem activation. Implications of the findings for research and practice are discussed.

  6. Using Movement to Regulate Emotion: Neurophysiological Findings and Their Application in Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Shafir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation is a person’s active attempt to manage their emotional state by enhancing or decreasing specific feelings. Peripheral theories of emotion argue that the origins of emotions stem from bodily responses. This notion has been reformulated in neurophysiological terms by Damasio, who claimed that emotions are generated by conveying the current state of the body to the brain through interoceptive and proprioceptive afferent input. The resulting brain activation patterns represent unconscious emotions and correlate with conscious feelings. This proposition implies that through deliberate control of motor behavior and its consequent proprioception and interoception, one could regulate his emotions and affect his feelings. This concept is used in dance/movement (psychotherapy where, by guiding to move in a certain way, the therapist helps the client to evoke, process, and regulate specific emotions. Exploration and practice of new and unfamiliar motor patterns can help the client to experience new unaccustomed feelings. The idea that certain motor qualities enhance specific emotions is utilized by the therapist also when she mirrors the client’s movements or motor qualities in order to feel what the client feels, and empathize with them. Because of the mirror neurons, feeling what the client feels is enabled also through observation and imagination of their movements and posture. This principle can be used by verbal therapists as well, who should be aware of its bi-directionality: clients seeing the therapist’s motor behavior are unconsciously affected by the therapist’s bodily expressions. Additional implications for psychotherapy, of findings regarding mirror neurons activation, are discussed.

  7. Psychotherapy, antidepressants, and their combination for chronic major depressive disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, Jan; van Straten, Annemieke; Bockting, Claudi L H; Meeuwissen, Jolanda A C; van Balkom, Anton J L M

    2013-07-01

    Recommendations for treatment of chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD) are mostly based on clinical experiences and on the literature on treatment-resistant depression (TRD) but not on a systematic review of the literature. We conducted a systematic review of 10 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), with 17 comparisons between antidepressants (ADs), psychotherapy, or the combination of both interventions. The best evidence is for the combination of psychotherapy and ADs, and especially for the combination of the cognitive behavourial analysis system of psychotherapy and ADs. Evidence is very weak for both ADs alone and psychotherapy alone. Assessment of TRD was mostly absent in the studies. The best treatment for cMDD is a combination of psychotherapy and ADs. However, there is a lack of well-performed RCTs in both ADs and psychotherapy and their combination for cMDD. Therefore, the conclusions are preliminary.

  8. [Meaning in life and mental health: personal meaning systems of psychotherapists and psychotherapy patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Sabine; Knappe, Rainer; Joraschky, Peter; Pöhlmann, Karin

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated differences in the personal meaning systems of psychotherapists and psychotherapy patients as well as correlations between meaning in life and mental health. We qualitatively assessed the content and structure of the personal meaning systems of 41 psychotherapists and 77 psychotherapy patients. In addition, the participants completed questionnaires measuring meaning in life (LRI-r-d), sense of coherence (SOC-9L), self-esteem (RSES), satisfaction with life (SWLS), self-efficacy (SWK), and depression (BDI). The personal meaning systems of psychotherapists were more complex and coherent compared to psychotherapy patients. In the group of psychotherapy patients, a more elaborate structure of the personal meaning system correlated with the subjective sense of meaning. We were able to confirm correlations between meaning in life and mental health for most of the instances. Psychotherapists had more elaborate and coherent meaning systems than psychotherapy patients. Especially for psychotherapy patients elaborate and coherent meaning systems turned out to be important for mental health.

  9. Hidden points of view in cross-cultural psychotherapy and ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Inga-Britt

    2006-06-01

    This article examines the challenges posed by cross-cultural psychotherapy in a creolized world, and the way this intersects with issues faced by the ethnographer. It proposes 'the relational subject,' implicit in systemic psychotherapy and social anthropology, as a framework for an understanding of communication. In cross-cultural psychotherapy, this assumption is central to non-discriminatory and equitable treatment. Drawing on Bateson's ethnographic work, the article connects 'the relational subject' to what Bateson, following Whitehead, called 'the fallacy of misplaced concreteness' and later referred to as 'context.' The article examines the choices of 'context' first in ethnography and systemic psychotherapy and then in Bateson's own analysis of the Naven ritual. It is suggested that cross-cultural psychotherapy is psychotherapy in which the therapist keeps in mind, both her own and her client's contexts. This means an assessment of process (performative aspects) as well as content (semiotic aspects) and attention to 'moments' rather than longer sequences in the therapy.

  10. Counseling and Psychotherapy for Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Joseph; Damon, Will

    1995-01-01

    Clinical research on sexual behavior has increased dramatically in the last decade. Connected with these efforts has been the need to understand more about sexuality in order to help reduce the spread of human immunodeficiency virus. This report details the results of a study of men (N=536) aged 18 to 30 years, who reported having had sex with a…

  11. Teaching behavioral assessment and therapy to French psychiatric students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathon, M; Samuel-Lajeunesse, B

    1988-03-01

    This paper provides an account of current teaching of behavior therapy at the Psychological Clinic at Cochin-Port-Royal Medical School in Paris. It discusses the kinds of trainees, and the organization and contents of the course, noting its emphasis on behavior analysis. It is only recently that behavior therapy has begun to be recognized as a major alternative psychotherapy in France.

  12. THE THERAPIST'S EXPERIENCE OF PSYCHOTHERAPY: SOME DIMENSIONS AND DETERMINANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J A; Howard, K I; Orlinsky, D E

    1970-01-01

    Eleven dimensions of therapists' experiences during psychotherapy ses- sions were derived, factor analytically, for a sample of 17 therapists. These therapists completed a standard questionnaire after each of 8 or more sessions with 31 female patients. In general, the 11 dimensions reflected various experiences of (a) being helpful towards patients, (b) attempting to deal with difSicult patients, (c) making non-therapeutic responses to patients, and (d) entrapment in personally distressing situations with patients. Personal-social characteristics of patients and therapists were examined as possible determinants of therapist experience. Among other characteristics, patients' employment and marital status, diagnosis and previous treatment, influenced certain therapist experience dimensions-as did therapists' profession, marital status, and personal psychotherapy.

  13. Using Alba Emoting™ to work with emotions in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawski, Juan Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Alba Emoting™ is a physical method to help recognize, induce, express and regulate the basic emotions. This is achieved through specific breathing, postural and facial behaviours. Alba Emoting is based on psychophysiological research by Susana Bloch and her collaborators, who have applied this method mainly to train actors. Alba Emoting can be used in psychotherapy to facilitate emotion awareness, regulation and transformation. It can also help therapists better recognize their own and their clients' emotions. The application of Alba Emoting in psychotherapy is illustrated with a case example. Alba Emoting is a physical, scientific method for working with emotions. Alba Emoting can help therapists better recognize their own and their clients' emotions. Alba Emoting can help clients achieve better emotional awareness and regulation. Alba Emoting can also help clients experience and express emotions they may normally inhibit. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: Progress and Remaining Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Paul S; Shah, Ravi; Eynan, Rahel

    2017-03-01

    The main purpose of this review was to critically evaluate the literature on psychotherapies for borderline personality disorder (BPD) published over the past 5 years to identify the progress with remaining challenges and to determine priority areas for future research. A systematic review of the literature over the last 5 years was undertaken. The review yielded 184 relevant abstracts, and after applying inclusion criteria, 16 articles were fully reviewed based on the articles' implications for future research and/or clinical practice. Our review indicated that patients with various severities benefited from psychotherapy; more intensive therapies were not significantly superior to less intensive therapies; enhancing emotion regulation processes and fostering more coherent self-identity were important mechanisms of change; therapies had been extended to patients with BPD and posttraumatic stress disorder; and more research was needed to be directed at functional outcomes.

  15. Social Integration as Professional Field: Psychotherapy in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Johnsson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes and analyses the emergence and development of a professional field called social integration. Ideas, theories, and occupational practices forming this field are explored, particularly those related to the development of a new discipline, that of psychotherapy. The development of three occupations (psychiatry, psychology and social work and their professionalisation is described through their qualitative and quantitative take‑offs in particular historical periods. Three periods are identified: formation, 1850-1920, when psychiatry was defined as a medical sub-discipline; consolidation, 1920-1945, with the institutionalisation of psychiatric care, and with psychoanalysis and mental hygiene as qualitatively new cognitive bases for practitioners; and professionalisation, 1945-1980, with the deinstitutionalisation of psychiatric care and the professionalisation of psychologists and social workers. New ideas on subjectivity and individualism, new welfare state institutions, as well as collaborative professionalism all favoured the creation of psychotherapy as professional knowledge, and a possible new profession of psychotherapists.

  16. Group psychotherapy and neuro-plasticity: an attachment theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Philip J

    2010-10-01

    This article selectively highlights relevant areas of neuroscience research which have direct application for attachment theory and group psychotherapy. Emerging evidence from the neurosciences is revealing that the developing brain of the infant, sculpted by the earliest attachment relationships, continues to be malleable in adulthood and can be profoundly influenced by ongoing relationships throughout one's lifespan. Advances in the neurosciences are also supporting the idea that strong attachment bonds and external interpersonal interactions that arise within the context of these attachments are registered as a person's neurophysiology and neurobiology. Attachment theory in particular provides a common language and conceptual framework from which the contributions from the neurosciences can be made applicable to group psychotherapy.

  17. Utilizing technological innovations to enhance psychotherapy supervision, training, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeffrey E

    2011-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the use of the Internet and video technologies has greatly impacted the provision of psychotherapy and other clinical services as well as how the training of psychotherapists may be conducted. When utilized appropriately these technologies may provide greater access to needed services to include treatment, consultation, supervision, and training. Specific ethical challenges and pitfalls are discussed and recommendations are made for the ethical use of these technologies. Additionally, innovative practices from the seven articles in the special section that follows are highlighted and reviewed. These articles present a number of innovations that can take psychotherapy training, research, supervision, and treatment forward toward increased effectiveness. Recommendations for integrating these innovations into ongoing practices are provided and for additional research to build on the important work of the authors in this special section are provided.

  18. The PAP-S (Practice of Ambulant Psychotherapy-Study), Switzerland : study design and feasibility

    OpenAIRE

    Wyl, Agnes von; Crameri, Aureliano; Koemeda, Margrit; Tschuschke, Volker; Schulthess, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Im Rahmen der Forderung nach Evidenzbasierung in der Medizin wird auch von der Psychotherapie der Nachweis verlangt, dass sie wirksam ist. Deshalb hat die Charta für Psychotherapie, der schweizerische Dachverband für psychotherapeutische Ausbildungsinstitutionen, im Jahr 2004 die Initiative ergriffen, eine prospektive, naturalistische Psychotherapie-Outcomestudie durchzuführen. Alle der Charta angegliederten Institute wurden angefragt, sich an der Studie zu beteiligen. In der Schweiz sind nac...

  19. Promoting Youth Self-Regulation through Psychotherapy: Redesigning Treatments to Fit Complex Youth in Clinical Care

    OpenAIRE

    Weisz, John R

    2015-01-01

    Improving self-regulation can be seen as a central objective of youth psychotherapy. Five decades of psychotherapy research have produced an array of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs), but meta-analyses have shown that these EBPs show only a modest advantage over treatments-as-usual. This suggests a need for therapies that can clearly improve upon usual practice. The Modular Approach to Therapy for Children protocol (MATCH; Chorpita & Weisz, 2009) was designed to meet this objective. MATC...

  20. An Empirical Test of the Generic Model of Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    KOLDEN, GREGORY G.; HOWARD, KENNETH I.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined the propositions of Orlinsky and Howard’s generic model of psychotherapy with regard to self-relatedness, therapeutic bond, therapeutic realizations, session outcome, and termination outcome. Measures representing these constructs were derived from therapy session reports obtained from patients after sessions three and seven. A multiple-regression data analytic strategy was used that focused on the proportion of variance accounted for by single vari...

  1. Etyczne uwarunkowania psychoterapii Gestalt [Ethical basics of Gestalt psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Paruzel-Czachura, Mariola

    2013-01-01

    The article is an attempt to describe the ethical basics of Gestalt psychotherapy, both known to the authors of Gestalt and unknown, to the insight into the problem. The ethical principles underlying Gestalt are the issue of responsibility, freedom, rationality, nature of good and evil and the principle of the golden mean. The article also attempts to answer the question of how to be a free and authentic person on the basis of the Gestalt approach

  2. Characteristics of Patients Involved in Psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Sabina Alispahić; Enedina Hasanbegović-Anić; Đenita Tuce; Nina Hadžiahmetović; Aneta Sandić

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the demographic and clinical characteristics of Bosnian and Herzegovinian patients involved in psychotherapeutic treatments in order to explore the current situation of psychotherapy in Bosnia and Herzegovina.Methods: The study included 213 patients (154 women and 47 men) undergoing diverse psychotherapeutic treatments. Data about demographic and clinical characteristics were collected by questionnaire. Following characteristics were docume...

  3. P-1139 - Increased utilization of health care services after psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten Munthe; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    2012-01-01

    Background Psychotherapeutic treatment is associated with significant reduction of symptoms in patients, and it is generally assumed that treatment improves health and decreases the need for additional health care. The present study investigates the long-term changes in utilization of health care...... a long-term period psychotherapy patients increased their utilization of health care services with a factor 3 compared to a control group....

  4. Investigating Links Between Intimacy and Violence in Intensive Psychotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Trice, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This research examines links between intimacy and violence within the transference relationship of a three year old boy during intensive psychotherapy. Psychoanalytic clinical findings are used to examine triggers to violence that initially appeared to link with moments of emotional warmth. The research uses a retrospective single case study design. The clinical data cover a period of transition in the child's life from being a 'looked after child' in foster care to being adopted. There was a...

  5. [Psychotherapies for the Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Katherine; Aranda, Mariana

    The phantom limb pain has been described as a condition in which patients experience a feeling of itching, spasm or pain in a limb or body part that has been previously amputated. Such pain can be induced by a conflict between the representation of the visual and proprioceptive feedback of the previously healthy limb. The phantom limb pain occurs in at least 42 to 90% of amputees. Regular drug treatment of phantom limb pain is almost never effective. A systematic review of the literature was conducted in Medline and Cochrane using the MESH terms "phantom limb pain" and "psychotherapy", published in the last 10 years, in English and Spanish, finding 49 items. After reviewing the abstracts, 25 articles were excluded for not being related to the objective of the research. Additionally cross references of included articles and literature were reviewed. To describe the psychotherapies used in the management of phantom limb pain, their effectiveness and clinical application reported in the literature. The mechanisms underlying phantom limb pain were initially explained, as were the published studies on the usefulness of some psychotherapies such as mirror visual feedback and immersive virtual reality, visual imagery, desensitization and reprocessing eye movements and hypnosis. The phantom limb pain is a complex syndrome that requires pharmacological and psychotherapeutic intervention. The psychotherapies that have been used the most as adjuvants in the treatment of phantom limb pain are mirror visual feedback, desensitization and reprocessing eye movements, imagery and hypnosis. Studies with more representative samples, specifically randomized trials are required. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Form and structure and their function in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A

    1992-07-01

    Psychotherapy is a creative process with the same types of effects and determinants as other creative activities in fields such as literature, visual arts, and science. In all of these activities, a focus on form and structure serves to generate new and valuable resultants or creations. As shown in the example of the poet Richard Wilbur's creation of a poem, his focus on rhyme and other formal features generated a new and valuable emotional tension in the poem. In psychotherapy, the creation consists of new and valuable aspects or structural features of personality. This creative result in therapy is produced in part by therapists' focus on form in terms of sequences, style of verbal and non-verbal presentation, and the phases of encounter, growth, and separation. As shown in the psychotherapy session excerpted, the therapist's lack of attention to the critical theme initiated by the patient at the beginning of the session (encounter) as well as to the meanings of connections between sequences in the following interactions (growth) led to a non-creative or destructive suicidal threat at the end (separation). The overall creative result arises also from therapists' attention to patients' approaches to the overall structure of psychotherapy as a regularly occurring timed experience in which the therapist does not directly intervene in the patient's life. This structural organization provides a trial domain for the patient in which creative growth and personal welfare can be facilitated. Both patient and therapist need to focus on any attempts to undermine the structural organization and its meaning. Similarly, in creative activities in other fields, writers, artists, and scientists characteristically focus on form, in a detailed as well as general way, in order to facilitate both aesthetic and social growth and welfare.

  7. Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy: An Emerging Trauma-Informed Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Page Walker Buck; Nadine Bean; Kristen de Marco

    2017-01-01

    Equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) has emerged as a promising, evidence-based intervention for the treatment of trauma and stressor-related disorders. This experiential therapy offers an option for clients whose traumatic experiences render traditional talk therapies ineffective. Initial research on the most robust model of EAP, developed by the Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA), indicates strong, positive effects for children, adolescents and adults who have experienc...

  8. The application of attachment theory to a psychotherapy case

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.A. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the psychotherapeutic use of Attachment Theory. Attachment Theory is an interpersonal theory which refers to the way an individual internalises an emotional-cognitive model of his relationships with his various attachment figures. These models of ways of relating are reflected in the way an individual speaks. The methodology of the study entailed conducting the semi-structured Adult Attachment Interview to elicit a psychotherapy client's narr...

  9. Beyond sensorimotor imitation in the neonate: Mentalization psychotherapy in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desseilles, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Despite the persuasiveness of Keven & Akins' (K&A) review, we argue that mentalization, or the ability to interpret the mental states of oneself and others, is required to construct the neonate mind, going far beyond sensorimotor imitation. This concept, informed by certain psychoanalytic and attachment theories, has produced a form of therapy called mentalization-based psychotherapy, which aims to improve emotional regulation. Our aim here is to shed light on a form of neonatal imitation that goes beyond sensorimotor imitation.

  10. Efficacy of combined cognitive-behavior therapy and hypnotherapy in anorexia nervosa: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Prasanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 22-year-old female diagnosed with anorexia nervosa received brief psychotherapy within a span of 1.5 months. Detailed cognitive-behavioral assessment was done and eating attitude was rated. Intervention of eating behavior and cognitive restructuring were initiated along with regular practice of self-hypnosis with ego-strengthening suggestions. Age regression was done to identify conflicts. Significant improvement in eating attitude was noted after 8 sessions without relapse at 3 months. Details of the psychotherapy are discussed.

  11. Incorporation of massage into psychotherapy: an integrative and conjoint approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, Paul; Parekh-Bhurke, Sheetal

    2011-02-01

    This article presents the potential integration of psychotherapy and massage when considering the essence of their beneficial effects. The essence of this model of practice is multifaceted, combining principles from anatomy, physiology and neuroscience with psychotherapy to benefit patient care. It has been advocated that possessing multidisciplinary knowledge from these areas of science enhances psychotherapists' holistic care of their depressive patients. A narrative review of the literatures and a qualitative, conceptual synthesis has been performed to create a new theoretical-pragmatic construct. This article introduces the concept of massage practice as a part of psychotherapy practice and presents the potential integration of psychotherapeutic knowledge with clinical decision-making and the management of depressive symptoms. The authors emphasize the usefulness of multi- and interdisciplinary knowledge in the psychotherapeutic process and explain how this knowledge might be extrapolated and incorporated into theoretical and practical settings to benefit depressive patients. The justification for this concept is also presented. The principles set out in this article may be a useful source of information for psychotherapists concerned about their patients' holistic well-being in addition to the psychopathology for which they have sought treatment. Researchers and psychotherapists can obtain valuable and additional knowledge through cross-fertilization of ideas across the arguments presented here.

  12. Issues of spirituality and religion in psychotherapy supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienenfeld, David; Yager, Joel

    2007-01-01

    We note gaps between the basic science of psychotherapy and the spiritual dimensions of religious life; between the beliefs and practices of patients and those of therapists; and between evidence for the influence of spirituality on health and the lack of its integration into psychotherapeutic training. We attempt to provide a framework to bridge this gap in supervision. We reviewed the literature on the roles of spirituality and religion in mental health and illness; on the place of religion in psychotherapy; and on the pedagogy of spirituality. Issues requiring attention include definitions of terms; awareness of personal beliefs; consideration of the boundaries between religiosity and pathology; and distinction between religious structures and personal beliefs. A format for addressing these issues in supervision includes: assisting the trainee with self-awareness; providing tools for spiritual assessment of the patient; providing developmental schema for spirituality; and maintaining awareness of the intersubjectivity of the patient-therapist field and the trainee-supervisor field. Existing literature provides usable frameworks for integrating religion and spirituality into psychotherapy supervision. We offer suggestions on how this may be accomplished.

  13. [Clinical experience in communication in autogenous psychotherapy and hypnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletti, P L; Peresson, L

    1983-12-30

    Questions relating to communication and metacommunication during two forms of directive psychotherapy (Schultz's autogenous training and hypnosis) are examined. The concept of rigidity and cognitive flexibility with regard to the physician-patient relationship is discussed: abstract-concrete dynamics, abstract generalisation of diagnosis, linguistic egocentricity, stereotypical adaptation to conventional language. Some attention is devoted to Heider's balance theory as the first approach to psychological understanding of the therapeutic relationship. The communicative and metacommunicative process described by the Palo Alto (California) school is discussed. Autogenous psychotherapy and hypnosis extend through the concepts of symmetrical relation and inferior complementarity. The criteria for reaching these objectives are stated, along with the pragmatic methods devised for decoding messages and gaining access to metacommunication. Three clinical cases treated through autogenous training and one with hypnosis are analysed with respect to communication and from the relational standpoint. The patient's messages are decoded, the ambiguity of the communication is detected, and the physician's possible answers are examined at both the technical and the emotive level. It is felt that the correct use of the communicational perspective greatly extends the possibilities of autogenous training and hypnosis. It is not a question of combining relational and autogenous management, but of using the Palo Alto discoveries in the more complete understanding of cases in which psychotherapy is employed.

  14. AN INTEGRATIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN. THE WIZARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria Popescu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tendencies in child psychotherapy is the integration of various psychotherapeutic approaches and technical interventions belonging to different orientations. Based on the Harry Potter stories, the „Wizarding School” structured group therapy program is a 12-step integratively oriented program applicable in personal development, individual and group therapy for children aged 6 to 13 (at present being adapted for adult psychotherapy. The program takes place within a fairy tale, being therefore a type of informal hypnotic trance. The interventions are drawn from the lessons described in Harry Potter’s story at Hogwarts, based on the fundamental principles of child psychotherapy and including elements of play therapy, art therapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive- behavioural therapy, transactional analysis, supportive therapy, family therapy and person centred therapy. From a theoretical point of view the program is based on elements from a number of psychotherapeutic approaches, the main concept being that we need to create a therapeutic myth that is acceptable to a child. The program is not suitable for children with structural deficits, who have difficulties in making the difference between fantasy and reality.

  15. How Can Geography and Mobile Phones Contribute to Psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrás, Carlos; García, Yolanda; Aguilera, Adrián; Rocha, Álvaro

    2017-06-01

    Interdisciplinary relationships between Geography and Psychotherapy are an opportunity for innovation. Indeed, scientific works found on bibliographic databases and concerning this theme are scarce. Geographical sub-fields, such as the Geography of Emotions or Psychoanalytical Geography have started to emerge, theorizing about and interpreting feelings, emotions, moods, sufferings, of the chronically ill or diversified social groups and sites. But a less theoretical and more practical approach, in the sense of proposing, predicting and intervening, is lacking; as well as research into the possibilities offered by communication technologies and mobile phones. In the present work, we present the results of a review of the most relevant scientific works published internationally; we reflect on the contributions of Geography and mobile phones to psychosocial therapies and define the orientation and questions that should be posed in future research, from the point of view of geography and regarding psychotherapy. We conclude that the production of georeferenced data via mobile phones concerning the daily lives of people opens great possibilities for cognitive behavioural therapy and mental health. They allow for the development of personalized mood maps that locate the places where a person experiences greater or lesser stress on a daily basis; they allow for a cartography of emotions, a cognitive cartography of the places we access physically or through the Internet, of our feelings and psychosocial experiences. They open the door to the possibility of offering personalized psychotherapy treatments focusing on the ecological-environmental analysis of the places frequented by the person on a daily basis.

  16. The potential dangers of using MDMA for psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Andrew C

    2014-01-01

    MDMA has properties that may make it attractive for psychotherapy, although many of its effects are potentially problematic. These contrasting effects will be critically reviewed in order to assess whether MDMA could be safe for clinical usage. Early studies from the 1980s noted that MDMA was an entactogen, engendering feelings of love and warmth. However, negative experiences can also occur with MDMA since it is not selective in the thoughts or emotions it releases. This unpredictability in the psychological material released is similar to another serotonergic drug, LSD. Acute MDMA has powerful neurohormonal effects, increasing cortisol, oxytocin, testosterone, and other hormone levels. The release of oxytocin may facilitate psychotherapy, whereas cortisol may increase stress and be counterproductive. MDMA administration is followed by a period of neurochemical recovery, when low serotonin levels are often accompanied by lethargy and depression. Regular usage can also lead to serotonergic neurotoxicity, memory problems, and other psychobiological problems. Proponents of MDMA-assisted therapy state that it should only be used for reactive disorders (such as PTSD) since it can exacerbate distress in those with a prior psychiatric history. Overall, many issues need to be considered when debating the relative benefits and dangers of using MDMA for psychotherapy.

  17. The State of the Art of Group Psychotherapy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Taboada, Cristina; Amutio, Alberto; Elgorriaga, Edurne; Arnoso, Ainara

    2015-10-01

    (1) What is the history and the theoretical orientation of group therapy in Spain? (2) How is training organized? (3) What role does group psychotherapy play in the health system in Spain? (4) What is the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice in Spain? (5) What topics can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Spain? (6) How are group-related issues important within the social background of Spain? and (7) What does group work hold for the future? Although not even a century has passed since the birth of this discipline, there have already been many events associated with the management of power and knowledge, the development of a sense of community, and the evolution of the political and social life of our country. Group therapy training is still evolving and is properly supported and accredited by prestigious institutions. In the 2013 Symposium of the Spanish Society of Group Psychotherapy and Group Techniques (SEPTG), the need for joint group theories and techniques within the profession's activities was clearly highlighted. Further, the enthusiasm of group psychotherapists to open themselves to specific social perspectives (health, education, community prevention, organizations) is a way of encouraging society to untangle conscious and unconscious knots that are created in social interaction.

  18. Mentalization-based psychotherapy interventions with mothers-to-be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Rayna D

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the theory of mentalization has been applied to a number of clinically relevant areas including psychotherapy for patients with borderline personality disorder, therapy with adolescents and children, treatment of self-harm in young people, parent-infant early interventions, and even community outreach (see Midgley & Vrouvam, 2012. Minding the child: Mentalizing interventions with children, young people, and their families. London and New York: Routledge). Extending on this body of work, the present article applies the theory of mentalization to psychotherapies that aim to help first time expecting mothers psychologically adjust to and prepare for motherhood. Theory and research suggest that pregnancy represents an intermediate space in which, under ideal circumstances, the woman comes to represent herself as a mother, her unborn child as a separate and intentional being, and her emotional bond or attachment to the fetus. However, the expecting mother's own conflictual experiences being mothered are likely to influence her ability to mentalize her pregnancy, setting the stage for problems in the mother-infant dyad postpartum. This article explores how mentalizing techniques may be used in psychotherapy to help mothers-to-be to mentalize their emerging identity as a mother, their unborn child, and their developing relationship to the fetus. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Learning through the lens: ethical considerations in videotaping psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funkenstein, Amy B; Kessler, Katherine Ann; Schen, Cathy R

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatry training programs have begun to use technology to enhance psychotherapy teaching. Videotaped interviews provide a window into the psychotherapeutic exchange, demystifying the process and capturing verbal and nonverbal interactions, facial expression, and tone of voice-which can illustrate therapeutic elements such as the alliance and resistance. The process of videotaping psychotherapeutic interviews, however, introduces issues related to consent, ethics, and the dynamics of therapy. By examining two cases in which residents asked their patients to videotape a session for didactic purposes and encountered divergent outcomes, we explore the ethical issues unique to providing informed consent for videotaping psychotherapy. Informed consent must be given verbally and in writing. Verbal consent must include discussion of the risks and benefits of therapy. The discussion must also include the risks inherent in memorializing sensitive material on an external device, with disclosure of the logistics of how data will be stored, who will view the recorded material, and when it will be destroyed. Therapists should be aware of the coercive power inherent in the physician-patient relationship and should individualize each informed consent procedure with this knowledge in mind. Despite these potential pitfalls, videotaping sessions provides a wealth of information about both patients and therapists that can improve psychotherapy teaching and supervision, and indirectly improve patient care.

  20. The dose-effect relationship in psychotherapy: a defining achievement for Dr. Kenneth Howard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopta, S Mark

    2003-07-01

    This article summarizes the Howard, Kopta, Krause, and Orlinsky (1986) study and notes its contributions to the field of psychotherapy. These contributions include (a) being the flagship study to estimate how psychotherapy is enough, (b) establishing number of sessions or dose as the common treatment unit of psychotherapy, (c) providing the first dosage standard for determining treatment groups, (d) inspiring the recent wave of effectiveness research, and (e) presenting the first methodology that assesses the efficiency of psychotherapy. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol.

  1. [What type of psychotherapy in the management of chronic pelvic and perineal pain?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard-Destelan, M; Rigaud, J; Riant, T; Labat, J-J

    2010-11-01

    How to propose psychotherapy in a patient with chronic pelvic and perineal pain? Description of the psychological and behavioural profile of patients with chronic pelvic and perineal pain, the indications for proposing psychotherapy and the reasons for choosing a particular type of psychotherapy. Very few studies have analysed the impact of psychotherapy in the treatment of chronic pelvic and perineal pain and more extensive studies should be conducted. Advice concerning the modalities of referring a patient to a psychotherapist, based on a multidisciplinary approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy on marriage adaptive and postpartum depression in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Hajiheidari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The findings of this research confirm marriage interpersonal psychotherapy on the depression recovery and the increasing marriage satisfaction of women suffering from postpartum depression.

  3. Tools for Practical Psychotherapy: A Transtheoretical Collection (or Interventions Which Have, At Least, Worked for Us).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joel; Feinstein, Robert E

    2017-01-01

    Regardless of their historical and theoretical roots, strategies, tactics, and techniques used in everyday psychotherapy across diverse theoretical schools contain common factors and methods from other specific psychotherapeutic modalities that contribute substantially to psychotherapy outcomes. Common factors include alliance, empathy, goal consensus/collaboration, positive regard/affirmation, and congruence/genuineness, among others. All therapies also recognize that factors specific to therapists impact treatment. Starting with these common factors, we add psychotherapeutic methods from many theoretical orientations to create a collection of clinical tools. We then provide concrete suggestions for enacting psychotherapy interventions, which constitute a transtheoretical collection. We begin with observations made by earlier scholars, our combined clinical and teaching experiences, and oral traditions and clinical pearls passed down from our own supervisors and mentors. We have compiled a list of tools for students with foundational knowledge in the basic forms of psychotherapy, which may expand their use of additional interventions for practicing effective psychotherapy. Our toolbox is organized into 4 categories: Relating; Exploring; Explaining; and Intervening. We note how these tools correspond to items previously published in a list of core psychotherapy competencies. In our view, the toolbox can be used most judiciously by students and practitioners schooled and grounded in frameworks for conducting established psychotherapies. Although they are still a work in progress, these tools can authorize and guide trainees and practitioners to enact specific approaches to psychotherapy utilizing other frameworks. We believe that psychotherapy education and training might benefit from explicitly focusing on the application of such interventions.

  4. A meta-analysis of psychotherapy and medication in unipolar depression and dysthymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imel, Zac E; Malterer, Melanie B; McKay, Kevin M; Wampold, Bruce E

    2008-10-01

    There remains considerable disagreement regarding the relative efficacy of psychotherapy and medication across types of depression. We used random effects meta-analysis to examine the relative efficacy of psychotherapy vis-à-vis medication at post-treatment and follow-up. We also estimated the relative efficacy of continued medication versus discontinued psychotherapy. As twenty-eight studies (39 effects, n=3,381) met inclusion criteria, we were able to conduct an adequately powered test of between-study heterogeneity and examine if the type of depression influenced relative efficacy. Psychotherapy and medication were not significantly different at post-treatment, however effect sizes were not consistent. Although there was no association between severity and relative efficacy, a small but significant advantage for medications in the treatment of dysthymia did emerge. However, psychotherapy showed a significant advantage over medication at follow-up and this advantage was positively associated with length of follow-up. Moreover, discontinued acute phase psychotherapy did not differ from continued medication at follow-up. Limitations included relatively fewer studies of severe and chronic depression, as well as dysthymia. In addition, only a minority of studies reported follow-up data. Our results indicated that both psychotherapy and medication are viable treatments for unipolar depression and that psychotherapy may offer a prophylactic effect not provided by medication. However, our analyses diverged from previous findings in that effects were not consistent and medication was significantly more efficacious than psychotherapy in the treatment of dysthymia.

  5. Mirror neurons: their implications for group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Victor L

    2010-10-01

    Recently discovered mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the brain register the actions and intentions of both the organism and others in the environment. As such, they may play a significant role in social behavior and groups. This paper considers the potential implications of mirror neurons and related neural networks for group therapists, proposing that mirror neurons and mirror systems provide "hard-wired" support for the group therapist's belief in the centrality of relationships in the treatment process and exploring their value in accounting for group-as-a-whole phenomena. Mirror neurons further confirm the holistic, social nature of perception, action, and intention as distinct from a stimulus-response behaviorism. The implications of mirror neurons and mirroring processes for the group therapist role, interventions, and training are also discussed.

  6. New developments in transference focused psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernberg, Otto F

    2016-04-01

    This paper will summarize recent clinical developments in the treatment of borderline patients at the Personality Disorders Institute at Cornell. The experiences under review will include the careful, ongoing monitoring of developments in the patient's life outside the sessions, and their consideration in diagnosing affective dominance during the hours. Other issues include the discussion of a 'second chance' approach to contract violations; the assessment and concern with the patient's assumption of responsibility for himself; the contradictions between actual behavior patterns and life goals, and between personality potentials and present functioning; the technical implications of particular constellations of regressive narcissistic features; drug dependence and antisocial behavior; and life goals and treatment goals. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  7. Emotions, the great captains of our lives: their role in the process of change in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie S

    2012-11-01

    A view of human functioning is presented in which functioning is seen as integrating head and heart, emotion and reason, in a process by which people are constantly making sense of their lived emotional experience to form narratives of told experience. Because much of the processing involved in the generation of emotional experience occurs independently of and prior to conscious thought, therapeutic work on a purely cognitive level of processing is unlikely to produce enduring emotional change. The questions especially relevant to psychotherapy are how we can best facilitate change in emotions rather than only changes in cognition or behavior. A theory of emotional change is presented in which change in emotion is seen as requiring that first emotions be felt and then they both be exposed to new emotional experience and be reflected on to create new meaning. The process of emotional change thus involves both new experience and new understanding. At times, people also need to protect themselves from being overwhelmed by emotions. They need to be helped to tolerate and regulate them so that emotions inform their lives rather than control them. The importance of both emotion awareness and emotion regulation in therapeutic change is thus highlighted. The article ends by reviewing research on the role of emotional processing in therapeutic change and presents six empirically based principles of emotional processing that will help move the field toward psychotherapy integration in a manner that clearly recognizes emotion as a key component of functioning and change. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary data from a randomized pilot study of web-based functional analytic psychotherapy therapist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Jonathan W; Tsai, Mavis; Holman, Gareth; Koerner, Kelly

    2013-06-01

    Therapists of many persuasions emphasize the therapy relationship in their work, a priority backed by strong empirical evidence. Training in how to maximize the power and potential of the therapy relationship, however, has lagged behind. A novel approach to using the therapy relationship and to training therapists in its use is provided by Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP). FAP training involves eight 2-hr weekly training sessions conducted online using web-conferencing technology. The training integrates behavioral principles with a focus on trainee-trainer and trainee-trainee relationships in a highly structured course that evokes the desirable FAP therapist-trainee behaviors and collectively shapes the behaviors through reinforcement by the trainer and other trainees. In a preliminary study, 16 therapist-trainees were randomly assigned to receive either immediate FAP training or training after a waitlist period. Significant and large effects of training were found on both self-reported and observer-assessed measures for the first training group, and the waitlist training group replicated the first training group with significant within-subject change over the course of training. Finally, qualitative feedback from therapists indicated high satisfaction with the primary elements of the training protocol. Several important limitations to this preliminary study are discussed.

  9. Change processes in residential cognitive and interpersonal psychotherapy for social phobia: a process-outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffart, Asle; Borge, Finn-Magnus; Sexton, Harold; Clark, David M

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test cognitive and interpersonal models for improving social phobia. Eighty patients with social phobia were randomized to 10-week residential cognitive (RCT) or residential interpersonal psychotherapy (RIPT). They completed process measures every Thursday and a sub-outcome measure every Monday. The ratings were analyzed with mixed models. Weekly changes in the process variables derived from the cognitive model (self-focus, estimated probability and estimated cost of negative social events, safety behaviors) predicted subsequent weekly changes in social anxiety. Changes in the interpersonal variable perceived acceptance by others also predicted subsequent changes in social anxiety. On the other hand, changes in social anxiety predicted changes in the four cognitive variables. There were no interactive effects of process with treatment. The cognitive variables decreased during treatment to a similar degree in both treatments. The results indicate that, to reduce social anxiety, therapy should target self-focus, estimated probability and cost of feared social events, safety behaviors, and perceived acceptance by others. The process of improvement may involve positive cycles in that a reduction of social anxiety, in turn, appeared to impact self-focus, probability, cost, and safety behaviors.

  10. A Review of Psychotherapy Outcome Research: Considerations for School-Based Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkelback, Emily A.; Reese, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating psychotherapeutic outcome is an important endeavor given psychology's focus on identifying effective treatments. There is ample evidence to suggest that psychotherapy interventions for children and adolescents are effective. Unfortunately, the child and adolescent psychotherapy outcome literature lags behind the adult-focused outcome…

  11. Transference--counter-transference constellations and enactments in the psychotherapy of destructive narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, G

    1999-03-01

    Destructive narcissism, characterized by a perverse alliance between the self and an omnipotent bad internal object, constitutes a serious obstacle to psychoanalytic psychotherapy. This paper draws together various object relations theories of destructive narcissism, and presents a case study of a failed psychotherapy to illustrate the transference--counter-transference constellations and their associated enactments in treatment of this disturbance.

  12. [Marketing of psychotherapy--small advertisements in the "market" of psychology today].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finzen, A; Hoffmann-Richter, U

    1996-02-01

    Beyond traditional psychotherapy many new psychotherapeutic schools and methods strive for recognition. Many of them offer psychotherapeutic training by advertisement in Psychologie heute, a popular psychological magazine. These advertisements are analysed. Possible consequences of this flouristing market of methods on social representation of psychotherapy are discussed.

  13. Does Adding Medication to Psychotherapy for Depression Improve or Worsen Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karon, Bertram P.

    2007-01-01

    That two-thirds of depressed adults are resistant to medication has led to the addition of psychotherapy to treatment, but is medication necessary? Results are at least as good with psychotherapy alone, and the relapse rate is less. Handling of suicidal danger, sleep disorders, and common depressing issues in college students are discussed along…

  14. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy with former child soldiers: meeting the murderous self

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, N.; Van Zon, P.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the application of transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) to the treatment of former child soldiers suffering from dissociative identity disorder. It focuses on the problems with aggression faced in psychotherapy. TFP provides a psychodynamic, object relations model to

  15. Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A): A Case Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Elisabeth Baerg; Mufson, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of a depressed adolescent (15 years of age) boy using Interpersonal Psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A). IPT-A is an empirically supported psychosocial intervention for adolescents suffering from a depressive episode. It is delivered as an individual psychotherapy with a minimum of parental…

  16. Solicited Diary Studies of Psychotherapy in Qualitative Research - Pros and Cons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackrill, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Diary studies are scarce within the field of qualitative psychotherapy research. In this article arguments for and against the employment of solicited diaries studies in qualitative psychotherapy research are investigated. The strengths of diary studies are presented along with arguments concerning...

  17. Gestalt Therapy: Student Perceptions of Fritz Perls in "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joe; Jacobus, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" ("TAP") videotape series introduces students to three major schools of psychotherapy: client-centered therapy, Gestalt therapy, and rational-emotive therapy. A sample of undergraduate students viewed the "TAP" series. The students were surveyed about their observations of…

  18. The role of emotional intelligence in symptom reduction after psychotherapy in a heterogeneous psychiatric sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyklicek, I.; Schalken, P.; Meertens, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Emotional intelligence of the patient has been claimed to potentially be an important factor in psychotherapy. Empirical studies are largely lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine if (i) pre-intervention emotional intelligence predicts outcome of psychotherapy and (ii) change

  19. Clinical Significance of Psychotherapy for Unipolar Depression: A Meta-Analytic Approach to Social Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietzel, Michael T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Used meta-analysis to study the clinical significance of psychotherapy for symptoms of unipolar depression, using the Beck Depression Inventory. Results indicated that psychotherapy produces outcomes of moderate clinical significance which are well-maintained at follow-up, that individual therapy is associated with greater clinical significance…

  20. Effects of Varying Session Length and Frequency in Brief Emotive Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierenbaum, Howard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study examined the role of emotional catharsis in brief emotive psychotherapy and its differential effects within three time frames. The findings are seen as supporting the contention that within a specific time frame emotional catharsis can lead to certain positive outcomes in brief emotive psychotherapy. (Author)

  1. Can Two Psychotherapy Process Measures Be Dependably Rated Simultaneously? A Generalizability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvenes, Pal G.; Berggraf, Lene; Hoffart, Asle; Levy, Raymon A.; Ablon, J. Stuart; McCullough, Leigh; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    Observer ratings in psychotherapy are a common way of collecting information in psychotherapy research. However, human observers are imperfect instruments, and their ratings may be subject to variability from several sources. One source of variability can be raters' assessing more than 1 instrument at a time. The purpose of this research is to…

  2. Culturally Adapted Psychotherapy and the Legitimacy of Myth: A Direct-Comparison Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benish, Steven G.; Quintana, Stephen; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychotherapy is a culturally encapsulated healing practice that is created from and dedicated to specific cultural contexts (Frank & Frank, 1993; Wampold, 2007; Wrenn, 1962). Consequently, conventional psychotherapy is a practice most suitable for dominant cultural groups within North America and Western Europe but may be culturally incongruent…

  3. ‘We’re all learning from the horse’: an investigation of practitioners’ experiences of offering equine assisted psychotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleetwood, Kirstie J.

    2016-01-01

    The research dossier contains a literature review and two research reports. The literature review provides an overview of the development of Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (EAP) and explores the research literature to date. This is followed by two qualitative research reports. The first is an exploration of clients’ experiences of Equine Assisted Psychotherapy. The second investigates how practitioners experience offering Equine Assisted Psychotherapy.

  4. Subgroup effects of occupational therapy-based intervention for people with advanced cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Marc Sampedro; Østergaard, Lisa Gregersen; la Cour, Karen

    2018-01-01

    Background: Many people with advanced cancer have decreased ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL). We recently performed a randomized, controlled trial (RCT) assessing the efficacy of an occupational therapy-based program, the ’Cancer Home-Life Intervention’ in people with advanced...

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Pathological Gamblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M.; Ammerman, Yola; Bohl, Jaime; Doersch, Anne; Gay, Heather; Kadden, Ronald; Molina, Cheryl; Steinberg, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated efficacy of psychotherapies for pathological gambling. Pathological gamblers (N = 231) were randomly assigned to (a) referral to Gamblers Anonymous (GA), (b) GA referral plus a cognitive-behavioral (CB) workbook, or (c) GA referral plus 8 sessions of individual CB therapy. Gambling and related problems were assessed…

  6. Lessons from literature for psychotherapy practice and research1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlinsky, David E

    2018-02-01

    Insights from the study of literature can inform and clarify concepts to guide psychotherapy practice and research. The author offers instances from narrative fiction (Durrell's Alexandria Quartet) and poetry (Hopkins, Baudelaire) to illustrate how the formulation of experience in words that are evocative (vs. ordinary), original (vs. trite), and precise (vs. approximate) are able to capture attention, move the emotions, and challenge beliefs; and how linkages among experiences, vividly and precisely expressed, create and enhance narrative meaning-revealing the inherent relativity of individual meanings and the need to consider the aggregate of relevant perspectives in every interpersonal situation. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Psychotherapy in South Africa: the case of Mrs. A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Saths

    2007-08-01

    Psychotherapy in South Africa is confronted by issues that reflect the emerging nature of the nascent democracy. Historic racial patterns have characterized the production of psychotherapists and psychologists who are predominantly white female and who often have difficulty mediating the socioeconomic and ethnic reality of their black clientele. Despite this problem, psychotherapists are increasingly relied on and are equipping themselves to intervene meaningfully without their values impacting on the outcomes. These points are illustrated in the case of Mrs. A, who is treated in the cultural context of an evolving South Africa. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The experience in diagnosis and psychotherapy of students’ anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokoumova G.V.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available the article discusses the concept and types of anxiety, the characteristics of student age, describes the experience of diagnosis and psychotherapy of students’ anxiety during the examination session by the scientific student laboratory. The work consists of 3 stages: 1 ascertaining stage – the aim is to analyze the level of students’ anxiety; 2 psycho-corrective stage – the aim is to optimize and reduce the level of anxiety of students in the examination period; 3 controlling stage – the aim is to analyze the influence of the method of desensitization and reprocessing trauma by eye movements (EMDR on the level of students’ anxiety.

  9. The Perception of Changes Among Participants of Drug Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Opora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The positive changes among addicted people usually don’t happen by themselves, but they are results of the process which stays under the impact of the aspirations, values and priorities of the person at the moment. Enhancing the motivation of addicted people requires a huge effort from them what helps in making changes in the life style. The presented article contains results of the research. The main aim was describing critical events, which appeared among people addicted to drugs and made them to change their life styles. Additionally the article describes an classifies changes which were noticed by the participants of the stationary psychotherapy of drug addiction.

  10. Emotional regulation: implications for the psychobiology of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dan J

    2008-03-01

    A range of studies have contributed to understanding the psychobiology of emotional regulation. Functional imaging studies have demonstrated that cortico-limbic circuitry plays an important role in mediating processes such as reappraisal and suppression. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may be important in conscious reframing, while ventromedial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex may be particularly important in emotion evaluation. Gene variants and early environments impact underlying emotional regulation and its neurobiology. It may be hypothesized that during interventions such as psychotherapy there are improvements in emotional regulation, together with the normalization of related psychobiological mechanisms.

  11. The polar unities as a guide to psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J

    1982-03-01

    The author recognizes the need for a psychotherapy that aims to be either spiritual or wholistic to ground itself in appropriate philosophical and theological constructs. As one small step in this direction, the ontological elements as discussed by Paul Tillich are applied to some specific therapeutic issues. Striking parallels are found between Tillich's first two ontological elements (individualization-participation, and dynamics-form) and the two dimensions (cohesion and adaptability) of the circumplex model of family therapy. It is suggested that Tillich's third ontological element (freedom-destiny) throws useful light on the educational and psychotherapeutic issue of permissiveness versus authoritarianism.

  12. [Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of comorbid anxiety disorders and alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, S S

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders commonly co-occur with substance use disorders. It is known that alcohol-dependent patients are at greater risk of a relapse if they have a comorbid anxiety disorder. There is a lot of literature reporting on the efficacy of treatments that target anxiety or alcohol addiction separately but less research has examined treatments that address these disorders when they co-occur. Anxiety treatment for alcohol-dependent patients with a co-occuring anxiety disorder can alleviate anxiety symptoms but has no significant effect on the outcomes of alcohol treatment. Efficient combinations of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy can improve outcomes of comorbid disorders.

  13. Psychotherapy in General Practice as an Independent field of Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Fritzsche

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mental and psychosomatic problems and disorders are increasing and have become an enormous cost factor due to their chronification (increase in the periods of incapacity to work and a third of early retirement is due to mental disorders. A timely detection and targeted short-term interventions in primary care can, however, prevent their chronification. Patients desire the consideration of their psychosocial problems and emotional needs by their GP within the framework of professionally competent guided dialogues. Doctors with qualifications in psychosomatic basic care and an additional designation in psychotherapy are further trained for this and are able to intervene promptly and effectively.

  14. The psychosocial genomics of therapeutic hypnosis, psychotherapy, and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    This paean composed on the occasion of the inaugural Bernauer W. Newton Trust presentation celebrates the personal and professional culture of 50 years of mentorship, teaching, and research by the American Society for Clinical Hypnosis (ASCH). This review of current neuroscience concepts of therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy is made possible by the cooperation and dedication of all members of our society. Emerging pathways of psychosocial genomic research, which will lead to new directions for our society, are highlighted for their impact on our professional practice in the present and future.

  15. Changes in personality functioning as a result of group psychotherapy with elements of individual psychotherapy in persons with neurotic and personality disorders - MMPI-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyranka, Katarzyna; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Mielimąka, Michał; Sobański, Jerzy A; Smiatek-Mazgaj, Bogna; Klasa, Katarzyna; Dembińska, Edyta; Müldner-Nieckowski, Łukasz; Rodziński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The study of group psychotherapy influence on the personality functioning of patients on treatment for neurotic disorders and selected personality disorders (F4-F6 under ICD-10). The study concerned 82 patients (61 women and 21 men) who underwent intensive short-term group psychotherapy in a day ward. A comprehensive assessment of the patients' personality functioning was carried out at the outset and the end of the psychotherapy utilising the MMPI-2 questionnaire. At the treatment outset the majority of the study patients demonstrated a considerable level of disorders in five MMPI-2 clinical scales (Depression, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Psychastenia, Schizophrenia) and moderate pathology in Hypochondria. In the Mania scale most patients obtained results comparable to the healthy population when the treatment commenced. Having undergone the psychotherapy treatment, the majority of the examined were observed to demonstrate positive changes in those areas of personality functioning which were classified as severe or moderate pathology. Short-term intensive comprehensive group psychotherapy with elements of individual psychotherapy leads to desirable changes in personality functioning.

  16. An expressive virtual audience with flexible behavioral styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, N.; Brinkman, W.P.; Riemsdijk, M.B. van; Neerincx, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, expressive virtual humans are used in psychological research, training, and psychotherapy. However, the behavior of these virtual humans is usually scripted and therefore cannot be modified freely at runtime. To address this, we created a virtual audience with parameterized behavioral

  17. Novel activity-dependent approaches to therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy: the general waking trance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Ernest; Erickson-Klein, Roxanna; Rossi, Kathryn

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a highly edited version of a videotape made in 1980 by Marion Moore, M.D., showing Milton H. Erickson and Moore demonstrating novel, activity-dependent approaches to hand-levitation and therapeutic hypnosis on their subject, Ernest Rossi. Erickson's naturalistic and utilization approach is described in his very direct and surprising induction in a trance challenged patient. These novel, and surprising inductions are examples of how Erickson was prescient in developing activity-dependent approaches to therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy several generations before modern neuroscience documented the activity-dependent molecular-genomic mechanisms of memory, learning, and behavior change. Erickson describes a case where he utilized what he called, "The General Waking Trance" when he "dared" not use an obvious hypnotic induction. It is proposed that the states of intense mental absorption and response attentiveness that are facilitated by the general waking trance are functionally related to the three conditions neuroscientists have identified as novelty, enrichment, and exercise (both mental and physical), which can turn on activity-dependent gene expression and activity-dependent brain plasticity, that are the molecular-genomic and neural basis ofmemory, learning, consciousness, and behavior change. We recommend that the next step in investigating the efficacy of therapeutic hypnosis will be in partnering with neuroscientists to explore the possibilities and limitations of utilizing the activity-dependent approaches to hypnotic induction and the general waking trance in facilitating activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity.

  18. Prescribing Clinicians’ Perspectives on Evidence-Based Psychotherapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Erin R.; Bernardy, Nancy C.; Jenkyn, Aaron B.; Parker, Louise E.; Lund, Brian C.; Alexander, Bruce; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based psychotherapies (EBP) for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder are not utilized to their full extent within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). VA provides care to many persons with PTSD and has been in the forefront of clinical practice guidelines and EBP training and dissemination. Yet VA continues to find EBP implementation difficult. Veterans with PTSD often initially present to prescribing clinicians, who then help make care decisions. It is therefore critical that these clinicians correctly screen and triage appropriate mental health care. The purpose of this study was to assess VA prescribing clinicians’ knowledge, perceptions, and referral behaviors related to EBPs for PTSD and to identify facilitators and barriers to implementing EBPs within VA. We conducted qualitative interviews with 26 VA prescribing clinicians. Limited access to EBPs was the most commonly noted barrier. The clinicians we interviewed also held specific beliefs and behaviors that may delay or deter EBPs. Strategies to improve utilization also emerged. Findings suggest the need for increased access to EBPs, training to optimize the role of prescribing clinicians in helping Veterans with PTSD make appropriate care decisions, and specific organizational changes to facilitate access and effective referral systems for EBPs. PMID:25431445

  19. Latent classes of nonresponders, rapid responders, and gradual responders in depressed outpatients receiving antidepressant medication and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Michel A; Quilty, Lena C; De Fruyt, Filip; De Bolle, Marleen; Rouillon, Frédéric; Bagby, R Michael

    2015-03-01

    We used growth mixture modeling (GMM) to identify subsets of patients with qualitatively distinct symptom trajectories resulting from treatment. Existing studies have focused on 12-week antidepressant trials. We used data from a concurrent antidepressant and psychotherapy trial over a 6-month period. Eight hundred twenty-one patients were randomized to receive either fluoxetine or tianepine and received cognitive-behavioral therapy, supportive therapy, or psychodynamic therapy. Patients completed the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale (MADRS) at the 0, 1, 3, and 6-month periods. Patients also completed measures of dysfunctional attitudes, functioning, and personality. GMM was conducted using MADRS scores and the number of growth classes to be retained was based on the Bayesian information criterion. Criteria supported the presence of four distinct latent growth classes representing gradual responders of high severity (42% of sample), gradual responders of moderate severity (31%), nonresponders (15%), and rapid responders (11%). Initial severity, greater use of emotional coping strategies, less use of avoidance coping strategies, introversion, and less emotional stability predicted nonresponder status. Growth classes were not associated with different treatments or with proportion of dropouts. The longer time period used in this study highlights potential overestimates of nonresponders in previous research and the need for continued assessments. Our findings demonstrate distinct growth trajectories that are independent of treatment modality and generalizable to most psychotherapy patients. The correlates of class membership provide directions for future studies, which can refine methods to predict likely nonresponders as a means to facilitate personalized treatments. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Review of The psychotherapist's own psychotherapy: Patient and clinician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip S

    2007-06-01

    Reviews the book, The psychotherapist's own psychotherapy: Patient and clinician perspectives by Jesse D. Geller, John C. Norcross, and David E. Orlinsky (2005). The editors of this book have two aims: 1) "to synthesize and explicate the accumulated knowledge on psychotherapy with psychotherapists," and 2) "to provide clinically tested and empirically grounded assistance to psychotherapists treating fellow therapists, as well as to those clinicians who seek personal treatment themselves." The editors seem to be walking a fine line between asserting their own integrative conclusions and setting the conditions for readers to arrive at conclusions on their own. The tendency is toward the latter. With this propensity in mind, readers might approach the book as a truly encyclopedic collection- best approached in piecemeal (nonintegrative) fashion, focusing on fascinating morsels that can stand alone. In contrast, for those readers who are drawn toward integration, the book may elicit contrasting experiences of deep familiarity and understanding, and disorienting befuddlement about what was just read. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).