WorldWideScience

Sample records for behavior control

  1. [Dyspnea and behavioral control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, T

    1992-04-01

    Respiration is automatically regulated via chemo- and mechanoreceptors existing in and outside the lungs, but it is also controlled voluntarily by behavioral factors. Voluntary increase in ventilation accentuates dyspnea and the sensory intensity at a given ventilation does not differ from that of exercise-induced hyperventilation, but it is significantly smaller than that during hypercapnia or hypoxia. Voluntary constraint of ventilation augments dyspnea in proportion to the degree of constraint even under isocapnic hyperoxia, and the respiratory sensation during constrained breathing is qualitatively more discomfortable than that during hyperventilation. Changes in the level and pattern of breathing under constant levels of chemical stimuli increase respiratory sensations and the intensity of dyspnea is minimal near the spontaneous levels, which supports the hypothesis that breathing is behaviorally regulated in part to minimize dyspnea. The system of behavioral control of breathing appears to be involved in the maintenance of body homeostasis by modifying the respiratory output through respiratory sensations.

  2. Facilitator control as automatic behavior: A verbal behavior analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Genae A.

    1993-01-01

    Several studies of facilitated communication have demonstrated that the facilitators were controlling and directing the typing, although they appeared to be unaware of doing so. Such results shift the focus of analysis to the facilitator's behavior and raise questions regarding the controlling variables for that behavior. This paper analyzes facilitator behavior as an instance of automatic verbal behavior, from the perspective of Skinner's (1957) book Verbal Behavior. Verbal behavior is autom...

  3. A Bayesian Formulation of Behavioral Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Quentin J. M.; Dayan, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Helplessness, a belief that the world is not subject to behavioral control, has long been central to our understanding of depression, and has influenced cognitive theories, animal models and behavioral treatments. However, despite its importance, there is no fully accepted definition of helplessness or behavioral control in psychology or…

  4. Fuzzy Behaviors for Control of Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Zein-Sabatto

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, an RWI B-14 robot has been used as the development platform to embody some basic behaviors that can be combined to build more complex robotics behaviors. Emergency, avoid-obstacle, left wall- following, right wall-following, and move-to-point behaviors have been designed and embodied as basic robot behaviors. The basic behaviors developed in this research are designed based on fuzzy control technique and are integrated and coordinated to from complex robotics system. More behaviors can be added into the system as needed. A robot task can be defined by the user and executed by the intelligent robot control system. Testing results showed that fuzzy behaviors made the robot move intelligently and adapt to changes in its environment.

  5. The Multiple Control of Verbal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Jack; Palmer, David C.; Sundberg, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Amid the novel terms and original analyses in Skinner's "Verbal Behavior", the importance of his discussion of multiple control is easily missed, but multiple control of verbal responses is the rule rather than the exception. In this paper we summarize and illustrate Skinner's analysis of multiple control and introduce the terms "convergent…

  6. Evaluating the Chinese Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Agnes; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak; Chan, Ko Ling; Yan, Elsie Chau Wai; Lam, Gloria Ling Lee; Tang, Debbie Hoi Ming; Graham-Kevan, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the utility of the Chinese version of the Revised Controlling Behaviors Scale (C-CBS-R) as a measure of controlling behaviors in violent Chinese intimate relationships. Using a mixed-methods approach, in-depth, individual interviews were conducted with 200 Chinese women survivors to elicit qualitative data about their personal experiences of control in intimate relationships. The use of controlling behaviors was also assessed using the C-CBS-R. Interview accounts suggested that the experiences of 91 of the women were consistent with the description of coercive control according to Dutton and Goodman's conceptualization of coercion. Using the split-half validation procedure, a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was conducted with the first half of the sample. The area under the curve (AUC) for using the C-CBS-R to identify high control was .99, and the cutoff score of 1.145 maximized both sensitivity and specificity. Applying the cutoff score to the second half gave a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 95%. Overall, the C-CBS-R has demonstrated utility as a measure of controlling behaviors with a cutoff score for distinguishing high from low levels of control in violent Chinese intimate relationships. PMID:24860075

  7. Controlling complex networks with conformity behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Wen; Nie, Sen; Wang, Wen-Xu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Controlling complex networks accompanied by common conformity behavior is a fundamental problem in social and physical science. Conformity behavior that individuals tend to follow the majority in their neighborhood is common in human society and animal communities. Despite recent progress in understanding controllability of complex networks, the existent controllability theories cannot be directly applied to networks associated with conformity. Here we propose a simple model to incorporate conformity-based decision making into the evolution of a network system, which allows us to employ the exact controllability theory to explore the controllability of such systems. We offer rigorous theoretical results of controllability for representative regular networks. We also explore real networks in different fields and some typical model networks, finding some interesting results that are different from the predictions of structural and exact controllability theory in the absence of conformity. We finally present an example of steering a real social network to some target states to further validate our controllability theory and tools. Our work offers a more realistic understanding of network controllability with conformity behavior and can have potential applications in networked evolutionary games, opinion dynamics and many other complex networked systems.

  8. Mathematical Control Theory II : Behavioral Systems and Robust Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belur, M.; Camlibel, M.K.; Rapisarda, P.; Scherpen, J.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This treatment of modern topics related to mathematical systems theory forms the proceedings of a workshop, Mathematical Systems Theory: From Behaviors to Nonlinear Control, held at the University of Groningen in July 2015. The workshop celebrated the work of Professors Arjan van der Schaft and Harr

  9. Neuroengineering control and regulation of behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, A.; Radzewicz, C.; Mankiewicz, L.; Hottowy, P.; Knapska, E.; Konopka, W.; Kublik, E.; Radwańska, K.; Waleszczyk, W. J.; Wójcik, D. K.

    2014-11-01

    To monitor neuronal circuits involved in emotional modulation of sensory processing we proposed a plan to establish novel research techniques combining recent biological, technical and analytical discoveries. The project was granted by National Science Center and we started to build a new experimental model for studying the selected circuits of genetically marked and behaviorally activated neurons. To achieve this goal we will combine the pioneering, interdisciplinary expertise of four Polish institutions: (i) the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology (Polish Academy of Sciences) will deliver the expertise on genetically modified mice and rats, mapping of the neuronal circuits activated by behavior, monitoring complex behaviors measured in the IntelliCage system, electrophysiological brain activity recordings by multielectrodes in behaving animals, analysis and modeling of behavioral and electrophysiological data; (ii) the AGH University of Science and Technology (Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Sciences) will use its experience in high-throughput electronics to build multichannel systems for recording the brain activity of behaving animals; (iii) the University of Warsaw (Faculty of Physics) and (iv) the Center for Theoretical Physics (Polish Academy of Sciences) will construct optoelectronic device for remote control of opto-animals produced in the Nencki Institute based on the unique experience in laser sources, studies of light propagation and its interaction with condensed media, wireless medical robotic systems, fast readout opto-electronics with control software and micromechanics.

  10. Can price controls induce optimal physician behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedig, G; Mitchell, J B; Cromwell, J

    1989-01-01

    Recently, budget-conscious policymakers have shifted their attention to the physician services market and have begun to consider a wide variety of price regulatory schemes for moderating expenditures in this market. In a recent article in this journal, Feldman and Sloan warned that price controls on physician services may cause undesirable declines in service quality, independent of their budgetary ramifications. Our aim in this article is to reconsider the effects of price controls in the broader context of insurance coverage and moral hazard. Our ultimate goal is to assess the benefits of price controls independent of specific assumptions about the controversial issues of demand inducement and income targeting. Using a simple extension of the Feldman/Sloan model, we find that price controls can be and almost certainly are welfare-improving as long as consumers are sufficiently well insured, regardless of where one stands on the inducement issue. The salutary effects of price controls, on the other hand, can be compromised by income-targeting behavior on the part of physicians. We also introduce evidence from Medicare's recent fee freeze to evaluate the possibility of income-targeting behavior empirically. While formal studies of income targeting suggest that its magnitude is small in cross-section, we warn that its effects may be larger over time; this is what our descriptive evidence suggests. We conclude that more dramatic short-term progress on physician fee inflation will require stronger measures, such as putting physicians at risk for consumer expenditures.

  11. Resilience and Controllability of Dynamic Collective Behaviors

    CERN Document Server

    Komareji, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The network paradigm is used to gain insight into the structural root causes of the resilience of consensus in dynamic collective behaviors, and to analyze the controllability of the swarm dynamics. Here we devise the dynamic signaling network which is the information transfer channel underpinning the swarm dynamics of the directed interagent connectivity based on a topological neighborhood of interactions. The study of the connectedness of the swarm signaling network reveals the profound relationship between group size and number of interacting neighbors, which is found to be in good agreement with field observations on flock of starlings [Ballerini et al. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 105: 1232]. Using a dynamical model, we generate dynamic collective behaviors enabling us to uncover that the swarm signaling network is a homogeneous clustered small-world network, thus facilitating emergent outcomes if connectedness is maintained. Resilience of the emergent consensus is tested by introducing exogenous e...

  12. Safety control program for complex system based on behavior science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Mei-jian; YANG Guang; CHEN Da-wei

    2008-01-01

    To control complex system's safety effectively, safety control program was supported based on the principles of behavioral science that shapes organizational be-havior, and organizational behavior produced individual behavior. The program can be structured into a model that consists of three modules including individual behavior rectifi-cation, organization behavior diagnosis and model of safety culture. The research result not only reveals the deep cause of complex system accidents but also provides structural descriptions with the accidents cause.

  13. Safety control program for complex system based on behavior science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Mei-jian; YANG Guang; CHEN Da-wei

    2008-01-01

    To control complex system's safety effectively,safety control program was supported based on the principles of behavioral science that shapes organizational behavior,and organizational behavior produced individual behavior.The program can be structured into a model that consists of three modules including individual behavior rectification,organization behavior diagnosis and model of safety culture.The research result not only reveals the deep cause of complex system accidents but also provides structural descriptions with the accidents cause.

  14. Instructional control of reinforcement learning: A behavioral and neurocomputational investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, Bradley B.; Jacobs, W. Jake; Sanfey, Alan G.; Frank, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Humans learn how to behave directly through environmental experience and indirectly through rules and instructions. Behavior analytic research has shown that instructions can control behavior, even when such behavior leads to sub-optimal outcomes (Hayes, S. (Ed.). 1989. Rule-governed behavior: cognition, contingencies, and instructional control. Plenum Press.). Here we examine the control of behavior through instructions in a reinforcement learning task known to depend on striatal dopaminergi...

  15. Complex chemosensory control of female reproductive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Eleanor J; Shah, Nirao M

    2014-01-01

    Olfaction exerts a profound influence on reproductive physiology and behavior in many animals, including rodents. Odors are recognized by sensory neurons residing in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO) in mice and many other vertebrates. The relative contributions of the MOE and VNO in the display of female behaviors are not well understood. Mice null for Cnga2 or Trpc2 essentially lack odor-evoked activity in the MOE and VNO, respectively. Using females mutant for one or both of Cnga2 and Trpc2, we find that maternal care is differentially regulated by the MOE and VNO: retrieval of wandering pups requires the MOE and is regulated redundantly by the VNO whereas maternal aggression requires both sensory epithelia to be functional. Female sexual receptivity appears to be regulated by both the MOE and VNO. Trpc2 null females have previously been shown to display male-type mounting towards other males. Remarkably, we find that females double mutant for Cnga2 and Trpc2 continue to mount other males, indicating that the disinhibition of male-type sexual displays observed in Trpc2 null females does not require chemosensory input from a functional MOE. Taken together, our findings reveal a previously unappreciated complexity in the chemosensory control of reproductive behaviors in the female mouse. PMID:24587340

  16. Complex chemosensory control of female reproductive behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor J Fraser

    Full Text Available Olfaction exerts a profound influence on reproductive physiology and behavior in many animals, including rodents. Odors are recognized by sensory neurons residing in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE and the vomeronasal organ (VNO in mice and many other vertebrates. The relative contributions of the MOE and VNO in the display of female behaviors are not well understood. Mice null for Cnga2 or Trpc2 essentially lack odor-evoked activity in the MOE and VNO, respectively. Using females mutant for one or both of Cnga2 and Trpc2, we find that maternal care is differentially regulated by the MOE and VNO: retrieval of wandering pups requires the MOE and is regulated redundantly by the VNO whereas maternal aggression requires both sensory epithelia to be functional. Female sexual receptivity appears to be regulated by both the MOE and VNO. Trpc2 null females have previously been shown to display male-type mounting towards other males. Remarkably, we find that females double mutant for Cnga2 and Trpc2 continue to mount other males, indicating that the disinhibition of male-type sexual displays observed in Trpc2 null females does not require chemosensory input from a functional MOE. Taken together, our findings reveal a previously unappreciated complexity in the chemosensory control of reproductive behaviors in the female mouse.

  17. Behavioral Portfolio Selection with Loss Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song ZHANG; Han Qing JIN; Xun Yu ZHOU

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we formulate a continuous-time behavioral (à la cumulative prospect theory)portfolio selection model where the losses are constrained by a pre-specified upper bound. Economically the model is motivated by the previously proved fact that the losses occurring in a bad state of the world can be catastrophic for an unconstrained model. Mathematically solving the model boils down to solving a concave Choquet minimization problem with an additional upper bound. We derive the optimal solution explicitly for such a loss control model. The optimal terminal wealth profile is in general characterized by three pieces: the agent has gains in the good states of the world, gets a moderate, endogenously constant loss in the intermediate states, and suffers the maximal loss (which is the given bound for losses) in the bad states. Examples are given to illustrate the general results.

  18. Neural control of maternal and paternal behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulac, Catherine; O'Connell, Lauren A; Wu, Zheng

    2014-08-15

    Parental care, including feeding and protection of young, is essential for the survival as well as mental and physical well-being of the offspring. A large variety of parental behaviors has been described across species and sexes, raising fascinating questions about how animals identify the young and how brain circuits drive and modulate parental displays in males and females. Recent studies have begun to uncover a striking antagonistic interplay between brain systems underlying parental care and infant-directed aggression in both males and females, as well as a large range of intrinsic and environmentally driven neural modulation and plasticity. Improved understanding of the neural control of parental interactions in animals should provide novel insights into the complex issue of human parental care in both health and disease.

  19. Instructional control of reinforcement learning: A behavioral and neurocomputational investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doll, B.B.; Jacobs, W.J.; Sanfey, A.G.; Frank, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Humans learn how to behave directly through environmental experience and indirectly through rules and instructions. Behavior analytic research has shown that instructions can control behavior, even when such behavior leads to sub-optimal outcomes (Hayes, S (Ed) 1989. Rule-governed behavior: cognitio

  20. The pattern of influence of perceived behavioral control upon exercising behavior: an application of Ajzen's theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, G; Valois, P; Lepage, L

    1993-02-01

    The aim of the present studies was to verify the basic assumptions underlying the theory of planned behavior for the prediction of exercising intentions and behavior among adults of the general population (study 1) and a group of pregnant women (study 2). In both studies, baseline data were collected at home with trained interviewers and with the use of paper-and-pencil questionnaires. The self-report on behavior was obtained 6 months (study 1) and between 8 and 9 months (study 2) after baseline data collection. In study 1, perceived behavioral control influenced behavior only through intention. In study 2, none of the Ajzen model variables was associated to exercising behavior. Nonetheless, intention was influenced by attitude, habit, and perceived behavioral control. The results of the present studies suggest that perceived behavioral control contributes to the understanding of intentions to exercise but not to the prediction of exercising behavior. PMID:8433359

  1. Treatment of multiply controlled destructive behavior with food reinforcement.

    OpenAIRE

    Adelinis, J D; Piazza, C C; Goh, H L

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the extent to which the positive reinforcement of communication would reduce multiply controlled destructive behavior in the absence of relevant extinction components. When edible reinforcement for appropriate communication and nonfood reinforcers for problem behavior were available simultaneously, responding was allocated almost exclusively toward the behavior that produced edible reinforcement.

  2. Parental behavioral and psychological control relationships to self-esteem, life satisfaction, depression, and antisocial behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın Özdemir

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental behavioral control, psychological control and self-esteem, life satisfaction, antisocial behaviors and depression among Turkish adolescents. Participants for the present study consisted of 333 adolescents (168 girls, 163 boys between the age of 13 to 15 with a mean of 13.90 (SD=.514 years. Participants completed measures on behavioral control, psychological control and self-esteem, life satisfaction, antisocial behaviors and depression. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that behavioral control positively predicted life satisfaction, self-esteem, and negatively predicted antisocial behaviors and depression. Psychological control was significantly and positively predicted antisocial behaviors and depression, negatively predicted life satisfaction. Present study provided evidence for the role of behavioral and psychological control in adolescents’ self-esteem, life satisfaction, depression and antisocial behaviors. Also, findings underscore the role of differential associations of parental behavioral and psychological control with the well-being and ill-being of adolescents. Findings were discussed in terms of implications for parent education programs and family intervention program.

  3. Parental behavioral and psychological control relationships to self-esteem, life satisfaction, depression, and antisocial behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın Özdemir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between parental behavioral control, psychological control and self-esteem, life satisfaction, antisocial behaviors and depression among Turkish adolescents. Participants for the present study consisted of 333 adolescents (168 girls, 163 boys between the age of 13 to 15 with a mean of 13.90 (SD=.514 years. Participants completed measures on behavioral control, psychological control and self-esteem, life satisfaction, antisocial behaviors and depression. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that behavioral control positively predicted life satisfaction, self-esteem, and negatively predicted antisocial behaviors and depression. Psychological control was significantly and positively predicted antisocial behaviors and depression, negatively predicted life satisfaction. Present study provided evidence for the role of behavioral and psychological control in adolescents’ self-esteem, life satisfaction, depression and antisocial behaviors. Also, findings underscore the role of differential associations of parental behavioral and psychological control with the well-being and ill-being of adolescents. Findings were discussed in terms of implications for parent education programs and family intervention program.

  4. International note: Maternal warmth, behavioral control, and psychological control: Relations to adjustment of Ghanaian early adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaam, Braima; Mounts, Nina S

    2016-06-01

    This investigation addressed the relation between maternal warmth, behavioral control, psychological control, and psychological adjustment in a sample of 119 Ghanaian adolescents (42% boys) living in an urban area (mean age = 14.19). Adolescents in the sample reported clinically elevated levels of depression and anxiety. Significant associations were found between warmth, behavioral control, and psychological control and adolescents' anxiety, physical aggression, relational aggression, positive friendship quality, and conflict with friends. Warmth moderated the effect of behavioral control on anxiety, physical aggression, and relational aggression such that higher levels of warmth in combination with higher levels of behavioral control were related to more positive adjustment. Higher levels of warmth in conjunction with higher psychological control were related to higher levels of anxiety. Boys who reported lower levels of warmth in combination with higher behavioral control reported higher levels of physical aggression. For boys reporting higher levels of warmth, higher behavioral control was associated with lower physical aggression.

  5. International note: Maternal warmth, behavioral control, and psychological control: Relations to adjustment of Ghanaian early adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaam, Braima; Mounts, Nina S

    2016-06-01

    This investigation addressed the relation between maternal warmth, behavioral control, psychological control, and psychological adjustment in a sample of 119 Ghanaian adolescents (42% boys) living in an urban area (mean age = 14.19). Adolescents in the sample reported clinically elevated levels of depression and anxiety. Significant associations were found between warmth, behavioral control, and psychological control and adolescents' anxiety, physical aggression, relational aggression, positive friendship quality, and conflict with friends. Warmth moderated the effect of behavioral control on anxiety, physical aggression, and relational aggression such that higher levels of warmth in combination with higher levels of behavioral control were related to more positive adjustment. Higher levels of warmth in conjunction with higher psychological control were related to higher levels of anxiety. Boys who reported lower levels of warmth in combination with higher behavioral control reported higher levels of physical aggression. For boys reporting higher levels of warmth, higher behavioral control was associated with lower physical aggression. PMID:27038973

  6. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  7. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, William V.; Dickson, Chata A.; Balsamo, Lyn M.; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y.; Farren, Kevin M.; Wheeler, Emily E.; McIlvane, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded…

  8. Behavioral Self-Control Strategies for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Leasha M.; Haraway, Dana L.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, self-control strategies are conceptualized as existing on two intersecting continuums of more or less individual control and increasing complexity depending on individual need. Behavioral self-control strategies for young children require external supports to assist children in learning the skills necessary to practice and implement…

  9. Prevention and Control of Adolescents’ Deviant Behavior in Rural Community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Firstly,an analysis is made from the point of view of sociology on traditional modeling logic of prevention and control of adolescents’ deviant behavior in rural community,and maintenance and reproduction of this model.The traditional prevention and control model of adolescents’ deviant behavior in rural community is diversity-orderly pattern prevention and control system.This system is based on natural economy,especially on agricultural economy."Supervision by public opinion and moral imitation" is the basic operation logic of this system.It contains a compensation mechanism of "bringing up children for the purpose of being looked after in old age" and "favor returning".Then,deconstruction of traditional prevention and control model for adolescents’ deviant behavior in rural community is analyzed.Along with advance in rural modern democratic management and legal construction and growing of rural market economy,function of traditional diversity-orderly pattern of prevention and control of adolescents’ deviate behavior in rural community is weak and weak in prevention and control of modern rural adolescents’ deviant behavior.Finally,modeling ideas of new(coordinative) prevention and control of rural adolescents’ deviant behavior are put forward from four aspects,namely,democracy and legal system,community,family and various rural adolescent admittance organizations.

  10. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  11. Predicting Preschool Effortful Control from Toddler Temperament and Parenting Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriano, Elizabeth A.; Stifter, Cynthia A.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study assessed whether maternal behavior and emotional tone moderated the relationship between toddler temperament and preschooler's effortful control. Maternal behavior and emotional tone were observed during a parent-child competing demands task when children were 2 years of age. Child temperament was also assessed at 2 years…

  12. Perceived Parental Behavioral Control and Psychological Control in Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong: A Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2007-01-01

    Perceived paternal and maternal behavioral control (including dimensions of parental knowledge, expectation, monitoring, discipline and demandingness) and psychological control in 2,748 Chinese Secondary 2 students were examined. Results showed that two stable dimensions (paternal and maternal behavioral control) were extracted from the parental…

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Standardized Behavior Management Intervention for Students with Externalizing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Martin; Sundell, Knut; Morris, Richard J.; Karlberg, Martin; Melin, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the results from a Swedish randomized controlled trial of a standardized behavior management intervention. The intervention targeted students with externalizing behavior in a regular education setting. First- and second-grade students (N = 100) from 38 schools were randomly assigned to either the intervention or an active…

  14. Behavior-Based Formation Control of Swarm Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Swarm robotics is a specific research field of multirobotics where a large number of mobile robots are controlled in a coordinated way. Formation control is one of the most challenging goals for the coordination control of swarm robots. In this paper, a behavior-based control design approach is proposed for two kinds of important formation control problems: efficient initial formation and formation control while avoiding obstacles. In this approach, a classification-based searching method for generating large-scale robot formation is presented to reduce the computational complexity and speed up the initial formation process for any desired formation. The behavior-based method is applied for the formation control of swarm robot systems while navigating in an unknown environment with obstacles. Several groups of experimental results demonstrate the success of the proposed approach. These methods have potential applications for various swarm robot systems in both the simulation and the practical environments.

  15. Instructional control of reinforcement learning: a behavioral and neurocomputational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Bradley B; Jacobs, W Jake; Sanfey, Alan G; Frank, Michael J

    2009-11-24

    Humans learn how to behave directly through environmental experience and indirectly through rules and instructions. Behavior analytic research has shown that instructions can control behavior, even when such behavior leads to sub-optimal outcomes (Hayes, S. (Ed.). 1989. Rule-governed behavior: cognition, contingencies, and instructional control. Plenum Press.). Here we examine the control of behavior through instructions in a reinforcement learning task known to depend on striatal dopaminergic function. Participants selected between probabilistically reinforced stimuli, and were (incorrectly) told that a specific stimulus had the highest (or lowest) reinforcement probability. Despite experience to the contrary, instructions drove choice behavior. We present neural network simulations that capture the interactions between instruction-driven and reinforcement-driven behavior via two potential neural circuits: one in which the striatum is inaccurately trained by instruction representations coming from prefrontal cortex/hippocampus (PFC/HC), and another in which the striatum learns the environmentally based reinforcement contingencies, but is "overridden" at decision output. Both models capture the core behavioral phenomena but, because they differ fundamentally on what is learned, make distinct predictions for subsequent behavioral and neuroimaging experiments. Finally, we attempt to distinguish between the proposed computational mechanisms governing instructed behavior by fitting a series of abstract "Q-learning" and Bayesian models to subject data. The best-fitting model supports one of the neural models, suggesting the existence of a "confirmation bias" in which the PFC/HC system trains the reinforcement system by amplifying outcomes that are consistent with instructions while diminishing inconsistent outcomes. PMID:19595993

  16. Iterative learning control algorithm for spiking behavior of neuron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunan; Li, Donghui; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao

    2016-11-01

    Controlling neurons to generate a desired or normal spiking behavior is the fundamental building block of the treatment of many neurologic diseases. The objective of this work is to develop a novel control method-closed-loop proportional integral (PI)-type iterative learning control (ILC) algorithm to control the spiking behavior in model neurons. In order to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method, two single-compartment standard models of different neuronal excitability are specifically considered: Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model for class 1 neural excitability and Morris-Lecar (ML) model for class 2 neural excitability. ILC has remarkable advantages for the repetitive processes in nature. To further highlight the superiority of the proposed method, the performances of the iterative learning controller are compared to those of classical PI controller. Either in the classical PI control or in the PI control combined with ILC, appropriate background noises are added in neuron models to approach the problem under more realistic biophysical conditions. Simulation results show that the controller performances are more favorable when ILC is considered, no matter which neuronal excitability the neuron belongs to and no matter what kind of firing pattern the desired trajectory belongs to. The error between real and desired output is much smaller under ILC control signal, which suggests ILC of neuron’s spiking behavior is more accurate.

  17. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas eSpierer; Camille eChavan; Aurelie Lynn Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may fo...

  18. Real Time Behavior-Based Control on a Mobile Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KootaMuzyamba; 钱晋武; 沈林勇; 章亚男

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses and compares some common architectures used in autonomous mobile robotics. Then it describes a behavior-based autonomous mobile robot that was implemented successfully in the Robotics of the Department of Precision Mechanical Engineering. Fuzzy controller was used to implement the emergency behavior, the t~uiviors arbitration was implemented using the subsumption architecture. In an tmknown dynamic indoor environment, the robot achieved real-time obstacle avoidance properties that are cruel for mobile robolics.

  19. Controlling neural activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V.; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2013-03-01

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its simple nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behavior. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behavior. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behavior. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients.

  20. Teasing and weight-control behaviors in adolescent girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina B. Leme

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between weight teasing, body satisfaction and weight control behaviors. METHODS: Cross-sectional study based on adaptation and validity research of a North American questionnaire for adolescent girls about physical activity, nutrition, body image, perceptions, and behaviors. The variables used to conduct the study were weight control behaviors, body satisfaction and presence of teasing by family members. Descriptive analyses were carried out by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: A total of 159 adolescent girls, with 16.2±1.3 years old were enrolled in this study. Of the total, 60.1% reported that family members did not tease them. The teasing was associated with weight dissatisfaction (p<0.001, body shape (p=0.006, belly (p=0.001, waist (p=0.001, face (p=0.009, arms (p=0.014 and shoulders (p=0.001. As a consequence, there was association with unhealthy weight control behaviors (p<0.001, vomiting (p=0,011, diet (p=0.002 and use of laxatives (p=0.035. CONCLUSIONS: The teasing about body image by family members was associated with risk for unhealthy weight control behaviors in female adolescents.

  1. Resource allocation and supervisory control architecture for intelligent behavior generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh K.; Bahl, Vikas; Moore, Kevin L.; Flann, Nicholas S.; Martin, Jason

    2003-09-01

    In earlier research the Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems (CSOIS) at Utah State University (USU) was funded by the US Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command's (TACOM) Intelligent Mobility Program to develop and demonstrate enhanced mobility concepts for unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs). As part of our research, we presented the use of a grammar-based approach to enabling intelligent behaviors in autonomous robotic vehicles. With the growth of the number of available resources on the robot, the variety of the generated behaviors and the need for parallel execution of multiple behaviors to achieve reaction also grew. As continuation of our past efforts, in this paper, we discuss the parallel execution of behaviors and the management of utilized resources. In our approach, available resources are wrapped with a layer (termed services) that synchronizes and serializes access to the underlying resources. The controlling agents (called behavior generating agents) generate behaviors to be executed via these services. The agents are prioritized and then, based on their priority and the availability of requested services, the Control Supervisor decides on a winner for the grant of access to services. Though the architecture is applicable to a variety of autonomous vehicles, we discuss its application on T4, a mid-sized autonomous vehicle developed for security applications.

  2. H∞ control in a behavioral context : The Full Information Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, H.L.; Willems, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the authors formulate the H∞-control problem in a behavioral setting. Given a mathematical model, say a set of higher order differential equations together with some static equations, the vector of manifest variables (i.e., the variables to be modeled) is partitioned into yet to be con

  3. Human Behavior Model Based Control Program for ACC Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Pozna

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Present work is a part of the ACC autonomous car project. This paper will focuson the control program architecture. To design this architecture we will start from thehuman driver behavior model. Using this model we have constructed a three level controlprogram. Preliminary results are presented.

  4. Experimental control of scaling behavior: what is not fractal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likens, Aaron D; Fine, Justin M; Amazeen, Eric L; Amazeen, Polemnia G

    2015-10-01

    The list of psychological processes thought to exhibit fractal behavior is growing. Although some might argue that the seeming ubiquity of fractal patterns illustrates their significance, unchecked growth of that list jeopardizes their relevance. It is important to identify when a single behavior is and is not fractal in order to make meaningful conclusions about the processes underlying those patterns. The hypothesis tested in the present experiment is that fractal patterns reflect the enactment of control. Participants performed two steering tasks: steering on a straight track and steering on a circular track. Although each task could be accomplished by holding the steering wheel at a constant angle, steering around a curve may require more constant control, at least from a psychological standpoint. Results showed that evidence for fractal behavior was strongest for the circular track; straight tracks showed evidence of two scaling regions. We argue from those results that, going forward, the goal of the fractal literature should be to bring scaling behavior under experimental control.

  5. Mathematical Systems Theory : from Behaviors to Nonlinear Control

    CERN Document Server

    Julius, A; Pasumarthy, Ramkrishna; Rapisarda, Paolo; Scherpen, Jacquelien

    2015-01-01

    This treatment of modern topics related to mathematical systems theory forms the proceedings of a workshop, Mathematical Systems Theory: From Behaviors to Nonlinear Control, held at the University of Groningen in July 2015. The workshop celebrated the work of Professors Arjan van der Schaft and Harry Trentelman, honouring their 60th Birthdays. The first volume of this two-volume work covers a variety of topics related to nonlinear and hybrid control systems. After giving a detailed account of the state of the art in the related topic, each chapter presents new results and discusses new directions. As such, this volume provides a broad picture of the theory of nonlinear and hybrid control systems for scientists and engineers with an interest in the interdisciplinary field of systems and control theory. The reader will benefit from the expert participants’ ideas on exciting new approaches to control and system theory and their predictions of future directions for the subject that were discussed at the worksho...

  6. Remote controlled bio-stimulator and animal behavior analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiguo; Yuan, Kui; Han, Taizhen; Chai, Jie

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a surveillance and stimulation system to study the animal locomotion behavior under electrical micro-stimulations in the brain nerve, which provides a new platform and methodology for behavior experiment in neural science. The system consists of two parts: 1) micro-control based multi-channel stimulator backed by animal; 2) Computer vision based animal behavior tracking system; The performance of the micro-stimulator is validated for sciatic nerve of frog and the results show that it is reliable, stabile, compact (25×35×10 mm), light (20g with cell). The tracking speed and accuracy is improved with our new hybrid tracking algorithm based on color table looking and moving predication, and compared with the manual recording. The preliminary results of rat tracking show that it works accurately and robustly in real-time even under interference condition.

  7. Serotonin control of thermotaxis memory behavior in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinxia Li

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans.

  8. CHOLESTEROL LEVELS AND SUICIDAL BEHAVIOR: A CASE CONTROL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In modern psychiatry, there is a movement to understand mental health, not solely based on behaviors and subjective report, but also based on objective markers of illness. Several studies have focused on a relationship between serum cholesterol levels and aggressive behaviors including suicide. AIM: To identify a potential link between cholesterol and suicidal behavior. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 150 patients with psychiatry diagnosis were divided into three equal groups (50 each: those who had a recent suicidal attempt, those who had suicidal ideations but no attempts and those with psychiatry diagnosis but no suicidal ideations and attempts. Blood sample for total cholesterol level was on IPD or OPD basis. The study was started after taking approval from institute ethical committee. Analysis was done using Chi square test. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: It was found that maximum patients who attempted suicide belonged to major depression and schizophrenia followed by substance dependence and bipolar affective disorder (BPAD with major depression and there was statistical difference in cholesterol levels of patients with suicide attempt, with suicidal ideations and control group. 42% and 44% of major depression and schizophrenia cases respectively had low total serum cholesterol levels (below 160 mg%. CONCLUSION: There is a potential link between serum total cholesterol levels and suicidal behavior. Taking the literature as a whole there is substantial evidence that low cholesterol levels are found in suicidal behaviors of various psychiatric illnesses especially major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, substance dependence and bipolar depressive disorder

  9. Reading comprehension metacognitive strategies as a means for controlling behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinorah Aladina Caballero López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Textual comprehension implies the use of various metacognitive strategies by the students when they have to face a text to be competent readers. That is why the objective of this article is to illustrate the application of metacognitive strategies in order to achieve an efficient textual comprehension, taking into account the self – regulation the student exerts over his own learning process. It is applied as the main method historical-logical studies based on a professional-researching systematic practice; at the same time observation is largely used. The main result is the introduction of metacognitive strategies in reading comprehension, which subsequently favor the self-control of personal behavior. The article is the result of a research project sponsored by the department of Special Education. Key words: reading comprehension, metacognitive strategies, behavior self-control.

  10. International Symposium on Monitoring Behavior and Supervisory Control

    CERN Document Server

    Johannsen, Gunnar

    1976-01-01

    This book includes all papers presented at the International Symposium on Monitoring Behavior and Supervisory Control held at Berchtesgaden, Federal Republic of Germany, March 8-12, 1976. The Symposium was sponsored by the Scientific Affairs Division of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Brussels, and the government of the Federal Republic of Germany, Bonn. We believe the book constitutes an important and timely status report on monitoring behavior and supervisory control by human operators of complex man-machine systems in which the computer is sharing key functions with the man. These systems include aircraft and other vehicles, nuclear and more conventional power plants, and processes for the manu­ facture of chemicals, petroleum, and discrete parts. By "monitoring" we mean the systematic observation by a human operator of mul tiple sources of information, e. g. , ranging from integrated display consoles to disparate "live situations". The monitor's purpose is to determine whether operations are norm...

  11. Coupling chemical networks to hydrogels controls oscillatory behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, Daniel; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate that oscillations and excitable behavior can be imparted to a chemical network by coupling the network to an active hydrogel. We discuss two mechanisms by which the mechanical response of the gel to the embedded chemical reactant provides feedback into the chemistry. These feedback mechanisms can be applied to control existing chemical oscillations as well as create new oscillations under some conditions. We analyze two model systems to demonstrate these two effects, respectively: a theoretical system that exhibits no excitability in the absence of a gel, and the Oregonator model of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in which the metal catalyst is intercalated into the polymer network. This work can aid in designing new materials that harness these feedbacks to create, control, and stabilize oscillatory and excitable chemical behavior in both oscillatory and non-oscillatory chemical networks.

  12. Behavioral Control in At-Risk Toddlers: The Influence of the Family Check-up

    OpenAIRE

    Shelleby, Elizabeth C.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Cheong, Jeewon; CHANG, HYEIN; Gardner, Frances; Dishion, Thomas J.; Wilson, Melvin N.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the role of one component of emotion regulation, behavioral control, in the growth of children’s early behavior problems by examining whether increases in parental positive behavior support brought about by a family-centered intervention were associated with greater child behavioral control, and whether greater behavioral control at age 3 mediated the association between improvements in aspects of positive behavior support from ages 2 to 3 and decreases in growth of behavi...

  13. Engineering Sensorial Delay to Control Phototaxis and Emergent Collective Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijalkov, Mite; McDaniel, Austin; Wehr, Jan; Volpe, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviors to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense, and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary; e.g., a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy; e.g., the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We experimentally demonstrate that the collective behavior of a group of phototactic robots capable of emitting a radially decaying light field can be tuned from segregation to aggregation and clustering by controlling the delay with which they change their propulsion speed in response to the light intensity they measure. We track this transition to the underlying dynamics of this system, in particular, to the ratio between the robots' sensorial delay time and the characteristic time of the robots' random reorientation. Supported by numerics, we discuss how the same mechanism can be applied to control active agents, e.g., airborne drones, moving in a three-dimensional space. Given the simplicity of this mechanism, the engineering of sensorial delay provides a potentially powerful tool to engineer and dynamically tune the behavior of large ensembles of autonomous mobile agents; furthermore, this mechanism might already be at work within living organisms such as

  14. Training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas eSpierer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Deficits in inhibitory control, the ability to suppress ongoing or planned motor or cognitive processes, contribute to many psychiatric and neurological disorders. The rehabilitation of inhibition-related disorders may therefore benefit from neuroplasticity-based training protocols aiming at normalizing inhibitory control proficiency and the underlying brain networks. Current literature on training-induced behavioral and brain plasticity in inhibitory control suggests that improvements may follow either from the development of automatic forms of inhibition or from the strengthening of top-down, controlled inhibition. Automatic inhibition develops in conditions of consistent and repeated associations between inhibition-triggering stimuli and stopping goals. Once established, the stop signals directly elicit inhibition, thereby bypassing slow, top-down executive control and accelerating stopping processes. In contrast, training regimens involving varying stimulus-response associations or frequent inhibition failures prevent the development of automatic inhibition and thus strengthen top-down inhibitory processes rather than bottom-up ones. We discuss these findings in terms of developing optimal inhibitory control training regimens for rehabilitation purposes.

  15. Emergent collective decision-making: Control, model and behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tian

    In this dissertation we study emergent collective decision-making in social groups with time-varying interactions and heterogeneously informed individuals. First we analyze a nonlinear dynamical systems model motivated by animal collective motion with heterogeneously informed subpopulations, to examine the role of uninformed individuals. We find through formal analysis that adding uninformed individuals in a group increases the likelihood of a collective decision. Secondly, we propose a model for human shared decision-making with continuous-time feedback and where individuals have little information about the true preferences of other group members. We study model equilibria using bifurcation analysis to understand how the model predicts decisions based on the critical threshold parameters that represent an individual's tradeoff between social and environmental influences. Thirdly, we analyze continuous-time data of pairs of human subjects performing an experimental shared tracking task using our second proposed model in order to understand transient behavior and the decision-making process. We fit the model to data and show that it reproduces a wide range of human behaviors surprisingly well, suggesting that the model may have captured the mechanisms of observed behaviors. Finally, we study human behavior from a game-theoretic perspective by modeling the aforementioned tracking task as a repeated game with incomplete information. We show that the majority of the players are able to converge to playing Nash equilibrium strategies. We then suggest with simulations that the mean field evolution of strategies in the population resemble replicator dynamics, indicating that the individual strategies may be myopic. Decisions form the basis of control and problems involving deciding collectively between alternatives are ubiquitous in nature and in engineering. Understanding how multi-agent systems make decisions among alternatives also provides insight for designing

  16. Impact of behavioral control on the processing of nociceptive stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Grau

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available How nociceptive signals are processed within the spinal cord, and whether these signals lead to behavioral signs of neuropathic pain, depends upon their relation to other events and behavior. Our work shows that these relations can have a lasting effect on spinal plasticity, inducing a form of learning that alters the effect of subsequent nociceptive stimuli. The capacity of lower spinal systems to adapt, in the absence of brain input, is examined in spinally transected rats that receive a nociceptive shock to the tibialis anterior muscle of one hind leg. If shock is delivered whenever the leg is extended (controllable stimulation, it induces an increase in flexion duration that minimizes net shock exposure. This learning is not observed in subjects that receive the same amount of shock independent of leg position (uncontrollable stimulation. These two forms of stimulation have a lasting, and divergent, effect on subsequent learning: Controllable stimulation enables learning whereas uncontrollable stimulation disables it (learning deficit. Uncontrollable stimulation also enhances mechanical reactivity (allodynia. We review evidence that training with controllable stimulation engages a BDNF-dependent process that can both prevent and reverse the consequences of uncontrollable shock. We relate these effects to changes in BDNF protein and TrkB signaling. Controllable stimulation is also shown to counter the effects of peripheral inflammation (from intradermal capsaicin. A model is proposed that assumes nociceptive input is gated at an early stage, within the dorsal horn. his gate is sensitive to current environmental relations (between proprioceptive and nociceptive input, allowing stimulation to be classified as controllable or uncontrollable. We further propose that the status of this gate is affected by past experience and that a history of uncontrollable stimulation will promote the development of neuropathic pain.

  17. Dynamic behavior of superheated steam and ways of control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu LI

    2008-01-01

    A simple way of calculating the dynamic behavior of a superheater is presented. A comparison of the measured data with the calculated result verifies the accuracy of this simple method. It is the first time that a phase compensation for real roots, i.e., the twin lead/lag loop which is facile for engineering applications, is used in superheated steam temperature control. Numerous simu-lation results show that both the response time lapse and maximal dynamic deviation are greatly reduced. Moreover, a formula to calculate the setting parameters is presented, together with a practical example of its engineering application in superheated steam temperature control with single-stage attemperation in a power plant boiler. This method can remarkably improve the control performance of superheated steam temperature and makes it possible for one stage attemperation to be sufficient for the superheater of power plant boilers, thus simplifying the superheater system and reducing investment. Because the control performance is remarkably raised, the set values of the steam temperature control system can be raised above rated values and also the operational economy, without impairing the operation safety.

  18. Controlling block copolymer phase behavior using ionic surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, D.; Aswal, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The phase behavior of poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide-poly(ethylene oxide) PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer [P85 (EO26PO39EO26)] in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution as a function of temperature has been studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations (1 wt%) of block copolymer and surfactants. Each of the individual components (block copolymer and surfactant) and the nanoparticle-surfactant mixed system have been examined at varying temperature. The block copolymer P85 forms spherical micelles at room temperature whereas shows sphere-to-rod like micelle transition at higher temperatures. On the other hand, SDS surfactant forms ellipsoidal micelles over a wide temperature range. Interestingly, it is found that phase behavior of mixed micellar system (P85 + SDS) as a function of temperature is drastically different from that of P85, giving the control over the temperature-dependent phase behavior of block copolymers.

  19. The Impact of Pubertal Timing and Parental Control on Adolescent Problem Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arim, Rubab G.; Shapka, Jennifer D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among pubertal timing, parental control, and problem behaviors. There were 267 participants, whose ages ranged from 9 to 16 years. Both maternal and paternal psychological control predicted problem behaviors over and above the effects of behavioral control. For boys, early maturation and high levels of paternal…

  20. Self-control and academic performance: Two field studies on university citizenship behavior and counterproductive academic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zettler, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    that students' self-control impacts university citizenship behavior positively and counterproductive academic behavior negatively. Two correlative field studies, at which one is predictive, using different questionnaires to assess self-control support both hypotheses. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.......Self-control affects, among other things, individuals' performance and criminal or deviant behavior. Herein, the construct of self-control is linked to rather specific criteria in an academic context, as derived from findings in the area of organizational psychology. Specifically, it is assumed...

  1. Application of optimal control principles to describe the supervisory control behavior of AAA crew members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, C.; Valentino, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    Supervisory decision making and control behavior within a C(3) oriented, ground based weapon system is being studied. The program involves empirical investigation of the sequence of control strategies used during engagement of aircraft targets. An engagement is conceptually divided into several stages which include initial information processing activity, tracking, and ongoing adaptive control decisions. Following a brief description of model parameters, two experiments which served as initial investigation into the accuracy of assumptions regarding the importance of situation assessment in procedure selection are outlined. Preliminary analysis of the results upheld the validity of the assumptions regarding strategic information processing and cue-criterion relationship learning. These results indicate that this model structure should be useful in studies of supervisory decision behavior.

  2. The Effects of Management Control on Employees’ Behavior Performance: A Case in Pharmaceutical Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Yucel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This survey study aims to explore the relations among the formal and informal control, employees’ orientations, and behavior performance. For this purpose, the research uses structured equation modeling to investigate the relationships of the variables. The research was carried out within 121 pharmaceutical companies operating in Marmara Region, and used a questionnaire to determine 560 medical sales representatives’ perceptions. According to the research findings; process control has direct and indirect positive effects on informal controls, control-related orientation of representatives, and their behavior performance. However, output control doesn’t affect directly any research variables except social control. In addition, informal controls are correlated to control-related orientations and behavior performance as formal controls. Particularly, self control has significant direct and indirect effect on behavior performance through control-related orientations. In this respect, the study provides contribution to understand the interaction between formal and informal controls and their effects on behavior performance.

  3. A simple method to control nanotribology behaviors of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. D.; Guo, J.; Chen, C.; Chen, L.; Qian, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    A simple method was proposed to control the nanotribology behaviors of monocrystalline silicon against SiO2 microsphere by adjusting relative humidity (RH). Experimental results indicated that adhesion work, friction coefficient, and nanowear of silicon against SiO2 microsphere significantly varied between 60% and 90% RH. Under 60% RH, adhesion work was 119 mN/m, and friction coefficient was about 0.53. However, adhesion work and friction coefficient decreased to ˜70 mN/m and ˜0.3 under 90% RH, respectively. An apparent wear track ˜13 nm deep formed on the silicon surface under 60% RH, whereas no obvious wear scar was observed on the silicon surface under 90% RH. Analysis indicated that such tribological behaviors were due to different water condensations on the silicon surface under 60% and 90% RH. Under 60% RH, the water that condensed on the surfaces of the silicon sample and SiO2 tip mainly consisted of ice-like water. As a result, adhesion work was enlarged by the breaking force of the ice-like water bridge in the contact area. Given that a ≡Si-O-Si≡ bonding bridge easily formed between the silicon surface and the SiO2 tip with the help of water condensation under 60% RH instead of 90% RH, the friction coefficient was large and the nanowear of the silicon sample was severe under 60% RH. These results may help elucidate the nanotribology behaviors of silicon and facilitate the tribological design of dynamic microelectromechanical systems working under humid conditions.

  4. Closed-loop glucose control: psychological and behavioral considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Shepard, Jaclyn; Peterson, Ninoska

    2011-11-01

    Since 2000, the diabetes community has witnessed tremendous technological advances that have revolutionized diabetes management. Currently, closed-loop glucose control (CLC) systems, which link continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring, are the newest, cutting edge technology aimed at reducing glycemic variability and improving daily management of diabetes. Although advances in knowledge and technology in the treatment of diabetes have improved exponentially, adherence to diabetes regimens remains complex and often difficult to predict. Human factors, such as patient perceptions and behavioral self-regulation, are central to adherence to prescribed regimens, as well as to adoption and utilization of diabetes technology, and they will continue to be crucial as diabetes management evolves. Thus, the aims of this article are three-fold: (1) to review psychological and behavioral factors that have influenced adoption and utilization of past technologies, (2) to examine three theoretical frameworks that may help in conceptualizing relevant patient factors in diabetes management, and (3) to propose patient-selection factors that will likely affect future CLC systems. PMID:22226256

  5. FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior Strategies) to Improve Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, John

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the FAB (Functionally Alert Behavior) Strategies approach to improve behavior in children and adolescents with complex behavioral challenges. FAB Strategies include evidence-based environmental adaptations, sensory modulation, positive behavioral support, and physical self-regulation strategies. FAB Strategies can be used by…

  6. Predictive models of procedural human supervisory control behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussemart, Yves

    Human supervisory control systems are characterized by the computer-mediated nature of the interactions between one or more operators and a given task. Nuclear power plants, air traffic management and unmanned vehicles operations are examples of such systems. In this context, the role of the operators is typically highly proceduralized due to the time and mission-critical nature of the tasks. Therefore, the ability to continuously monitor operator behavior so as to detect and predict anomalous situations is a critical safeguard for proper system operation. In particular, such models can help support the decision J]l8king process of a supervisor of a team of operators by providing alerts when likely anomalous behaviors are detected By exploiting the operator behavioral patterns which are typically reinforced through standard operating procedures, this thesis proposes a methodology that uses statistical learning techniques in order to detect and predict anomalous operator conditions. More specifically, the proposed methodology relies on hidden Markov models (HMMs) and hidden semi-Markov models (HSMMs) to generate predictive models of unmanned vehicle systems operators. Through the exploration of the resulting HMMs in two distinct single operator scenarios, the methodology presented in this thesis is validated and shown to provide models capable of reliably predicting operator behavior. In addition, the use of HSMMs on the same data scenarios provides the temporal component of the predictions missing from the HMMs. The final step of this work is to examine how the proposed methodology scales to more complex scenarios involving teams of operators. Adopting a holistic team modeling approach, both HMMs and HSMMs are learned based on two team-based data sets. The results show that the HSMMs can provide valuable timing information in the single operator case, whereas HMMs tend to be more robust to increased team complexity. In addition, this thesis discusses the

  7. Psychological Control Associated with Youth Adjustment and Risky Behavior in African American Single Mother Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Carlye; Jones, Deborah J.; Cuellar, Jessica; Gonzalez, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    A distinction between parental behavioral control and psychological control has been elucidated in the literature, yet far less is known about the role of psychological control in youth adjustment broadly or risky behavior in particular. We examined the interrelationship of maternal psychological control, youth psychosocial adjustment, and youth…

  8. Authoritarian Child Rearing, Parental Locus of Control, and the Child's Behavior Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Jan M. A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Examined relationships among childrearing, parental locus of control about childrearing, and child's behavior style. Found that parents who perceived their child's behavior as either externalizing or internalizing had a weak internal locus of control and were more authoritarian. Perceived externalizing child behavior was positively related to…

  9. Discretization behavior analysis of a switching control system from a unified mathematical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinghuo YU; Ling YANG; Guanrong CHEN

    2003-01-01

    A useful unified analysis framework is proposed for exploring the intriguing behaviors of a second-order switching control system. Complex discretization behaviors of the switching control system are explored in detail, and some intrinsic relationships between the system periodic behaviors and their associated symbolic sequences are studied.

  10. Self-Control and Academic Performance: Two Field Studies on University Citizenship Behavior and Counterproductive Academic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettler, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Self-control affects, among other things, individuals' performance and criminal or deviant behavior. Herein, the construct of self-control is linked to rather specific criteria in an academic context, as derived from findings in the area of organizational psychology. Specifically, it is assumed that students' self-control impacts university…

  11. The Good Behavior Game Plus Merit: Controlling Disruptive Behavior and Improving Student Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darveaux, Dion X.

    1984-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game was modified to include a token reinforcement system (Good Behavior Game Plus Merit). It proved successful in reducing disruptive behavior and improving assignment completion in two students designated as high-risk for placement in a behaviorally impaired classroom. General Acceptability and uses of the intervention are…

  12. Scoping studies: behavior and control of lithium and lithium aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, D W

    1982-01-01

    The HEDL scoping studies examining the behavior of lithium and lithium aerosols have been conducted to determine and examine potential safety and environmental issues for postulated accident conditions associated with the use of lithium as a fusion reactor blanket and/or coolant. Liquid lithium reactions with air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and concretes have been characterized. The effectiveness of various powder extinguishing agents and methods of application were determined for lithium-air reactions. The effectiveness of various lithium aerosol collection methods were determined and the volatilization and transport of radioactive metals potentially associated with lithium-air reactions were evaluated. Liquid lithium atmosphere reactions can be safely controlled under postulated accident conditions, but special handling practices must be provided. Lithium-concrete reactions should be avoided because of the potential production of high temperatures, corrosive environment and hydrogen. Carbon microspheres are effective in extinguishing well established lithium-air reactions for the lithium quantities tested (up to 10 kg). Large mass loading of lithium aerosols can be efficiently collected with conventional air cleaning systems. Potentially radioactive species (cobalt, iron and manganese) will be volatilized in a lithium-air reaction in contact with neutron activated stainless steel.

  13. Behavior-based High Level Control of a VTOL UAV

    OpenAIRE

    Moraes Carneiro, Maurício

    2008-01-01

    This work addresses the problem of providing the on-board system of an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with the capabilities to plan and conduct complex missions with reduced off-board assistance. Such capabilities are referred to in this work as Intelligent Behaviors. In this work, three intelligent behaviors are proposed: Fly Home, Search Object and Object Tracking. The Fly Home intelligent behavior is intended to provide the UAV’s on-board system with the capability of autonomousl...

  14. Hydration state controls stress responsiveness and social behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Eric G.; de Kloet, Annette D.; Flak, Jonathan N.; Smeltzer, Michael D.; Solomon, Matia B.; Evanson, Nathan K.; Woods, Stephen C; Sakai, Randall R.; Herman, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Life stress frequently occurs within the context of homeostatic challenge, requiring integration of physiological and psychological need into appropriate hormonal, cardiovascular and behavioral responses. To test neural mechanisms underlying stress integration within the context of homeostatic adversity, we evaluated the impact of a pronounced physiological (hypernatremia) challenge on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), cardiovascular and behavioral responses to an acute psychogenic stress...

  15. Spatial Heterogeneity in Cancer Control Planning and Cancer Screening Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Lee R; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Urato, Matthew; Subramanian, Sujha; Watson, Lisa; Anselin, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Each state is autonomous in its comprehensive cancer control (CCC) program, and considerable heterogeneity exists in the program plans. However, researchers often focus on the concept of nationally representative data and pool observations across states using regression analysis to come up with average effects when interpreting results. Due to considerable state autonomy and heterogeneity in various dimensions-including culture, politics, historical precedent, regulatory environment, and CCC efforts-it is important to examine states separately and to use geographic analysis to translate findings in place and time. We used 100 percent population data for Medicare-insured persons aged 65 or older and examined predictors of breast cancer (BC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) screening from 2001-2005. Examining BC and CRC screening behavior separately in each state, we performed 100 multilevel regressions. We summarize the state-specific findings of racial disparities in screening for either cancer in a single bivariate map of the 50 states, producing a separate map for African American and for Hispanic disparities in each state relative to whites. The maps serve to spatially translate the voluminous regression findings regarding statistically significant disparities between whites and minorities in cancer screening within states. Qualitative comparisons can be made of the states' disparity environments or for a state against a national benchmark using the bivariate maps. We find that African Americans in Michigan and Hispanics in New Jersey are significantly more likely than whites to utilize CRC screening and that Hispanics in 6 states are significantly and persistently more likely to utilize mammography than whites. We stress the importance of spatial translation research for informing and evaluating CCC activities within states and over time. PMID:24944346

  16. Unsteady behavior and control of vortices in centrifugal compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yutaka; Fujisawa, Nobumichi

    2014-10-01

    Two examples of the use of vortex control to reduce noise and enhance the stable operating range of a centrifugal compressor are presented in this paper. In the case of high-flow operation of a centrifugal compressor with a vaned diffuser, a discrete frequency noise induced by interaction between the impeller-discharge flow and the diffuser vane, which appears most notably in the power spectra of the radiated noise, can be reduced using a tapered diffuser vane (TDV) without affecting the performance of the compressor. Twin longitudinal vortices produced by leakage flow passing through the tapered portion of the diffuser vane induce secondary flow in the direction of the blade surface and prevent flow separation from the leading edge of the diffuser. The use of a TDV can effectively reduce both the discrete frequency noise generated by the interaction between the impeller-discharge flow and the diffuser surface and the broadband turbulent noise component. In the case of low-flow operation, a leading-edge vortex (LEV) that forms on the shroud side of the suction surface near the leading edge of the diffuser increases significantly in size and blocks flow in the diffuser passage. The formation of an LEV may adversely affect the performance of the compressor and may cause the diffuser to stall. Using a one-side tapered diffuser vane to suppress the evolution of an LEV, the stable operating range of the compressor can be increased by more than 12 percent, and the pressure-rise characteristics of the compressor can be improved. The results of a supplementary examination of the structure and unsteady behavior of LEVs, conducted by means of detailed numerical simulations, are also presented.

  17. A behavioral family intervention to improve adherence and metabolic control in children with IDDM

    OpenAIRE

    Bonner, Melanie Jean

    1992-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a behavioral family intervention on adherence and metabolic control in insulin dependent diabetic children (IODM). Specifically, assumption of regimen responsibilities between the parent and child were manipulated to facilitate regimen adherence. The intervention delivered was a target-specific behavioral contract extended sequentially across four target behaviors (Le., blood glucose testing, insulin injections, diet, and exercise). Regimen...

  18. Parental behavioral and psychological control and problematic internet use among Chinese adolescents: the mediating role of self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Li, Dongping; Newman, Joan

    2013-06-01

    Previous research has reported contradictory effects of parental control on adolescents' problematic Internet use (PIU). To reconcile the discrepant findings, the current study examined the differential effects of parental behavioral control (solicitation and restriction) and psychological control (guilt induction, love withdrawal, and authority assertion) on adolescents' PIU. The mediating effect of self-control on the relationships between parental control and PIU was also examined. A total of 694 Chinese adolescents (M=13.67 years) completed questionnaire measures of parental behavioral control, psychological control, self-control, and PIU. After adjusting for age, gender, and family financial status, it was found that parental restriction (a form of behavioral control) was negatively associated with PIU, whereas love withdrawal (a form of psychological control) was positively associated with PIU. Increased self-control was associated with decreased PIU, and changes in self-control at least partially mediated the differential effects of parental behavioral and psychological control on PIU. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. An Overview on Study of Identification of Driver Behavior Characteristics for Automotive Control

    OpenAIRE

    Na Lin; Changfu Zong; Masayoshi Tomizuka; Pan Song; Zexing Zhang; Gang Li

    2014-01-01

    Driver characteristics have been the research focus for automotive control. Study on identification of driver characteristics is provided in this paper in terms of its relevant research directions and key technologies involved. This paper discusses the driver characteristics based on driver’s operation behavior, or the driver behavior characteristics. Following the presentation of the fundamental of the driver behavior characteristics, the key technologies of the driver behavior characteristi...

  20. Design of an Integrated Vehicle Chassis Control System with Driver Behavior Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Bing Zhu; Yizhou Chen; Jian Zhao; Yunfu Su

    2015-01-01

    An integrated vehicle chassis control strategy with driver behavior identification is introduced in this paper. In order to identify the different types of driver behavior characteristics, a driver behavior signals acquisition system was established using the dSPACE real-time simulation platform, and the driver inputs of 30 test drivers were collected under the double lane change test condition. Then, driver behavior characteristics were analyzed and identified based on the preview optimal cu...

  1. Activity of Raphé Serotonergic Neurons Controls Emotional Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Teissier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the well-established role of serotonin signaling in mood regulation, causal relationships between serotonergic neuronal activity and behavior remain poorly understood. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find that selectively increasing serotonergic neuronal activity in wild-type mice is anxiogenic and reduces floating in the forced-swim test, whereas inhibition has no effect on the same measures. In a developmental mouse model of altered emotional behavior, increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors correlate with reduced dorsal raphé and increased median raphé serotonergic activity. These mice display blunted responses to serotonergic stimulation and behavioral rescues through serotonergic inhibition. Furthermore, we identify opposing consequences of dorsal versus median raphé serotonergic neuron inhibition on floating behavior, together suggesting that median raphé hyperactivity increases anxiety, whereas a low dorsal/median raphé serotonergic activity ratio increases depression-like behavior. Thus, we find a critical role of serotonergic neuronal activity in emotional regulation and uncover opposing roles of median and dorsal raphé function.

  2. Role of dopamine in the motivational and cognitive control of behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cools, R.

    2008-01-01

    Brain dopamine has often been implicated in impulsive and/or inflexible behaviors, which may reflect failures of motivational and/or cognitive control. However, the precise role of dopamine in such failures of behavioral control is not well understood, not least because they implicate paradoxical ch

  3. Randomized Trial of Anger Control Training for Adolescents with Tourette's Syndrome and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhdolsky, Denis G.; Vitulano, Lawrence A.; Carroll, Deirdre H.; McGuire, Joseph; Leckman, James F.; Scahill, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A randomized trial to examine the efficacy of anger control training for treating adolescents with Tourette's syndrome and disruptive behavior reveals that those administered with the anger control training showed a decrease in their Disruptive Behavior Rating Scale score by 52 percent as compared with a decrease of 11 percent in the treatment as…

  4. Adolescent Resource Control: Associations with Physical and Relational Aggression, Prosocial and Withdrawn Behaviors, and Peer Regard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Danielle; Ojanen, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined adolescent coercive and prosocial resource control strategies in relation to various indices of peer-reported behaviors and peer regard ("N" = 384; 12-14 years). Coercive control was uniquely positively related to physical and relational aggression and peer disliking, and negatively to prosocial behaviors when…

  5. Inhibitory behavioral control: A stochastic dynamic causal modeling study comparing cocaine dependent subjects and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangsuo Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine dependence is associated with increased impulsivity in humans. Both cocaine dependence and impulsive behavior are under the regulatory control of cortico-striatal networks. One behavioral laboratory measure of impulsivity is response inhibition (ability to withhold a prepotent response in which altered patterns of regional brain activation during executive tasks in service of normal performance are frequently found in cocaine dependent (CD subjects studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. However, little is known about aberrations in specific directional neuronal connectivity in CD subjects. The present study employed fMRI-based dynamic causal modeling (DCM to study the effective (directional neuronal connectivity associated with response inhibition in CD subjects, elicited under performance of a Go/NoGo task with two levels of NoGo difficulty (Easy and Hard. The performance on the Go/NoGo task was not significantly different between CD subjects and controls. The DCM analysis revealed that prefrontal–striatal connectivity was modulated (influenced during the NoGo conditions for both groups. The effective connectivity from left (L anterior cingulate cortex (ACC to L caudate was similarly modulated during the Easy NoGo condition for both groups. During the Hard NoGo condition in controls, the effective connectivity from right (R dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC to L caudate became more positive, and the effective connectivity from R ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC to L caudate became more negative. In CD subjects, the effective connectivity from L ACC to L caudate became more negative during the Hard NoGo conditions. These results indicate that during Hard NoGo trials in CD subjects, the ACC rather than DLPFC or VLPFC influenced caudate during response inhibition.

  6. Peran Sikap, Nornma Subjektif, dan Perceived Behavioral Control terhadap Intensi Membeli Pakaian Bekas

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Fatimah

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the role of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control toward purchase intention of used clothing. This study used the quantitative approach and involved 297 respondents as subject and selected using incidental sampling. The data was collected by the scale of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and scale of intention based on Theory of Planned Behavior by Ajzen (2005). The results showed that attitudes, subje...

  7. Locus of control, problem-solving skills appraisal as predictors of waste prevention behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Karbalaei, S.; Abdollahi, A.; Talib, M.A.; Yaacob, S.N.; Ismail, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Given that waste generation is a devastating problem, it is necessary that we advance our knowledge about the etiology of waste prevention behaviors. Accordingly, this study sought to increase the existing literature of waste prevention behaviors by examining the relationships among the locus of control, problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, personal control style and participant’s age with waste prevention behaviors. Two hundred and forty participants (126 Women, and 114 men)...

  8. Designing stable finite state machine behaviors using phase plane analysis and variable structure control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, J.T.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.

    1998-03-10

    This paper discusses how phase plane analysis can be used to describe the overall behavior of single and multiple autonomous robotic vehicles with finite state machine rules. The importance of this result is that one can begin to design provably asymptotically stable group behaviors from a set of simple control laws and appropriate switching points with decentralized variable structure control. The ability to prove asymptotically stable group behavior is especially important for applications such as locating military targets or land mines.

  9. Cognitive Control as a Moderator of Temperamental Motivations Toward Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, George J; Whittle, Sarah; Allen, Nicholas B; Lubman, Dan I; Simmons, Julian G; Yücel, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have directly examined whether cognitive control can moderate the influence of temperamental positive and negative affective traits on adolescent risk-taking behavior. Using a combined multimethod, latent variable approach to the assessment of adolescent risk-taking behavior and cognitive control, this study examined whether cognitive control moderates the influence of temperamental surgency and frustration on risk-taking behavior in a sample of 177 adolescents (Mage = 16.12 years, SD = 0.69). As predicted, there was a significant interaction between cognitive control and frustration, but not between cognitive control and surgency, in predicting risk-taking behavior. These findings have important implications and suggest that the determinants of adolescent risk taking depend on the valence of the affective motivation for risk-taking behavior.

  10. Factors Impacting Emergence of Behavioral Control by Underselected Stimuli in Humans after Reduction of Control by Overselected Stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Broomfield, Laura; McHugh, Louise; Reed, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Stimulus overselectivity occurs when only one of potentially many aspects of the environment controls behavior. Adult participants were trained and tested on a trial-and-error discrimination learning task while engaging in a concurrent load task, and overselectivity emerged. When responding to the overselected stimulus was reduced by reinforcing a novel stimulus in the presence of the previously overselected stimulus in a second trial-and-error discrimination task, behavioral control by the u...

  11. Self-Control and Impulsivity in Children: Multiple Behavioral Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzano, L. B.; Michels, Jennifer L.; Carapella, R. K.; Conway, Patrick; Chelonis, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present experiment investigated the relationship between laboratory measures of self-control and delay of gratification in children and explored several other factors that may influence self-control. In the self-control paradigm, 30 four-year-old children repeatedly chose between three reinforcers received after a delay and one reinforcer…

  12. Control of stress and violent behavior: mid-course review of the 1990 health objectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, M M; Lalley, T L; Rosenberg, M L; Smith, J. C.; Parron, D; Jacobs, J.

    1988-01-01

    Control of stress and violent behavior is 1 of the 15 priority areas addressed in the 1990 health objectives for the nation. For control of stress, improved awareness of appropriate community service agencies and increased scientific knowledge of stress effects are the main objectives. For control of violent behavior, the objectives focus on three major problems: (a) deaths from homicide among young black males, (b) adolescent suicide, and (c) child abuse. Since the last progress report, publ...

  13. Aggressive Behavior among Israeli Elementary School Students and Associated Emotional/Behavioral Problems and Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Tammie; Rahav, Giora; Moldawsky, Ayala

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to identify aggression patterns among students, compare teachers' and students' reports on aggressiveness, and examine whether emotional and behavioral problems and self-control intercorrelate with aggression and can explain it among students. The study investigated 363 students aged 8 to 11 years and their 12 homeroom teachers in…

  14. Locus of control, problem-solving skills appraisal as predictors of waste prevention behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karbalaei, S.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Given that waste generation is a devastating problem, it is necessary that we advance our knowledge about the etiology of waste prevention behaviors. Accordingly, this study sought to increase the existing literature of waste prevention behaviors by examining the relationships among the locus of control, problem-solving confidence, approach-avoidance style, personal control style and participant’s age with waste prevention behaviors. Two hundred and forty participants (126 Women, and 114 men from Putra University (Universiti Putra Malaysia completed the Locus of Control of Behavior Scale, Waste Prevention Behaviors, Problem-Solving skills Appraisal and Socio-demographic questions. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM estimated individuals with internal personal control, effective problem-solving confidence, internal locus of control and approaching styles were more likely to pursue waste prevention behaviors. In addition, men were better than women at problem-solving confidence, approaching style, while women were better than men at internal locus of control, and personal control style. Therefore, these findings reinforce the importance of personality traits in waste prevention behaviors.

  15. Transcriptional control of behavior: Engrailed knockout changes cockroach escape trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, David; Marie, Bruno; Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The cerci of the cockroach are covered with identified sensory hairs, which detect air movements. The sensory neurons which innervate these hairs synapse with giant interneurons (GIs) in the terminal ganglion which in turn synapse with interneurons and leg motorneurons in thoracic ganglia. This neural circuit mediates the animal's escape behavior. The transcription factor Engrailed (En) is expressed only in the medially born sensory neurons, which suggested it could work as a positional deter...

  16. Explanation Capabilities for Behavior-Based Robot Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance L.

    2012-01-01

    A recent study that evaluated issues associated with remote interaction with an autonomous vehicle within the framework of grounding found that missing contextual information led to uncertainty in the interpretation of collected data, and so introduced errors into the command logic of the vehicle. As the vehicles became more autonomous through the activation of additional capabilities, more errors were made. This is an inefficient use of the platform, since the behavior of remotely located autonomous vehicles didn't coincide with the "mental models" of human operators. One of the conclusions of the study was that there should be a way for the autonomous vehicles to describe what action they choose and why. Robotic agents with enough self-awareness to dynamically adjust the information conveyed back to the Operations Center based on a detail level component analysis of requests could provide this description capability. One way to accomplish this is to map the behavior base of the robot into a formal mathematical framework called a cost-calculus. A cost-calculus uses composition operators to build up sequences of behaviors that can then be compared to what is observed using well-known inference mechanisms.

  17. The importance of behavior theory in control system modeling of physical activity sensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, William T; Martin, Cesar A; Rivera, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Among health behaviors, physical activity has the most extensive record of research using passive sensors. Control systems and other system dynamic approaches have long been considered applicable for understanding human behavior, but only recently has the technology provided the precise and intensive longitudinal data required for these analytic approaches. Although sensors provide intensive data on the patterns and variations of physical activity over time, the influences of these variations are often unmeasured. Health behavior theories provide an explanatory framework of the putative mediators of physical activity changes. Incorporating the intensive longitudinal measurement of these theoretical constructs is critical to improving the fit of control system model of physical activity and for advancing behavioral theory. Theory-based control models also provide guidance on the nature of the controllers which serve as the basis for just-in-time adaptive interventions based on these control system models.

  18. An Overview on Study of Identification of Driver Behavior Characteristics for Automotive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Driver characteristics have been the research focus for automotive control. Study on identification of driver characteristics is provided in this paper in terms of its relevant research directions and key technologies involved. This paper discusses the driver characteristics based on driver’s operation behavior, or the driver behavior characteristics. Following the presentation of the fundamental of the driver behavior characteristics, the key technologies of the driver behavior characteristics are reviewed in detail, including classification and identification methods of the driver behavior characteristics, experimental design and data acquisition, and model adaptation. Moreover, this paper discusses applications of the identification of the driver behavior characteristics which has been applied to the intelligent driver advisory system, the driver safety warning system, and the vehicle dynamics control system. At last, some ideas about the future work are concluded.

  19. Recent Progress in the Control of Fish Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens G. Balchen

    1984-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives a survey of recent activities in developing techniques for controlling fish behaviour over short and medium distances. The bases for control are described with reference to the sensory system of the fish and a simple model of fish behaviour. It is suggested that an effective way of controlling fish behaviour is by means of conditioning, in which reward or punishment is used in connection with an acoustical or visual signal. A number of possible applications which have been tested in practice are described.

  20. Antecedents and Behavior-Problem Outcomes of Parental Monitoring and Psychological Control in Early Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Pettit, Gregory S.; Laird, Robert D.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Bates, John E.; Criss, Michael M.

    2001-01-01

    The early childhood antecedents and behavior-problem correlates of monitoring and psychological control were examined in this prospective, longitudinal, multi-informant study. Parenting data were collected during home visit interviews with 440 mothers and their 13-year-old children. Behavior problems (anxiety/depression and delinquent behavior) were assessed via mother, teacher, and/or adolescent reports at ages 8 through 10 years and again at ages 13 through 14. Home-interview data collected...

  1. The Effects of Locus of Control, Organizational Justice Perception and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Basım, Prof. Dr. H. Nejat

    2015-01-01

    Personal and organizational factors, which have effect on personal behaviors, can increase organizational performance and effectiveness by protecting the organization from unwanted behaviors and can have an effect on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors (OCB). In this study, locus of control (LOC) has been included to the research as a personal variable and organizational justice perception and organizational commitment have been included to the research as organizational variables to put...

  2. To Punish or to Leave: Distinct Cognitive Processes Underlie Partner Control and Partner Choice Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Justin W Martin; Cushman, Fiery

    2015-01-01

    When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show...

  3. Evaluating the combined effectiveness of influenza control strategies and human preventive behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Mao

    Full Text Available Control strategies enforced by health agencies are a major type of practice to contain influenza outbreaks. Another type of practice is the voluntary preventive behavior of individuals, such as receiving vaccination, taking antiviral drugs, and wearing face masks. These two types of practices take effects concurrently in influenza containment, but little attention has been paid to their combined effectiveness. This article estimates this combined effectiveness using established simulation models in the urbanized area of Buffalo, NY, USA. Three control strategies are investigated, including: Targeted Antiviral Prophylaxis (TAP, workplace/school closure, community travel restriction, as well as the combination of the three. All control strategies are simulated with and without regard to individual preventive behavior, and the resulting effectiveness are compared. The simulation outcomes suggest that weaker control strategies could suffice to contain influenza epidemics, because individuals voluntarily adopt preventive behavior, rendering these weaker strategies more effective than would otherwise have been expected. The preventive behavior of individuals could save medical resources for control strategies and avoid unnecessary socio-economic interruptions. This research adds a human behavioral dimension into the simulation of control strategies and offers new insights into disease containment. Health policy makers are recommended to review current control strategies and comprehend preventive behavior patterns of local populations before making decisions on influenza containment.

  4. Parental Perceptions of Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers: Inhibitory Control Moderates the Association with Negative Emotionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suurland, Jill; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Huijbregts, Stephan C. J.; Smaling, Hanneke J. A.; de Sonneville, Leo M. J.; Van Goozen, Stephanie H. M.; Swaab, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control (IC) and negative emotionality (NE) are both linked to aggressive behavior, but their interplay has not yet been clarified. This study examines different NE × IC interaction models in relation to aggressive behavior in 855 preschoolers (aged 2-5 years) using parental questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that…

  5. Parental Control is Not Unconditionally Detrimental for Externalizing Behaviors in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcinar, Berna; Baydar, Nazli

    2014-01-01

    The association of three different strategies of maternal control (behavioral, psychological, and physical), and maternal warmth with children's externalizing behaviors were analyzed in an observational study of 3-year-old children in Turkey ("N" = 123). The results indicated that (i) mothers exercised all three types of control…

  6. Treatment of Multiply Controlled Problem Behavior with Procedural Variations of Differential Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidert, Pamela L.; Iwata, Brian A.; Dozier, Claudia L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the assessment and treatment of 2 children with autism spectrum disorder whose problem behaviors (self-injury, aggression, and disruption) were multiply controlled. Results of functional analyses indicated that the children's problem behaviors were maintained by both positive reinforcement (attention) and negative reinforcement (escape…

  7. The Development of Verbal Control over Motor Behavior: A Replication and Extension of Luria's Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Virginia S.; Waters, Harriet Salatas

    1982-01-01

    Two experiments replicate and extend Luria's (1959, 1961) findings on the development of verbal self-regulation during early childhood. Results support Luria's hypothesis that overt verbalizations facilitate control of motor behavior in young children and that language can play an active and integrative role in the development of behavioral and…

  8. What predicts intention-behavior discordance? A review of the action control framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. Rhodes; G.J. de Bruijn

    2013-01-01

    The physical activity intention-behavior gap is a focus of considerable research. The purpose of this article is to overview contemporary evidence for predictors of this intention-behavior discordance using the action control framework developed in our laboratories. We propose the hypothesis that in

  9. An Analysis of Verbal Stimulus Control in Intraverbal Behavior: Implications for Practice and Applied Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeseth, Svein; Smith, Dean P.

    2013-01-01

    A common characteristic of the language deficits experienced by children with autism (and other developmental disorders) is their failure to acquire a complex intraverbal repertoire. The difficulties with learning intraverbal behaviors may, in part, be related to the fact that the stimulus control for such behaviors usually involves highly complex…

  10. Anger and Approach Motivation in Infancy: Relations to Early Childhood Inhibitory Control and Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Degnan, Kathryn Amey; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Henderson, Heather A.; Hane, Amie Ashley; Xu, Qinmei; Fox, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    The relations among infant anger reactivity, approach behavior, and frontal electroencephalogram (EEG) asymmetry, and their relations to inhibitory control and behavior problems in early childhood were examined within the context of a longitudinal study of temperament. Two hundred nine infants' anger expressions to arm restraint were observed at 4…

  11. The Genetic Etiology of Inhibitory Control and Behavior Problems at 24 Months of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Jeffrey R.; Saudino, Kimberly J.; Asherson, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Background: To investigate links between inhibitory control (IC) and behavior problems in early childhood, as well as genetic and environmental covariances between these two constructs. Methods: Parent and laboratory ratings of IC and parent ratings of externalizing and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder behaviors were administered at 24…

  12. Exploring the Link between Pet Abuse and Controlling Behaviors in Violent Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Domestic violence is not as simple as one partner physically harming another. Instead, it consists of a complex range of controlling behaviors including physical, emotional, sexual, and economic maltreatment as well as isolation, male privilege, blaming, intimidation, threats, and minimizing/denying behaviors. In addition to the controlling…

  13. Behavior Modification and Transfer in an Out-of-Control Classroom. Monograph Number 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Michael E. J.; Purnell, Richard F.

    Three hypotheses were tested in this 6-week study: a) training in systematic application of strategies designed to reinforce desirable pupil behavior would enable the teacher to develop and maintain classroom control and increase pupil learning; b) desirable pupil behavior thus produced could be transferred from one classroom to another in which…

  14. Zen Meditation and Behavioral Self-Control: Some Similarities and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Deane H., Jr.

    An attempt is made to understand the behaviors involved in two different self-control strategies: Zen meditation and behavioral self-management. The first technique is derived from the Eastern "religious-Philosophical" tradition of Zen Buddhism; the other technique is derived from laboratory and field studies in Western settings. Using tools of…

  15. Highly competitive reindeer males control female behavior during the rut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Body

    Full Text Available During the rut, female ungulates move among harems or territories, either to sample mates or to avoid harassment. Females may be herded by a male, may stay with a preferred male, or aggregate near a dominant male to avoid harassment from other males. In fission-fusion group dynamics, female movement is best described by the group's fission probability, instead of inter-harem movement. In this study, we tested whether male herding ability, female mate choice or harassment avoidance influence fission probability. We recorded group dynamics in a herd of reindeer Rangifer tarandus equipped with GPS collars with activity sensors. We found no evidence that the harassment level in the group affected fission probability, or that females sought high rank (i.e. highly competitive and hence successful males. However, the behavior of high ranked males decreased fission probability. Male herding activity was synchronous with the decrease of fission probability observed during the rut. We concluded that male herding behavior stabilized groups, thereby increasing average group size and consequently the opportunity for sexual selection.

  16. Engineering sensorial delay to control phototaxis and emergent collective behaviors

    CERN Document Server

    Mijalkov, Mite; Wehr, Jan; Volpe, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Collective motions emerging from the interaction of autonomous mobile individuals play a key role in many phenomena, from the growth of bacterial colonies to the coordination of robotic swarms. For these collective behaviours to take hold, the individuals must be able to emit, sense and react to signals. When dealing with simple organisms and robots, these signals are necessarily very elementary, e.g. a cell might signal its presence by releasing chemicals and a robot by shining light. An additional challenge arises because the motion of the individuals is often noisy, e.g. the orientation of cells can be altered by Brownian motion and that of robots by an uneven terrain. Therefore, the emphasis is on achieving complex and tunable behaviors from simple autonomous agents communicating with each other in robust ways. Here, we show that the delay between sensing and reacting to a signal can determine the individual and collective long-term behavior of autonomous agents whose motion is intrinsically noisy. We exp...

  17. Highly competitive reindeer males control female behavior during the rut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body, Guillaume; Weladji, Robert B; Holand, Øystein; Nieminen, Mauri

    2014-01-01

    During the rut, female ungulates move among harems or territories, either to sample mates or to avoid harassment. Females may be herded by a male, may stay with a preferred male, or aggregate near a dominant male to avoid harassment from other males. In fission-fusion group dynamics, female movement is best described by the group's fission probability, instead of inter-harem movement. In this study, we tested whether male herding ability, female mate choice or harassment avoidance influence fission probability. We recorded group dynamics in a herd of reindeer Rangifer tarandus equipped with GPS collars with activity sensors. We found no evidence that the harassment level in the group affected fission probability, or that females sought high rank (i.e. highly competitive and hence successful) males. However, the behavior of high ranked males decreased fission probability. Male herding activity was synchronous with the decrease of fission probability observed during the rut. We concluded that male herding behavior stabilized groups, thereby increasing average group size and consequently the opportunity for sexual selection.

  18. Some neural correlates of sensorial and cognitive control of behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogmen, Haluk; Prakash, R. V.; Moussa, M.

    1992-07-01

    Development and maintenance of unsupervised intelligent activity relies on an active interaction with the environment. Such active exploratory behavior plays an essential role in both the development and adult phases of higher biological systems including humans. Exploration initiates a self-organization process whereby a coherent fusion of different sensory and motor modalities can be achieved (sensory-motor development) and maintained (adult rearrangement). In addition, the development of intelligence depends critically on an active manipulation of the environment. These observations are in sharp contrast with current attempts of artificial intelligence and various neural network models. In this paper, we present a neural network model that combines internal drives and environmental cues to reach behavioral decisions for the exploratory activity. The vision system consists of an ambient and a focal system. The ambient vision system guides eye movements by using nonassociative learning. This sensory based attentional focusing is augmented by a `cognitive' system using models developed for various aspects of frontal lobe function. The combined system has nonassociative learning, reinforcement learning, selective attention, habit formation, and flexible criterion categorization properties.

  19. Behavior and control of chlorine in dyestuff residue incineration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jian-hua; TAN Zhong-xin; JIANG Xue-guang; CHI Yong; CEN Ke-fa

    2006-01-01

    Dyestuff residue, a type of hazardous waste, is incinerated in the tubular furnace, and thermodynamic equilibrium model is used to calculate and analyze the chlorine behavior. The HCl emission and its effects on the behaviors of heavy metals are studied.Meanwhile, the effects of three dechlorine reagents are predicted at a high temperature. Results show that HCl emission is dependent on incineration temperature. The HCl evaporated mainly derives from the organic chlorine. Under the working condition of 500--900℃, the main products of Hg, Pb, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mn in reaction with HCl are HgCl2 (g), PbCl4(g), PbCl2 (g), (CuCl)3 (g), NiCl2 (s),NiCl2 (g), ZnCl2 (s), ZnCl2 (g), Zn (g), MnCl2 (s), and MnCl2 (g), respectively. Among the three dechlorine reagents, CaCO3 is optimal to remove chlorine at high temperature, little of HCl is released below 800℃, whereas Fe3O4 is unstable at high temperature.

  20. Multidimensional Scales for the Measurement of Locus of Control of Reinforcements for Physical Fitness Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, James R.; Corbin, Charles B.

    1988-01-01

    Trial administrations of the FITLOC, multidimensional scales for the measurement of locus of control of reinforcement for physical fitness behavior, provided preliminary evidence for the scales' reliability and validity. (Author/CB)

  1. Multidisciplinary behavioral treatment of defecation problems: a controlled study in children with anorectal malformations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyk, E.M. van; Wissink-Essink, M.; Brugman-Boezeman, A.T.M.; Oerlemans, H.M.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Severijnen, R.S.V.M.; Festen, C.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The most frequent consequences of being born with an anorectal malformation (ARM) are problems with fecal continence and constipation, which can have various negative implications. In this prospective, controlled study the effect of multidisciplinary behavioral treatment dealing

  2. Controlling maternal feeding practices associated with decreased dieting behavior in 6th grade children

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Kyung E; Appugliese, Danielle P.; Prisco, Alicia; Kaciroti, Niko A.; Corwyn, Robert F.; Bradley, Robert H.; Lumeng, Julie C.

    2010-01-01

    Controlling maternal feeding practices (CMFPs) have been linked to increased caloric intake, disinhibited eating, and obesity in children. Its relationship to child dieting behavior however is unknown. Using the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, this study examined whether controlling feeding practices are associated with increased or decreased dieting behavior in children. CMFP was assessed in 3rd grade by the question, ...

  3. Eating Behavior among Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Poorly Recognized Aspect in a Poorly Controlled Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yannakoulia, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Nutrition intervention is an integral part of type 2 diabetes care. Dietary management entails a series of eating behavior changes regarding meal planning, food selection, food preparation, dinning out, portion control, as well as appropriate responses to eating challenges. Diabetic patients encounter several difficulties in complying with the dietary regime. They exhibit restrictive eating behaviors, they express feelings of dietary deprivation, and rigid dietary control is perceived as the ...

  4. Modular state-based behavior control for safe human-robot interaction: A lightweight control architecture for a lightweight robot

    OpenAIRE

    Parusel, Sven; Haddadin, Sami; Albu-Schaeffer, Alin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel control architecture for realizing human-friendly behaviors and intuitive state based programming. The design implements strategies that take advantage of sophisticated soft-robotics features for providing reactive, robust, and safe robot actions in dynamic environments. Quick access to the various functionalities of the robot enables the user to develop flexible hybrid state automata for programming robot behaviors. The real-time robot co...

  5. Position control of a wheeled mobile robot including tire behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, J.; Schouten, H.E.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced driver assistance systems are increasingly available on road vehicles. These systems require a thorough development procedure, an important part of which consists of hardware-in-the-loop experiments in a controlled environment. To this end, a facility called Vehicle Hardware-In-the-Loop (Ve

  6. Discriminative Control of Punished Stereotyped Behavior in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Shannon S.; Anderson, Cynthia M.; Doughty, Adam H.; Williams, Dean C.; Saunders, Kathryn J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to establish discriminative control of responding by an antecedent stimulus using differential punishment because the results of past studies on this topic have been mixed. Three adults with mental retardation who exhibited stereotypy not maintained by social consequences (i.e., automatic reinforcement)…

  7. Antagonistic control of social versus repetitive self-grooming behaviors by separable amygdala neuronal subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weizhe; Kim, Dong-Wook; Anderson, David J

    2014-09-11

    Animals display a range of innate social behaviors that play essential roles in survival and reproduction. While the medial amygdala (MeA) has been implicated in prototypic social behaviors such as aggression, the circuit-level mechanisms controlling such behaviors are not well understood. Using cell-type-specific functional manipulations, we find that distinct neuronal populations in the MeA control different social and asocial behaviors. A GABAergic subpopulation promotes aggression and two other social behaviors, while neighboring glutamatergic neurons promote repetitive self-grooming, an asocial behavior. Moreover, this glutamatergic subpopulation inhibits social interactions independently of its effect to promote self-grooming, while the GABAergic subpopulation inhibits self-grooming, even in a nonsocial context. These data suggest that social versus repetitive asocial behaviors are controlled in an antagonistic manner by inhibitory versus excitatory amygdala subpopulations, respectively. These findings provide a framework for understanding circuit-level mechanisms underlying opponency between innate behaviors, with implications for their perturbation in psychiatric disorders.

  8. Optimal Control and Equilibrium Behavior of Production-Inventory Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Owen Q. Wu; Hong Chen

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between commodity inventory and short-term price variations has received considerable attention, but the understanding has been limited to single-stage cross-sectional relation. In this paper, we aim to deepen our understanding of the inventory-price relationship in two dimensions: across time and across production stages. We first examine an individual firm controlling production and two stages of inventory under uncertain input and output prices and operating costs. We next...

  9. User Behavior Trust Based Cloud Computing Access Control Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jiangcheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Context. With the development of computer software, hardware, and communication technologies, a new type of human-centered computing model, called Cloud Computing (CC) has been established as a commercial computer network service. However, the openness of CC brings huge security challenge to the identity-based access control system, as it not able to effectively prevent malicious users accessing; information security problems, system stability problems, and also the trust issues between cloud...

  10. Do Personality Traits Moderate Relations Between Psychologically Controlling Parenting and Problem Behavior in Adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabbe, Elien; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2016-06-01

    This research examined whether and how adolescents' personality traits moderate associations between psychologically controlling parenting and problem behaviors. On the basis of self-determination theory, we also examined the mediating role of psychological need frustration in the effects of psychologically controlling parenting. A cross-sectional study in two samples (N = 423 and 292; Mage = 12.43 and 15.74 years) was conducted. While in Sample 1 both mothers and adolescents provided reports of parenting and problem behavior, Sample 2 relied on adolescent-reported parenting and mother-reported problem behavior. Psychologically controlling parenting was related to internalizing and externalizing problems in both samples. Little systematic evidence was obtained for the moderating role of personality, with the exception of a moderating effect of Agreeableness. In both samples, psychological control was unrelated to externalizing problems among adolescents high on Agreeableness. Analyses of Sample 2 showed that associations between psychological control and problem behavior were mediated by psychological need frustration. Adolescent personality plays a modest role as a moderator of associations between psychologically controlling parenting and problem behavior. Frustration of adolescents' basic and universal psychological needs can account for the undermining effects of psychologically controlling parenting. Directions for future research are discussed.

  11. Hypothalamic control of male aggression-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Annegret L; Grosenick, Logan; Davidson, Thomas J; Deisseroth, Karl; Lin, Dayu

    2016-04-01

    In many vertebrate species, certain individuals will seek out opportunities for aggression, even in the absence of threat-provoking cues. Although several brain areas have been implicated in the generation of attack in response to social threat, little is known about the neural mechanisms that promote self-initiated or 'voluntary' aggression-seeking when no threat is present. To explore this directly, we utilized an aggression-seeking task in which male mice self-initiated aggression trials to gain brief and repeated access to a weaker male that they could attack. In males that exhibited rapid task learning, we found that the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl), an area with a known role in attack, was essential for aggression-seeking. Using both single-unit electrophysiology and population optical recording, we found that VMHvl neurons became active during aggression-seeking and that their activity tracked changes in task learning and extinction. Inactivation of the VMHvl reduced aggression-seeking behavior, whereas optogenetic stimulation of the VMHvl accelerated moment-to-moment aggression-seeking and intensified future attack. These data demonstrate that the VMHvl can mediate both acute attack and flexible seeking actions that precede attack.

  12. A multitasking behavioral control system for the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klarer, P.

    1994-03-01

    The design of a multitasking behavioral control system for the Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) is described. The control system design attempts to ameliorate some of the problems noted by some researchers when implementing subsumption or behavioral control systems, particularly with regard to multiple processor systems and real-time operations. The architecture is designed to allow both synchronous and asynchronous operations between various behavior modules by taking advantage of intertask communications channels, and by implementing each behavior module and each interconnection node as a stand-alone task. The potential advantages of this approach over those previously described in the field are discussed. An implementation of the architecture is planned for a prototype Robotic All Terrain Lunar Exploration Rover (RATLER) currently under development, and is briefly described.

  13. Relation of Self-efficacy and Perceived Behavior Control on Gym Users’ Anabolic Steroid Use Related Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jalilian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Anabolic steroids (AS abuse is spreading increasingly among professionals and amateur athletes taking part in gym halls. Healths educators' awareness of why athletes and gym users take such substances may help them to develop appropriate intervention. In this regard, perceived behavioral control (PBC is defined as “a person’s estimate of how easy or difficult it will be for him or her to carry out the behavior”, and Self-efficacy (SE is defined as “people’s beliefs about their capabilities to produce performances that influence events affecting their lives”. Both concepts refer to people's beliefs that they are capable of performing a given behavior. The aim of this study was to determine the role of SE and PBC in predicting AS use among male body builders. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, totally three hundred male body builders in Hamadan were randomly selected. The data was gathered using a self-report questionnaire included: demographic characteristics, self-efficacy for not using AS, and PBC for not using AASs. Logistic regression analysis was applied to assess association between SE and PBC with AASs use.Results: Based on the results, 24.3% (n=73 of athletes reported that they had used AS and 38% of them reported the history of using AS in the past. Logistic regression model showed SE (OR=0.851 P=0.000 and PBC (OR= 0.711 & P=0.000 that indicate association between low PBC and Low SE to use AS. Conclusion: High self-efficacy for not using AS and high perceived behavioral control have effective potential to protect adolescents against high risk behaviors. Comprehensive preventative health education programs need to emphasize on psychological factors that mediate and predict adolescents’ and youths' health-related behaviors(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:45-52

  14. Design of an Integrated Vehicle Chassis Control System with Driver Behavior Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated vehicle chassis control strategy with driver behavior identification is introduced in this paper. In order to identify the different types of driver behavior characteristics, a driver behavior signals acquisition system was established using the dSPACE real-time simulation platform, and the driver inputs of 30 test drivers were collected under the double lane change test condition. Then, driver behavior characteristics were analyzed and identified based on the preview optimal curvature model through genetic algorithm and neural network method. Using it as a base, an integrated chassis control strategy with active front steering (AFS and direct yaw moment control (DYC considering driver characteristics was established by model predictive control (MPC method. Finally, simulations were carried out to verify the control strategy by CarSim and MATLAB/Simulink. The results show that the proposed method enables the control system to adjust its parameters according to the driver behavior identification results and the vehicle handling and stability performance are significantly improved.

  15. Genetic and environmental influences on the relationship between flow proneness, locus of control and behavioral inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam A Mosing

    Full Text Available Flow is a psychological state of high but subjectively effortless attention that typically occurs during active performance of challenging tasks and is accompanied by a sense of automaticity, high control, low self-awareness, and enjoyment. Flow proneness is associated with traits and behaviors related to low neuroticism such as emotional stability, conscientiousness, active coping, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Little is known about the genetic architecture of flow proneness, behavioral inhibition and locus of control--traits also associated with neuroticism--and their interrelation. Here, we hypothesized that individuals low in behavioral inhibition and with an internal locus of control would be more likely to experience flow and explored the genetic and environmental architecture of the relationship between the three variables. Behavioral inhibition and locus of control was measured in a large population sample of 3,375 full twin pairs and 4,527 single twins, about 26% of whom also scored the flow proneness questionnaire. Findings revealed significant but relatively low correlations between the three traits and moderate heritability estimates of .41, .45, and .30 for flow proneness, behavioral inhibition, and locus of control, respectively, with some indication of non-additive genetic influences. For behavioral inhibition we found significant sex differences in heritability, with females showing a higher estimate including significant non-additive genetic influences, while in males the entire heritability was due to additive genetic variance. We also found a mainly genetically mediated relationship between the three traits, suggesting that individuals who are genetically predisposed to experience flow, show less behavioral inhibition (less anxious and feel that they are in control of their own destiny (internal locus of control. We discuss that some of the genes underlying this relationship may include those influencing the function of

  16. The Marketing & Positive Impacts of Behavioral Control System on Societies & Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Adel Mostafa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral control systems are one of the most prominent tools used by managers and marketers for different internal and external purposes. One of the most important external purposes they have been used for is influencing consumer behavior. This paper explores the positive effects of implementing such systems on societies. It discusses consumer perception of the systems, their influence on their financial behavior in different contexts, how can they create order and how as well as to what extent should it be implemented and finally how can minimize negative consumer behavior. A judgment based sample of typical consumers was surveyed using questionnaires for collecting primary data on these aspects. Secondary data from Egypt, Singapore and Malaysia was also used as an example of using behavioral control systems. Results show that consumers in general have a positive attitude towards imposing such systems. However, there were worries about misuse, abuse and overuse of theses systems’ policies. Consequently, data shows that behavioral control systems can positively enhance and influence consumer behavior as long as it is used to balance both consumer and retailer interests in a moderate, risk free manner.

  17. Control of Body Weight by Eating Behavior in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandian, Modjtaba; Bergh, Cecilia; Ioakimidis, Ioannis; Esfandiari, Maryam; Shield, Julian; Lightman, Stafford; Leon, Michael; Södersten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Diet, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have limited effects in counteracting the worldwide increase in pediatric body weight. Moreover, the promise that individualized drug design will work to induce weight loss appears to be exaggerated. We suggest that the reason for this limited success is that the cause of obesity has been misunderstood. Body weight is mainly under external control; our brain permits us to eat under most circumstances, and unless the financial or physical cost of food is high, eating and body weight increase by default. When energy-rich, inexpensive foods are continually available, people need external support to maintain a healthy body weight. Weight loss can thereby be achieved by continuous feedback on how much and how fast to eat on a computer screen. PMID:26539422

  18. Control of body weight by eating behavior in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modjtaba eZandian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diet, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have limited effects in counteracting the worldwide increase in pediatric body weight. Moreover, the promise that individualized drug design will work to induce weight loss appears to be exaggerated. We suggest that the reason for this limited success is that the cause of obesity has been misunderstood. Body weight is mainly under external control; our brain permits us to eat under most circumstances, and unless the financial or physical cost of food is high, eating and body weight increase by default. When energy-rich, inexpensive foods are continually available, people need external support to maintain a healthy body weight. Weight loss can thereby be achieved by continuous feedback on how much and how fast to eat on a computer screen.

  19. Unique genetic loci identified for emotional behavior in control and chronic stress conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly AK Carhuatanta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An individual’s genetic background affects their emotional behavior and response to stress. Although studies have been conducted to identify genetic predictors for emotional behavior or stress response, it remains unknown how prior stress history alters the interaction between an individual’s genome and their emotional behavior. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify chromosomal regions that affect emotional behavior and are sensitive to stress exposure. We utilized the BXD behavioral genetics mouse model to identify chromosomal regions that predict fear learning and emotional behavior following exposure to a control or chronic stress environment. 62 BXD recombinant inbred strains and C57BL/6 and DBA/2 parental strains underwent behavioral testing including a classical fear conditioning paradigm and the elevated plus maze. Distinct quantitative trait loci (QTLs were identified for emotional learning, anxiety and locomotion in control and chronic stress populations. Candidate genes, including those with already known functions in learning and stress were found to reside within the identified QTLs. Our data suggest that chronic stress history reveals novel genetic predictors of emotional behavior.

  20. Reactive Neural Control for Phototaxis and Obstacle Avoidance Behavior of Walking Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoonpong, Poramate; Pasemann, Frank; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2007-01-01

    —This paper describes reactive neural control used to generate phototaxis and obstacle avoidance behavior of walking machines. It utilizes discrete-time neurodynamics and consists of two main neural modules: neural preprocessing and modular neural control. The neural preprocessing network acts...... as a sensory fusion unit. It filters sensory noise and shapes sensory data to drive the corresponding reactive behavior. On the other hand, modular neural control based on a central pattern generator is applied for locomotion of walking machines. It coordinates leg movements and can generate omnidirectional...

  1. Physiological, Behavioral, and Scientific Impact of Different Fluid Control Protocols in the Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Henri; Mindus, Claire; Flecknell, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rhesus macaques are an important model in behavioral neuroscience due to their advanced cognitive abilities. To motivate animals to engage in complex tasks, fluid rewards, in conjunction with fluid control protocols, are often used. The impact of these protocols on animal welfare is controversial. We compared two fluid control protocols against a protocol providing free access to water and evaluated the impacts on physiological states of hydration, behavioral measures of welfare, and scientific output. Blood physiology did not significantly differ between any of the protocols, and urine measures were indicative of well functioning, healthy kidneys. Changes in behaviors were limited, the main one being an increase in motivation to drink on the stricter fluid control protocol, and improved task performance early in the week. Overall, fluid control protocols had little measurable impact on the welfare of rhesus macaques while ensuring that scientific data of high quality could be obtained. PMID:27679812

  2. Health behavior in teens with epilepsy: how do they compare with controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, C G; Lee, A; Wirrell, Elaine; Sherman, E M S; Hamiwka, Lorie

    2008-07-01

    The goal of the study was to determine if adolescents with epilepsy have poorer health behavior than healthy controls. Health behavior was compared in two cohorts: cognitively normal teens aged 11-16 with epilepsy and similarly aged controls. Teens completed the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) and Piers-Harris II, and the primary caregiver completed the Family Assessment Measure III. Forty-four teens with epilepsy and 119 orthopedic controls returned questionnaires. Adolescents with epilepsy had poorer health behavior than controls (P<0.003). They felt significantly less positive about their health (P<0.01) and were less physically active (P<0.02). Poorer family function (P<0.05) and lower self-esteem (P<0.001) were predictors of poorer health behavior. Given the increased prevalence of comorbid diseases in adults with epilepsy, clinicians should routinely query teens with epilepsy regarding health behavior and provide anticipatory guidance and appropriate interventions for poor health behavior choices. PMID:18555203

  3. Threat Interference Biases Predict Socially Anxious Behavior: The Role of Inhibitory Control and Minute of Stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlin, Eugenia I; Teachman, Bethany A

    2015-07-01

    The current study brings together two typically distinct lines of research. First, social anxiety is inconsistently associated with behavioral deficits in social performance, and the factors accounting for these deficits remain poorly understood. Second, research on selective processing of threat cues, termed cognitive biases, suggests these biases typically predict negative outcomes, but may sometimes be adaptive, depending on the context. Integrating these research areas, the current study examined whether conscious and/or unconscious threat interference biases (indexed by the unmasked and masked emotional Stroop) can explain unique variance, beyond self-reported anxiety measures, in behavioral avoidance and observer-rated anxious behavior during a public speaking task. Minute of speech and general inhibitory control (indexed by the color-word Stroop) were examined as within-subject and between-subject moderators, respectively. Highly socially anxious participants (N=135) completed the emotional and color-word Stroop blocks prior to completing a 4-minute videotaped speech task, which was later coded for anxious behaviors (e.g., speech dysfluency). Mixed-effects regression analyses revealed that general inhibitory control moderated the relationship between both conscious and unconscious threat interference bias and anxious behavior (though not avoidance), such that lower threat interference predicted higher levels of anxious behavior, but only among those with relatively weaker (versus stronger) inhibitory control. Minute of speech further moderated this relationship for unconscious (but not conscious) social-threat interference, such that lower social-threat interference predicted a steeper increase in anxious behaviors over the course of the speech (but only among those with weaker inhibitory control). Thus, both trait and state differences in inhibitory control resources may influence the behavioral impact of threat biases in social anxiety. PMID:26163713

  4. Factors Impacting Emergence of Behavioral Control by Underselected Stimuli in Humans after Reduction of Control by Overselected Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomfield, Laura; McHugh, Louise; Reed, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Stimulus overselectivity occurs when only one of potentially many aspects of the environment controls behavior. Adult participants were trained and tested on a trial-and-error discrimination learning task while engaging in a concurrent load task, and overselectivity emerged. When responding to the overselected stimulus was reduced by reinforcing a…

  5. Effects of Self-Control, Social Control, and Social Learning on Sexting Behavior among South Korean Youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Moak, Stacy; Walker, Jeffery T.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the emerging phenomenon of sexting, scientific investigation with criminological perspectives has been limited. Utilizing data collected from 1,612 randomly selected youth in South Korea, this study begins the investigation into which criminological theory best explains sexting behaviors. Theories considered include self-control, social…

  6. OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF KOVAR ALLOY IN CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Controlled oxidation experiments were performed on Kovar alloy by changing oxi-dation atmosphere, temperature, and exposure time to produce films with different oxide type and thickness. The results indicated that single Fe3O4 and single FeO were respectively obtained when Kovar alloy was oxidized in N2-2.31%H2O-0.95%H2 at 500℃ and in N2-2.31%H2O-O.5%H2 at 1000℃, and all kinetic curves followed linear relation; mixed oxides of FeO and Fe3O4 formed when Kovar was oxidized in N2-2.31%H2O at 1000℃, and parabolic kinetics were obeyed. Analysis of metal-lographic cross section of oxides indicated that oxygen diffusion inward through the oxide scale is responsible for intergranular oxide, which had formed beneath the oxide scales when the oxide products were mixed oxides of FeO and Fe3O4, and which did not occur when the oxide was single FeO or Fe3O4. The oxidation model was also established.

  7. Case-controlled study of nursing home residents referred for treatment of vocally disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, B; Snowdon, J; Meares, S; Turner, J; Gonski, P; McMinn, B; McIntosh, H; Latham, L; Draper, D; Luscombe, G

    2000-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with vocally disruptive behavior (VDB) in nursing home patients referred to aged care services for treatment, using a case-control methodology. Characteristics of the VDB, reasons for referral, perceived causal factors, and psychotropic use were noted. Twenty-five subjects and controls were examined with the Screaming Behavior Mapping Instrument, the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, the Dementia Behavior Disturbance Scale, and measures of cognition, functional capacity, social activities, and emotional reactions of nursing staff. VDB was associated with other disturbed behaviors, depression, anxiety, severe dementia, functional impairment, communication difficulties, use of psychotropic medication, social isolation, and emotional distress in the nursing staff. Reasons for referral may relate more to the stress experienced by nursing home staff in managing VDB than to specific attributes of the VDB itself. PMID:11081953

  8. The Prevention Program for Externalizing Problem Behavior (PEP) Improves Child Behavior by Reducing Negative Parenting: Analysis of Mediating Processes in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Charlotte; Hautmann, Christopher; Plück, Julia; Eichelberger, Ilka; Döpfner, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Background: Our indicated Prevention program for preschool children with Externalizing Problem behavior (PEP) demonstrated improved parenting and child problem behavior in a randomized controlled efficacy trial and in a study with an effectiveness design. The aim of the present analysis of data from the randomized controlled trial was to identify…

  9. Genetic and environmental influences on the relationship between flow proneness, locus of control and behavioral inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Mosing, Miriam A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; David Cesarini; Magnus Johannesson; Patrik K. E. Magnusson; Jeanne Nakamura; Guy Madison; Fredrik Ullén

    2012-01-01

    Flow is a psychological state of high but subjectively effortless attention that typically occurs during active performance of challenging tasks and is accompanied by a sense of automaticity, high control, low self-awareness, and enjoyment. Flow proneness is associated with traits and behaviors related to low neuroticism such as emotional stability, conscientiousness, active coping, self-esteem and life satisfaction. Little is known about the genetic architecture of flow proneness, behavioral...

  10. Hybrid coordination of reinforcement learning-based behaviors for AUV control

    OpenAIRE

    Carreras Pérez, Marc; Batlle i Grabulosa, Joan; Ridao Rodríguez, Pere

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid coordination method for behavior-based control architectures. The hybrid method takes advantages of the robustness and modularity in competitive approaches as well as optimized trajectories in cooperative ones. This paper shows the feasibility of applying this hybrid method with a 3D-navigation to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The behaviors are learnt online by means of reinforcement learning. A continuous Q-learning implemented with a feed-forward neura...

  11. The hormonal control of begging and early aggressive behavior: Experiments in black-headed gull chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Groothuis, TGG; Ros, AFH; Groothuis, Ton G.G

    2005-01-01

    The hormonal control of begging and sibling competition is largely unknown, but recent evidence suggests a role for steroid hormones. We tested the influence of the aromatizable androgen testosterone (T), the non-aromatizable androgen 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and 17 beta-estradiol (E) on both begging behavior and aggressive behavior in black-headed gull chicks (Larus ridibundus). Chicks of this species have a conspicuous begging display, while their frequently performed early aggres...

  12. Behavioral Inhibition and Attentional Control in Adolescents: Robust Relationships with Anxiety and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Sportel, B. Esther; Nauta, Maaike H; de Hullu, Eva; de Jong, Peter J; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) has been associated with the development of internalizing disorders in children and adolescents. It has further been shown that attentional control (AC) is negatively associated with internalizing problems. The combination of high BI and low AC may particularly lead to elevated symptomatology of internalizing behavior. This study broadens existing knowledge by investigating the additive and interacting effects of BI and AC on the various DSM-IV based internalizing d...

  13. Towards Behavior Control for Evolutionary Robot Based on RL with ENN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingan Yang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a behavior-switching control strategy of anevolutionary robotics based on Artificial NeuralNetwork (ANN and Genetic Algorithms (GA. This method is able not only to construct thereinforcement learning models for autonomous robots and evolutionary robot modules thatcontrol behaviors and reinforcement learning environments, and but also to perform thebehavior-switching control and obstacle avoidance of an evolutionary robotics (ER intime-varying environments with static and moving obstacles by combining ANN and GA.The experimental results on thebasic behaviors and behavior-switching control have demonstrated that ourmethod can perform the decision-making strategy and parameters set opimization ofFNN and GA by learning and can escape successfully from the trap of a localminima and avoid \\emph{"motion deadlock" status} of humanoid soccer robotics agents,and reduce the oscillation of the planned trajectory betweenthe multiple obstacles by crossover and mutation. Some results of the proposed algorithmhave been successfully applied to our simulation humanoid robotics soccer team CIT3Dwhich won \\emph{the 1st prize} of RoboCup Championship and ChinaOpen2010 (July 2010 and \\emph{the $2^{nd}$ place}of the official RoboCup World Championship on 5-11 July, 2011 in Istanbul, Turkey.As compared with the conventional behavior network and the adaptive behavior method,the genetic encoding complexity of our algorithm is simplified, and the networkperformance and the {\\em convergence rate $\\rho$} have been greatlyimproved.

  14. The effects of cognitive and behavioral control on post-stress performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foushee, H. C.; Davis, M. H.; Stephan, W. G.; Bernstein, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    A study was designed to investigate the effects of behavioral and cognitive control on post-stress performance. Half of the subjects exposed to loud unpredictable noise bursts were given 'behavioral' control (a button which would terminate the noise), while the other half had no behavioral control. In addition, subjects were provided with one of three levels of feedback (success, failure, or no feedback) regarding their performance during the noise. It was expected that information about performance would provide subjects with an increased sense of 'cognitive' control which would affect their appraisal of stressful events and their later performance. The results indicated that subjects given feedback performed better on subsequent tasks than those given no feedback. Perceived behavioral control had little effect on performance. The causal attributions made by subjects were used to interpret these effects. These findings were viewed as supportive of Averill's (1973) notion that various types of control are related to stress in a complex fashion. The data may also support the reformulation by Abramson et al. (1978) of learned helplessness theory.

  15. Antecedents and behavior-problem outcomes of parental monitoring and psychological control in early adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, G S; Laird, R D; Dodge, K A; Bates, J E; Criss, M M

    2001-01-01

    The early childhood antecedents and behavior-problem correlates of monitoring and psychological control were examined in this prospective, longitudinal, multi-informant study. Parenting data were collected during home visit interviews with 440 mothers and their 13-year-old children. Behavior problems (anxiety/depression and delinquent behavior) were assessed via mother, teacher, and/or adolescent reports at ages 8 through 10 years and again at ages 13 through 14. Home-interview data collected at age 5 years were used to measure antecedent parenting (harsh/reactive, positive/proactive), family background (e.g., socioeconomic status), and mother-rated child behavior problems. Consistent with expectation, monitoring was anteceded by a proactive parenting style and by advantageous family-ecological characteristics, and psychological control was anteceded by harsh parenting and by mothers' earlier reports of child externalizing problems. Consistent with prior research, monitoring was associated with fewer delinquent behavior problems. Links between psychological control and adjustment were more complex: High levels of psychological control were associated with more delinquent problems for girls and for teens who were low in preadolescent delinquent problems, and with more anxiety/depression for girls and for teens who were high in preadolescent anxiety/depression.

  16. Health locus of control and self-esteem as related to adolescent health behavior and intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielman, T E; Leech, S L; Lorenger, A T; Horvath, W J

    1984-01-01

    A health behavior and attitudes questionnaire was administered to 246 fifth-grade and 265 sixth-grade students during class time. The questions included 20 children's health locus of control (CHLC) items reported by Parcel and Meyer (1978), 17 children's self-esteem (CSE) items modified from those reported by Coopersmith (1967), and questions concerning past and current behavior and future intentions with respect to cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and marijuana use. The results indicate that the relationships between dimensions of children's health locus of control and self-esteem and their behaviors and intentions are not large enough to suggest that intervention programs directed at the prevention of detrimental health behaviors focus on the enhancement of self-esteem or the internal locus of control. An appropriate test of the efficacy of such an approach requires a longitudinal rather than a cross-sectional study, monitoring changes in the levels of self-esteem and health locus of control and associated changes in health behavior.

  17. The real-time control of planetary rovers through behavior modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David P.

    1991-01-01

    It is not yet clear of what type, and how much, intelligence is needed for a planetary rover to function semi-autonomously on a planetary surface. Current designs assume an advanced AI system that maintains a detailed map of its journeys and the surroundings, and that carefully calculates and tests every move in advance. To achieve these abilities, and because of the limitations of space-qualified electronics, the supporting rover is quite sizable, massing a large fraction of a ton, and requiring technology advances in everything from power to ground operations. An alternative approach is to use a behavior driven control scheme. Recent research has shown that many complex tasks may be achieved by programming a robot with a set of behaviors and activation or deactivating a subset of those behaviors as required by the specific situation in which the robot finds itself. Behavior control requires much less computation than is required by tradition AI planning techniques. The reduced computation requirements allows the entire rover to be scaled down as appropriate (only down-link communications and payload do not scale under these circumstances). The missions that can be handled by the real-time control and operation of a set of small, semi-autonomous, interacting, behavior-controlled planetary rovers are discussed.

  18. SOFT CONTROL ON COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR OF A GROUP OF AUTONOMOUS AGENTS BY A SHILL AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing HAN; Ming LI; Lei GUO

    2006-01-01

    This paper asks a new question: how can we control the collective behavior of self-organized which keeps the local rule of the existing agents in the system. We show the feasibility of soft control by a case study. Consider the simple but typical distributed multi-agent model proposed by Vicsek et al. for flocking of birds: each agent moves with the same speed but with different headings which are updated using a local rule based on the average of its own heading and the headings of its neighbors.Most studies of this model are about the self-organized collective behavior, such as synchronization of headings. We want to intervene in the collective behavior (headings) of the group by soft control. A as an ordinary agent by other agents. We construct a control law for the shill so that it can synchronize the whole group to an objective heading. This control law is proved to be effective analytically and numerically. Note that soft control is different from the approach of distributed control. It is a natural way to intervene in the distributed systems. It may bring out many interesting issues and challenges on the control of complex systems.

  19. Recrystallization Behavior Design for Controlling Grain Size in Strip Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guo-hui; S V Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    To promote effectively dynamic recrystallization and obtain a homogeneous distribution of ultrafine grain size in strip finish rolling process, the behavior of static and dynamic recrystallization must be appropriately designed to provide an ultrafine austenite microstructure without mixed grain size. The design of rolling schedule was analyzed based on the control of the recrystallization behavior to achieve ultrafine grain size in the strip rolling process of niobium microalloyed steel. The experimental simulations were presented to validate the twice dynamic recrystallization design to achieve ultrafine grain size control.

  20. Trastornos de alimentación y control personal de la conducta Eating disorders and personal behavioral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraide Lugli-Rivero

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Explorar el control personal de la conducta en sus tres aspectos: control objetivo, control subjetivo y creencias de control en mujeres con trastornos alimentarios, en riesgo de padecer trastornos alimentarios y normales. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Es un estudio transversal que se llevó a cabo en Caracas, Venezuela, en 1997. Se trabajó con una muestra de 87 mujeres, 21 con trastornos alimentarios subclínicos, 33 en riesgo y 33 normales. Se utilizaron los siguientes instrumentos: Test de actitudes hacia la alimentación, Entrevista diagnóstica internacional compuesta, Inventario de autocontrol, Inventario de autoeficacia percibida para el autocontrol de la conducta e Inventario de locus de control. Los datos fueron analizados mediante el análisis de varianza y para las comparaciones post hoc se utilizó la prueba Student-Neuman-Keuls. RESULTADOS: Se encontró que las personas con trastornos alimentarios presentan dificultad en la emisión de conductas de autocontrol, menor sentimiento de eficacia personal para autorregular la conducta y mayor creencia en el control de otros poderosos sobre sus actos y consecuencias. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados encontrados constituyen una primera aproximación para entender el papel que juega la variable psicológica "control personal de la conducta" como factor protector o de riesgo en el desarrollo de la anorexia o bulimia nerviosa. El texto completo en inglés de este artículo está disponible en: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlOBJECTIVE: To explore the three components of personal behavioral control: Objective control, subjective control and control beliefs among normal women, women at risk of anorexia or bulimia and women with sub-clinical eating disorders. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 1997, a cross-sectional study was conducted in Caracas, Venezuela. The study population consisted of 87 women: 21 with sub-clinical eating disorders, 33 at risk of having an eating disorder, and 33 normal women

  1. An Evaluation of a Smartphone–Assisted Behavioral Weight Control Intervention for Adolescents: Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncombe, Kristina M; Lott, Mark A; Hunsaker, Sanita L; Duraccio, Kara M; Woolford, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of adolescent weight control treatments is modest, and effective treatments are costly and are not widely available. Smartphones may be an effective method for delivering critical components of behavioral weight control treatment including behavioral self-monitoring. Objective To examine the efficacy and acceptability of a smartphone assisted adolescent behavioral weight control intervention. Methods A total of 16 overweight or obese adolescents (mean age=14.29 years, standard deviation=1.12) received 12 weeks of combined treatment that consisted of weekly in-person group behavioral weight control treatment sessions plus smartphone self-monitoring and daily text messaging. Subsequently they received 12 weeks of electronic-only intervention, totaling 24 weeks of intervention. Results On average, participants attained modest but significant reductions in body mass index standard score (zBMI: 0.08 standard deviation units, t (13)=2.22, P=.04, d=0.63) over the in-person plus electronic-only intervention period but did not maintain treatment gains over the electronic-only intervention period. Participants self-monitored on approximately half of combined intervention days but less than 20% of electronic-only intervention days. Conclusions Smartphones likely hold promise as a component of adolescent weight control interventions but they may be less effective in helping adolescents maintain treatment gains after intensive interventions. PMID:27554704

  2. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin W Martin

    Full Text Available When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice. Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice.

  3. To punish or to leave: distinct cognitive processes underlie partner control and partner choice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justin W; Cushman, Fiery

    2015-01-01

    When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person's intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a "trembling hand" economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator's intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control) or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice). Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner's intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice. PMID:25915550

  4. To Punish or to Leave: Distinct Cognitive Processes Underlie Partner Control and Partner Choice Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Justin W.; Cushman, Fiery

    2015-01-01

    When a cooperative partner defects, at least two types of response are available: Punishment, aimed at modifying behavior, and ostracism, aimed at avoiding further social interaction with the partner. These options, termed partner control and partner choice, have been distinguished at behavioral and evolutionary levels. However, little work has compared their cognitive bases. Do these disparate behaviors depend on common processes of moral evaluation? Specifically, we assess whether they show identical patterns of dependence on two key dimensions of moral evaluation: A person’s intentions, and the outcomes that they cause. We address this issue in a “trembling hand” economic game. In this game, an allocator divides a monetary stake between themselves and a responder based on a stochastic mechanism. This allows for dissociations between the allocator’s intent and the actual outcome. Responders were either given the opportunity to punish or reward the allocator (partner control) or to switch to a different partner for a subsequent round of play (partner choice). Our results suggest that partner control and partner choice behaviors are supported by distinct underlying cognitive processes: Partner control exhibits greater sensitivity to the outcomes a partner causes, while partner choice is influenced almost exclusively by a partner’s intentions. This cognitive dissociation can be understood in light of the unique adaptive functions of partner control and partner choice. PMID:25915550

  5. The Influence of Culture and Adoption Status on the Development of Behavioral Inhibition, Anxiety, Temperament, and Parental Control

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Jennifer Yu

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that child behavioral phenotypes such as behavioral inhibition and aspects of parental control behavior may be shaped by culturally-informed socialization goals. Specifically, in accord with collectivistic values for interpersonal harmony and self-discipline, East Asian parents tend to support children's behavioral inhibition (BI; Chen & French, 2008) and utilize more parental control strategies such as encouragement of moderate emotional expressivity and restricti...

  6. Prey-mediated behavioral responses of feeding blue whales in controlled sound exposure experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlaender, A S; Hazen, E L; Goldbogen, J A; Stimpert, A K; Calambokidis, J; Southall, B L

    2016-06-01

    Behavioral response studies provide significant insights into the nature, magnitude, and consequences of changes in animal behavior in response to some external stimulus. Controlled exposure experiments (CEEs) to study behavioral response have faced challenges in quantifying the importance of and interaction among individual variability, exposure conditions, and environmental covariates. To investigate these complex parameters relative to blue whale behavior and how it may change as a function of certain sounds, we deployed multi-sensor acoustic tags and conducted CEEs using simulated mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and pseudo-random noise (PRN) stimuli, while collecting synoptic, quantitative prey measures. In contrast to previous approaches that lacked such prey data, our integrated approach explained substantially more variance in blue whale dive behavioral responses to mid-frequency sounds (r2 = 0.725 vs. 0.14 previously). Results demonstrate that deep-feeding whales respond more clearly and strongly to CEEs than those in other behavioral states, but this was only evident with the increased explanatory power provided by incorporating prey density and distribution as contextual covariates. Including contextual variables increases the ability to characterize behavioral variability and empirically strengthens previous findings that deep-feeding blue whales respond significantly to mid-frequency sound exposure. However, our results are only based on a single behavioral state with a limited sample size, and this analytical framework should be applied broadly across behavioral states. The increased capability to describe and account for individual response variability by including environmental variables, such as prey, that drive foraging behavior underscores the importance of integrating these and other relevant contextual parameters in experimental designs. Our results suggest the need to measure and account for the ecological dynamics of predator

  7. Complex Behavior in a Fish Algae Consumption Model with Impulsive Control Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a dynamic mathematical model of fish algae consumption with an impulsive control strategy analytically. It is proved that the system has a globally asymptotically stable algae-eradication periodic solution and is permanent by using the theory of impulsive equations and small-amplitude perturbation techniques. Numerical results for impulsive perturbations demonstrate the rich dynamic behavior of the system. Further, we have also compared biological control with chemical control. All these results may be useful in controlling eutrophication.

  8. The role of executive functions in the control of aggressive behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike M Krämer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An extensive literature suggests a link between executive functions and aggressive behavior in humans, pointing mostly to an inverse relationship, i.e. increased tendencies towards aggression in individuals scoring low on executive function tests. This literature is limited, though, in terms of the groups studied and the measures of executive functions. In this paper, we present data from two studies addressing these issues. In a first behavioral study, we asked whether high trait aggressiveness is related to reduced executive functions. A sample of over 600 students performed in an extensive behavioral test-battery including paradigms addressing executive functions such as the Eriksen Flanker task, Stroop task, n-back task and Tower of London. High trait aggressive participants were found to have a significantly reduced latency score in the Tower of London, indicating more impulsive behavior compared to low trait aggressive participants. No other differences were detected. In an EEG-study, we assessed neural and behavioral correlates of error monitoring and response inhibition in participants who were characterized based on their laboratory-induced aggressive behavior in a competitive reaction time task. Participants who retaliated more in the aggression paradigm and had reduced frontal activity when being provoked did not, however, show any reduction in behavioral or neural correlates of executive control compared to the more aggressive participants. Our results question a strong relationship between aggression and executive functions at least for healthy, high-functioning people.

  9. The Effects of Implementation Intentions on Volunteer Firefighter Exercise Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hammer, Rodney L.

    2010-01-01

    The current study used a randomized control design to determine if an implementation intention intervention based on the Health Action Process Approach would increase exercise behavior in volunteer firefighters. One hundred forty-seven male and female volunteer firefighters from nine fire departments participated. The treatment group received a survey that prompted them to create exercise implementation intentions by describing "where," "when," and "how" they will exercise, while the control ...

  10. Health locus of control and self-care behaviors in diabetic foot patients

    OpenAIRE

    Abredari, Hamid; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Rassouli, Maryam; Nasiri, Navideh; Taher, Mohammad; Abedi, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot affects more than 25% of diabetic patients and finally up to 20% of cases result in amputation. The most important factor resulting in severe complications or even death is lack of self-care. Health locus of control has been introduced as one of health factors and predicting factors of self-care. This research was performed for analyzing the correlation between self-care behaviors and health locus of control in diabetic foot patients. Methods: In this descriptive stu...

  11. Sonic hedgehog controls stem cell behavior in the postnatal and adult brain

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Veronica; Lim, D A; Dahmane, Nadia; Sanchez, Pilar; Brionne, T. C.; Herzberg, C. D.; Gitton, Yorick; Carleton, Alan; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Ruiz Altaba, Ariel

    2005-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling controls many aspects of ontogeny, orchestrating congruent growth and patterning. During brain development, Shh regulates early ventral patterning while later on it is critical for the regulation of precursor proliferation in the dorsal brain, namely in the neocortex, tectum and cerebellum. We have recently shown that Shh also controls the behavior of cells with stem cell properties in the mouse embryonic neocortex, and additional studies have implicated it in t...

  12. The effects of extinction, noncontingent reinforcement and differential reinforcement of other behavior as control procedures.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Rachel H; Iwata, Brian A; Hanley, Gregory P; Dozier, Claudia L; Samaha, Andrew L

    2003-01-01

    Several techniques have been used in applied research as controls for the introduction of a reinforcement contingency, including extinction, noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), and differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO). Little research, however, has examined the relative strengths and limitations of these "reversal" controls. We compared the effects of extinction with those of NCR and DRO in both multi-element and reversal designs, with respect to (a) rate and amount of response d...

  13. The Effects of Management Control on Employees’ Behavior Performance: A Case in Pharmaceutical Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmi Yucel; Selim Sait Eren

    2010-01-01

    This survey study aims to explore the relations among the formal and informal control, employees’ orientations, and behavior performance. For this purpose, the research uses structured equation modeling to investigate the relationships of the variables. The research was carried out within 121 pharmaceutical companies operating in Marmara Region, and used a questionnaire to determine 560 medical sales representatives’ perceptions. According to the research findings; process control has direct ...

  14. Relationship between Locus of Control and Alcohol and Drug-Related Behaviors in Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, William F., Jr.; Luhrs, Joyce A.

    1978-01-01

    Teenagers, classified according to Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, indicated whether or not and why they engaged in alcohol consumption or marijuana smoking. A higher proportion of externals drank but the groups did not generally differ in marijuana smoking behaviors. (Author/BEF)

  15. Comparing Multimodal Pilot Pitch Control Behavior Between Simulated and Real Flight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, P.M.T.; Pool, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the tuning process of flight simulator motion cueing filters and support the development of objective simulator motion cueing requirements, a better understanding of how multimodal pilot control behavior is affected by simulator motion fidelity is required. To this end, an experi

  16. The Role of Inhibitory Control in Children's Cooperative Behaviors during a Structured Puzzle Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannotta, Fabrizia; Burk, William J.; Ciairano, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of inhibitory control (measured by Stroop interference) in children's cooperative behaviors during a structured puzzle task. The sample consisted of 250 8-, 10-, and 12-year-olds (117 girls and 133 boys) attending classrooms in three primary schools in Northern Italy. Children individually completed an elaborated…

  17. Desire for Thinness among High School Cheerleaders: Relationship to Disordered Eating and Weight Control Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundholm, Jean K.; Littrell, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Examined cheerleaders' desire for thinness in relationship to disordered eating and weight control behaviors. A Desire for Thinness Scale and selected scales from three eating disorder instruments were administered to 751 high school cheerleaders. Cheerleaders who expressed a strong desire for thinness had significantly higher scores on seven of…

  18. Weight Control Behavior as an Indicator of Adolescent Psychological Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatts, Paul E.; Martin, Scott B.; Petrie, Trent A.; Greenleaf, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a critical time for the development of psychological well-being. Weight gain and the emergence of body image concerns during this period can lead to the development of negative psychological states. To explore this issue, we examined the relationship between weight control behavior (WCB; i.e., trying to lose, gain, stay…

  19. Gender and Socioeconomic Status in Relation to Weight Perception and Weight Control Behavior in Korean Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Kyung Joh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In Korea, obesity is more prevalent among men and lower socioeconomic groups. To explain this obesity disparity, we compared weight perception and weight control behavior across gender and socioeconomic status (SES. Methods: We analyzed data from 16,260 participants aged 20 years or older in a nationally representative cross-sectional survey. SES indicators included education and income levels. Weight under-perception was defined when participants considered themselves lighter than their measured BMI status. Either no active or inappropriate weight control (i.e., trying to gain weight in obese individuals was considered to be unhealthy patterns. Multivariate prevalence ratios were calculated using log-binomial regressions. Results: Men had a higher prevalence of weight under-perception (24.5 vs. 11.9% and unhealthy patterns of weight control behavior (57 vs. 40% than women. Low education level was associated with weight under-perception (ptrend = 0.022 in men, ptrend trend trend = 0.047 in men, ptrend Conclusion: Weight perception and weight control behavior significantly varied by gender and SES. Public actions should be directed toward improving perception and behavior of high-risk populations.

  20. The independent roles of temperature and thermal perception in the control of human thermoregulatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlader, Zachary J; Simmons, Shona E; Stannard, Stephen R; Mündel, Toby

    2011-05-01

    The present study independently evaluated temperature and thermal perception as controllers of thermoregulatory behavior in humans. This was accomplished using a self-paced exercise and heat stress model in which twelve physically active male subjects exercised at a constant subjective rating of perceived exertion (16, 'hard--very hard') while their face was thermally and non-thermally cooled, heated, or left alone (control trial). Thermal cooling and heating were achieved via forced convection, while non-thermal cooling and heating were accomplished via the topical application of menthol and capsaicin solutions. Evidence for thermoregulatory behavior was defined in terms of self-selected exercise intensity, and thus exercise work output. The results indicate that, in the absence of changes in temperature, non-thermal cooling and warming elicited thermal sensory and discomfort sensations similar to those observed during thermal cooling and warming. Furthermore, the perception of effort was maintained throughout exercise in all trials, while the initial and final exercise intensities were also similar. Thermal and non-thermal cooling resulted in the highest work output, while thermal warming the lowest. Non-thermal warming and control trials were similar. Heart rate, mean skin and core (rectal) temperatures, and whole body and local (neck) sweat rates were similar between all trials. These data indicate that changes in temperature are not a requirement for the initiation of thermoregulatory behavior in humans. Rather, thermal sensation and thermal discomfort are capable behavioral controllers.

  1. Behavioral and Electrophysiological Differences in Executive Control between Monolingual and Bilingual Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barac, Raluca; Moreno, Sylvain; Bialystok, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study examined executive control in sixty-two 5-year-old children who were monolingual or bilingual using behavioral and event-related potentials (ERPs) measures. All children performed equivalently on simple response inhibition (gift delay), but bilingual children outperformed monolinguals on interference suppression and complex response…

  2. Traffic flow impacts of adaptive cruise control deactivation and (Re)activation with cooperative driver behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klunder, G.; Li, M.; Minderhoud, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 in the Netherlands, a field operational test was carried out to study the effect of adaptive cruise control (ACC) and lane departure warning on driver behavior and traffic flow in real traffic. To estimate the effect for larger penetration rates, simulations were needed. For a reliable impac

  3. Self-Control and Early Adolescent Antisocial Behavior: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kemp, Raymond A. T.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Finkenauer, Catrin; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Overbeek, Geertjan; Rommes, Els W. M.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses a three-wave longitudinal study that investigates the relationship between self-control and aggressive and delinquent behavior of early adolescent boys and girls. The sample consists of 1,012 Dutch adolescents (mean age = 12.3) in their first year of secondary education. Structural equation modeling analyses reveal that high…

  4. Prevention of Problem Behavior by Teaching Functional Communication and Self-Control Skills to Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Kevin C.; Hanley, Gregory P.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the preschool life skills program (PLS; Hanley, Heal, Tiger, & Ingvarsson, 2007) on the acquisition and maintenance of functional communication and self-control skills, as well as its effect on problem behavior, of small groups of preschoolers at risk for school failure. Six children were taught to request teacher…

  5. Complementary Roles of Care and Behavioral Control in Classroom Management: The Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Youyan; Lau, Shun

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how classroom management practices--care and behavioral control--were differentially associated with students' engagement, misbehavior, and satisfaction with school, using a large representative sample of 3196 Grade 9 students from 117 classes in Singapore. Results of hierarchical linear modeling showed differential relations.…

  6. Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome Can Use a Mindfulness-Based Strategy to Control Their Aggressive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Angela D. A.; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome occasionally exhibit aggressive behavior against peers and parents. In a multiple baseline design across subjects, three adolescents with Asperger syndrome were taught to use a mindfulness-based procedure called "Meditation on the Soles of the Feet" to control their physical aggression in the family…

  7. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Physiology and Cognitive Control of Behavior in Stress Inoculated Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Lindley, Steven E.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Monkeys exposed to stress inoculation protocols early in life subsequently exhibit diminished neurobiological responses to moderate psychological stressors and enhanced cognitive control of behavior during juvenile development compared to non-inoculated monkeys. The present experiments extended these findings and revealed that stress inoculated…

  8. Behavioral Inhibition and Attentional Control in Adolescents : Robust Relationships with Anxiety and Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sportel, B. Esther; Nauta, Maaike H.; de Hullu, Eva; de Jong, Peter J.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) has been associated with the development of internalizing disorders in children and adolescents. It has further been shown that attentional control (AC) is negatively associated with internalizing problems. The combination of high BI and low AC may particularly lead to ele

  9. Assessment of Adherence to Eating Habit and Exercise Components in a Behavioral Weight Control Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegman, Marilyn A.

    Although the augmental value of exercise to behavioral weight control programs has been suggested, demonstration of this value is dependent upon an assessment of adherence to change in eating habits and activity patterns. Self-report measures of adherence were obtained from overweight college women undergoing treatment that involved either dietary…

  10. Climate control based on stomatal behavior in a semi-closed greenhouse system 'Aircokas'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Weel, van P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Climate control in a greenhouse is usually based on maintaining a specific air temperature, sometimes adjusted to the available light level or the cost of energy. According to theoretical physiological knowledge optimal photosynthesis depends on the behavior of the stomata. No existing climate contr

  11. Maternal and Paternal Psychological Control as Moderators of the Link between Peer Attitudes and Adolescents’ Risky Sexual Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Oudekerk, Barbara A.; Allen, Joseph P.; Hafen, Christopher A.; Hessel, Elenda T.; Szwedo, David E.; Spilker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Maternal and paternal psychological control, peer attitudes, and the interaction of psychological control and peer attitudes at age 13 were examined as predictors of risky sexual behavior before age 16 in a community sample of 181 youth followed from age 13 to 16. Maternal psychological control moderated the link between peer attitudes and sexual behavior. Peer acceptance of early sex predicted greater risky sexual behaviors, but only for teens whose mothers engaged in high levels of psycholo...

  12. Cognitive control in adolescence: neural underpinnings and relation to self-report behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Andrews-Hanna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adolescence is commonly characterized by impulsivity, poor decision-making, and lack of foresight. However, the developmental neural underpinnings of these characteristics are not well established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that these adolescent behaviors are linked to under-developed proactive control mechanisms, the present study employed a hybrid block/event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI Stroop paradigm combined with self-report questionnaires in a large sample of adolescents and adults, ranging in age from 14 to 25. Compared to adults, adolescents under-activated a set of brain regions implicated in proactive top-down control across task blocks comprised of difficult and easy trials. Moreover, the magnitude of lateral prefrontal activity in adolescents predicted self-report measures of impulse control, foresight, and resistance to peer pressure. Consistent with reactive compensatory mechanisms to reduced proactive control, older adolescents exhibited elevated transient activity in regions implicated in response-related interference resolution. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, these results suggest that maturation of cognitive control may be partly mediated by earlier development of neural systems supporting reactive control and delayed development of systems supporting proactive control. Importantly, the development of these mechanisms is associated with cognitive control in real-life behaviors.

  13. Intention, perceived control, and weight loss: an application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifter, D E; Ajzen, I

    1985-09-01

    Success at attempted weight reduction among college women was predicted on the basis of a theory of planned behavior. At the beginning of a 6-week period, participants expressed their attitudes, subjective norms, perceived control, and intentions with respect to losing weight. In addition, the extent to which they had made detailed weight reduction plans was assessed, as were a number of general attitudes and personality factors. In support of the theory, intentions to lose weight were accurately predicted on the basis of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control; perceived control and intentions were together moderately successful in predicting the amount of weight that participants actually lost over the 6-week period. Actual weight loss was also found to increase with development of a plan and with ego strength, factors that were assumed to increase control over goal attainment. Other factors, such as health locus of control, perceived competence, and action control, were found to be unrelated to weight reduction. PMID:4045706

  14. A Behavioral Intervention for War-Affected Youth in Sierra Leone: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa S.; McBain, Ryan; Newnham, Elizabeth A.; Akinsulure-Smith, Adeyinka M.; Brennan, Robert T.; Weisz, John R.; Hansen, Nathan B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Youth in war-affected regions are at risk for poor psychological, social, and educational outcomes. Effective interventions are needed to improve mental health, social behavior, and school functioning. This randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a 10-session cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)–based group mental health intervention for multisymptomatic war-affected youth (aged 15–24 years) in Sierra Leone. Method War-affected youth identified by elevated distress and impairment via community screening were randomized (stratified by sex and age) to the Youth Readiness Intervention (YRI) (n = 222) or to a control condition (n = 214). After treatment, youth were again randomized and offered an education subsidy immediately (n = 220) or waitlisted (n = 216). Emotion regulation, psychological distress, prosocial attitudes/behaviors, social support, functional impairment, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed at pre- and postintervention and at 6-month follow-up. For youth in school, enrollment, attendance, and classroom performance were assessed after 8 months. Linear mixed-effects regressions evaluated outcomes. Results The YRI showed significant postintervention effects on emotion regulation, prosocial attitudes/behaviors, social support, and reduced functional impairment, and significant follow-up effects on school enrollment, school attendance, and classroom behavior. In contrast, education subsidy was associated with better attendance but had no effect on mental health or functioning, school retention, or classroom behavior. Interactions between education subsidy and YRI were not significant. Conclusion YRI produced acute improvements in mental health and functioning as well as longer-term effects on school engagement and behavior, suggesting potential to prepare war-affected youth for educational and other opportunities. Clinical trial registration information-Trial of the Youth Readiness Intervention (YRI

  15. Relationships among Subjective Social Status, Weight Perception, Weight Control Behaviors, and Weight Status in Adolescents: Findings from the 2009 Korea Youth Risk Behaviors Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yeongmi; Choi, Eunsook; Seo, Yeongmi; Kim, Tae-gu

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study identified relationships among subjective social status (SSS), weight perception, weight control behaviors, and weight status in Korean adolescents using nationally representative data collected from the 2009 Korea Youth Risk Behaviors Web-Based Survey. Methods: Data from 67,185 students aged 12-18 years were analyzed.…

  16. An efficient method to detect periodic behavior in botnet traffic by analyzing control plane traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    AsSadhan, Basil; Moura, José M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Botnets are large networks of bots (compromised machines) that are under the control of a small number of bot masters. They pose a significant threat to Internet’s communications and applications. A botnet relies on command and control (C2) communications channels traffic between its members for its attack execution. C2 traffic occurs prior to any attack; hence, the detection of botnet’s C2 traffic enables the detection of members of the botnet before any real harm happens. We analyze C2 traffic and find that it exhibits a periodic behavior. This is due to the pre-programmed behavior of bots that check for updates to download them every T seconds. We exploit this periodic behavior to detect C2 traffic. The detection involves evaluating the periodogram of the monitored traffic. Then applying Walker’s large sample test to the periodogram’s maximum ordinate in order to determine if it is due to a periodic component or not. If the periodogram of the monitored traffic contains a periodic component, then it is highly likely that it is due to a bot’s C2 traffic. The test looks only at aggregate control plane traffic behavior, which makes it more scalable than techniques that involve deep packet inspection (DPI) or tracking the communication flows of different hosts. We apply the test to two types of botnet, tinyP2P and IRC that are generated by SLINGbot. We verify the periodic behavior of their C2 traffic and compare it to the results we get on real traffic that is obtained from a secured enterprise network. We further study the characteristics of the test in the presence of injected HTTP background traffic and the effect of the duty cycle on the periodic behavior. PMID:25685512

  17. The Comparison of Dietary Behaviors among Rural Controlled and Uncontrolled Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, Aziz; Shekarchi, Ali Akbar; Sharifian, Elham; Heydari, Heshmatolah

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition is a dominant peripheral factor in increasing blood pressure; however, little information is available about the nutritional status of hypertensive patients in Iran. This study aimed to compare nutritional behaviors of the rural controlled and uncontrolled hypertensive patients and to determine the predictive power of nutritional behaviors from blood pressure. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 671 rural hypertensive patients, using multistage random sampling method in Ardabil city in 2013. Data were collected by a 3-day food record questionnaire. Nutritional data were extracted by Nutritionist 4 software and analyzed by the SPSS 18 software using Pearson correlation, multiple linear regression, ANOVA, and independent t-test. A significant difference was observed in the means of fat intake, cholesterol, saturated fat, sodium, energy, calcium, vitamin C, fiber, and nutritional knowledge between controlled and uncontrolled groups. In the controlled group, sodium, saturated fats, vitamin C, calcium, and energy intake explained 30.6% of the variations in blood pressure and, in the uncontrolled group, sodium, carbohydrate, fiber intake, and nutritional knowledge explained 83% of the variations in blood pressure. There was a significant difference in the nutritional behavior between the two groups and changes in blood pressure could be explained significantly by nutritional behaviors. PMID:27516908

  18. A behavioral-educational alternative to drug control of hyperactive children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayllon, T; Layman, D; Kandel, H J

    1975-01-01

    A behavioral procedure for controlling hyperactivity without inhibiting academic performance is described. Using a time-sample observational method, the hyperactivity displayed by three school children was recorded during math and reading classes. Concurrently, math and reading performances were measured. The study consisted of two baselines, one while the children were on medication and the second while they were off medication. A multiple-baseline design across the two academic subject matters was used to assess the behavioral intervention, which consisted of token reinforcement for correct academic responses in math and subsequently math and reading. Discontinuation of medication resulted in a gross increase in hyperactivity from 20% to about 80%, and a slight increase in math and reading performance. Introduction of a behavioral program for academic performance, during no medication, controlled the children's hyperactivity at a level comparable to that when they were on drugs (about 20%). At the same time, math and reading performance for the group jumped from about 12% during baseline to a level of over 85% correct. Each child performed behaviorally and academically in an optimal manner without medication. Contingency management techniques provided a feasible alternative to medication for controlling hyperactivity in the classroom while enabling the children to grow academically. PMID:1184484

  19. Investigation on creep behavior of geo-materials with suction control technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The compacted bentonite which has typical couple problem associated to thermal - hydration - mechanical – chemical (THMC consist of one component of engineered barrier. Recently, the couple THMC formulation modelling suggested by some researchers can be predicted basically phenomena for engineered barrier that approach to correct evaluate satisfied facilities. The compacted bentonite is essentially unsaturated condition, some behaviors for bentonite has similar or close with generally expansive unsaturated soils. Therefore, hydrations have given significant influence on deformation of compacted bentonite such as swelling. There are many researches for swelling behavior of compacted bentonite within soaking. Extended theoretical or experimental investigations for unsaturated soil mechanics are possible to describe the strength-deformation behavior of compacted bentonite with suction controlling principle. A new method of determining the failure phase such as great axis deformation and destructions like strip of surface in the laboratory is described and the creep behavior of compacted bentonite is considered under maintain of high relative humidity environment. The creep deformation measured using improved cyclic relative humidity control apparatus in terms of specific suction control technique.

  20. Predicting healthcare employees' participation in an office redesign program: Attitudes, norms and behavioral control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Carol

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study examined the extent to which components based on a modified version of the theory of planned behavior explained employee participation in a new clinical office program designed to reduce patient waiting times in primary care clinics. Methods We regressed extent of employee participation on attitudes about the program, group norms, and perceived behavioral control along with individual and clinic characteristics using a hierarchical linear mixed model. Results Perceived group norms were one of the best predictors of employee participation. Attitudes about the program were also significant, but to a lesser degree. Behavioral control, however, was not a significant predictor. Respondents with at least one year of clinic tenure, or who were team leaders, first line supervisor, or managers had greater participation rates. Analysis at the clinic level indicated clinics with scores in the highest quartile clinic scores on group norms, attitudes, and behavioral control scores were significantly higher on levels of overall participation than clinics in the lowest quartile. Conclusion Findings suggest that establishing strong norms and values may influence employee participation in a change program in a group setting. Supervisory level was also significant with greater responsibility being associated with greater participation.

  1. Vibration control of an MR vehicle suspension system considering both hysteretic behavior and parameter variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents vibration control responses of a controllable magnetorheological (MR) suspension system considering the two most important characteristics of the system; the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper and the parameter variation of the suspension. In order to achieve this goal, a cylindrical MR damper which is applicable to a middle-sized passenger car is designed and manufactured. After verifying the damping force controllability, the field-dependent hysteretic behavior of the MR damper is identified using the Preisach hysteresis model. The full-vehicle suspension model is then derived by considering vertical, pitch and roll motions. An H∞ controller is designed by treating the sprung mass of the vehicle as a parameter variation and integrating it with the hysteretic compensator which produces additional control input. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed control system, the hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) methodology is adopted by integrating the suspension model with the proposed MR damper. Vibration control responses of the vehicle suspension system such as vertical acceleration are evaluated under both bump and random road conditions

  2. The Role of Self-Control and Early Adolescents' Friendships in the Development of Externalizing Behavior: The SNARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Aart; Moffitt, Terrie E; Steglich, Christian E G; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Harakeh, Zeena; Vollebergh, Wilma A M

    2016-09-01

    This social network study investigated the moderating role of self-control in the association between friendship and the development of externalizing behavior: Antisocial behavior, alcohol use, tobacco use. Previous studies have shown inconsistent findings, and did not control for possible friendship network or selection effects. We tested two complementary hypotheses: (1) That early-adolescents with low self-control develop externalizing behavior regardless of their friends' behavior, or (2) as a result of being influenced by their friends' externalizing behavior to a greater extent. Hypotheses were investigated using data from the SNARE (Social Network Analysis of Risk behavior in Early adolescence) study (N = 1144, 50 % boys, M age 12.7, SD = 0.47). We controlled for selection effects and the network structure, using a data-analysis package called SIENA. The main findings indicate that personal low self-control and friends' externalizing behaviors both predict early adolescents' increasing externalizing behaviors, but they do so independently. Therefore, interventions should focus on all early adolescents' with a lower self-control, rather than focus on those adolescents with a lower self-control who also have friends who engage in externalizing behavior. PMID:25922116

  3. Child Vocabulary, Maternal Behavior, and Inhibitory Control Development Among Spanish-Speaking Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, Tatiana Nogueira; Owen, Margaret Tresch; Rojas, Raúl; Caughy, Margaret O’Brien

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings The roles of child lexical diversity and maternal sensitivity in the development of young children’s inhibitory control were examined in 100 low-income Hispanic Spanish-speaking children. Child communication utterances at age 2½ years were transcribed from 10-min mother–child interactions to quantify lexical diversity. Maternal behavior was rated independently from the interactions. Inhibitory control was measured with a battery of tasks at ages 2½ and 3½. Greater maternal sensitivity was correlated with higher vocabulary at 2½. Greater vocabulary predicted positive growth in child inhibitory control skills from ages 2½ to 3½ in multivariable regression models that controlled for maternal education, family income, the home environment, and mothering quality. Practice or Policy These findings suggest that supporting vocabulary development in low-income Spanish-speaking children is important for the development of inhibitory control skills, an important foundation for school readiness and academic success. PMID:26306074

  4. Threshold behavior in hydrological systems and geo-ecosystems: manifestations, controls and implications for predictability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zehe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide evidence that the dynamics of hydrological systems and geo-ecosystems is often influenced by threshold behavior at a variety of space and time scales. Based on well known characteristics of elementary threshold phenomena we suggest criteria for detecting threshold behavior in hydrological systems. The most important one is intermittence of phenomena, i.e. the rapid switching of related state variables/fluxes from zero to finite values, or existence of behavior regimes where the same process/response appears qualitatively differently at the macroscopic level. From the literature we present several examples for intermittent hydrological phenomena, ranging from overland flow generation in different landscapes, including the effects of hydrophobicity, to soil water flow occurring in the matrix continuum or via preferential pathways, including the case of cracking soils, nonlinear subsurface stormflow response of hillslopes during severe rainfall events, and long-term catchment flooding responses. Since threshold phenomena are often associated with environmental hazards such as floods, soil erosion, and contamination of shallow groundwater resources, we discuss common difficulties that complicate predictions of whether or not they might even occur. Predicting the onset of threshold phenomena requires a thorough understanding of the underlying controls. Through examples we illustrate that threshold behavior in hydrological systems can manifest at (a the process level, (b the response level, and (c the functional level, and explain that the complexity of the underlying controls and of the interacting phenomena that determine threshold behavior become increasingly complex at the higher levels. Finally we provide evidence from field observations and model predictions that show that within an "unstable range" of system states "close" to a threshold, it is difficult to predict whether or not the system will switch

  5. Analysis of behavior based control for planetary cliff descent using cooperative robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Erik; Farritor, Shane; Huntsberger, Terrance L.; Schenker, Paul S.

    2003-09-01

    Future robotic planetary exploration will need to traverse geographically diverse and challenging terrain. Cliffs, ravines, and fissures are of great scientific interest because they may contain important data regarding past water flow and past life. Highly sloped terrain is difficult and often impossible to safely navigate using a single robot. This paper describes a control system for a team of three robots that access cliff walls at inclines up to 70°. Two robot assistants, or anchors, lower a third robot, called the rappeller, down the cliff using tethers. The anchors use actively controlled winches to first assist the rappeller in navigation about the cliff face and then retreat to safe ground. This paper describes the control of these three robots so they function as a team to explore the cliff face. Stability requirements for safe operation are identified and a behavior-based control scheme is presented. Behaviors are defined for the system and command fusion methods are described. Controller stability and sensitivity are examined. Controller performance is evaluated with simulation and a laboratory system.

  6. Homeostasis lighting control based on relationship between lighting environment and human behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Risa; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    Although each person has own preferences, living spaces which can respond to various preferences and needs have not become reality. Focusing on the lighting environments which influence on the impression of living spaces, this research aims to offer comfortable lighting environments for each resident by a flexible control. This research examines the relationship between lighting environments and human behaviors considering colored lights. In accord with the relationship, this research proposes an illuminance-color control system which flexibly changes spatial environments responding to human conditions. Firstly, the psychological evaluation was conducted in order to build human models for various environments. As a result, preferred lighting environments for each examinee were determined for particular behaviors. Moreover, satisfaction levels of lighting environments were calculated by using seven types of impression of the environments as parameters. The results were summarized as human models. Secondly, this research proposed "Homeostasis Lighting Control System", which employs the human models. Homeostasis lighting control system embodies the algorithm of homeostasis, which is one of the functions of the physiological adaptation. Human discomfort feelings are obtained automatically by the sensor agent robot. The system can offer comfortable lighting environments without controlling environments by residents autonomously based on the information from the robot. This research takes into accounts both illuminance and color. The robot communicates with the server which contains human models, then the system corresponds to individuals. Combining these three systems, the proposed system can effectively control the lighting environment. At last, the feasibility of the proposed system was verified by simulation experiments.

  7. Distributed behavior-based control architecture for a wall climbing robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past two decades, Behavior-based AI (Artificial Intelligence) has emerged as a new approach in designing mobile robot control architecture. It stresses on the issues of reactivity, concurrency and real-time control. In this paper we propose a new approach in designing robust intelligent controllers for mobile robot platforms. The Behaviour-based paradigm implemented in a multiprocessing firmware architecture will further enhance parallelism present in the subsumption paradigm itself and increased real-timeness. The paper summarises research done to design a four-legged wall climbing robot. The emphasis will be on the control architecture of the robot based on the Behavior -based paradigm. The robot control architecture is made up of two layers, the locomotion layer and the gait controller layer. The two layers are implemented on a Vesta 68332 processor board running the Behaviour-based kernel, The software is developed using the L programming language, introduced by IS Robotics. The Behaviour-based paradigm is outlined and contrasted with the classical Knowledge-based approach. A description of the distributed architecture is presented followed by a presentation of the Behaviour-based agents for the two layers. (author)

  8. Positive correlations between the health locus of control and self-management behaviors in hemodialysis patients in Xiamen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Li Fan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study provided evidence that there is a strong relationship between the health locus of control and self-management behaviors in hemodialysis patients. This study provides important information for medical professionals as they design strategies to educate hemodialysis patients on their health locus of control and self-management behaviors.

  9. Affective-Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Woolfolk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized controlled trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of an individually administered form of cognitive behavioral treatment for fibromyalgia. In an additive design, 76 patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to either the experimental treatment (affective-cognitive behavioral therapy, 10 individual sessions, one per week administered concurrently with treatment-as-usual or to an unaugmented treatment-as-usual condition. Statistical analysis conducted at the end of treatment (3 months after the baseline assessment and at a followup (9 months after the baseline assessment indicated that the patients receiving the experimental treatment reported less pain and overall better functioning than control patients, both at posttreatment and at followup. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  10. Behavioral trends in young children with conductive hearing loss: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouma, Panagiota; Mallis, Antonios; Daniilidis, Vasilis; Gouveris, Haralambos; Armenakis, Nikolaos; Naxakis, Stephanos

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a common condition affecting children and a well-known cause of conductive hearing loss that can potentially lead to speech development disorders. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated the influence of OME on development of attention disorders or social adaptation and acceptance. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the behavioral trends of children with OME based on the Achenbach test. A group of 117 patients with episodes of OME at the age of 4-5 was compared with a control group according to the Achenbach system of evaluation, by application of the Child Behavior Checklist questionnaire (CBCL). Patients suffering from OME had more anxiety/depression related disorders and attention disorders as compared with the control group. The psychological effect of OME in children of ages 6-8 is evident with anxiety and depression disorders being especially prominent among these patients. PMID:20665042

  11. A smartphone application of alcohol resilience treatment for behavioral self-control training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Fei; Albers, Jörg; Gao, Tian;

    2012-01-01

    , and intends to improve patients' capability to withstand craving of alcohol. This method emphasizes the interplay of resilience and resourcefulness. It contains 6 sessions with different topics according to the stage of treatment circuit, and each session consists of 6 steps. Due to the purity and structure...... of the treatment rationale, it is realistic, reasonable and manageable to transform the method into a smartphone application. An ART app in Android system and an accessory of bilateral tactile stimulation were developed and will be used in a study with behavioral self-control training. This paper presents...... the design and realization of the smartphone based ART application. The design of a pilot study, which is to examine the benefits of a smartphone application providing behavioral self-control training, is also reported in this paper....

  12. GABAergic control of critical developmental periods for anxiety- and depression-related behavior in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Shen

    Full Text Available Vulnerability for anxiety and depressive disorders is thought to have origins in early life and is increasingly recognized to involve deficits in GABAergic neurotransmission. Mice that were rendered heterozygous for the γ2 subunit gene of GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs show behavioral, cognitive, neuroendocrine and pharmacologic features expected of a mouse model of melancholic anxious depression, including reduced survival of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Here we embarked on elucidating the developmental substrate underlying this phenotype, focusing on the Elevated Plus Maze and Forced Swim Test as relevant behavioral paradigms. In a first series of experiments using hemizygous tamoxifen-induced genetic inactivation of a floxed γ2 genomic locus we show that reducing the gene dosage at postnatal days (P13/14 but not P27/28 results in altered behavior in both of these tests in adulthood, reminiscent of the anxious-depressive phenotype previously described for global heterozygous mice. However, in contrast to global heterozygous mice, the behavioral changes induced by γ2 subunit knockdown at P13/14 occurred without changes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, indicating that altered neurogenesis is not an absolute prerequisite for anxiety- and depression-related behavior in this model. In a separate series of experiments using a pharmacological approach, acute but transient potentiation of GABA(ARs with diazepam uncovered distinct developmental vulnerabilities for altered behavior in the Elevated Plus Maze and Forced Swim Test, respectively. Specifically, diazepam given during P10-16 but not during later weeks resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior in adulthood, while diazepam administered during P29-35 but not earlier nor later resulted in increased immobility behavior in adulthood. We conclude that anxiety-like behavior in the Elevated Plus Maze and behavioral despair-like immobility in the Forced Swim Test are controlled by separate

  13. Mixed methods evaluation of a randomized control pilot trial targeting sugar-sweetened beverage behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Zoellner, Jamie; Cook, Emily; Chen, Yvonnes; You, Wen; Davy, Brenda; Estabrooks, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This Excessive sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and low health literacy skills have emerged as two public health concerns in the United States (US); however, there is limited research on how to effectively address these issues among adults. As guided by health literacy concepts and the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), this randomized controlled pilot trial applied the RE-AIM framework and a mixed methods approach to examine a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intervention (SipSmartER)...

  14. Peran Sikap, Norma Subjektif, dan Perceived Behavioral Control (PBC) terhadap Intensi Menggunakan Homeschooling sebagai Jalur Pendidikan

    OpenAIRE

    Surbakti, Ratri Pramuwidyandari

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the role of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control of the intention of using homeschooling as educational way and the role of each aspect on the intention of using homeschooling service. This study used the quantitative approach method using one hundred people in Medan City as subject and selected using convenience sampling. The data was displayed through the scale of attitude toward homechooling, subjective norm toward homechool...

  15. Peran Sikap, Norma Subjektif, dan Perceived Behavioral Control terhadap Intensi Menggunakan Jasa Klinik Kecantikan

    OpenAIRE

    Rethiza, Rizqa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the role of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control of the intention of using homeschooling as educational way and the role of each aspect on the intention of using homeschooling service. This study used the quantitative approach using one hundred thirdty two people in Medan City as subject and selected using convenience sampling. The data was displayed through the scale of attitude, subjective norm, perceived behav...

  16. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own V mem but also by the V mem of their ne...

  17. The Effect of The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy on Infertility Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mahbobeh Faramarzi; Hajar Pasha; Seddigheh Esmailzadeh; Farzan Kheirkhah; Shima Heidary; Zohreh Afshar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infertility has been described as creating a form of stress leading to a variety of psychological problems. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are effective treatments for infertility stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy along with fluoxetine for improvement infertility stress in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck ...

  18. The Empowering Role of Mobile Apps in Behavior Change Interventions: The Gray Matters Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Chris D; McClean, Sally I; Cleland, Ian; Tschanz, JoAnn T; Clark, Christine J; Norton, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Background Health education and behavior change programs targeting specific risk factors have demonstrated their effectiveness in reducing the development of future diseases. Alzheimer disease (AD) shares many of the same risk factors, most of which can be addressed via behavior change. It is therefore theorized that a behavior change intervention targeting these risk factors would likely result in favorable rates of AD prevention. Objective The objective of this study was to reduce the future risk of developing AD, while in the short term promoting vascular health, through behavior change. Methods The study was an interventional randomized controlled trial consisting of subjects who were randomly assigned into either treatment (n=102) or control group (n=42). Outcome measures included various blood-based biomarkers, anthropometric measures, and behaviors related to AD risk. The treatment group was provided with a bespoke “Gray Matters” mobile phone app designed to encourage and facilitate behavior change. The app presented evidence-based educational material relating to AD risk and prevention strategies, facilitated self-reporting of behaviors across 6 behavioral domains, and presented feedback on the user’s performance, calculated from reported behaviors against recommended guidelines. Results This paper explores the rationale for a mobile phone–led intervention and details the app’s effect on behavior change and subsequent clinical outcomes. Via the app, the average participant submitted 7.3 (SD 3.2) behavioral logs/day (n=122,719). Analysis of these logs against primary outcome measures revealed that participants who improved their high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels during the study duration answered a statistically significant higher number of questions per day (mean 8.30, SD 2.29) than those with no improvement (mean 6.52, SD 3.612), t97.74=−3.051, P=.003. Participants who decreased their body mass index (BMI) performed significantly

  19. Application of radio control cars as intelligent unmanned ground vehicles with collaborative and independent behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, Steven R.; Kouns, John; Bruder, Stephen; Wedeward, Kevin; El-Osery, Aly

    2004-09-01

    Simple radio control cars commonly sold as toys can provide a viable starting platform for the development of low-cost intelligent Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) for the study of robot collectives. In a collaborative effort, Sandia National Labs and New Mexico Tech have successfully demonstrated proof-of-concept by utilizing low-cost radio control cars manufactured by Nikko. Initial tests have involved using a small number (two to ten) of these UGVs to successfully demonstrate both collaborative and independent behavior simultaneously. In the tests individuals share their locations with the collective to cover an area, thus demonstrating collaborative behavior. Independent behavior is demonstrated as each member of the collective maintains a desired compass heading while simultaneously avoiding obstacles in its path. These UGVs are powered by high-capacity rechargeable batteries and equipped with a custom-designed microcontroller board with a stackable modular interface and wireless communication. The initial modular sensor configuration includes a digital compass and GPS unit for navigation as well as ultrasonic sensors for obstacle avoidance. This paper describes the design and operations of these UGVs, their possible uses, and the advantages of using a radio control car platform as a low-cost starting point for the development of intelligent UGV collectives.

  20. Cyclic mechanical behavior of 316L: Uniaxial LCF and strain-controlled ratcheting tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facheris, G., E-mail: giacomo.facheris@psi.ch [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Janssens, K.G.F., E-mail: koen.janssens@psi.ch [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Characterization of cyclic plastic deformation behavior of plate and tubular 316L. ► Strain-controlled ratcheting response between room temperature and 200 °C. ► Isotropic cyclic hardening is dependent on the yield criterion used. ► Ratcheting induced hardening mostly affects the kinematic hardening component. ► Ratcheting induced hardening is related to the mean strain and the ratcheting rate. -- Abstract: With the purpose of analyzing the fatigue behavior under loading conditions relevant for the primary cooling circuit of a light water nuclear reactor, a set of uniaxial low cycle fatigue and strain-controlled ratcheting tests (also named ‘cyclic tension tests’) has been performed at room temperature and at 200 °C on specimens manufactured from two different batches of stainless steel grade 316L. The experiments have been repeated varying strain amplitude, cyclic ratcheting rate and ratcheting direction in order to investigate the influence on the cyclic deformation behavior. In strain-controlled ratcheting tests, the stress response is found to be a superposition of two hardening mechanisms: the first one due to the zero mean strain cycling and the second one linked with the monotonic drifting of mean plastic strain. An approach is proposed to distinguish the effect of each mechanism and the influence of the test parameters on the hardening mechanisms is discussed.

  1. Optimal control of an SIR model with changing behavior through an education campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem Raj Joshi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An SIR type model is expanded to include the use of education or information given to the public as a control to manage a disease outbreak when effective treatments or vaccines are not readily available or too costly to be widely used. The information causes a change in behavior resulting in three susceptible classes. We study stability analysis and use optimal control theory on the system of differential equations to achieve the goal of minimizing the infected population (while minimizing the cost. We illustrate our results with some numerical simulations.

  2. A Case for Distributed Control of Local Stem Cell Behavior in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahni, Ramin; Efroni, Idan; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2016-09-26

    The root meristem has a centrally located group of mitotically quiescent cells, to which current models assign a stem cell organizer function. However, evidence is emerging for decentralized control of stem cell activity, whereby self-renewing behavior emerges from the lack of cell displacement at the border of opposing differentiation gradients. We term this a "stagnation" model due to its reliance on passive mechanics. The position of stem cells is established by two opposing axes that reciprocally control each other's differentiation. Such broad tissue organization programs would allow plants, like some animal systems, to rapidly reconstitute stem cells from non-stem-cell tissues. PMID:27676436

  3. Efficiency analysis of control algorithms in spatially distributed systems with chaotic behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korus Łukasz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of examination of control algorithms for the purpose of controlling chaos in spatially distributed systems like the coupled map lattice (CML. The mathematical definition of the CML, stability analysis as well as some basic results of numerical simulation exposing complex, spatiotemporal and chaotic behavior of the CML were already presented in another paper. The main purpose of this article is to compare the efficiency of controlling chaos by simple classical algorithms in spatially distributed systems like CMLs. This comparison is made based on qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods proposed in the previous paper such as the indirect Lyapunov method, Lyapunov exponents and the net direction phase indicator. As a summary of this paper, some conclusions which can be useful for creating a more efficient algorithm of controlling chaos in spatially distributed systems are made.

  4. Encyrtid parasitoids of soft scale insects: biology, behavior, and their use in biological control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapranas, Apostolos; Tena, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoids of the hymenopterous family Encyrtidae are one of the most important groups of natural enemies of soft scale insects and have been used extensively in biological control. We summarize existing knowledge of the biology, ecology, and behavior of these parasitoids and how it relates to biological control. Soft scale stage/size and phenology are important determinants of host range and host utilization, which are key aspects in understanding how control by these parasitoids is exerted. Furthermore, the nutritional ecology of encyrtids and their physiological interactions with their hosts affect soft scale insect population dynamics. Lastly, the interactions among encyrtids, heteronomous parasitoids, and ants shape parasitoid species complexes and consequently have a direct impact on the biological control of soft scale insects.

  5. Can the Theory of Planned Behavior Mediate the Effects of Low Self-Control on Alcohol Use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, George E.; Marcum, Catherine Davis

    2005-01-01

    Some studies show that Gottfredson and Hirschi's low self-control plays an important role in alcohol use, but low self-control remains stable over time. Because self-control is not easily changed, the present study examines the ability of theory of planned behavior to mediate the effect of low self-control on intentions to use alcohol and alcohol…

  6. The risk behaviors and mental health of detained adolescents: a controlled, prospective longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the behavioral risk factors and mental health needs of adolescents in juvenile detention centers (JDC. METHOD: A total of 238 boys aged 12-17 years was surveyed who had been admitted to a detention center and compared them with boys from the community (n = 238 matched for sex and age. We assessed behavioral risk factors and mental health problems by using the Youth Risk Behavior Survey questionnaire (YRBS and the Youth Self-Report questionnaire (YSR. RESULTS: Young offenders had significantly higher YRBS scores than controls for drug use (odds ratio (OR 5.16, 95% CI 2.27-7.84, sexual intercourse (OR, 2.51; 95% CI 1.55-2.90, irregular diet (4.78, 2.11-7.51, suicide attempts (1.96, 1.32-5.85, and physical fighting behavior (3.49, 1.60-7.07, but not for tobacco use, alcohol use, and high-risk cycling. Young offenders at the time of admission (6.61, 2.58-15.2, at 6 months (3.12, 1.81-10.1, and at 12 months (5.29, 1.98-13.3 reported statistically higher levels of total mental health problems than adolescents in a community sample. CONCLUSIONS: Young offenders have a high rate of mental and behavioral disorders. In the detention period, aggressive behavior, self-destructive/identity, and externalizing of problems improved while withdrawn, anxious or depressed, and internalizing of problems worsened.

  7. Context, emotion, and the strategic pursuit of goals: interactions among multiple brain systems controlling motivated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Aaron J; McDonald, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Motivated behavior exhibits properties that change with experience and partially dissociate among a number of brain structures. Here, we review evidence from rodent experiments demonstrating that multiple brain systems acquire information in parallel and either cooperate or compete for behavioral control. We propose a conceptual model of systems interaction wherein a ventral emotional memory network involving ventral striatum (VS), amygdala, ventral hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex triages behavioral responding to stimuli according to their associated affective outcomes. This system engages autonomic and postural responding (avoiding, ignoring, approaching) in accordance with associated stimulus valence (negative, neutral, positive), but does not engage particular operant responses. Rather, this emotional system suppresses or invigorates actions that are selected through competition between goal-directed control involving dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and habitual control involving dorsolateral striatum (DLS). The hippocampus provides contextual specificity to the emotional system, and provides an information rich input to the goal-directed system for navigation and discriminations involving ambiguous contexts, complex sensory configurations, or temporal ordering. The rapid acquisition and high capacity for episodic associations in the emotional system may unburden the more complex goal-directed system and reduce interference in the habit system from processing contingencies of neutral stimuli. Interactions among these systems likely involve inhibitory mechanisms and neuromodulation in the striatum to form a dominant response strategy. Innate traits, training methods, and task demands contribute to the nature of these interactions, which can include incidental learning in non-dominant systems. Addition of these features to reinforcement learning models of decision-making may better align theoretical predictions with behavioral and neural correlates in

  8. Context, emotion, and the strategic pursuit of goals: interactions among multiple brain systems controlling motivated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Aaron J; McDonald, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Motivated behavior exhibits properties that change with experience and partially dissociate among a number of brain structures. Here, we review evidence from rodent experiments demonstrating that multiple brain systems acquire information in parallel and either cooperate or compete for behavioral control. We propose a conceptual model of systems interaction wherein a ventral emotional memory network involving ventral striatum (VS), amygdala, ventral hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex triages behavioral responding to stimuli according to their associated affective outcomes. This system engages autonomic and postural responding (avoiding, ignoring, approaching) in accordance with associated stimulus valence (negative, neutral, positive), but does not engage particular operant responses. Rather, this emotional system suppresses or invigorates actions that are selected through competition between goal-directed control involving dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and habitual control involving dorsolateral striatum (DLS). The hippocampus provides contextual specificity to the emotional system, and provides an information rich input to the goal-directed system for navigation and discriminations involving ambiguous contexts, complex sensory configurations, or temporal ordering. The rapid acquisition and high capacity for episodic associations in the emotional system may unburden the more complex goal-directed system and reduce interference in the habit system from processing contingencies of neutral stimuli. Interactions among these systems likely involve inhibitory mechanisms and neuromodulation in the striatum to form a dominant response strategy. Innate traits, training methods, and task demands contribute to the nature of these interactions, which can include incidental learning in non-dominant systems. Addition of these features to reinforcement learning models of decision-making may better align theoretical predictions with behavioral and neural correlates in

  9. The Individual and Joint Performance of Economic Preferences, Personality, and Self-Control in Predicting Criminal Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Friehe, Tim; Schildberg-Hörisch, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    We explore the individual and joint explanatory power of concepts from economics, psychology, and criminology for criminal behavior. More precisely, we consider risk and time preferences, personality traits from psychology (Big Five and locus of control), and a self-control scale from criminology. We find that economic preferences, personality traits, and self-control complement each other in predicting criminal behavior. The most significant predictors stem from all three disciplines: risk a...

  10. The Association between Inappropriate Weight Control Behaviors and Suicide Ideation and Attempt among Korean Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Jang, Suk Yong; Shin, Jaeyong; Ju, Yeong Jun; Nam, Jin Young; Park, Eun Cheol

    2016-10-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of death among adolescents globally, and body weight is also a recognized reason for adolescent suicide. Therefore, we investigated the association between weight control behaviors (WCB) and suicide ideation and attempt, focusing on inappropriate weight control measures. We used data from the 2014 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, representing a total of 35,224 boys and 34,361 girls aged 12 to 18 years. Adolescents were classified into groups based on WCB: appropriate WCB, inappropriate WCB, and no WCB. We performed logistic regression models to examine associations between WCB and suicide ideation and attempt, controlling for covariates. Both boys and girls with inappropriate WCB were more likely to report suicide ideation and attempt. Underweight and normal weight boys with inappropriate WCB were more likely to think or attempt suicide, and underweight girls with inappropriate WCB were also more likely to attempt suicide. Among five common WCB combinations, the combination of "regular exercise, fasting, eating less" was highly associated with suicide ideation and attempt. We confirmed that inappropriate WCB is associated with suicide ideation and attempt among Korean adolescents. Given the high incidence rate of suicide among adolescents and the adverse effect of inappropriate WCB, encouraging adolescents to control their weight in healthy ways is imperative. PMID:27550479

  11. Behavioral regulation assessment in exercise: exploring an autonomous and controlled motivation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Luis; Moutão, João; Leitão, José; Alves, José

    2012-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version of the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-2) and to test the hypothesis that the different types of behavioral regulation can be combined on a single factor to assess autonomous and controlled motivation. Data were collected from 550 members of private fitness centres who ranged in age from 14 to 69 years. The analysis supported an 18-item, 5-factor model after excluding one item (S-B chi2 = 221.7, df = 125, p = .000, S-B chi2/df = 1.77; SRMR = .06; NNFI = .90; CFI = .92; RMSEA = .04, 90% CI = .03-.05). However, the analysis also revealed a lack of internal consistency. The results of a hierarchical model based on 2 second-order factors that reflected controlled motivation (external and introjected regulation) and autonomous motivation (identified and intrinsic regulation) provided an acceptable fit to the data (S-B chi2 = 172.6, df = 74, p = .000, S-B chi2/df = 2.33; SRMR = .07; NNFI = .90; CFI = .92; RMSEA = .05, 90% CI = .04-.06), with reliability coefficients of .75 for controlled motivation and .76 for autonomous motivation. The study findings indicated that when item 17 was excluded, the Portuguese BREQ-2 was an appropriate measure of the controlled and autonomous motivation in exercise.

  12. Can Targeted Intervention Mitigate Early Emotional and Behavioral Problems?: Generating Robust Evidence within Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orla Doyle

    Full Text Available This study examined the impact of a targeted Irish early intervention program on children's emotional and behavioral development using multiple methods to test the robustness of the results. Data on 164 Preparing for Life participants who were randomly assigned into an intervention group, involving home visits from pregnancy onwards, or a control group, was used to test the impact of the intervention on Child Behavior Checklist scores at 24-months. Using inverse probability weighting to account for differential attrition, permutation testing to address small sample size, and quantile regression to characterize the distributional impact of the intervention, we found that the few treatment effects were largely concentrated among boys most at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. The average treatment effect identified a 13% reduction in the likelihood of falling into the borderline clinical threshold for Total Problems. The interaction and subgroup analysis found that this main effect was driven by boys. The distributional analysis identified a 10-point reduction in the Externalizing Problems score for boys at the 90th percentile. No effects were observed for girls or for the continuous measures of Total, Internalizing, and Externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the impact of this prenatally commencing home visiting program may be limited to boys experiencing the most difficulties. Further adoption of the statistical methods applied here may help to improve the internal validity of randomized controlled trials and contribute to the field of evaluation science more generally.ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN04631728.

  13. Can Targeted Intervention Mitigate Early Emotional and Behavioral Problems?: Generating Robust Evidence within Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Orla; McGlanaghy, Edel; O’Farrelly, Christine; Tremblay, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a targeted Irish early intervention program on children’s emotional and behavioral development using multiple methods to test the robustness of the results. Data on 164 Preparing for Life participants who were randomly assigned into an intervention group, involving home visits from pregnancy onwards, or a control group, was used to test the impact of the intervention on Child Behavior Checklist scores at 24-months. Using inverse probability weighting to account for differential attrition, permutation testing to address small sample size, and quantile regression to characterize the distributional impact of the intervention, we found that the few treatment effects were largely concentrated among boys most at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. The average treatment effect identified a 13% reduction in the likelihood of falling into the borderline clinical threshold for Total Problems. The interaction and subgroup analysis found that this main effect was driven by boys. The distributional analysis identified a 10-point reduction in the Externalizing Problems score for boys at the 90th percentile. No effects were observed for girls or for the continuous measures of Total, Internalizing, and Externalizing problems. These findings suggest that the impact of this prenatally commencing home visiting program may be limited to boys experiencing the most difficulties. Further adoption of the statistical methods applied here may help to improve the internal validity of randomized controlled trials and contribute to the field of evaluation science more generally. Trial Registration: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN04631728 PMID:27253184

  14. Neural substrates of contingency learning and executive control: dissociating physical, valuative, and behavioral changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dhaniel A Mullette-Gillman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Contingency learning is fundamental to cognition. Knowledge about environmental contingencies allows behavioral flexibility, as executive control processes accommodate the demands of novel or changing environments. Studies of experiential learning have focused on the relationship between actions and the values of associated outcomes. However, outcome values have often been confounded with the physical changes in the outcomes themselves. Here, we dissociated contingency learning into valuative and non-valuative forms, using a novel version of the two-alternative choice task, while measuring the neural effects of contingency changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Changes in value-relevant contingencies evoked activation in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC, posterior parietal cortex (PPC, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC consistent with prior results (e.g., reversal-learning paradigms. Changes in physical contingencies unrelated to value or to action produced similar activations within the LPFC, indicating that LPFC may engage in generalized contingency learning that is not specific to valuation. In contrast, contingency changes that required behavioral shifts evoked activation localized to the DMPFC, supplementary motor, and precentral cortices, suggesting that these regions play more specific roles within the executive control of behavior.

  15. Individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled crossover pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Fiorentino

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Lavinia Fiorentino1, John R McQuaid2, Lianqi Liu3, Loki Natarajan4, Feng He4, Monique Cornejo3, Susan Lawton3, Barbara A Parker6, Georgia R Sadler5, Sonia Ancoli-Israel31Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, 5Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA, USA; 6Moores UCSD Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USAPurpose: Estimates of insomnia in breast cancer patients are high, with reports of poor sleep lasting years after completion of cancer treatment. This randomized controlled crossover pilot study looked at the effects of individual cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (IND-CBT-I on sleep in breast cancer survivors.Patients and methods: Twenty-one participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment group (six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions followed by six weeks of follow up or a delayed treatment control group (no treatment for six weeks followed by six weekly IND-CBT-I sessions. Of these, 14 participants completed the pilot study (six in the treatment group and eight in the delayed treatment control group.Results: Self-rated insomnia was significantly improved in the treatment group compared to the waiting period in the delayed treatment control group. The pooled pre–post-IND-CBT-I analyses revealed improvements in self-rated insomnia, sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep.Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that IND-CBT-I is appropriate for improving sleep in breast cancer survivors. Individual therapy in a clinic or private practice may be a more practical option for this population as it is more easily accessed and readily available in an outpatient setting.Keywords: insomnia, breast cancer, cognitive behavioral therapy

  16. Experimental Investigation on Transmission Control Protocol Throughput Behavior in Optical Fiber Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tego, Edion; Matera, Francesco; del Buono, Donato

    2016-03-01

    This article describes an experimental investigation on the behavior of transmission control protocol in throughput measurements to be used in the verification of the service-level agreement between the Internet service provider and user in terms of line capacity for ultra-broadband access networks typical of fiber-to-the-x architectures. It is experimentally shown different conditions in high bandwidth-delay product links where the estimation of the line capacity based on a single transmission control protocol session results are unreliable. Simple equations reported in this work, and experimentally verified, point out the conditions in terms of packet loss, time delay, and line capacity, that allow consideration of the reliability of the measurement carried out with a single transmission control protocol session test by adopting a suitable measurement time duration.

  17. The Impact of Parental Support, Behavioral Control, and Psychological Control on the Academic Achievement and Self-Esteem of African American and European American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Roy A.; Bush, Kevin R.; McKenry, Patrick C.; Wilson, Stephan M.

    2003-01-01

    Relationships between adolescent functioning and parent support, behavioral control, and psychological control were examined among European American and African American adolescents. A number of correlations were significant, including maternal support and academic achievement and self-esteem, and paternal psychological control and self-esteem.…

  18. Maternal Control Behavior and Locus of Control: Examining Mechanisms in the Relation between Maternal Anxiety Disorders and Anxiety Symptomatology in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kimberly D.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Domingues, Janine; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    This study tested components of a proposed model of child anxiety and examined the mediational roles of (1) maternal control behavior, (2) maternal external locus of control, and (3) child external locus of control in the association between maternal and child anxiety. Thirty-eight clinically anxious mothers and 37 nonanxious mothers participated…

  19. Theoretical study on controlling nonlinear behaviors of a coupled-cavity VCSEL by external optical injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Li(李孝峰); Wei Pan(潘炜); Bin Luo(罗斌); Dong Ma(马冬); Zheng Zhao(赵峥); Guo Deng(邓果)

    2004-01-01

    A master-slave configuration used to control the nonlinear behaviors arising in a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with strong external optical feedback is established. In terms of bifurcation diagram, time and frequency domain, the influence of the continuous optical injection from the master VCSEL on the nonlinear characteristics of the slave is investigated theoretically. For relatively weak injection, the slave still keeps its intrinsic nonlinear state. With increasing the injection strength, these nonlinear behaviors evolve to periodic fluctuation, and at last are replaced by the steady-state (e.g. the critical injection parameter for steady-state is 1.2 when external cavity's reflectivity and length are 4% and 4 cm, respectively). During this evolution the bifurcation-contraction phenomena are also observed.

  20. Theoretical study on controlling nonlinear behaviors of a coupled-cavity VCSEL by external optical injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李孝峰; 潘炜; 罗斌; 马冬; 赵峥; 邓果

    2004-01-01

    A master-slave configuration used to control the nonlinear behaviors arising in a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with strong external optical feedback is established. In terms of bifurcation diagram, time and frequency domain, the influence of the continuous optical injection from the master VCSEL on the nonlinear characteristics of the slave is investigated theoretically. For relatively weak injection, the slave still keeps its intrinsic nonlinear state. With increasing the injection strength, these nonlinear behaviors evolve to periodic fluctuation, and at last are replaced by the steady-state (e.g. the critical injection parameter for steady-state is 1.2 when external cavity's reflectivity and length are 4%and 4 cm, respectively). During this evolution the bifurcation-contraction phenomena are also observed.

  1. Behavior restructuring and social activation as self-control strategies facing alcohol consumption in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Obando-Posada

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption remains a world major problem because it affects more than a half of the world population and it is associated with multiple physical and psychological illnesses, domestic violence, traffic accidents, financial, labor and academic problems, among others. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of behavior restructuring and social activation as self-control techniques, in three male adults of 21, 39 and 42 years old, who reported problems related with substance use. An intrasubject temporary series A-B-A-BC design was conducted. Results indicate that intervention aimed to modify behavioral patterns based on the suggested techniques, had a positive effect. In monitoring phase, all participants showed a decrease in consumed grams of alcohol and invested time on consumption, compared with the assessment phase.

  2. Motor planning modulates sensory-motor control of collision avoidance behavior in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Nakagawa

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we examined the collision avoidance behavior of the frog, Rana catesbeiana to an approaching object in the upper visual field. The angular velocity of the frog's escape turn showed a significant positive correlation with the turn angle (r2 = 0.5741, P0.05. Thus, the frog was not able to control the velocity of the large escape turns accurately and did not complete the behavior within a constant time. In the latter case, there was a small but significant positive correlation between the threshold angular size and the angular velocity (r2 = 0.1459, P<0.05. This suggests that the threshold is controlled to compensate for the insufficient escape velocity achieved during large turn angles, and could explain a significant negative correlation between the turn angle and the threshold angular size (r2 = 0.1145, P<0.05. Thus, it is likely that the threshold angular size is also controlled by the turn angle and is modulated by motor planning.

  3. Self-other resonance, its control and prosocial inclinations: Brain-behavior relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christov-Moore, Leonardo; Iacoboni, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Humans seem to place a positive reward value on prosocial behavior. Evidence suggests that this prosocial inclination is driven by our reflexive tendency to share in the observed sensations, emotions and behavior of others, or "self-other resonance". In this study, we examine how neural correlates of self-other resonance relate to prosocial decision-making. Subjects performed two tasks while undergoing fMRI: observation of a human hand pierced by a needle, and observation and imitation of emotional facial expressions. Outside the scanner, subjects played the Dictator Game with players of low or high income (represented by neutral-expression headshots). Subjects' offers in the Dictator Game were correlated with activity in neural systems associated with self-other resonance and anticorrelated with activity in systems implicated in the control of pain, affect, and imitation. Functional connectivity between areas involved in self-other resonance and top-down control was negatively correlated with subjects' offers. This study suggests that the interaction between self-other resonance and top-down control processes are an important component of prosocial inclinations towards others, even when biological stimuli associated with self-other resonance are limited. These findings support a view of prosocial decision-making grounded in embodied cognition. PMID:26954937

  4. Dynamics and control designs for internal thermally coupled distillation columns with different purities, Part 1: Open loop dynamic behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The open loop dynamic behaviors of internal thermally coupled distillation column with four different purities (low-,moderate-, high- and very high-purity) are studied. These dynamic behaviors are characterized by strong asymmetric non-linearity, high sensitivity to operation conditions change and distinct inverse response. With the increase of purity, these dynamic behaviors are intensified and become more complex, which easily lead to the mismatch between linear model and plant and also change the relationship between manipulated and controlled variables.

  5. Relationships Between Alcohol-Related informal Social Control, Parental Monitoring and Adolescent Problem Behaviors Among Racially Diverse Urban Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Pasch, Keryn E.; Perry, Cheryl L; Komro, Kelli

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationships between alcohol-related informal social control and parental monitoring on alcohol use, behavior and intentions; violent behavior; and delinquent behavior in a racially diverse population of young urban adolescents. Baseline surveys were administered to 6th grade male and female students in 61 urban Chicago schools as part of Project Northland Chicago, a group randomized trial for the prevention/reduction of substance use. A...

  6. Control of Reversible Self-Bending Behavior in Responsive Janus Microstrips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Myung Seok; Song, Young Shin; Kim, Cheolgyu; Kim, Jongmin; You, Jae Bem; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Chang-Soo; Im, Sung Gap

    2016-04-01

    Here, we demonstrate a simple method to systematically control the responsive self-bending behavior of Janus hydrogel microstrips consisting of a polymeric bilayer with a high modulus contrast. The Janus hydrogel microstrips could be easily fabricated by a simple micromolding technique combined with an initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) coating, providing high flexibility in controlling the physical and chemical properties of the microstrips. The fabricated Janus hydrogel microstrip is composed of a soft, pH-responsive polymer hydrogel layer laminated with a highly cross-linked, rigid thin film, generating a geometric anisotropy at a micron scale. The large difference in the elastic moduli between the two layers of the Janus microstrips leads to a self-bending behavior in response to the pH change. More specifically, the impact of the physical and chemical properties of the microstrip on the self-bending phenomena was systematically investigated by changing the thickness and composition of two layers of the microstrip, which renders high controllability in bending of the microstrips. The curvature of the Janus microstrips, formed by self-bending, highly depends on the applied acidity. A reversible, responsive self-bending/unbending exhibits a perfect resilience pattern with repeated changes in pH for 5 cycles. We envision that the Janus microstrips can be engineered to form complex 3D microstructures applicable to various fields such as soft robotics, scaffolds, and drug delivery. The reliable responsive behaviors obtained from the systematic investigation will provide critical information in bridging the gap between the theoretical mechanical analysis and the chemical properties to achieve micron-scale soft robotics. PMID:26974225

  7. Patterns of Success: Online Self-Monitoring in a Web-Based Behavioral Weight Control Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Rebecca A.; Harvey-Berino, Jean; Bursac, Zoran; Ashikaga, Taka; West, Delia Smith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Online weight control technologies could reduce barriers to treatment, including increased ease and convenience of self-monitoring. Self-monitoring consistently predicts outcomes in behavioral weight loss programs; however, little is known about patterns of self-monitoring associated with success. Methods The current study examines 161 participants (93% female; 31% African-American; mean BMI=35.7±5.7) randomized to a 6-month online behavioral weight control program which offered weekly group “chat” sessions and online self-monitoring. Self-monitoring log-ins were continuously monitored electronically during treatment and examined in association with weight change and demographics. Weekend and weekday log-ins were examined separately and length of periods of continuous self-monitoring were examined. Results We found that 91% of participants logged in to the self-monitoring webpage at least once. Over 6 months, these participants monitored on an average of 28% of weekdays and 17% of weekend days, with most log-ins earlier in the program. Women were less likely to log-in, and there were trends for greater self-monitoring by older participants. Race, education and marital status were not significant predictors of self-monitoring. Both weekday and weekend log-ins were significant independent predictors of weight loss. Patterns of consistent self-monitoring emerged early for participants who went on to achieve greater than a five percent weight loss. Conclusions Patterns of online self-monitoring were strongly associated with weight loss outcomes. These results suggest a specific focus on consistent self-monitoring early in a behavioral weight control program might be beneficial for achieving clinically significant weight losses. PMID:22545978

  8. Tratamento cognitivo e comportamental para transtornos do controle de impulsos Cognitive-behavioral treatment for impulse control disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Hodgins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Este artigo revisa o tratamento da cleptomania, do comprar compulsivo e do jogo patológico. MÉTODO: Realizou-se uma revisão da literatura publicada. RESULTADOS: A pesquisa sobre o tratamento em todas essas áreas é limitada. As técnicas cognitivo-comportamentais utilizadas no tratamento da cleptomania compreendem sensibilização encoberta, dessensibilização imaginal, dessensibilização sistemática, terapia de aversão, treinamento de relaxamento e fontes alternativas de satisfação. Com relação ao comprar compulsivo, não existe amparo empírico para o tratamento, mas as técnicas comuns examinadas foram sensibilização encoberta, exposição e prevenção de resposta, controle do estímulo, reestruturação cognitiva e prevenção de recaída. O tratamento do jogo patológico teve êxito tanto no formato em grupo como no individual, utilizando técnicas tais como terapia aversiva, dessensibilização sistemática, dessensibilização imaginal e terapia comportamental multimodal (incluindo exposição in vivo, controle do estímulo e sensibilização encoberta, juntamente com técnicas cognitivas, tais como psicoeducação, reestruturação cognitiva e prevenção de recaída. CONCLUSÕES: Há um consenso geral na literatura de que as terapias cognitivo-comportamentais oferecem um modelo eficaz de intervenção em todos esses transtornos. Uma formulação de caso individualizada é apresentada com um exemplo de estudo de caso. Sugerem-se diretrizes para a prática clínica de cada transtorno.OBJECTIVES: This paper reviews the cognitive-behavioral treatment of kleptomania, compulsive buying, and pathological gambling. METHOD: A review of the published literature was conducted. RESULTS: Treatment research in all of these areas is limited. The cognitive-behavioral techniques used in the treatment of kleptomania encompass covert sensitization, imaginal desensitization, systematic desensitization, aversion therapy, relaxation

  9. Maternal and Paternal Psychological Control as Moderators of the Link between Peer Attitudes and Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudekerk, Barbara A.; Allen, Joseph P.; Hafen, Christopher A.; Hessel, Elenda T.; Szwedo, David E.; Spilker, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Maternal and paternal psychological control, peer attitudes, and the interaction of psychological control and peer attitudes at age 13 were examined as predictors of risky sexual behavior before age 16 in a community sample of 181 youth followed from age 13 to 16. Maternal psychological control moderated the link between peer attitudes and sexual…

  10. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in euthymic bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Steinan, Mette Kvisten; Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Langsrud, Knut; Sand, Trond; Kallestad, Håvard; Morken, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with bipolar disorder experience sleep disturbance, even in euthymic phases. Changes in sleep pattern are frequent signs of a new episode of (hypo)mania or depression. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is an effective treatment for primary insomnia, but there are no published results on the effects of CBT-I in patients with bipolar disorder. In this randomized controlled trial, we wish to compare CBT-I and treatment as usual with treatment as usual alone to...

  11. Dynamic nonlinear feedback for temperature control of continuous stirred reactor with complex behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A. López Pérez

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to present an alternative methodology for the design of a class of integral high order slidingmodecontroller applied to a class of continuous chemical reactor with complex behavior for temperature tracking purposes.The proposed design is based on the differential geometry framework, where the named reaching trajectory contains a highorder sliding mode term in order to diminish chattering. Considering that the proposed technique is model based, an observerbaseduncertainty estimator is coupled, which provides robustness against model uncertainties and noisy measurements.Numerical simulations are performed in order to show the capacities of the proposed controller, which is compared with othernonlinear methodologies.

  12. Oxide stoichiometry-controlled TaOx-based resistive switching behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Gwang Ho; Lee, Ah Rahm; Kim, Tae Yoon; Im, Hyun Sik; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2016-10-01

    We examine the influence of variable oxygen concentration in TaOx active layers on the forming process and bipolar resistive switching (BRS) features of TaOx-based resistive switching cells. TaOx active layers prepared using various rf sputtering powers were systematically analyzed to identify the relation between initial compositions and BRS behavior. Proper control of oxygen vacancy concentration was clearly identified as a basic factor in ensuring typical BRS features without affecting the structural properties. We describe the possible origins of both conduction and switching based on the variation of oxygen concentrations initially provided by the growth conditions.

  13. Applying the Skill-Rule-Knowledge Framework to Understanding Operators’ Behaviors and Workload in Advanced Main Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Operator behaviors were analyzed according to Rasmussen's SRK classification. • Different job positions connote different abilities to perform the job successfully. • Rule-based behavior comprised the main behavior patterns of the operating crew. - Abstract: For the past years, a number of researches have focused on operators’ behaviors and workloads in advanced main control rooms (MCRs) in either the procedure-domain or knowledge-domain and in either workload-increased or workload-decreased conditions. Different job positions connote different responsibilities and abilities that are required to perform the job successfully. However, it may be inappropriate to apply a dichotomy in these issues. In this study, we clarified these controversial points through the analysis of the time, frequency, and workload of the behaviors based on Rasmussen's skill–rule–knowledge classification (SRK framework) according to the supervisor operator (SRO), reactor operator (RO), and assistant reactor operator (ARO). The results showed that, for the SRO, rule- and knowledge-based behaviors occurred more often than skill-based behavior in terms of time and frequency, and knowledge-based behavior was the main source of workload. For the RO, no significant differences were found among the three behavior types in terms of frequency and workload, but more time was spent on rule-based behaviors than on skill- and knowledge-based behaviors. The ARO spent more time performing skill-based behaviors than rule- and knowledge-based behaviors, but in terms of frequency and workload, rule-based behavior was the predominant type. Operators’ behaviors contribute to a plant's defense-in-depth approach to safety and serve a vital function in ensuring its safe operation. Research on behavioral taxonomies of advanced MCRs has many significant benefits in both scientific-theoretical and applied practical fields

  14. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety in Patients with Terminal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, Joseph A.; Traeger, Lara; Bemis, Heather; Solis, Jessica; Hendriksen, Ellen S.; Park, Elyse R; Pirl, William F.; Temel, Jennifer S.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Safren, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a pilot randomized controlled trial that examined the feasibility and potential efficacy of brief cognitive-behavioral therapy to reduce anxiety in patients with terminal cancer.

  15. Effects of a stepwise multidisciplinary intervention for challenging behavior in advanced dementia: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, M.J.C.; Francke, A.L.; Steen, J.T. van der; Scherder, E.J.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Kovach, C.R.; Achterberg, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether implementation of a stepwise multicomponent intervention (STA OP!) is effective in reducing challenging behavior and depression in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. Design: Cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting: Twenty-one clusters (single independe

  16. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD - a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-09-07

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing.

  17. A case-control study of brain structure and behavioral characteristics in 47,XXX syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenroot, R K; Blumenthal, J D; Wallace, G L; Clasen, L S; Lee, N R; Giedd, J N

    2014-11-01

    Trisomy X, the presence of an extra X chromosome in females (47,XXX), is a relatively common but under-recognized chromosomal disorder associated with characteristic cognitive and behavioral features of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine whether there were neuroanatomical differences in girls with Trisomy X that could relate to cognitive and behavioral differences characteristic of the disorder during childhood and adolescence. MRI scans were obtained on 35 girls with Trisomy X (mean age 11.4, SD 5.5) and 70 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cognitive and behavioral testing was also performed. Trisomy X girls underwent a semi-structured psychiatric interview. Regional brain volumes and cortical thickness were compared between the two groups. Total brain volume was significantly decreased in subjects with Trisomy X, as were all regional volumes with the exception of parietal gray matter. Differences in cortical thickness had a mixed pattern. The subjects with Trisomy X had thicker cortex in bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and right medial temporal lobe, but decreased cortical thickness in both lateral temporal lobes. The most common psychiatric disorders present in this sample of Trisomy X girls included anxiety disorders (40%), attention-deficit disorder (17%) and depressive disorders (11%). The most strongly affected brain regions are consistent with phenotypic characteristics such as language delay, poor executive function and heightened anxiety previously described in population-based studies of Trisomy X and also found in our sample.

  18. Control of critical behavior in a small-scale social system

    CERN Document Server

    Daniels, Bryan C; Flack, Jessica C

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade new technologies for making large numbers of fine-grained measurements have led to the surprising discovery that many biological systems sit near a critical point. These systems are potentially more adaptive in that small changes to component behavior can induce large-scale changes in aggregate structure and function. Accounting for criticality remains a challenge as sensitivity to perturbation suggests a lack of robustness. Furthermore, change induced by perturbation may not be adaptive. Complicating matters further critical phenomena can result from history-dependent stochastic processes. A question central to distinguishing among these conflicting views of criticality is to what degree criticality can be controlled by the components of the system. We address the control of criticality using data on conflict dynamics and fight sizes from an animal society model system (Macaca nemestrina, n=48). The system is fundamentally finite so we operationalize criticality in information theoretic ...

  19. Behavioral and neural correlates of increased self-control in the absence of increased willpower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magen, Eran; Kim, Bokyung; Dweck, Carol S; Gross, James J; McClure, Samuel M

    2014-07-01

    People often exert willpower to choose a more valuable delayed reward over a less valuable immediate reward, but using willpower is taxing and frequently fails. In this research, we demonstrate the ability to enhance self-control (i.e., forgoing smaller immediate rewards in favor of larger delayed rewards) without exerting additional willpower. Using behavioral and neuroimaging data, we show that a reframing of rewards (i) reduced the subjective value of smaller immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards, (ii) increased the likelihood of choosing the larger delayed rewards when choosing between two real monetary rewards, (iii) reduced the brain reward responses to immediate rewards in the dorsal and ventral striatum, and (iv) reduced brain activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (a correlate of willpower) when participants chose the same larger later rewards across the two choice frames. We conclude that reframing can promote self-control while avoiding the need for additional willpower expenditure.

  20. Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, risky behaviors, and motorcycle injuries: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani H

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani,1,2 Leili Abedi,3 Minoo Mahini,4 Shahrokh Amiri,5 Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh6 1Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 2World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Safe Community Promotion, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, 4Department of Counseling, Aras International Campus, University of Tehran, Jolfa, 5Research Center of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, 6Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran Background: The aim of this study was to assess the association of motorcycle traffic injuries with motorcycle riding behavior and subtypes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD while controlling for individual correlates of motorcycle traffic injuries.Methods: A case-control study was carried out in 298 patients with motorcycle trauma along with 151 control patients admitted to the Shohada and Imam Reza university hospitals as the two referral specialty centers in the East Azarbyjan Province of Iran in 2013. The Persian version of the Motorcycle Riding Behavior Questionnaire and the Persian version of Conner’s Adult ADHD Rating Scales (the self-report short version were used to assess riding behavior and screen for adult ADHD, respectively. The scale has four subscales, comprising subscale A (inattention, subscale B (hyperactivity, impulsivity, subscale C (A + C, and subscale D (ADHD index. The statistical analysis was done using Stata version 11.Results: All subjects were male and aged 13–79 years. Approximately 54% of the participants were married and 13% had academic education. Approximately 18% of the motorcycle riders stated that their motorcycle riding was only for fun purposes. More than two thirds of the participants did not

  1. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control. PMID:27047324

  2. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning eMa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1 the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2 an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination results in a longer go reaction time (RT, a lower stop error rate, as well as a faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  3. Inseparability of Go and Stop in Inhibitory Control: Go Stimulus Discriminability Affects Stopping Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory control, the ability to stop or modify preplanned actions under changing task conditions, is an important component of cognitive functions. Two lines of models of inhibitory control have previously been proposed for human response in the classical stop-signal task, in which subjects must inhibit a default go response upon presentation of an infrequent stop signal: (1) the race model, which posits two independent go and stop processes that race to determine the behavioral outcome, go or stop; and (2) an optimal decision-making model, which posits that observers decides whether and when to go based on continually (Bayesian) updated information about both the go and stop stimuli. In this work, we probe the relationship between go and stop processing by explicitly manipulating the discrimination difficulty of the go stimulus. While the race model assumes the go and stop processes are independent, and therefore go stimulus discriminability should not affect the stop stimulus processing, we simulate the optimal model to show that it predicts harder go discrimination should result in longer go reaction time (RT), lower stop error rate, as well as faster stop-signal RT. We then present novel behavioral data that validate these model predictions. The results thus favor a fundamentally inseparable account of go and stop processing, in a manner consistent with the optimal model, and contradicting the independence assumption of the race model. More broadly, our findings contribute to the growing evidence that the computations underlying inhibitory control are systematically modulated by cognitive influences in a Bayes-optimal manner, thus opening new avenues for interpreting neural responses underlying inhibitory control.

  4. Executive functioning and risk-taking behavior in Parkinson's disease patients with impulse control disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Fanny; Roze, Emmanuel; Lacomblez, Lucette; Bonnet, Anne-Marie; Vidailhet, Marie; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean-Christophe

    2016-06-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and are associated with dopaminergic medication. The purpose of this study was to investigate executive function and risk-taking behavior in PD patients with ICD. 17 PD patients with ICD (ICD-PD) were compared to 20 PD patients without ICD (CTRL-PD) using neuropsychological and experimental tasks. Executive functions were assessed using standard executive testing (Conner's Performance Test, Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Trail Making Test and phonological verbal fluency). Subjects were also submitted to an experimental gambling task consisted of three decks of money cards: neutral deck (equal opportunity for gains as losses), winning deck (small amount of money with a positive balance) and loser deck (high amount of money with a negative balance), evaluating risk-taking behavior (number of cards picked in each deck) and valuation of the reward (subjective appreciation of the value of each deck). There was no significant difference in executive functioning between groups. Both groups selected more cards in the losing deck (high amount of money) as compared to the neutral deck (Mann-Whitney test, ICD-PD, p = 0.02; CTRL-PD, p = 0.003) and to the winning deck (Mann-Whitney test, ICD-PD p = 0.0001; CTRL-PD p = 0.003), suggesting an increased risk-taking behavior. Interestingly, we found that ICD-PD patients estimated the value of decks differently from CTRL-PD patients, taking into account mainly the positive reinforced value of the decks (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.04). This study showed that executive pattern and risk-taking behavior are similar between ICD-PD and CTRL-PD patients. However, ICD-PD patients showed a specific deficit of the subjective estimation of the reward. Links between this deficit and metacognitive skills are discussed. PMID:27085342

  5. The effects of risk perception and flight experience on airline pilots' locus of control with regard to safety operation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xuqun; Ji, Ming; Han, Haiyan

    2013-08-01

    The primary objective of this paper was to integrate two research traditions, social cognition approach and individual state approach, and to understand the relationships between locus of control (LOC), risk perception, flight time, and safety operation behavior (SOB) among Chinese airline pilots. The study sample consisted of 193 commercial airline pilots from China Southern Airlines Ltd. The results showed that internal locus of control directly affected pilot safety operation behavior. Risk perception seemed to mediate the relationship between locus of control and safety operation behaviors, and total flight time moderated internal locus of control. Thus, locus of control primarily influences safety operation behavior indirectly by affecting risk perception. The total effect of internal locus of control on safety behaviors is larger than that of external locus of control. Furthermore, the safety benefit of flight experience is more pronounced among pilots with high internal loci of control in the early and middle flight building stages. Practical implications for aviation safety and directions for future research are also discussed.

  6. Prevention of problem behavior by teaching functional communication and self-control skills to preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczynski, Kevin C; Hanley, Gregory P

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the preschool life skills program (PLS; Hanley, Heal, Tiger, & Ingvarsson, 2007) on the acquisition and maintenance of functional communication and self-control skills, as well as its effect on problem behavior, of small groups of preschoolers at risk for school failure. Six children were taught to request teacher attention, teacher assistance, and preferred materials, and to tolerate delays to and denial of those events during child-led, small-group activities. Teaching strategies included instruction, modeling, role play, and differential reinforcement. Six additional children randomly assigned to similarly sized control groups participated in small-group activities but did not experience the PLS program. Within-subject and between-groups designs showed that the PLS teaching procedures were functionally related to the improvements and maintenance of the skills and prevention of problem behavior. Stakeholder responses on a social acceptability questionnaire indicated that they were satisfied with the form of the targeted social skills, the improvements in the children's performance, and the teaching strategies.

  7. Influence of weld discontinuities on strain controlled fatigue behavior of 308 stainless steel weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed investigations have been performed for assessing the importance of weld discontinuities in strain controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 308 stainless steel (SS) welds. The LCF behavior of 308 SS welds containing defects was compared with that of type 304 SS base material and 308 SS sound weld metal. Weld pads were prepared by shielded metal arc welding process. Porosity and slag inclusions were introduced deliberately into the weld metal by grossly exaggerating the conditions normally causing such defects. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests have been conducted in air at 823 K on type 304 SS base and 308 SS sound weld metal employing strain amplitudes in the range from ±0.25 to ±0.8 percent. A single strain amplitude of ±0.25 percent was used for all the tests conducted on weld samples containing defects. The results indicated that the base material undergoes cyclic hardening whereas sound and defective welds experience cyclic softening. Base metal showed higher fatigue life than sound weld metal at all strain amplitudes. The presence of porosity and slag inclusions in the weld metal led to significant reduction in life. Porosity on the specimen surface has been found to be particularly harmful and caused a reduction in life by a factor of seven relative to sound weld metal

  8. A smartphone application of alcohol resilience treatment for behavioral self-control training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Albers, Jörg; Gao, Tian; Wang, Minghao; Bilberg, Arne; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    High relapse rate is one of the most prominent problems in addiction treatment. Alcohol Resilience Treatment (ART), an alcohol addiction therapy, is based on Cue Exposure Treatment, which has shown promising results in preliminary studies. ART aims at optimizing the core area of relapse prevention, and intends to improve patients' capability to withstand craving of alcohol. This method emphasizes the interplay of resilience and resourcefulness. It contains 6 sessions with different topics according to the stage of treatment circuit, and each session consists of 6 steps. Due to the purity and structure of the treatment rationale, it is realistic, reasonable and manageable to transform the method into a smartphone application. An ART app in Android system and an accessory of bilateral tactile stimulation were developed and will be used in a study with behavioral self-control training. This paper presents the design and realization of the smartphone based ART application. The design of a pilot study, which is to examine the benefits of a smartphone application providing behavioral self-control training, is also reported in this paper. PMID:23366304

  9. Leaching behavior of Pb and Zn in air pollution control residues and their modeling prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hua; HE Pin-jing; SHAO Li-ming; FENG Jun-hui; CAO Qun-ke

    2006-01-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to air pollution control (APC) residues in China recently due to the rising proportion of waste incineration and the hazardous characteristics of the residues, among which heavy metal leaching toxicity plays an important role. Leaching behavior and potential risk of Pb and Zn in the APC residues from a Shanghai municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator was studied, based on the leaching tests under different conditions and theoretical calculation using a geochemical thermodynamic equilibrium model MINTEQA2. Results showed that, extractant species and liquid to solid (L/S) ratio predominantly controlled the leaching toxicity of Pb and Zn, while ionic strength, vibration method and leaching time had less effect on the metals release.Leachate/final pH determined the metal leaching behavior, which changed the speciation of heavy metals in the extraction system. The equilibrium aqueous speciation, precipitation-dissolution of Pb and Zn was investigated according to the model computation, which was well in agreement with the experimental results.

  10. Psychological and behavioral differences among females classified as bulimic, obligatory exerciser and normal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, R C; Sargent, R; Forand, K J; Ureda, J R; Saunders, R P; Durstine, J L

    1992-05-01

    The compulsion to maintain a lean body shape while living in a society obsessed with food may encourage the use of dieting, binge eating and purging behaviors in young women. The body of literature on bulimia nervosa (Boskind-Lodahl and Sirlin 1977; Fairburn and Cooper 1984; Katzman and Wolchik 1984; Scott 1988) clearly establishes its relationship to the current American fashion for thinness and the value placed on physical attractiveness for self-esteem. This notion promotes a multitude of weight control strategies ranging from self-starvation (Humphrey 1983; Brownell and Foreyth 1986) to cigarette smoking (Klesges and Klesges 1988), many of which may have a profound influence on maintenance of good health. Similar to weight control, exercise behavior could be viewed as falling on a continuum from reasonable efforts to maintain physical fitness to a preoccupation with exercise that is far out of proportion to the expected benefits of a 30-minute, three to five day a week routine. Characteristics of obligatory exercise have been described by several researchers and include maintaining a rigid schedule of intense exercise; resisting temptation to lapse into nonexercising; feelings of guilt and anxiety when the exercise schedule is violated; compensatory increase in exercise to make up for lapses; pushing oneself even when tired, ill, or injured; mental preoccupation with exercise; and detailed recordkeeping on exercise (Yates et al. 1983; Blumenthal et al. 1984; Nudelman et al. 1988). In a competitive society, obsessive exercise behaviors may be linked to the development of rigid dietary guidelines while one strives toward the "optimal" lean-fat ratio of body composition.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1603874

  11. Parenting and Antisocial Behavior: A Model of the Relationship between Adolescent Self-Disclosure, Parental Closeness, Parental Control, and Adolescent Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieno, Alessio; Nation, Maury; Pastore, Massimiliano; Santinello, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    This study used data collected from a sample of 840 Italian adolescents (418 boys; M age = 12.58) and their parents (657 mothers; M age = 43.78) to explore the relations between parenting, adolescent self-disclosure, and antisocial behavior. In the hypothesized model, parenting practices (e.g., parental monitoring and control) have direct effects…

  12. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bindu; Bellipady, Sumanth Shetty; Bhat, Shrinivasa Undaru

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n = 34; control group, n = 24). Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118. PMID:27088040

  13. Sleep Promotion Program for Improving Sleep Behaviors in Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu John

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The purpose of this pilot trial was to determine the efficacy of sleep promotion program to adapt it for the use of adolescents studying in various schools of Mangalore, India, and evaluate the feasibility issues before conducting a randomized controlled trial in a larger sample of adolescents. Methods. A randomized controlled trial design with stratified random sampling method was used. Fifty-eight adolescents were selected (mean age: 14.02 ± 2.15 years; intervention group, n=34; control group, n=24. Self-report questionnaires, including sociodemographic questionnaire with some additional questions on sleep and activities, Sleep Hygiene Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire, and PedsQL™ Present Functioning Visual Analogue Scale, were used. Results. Insufficient weekday-weekend sleep duration with increasing age of adolescents was observed. The program revealed a significant effect in the experimental group over the control group in overall sleep quality, sleep onset latency, sleep duration, daytime sleepiness, and emotional and overall distress. No significant effect was observed in sleep hygiene and other sleep parameters. All target variables showed significant correlations with each other. Conclusion. The intervention holds a promise for improving the sleep behaviors in healthy adolescents. However, the effect of the sleep promotion program treatment has yet to be proven through a future research. This trial is registered with ISRCTN13083118.

  14. Mindfulness-based therapy and behavioral activation: A randomized controlled trial with depressed college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIndoo, C C; File, A A; Preddy, T; Clark, C G; Hopko, D R

    2016-02-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) manifests in 20-30% of college students, with increased incidence in recent decades. Very limited research has assessed the efficacy of evidence-based interventions for MDD in college students. Mindfulness-Based Therapy (MBT) and Behavioral Activation (BA) are two interventions with significant potential to meet demands of college counseling clinics and effectively treat college students with MDD. This study utilized a randomized controlled research design (n = 50) to examine the efficacy of four-sessions of abbreviated MBT and BA relative to a wait-list control condition with depressed college students. Intent-to-treat data analyses on depression outcome measures suggested both treatments were superior to the control group. There were significant pre-post treatment improvements across measures of depression, rumination, stress, and mindfulness, gains largely maintained at 1-month follow-up. Neither active treatment effectively reduced somatic anxiety. Both treatments generally had moderate-strong effect sizes relative to the control group, and based on depression response and remission criteria, 56-79% of patients exhibited clinically significant improvement. Based on reliable change indices, 75-85% experienced clinically significant reductions in depression. There was strong therapist competence and adherence to treatment protocols and high patient satisfaction with both interventions. Study limitations and implications for the assessment and treatment of depressed college students are discussed. PMID:26745622

  15. Parental behavioral control in academic and non-academic domains: a three-year longitudinal study in the Chinese culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Lee, Tak Yan

    2007-01-01

    For over three consecutive years, 2559 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 12.65 years at Wave 1) responded to instruments assessing their perceived parental behavioral control based on measures of parental knowledge, expectation, monitoring, and discipline. The results show that compared with parental control in the academic domain, parental control in the non-academic domain (peer relations domain) was relatively weaker, using parental knowledge, parental expectation, parental monitoring, and parental discipline as indicators, and a decline in parental behavioral control occurred over time. Although domain (academic domain versus non-academic domain) X time (Time 1, Time 2 versus Time 3) interaction effects were found, the findings mirrored the main effects of domain and time. Parental education and economic sufficiency were linearly related to differences in parental behavioral control in the academic domain and non-academic domain. The present findings suggest that traditional Chinese cultural emphasis on academic excellence still prevails in the contemporary Chinese culture. PMID:18348428

  16. The counseling african americans to control hypertension (caatch trial: baseline demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz-Gloster Marleny

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effectiveness of combined physician and patient-level interventions for blood pressure (BP control in low-income, hypertensive African Americans with multiple co-morbid conditions remains largely untested in community-based primary care practices. Demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics of participants in the Counseling African American to Control Hypertension (CAATCH Trial are described. CAATCH evaluates the effectiveness of a multi-level, multi-component, evidence-based intervention compared with usual care (UC in improving BP control among poorly controlled hypertensive African Americans who receive primary care in Community Health Centers (CHCs. Methods Participants included 1,039 hypertensive African Americans receiving care in 30 CHCs in the New York Metropolitan area. Baseline data on participant demographic, clinical (e.g., BP, anti-hypertensive medications, psychosocial (e.g., depression, medication adherence, self-efficacy, and behavioral (e.g., exercise, diet characteristics were gathered through direct observation, chart review, and interview. Results The sample was primarily female (71.6%, middle-aged (mean age = 56.9 ± 12.1 years, high school educated (62.4%, low-income (72.4% reporting less than $20,000/year income, and received Medicaid (35.9% or Medicare (12.6%. Mean systolic and diastolic BP were 150.7 ± 16.7 mm Hg and 91.0 ± 10.6 mm Hg, respectively. Participants were prescribed an average of 2.5 ± 1.9 antihypertensive medications; 54.8% were on a diuretic; 33.8% were on a beta blocker; 41.9% were on calcium channel blockers; 64.8% were on angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs. One-quarter (25.6% of the sample had resistant hypertension; one-half (55.7% reported medication non-adherence. Most (79.7% reported one or more co-morbid medical conditions. The majority of the patients had a Charlson Co-morbidity score ≥ 2. Diabetes

  17. Neuroethology of Olfactory-Guided Behavior and Its Potential Application in the Control of Harmful Insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenman, Carolina E.; Lei, Hong; Guerenstein, Pablo G.

    2016-01-01

    Harmful insects include pests of crops and storage goods, and vectors of human and animal diseases. Throughout their history, humans have been fighting them using diverse methods. The fairly recent development of synthetic chemical insecticides promised efficient crop and health protection at a relatively low cost. However, the negative effects of those insecticides on human health and the environment, as well as the development of insect resistance, have been fueling the search for alternative control tools. New and promising alternative methods to fight harmful insects include the manipulation of their behavior using synthetic versions of “semiochemicals”, which are natural volatile and non-volatile substances involved in the intra- and/or inter-specific communication between organisms. Synthetic semiochemicals can be used as trap baits to monitor the presence of insects, so that insecticide spraying can be planned rationally (i.e., only when and where insects are actually present). Other methods that use semiochemicals include insect annihilation by mass trapping, attract-and- kill techniques, behavioral disruption, and the use of repellents. In the last decades many investigations focused on the neural bases of insect's responses to semiochemicals. Those studies help understand how the olfactory system detects and processes information about odors, which could lead to the design of efficient control tools, including odor baits, repellents or ways to confound insects. Here we review our current knowledge about the neural mechanisms controlling olfactory responses to semiochemicals in harmful insects. We also discuss how this neuroethology approach can be used to design or improve pest/vector management strategies. PMID:27445858

  18. Neuroethology of Olfactory-Guided Behavior and Its Potential Application in the Control of Harmful Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisenman, Carolina E; Lei, Hong; Guerenstein, Pablo G

    2016-01-01

    Harmful insects include pests of crops and storage goods, and vectors of human and animal diseases. Throughout their history, humans have been fighting them using diverse methods. The fairly recent development of synthetic chemical insecticides promised efficient crop and health protection at a relatively low cost. However, the negative effects of those insecticides on human health and the environment, as well as the development of insect resistance, have been fueling the search for alternative control tools. New and promising alternative methods to fight harmful insects include the manipulation of their behavior using synthetic versions of "semiochemicals", which are natural volatile and non-volatile substances involved in the intra- and/or inter-specific communication between organisms. Synthetic semiochemicals can be used as trap baits to monitor the presence of insects, so that insecticide spraying can be planned rationally (i.e., only when and where insects are actually present). Other methods that use semiochemicals include insect annihilation by mass trapping, attract-and- kill techniques, behavioral disruption, and the use of repellents. In the last decades many investigations focused on the neural bases of insect's responses to semiochemicals. Those studies help understand how the olfactory system detects and processes information about odors, which could lead to the design of efficient control tools, including odor baits, repellents or ways to confound insects. Here we review our current knowledge about the neural mechanisms controlling olfactory responses to semiochemicals in harmful insects. We also discuss how this neuroethology approach can be used to design or improve pest/vector management strategies. PMID:27445858

  19. Freud, Piaget, or neither? Beliefs in controlling others by wishful thinking and magical behavior in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikan, A; Clausen, S E

    1993-09-01

    Tests showed that 4- to 6-year-old children believe that people can be influenced or "controlled" both by thinking (e.g., both wishful thinking and magical behavior) and by realistic means (e.g., positive reinforcement, example, and group pressure). Belief in control by thinking did not vary by the subjects' sex or age, influence type (wishing or magical behavior), or target response (behavior, emotion, or thought). Quantitative measures, however, suggested that magical behavior was seen by subjects as being more efficient than wishing, and that emotion was considered easier to influence than thinking. Beliefs in control by thinking were not related to a measure of fantasy-reality differentiation (realism).

  20. Patterns and correlates of tobacco control behavior among american association of pediatric dentistry members: a cross-sectional national study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Arthur J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the tobacco-related knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors among US pediatric dentists. Methods A survey was conducted in 1998 among a national, random sample of 1500 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry members. Chi-square tests and logistic regression with odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals assessed factors related to pediatric dentists' tobacco control behaviors. Results Response was 65% for the survey. Only 12% of respondents had prior tobacco prevention/cessation training. Of those untrained, 70% were willing to be trained. Less than two-thirds correctly answered any of four tobacco-related knowledge items. Over one-half agreed pediatric dentists should engage in tobacco control behaviors, but identified patient resistance as a barrier. About 24% of respondents reported always/often asking their adolescent patients about tobacco use; 73% reported always/often advising known tobacco users to quit; and 37% of respondents always/often assisting with stopping tobacco use. Feeling prepared to perform tobacco control behaviors (ORs = 1.9–2.8, a more positive attitude score (4 points from 11 tobacco-related items (ORs = 1.5–1.8, and a higher statewide tobacco use prevalence significantly predicted performance of tobacco control behaviors. Conclusion Findings suggest thatraining programs on tobacco use and dependence treatment in the pediatric dental setting may be needed to promote tobacco control behaviors for adolescent patients.

  1. Towards Behavior Control for Evolutionary Robot Based on RL with ENN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingan Yang

    2013-03-01

    In comparison with the conventional behavior network and the adaptive behavior method, our algorithm simplified the genetic encoding complexity, improved the convergence rate  and the network performance.

  2. The Effect of The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Pharmacotherapy on Infertility Stress: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Pasha, Hajar; Esmailzadeh, Seddigheh; Kheirkhah, Farzan; Heidary, Shima; Afshar, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Infertility has been described as creating a form of stress leading to a variety of psychological problems. Both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are effective treatments for infertility stress. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy along with fluoxetine for improvement infertility stress in infertile women. Materials and Methods: In a randomized controlled clinical trial, 89 infertile women with mild to moderate depression (Beck scores 10-47) were recruited into the following three groups: i. cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), ii. antidepressant therapy, and iii. control group. Twenty-nine participants in the CBT method received gradual relaxation training, restructuring, and eliminating of negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional attitudes to infertility for 10 sessions. Thirty participants in the pharmacotherapy group took 20 mg fluoxetine daily for 90 days. Thirty individuals in control group did not receive any intervention. All participants completed fertility problem inventory (FPI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) at the beginning and end of the study. We applied Chi-square paired t test, ANOVA and Turkey’s test to analyze the data. Results: The mean of the infertility stress scores in CBT, fluoxetine, and control groups at the beginning and end of the study were as follows, respectively: 3.5 ± 0.62 vs.2.7 ± 0.62 (p<0.05), 3.5 ± 0.53 vs.3.2 ± 4.4 (p<0.05), and 3.4 ± 0.55 vs. 3.5 ± 0.48. In CBT group, the mean scores of social concern, sexual concern, marital concern, rejection of child-free lifestyle, and need for parenthood decreased meaningfully compared to those before starting the therapy. But in fluoxetine group, mean score of women sexual concern out of those five main problems of infertility reduced significantly. Also, fluoxetine and CBT reduced depression compared to the control group. Conclusion: CBT improved the social concerns, sexual concerns, marital concerns

  3. Don't give me attitude: Can perceptions of social norms, behavioral control and moral intensity help bridge the attitude-behavior gap in ethical consumer behavior?

    OpenAIRE

    Gloukhovtsev, Alexei

    2014-01-01

    The last couple of decades have seen a significant increase in positive attitudes towards ethical products and services. However, this increase is has yet to lead to a marked growth in the sales of such products. This thesis looks at the consumer decision-making process in situations where a moral issue or dilemma is present, and examines possible reasons for the disconnect between consumers' attitudes and behavioral intentions. Drawing on Icek Ajzen's (1985) theory of planned behavior, t...

  4. Assessment of Substance Abuse Behaviors in Adolescents’: Integration of Self-Control into Extended Parallel Process Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Witte

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An effective preventive health education program on drug abuse can be delivered by applying behavior change theories in a complementary fashion. Methods: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of integrating self-control into Extended Parallel Process Model in drug substance abuse behaviors. A sample of 189 governmental high school students participated in this survey. Information was collected individually by completing researcher designed questionnaire and a urinary rapid immuno-chromatography test for opium and marijuana. Results: The results of the study show that 6.9% of students used drugs (especially opium and marijuana and also peer pressure was determinant factor for using drugs. Moreover the EPPM theoretical variables of perceived severity and perceived self-efficacy with self-control are predictive factors to behavior intention against substance abuse. In this manner, self-control had a significant effect on protective motivation and perceived efficacy. Low self- control was a predictive factor of drug abuse and low self-control students had drug abuse experience. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that an integration of self-control into EPPM can be effective in expressing and designing primary preventive programs against drug abuse, and assessing abused behavior and deviance behaviors among adolescent population, especially risk seekers

  5. Effects of the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity and Multimodal Pain Rehabilitation: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelson, Peter; Gard, Gunvor; Eriksson, Margareta K

    2016-01-01

    Background Web-based interventions with a focus on behavior change have been used for pain management, but studies of Web-based interventions integrated in clinical practice are lacking. To emphasize the development of cognitive skills and behavior, and to increase activity and self-care in rehabilitation, the Web Behavior Change Program for Activity (Web-BCPA) was developed and added to multimodal pain rehabilitation (MMR). Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of MMR in combination with the Web-BCPA compared with MMR among persons with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary health care on pain intensity, self-efficacy, and copying, as part of a larger collection of data. Web-BCPA adherence and feasibility, as well as treatment satisfaction, were also investigated. Methods A total of 109 participants, mean age 43 (SD 11) years, with persistent pain in the back, neck, shoulder, and/or generalized pain were recruited to a randomized controlled trial with two intervention arms: (1) MMR+WEB (n=60) and (2) MMR (n=49). Participants in the MMR+WEB group self-guided through the eight modules of the Web-BCPA: pain, activity, behavior, stress and thoughts, sleep and negative thoughts, communication and self-esteem, solutions, and maintenance and progress. Data were collected with a questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Outcome measures were pain intensity (Visual Analog Scale), self-efficacy to control pain and to control other symptoms (Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale), general self-efficacy (General Self-Efficacy Scale), and coping (two-item Coping Strategies Questionnaire; CSQ). Web-BCPA adherence was measured as minutes spent in the program. Satisfaction and Web-BCPA feasibility were assessed by a set of items. Results Of 109 participants, 99 received the allocated intervention (MMR+WEB: n=55; MMR: n=44); 88 of 99 (82%) completed the baseline and follow-up questionnaires. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with a sample

  6. PKA controls calcium influx into motor neurons during a rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels.

  7. MicroRNA-133 inhibits behavioral aggregation by controlling dopamine synthesis in locusts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Yang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is ubiquitous and primarily controlled by interactions between environmental and genetic factors. The migratory locust, a worldwide pest, exhibits pronounced phenotypic plasticity, which is a population density-dependent transition that occurs between the gregarious and solitary phases. Genes involved in dopamine synthesis have been shown to regulate the phase transition of locusts. However, the function of microRNAs in this process remains unknown. In this study, we report the participation of miR-133 in dopamine production and the behavioral transition by negatively regulating two critical genes, henna and pale, in the dopamine pathway. miR-133 participated in the post-transcriptional regulation of henna and pale by binding to their coding region and 3' untranslated region, respectively. miR-133 displayed cellular co-localization with henna/pale in the protocerebrum, and its expression in the protocerebrum was negatively correlated with henna and pale expression. Moreover, miR-133 agomir delivery suppressed henna and pale expression, which consequently decreased dopamine production, thus resulting in the behavioral shift of the locusts from the gregarious phase to the solitary phase. Increasing the dopamine content could rescue the solitary phenotype, which was induced by miR-133 agomir delivery. Conversely, miR-133 inhibition increased the expression of henna and pale, resulting in the gregarious-like behavior of solitary locusts; this gregarious phenotype could be rescued by RNA interference of henna and pale. This study shows the novel function and modulation pattern of a miRNA in phenotypic plasticity and provides insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of the phase transition of locusts.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Light Therapy, and Their Combination for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Tierney Lindsey, Kathryn; Johnson, Leigh G.; Lippy, Robert D.; Lacy, Timothy J.; Barton, Franca B.

    2007-01-01

    This first controlled psychotherapy trial for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) compared SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), light therapy (LT), and their combination to a concurrent wait-list control. Adults (N = 61) with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, were randomized to one of four 6-week conditions: CBT (1.5-hr…

  9. Role of the Ventral Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Mediating Behavioral Control-Induced Reduction of Later Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratta, Michael V.; Lucero, Thomas R.; Amat, Jose; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    A prior experience of behavioral control over a stressor interferes with subsequent Pavlovian fear conditioning, and this effect is dependent on the activation of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFCv) at the time of the initial experience with control. It is unknown whether mPFCv activity is necessary during fear learning and/or testing for…

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluation of an After-School Prosocial Behavior Program in an Area of Socioeconomic Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, Liam; Biggart, Andy; Kerr, Karen; Connolly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial was used to evaluate the effects of a prosocial behavior after-school program called Mate-Tricks for 9- and 10-year-old children and their parents living in an area of significant socioeconomic disadvantage. The children were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 220) or a control group (n = 198). Children were…

  11. Perceived Parent-Child Relational Qualities and Parental Behavioral and Psychological Control in Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 3,017) were asked to respond to instruments measuring their perceived parent-child relational qualities (parental trust of the child, child's trust of parents, child's readiness to communicate with parents, and child's satisfaction with parental control), parental behavioral control (including indicators of…

  12. A field investigation of perceived behavioral control and blood alcohol content: a pattern-oriented approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan C; Coyle, Patrick T; Baldner, Conrad; Bray, Bethany C; Geller, E Scott

    2013-04-01

    As the first field study of perceived behavioral control (PBC) to assess alcohol consumption with a physiological measure (i.e., blood alcohol content; BAC), the research examined the impact of intoxication on alcohol-specific PBC (APBC). In total, 665 passersby were recruited into the study at several late-night drinking locations near a large university campus. After answering questions regarding personal demographics and APBC, participants were administered a breath alcohol test (Lifeloc FC-20; ±.005mL/L). The average BAC of drinking participants was .096mL/L. A latent class analysis (LCA) was performed to classify participants based on APBC responses. Three classes emerged: high PBC, high controllability, and low controllability. Class membership varied as a function of gender and Greek-life membership. Blood alcohol content was a significant predictor of class membership. Results show a link between alcohol consumption and APBC that varies based on gender and Greek-life status. These findings are discussed with regard to their implications for a variety of prevention interventions.

  13. Perancangan Autonomous Landing pada Quadcopter Menggunakan Behavior-Based Intelligent Fuzzy Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalidia Nurin Hamdani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Quadcopter adalah salah satu platform unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV yang saat ini banyak diriset karena kemampuannya melakukan take-off dan landing secara vertikal. Karena menggunakan 4 motor brushless sebagai penggerak utama, quadcopter memiliki kompleksitas yang cukup tinggi baik dalam pemodelan maupun pengendalian. Landing merupakan salah satu mekanisme pada quadcopter yang membutuhkan kecepatan yang akurat dan aman dengan tetap mempertahankan keseimbangan. Pada penelitian ini, penulis menggunakan Behavior-Based Intelligent Fuzzy Control (BBIFC sebagai dasar kontrol untuk penerapan autonomous landing pada quadcopter. BBIFC adalah salah satu skema high-level control di mana desain kontrol terdiri dari beberapa layer. Ada 2 layer yang digunakan pada penelitian ini yaitu layer untuk pengendalian sudut pitch, roll, yaw dan layer untuk pengendalian ketinggian. Setiap layer memiliki mekanisme kontrol yang berbeda yang didesain menggunakan Intelligent Fuzzy Controller dan kontroler PID. Dengan metode ini dihasilkan algoritma untuk mekanisme safe autonomous landing dengan mengikuti sinyal eksponensial di mana quadcopter mencapai titik 0 (nol meter dalam waktu 15 detik dan Kontroler PID dapat mengendalikan keseimbangan quadcopter dalam waktu 7.97 detik untuk roll dan pitch serta 1.25 detik untuk yaw sejak gangguan sudut diberikan.

  14. The strain-controlled fatigue behavior and modeling of Haynes HASTELLOY C-2000 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniels, R.L., E-mail: rmcdanie@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); Chen, L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110023 (China); Steward, R.; Liaw, P.K.; Buchanan, R.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); White, Steve; Liaw, Kevin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, TN 37996-2200 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110023 (China); Haynes International, Inc., 1020 West Park Avenue, P.O. Box 9013, Kokomo, IN 46904-9013 (United States); Klarstrom, D.L. [Haynes International, Inc., 1020 West Park Avenue, P.O. Box 9013, Kokomo, IN 46904-9013 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted at temperatures of 24 deg. C, 204 deg. C, and 427 deg. C. {yields} Metallographic and fractographic characterization was performed. {yields} Coffin-Manson and Holloman curves were generated. {yields} A strain energy theoretical life prediction model was introduced. - Abstract: The strain-controlled fatigue behavior of the new nickel-chromium-molybdenum superalloy, HASTELLOY C-2000 was investigated. Low-cycle fatigue specimens were tested in strain-controlled fatigue conditions under axial strain range control at 24 deg. C, 204 deg. C and 427 deg. C. The results indicated that at total strain ranges below 0.8%, temperature does not significantly influence fatigue life, whereas at high total strain ranges, there is a significant drop in fatigue life at 427 deg. C. At room temperature and 204 deg. C, the cyclic stress response was cyclic hardening, followed by cyclic stability, cyclic hardening, or cyclic softening, depending on the total strain range. At 427 deg. C, only cyclic hardening was observed. Fractographic and metallographic analyses were also conducted. The strain-life and Holloman relation parameters are calculated. A theoretical model that predicts the life of this alloy under the tested conditions using the plastic strain energy method is also presented. The results of the theoretical model are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Internet-Based Exposure and Behavioral Activation for Complicated Grief and Rumination: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisma, Maarten C; Boelen, Paul A; van den Bout, Jan; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Schut, Henk A W; Lancee, Jaap; Stroebe, Margaret S

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the effectiveness and feasibility of therapist-guided Internet-delivered exposure (EX) and behavioral activation (BA) for complicated grief and rumination. Forty-seven bereaved individuals with elevated levels of complicated grief and grief rumination were randomly assigned to three conditions: EX (N=18), BA (N=17), or a waiting-list (N=12). Treatment groups received 6 homework assignments over 6 to 8weeks. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that EX reduced complicated grief, posttraumatic stress, depression, grief rumination, and brooding levels relative to the control group at posttreatment (d=0.7-1.2). BA lowered complicated grief, posttraumatic stress, and grief rumination levels at posttreatment (d=0.8-0.9). At 3-month follow-up, effects of EX were maintained on complicated grief and grief rumination (d=0.6-1.2), and for BA on complicated grief, posttraumatic stress, and grief rumination (d=0.8-0.9). EX reduced depression more strongly than BA (d=0.6). Completers analyses corroborated results for EX, and partially those for BA, but no group differences were detected. BA suffered from high dropout (59%), relative to EX (33%) and the waiting-list (17%). Feasibility appeared higher for EX than BA. Results supported potential applicability of online exposure but not behavioral activation to decrease complicated grief and rumination. PMID:26520217

  16. A Smartphone Application of Alcohol Resilience Treatment for Behavioral Self-Control Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Fei; Albers, Jörg; Gao, Tian;

    2012-01-01

    High relapse rate is one of the most prominent problems in addiction treatment. Alcohol Resilience Treatment (ART), an alcohol addiction therapy, is based on Cue Exposure Treatment, which has shown promising results in preliminary studies. ART aims at optimizing the core area of relapse prevention......, and intends to improve patients’ capability to withstand craving of alcohol. This method emphasizes the interplay of resilience and resourcefulness. It contains 6 sessions with different topics according to the stage of treatment circuit, and each session consists of 6 steps. Due to the purity and structure...... of the treatment rationale, it is realistic, reasonable and manageable to transform the method into a smartphone application. An ART app in Android system and an accessory of bilateral tactile stimulation were developed and will be used in a study with behavioral self-control training. This paper presents...

  17. Combining Dense Structure From Motion and Visual SLAM in a Behavior-Based Robot Control Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert De Cubber

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a control architecture for an intelligent outdoor mobile robot. This enables the robot to navigate in a complex, natural outdoor environment, relying on only a single on-board camera as sensory input. This is achieved through a twofold analysis of the visual data stream: a dense structure from motion algorithm calculates a depth map of the environment and a visual simultaneous localization and mapping algorithm builds a map of the surroundings using image features. This information enables a behavior-based robot motion and path planner to navigate the robot through the environment. In this paper, we show the theoretical aspects of setting up this architecture.

  18. Measuring Effortful Control Using the Children's Behavior Questionnaire-Very Short Form: Modeling Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer-Grøndahl, Agathe; Nærde, Ane; Ulleberg, Pål; Janson, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Effortful control (EC) is an important concept in the research on self-regulation in children. We tested 2 alternative factor models of EC as measured by the Children's Behavior Questionnaire-Very Short Form (CBQ-VSF; Putnam & Rothbart, 2006 ) in a large sample of preschoolers (N = 1,007): 1 lower order and 1 hierarchical second-order structure. Additionally, convergent and predictive validity of EC as measured by the CBQ-VSF were investigated. The results supported a hierarchical model. Moderate convergent validity of the second-order latent EC factor was found in that it correlated with compliance and observed EC tasks. Both CBQ-VSF EC measures were also negatively correlated with child physical aggression. The results have implications for the measurement, modeling, and interpretation of EC applying the CBQ. PMID:26156045

  19. Precise Control over the Rheological Behavior of Associating Stimuli-Responsive Block Copolymer Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Brassinne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available “Smart” materials have considerably evolved over the last few years for specific applications. They rely on intelligent macromolecules or (supra-molecular motifs to adapt their structure and properties in response to external triggers. Here, a supramolecular stimuli-responsive polymer gel is constructed from heterotelechelic double hydrophilic block copolymers that incorporate thermo-responsive sequences. These macromolecular building units are synthesized via a three-step controlled radical copolymerization and then hierarchically assembled to yield coordination micellar hydrogels. The dynamic mechanical properties of this particular class of materials are studied in shear flow and finely tuned via temperature changes. Notably, rheological experiments show that structurally reinforcing the micellar network nodes leads to precise tuning of the viscoelastic response and yield behavior of the material. Hence, they constitute promising candidates for specific applications, such as mechano-sensors.

  20. Molecular Interaction Control in Diblock Copolymer Blends and Multiblock Copolymers with Opposite Phase Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhan

    2014-03-01

    Here we show how to control molecular interactions via mixing AB and AC diblock copolymers, where one copolymer exhibits upper order-disorder transition and the other does lower disorder-order transition. Linear ABC triblock copolymers possessing both barotropic and baroplastic pairs are also taken into account. A recently developed random-phase approximation (RPA) theory and the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) for general compressible mixtures are used to analyze stability criteria and morphologies for the given systems. It is demonstrated that the copolymer systems can yield a variety of phase behaviors in their temperature and pressure dependence upon proper mixing conditions and compositions, which is caused by the delicate force fields generated in the systems. We acknowledge the financial support from National Research Foundation of Korea and Center for Photofunctional Energy Materials.

  1. Dynamic behavior of Ni80Fe20 nanowires with controlled periodic width modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, L. L.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetization reversal and dynamic behaviors of Ni80Fe20 nanowires (NWs) with controlled periodic width modulation on single and double sides of the wires have been systematically investigated using magneto-optical Kerr effect and broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In contrast with the single resonance mode observed in the homogeneous NWs, the NWs with periodic width modulation display two distinct resonance modes (the fundamental mode at lower frequency and the high frequency mode which is localized in the modulated regions) due to the non-uniform demagnetizing field. An enhancement of the coercive field is observed for the width modulated NWs when compared with homogeneous NWs. We also observed that the high frequency mode and the frequency difference between the two distinct modes are very sensitive to the modulation profile and film thickness. The results obtained from our experimental results agree well with the micromagnetic simulations. The results have potential implications in the design of tunable magnonic filters.

  2. The modification of breathing behavior. Pavlovian and operant control in emotion and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to bring attention to breathing as a behavior that can be modified by means of Pavlovian and operant principles of control. With this aim in mind, this paper (a) reviews a selection of early and recent conditioning studies (Pavlovian and operant paradigms) in respiratory psychophysiology, (b) discusses the bidirectional relationship between breathing and emotion/cognition, and (c) discusses theoretical and applied implications that point to new directions for research in the laboratory and clinic. Emphasis is placed on dyspnea/suffocation fear and the acquisition of anticipatory dyspnea/suffocation fear in panic, anxiety, and stress disorders and their concomitant cognitive deficits. Discussions throughout the article focus on research relevant to theory and application, especially applications in programs of remedial breathing (breathing retraining) designed for the treatment of psychophysiological disorders (e.g., panic, anxiety, and stress) and the accompanying cognitive deficits that result from cerebral hypoxia induced by conditioned hyperventilation.

  3. Study of water intakes for oncomelania control based on information of oncomelania behavior and CFD results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease. They propagate in the Yangtze River valley of Chi-na. The spread of the disease is solely through a middle-agent named oncomelania, so the spread ofschistosomiasis by oncomelania can be controlled by properly designing water intakes which preventoncomelania from entering the farming land or residential areas. In this paper, a successful design pro-cess is reported and a new oncomelania-free intake device is demonstrated in the laboratory. The de-sign of the new intake is based on a sound research program in which an extensive experimental stud-ies have been carried out to gain knowledge of oncomelania eco-hydraulic behaviors and a detailed flowfield information is obtained through CFD simulation.

  4. Controlling and maximizing effective thermal properties by manipulating transient behaviors during energy-system cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Z J; Merlitz, H; Pagni, P J; Chen, Z

    2014-01-01

    Transient processes generally constitute part of energy-system cycles. If skillfully manipulated, they actually are capable of assisting systems to behave beneficially to suit designers' needs. In the present study, behaviors related to both thermal conductivities ($\\kappa$) and heat capacities ($c_{v}$) are analyzed. Along with solutions of the temperature and the flow velocity obtained by means of theories and simulations, three findings are reported herein: $(1)$ effective $\\kappa$ and effective $c_{v}$ can be controlled to vary from their intrinsic material-property values to a few orders of magnitude larger; $(2)$ a parameter, tentatively named as "nonlinear thermal bias", is identified and can be used as a criterion in estimating energies transferred into the system during heating processes and effective operating ranges of system temperatures; $(3)$ When a body of water, such as the immense ocean, is subject to the boundary condition of cold bottom and hot top, it may be feasible to manipulate transien...

  5. The dampening effect of employees' future orientation on cyberloafing behaviors: the mediating role of self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heyun; Zhao, Huanhuan; Liu, Jingxuan; Xu, Yan; Lu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on reducing employees' cyberloafing behaviors have primarily examined the external control factors but seldomly taken individual internal subjective factors into consideration. Future orientation, an important individual factor, is defined as the extent to which one plans for future time and considers future consequences of one's current behavior. To explore further whether and how employees' future orientation can dampen their cyberloafing behaviors, two studies were conducted to examine the relationship between employees' future orientation and cyberloafing behaviors. The mediation effect of employees' objective and subjective self-control between them was also examined. In Study 1, a set of questionnaires was completed, and the results revealed that the relationship between employees' future orientation and cyberloafing behaviors was negative, and objective self-control mediated the relationship. Next, we conducted a priming experiment (Study 2) to examine the causal relationship and psychological mechanism between employees' future orientation and cyberloafing behaviors. The results demonstrated that employees' future-orientation dampened their attitudes and intentions to engage in cyberloafing, and subjective self-control mediated this dampening effect. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are also discussed.

  6. Increasing Nonsedentary Behaviors in University Students Using Text Messages: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapavessis, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Background Sedentary behavior (SB) has been linked to many health problems such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Increasing the length and frequency of breaks from sitting and increasing the time spent standing and engaged in light and moderate physical activity are ways to decrease SB. Text message-based interventions have succeeded in aiding smoking cessation and increase both physical activity and healthy eating, but they have not been shown to reduce SB. Objective The primary purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of a text message-based intervention in increasing nonsedentary behaviors in university students. A secondary purpose was to (1) determine whether the intervention could enhance self-efficacy beliefs for decreasing SB and (2) whether these efficacious beliefs could predict actual SB. Methods Eighty-two university students were recruited via mass emails and randomized into intervention (SB-related text messages) or control (text messages unrelated to SB) groups. Participants received daily text messages scheduled by the researcher encouraging breaks from sitting, standing, light- and moderate-intensity physical activity (PA). They then reported various SBs via Web-based questionnaires at four time points (baseline, 2, 4, and 6 weeks). Self-efficacious beliefs toward taking breaks from sitting and decreasing the amount of time spent sitting were assessed at the same time points. Results Last observation carried forward (LOCF) method was used for incomplete data as an intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis (intervention group n=15, control group n=11). Small-to-moderate effects favoring the text intervention group were found at 6 weeks for break frequency -14.64 minutes, break length +.59 minutes, standing +24.30 min/day, light-intensity +74.34 min/day, and moderate-intensity + 9.97 min/day PA. Only light-intensity PA approached significance (P=.07). Self-efficacy beliefs also favored the text intervention group and reached

  7. Attitudes and behavioral response toward key tobacco control measures from the FCTC among Chinese urban residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fuzhong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chinese National People's Congress ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC on 27 August 2005, signaling China's commitment to implement tobacco control policies and legislation consistent with the treaty. This study was designed to examine attitudes towards four WHO FCTC measures among Chinese urban residents. Methods In a cross-sectional design study, survey data were collected from two Chinese urban cities involving a sample of 3,003 residents aged 15 years or older. Through a face-to-face interview, respondents were asked about attitudes toward four tobacco control measures developed by the WHO FCTC. Data on the four dependent measures were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression analyses. Using descriptive statistics, potential change in smoking behavior that smokers might make in response to increasing cigarette prices is also reported. Results 81.8% of the respondents in the study sample supported banning smoking in public places, 68.8% favored increasing the cigarette tax, 85.1% supported health warnings on cigarette packages, and 85.7% favored banning tobacco advertising. The likelihood to support these measures was associated with gender, educational level, and personal income. Smokers were less likely to support these measures than non-smokers, with decreased support expressed by daily smokers compared to occasional smokers, and heavy smokers compared to light smokers. The proportion of switching to cheaper cigarette brands, decreasing smoking, and quitting smoking altogether with increased cigarette prices were 29.1%, 30.90% and 40.0% for occasional smokers, respectively; and 30.8%, 32.7% and 36.5% for daily smokers, respectively. Conclusion Results from this study indicate strong public support in key WHO FCTC measures and that increases in cigarette price may reduce tobacco consumption among Chinese urban residents. Findings from this study have implications with respect to

  8. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-Esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae-Na Choi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents, Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control.

  9. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Glycemic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, S.; Z Tabibi; A Mashhadi; P Eshraghi; F Faroughi; Ahmadi, P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing anxiety and depression and glycemic control in children with type I diabetes. Methods and Matherials: The study was quasi- experimental with a pre-test, post-test design with control group. For this purpose, 30 children with diabetes were selected from Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad. The children were randomly assigned into two experimental group (15) and control group (15)....

  10. Associations between body mass index, weight control concerns and behaviors, and eating disorder symptoms among non-clinical Chinese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaoqi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research with adolescents has shown associations of body weight, weight control concerns and behaviors with eating disorder symptoms, but it is unclear whether these associations are direct or whether a mediating effect exists. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of overweight and obesity, weight control concerns and behaviors, and eating disorder symptoms and to examine the mediating function of weight control concerns and behaviors on the relationship between body mass index (BMI and eating disorder symptoms among non-clinical adolescents in China. Methods A cross-sectional survey among 2019 adolescent girls and 1525 adolescent boys in the 7th, 8th, 10th and 11th grades from seven cities in China was conducted. Information on weight control concerns and behaviors, and eating disorder symptoms (Eating Disorder Inventory-3 were collected from the adolescents using a self-administrated questionnaire. Results Weight control concerns and behaviors, and eating disorder symptoms were prevalent among the study population. A high proportion of adolescents scored at or above the threshold on the eating disorder inventory (EDI subscale such as bulimia, interoceptive deficits, perfectionism, and maturity fears, which indicated eating disorder symptoms. High BMI was significantly associated with high score of drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction, bulimia, low self-esteem, interceptive deficits and maturity fears, so do perceived body weight status. Almost all weight control concerns and behaviors we investigated were significantly associated with high EDI subscale scores. When weight control concerns were added to the model, as shown in the model, the association between BMI and tendency of drive to thinness and bulimia was attenuated but still kept significant. The association between BMI and body dissatisfaction were no further significant. The association of BMI and drive for thinness, body

  11. Low control over palatable food intake in rats is associated with habitual behavior and relapse vulnerability: individual differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes W de Jong

    Full Text Available The worldwide obesity epidemic poses an enormous and growing threat to public health. However, the neurobehavioral mechanisms of overeating and obesity are incompletely understood. It has been proposed that addiction-like processes may underlie certain forms of obesity, in particular those associated with binge eating disorder. To investigate the role of addiction-like processes in obesity, we adapted a model of cocaine addiction-like behavior in rats responding for highly palatable food. Here, we tested whether rats responding for highly palatable chocolate Ensure would come to show three criteria of addiction-like behavior, i.e., high motivation, continued seeking despite signaled non-availability and persistence of seeking despite aversive consequences. We also investigated whether exposure to a binge model (a diet consisting of alternating periods of limited food access and access to highly palatable food, promotes the appearance of food addiction-like behavior. Our data show substantial individual differences in control over palatable food seeking and taking, but no distinct subgroup of animals showing addiction-like behavior could be identified. Instead, we observed a wide range extending from low to very high control over palatable food intake. Exposure to the binge model did not affect control over palatable food seeking and taking, however. Animals that showed low control over palatable food intake (i.e., scored high on the three criteria for addiction-like behavior were less sensitive to devaluation of the food reward and more prone to food-induced reinstatement of extinguished responding, indicating that control over palatable food intake is associated with habitual food intake and vulnerability to relapse. In conclusion, we present an animal model to assess control over food seeking and taking. Since diminished control over food intake is a major factor in the development of obesity, understanding its behavioral and neural

  12. Low control over palatable food intake in rats is associated with habitual behavior and relapse vulnerability: individual differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Johannes W; Meijboom, Karin E; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Adan, Roger A H

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic poses an enormous and growing threat to public health. However, the neurobehavioral mechanisms of overeating and obesity are incompletely understood. It has been proposed that addiction-like processes may underlie certain forms of obesity, in particular those associated with binge eating disorder. To investigate the role of addiction-like processes in obesity, we adapted a model of cocaine addiction-like behavior in rats responding for highly palatable food. Here, we tested whether rats responding for highly palatable chocolate Ensure would come to show three criteria of addiction-like behavior, i.e., high motivation, continued seeking despite signaled non-availability and persistence of seeking despite aversive consequences. We also investigated whether exposure to a binge model (a diet consisting of alternating periods of limited food access and access to highly palatable food), promotes the appearance of food addiction-like behavior. Our data show substantial individual differences in control over palatable food seeking and taking, but no distinct subgroup of animals showing addiction-like behavior could be identified. Instead, we observed a wide range extending from low to very high control over palatable food intake. Exposure to the binge model did not affect control over palatable food seeking and taking, however. Animals that showed low control over palatable food intake (i.e., scored high on the three criteria for addiction-like behavior) were less sensitive to devaluation of the food reward and more prone to food-induced reinstatement of extinguished responding, indicating that control over palatable food intake is associated with habitual food intake and vulnerability to relapse. In conclusion, we present an animal model to assess control over food seeking and taking. Since diminished control over food intake is a major factor in the development of obesity, understanding its behavioral and neural underpinnings may facilitate

  13. Assessment of Substance Abuse Behaviors in Adolescents’: Integration of Self-Control into Extended Parallel Process Model

    OpenAIRE

    de Witte, K.; E Mirzaee; AR Hidarnia; A KAZEMNEJAD; F Shafii; P. Azad Fallah; H Allahverdipour

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: An effective preventive health education program on drug abuse can be delivered by applying behavior change theories in a complementary fashion. Methods: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of integrating self-control into Extended Parallel Process Model in drug substance abuse behaviors. A sample of 189 governmental high school students participated in this survey. Information was collected individually by completing researcher designed questionnaire and a uri...

  14. Antecedents of perceived coach autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors: coach psychological need satisfaction and well-being

    OpenAIRE

    Stebbings, Juliette; Taylor, Ian M; Spray, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Within the self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) framework, research has considered the consequences of coaches’ autonomy supportive and controlling behaviors on various athlete outcomes (e.g., motivation and performance). The antecedents of such behaviors, however, have received little attention. Coaches (N = 443) from a variety of sports and competitive levels completed a self-report questionnaire to assess their psychological need satisfaction, well-being and perceived interperson...

  15. "Behavior, Metabolic Control and Health-related Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients at Bandar Abbas Diabetic Clinic"

    OpenAIRE

    T Aghamollaei; H. Eftekhar; Shojaeizadeh, D; K Mohammad; M Nakhjavani; F Ghofrani Pour

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease of lifelong duration, and its management requires a fundamental change in the patient’s lifestyle. The aims of this study were to determine behaviors of diabetic patients in relation to management of their disease, assess metabolic control and health-related quality of life of them. The target population was type 2 diabetic patients and a cross-sectional approach was used. We studied 80 randomly chosen patients. To determine behaviors of patients, data was collec...

  16. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ae-Na Choi; Myeong Soo Lee; Jung-Sook Lee

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-...

  17. Gender Power Control, Sexual Experiences, Safer Sex Practices, and Potential HIV Risk Behaviors Among Young Asian-American Women

    OpenAIRE

    Hahm, Hyeouk Chris; Lee, Jieha; Rough, Kathryn; Steffanie A Strathdee

    2012-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of three domains of sexual behaviors among young Asian-American women: sexual experiences, safer sex practices, and potential HIV risk behaviors. We also investigated the impact of gender power control on these domains. Among sexually experienced women, 51% reported using condoms during their most recent sex act, 63% reported inconsistent condom use, and 18% reported ever having forced sex. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that women’s perceived lower ...

  18. Subjective State, Blood Pressure, and Behavioral Control Changes Produced by an "Energy Shot"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Stamates, Amy L; Ossege, Julianne; Maloney, Sarah F; Bardgett, Mark E; Brown, Clifford J

    2014-06-01

    Background: Energy drinks and energy shots are popular consumer beverages that are advertised to increase feelings of alertness. Typically, these products include high levels of caffeine, a mild psychostimulant drug. The scientific evidence demonstrating the specific benefits of energy products to users in terms of subjective state and objective performance is surprisingly lacking. Moreover, there are rising health concerns associated with the use of these products. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effects of a popular energy shot (5-Hour Energy(®)) on subjective and objective measures that were assessed hourly for 6 hours following consumption. Methods: Participants (n=14) completed a three-session study where they received the energy shot, a placebo control, and no drink. Following dose administration, participants completed subjective Profile of Mood States ratings hourly for 6 hours. Participants also repeatedly completed a behavioral control task (the cued go/no-go task) and provided blood pressure and pulse rate readings at each hour. Results: Consumption of the energy shot did improve subjective state, as measured by increased ratings of vigor and decreased ratings of fatigue. However, the energy shot did not alter objective performance, which worsened over time. Importantly, the energy shot elevated both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusions: Consumption of one energy shot may only result in modest benefits to subjective state. Individuals with preexisting hypertension or other medical conditions should be cautious about using these new consumer products.

  19. Using a digital game for training desirable behavior in cognitive-behavioral therapy of burnout syndrome: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielhorst, Thomas; van den Brule, Daphne; Visch, Valentijn; Melles, Marijke; van Tienhoven, Sam; Sinkbaek, Helle; Schrieken, Bart; Tan, Eduard S-H; Lange, Alfred

    2015-02-01

    Burnout is a globally increasing illness, and as a result, many forms of burnout therapy have arisen. The use of digital games can be psychotherapeutically effective because they can transform exercises that are by themselves unattractive into intrinsically motivated action. This pilot study aims to test whether a specially designed game contributes to patients learning desired behavior and achieving other specific therapeutic goals in an online cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT)-based burnout treatment context. In total, 101 participants took part in the experiment, under four conditions: (a) Game+Therapy, (b) Therapy Only, (c) Game Only, and (d) No Game+No Therapy. Pre- and postmeasures were taken online. Results showed that the two therapy conditions (Game+Therapy and Therapy Only) showed a greater decrease in complaints and disengagement, and a stronger increase in coping skills than the nontherapy conditions (Game Only and No Game+No Therapy). As expected, the Game+Therapy condition outperformed the Therapy Only condition on combined improvement measures of burnout symptoms. However, analyses of individual measures showed no effects. It can be cautiously concluded that the therapeutic digital game may be a useful tool when embedded in a therapeutic burnout treatment program and is probably more efficient than CBT, as it is used in current practice. PMID:25684611

  20. Examination of an antecedent communication intervention to reduce tangibly maintained challenging behavior: A controlled analog analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Reilly, M.F.; Fragale, C.; Gainey, S.; Kang, S.Y.; Koch, H.; Shubert, J.; El Zein, F.; Longino, D.; Chung, M.; Xu, Z.W.; White, P.J.; Lang, R.; Davis, T.; Rispoli, M.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.; Healy, O.; Kagohara, D.; Meer, L. van der; Sigafoos, J.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the influence of an antecedent communication intervention on challenging behavior for three students with developmental disorders. Students were taught to request tangible items that were identified as reinforcers for challenging behavior in a prior functional analysis. individual partic

  1. Controlled buckling behavior of patterned oxide structures on compliant substrates for flexible optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejitual, T.S.; Morris, N.J.; Cairns, D.R.; Sierros, K.A., E-mail: kostas.sierros@mail.wvu.edu

    2013-12-31

    There is currently a great interest to design and fabricate novel flexible devices for solar cell, solid-state lighting, biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Such devices require the use of electrode components. Desired electrodes must exhibit structural integrity, low electrical resistivity and, in most cases, high optical transparency in the visible range. Despite growing efforts to replace them, transparent conducting oxide layers deposited on polymer substrates are still enjoying a dominant role as the electrode component. This is because of their excellent combination of electrical and optical properties. However, their performance when they are subjected to externally-applied mechanical stresses is limited. Such performance has been extensively investigated for the case of continuous brittle oxide films on polymer substrates. However, there is relatively little work reported to date on the mechanical behavior of patterned conducting layers on compliant substrates. In this study we report on the mechanical behavior of various patterned indium tin oxide shapes and sizes on polyethylene terephthalate. Micron-sized shapes include squares, circles, and zigzag-based structures. Controlled buckling experiments are performed in-situ using an optical microscope in order to monitor critical strains and potential failure mechanisms. In addition, ITO electrical resistance changes are continuously monitored during deformation. Furthermore, ex-situ characterization of the tested surfaces using scanning electron microscopy is conducted. Higher crack onset values are observed for the smaller size patterns. Also, square-shaped patterns are found to exhibit the lowest crack onset values. SEM observations suggest cracking-driven and buckling-driven delamination during ITO tensile and compressive buckling mode respectively. In both cases, failure is observed to initiate from the pattern edges. - Highlights: • In-situ experimental analysis of various patterned shapes

  2. Personality Factors Predicting Smartphone Addiction Predisposition: Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems, Impulsivity, and Self-Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yejin; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Cho, Hyun; Jung, Dong-Jin; Kwak, Minjung; Rho, Mi Jung; Yu, Hwanjo; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choi, In Young

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify personality factor-associated predictors of smartphone addiction predisposition (SAP). Participants were 2,573 men and 2,281 women (n = 4,854) aged 20-49 years (Mean ± SD: 33.47 ± 7.52); participants completed the following questionnaires: the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale (K-SAPS) for adults, the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System questionnaire (BIS/BAS), the Dickman Dysfunctional Impulsivity Instrument (DDII), and the Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS). In addition, participants reported their demographic information and smartphone usage pattern (weekday or weekend average usage hours and main use). We analyzed the data in three steps: (1) identifying predictors with logistic regression, (2) deriving causal relationships between SAP and its predictors using a Bayesian belief network (BN), and (3) computing optimal cut-off points for the identified predictors using the Youden index. Identified predictors of SAP were as follows: gender (female), weekend average usage hours, and scores on BAS-Drive, BAS-Reward Responsiveness, DDII, and BSCS. Female gender and scores on BAS-Drive and BSCS directly increased SAP. BAS-Reward Responsiveness and DDII indirectly increased SAP. We found that SAP was defined with maximal sensitivity as follows: weekend average usage hours > 4.45, BAS-Drive > 10.0, BAS-Reward Responsiveness > 13.8, DDII > 4.5, and BSCS > 37.4. This study raises the possibility that personality factors contribute to SAP. And, we calculated cut-off points for key predictors. These findings may assist clinicians screening for SAP using cut-off points, and further the understanding of SA risk factors. PMID:27533112

  3. Controlled buckling behavior of patterned oxide structures on compliant substrates for flexible optoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is currently a great interest to design and fabricate novel flexible devices for solar cell, solid-state lighting, biomedical and energy harvesting applications. Such devices require the use of electrode components. Desired electrodes must exhibit structural integrity, low electrical resistivity and, in most cases, high optical transparency in the visible range. Despite growing efforts to replace them, transparent conducting oxide layers deposited on polymer substrates are still enjoying a dominant role as the electrode component. This is because of their excellent combination of electrical and optical properties. However, their performance when they are subjected to externally-applied mechanical stresses is limited. Such performance has been extensively investigated for the case of continuous brittle oxide films on polymer substrates. However, there is relatively little work reported to date on the mechanical behavior of patterned conducting layers on compliant substrates. In this study we report on the mechanical behavior of various patterned indium tin oxide shapes and sizes on polyethylene terephthalate. Micron-sized shapes include squares, circles, and zigzag-based structures. Controlled buckling experiments are performed in-situ using an optical microscope in order to monitor critical strains and potential failure mechanisms. In addition, ITO electrical resistance changes are continuously monitored during deformation. Furthermore, ex-situ characterization of the tested surfaces using scanning electron microscopy is conducted. Higher crack onset values are observed for the smaller size patterns. Also, square-shaped patterns are found to exhibit the lowest crack onset values. SEM observations suggest cracking-driven and buckling-driven delamination during ITO tensile and compressive buckling mode respectively. In both cases, failure is observed to initiate from the pattern edges. - Highlights: • In-situ experimental analysis of various patterned shapes

  4. Personality Factors Predicting Smartphone Addiction Predisposition: Behavioral Inhibition and Activation Systems, Impulsivity, and Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun; Jung, Dong-Jin; Kwak, Minjung; Rho, Mi Jung; Yu, Hwanjo; Kim, Dai-Jin; Choi, In Young

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify personality factor-associated predictors of smartphone addiction predisposition (SAP). Participants were 2,573 men and 2,281 women (n = 4,854) aged 20–49 years (Mean ± SD: 33.47 ± 7.52); participants completed the following questionnaires: the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale (K-SAPS) for adults, the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System questionnaire (BIS/BAS), the Dickman Dysfunctional Impulsivity Instrument (DDII), and the Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS). In addition, participants reported their demographic information and smartphone usage pattern (weekday or weekend average usage hours and main use). We analyzed the data in three steps: (1) identifying predictors with logistic regression, (2) deriving causal relationships between SAP and its predictors using a Bayesian belief network (BN), and (3) computing optimal cut-off points for the identified predictors using the Youden index. Identified predictors of SAP were as follows: gender (female), weekend average usage hours, and scores on BAS-Drive, BAS-Reward Responsiveness, DDII, and BSCS. Female gender and scores on BAS-Drive and BSCS directly increased SAP. BAS-Reward Responsiveness and DDII indirectly increased SAP. We found that SAP was defined with maximal sensitivity as follows: weekend average usage hours > 4.45, BAS-Drive > 10.0, BAS-Reward Responsiveness > 13.8, DDII > 4.5, and BSCS > 37.4. This study raises the possibility that personality factors contribute to SAP. And, we calculated cut-off points for key predictors. These findings may assist clinicians screening for SAP using cut-off points, and further the understanding of SA risk factors. PMID:27533112

  5. Bridging the gap between intentions and behavior: Implementation intentions, action control, and procrastination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.J. van Hooft (Edwin); M.Ph. Born (Marise); T.W. Taris (Toon); H. van der Flier (Henk); R.W.B. Blonk (Roland)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn the context of Ajzen’s (1991) theory of planned behavior, the antecedents of intentions are better understood than the antecedents of behavior. The current study aimed to improve the understanding of the transition from intentions to behavior. Based on the work of Gollwitzer (1993), K

  6. Control of male sexual behavior in Drosophila by the sex determination pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Billeter, Jean-Christophe; Rideout, Elizabeth J; Dornan, Anthony J; Goodwin, Stephen F

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how genes influence behavior, including sexuality, is one of biology's greatest challenges. Much of the recent progress in understanding how single genes can influence behavior has come from the study of innate behaviors in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In particular, the elab

  7. Bridging the Gap between Intentions and Behavior: Implementation Intentions, Action Control, and Procrastination

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, Edwin A. J.; Born, Marise Ph.; Taris, Toon W.; van der Flier, Henk; Blonk, Roland W. B.

    2005-01-01

    In the context of Ajzen's (1991) theory of planned behavior, the antecedents of intentions are better understood than the antecedents of behavior. The current study aimed to improve the understanding of the transition from intentions to behavior. Based on the work of Gollwitzer (1993), Kuhl and Beckmann (1994), and Lay (1986) we proposed a model…

  8. Does Observed Controlling Teaching Behavior Relate to Students' Motivation in Physical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, Jotie; Tallir, Isabel B.; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Aelterman, Nathalie; Van den Berghe, Lynn; Speleers, Lise; Haerens, Leen

    2014-01-01

    Self-determination theory (SDT) has served as a theoretical framework for considerable research on teaching behavior and student motivation. The majority of studies have focused on need-supportive teaching behavior at the expense of need-thwarting teaching behavior (i.e., the "dark side" of teaching). The goal of the present study was to…

  9. Recent Developments in Soviet Research on the Verbal Control of Voluntary Motor Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Larry

    The study of verbal behavior has a long history in the Soviet Union, and some of the studies, especially those related to verbal conditioning and learning, have had considerable impact on Western research, particularly in the United States. The view set forth in this paper is that "voluntary behavior" is only that behavior which is verbally…

  10. Prefrontal lobotomy on Evita was done for behavior/personality modification, not just for pain control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijensohn, Daniel E

    2015-07-01

    Eva Perón, best known as Evita, underwent a prefrontal lobotomy in 1952. Although the procedure was said to have been performed to relieve the pain of metastatic cancer, the author carried out a search for evidence that suggests that the procedure was prescribed to decrease violence and to modify Evita's behavior and personality, and not just for pain control. To further elucidate the circumstances surrounding the treatment of this well-known historic figure, the author reviewed the development of the procedure known as prefrontal lobotomy and its three main indications: management of psychiatric illness, control of intractable pain from terminal cancer, and mind control and behavior/personality modification. The role of pioneering neurosurgeons in the development of prefrontal lobotomy, particularly in Connecticut and at Yale University, was also studied, and the political and historical conditions in Argentina in 1952 and to the present were analyzed. Evita was the wife of Juan Perón, who was the supreme leader of the Peronist party as well as president of Argentina. In 1952, however, the Peronist government in Argentina was bicephalic because Evita led the left wing of the party and ran the Female Peronist Party and the Eva Perón Foundation. She was followed by a group of hardcore loyalists interested in accelerating the revolution. Evita was also suffering from metastatic cervical cancer, and her illness increased her anxiety and moved her to purchase weapons to start training workers' militias. Although the apparent purpose was to fight her husband's enemies, this was done without his knowledge. She delivered fiery political speeches and wrote incendiary documents that would have led to a fierce clash in the country at that time. Notwithstanding the disreputable connotation of conspiracy theories, evidence was found of a potentially sinister political conspiracy, led by General Perón, to quiet down his wife Evita and modify her behavior/personality to

  11. In vivo delta opioid receptor internalization controls behavioral effects of agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amynah A A Pradhan

    agonists produce distinct active receptor conformations in vivo which likely lead to differential receptor trafficking. CONCLUSIONS: Together our data show that delta agonists retain full analgesic efficacy when receptors remain on the cell surface. In contrast, delta agonist-induced analgesia is abolished following receptor internalization, and complete behavioral desensitization is observed. Overall these results establish that, in the context of pain control, receptor localization fully controls receptor function in vivo. This finding has both fundamental and therapeutic implications for slow-recycling GPCRs.

  12. Behavioral Problems in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Controlled Study to Examine the Risk of Psychopathology in a Chronic Pediatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanara, Elham; Raeeskarami, Seyed-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are prone to the problems that can delay their psychosocial development; however, the existing literature has not reached a consensus on the psychological problems related to JIA. A total of 51 children and adolescents with JIA and 75 healthy controls aged 6 to 18 years were examined using the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). Our results represented that 70 percent of JIA group reached “borderline clinical” range or “clinical” range in internalizing problems, while this percentage in the control group was 18 percent. In addition, our results indicated that JIA group has gotten significantly higher scores (more than twofold) in externalizing behaviors compared to control group. Furthermore, children with JIA showed higher rate of anxiety/depression, withdrawal/depression, somatic complaints, rule breaking behaviors, and aggressive behaviors as well as thought and social problems compared to control group (p < 0.001). As a conclusion, children and adolescents with JIA compared to healthy controls may show higher rate of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, our novel findings on externalizing, social, and thought problems in JIA warrant further investigation on affected children who may be at greater risk of future psychopathologies. PMID:27656678

  13. Behavioral Problems in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Controlled Study to Examine the Risk of Psychopathology in a Chronic Pediatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanara, Elham; Raeeskarami, Seyed-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are prone to the problems that can delay their psychosocial development; however, the existing literature has not reached a consensus on the psychological problems related to JIA. A total of 51 children and adolescents with JIA and 75 healthy controls aged 6 to 18 years were examined using the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL). Our results represented that 70 percent of JIA group reached “borderline clinical” range or “clinical” range in internalizing problems, while this percentage in the control group was 18 percent. In addition, our results indicated that JIA group has gotten significantly higher scores (more than twofold) in externalizing behaviors compared to control group. Furthermore, children with JIA showed higher rate of anxiety/depression, withdrawal/depression, somatic complaints, rule breaking behaviors, and aggressive behaviors as well as thought and social problems compared to control group (p < 0.001). As a conclusion, children and adolescents with JIA compared to healthy controls may show higher rate of both internalizing and externalizing problems. Furthermore, our novel findings on externalizing, social, and thought problems in JIA warrant further investigation on affected children who may be at greater risk of future psychopathologies.

  14. Luria's Model of the Verbal Control of Behavior. Study F: Motivational and Control in the Development of Language Functions, D. Birch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiswenger, Hugo

    A. R. Luria, in his conception of the verbal control of behavior, regards four fundamental and distinctive functional attributes of the human speech system as making up a signaling system that humans alone possess: (1) the nominative role of language, (2) the generalizing or semantic role, (3) the communicative role, and (4) the role of…

  15. A randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy and sertraline versus a wait-list control group for anxiety disorders in older adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, J.; Comijs, H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.; Gundy, C.M.; Weijnen, I.J.C.; Hout, van M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study is the first to investigate the relative effectiveness of cognitive? behavioral therapy (CBT) compared with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI; sertraline) in a randomized, controlled trial on the treatment of anxiety disorders in older adults. Method: Eighty-four p

  16. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Anxiety, Depression and Glycemic Control in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Ahmadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of group cognitive behavioral therapy in reducing anxiety and depression and glycemic control in children with type I diabetes. Methods and Matherials: The study was quasi- experimental with a pre-test, post-test design with control group. For this purpose, 30 children with diabetes were selected from Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad. The children were randomly assigned into two experimental group (15 and control group (15. The experimental group was undergone eight 2-hour sessions of cognitive-behavioral training. Before and after the intervention, the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children, which included four components of social anxiety, physical symptoms, harm avoidance, and separation anxiety, and Children Depression Inventory was administrated in both groups. Results: The findings from the covariance analysis test revealed that depression and anxiety and glycemic control in experimental group was controlled at post-test and depression score in experimental group compared to the control group at post-test was decreased. The findings from the multivariate covariance analysis test between components of, physical symptoms, harm avoidance, separation anxiety, and social anxiety revealed meaningful differences between the two groups in social anxiety post-test score. Conclusions: According to the article, cognitive behavior therapy can be effective for depression, anxiety, and blood sugar control in children.

  17. Feeding behavior and dietary intake of male children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Kamila; Faccioli, Larissa Slongo; Baronio, Diego; Gottfried, Carmem; Perry, Ingrid Schweigert; Riesgo, Rudimar

    2016-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with restrictive or repetitive behaviors and difficulties with verbal and interpersonal communication, in which some problems involving nutrition may be present. This study aims to evaluate dietary intake and identify feeding behavioral problems in male children and adolescents with ASD when compared to matched controls, as well as parents or caregivers' feelings about strategies for dealing with eating problems. A 3-day food record was performed and nutrient intake was compared to the Dietary Reference Intake according to age. To evaluate children feeding behavior and parents or caregivers' feelings, the Behavior Pediatrics Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFA) was used. ASD patients consumed in average more calories than controls (though with a high patient's frequency above and below calorie range references), had a limited food repertoire, high prevalence of children with inadequate calcium, sodium, iron vitamin B5, folate, and vitamin C intake. BPFA scores were also higher in the ASD group when compared to controls for all frequencies (child behavior, parents and total). These findings lead us to endorse the importance of evaluating feeding problems in the clinical routine, considering also the singular features of the patients.

  18. Ecology matters: Neighborhood differences in the protective role of self-control and social support for adolescent antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sara; Donlan, Alice E; McDermott, Elana R; Zaff, Jonathan F

    2015-11-01

    Adolescence can be characterized as a time when aggression, delinquency, and violence (taken together as antisocial behavior) increase. Adolescents who engage in antisocial behavior increase local crime and can create unsafe conditions for families. Understanding the protective factors that mitigate antisocial behavior can help to inform prevention practices. Using data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (n = 1,072, 51.40% female, 39.18% Hispanic, 32.28% Black), we examined how self-control, social support, and neighborhood characteristics were associated with these behaviors. Using latent profile analyses, we categorized neighborhoods based on several dimensions, including violence, disadvantage, and collective efficacy. Then, we examined how self-control and social support were associated with antisocial behavior within and across neighborhoods. Results suggested that self-control was a protective feature in only some types of disadvantaged and dangerous neighborhoods. We discuss findings in terms of implications for programs and policies to mitigate youth violence and delinquency. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26594922

  19. Control and support models of help-seeking behavior in women experiencing domestic violence in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatro, Meerambika; Gupta, R N; Gupta, Vinay K

    2014-01-01

    In India, there is limited prioritization of domestic violence, which is seen as a private and family matter, and handled as a social responsibility rather than a complaint or crime. Despite the Domestic Violence Act, implemented in 2006, the widespread phenomenon of domestic violence across Indian states goes unreported. Using control and support models, this article aims to examine women's behavior in seeking help while dealing with partner violence. It is a population-based analytical cross-sectional study covering 14,507 married women from 18 states of India, selected through a systematic multistage sampling strategy. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were used to generate data. It was observed that legal complexities combined with social realities make the life of an average Indian woman insecure and miserable. Most women surveyed preferred the social-support model and opined that if they face domestic violence, they would seek help from their parents as the first option in the order of preference. The responses of women while dealing with domestic violence are often spontaneous and determined by the pressing need to resolve matters within the home/community, rather than addressing them in the public domain of state institutions where procedures are cumbersome and lengthy. A new integrated development model proposed by several communities aims to prevent domestic violence through the intervention of health care systems. PMID:25069150

  20. Eating attitudes, weight control behaviors and risk factors for eating disorders among Chinese female dance students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuoli Tao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Along with the economic development, eating disorders begin to appear in China. In this context, we study potential risks for eating disorders. Methods: 1,199 Chinese students, aged 12-25 years, were randomly selected in spring 2006 from a survey with a series of scales (EAT-26, EDI that were used as a screening examination for eating attitudes, weight control behaviors and risk factors. Among them were 31 female Chinese dance students. The dancer students were compared with the female high risk group of eating disorders (EAT ≥ 20 and the female low risk group (EAT 0-9 according to their scores on EAT-26 and EDI. Results: There were just 3 dancers (10% with scores on the EAT-26 who were over the cut-off point of 20 for high risk of an eating disorder. The dance group also showed significantly higher scores than the low risk group (EAT 0-9 not only on the subscales Dieting, and EAT-26 total scores on the EAT-26, but also on the subscales Perfectionism and Maturity Fears on the EDI. Conclusions: Among the group of female Chinese dance students, most participants did not show a high risk for eating disorders and their high scores on some subscales on the EAT-26 and EDI could be caused by their occupation.

  1. Control of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas by means of a bifurcation behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tearing modes are known to affect tokamak performances. The evolution and saturation of the associated magnetic islands seem in reasonable agreement with the predictions of the so-called neoclassical ∇p-driven tearing mode model. However, the latter does not predict any threshold condition. This is in contradiction with experiment, since any mode should be unstable in the absence of a threshold condition, while only few are indeed observed, indicating the lack of a stabilizing contribution in the analysis. Two mechanisms have recently been proposed that could remove this discrepancy: (1) the destabilizing bootstrap current contribution is found to be reduced when longitudinal and transverse diffusivities are properly taken into account, preventing electron pressure to equilibrate upon perturbed magnetic surfaces, so that the required pressure flattening inside the island does not occur for small perturbations; (2) ion polarization drift effects provide a stabilizing contribution, potentially dominant for island width of the order of the ion Larmor radius (but rapidly decreasing with growing islands). These mechanisms provide the previously missing threshold condition: an island can grow if only its width w overcomes a critical value wcrit, controlled by a single parameter C. In addition, the dependence of wcrit with respect to C exhibits a bifurcation behavior: for C less than a bifurcation value Cbif the threshold wcrit is infinity. Various scenarii are proposed that could be tested experimentally

  2. A soldier suffering from PTSD, treated by controlled stress exposition using virtual reality and behavioral training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworus, Radosław; Szymanska, Sylwia; Ilnicki, Stanisław

    2010-02-01

    This article presents a case of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a 30-year-old soldier of the Polish Military Contingent in Iraq who narrowly escaped death three times. The first time occurred when during a change of guard he was unintentionally shot by his colleague. The projectile penetrated the victim's helmet, slid along its internal shell curvature, and left the shell causing only a scratch on the scalp skin. Another traumatic event was experienced by the soldier a month after the first incident. As a guard of honor, he was "shot" in the same rear head area with a cap of a cream tube, inadvertently stepped on by a colleague. The third event occurred a couple of days later, during a rocket attack on the Diwaniyah base. After this incident the soldier was evacuated to the Clinic of Psychiatry and Combat Stress in Warsaw. Multiform PTSDs that developed in this soldier are described in this work. The course of his comprehensive therapy during his two stays, with a total duration of 8 months, in the clinic is discussed. Also, a detailed description of the therapy controlled exposition to combat stressors in virtual reality (VR), supplemented with behavioral training consisting of desensitization of an aversive reaction to contact with a weapon at a shooting range is presented. The comprehensive treatment activities resulted in full remission of the PTSD symptoms. The soldier continues his service in a logistic support unit.

  3. Molecular bioelectricity: how endogenous voltage potentials control cell behavior and instruct pattern regulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    In addition to biochemical gradients and transcriptional networks, cell behavior is regulated by endogenous bioelectrical cues originating in the activity of ion channels and pumps, operating in a wide variety of cell types. Instructive signals mediated by changes in resting potential control proliferation, differentiation, cell shape, and apoptosis of stem, progenitor, and somatic cells. Of importance, however, cells are regulated not only by their own Vmem but also by the Vmem of their neighbors, forming networks via electrical synapses known as gap junctions. Spatiotemporal changes in Vmem distribution among nonneural somatic tissues regulate pattern formation and serve as signals that trigger limb regeneration, induce eye formation, set polarity of whole-body anatomical axes, and orchestrate craniofacial patterning. New tools for tracking and functionally altering Vmem gradients in vivo have identified novel roles for bioelectrical signaling and revealed the molecular pathways by which Vmem changes are transduced into cascades of downstream gene expression. Because channels and gap junctions are gated posttranslationally, bioelectrical networks have their own characteristic dynamics that do not reduce to molecular profiling of channel expression (although they couple functionally to transcriptional networks). The recent data provide an exciting opportunity to crack the bioelectric code, and learn to program cellular activity at the level of organs, not only cell types. The understanding of how patterning information is encoded in bioelectrical networks, which may require concepts from computational neuroscience, will have transformative implications for embryogenesis, regeneration, cancer, and synthetic bioengineering. PMID:25425556

  4. Medium to long term behavior of MR dampers for structural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caterino, N.; Azmoodeh, B. M.; Occhiuzzi, A.

    2014-10-01

    The medium to long term behavior of a prototype magnetorheological (MR) damper for structural control of earthquake induced vibrations is investigated herein. Unlike some applications for which MR devices experience frequent dynamic loads, seismic dampers might not be used for most of their life, staying dormant for a long period until an earthquake hits the hosting structure. This work aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a MR damper after years of inactivity. A MR device has been tested twice, first in 2008 and then in 2013, after five years of absolute inactivity. The comparison between the results of the two tests is made in terms of force-displacement loops. It is shown that, after a 5-year rest, only part of the first stroke of the damper is characterized by an unexpected response of the damper. After half a stroke, the damper quickly returned to behave like in 2008, even if a slight non-reversible decrease of the reacting force has been recorded. The latter is found to be more evident (5-7%) for larger currents, less visible in the case of zero magnetic field. From the point of view of civil engineering, this decay of performance is definitely acceptable, being largely bounded within the limits of the uncertainties typically involved and taken into account in the structural design. Finally, starting from a literature review, the paper discusses the possible causes of the observed changes in the mechanical response of the damper over time.

  5. Evaluating the effect of Focus Farms on Ontario dairy producers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward control of Johne's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, S M; Jones-Bitton, A; Meehan, M; Von Massow, M; Kelton, D F

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated a participatory-based, experiential learning program, Ontario Focus Farms (FF), which aimed to change dairy producer behavior to control Johne's disease (JD) in Ontario, Canada. The goals were to (1) assess the effect of FF on participating dairy producers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior with regard to JD control; (2) compare changes in these factors among FF participants to changes among a group of nonparticipating dairy producers; and (3) describe the characteristics of producers who made at least one on-farm management change. Pre- and post-FF intervention questionnaires collected data on respondents' knowledge, attitudes, behavior, herd production, and demographic information; before and after JD-risk assessments were used to assess respondents' on-farm risk of JD transmission. Overall, 176 dairy producers participated in the FF process; 39.8% (70/176) of FF and 14.6% (52/357) of control participants responded to both the pre- and postintervention questionnaires. Upon comparison, FF respondents were more likely to be younger, have larger herds, and have higher management scores. The proportion of FF participants who reported making at least one on-farm change (81%) was significantly higher than that of control respondents (38%). Overall, FF respondents significantly changed their risk score in 4 out of 5 risk areas and had an average reduction of 13 points in their overall risk score between before and after risk assessments. Control respondents' risk assessment scores did not significantly change during the study period. In a JD knowledge assessment, FF and control respondents exhibited a moderate knowledge score before the intervention period, with median scores of 75.9% (22/29) in each group. The FF respondents significantly increased their score at the postintervention assessment, with a median of 82.8% (24/29); control-respondent scores did not significantly change. Both FF and control respondents held strong positive attitudes

  6. Guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: A randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    David Ivarsson; Marie Blom; Hugo Hesser; Per Carlbring; Pia Enderby; Rebecca Nordberg; Gerhard Andersson

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects of guided internet-based cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sixty-two participants with chronic PTSD, as assessed by the Clinician-administered PTSD Scale, were recruited via nationwide advertising and randomized to either treatment (n= 31) or delayed treatment attention control (n= 31). The ICBT treatment consisted of 8 weekly text-based modules containing psychoeducation, brea...

  7. Group versus Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for procrastination: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Rozental

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Procrastination is defined as a voluntarily delay of an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, and is considered a persistent behavior pattern that can result in major psychological suffering. About one-fifth of the adult population and half of the student population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to recurrent procrastination in their everyday lives. However, chronic and severe procrastinators seldom receive adequate care due to preconceptions and the lack of understanding regarding procrastination and the treatment interventions that are assumed beneficial. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is often deemed a treatment of choice, although the evidence supporting its use is scarce, and only one randomized controlled trial has been performed. The primary aim of the proposed study is therefore to test the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy delivered as either a group intervention or via the Internet. Participants will consist of students recruited through the Student Health Centre at Karolinska Institutet. A randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 100 participants divided into blocks of thirty will be used, comparing an eight-week Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention, and an eight-week group cognitive-behavioral therapy based intervention. It is believed that the proposed study will result in two important findings. First, different treatment interventions in cognitive-behavioral therapy are assumed to be helpful for people suffering from problems caused by procrastination. Second, both an Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention and a group intervention are presumed suitable for administering treatment for procrastination, which is considered important as the availability of adequate care is limited, particularly among students. The proposed study will increase the knowledge regarding the efficacy of different treatments of procrastination, as well

  8. On taming horses and strengthening riders: recent developments in research on interventions to improve self-control in health behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Friese; W. Hofmann; R.W. Wiers

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in the design of interventions to improve health behavior. Based on dual-system models we classify intervention strategies according to whether they aim at: (i) changing impulsive structures; (ii) improving the ability to self-control; or (iii) changing refle

  9. Individual and Group Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Work-Related Stress Complaints and Sickness Absence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vente, W.de; Kamphuis, J.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Work-related stress is widespread and can lead to long-term absenteeism and work disability. Cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) has demonstrated effectiveness in treating psychopathology but has only rarely been tested in clinical samples with work-related stress. A randomized controlled trial was

  10. Project SUCCESS' Effects on Substance Use-Related Attitudes and Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Alternative High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heddy Kovach; Ringwalt, Chris L.; Shamblen, Stephen R.; Hanley, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    Using a randomized controlled effectiveness trial, we examined the effects of Project SUCCESS on a range of secondary outcomes, including the program's mediating variables. Project SUCCESS, which is based both on the Theory of Reasoned Action and on Cognitive Behavior Theory, is a school-based substance use prevention program that targets…

  11. Does This Make Me Look Fat? Peer Crowd and Peer Contributions to Adolescent Girls' Weight Control Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Eleanor Race; La Greca, Annette M.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the Theory of Reasoned Action, this study evaluated a "socialization" model linking girls' peer crowd affiliations (e.g., Jocks, Populars) with their own weight concern, perceived peer weight norms, and weight control behaviors. An alternative "selection" model was also evaluated. Girls (N = 236; M age = 15.95 years) from diverse ethnic…

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Severe Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueser, Kim T.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Xie, Haiyi; Jankowski, M. Kay; Bolton, Elisa E.; Lu, Weili; Hamblen, Jessica L.; Rosenberg, Harriet J.; McHugo, Gregory J.; Wolfe, Rosemarie

    2008-01-01

    A cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) program for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was developed to address its high prevalence in persons with severe mental illness receiving treatment at community mental health centers. CBT was compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in a randomized controlled trial with 108 clients with PTSD and either major…

  13. Credit Card Misuse, Money Attitudes, and Compulsive Buying Behaviors: A Comparison of Internal and External Locus of Control (LOC) Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stevie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined attitudinal and behavioral differences between internal and external locus of control (LOC) consumers on credit card misuse, the importance of money, and compulsive buying. Using multiple analysis of variance and separate analyses of variance, internal LOC consumers were found to have lower scores on credit card misuse and…

  14. Risperidone Improves Behavioral Symptoms in Children with Autism in a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandina, Gahan J.; Bossie, Cynthia A.; Youssef, Eriene; Zhu, Young; Dunbar, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Subgroup analysis of children (5-12 years) with autism enrolled in an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of risperidone for pervasive developmental disorders. The primary efficacy measure was the Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Irritability (ABC-I) subscale. Data were available for 55 children given risperidone (n = 27) or placebo (n =…

  15. The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviors in Autistic Children: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized…

  16. The Role of Insecure Attachment and Gender Role Stress in Predicting Controlling Behaviors in Men Who Batter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalik, James R.; Aldarondo, Etiony; Gilbert-Gokhale, Steven; Shore, Erika

    2005-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that masculine gender role stress would mediate the relationship between insecure attachment and controlling behaviors in a sample of men who batter. To examine this hypothesis, 143 men who were court mandated to attend a batterers' intervention program in a northeastern state completed measures including the Controlling…

  17. Prevalence of Disordered Eating and Pathogenic Weight Control Behaviors among NCAA Division I Female Collegiate Gymnasts and Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carlin; Petrie, Trent A.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders and related weight control behaviors, such as excessive exercising and restrictive eating, represent serious health problems for girls and women in the United States and other industrialized nations. Female athletes, in particular, have been identified as a subgroup to study because of the unique weight, performance, and body…

  18. Identity Development as a Buffer of Adolescent Risk Behaviors in the Context of Peer Group Pressure and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Tara M.; Ellis, Wendy E.; Wolfe, David A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined identity development as a moderator of the relation between peer group pressure and control and adolescents' engagement in risk behaviors. Participants (n = 1070; M[subscript age] = 15.45 years) completed a self-report measure of "identity exploration", the degree to which they have explored a variety of self-relevant values, beliefs…

  19. Perceived Parental Acculturation Behaviors and Control as Predictors of Subjective Well-Being in Arab American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hani M.; Stiles, William B.; Biran, Mia W.; Hinkle, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the relations of the well-being of college students whose parents immigrated to America from Arab countries with their perceptions of their parents' (a) acculturation behaviors (i.e., openness to the American culture and preservation of the Arab culture) and (b) control. Results indicate that the perceived acculturation…

  20. Comparison of personality traits in pedophiles, abstinent opiate addicts, and healthy controls: considering pedophilia as an addictive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lisa J; Grebchenko, Yuli F; Steinfeld, Matthew; Frenda, Steven J; Galynker, Igor I

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the model of pedophilia as a disorder of addictive behavior, pedophiles and chemically addicted individuals were compared on personality traits potentially associated with impaired behavioral inhibition. Twenty-nine pedophiles, 25 opiate addicts (OA's), and 27 healthy controls were administered the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-V for Axis-II. OA's scored higher than either pedophiles or controls on the Barratt. Pedophiles and OA's scored higher than controls on all 3 Psychopathy Checklist-Revised scores but OA's scored marginally higher than pedophiles on factor 2 (behavioral) and total scores. On Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-V for Axis-II, pedophiles scored higher than controls on paranoid and schizoid scores whereas OA's did so on paranoid scores. Thus, both pedophiles and OA's may have elevated psychopathic traits and propensity toward cognitive distortions, as reflected in cluster A traits. Such similarities support the conceptualization of pedophilia as a behavioral addiction. Pedophiles may be less impulsive than OA's, however, and more prone toward cognitive distortions.

  1. Guided online or face-to-face cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia: A randomized wait-list controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Lancee; A. van Straten; N. Morina; V. Kaldo; J.H. Kamphuis

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare the efficacy of guided online and individual face-to-face cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) to a wait-list condition. Methods: A randomized controlled trial comparing three conditions: guided online; face-to-face; wait-list. Posttest measurements were a

  2. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior to Control Environmental Stimulation through a Mouse Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Lin, Kun-Tsan; Chiang, Ming-Shan

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether two people with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior would be able to control environmental stimulation using thumb poke ability with a mouse wheel and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replacing standard mouse driver, and turning a mouse into a precise thumb poke detector).…

  3. Mediators of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety-disordered children and adolescents : cognition, perceived control, and coping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendoorn, Sanne M; Prins, Pier J M; Boer, Frits; Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H; Moorlag, Harma; Nauta, Maaike H; Garst, Harry; Hartman, Catharina A; de Haan, Else

    2014-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate whether a change in putative mediators (negative and positive thoughts, coping strategies, and perceived control over anxious situations) precedes a change in anxiety symptoms in anxiety-disordered children and adolescents receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). P

  4. Mediators of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety-disordered children and adolescents: cognition, perceived control, and coping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hogendoorn; P.J.M. Prins; F. Boer; L. Vervoort; L.H. Wolters; H. Moorlag; M.H. Nauta; H. Garst; C.A. Hartman; E. de Haan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate whether a change in putative mediators (negative and positive thoughts, coping strategies, and perceived control over anxious situations) precedes a change in anxiety symptoms in anxiety-disordered children and adolescents receiving cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). P

  5. Weight-related concerns and weight-control behaviors among overweight adolescents in Delhi, India: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastav Radhika

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is emerging as a public health problem among adolescents in India. The aim of this study was to describe specific weight-related concerns among school-going youth in Delhi, India and to assess the prevalence of weight control behaviors, including healthy and unhealthy ones. Differences by weight status, gender, grade level, and school-type (a proxy for SES in this setting are considered. Methods This study is cross-sectional by design. A sample of eighth and tenth graders (n = 1818 enrolled in Private (middle-high SES and Government (low SES schools (n = 8 in Delhi, India participated. All students' height and weight were measured. Students participated in a survey of weight-related concerns and weight-control behaviors, as well. Mixed-effects regression models were used to test for differences in weight-related concerns and weight-control behaviors across key factors of interest (i.e., weight status, gender, grade level, and SES. Results The combined prevalence of obesity and overweight was 16.6%, overall. Controlling one's weight was important to overweight and non-overweight youth, alike (94.2% v. 84.8%, p p Conclusions Interventions to promote healthy weight control should be pertinent to and well-received by school-going youth in India. Healthy weight control practices need to be explicitly encouraged and unhealthy practices reduced. Future interventions should address issues specific to body image, too, as body dissatisfaction was not uncommon among youth.

  6. Steady state, oscillations and chaotic behavior of a gas inside a cylinder with a mobile piston controlled by PI and nonlinear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Molina, Manuel; Gil-Chica, Javier; Fernández-Varó, Elena; Pérez-Polo, Manuel F.

    2016-07-01

    This paper analyzes the behavior of nitrogen inside a closed cylinder with a mobile piston actuated by a nonlinear spring, a viscous damper and a control force which compensates partially the effect of the high gas pressure. Two helical heating coils are placed inside the cylinder and with their flow rates controlled by means of a linear controller of type proportional plus integral (PI) and another nonlinear control law to provide an approximately isothermal gas behavior. Based on the analysis of the mechanical and thermal subsystems and the control laws, a justification of the parameter values is presented and corroborated through analytical solutions that are obtained by approximate methods. To investigate the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and the Redlich-Kwong state equations are analyzed and compared, showing that the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation is superior. The Melnikov method has been used to obtain sufficient conditions for chaotic behavior, which has also been investigated by means of the sensitive dependence, Lyapunov exponents and the power spectral density. The validity of the proposed model has been analyzed by using the compressibility chart for the nitrogen, and the analytical calculations have been verified through full numerical simulations.

  7. Rethink your drink... : The bidirectional relation between automatic and controlled processes and the development of drinking behavior in at-risk adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Peeters, Margot

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories suggest that behavioral control is a very important aspect in the drinking behavior of adolescents, and differences in the capacity to control one’s own responses are assumed to underlie the escalation from relatively normal drinking patterns to more severe drinking in adults and adolescents. The development of the behavioral control coincides together with the maturation of the prefrontal cortex and it is not until late adolescence that these brain areas are fully grown. This...

  8. Executive Functions in Preschool Children with Aggressive Behavior : Impairments in Inhibitory Control

    OpenAIRE

    Raaijmakers, M.A.J.; Smidts, D.P.; Sergeant, J.A.; Maassen, G.H.; Posthumus, J.A.; Matthys, W.C.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The question whether executive function (EF) deficits in children are associated with conduct problems remains controversial. Although the origins of aggressive behavior are to be found in early childhood, findings from EF studies in preschool children with aggressive behavior are inconsistent. The current study aimed to investigate whether preschool children with aggressive behavior show impairments in EF. From a population-based sample, 82 preschool children who were showing aggressive beha...

  9. Effortful Control, Behavior Problems and Peer Relations: What Predicts Academic Adjustment in Kindergarteners from Low-income Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Amanda Sheffield; John, Aesha; Halliburton, Amy L; Morris, Michael D S; Robinson, Lara R; Myers, Sonya S; Aucoin, Katherine J; Keyes, Angela W; Terranova, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the role of effortful control, behavior problems, and peer relations in the academic adjustment of 74 kindergarten children from primarily low-income families using a short-term longitudinal design. Teachers completed standardized measures of children's effortful control, internalizing and externalizing problems, school readiness, and academic skills. Children participated in a sociometric interview to assess peer relations. Research Findings: Correlational analyses indicate that children's effortful control, behavior problems in school, and peer relations are associated with academic adjustment variables at the end of the school year, including school readiness, reading skills, and math skills. Results of regression analyses indicate that household income and children's effortful control primarily account for variation in children's academic adjustment. The associations between children's effortful control and academic adjustment did not vary across sex of the child or ethnicity. Mediational analyses indicate an indirect effect of effortful control on school readiness, through children's internalizing problems. Practice or Policy: Effortful control emerged as a strong predictor of academic adjustment among kindergarten children from low-income families. Strategies for enhancing effortful control and school readiness among low-income children are discussed. PMID:24163572

  10. Investigation of rule control by controlling the effetcts of reinforcement history on human behavior / Investigação do controle por regras e do controle por histórias de reforço sobre o comportamento humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos de Albuquerque

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of experimental history and of relative density of reinforcement on rule following behavior. Sixteen undergraduate students participated. Under a matching-to-sample procedure, with 3 comparison stimuli, the participants were asked to point the comparisons in sequence, according to their dimension, Color, Thickness or Form, in common to the sample. At the beginning of Phases 1, 2, 3 and 4, participants were exposed, respectively, to minimal instructions, a discrepant rule (specifying a non reinforced sequence, a corresponding rule (specifying a TFC sequence and a repeated discrepant rule. Only the CTF sequence was reinforced in all phases. In Phase 3, two sequences, TFC and CTF, were concurrently reinforced (Concurrent FR 2 FR6 and FR2 FR6. Control by rules and by reinforcement history were both observed, under specific conditions. These findings have implications for drawing a distinction between behaviors controlled by rules and those shaped by contingencies.

  11. The effect of behavioral preferences on skill acquisition in determining unspecified, suitable action patterns to control humanoid robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Taiki; Watanabe, Tetsuyou

    2015-08-01

    This research investigated the effect of behavioral preferences on learning efficiency when attempting to determine unspecified, but suitable action sequences for unfamiliar tasks. The goal of this research was to develop a skill acquisition support system for the elderly to aid them in using unfamiliar IT products, particularly those of welfare systems. Here, behavioral preference is defined as the type of action sequences that people would prefer to adopt for completing unfamiliar tasks. To achieve this goal, this research investigated the action sequences of participants when they attempt to control the posture of an unfamiliar humanoid robot with an unfamiliar controller. The participants were assigned the task of making the humanoid stand on one foot. Machine-learning-based methods were presented for analyzing the behavioral preferences. The analysis results indicate that participants having behavioral preferences of adopting random action sequences can complete the task in a much shorter time, compared to participants having a behavioral preference of adopting action sequences similar to those of previous actions. PMID:26738048

  12. Using Sun’s Java Real-Time System to Manage Behavior-Based Mobile Robot Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew McKenzie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementing a robot controller that can effectively manage limited resources in a deterministic, real-time manner is challenging. Behavior-based architectures that decompose autonomy into levels of intelligence are popular due to their robustness but do not provide real-time features that enforce timing constraints or support determinism. We propose an architecture and approach for using the real-time features of the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ in a behavior-based mobile robot controller to show that timing constraints affect performance. This is accomplished by extending a real-time aware architecture that explicitly enumerates timing requirements for each behavior. It is not enough to reduce latency. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated via an implementation on Solaris 10 and the Sun Java Real-Time System (Java RTS. Experimental results are obtained using a K-team Koala robot performing path following with four composite behaviors. Experiments were conducted using several task period sets in three cases: real-time threads with the real-time garbage collector, real-time threads with the non- real-time garbage collector, and non-real-time threads with the non-real-time garbage collector. Results show that even if latency and determinism are improved, the timing of each individual behavior significantly affects task performance.

  13. Executive Functions in Preschool Children with Aggressive Behavior: Impairments in Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Maartje A. J.; Smidts, Diana P.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Maassen, Gerard H.; Posthumus, Jocelyne A.; van Engeland, Herman; Matthys, Walter

    2008-01-01

    The question whether executive function (EF) deficits in children are associated with conduct problems remains controversial. Although the origins of aggressive behavior are to be found in early childhood, findings from EF studies in preschool children with aggressive behavior are inconsistent. The current study aimed to investigate whether…

  14. Neuroendocrine control of maternal behavior in non-human and human mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévy, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian parental care is essentially provided by the mother and it occupies most of the reproductive period for female. The synchronization of maternal behavior with parturition and lactation ensures that the mother responds to the needs of the young at the appropriate time. This temporal synchrony is accomplished by hormonal changes that underly both the onset of maternal behavior and of parturition and lactation. The aim of this review is to describe and compare the hormonal mechanisms that regulate the onset of maternal behavior across a variety of mammals, including humans, that represent different behavioral strategies. Are involved the steroid hormones, estradiol and progesterone synthesized by the ovaries which primed the future mother to repond maternally. In response to these steroids, oxytocin release induced by vaginocervical stimulation and prolactin release affect the maternal brain. The medial preoptic area integrates the hormonal signals to regulate maternal behavior. The hormonal cocktail that stimulates maternal behavior varies across mammalian species. Because most of the studies in humans are correlative and because human environment is complex, direct causality between hormones and maternal behavior is unclear. However, one can reasonably think that hormones create a positive bias towards the baby increasing the occurrence of maternal behavior. PMID:27130073

  15. Behavioral Inhibition and Anxiety: The Moderating Roles of Inhibitory Control and Attention Shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lauren K.; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Henderson, Heather A.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI), a temperament identified in early childhood, is associated with social reticence in childhood and an increased risk for anxiety problems in adolescence and adulthood. However, not all behaviorally inhibited children remain reticent or develop an anxiety disorder. One possible mechanism accounting for the variability in…

  16. Response Persistence: The Effects of Stimulus Control on Negatively Reinforced Problem Behavior in a Concurrent Operant

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, Jennifer J.

    2009-01-01

    In the context of instructional demands, compliance and problem behavior can be considered concurrent operants. Of applied interest is increasing one response (i.e., compliance) while decreasing the other (i.e., problem behavior). Strategic arrangement of reinforcement can alter response allocation accordingly. Such schedules can also influence…

  17. EMDR versus CBT for children with self-esteem and behavioral problems: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Wanders; M. Serra; A. de Jongh

    2008-01-01

    This study compared eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Twenty-six children (average age 10.4 years) with behavioral problems were randomly assigned to receive either 4 sessions of EMDR or CBT prior to usual treatment provided in outpatient a

  18. Eating Habits and Body Weight Control Behaviors of High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek OZMEN

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional needs increase in puberty due to rapid growth and changes in body composition. Because of that healthy eating is vital for teen’s health. The aim of this study was to determine eating habits and weight control behaviors of high school students. A cross-sectional study was performed involving all (6 public and 3 private tenth-grade high schools in Manisa city. Two thousand one hundred forty six students completed a questionnaire which consists of 26 items and was designed by researchers. Among all students surveyed, 34.0% reported that they don’t have a habit to eat breakfast regularly, 38.3% reported that they don’t have a habit to eat lunch regularly, 6.5% reported that they don’t have a habit to eat dinner regularly, 36.7% reported that they were afraid getting fat, 6.5% reported that they were dieting, 39.4% reported that they don’t make sport regularly and 59.1% reported that they were snacking frequently. In this study it has seen that skipping meals is a common eating habit in high school students and many of them fail to eat three regular meals per day. On the other hand it has seen that students don’t have regular exercise habits. The results of this study have suggested that there is a need to encourage teens a healthy lifestyle that incorporates eating habits and regular exercise. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(2.000: 98-105

  19. How do price minimizing behaviors impact smoking cessation? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Andrea S; Hyland, Andrew J; O'Connor, Richard J; Chaloupka, Frank J; Borland, Ron; Fong, Geoffrey T; Nargis, Nigar; Cummings, K Michael

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines how price minimizing behaviors impact efforts to stop smoking. Data on 4,988 participants from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Four-Country Survey who were smokers at baseline (wave 5) and interviewed at a 1 year follow-up were used. We examined whether price minimizing behaviors at baseline predicted: (1) cessation, (2) quit attempts, and (3) successful quit attempts at one year follow up using multivariate logistic regression modeling. A subset analysis included 3,387 participants who were current smokers at waves 5 and 6 and were followed through wave 7 to explore effects of changing purchase patterns on cessation. Statistical tests for interaction were performed to examine the joint effect of SES and price/tax avoidance behaviors on cessation outcomes. Smokers who engaged in any price/tax avoidance behaviors were 28% less likely to report cessation. Persons using low/untaxed sources were less likely to quit at follow up, those purchasing cartons were less likely to make quit attempts and quit, and those using discount cigarettes were less likely to succeed, conditional on making attempts. Respondents who utilized multiple behaviors simultaneously were less likely to make quit attempts and to succeed. SES did not modify the effects of price minimizing behaviors on cessation outcomes. The data from this paper indicate that the availability of lower priced cigarette alternatives may attenuate public health efforts aimed at to reduce reducing smoking prevalence through price and tax increases among all SES groups. PMID:21655144

  20. How do price minimizing behaviors impact smoking cessation? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Andrea S; Hyland, Andrew J; O'Connor, Richard J; Chaloupka, Frank J; Borland, Ron; Fong, Geoffrey T; Nargis, Nigar; Cummings, K Michael

    2011-05-01

    This paper examines how price minimizing behaviors impact efforts to stop smoking. Data on 4,988 participants from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Four-Country Survey who were smokers at baseline (wave 5) and interviewed at a 1 year follow-up were used. We examined whether price minimizing behaviors at baseline predicted: (1) cessation, (2) quit attempts, and (3) successful quit attempts at one year follow up using multivariate logistic regression modeling. A subset analysis included 3,387 participants who were current smokers at waves 5 and 6 and were followed through wave 7 to explore effects of changing purchase patterns on cessation. Statistical tests for interaction were performed to examine the joint effect of SES and price/tax avoidance behaviors on cessation outcomes. Smokers who engaged in any price/tax avoidance behaviors were 28% less likely to report cessation. Persons using low/untaxed sources were less likely to quit at follow up, those purchasing cartons were less likely to make quit attempts and quit, and those using discount cigarettes were less likely to succeed, conditional on making attempts. Respondents who utilized multiple behaviors simultaneously were less likely to make quit attempts and to succeed. SES did not modify the effects of price minimizing behaviors on cessation outcomes. The data from this paper indicate that the availability of lower priced cigarette alternatives may attenuate public health efforts aimed at to reduce reducing smoking prevalence through price and tax increases among all SES groups.

  1. Control of cricket stridulation by a command neuron: efficacy depends on the behavioral state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, B

    2000-02-01

    Crickets use different song patterns for acoustic communication. The stridulatory pattern-generating networks are housed within the thoracic ganglia but are controlled by the brain. This descending control of stridulation was identified by intracellular recordings and stainings of brain neurons. Its impact on the generation of calling song was analyzed both in resting and stridulating crickets and during cercal wind stimulation, which impaired the stridulatory movements and caused transient silencing reactions. A descending interneuron in the brain serves as a command neuron for calling-song stridulation. The neuron has a dorsal soma position, anterior dendritic processes, and an axon that descends in the contralateral connective. The neuron is present in each side of the CNS. It is not activated in resting crickets. Intracellular depolarization of the interneuron so that its spike frequency is increased to 60-80 spikes/s reliably elicits calling-song stridulation. The spike frequency is modulated slightly in the chirp cycle with the maximum activity in phase with each chirp. There is a high positive correlation between the chirp repetition rate and the interneuron's spike frequency. Only a very weak correlation, however, exists between the syllable repetition rate and the interneuron activity. The effectiveness of the command neuron depends on the activity state of the cricket. In resting crickets, experimentally evoked short bursts of action potentials elicit only incomplete calling-song chirps. In crickets that previously had stridulated during the experiment, short elicitation of interneuron activity can trigger sustained calling songs during which the interneuron exhibits a spike frequency of approximately 30 spikes/s. During sustained calling songs, the command neuron activity is necessary to maintain the stridulatory behavior. Inhibition of the interneuron stops stridulation. A transient increase in the spike frequency of the interneuron speeds up the chirp

  2. The effect of a structured intervention on caregivers of patients with dementia and problem behaviors: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Alessandro; Riva, Emma; Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Liscio, Mariarosaria; Petrucci, Bianca; Porro, Gabriella Salvini

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of a structured intervention on caregiver stress and the institutionalization rate of patients with dementia and problem behaviors. Caregivers contacting the Federazione Alzheimer Italia (AI) to receive help, advice, or information in relation to problem behaviors of outpatients were enrolled. Eligible caregiver-patient dyads were randomized to receive either a structured intervention or the counseling AI usually provides (control group). After basal assessment, families were reassessed at 6 and 12 months. Problem behavior (particularly agitation) was the only variable significantly correlated (P = 0.006) with the baseline caregivers' stress score. Thirty-nine families completed the 12-month follow-up; the mean problem behavior score was significantly lower in the intervention than the control group (p < 0.03); the time needed for care of the patient increased by 0.5 +/- 9.7 hours/day in the control group and decreased by 0.3 +/- 4.1 in the intervention group (p = 0.4, Wilcoxon test). The main determinant of institutionalization seemed to be the level of caregiver stress (p = 0.03). In patients of the intervention group, there was a significant reduction in the frequency of delusions. This pilot study suggests that caregiver stress is relieved by a structured intervention. The number of families lost to follow-up, the relatively short duration of the study, and the ceiling effect due to the severity of the clinical characteristics of patients probably all partly dilute the observed findings.

  3. Impact of an Oral Health Education Workshop on Parents’ Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Behavioral Control among African Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Amin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the impact of an educational workshop on parental knowledge, attitude, and perceived behavioral control regarding their child’s oral health. Materials and Methods. A one-time oral health education workshop including audio/visual and hands-on components was conducted by a trained dentist and bilingual community workers in community locations. Participants were African parents of children who had lived in Canada for less than ten years. The impact of the workshop was evaluated by a questionnaire developed based on the theory of planned behavior. Results. A total of 105 parents participated in this study. Participants were mainly mothers (mean age 35.03±5.4 years who came to Canada as refugee (77.1% and had below high school education (70%. Paired t-test showed a significant difference in participants’ knowledge of caries, preventive measures, and benefits of regular dental visits after the workshop (P value<0.05. A significant improvement was also found in parental attitudes toward preventive measures and their perceived behavioral control (P<0.05. Parents’ intention to take their child to a dentist within six months significantly altered after the workshop (P value<0.05. Conclusions. A one-time hands-on training was effective in improving parental knowledge, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and intention with respect to their child’s oral health and preventive dental visits in African immigrants.

  4. CONSTRAINTS FUNCTION OF REPUTATION ON EMBEZZLEMENT BEHAVIOR OF CONTROLLING SHAREHOLDERS: A STUDY ABOUT THE LISTED COMPANIES OF CHINA

    OpenAIRE

    Dongping, Han; Li, Wei; Khan, Imran; Guo, Caicai

    2015-01-01

    In China, listed companies in China have the behavior of embezzlement for a long time. In the micro level, this seriously damages the interest of creditor and minority shareholders. In the macro level, this also harms the healthy development of the capital market and the national economy. So, it is very important to study the constraint for embezzlement behavior of controlling shareholders. Among many constraints mechanisms, reputation mechanism is considered to be the most perfect governance...

  5. Behavior control in the sensorimotor loop with short-term synaptic dynamics induced by self-regulating neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem eToutounji

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and skills of living systems depend on the distributed control provided by specialized and highly recurrent neural networks. Learning and memory in these systems is mediated by a set of adaptation mechanisms, known collectively as neuronal plasticity. Translating principles of recurrent neural control and plasticity to artificial agents has seen major strides, but is usually hampered by the complex interactions between the agent's body and its environment. One of the important standing issues is for the agent to support multiple stable states of behavior, so that its behavioral repertoire matches the requirements imposed by these interactions. The agent also must have the capacity to switch between these states in time scales that are comparable to those by which sensory stimulation varies. Achieving this requires a mechanism of short-term memory that allows the neurocontroller to keep track of the recent history of its input, which finds its biological counterpart in short-term synaptic plasticity. This issue is approached here by deriving synaptic dynamics in recurrent neural networks. Neurons are introduced as self-regulating units with a rich repertoire of dynamics. They exhibit homeostatic properties for certain parameter domains, which result in a set of stable states and the required short-term memory. They can also operate as oscillators, which allow them to surpass the level of activity imposed by their homeostatic operation conditions. Neural systems endowed with the derived synaptic dynamics can be utilized for the neural behavior control of autonomous mobile agents. The resulting behavior depends also on the underlying network structure, which is either engineered, or developed by evolutionary techniques. The effectiveness of these self-regulating units is demonstrated by controlling locomotion of a hexapod with eighteen degrees of freedom, and obstacle-avoidance of a wheel-driven robot.

  6. Behavior control in the sensorimotor loop with short-term synaptic dynamics induced by self-regulating neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutounji, Hazem; Pasemann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and skills of living systems depend on the distributed control provided by specialized and highly recurrent neural networks. Learning and memory in these systems is mediated by a set of adaptation mechanisms, known collectively as neuronal plasticity. Translating principles of recurrent neural control and plasticity to artificial agents has seen major strides, but is usually hampered by the complex interactions between the agent's body and its environment. One of the important standing issues is for the agent to support multiple stable states of behavior, so that its behavioral repertoire matches the requirements imposed by these interactions. The agent also must have the capacity to switch between these states in time scales that are comparable to those by which sensory stimulation varies. Achieving this requires a mechanism of short-term memory that allows the neurocontroller to keep track of the recent history of its input, which finds its biological counterpart in short-term synaptic plasticity. This issue is approached here by deriving synaptic dynamics in recurrent neural networks. Neurons are introduced as self-regulating units with a rich repertoire of dynamics. They exhibit homeostatic properties for certain parameter domains, which result in a set of stable states and the required short-term memory. They can also operate as oscillators, which allow them to surpass the level of activity imposed by their homeostatic operation conditions. Neural systems endowed with the derived synaptic dynamics can be utilized for the neural behavior control of autonomous mobile agents. The resulting behavior depends also on the underlying network structure, which is either engineered or developed by evolutionary techniques. The effectiveness of these self-regulating units is demonstrated by controlling locomotion of a hexapod with 18 degrees of freedom, and obstacle-avoidance of a wheel-driven robot. PMID:24904403

  7. The Effects of Subjective Loss of Control on Risk-taking Behavior: The Mediating Role of Anger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit M. Beisswingert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Appraisal Tendency Framework on the antecedents and consequences of emotions two experimental studies examined the relationship between externally caused loss of control experiences and risk-taking behavior, as well as the assumed mediation of this relationship by the emotion anger. An experimental paradigm for inducing externally caused and consequently externally attributed loss of control which should lead to experiences of anger was developed and pretested in a Pilot Study. The relationship between loss of control experiences, anger and risk-taking behavior was investigated using two separate student samples from Germany (N = 84, 54% female and China (N = 125; 64% female. In line with our hypotheses, results showed that anger mediated the link between subjective loss of control experiences and increasing risk-taking behavior. Multiple group comparisons revealing similar patterns in both samples affirmed the results’ cross-cultural generalizability. These results implicate that anger makes people less risk averse in the process of economic decision making.

  8. The direction of effects between perceived parental behavioral control and psychological control and adolescents' self-reported GAD and SAD symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Wijsbroek, Saskia A. M.; Hale III, William W.; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study examined the direction of effects and age and sex differences between adolescents? perceptions of parental behavioral and psychological control and adolescents? self-reports of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and separation anxiety disorder (SAD) symptoms. The study focused on 1,313 Dutch adolescents (early-to-middle cohort n = 923, 70.3%; middle-to-late cohort n = 390, 29.7%) from the general population. A multi-group, structural equation model was employed ...

  9. The effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in autistic children: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized tools and DVD analysis of sessions to evaluate behavioral changes in children with autism. The overall results indicated that improvisational music therapy was more effective at facilitating joint attention behaviors and non-verbal social communication skills in children than play. Session analysis showed significantly more and lengthier events of eye contact and turn-taking in improvisational music therapy than play sessions. The implications of these findings are discussed further. PMID:18592368

  10. The effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in autistic children: A randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy...... and play sessions with toys, and using standardized tools and DVD analysis of sessions to evaluate behavioral changes in children with autism. The overall results indicated that improvisational music therapy was more effective at facilitating joint attention behaviors and non-verbal social communication...... skills in children than play. Session analysis showed significantly more and lengthier events of eye contact and turn-taking in improvisational music therapy than play sessions. The implications of these findings are discussed further....

  11. The beauty of the network in the brain and the origin of the mind in the control of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, M

    2014-01-01

    Behavior is not adequately described as a stimulus-response process. It is initiated by the animal and is generated because of its expected outcome in the future. The outcome can be good or bad for the animal. The brain is in charge of the selection process. This is the basic function of the brain. Taking Drosophila as a study case, this paper discusses initiating activity, several examples of outcome expectations, trying out (the internal search for a suitable behavior), chaining of actions, and the functional roles of chance in action selection. It takes mental processes and states such as goals, intentions, feelings, memories, cognition, and attention as higher levels of behavioral control that have their origin in biological evolution.

  12. Deficient grip force control in schizophrenia: behavioral and modeling evidence for altered motor inhibition and motor noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teremetz, Maxime; Amado, Isabelle; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Lindberg, Pavel G; Maier, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Whether upper limb sensorimotor control is affected in schizophrenia and how underlying pathological mechanisms may potentially intervene in these deficits is still being debated. We tested voluntary force control in schizophrenia patients and used a computational model in order to elucidate potential cerebral mechanisms underlying sensorimotor deficits in schizophrenia. A visuomotor grip force-tracking task was performed by 17 medicated and 6 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and by 15 healthy controls. Target forces in the ramp-hold-and-release paradigm were set to 5 N and to 10% maximal voluntary grip force. Force trajectory was analyzed by performance measures and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A computational model incorporating neural control signals was used to replicate the empirically observed motor behavior and to explore underlying neural mechanisms. Grip task performance was significantly lower in medicated and non-medicated schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Three behavioral variables were significantly higher in both patient groups: tracking error (by 50%), coefficient of variation of force (by 57%) and duration of force release (up by 37%). Behavioral performance did not differ between patient groups. Computational simulation successfully replicated these findings and predicted that decreased motor inhibition, together with an increased signal-dependent motor noise, are sufficient to explain the observed motor deficits in patients. PCA also suggested altered motor inhibition as a key factor differentiating patients from control subjects: the principal component representing inhibition correlated with clinical severity. These findings show that schizophrenia affects voluntary sensorimotor control of the hand independent of medication, and suggest that reduced motor inhibition and increased signal-dependent motor noise likely reflect key pathological mechanisms of the sensorimotor deficit.

  13. Disruptive Behavior Disorders in 8 to 14 Years Old Offspring's of Opium and Heroin Dependent Parents: a Case-Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Ziaaddini, Hassan; Saieedi, Hamdollah; Nakhaiee, Nouzar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Drug abuse is usually associated with behavioral disorders in children especially conduct disorder. This study investigated the behavioral disorders of children whose parents were opium or heroin dependent in compare with children whose parents were non-addicts to find the effects of drug abuse on offspring's behavior disorders by adjusting intervening factors. Methods: This case-control study, compared the behavioral disorders of 128 students (aged 8 to 14 years) in two groups of...

  14. The role of executive functions in the control of aggressive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer, Ulrike M.; Kopyciok, Robert P. J.; Richter, Sylvia; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni; Münte, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    An extensive literature suggests a link between executive functions and aggressive behavior in humans, pointing mostly to an inverse relationship, i.e., increased tendencies toward aggression in individuals scoring low on executive function tests. This literature is limited, though, in terms of the groups studied and the measures of executive functions. In this paper, we present data from two studies addressing these issues. In a first behavioral study, we asked whether high trait aggressiven...

  15. Mind wandering and motor control: off-task thinking disrupts the online adjustment of behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kam, Julia W. Y.; Dao, Elizabeth; Blinn, Patricia; Krigolson, Olav E.; Boyd, Lara A.; Handy, Todd C

    2012-01-01

    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of “stimulus-independent” thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of “response-independent” thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor tracking task and wer...

  16. Mind Wandering and Motor Control: Off-Task Thinking Disrupts the Online Adjustment of Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kam, Julia W. Y.; Elizabeth eDao; Patricia eBlinn; Krigolson, Olav E.; Boyd, Lara A.; Handy, Todd C

    2012-01-01

    Mind wandering episodes have been construed as periods of "stimulus-independent" thought, where our minds are decoupled from the external sensory environment. In two experiments, we used behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to determine whether mind wandering episodes can also be considered as periods of "response-independent" thought, with our minds disengaged from adjusting our behavioral outputs. In the first experiment, participants performed a motor t...

  17. Behavioral inhibition and anxiety: The moderating roles of inhibitory control and attention shifting

    OpenAIRE

    White, Lauren K.; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Henderson, Heather A.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI), a temperament identified in early childhood, is associated with social reticence in childhood and an increased risk for anxiety problems in adolescence and adulthood. However, not all behaviorally inhibited children remain reticent or develop an anxiety disorder. One possible mechanism accounting for the variability in the developmental trajectories of BI is a child’s ability to successfully recruit cognitive processes involved in the regulation of negative reactiv...

  18. The Role of Serotonin (5-HT) in Behavioral Control: Findings from Animal Research and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, CL; Biskup, CS; Herpertz, S.; Gaber, TJ; Kuhn, CM; Hood, SH; Zepf, FD

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine both have a critical role in the underlying neurobiology of different behaviors. With focus on the interplay between dopamine and serotonin, it has been proposed that dopamine biases behavior towards habitual responding, and with serotonin offsetting this phenomenon and directing the balance toward more flexible, goal-directed responding. The present focus paper stands in close relationship to the publication by Worbe et al. (2015), which deals wit...

  19. The role of executive functions in the control of aggressive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Krämer, Ulrike M.; Kopyciok, Robert P. J.; Sylvia eRichter; Antoni eRodriguez-Fornells; Münte, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    An extensive literature suggests a link between executive functions and aggressive behavior in humans, pointing mostly to an inverse relationship, i.e. increased tendencies towards aggression in individuals scoring low on executive function tests. This literature is limited, though, in terms of the groups studied and the measures of executive functions. In this paper, we present data from two studies addressing these issues. In a first behavioral study, we asked whether high trait aggressiven...

  20. Stiffness and Adhesivity Control Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Behavior within Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kapetanovic, Edi; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive and biodegradable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix and regulate valve interstitial cells (VIC) behavior are of great interest as three dimensional (3D) model systems for understanding mechanisms of valvular heart disease pathogenesis in vitro and the basis for regenerative templates for tissue engineering. However, the role of stiffness and adhesivity of hydrogels in VIC behavior remains poorly understood. This study reports synthesis of oxidized and methacrylated hyalu...

  1. Distributed recurrent neural forward models with synaptic adaptation and CPG-based control for complex behaviors of walking robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures) with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of (1) central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps, leg damage adaptations, as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to online forward models outperforms the adaptive neuron forward models

  2. Model of Competencies for Decomposition of Human Behavior: Application to Control System of Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Vicente Berna-Martinez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans and machines have shared the same physical space for many years. To share the same space, we want the robots to behave like human beings. This will facilitate their social integration, their interaction with humans and create an intelligent behavior. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how human behavior is generated, analyze tasks running our nerves and how they relate to them. Then and only then can we implement these mechanisms in robotic beings. In this study, we propose a model of competencies based on human neuroregulator system for analysis and decomposition of behavior into functional modules. Using this model allow separate and locate the tasks to be implemented in a robot that displays human-like behavior. As an example, we show the application of model to the autonomous movement behavior on unfamiliar environments and its implementation in various simulated and real robots with different physical configurations and physical devices of different nature. The main result of this study has been to build a model of competencies that is being used to build robotic systems capable of displaying behaviors similar to humans and consider the specific characteristics of robots.

  3. Mothers' Temperament and Personality: Their Relationship to Parenting Behaviors, Locus of Control, and Young Children's Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puff, Jayme; Renk, Kimberly

    2016-10-01

    There appears to be a lack of construct clarity and a dearth of studies that have examined both mothers' temperament and personality in conjunction with parenting behaviors when predicting young children's functioning. As a result, this study examined these constructs jointly so that a further understanding of how mothers' temperament and personality may work together to predict young children's functioning could be gained. As part of this study, 214 diverse mothers with young children who ranged in age from 2- to 6-years rated their own temperament and personality, their parenting characteristics, and their young children's functioning (i.e., temperament and emotional and behavioral functioning). Based on the findings of hierarchical regression analyses completed in this study, both mothers' temperament and personality may be important individual predictors of young children's temperament but may be important joint predictors, along with parenting behaviors, of young children's behavior problems. Consequently, future research should examine the role that mothers' temperament and personality characteristics may play in conjunction with their parenting behaviors when trying to understand young children's functioning. These findings will be particularly helpful for professionals providing parenting interventions to families with young children who have difficult temperament styles and/or emotional and behavioral problems. PMID:26649858

  4. Rethink your drink... : The bidirectional relation between automatic and controlled processes and the development of drinking behavior in at-risk adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Margot

    2014-01-01

    Recent theories suggest that behavioral control is a very important aspect in the drinking behavior of adolescents, and differences in the capacity to control one’s own responses are assumed to underlie the escalation from relatively normal drinking patterns to more severe drinking in adults and ado

  5. Controlling the rheological behavior of ceramic slurries and consolidated bodies: Interpenetrating networks and ion size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Matthew Lyle

    Colloidal processing has been demonstrated as an effective technique for increasing the reliability of ceramic components by reducing the flaw populations in sintered bodies. The formation of long-range repulsive potentials produces a dispersed slurry which can be filtered to remove heterogeneities and truncate the flaw size distribution. When the pair potentials are changed from repulsive to weakly attractive, a short-range repulsive potential can be developed in the slurry state which prevents mass segregation, allows particles to consolidate to high volume fractions, and produces plastic consolidated bodies. Plastic behavior in saturated ceramic compacts would allow plastic shape forming technologies to be implemented on advanced ceramic powders. Two networks of different interparticle potential have been mixed to control the rheological properties of slurries and develop clay-like plasticity in consolidated bodies. The elastic modulus and yield stress of slurries were found to increase with volume fraction in a power law fashion. Consolidated bodies containing mixtures of alkylated and non-alkylated powder pack to high volume fraction and exhibit similar flow properties to clay. The mixing of aqueous networks of different pair potential can also be effective in tailoring the flow properties. The flow stress of saturated compacts has been adjusted by the addition of a second network of uncoated particles which is stabilized electrostatically. The influence of the addition of silica of various sizes on the viscosity and zeta potentials of alumina suspensions has been investigated. The adsorption of nano-silica to the surface of alumina shifts the iep. The amount of silica at which the maximum shift in zeta potential occurs is consistent with the silica required to produce the minimum viscosity. This level of silica on the surface is consistent with calculations of the amount necessary for dense random parking of silica spheres around alumina. The influence of

  6. Examining Contextual Influences on Classroom-Based Implementation of Positive Behavior Support Strategies: Findings from a Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T; Waasdorp, Tracy E; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-11-01

    Although it is widely recognized that variation in implementation fidelity influences the impact of preventive interventions, little is known about how specific contextual factors may affect the implementation of social and behavioral interventions in classrooms. Theoretical research highlights the importance of multiple contextual influences on implementation, including factors at the classroom and school level (Domitrovich et al., Advances in School Mental Health Promotion, 1, 6-28, 2008). The current study used multi-level modeling to empirically examine the influence of teacher, classroom, and school characteristics on the implementation of classroom-based positive behavior support strategies over the course of 4 years. Data were collected in the context of a 37-school randomized controlled trial examining the effectiveness of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. Multi-level results identified several school-level contextual factors (e.g., school size, behavioral disruptions) and teacher-level factors (perceptions of school organizational health and grade level taught) associated with variability in the implementation of classroom-based positive behavior supports. Implications for prevention research and practice are discussed. PMID:24793222

  7. Does intranasal oxytocin promote prosocial behavior to an excluded fellow player? A randomized-controlled trial with Cyberball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riem, Madelon M E; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Huffmeijer, Renske; van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H

    2013-08-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to stimulate prosocial behavior. However, recent studies indicate that adverse early caregiving experiences may moderate the positive effects of oxytocin. In this double blind randomized-controlled trial we investigated the effects of oxytocin on prosocial behavior during a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball. We examined the influence of oxytocin on prosocial helping behavior toward a socially excluded person who was known to the participant, taking into account early caregiving experiences and the emotional facial expression of the excluded person as potential moderators. Participants were 54 women who received a nasal spray containing either 16IU of oxytocin or a placebo and had reported how often their mother used love withdrawal as a disciplinary strategy involving withholding love and affection after a failure or misbehavior. We found that participants compensated for other players' ostracism by throwing the ball more often toward the excluded player. Oxytocin administration further increased the number of ball throws toward the excluded person, but only in individuals who experienced low levels of maternal love withdrawal. The facial expression of the excluded person did not affect prosocial helping behavior and did not moderate the effects of oxytocin. Our findings indicate that the positive effects of oxytocin on prosocial behavior toward a victim of social exclusion are limited to individuals with supportive family backgrounds. PMID:23352229

  8. Reducing developmental risk for emotional/behavioral problems: a randomized controlled trial examining the Tools for Getting Along curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunic, Ann P; Smith, Stephen W; Garvan, Cynthia W; Barber, Brian R; Becker, Mallory K; Peters, Christine D; Taylor, Gregory G; Van Loan, Christopher L; Li, Wei; Naranjo, Arlene H

    2012-04-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that cognitive-behavioral intervention strategies - such as social problem solving - provided in school settings can help ameliorate the developmental risk for emotional and behavioral difficulties. In this study, we report the results of a randomized controlled trial of Tools for Getting Along (TFGA), a social problem-solving universally delivered curriculum designed to reduce the developmental risk for serious emotional or behavioral problems among upper elementary grade students. We analyzed pre-intervention and post-intervention teacher-report and student self-report data from 14 schools, 87 classrooms, and a total of 1296 students using multilevel modeling. Results (effect sizes calculated using Hedges' g) indicated that students who were taught TFGA had a more positive approach to problem solving (g=.11) and a more rational problem-solving style (g=.16). Treated students with relatively poor baseline scores benefited from TFGA on (a) problem-solving knowledge (g=1.54); (b) teacher-rated executive functioning (g=.35 for Behavior Regulation and .32 for Metacognition), and proactive aggression (g=.20); and (c) self-reported trait anger (g=.17) and anger expression (g=.21). Thus, TFGA may reduce risk for emotional and behavioral difficulties by improving students' cognitive and emotional self-regulation and increasing their pro-social choices. PMID:22386118

  9. Prevalence and correlates of unhealthy weight control behaviors: findings from the national longitudinal study of adolescent health

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen, Eric M; Rose, Jennifer S.; Kenney, Lindsay; Rosselli-Navarra, Francine; Weissman, Ruth Striegel

    2014-01-01

    Background A recent study examined the prevalence, clinical correlates, age trends, and stability of unhealthy weight control behaviors (UWCB; purging and diet pill use) in a nationally representative sample of Norwegian boys and girls. The purpose of this study was to provide similar, comparative analyses for a nationally representative sample of American youth. Methods Data were extracted from the restricted use data files of survey Waves I, II, and III of the National Longitudinal Study of...

  10. DHAT SYNDROME AND ITS ASSOCIATION WITH SEXUAL BEHAVIOR AND PYSCHIATRIC COMORBIDITIES IN MALES: A CASE CONTROL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Sahu RN, Sharma VK, Ashutosh Kumar, Chintan Bavishi, Balaji More

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dhat syndrome is often taken as culture bound syndrome (CBS) of Indian subcontinent. There are many misconceptions which form base of symptoms and co morbidities. Aim: Dhat syndrome is reported on basis of self diagnosis. The study aims to study associated symptoms, sexual behavior and co morbidities in Indian population. Material and Methods: This cross-sectional and case-control study was carried with help of trained local interviewers at Department of Psychiatry and Medicine, ...

  11. Impact of an Oral Health Education Workshop on Parents’ Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Behavioral Control among African Immigrants

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Amin; Pawan Nyachhyon; Maryam Elyasi; Muhammed Al-Nuaimi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the impact of an educational workshop on parental knowledge, attitude, and perceived behavioral control regarding their child’s oral health. Materials and Methods. A one-time oral health education workshop including audio/visual and hands-on components was conducted by a trained dentist and bilingual community workers in community locations. Participants were African parents of children who had lived in Canada for less than ten years. The impact of the workshop was evalua...

  12. Treating Acute Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a “Single-Shot” of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Jason; Cushing, Toby; Germain, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives Despite considerable evidence supporting cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for chronic insomnia, it remains untested within the context of acute insomnia. This study examined the efficacy of a single session of CBT-I, with an accompanying self-help pamphlet, for individuals with acute insomnia. Design A pragmatic parallel group randomized controlled trial. Participants Forty adults (mean age 32.9 + 13.72 y) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manu...

  13. Genes in the dopaminergic system and delinquent behaviors across the life course: the role of social controls and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Boardman, Jason D.; Menard, Scott; Roettger, Michael E.; Knight, Kelly E.; Boutwell, Brian B.; Smolen, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction between social control and social risk mechanisms and genes within the dopaminergic system (DAT1 and DRD2) as related to serious and violent forms of delinquent behavior among adolescents and young adults. We use nine waves of data from the National Youth Survey Family Study to examine the relevance of protective or risky social factors at four social levels including school, neighborhood, friends, and family within the gene-environment interaction framewor...

  14. Internet-vs. group-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia: A randomized controlled non-inferiority trial

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, Kerstin; Tarkian Tillgren, Hanna; Wiklund, Tobias; Danlycke, Ewa; Forssen, Mattias; Söderström, Alexandra; Johansson, Robert; Hesser, Hugo; Jernelov, Susanna; Lindefors, Nils; Andersson, Gerhard; Kaldo, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare guided Internet-delivered to group-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. We conducted an 8-week randomized controlled non-inferiority trial with 6-months follow-up. Participants were forty-eight adults with insomnia, recruited via media. Interventions were guided Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) and group-delivered CBT (GCBT) for insomnia. Primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), secondary outcome measures were sleep...

  15. Exercise Self-Efficacy and Control Beliefs Predict Exercise Behavior After an Exercise Intervention for Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Neupert, Shevaun D.; Lachman, Margie E.; Whitbourne, Stacey B.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior during and after a strength training intervention program with older adults. A model with cross-lagged and contemporaneous paths was tested with structural equations. Within testing occasions, higher physical resistance was related to greater beliefs in efficacy and control over exercise. At 3 months into the intervention, those who had higher physical resistance were less likely to show subsequent changes in beliefs. Tho...

  16. Influences of Parental Control and Decision Making on Risk-Taking Behavior: A Cross-Cultural Study in the U.S. and Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Catherine Pei Wern

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to examine the use and the effect of parental control (i.e., behavioral control and psychological control) on risk-taking behavior among emerging adults by using a cross-cultural approach. Specifically, the current research aimed to examine the associations between parental control and risk-taking behavior as mediated by decision making processes. Data were drawn from college students from the U.S. (Asian American N = 164) and Taiwan (N = 156) by using ...

  17. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Synaptic Adaptation and CPG-based control for Complex Behaviors of Walking Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakyasingha eDasgupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present here, an artificial bio-inspired walking system which effectively combines biomechanics (in terms of the body and leg structures with the underlying neural mechanisms. The neural mechanisms consist of 1 central pattern generator based control for generating basic rhythmic patterns and coordinated movements, 2 distributed (at each leg recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and 3 searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different environmental conditions. Using simulations we show that this bio-inspired approach with adaptive internal models allows the walking robot to perform complex locomotive behaviors as observed in insects, including walking on undulated terrains, crossing large gaps as well as climbing over high obstacles. Furthermore we demonstrate that the newly developed recurrent network based approach to sensorimotor prediction outperforms the previous state of the art adaptive neuron

  18. How Do Price Minimizing Behaviors Impact Smoking Cessation? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC Four Country Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigar Nargis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines how price minimizing behaviors impact efforts to stop smoking. Data on 4,988 participants from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC Four-Country Survey who were smokers at baseline (wave 5 and interviewed at a 1 year follow-up were used. We examined whether price minimizing behaviors at baseline predicted: (1 cessation, (2 quit attempts, and (3 successful quit attempts at one year follow up using multivariate logistic regression modeling. A subset analysis included 3,387 participants who were current smokers at waves 5 and 6 and were followed through wave 7 to explore effects of changing purchase patterns on cessation. Statistical tests for interaction were performed to examine the joint effect of SES and price/tax avoidance behaviors on cessation outcomes. Smokers who engaged in any price/tax avoidance behaviors were 28% less likely to report cessation. Persons using low/untaxed sources were less likely to quit at follow up, those purchasing cartons were less likely to make quit attempts and quit, and those using discount cigarettes were less likely to succeed, conditional on making attempts. Respondents who utilized multiple behaviors simultaneously were less likely to make quit attempts and to succeed. SES did not modify the effects of price minimizing behaviors on cessation outcomes. The data from this paper indicate that the availability of lower priced cigarette alternatives may attenuate public health efforts aimed at to reduce reducing smoking prevalence through price and tax increases among all SES groups. This paper examines how price minimizing behaviors impact efforts to stop smoking. Data on 4,988 participants from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC Four-Country Survey who were smokers at baseline (wave 5 and interviewed at a 1 year follow-up were used. We examined whether price minimizing behaviors at baseline predicted: (1 cessation, (2 quit attempts, and (3 successful

  19. Metabolic behavior of bacterial biological control agents in soil and plant rhizospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control provides an attractive alternative to chemical pesticides for the control of plant diseases. To date, however, few biocontrol products have been developed successfully at the commercial level. This stems largely from variability in disease control performance that is often obser...

  20. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Background Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. Objective This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Methods Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Results Students remained weight stable (HW: −0.48+1.9 kg; control: −0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs −1

  1. The Effectiveness of “Improvement of Driver-Behavior Program” on Self-Control of Drunk Driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim TAYMUR

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study to evaluate the effectiveness of “Improvement of Driver-Behavior Program” on SelfControl of individuals whose driving licenses have been seized for two years due to drinking and driving. Methods: Study sample consisted of 60 volunteers whose driving licenses have been seized for two years due to getting stopped for drunk driving for the second time and who were participated in improvement of driver-behavior program. Self-Control Scale was administered to the group before, at the 6’th week and after the 12-week program. Results: When we examined the Self-Control Scale (SCL scores; means were 51±17.69. 6 at the first assessment, 54.23±15.61 at the 6’th week, and 48.86±17.76 at the 12’th of the program. Therefore, the alteration in Self-Control Scale Scores during the program was statistically not significant (F=1.434, p=0.236.Further pair-wise comparison revealed that only the difference between the SCL scores at 6’th and 12’th weeks was statistically significant (p=0.005.Besides, ANCOVA analysis revealed that the age had significant effect on the difference between the SCL scores at the 6’th and 12’th weeks (F=3.858, p=0.027. Conclusion: We conclude that the quality of “Driver-Behavior Improvement Program” should be enhanced by extending the duration of the education and addressing the age factor in improving self-control features of the relevant individuals

  2. The Undesirable Behaviors of Students in Academic Classrooms, and the Discipline Strategies Used by Faculty Members to Control Such Behaviors from the Perspective of the College of Education Students in King Saud University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Qahtani, Norah Saad Sultan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the undesirable students' behaviors in academic classrooms, and the disciplinary, preventive and therapeutic strategies that will be used by faculty members to control those behaviors from the perspective of the College of Education's students in King Saud University. The results of the study has shown that the…

  3. Talking with a Virtual Human: Controlling the Human Experience and Behavior in a Virtual Conversation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual humans are often designed to replace real humans in virtual reality applications for e.g., psychotherapy, education and entertainment. In general, applications with virtual humans are created for modifying a person's knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, emotions or behaviors. Reaching these intend

  4. A Placebo-Controlled Test of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Insomnia in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarczyk, Bruce; Stepanski, Edward; Fogg, Louis; Lopez, Martita; Barry, Paulette; Davis, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The present study tested cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia in older adults with osteoarthritis, coronary artery disease, or pulmonary disease. Ninety-two participants (mean age = 69 years) were randomly assigned to classroom CBT or stress management and wellness (SMW) training, which served as a placebo condition. Compared with SMW,…

  5. Neural mechanisms of female sexual behavior in the rat; comparison with male ejaculatory control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veening, J.G.; Coolen, L.M.; Gerrits, P.O.

    2014-01-01

    The sequential organization of sexual behavior of the female rat is described, eventually leading to the lordotic posture, shown during mating. A complex set of signals: olfactory, cutaneous sensory as well as genitosensory, is guiding the female to this specific posture, eventually. Genitosensory s

  6. Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for female patients with eating disorders: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurne, E.D. ter; Haan, H.A. de; Postel, M.G.; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Nagel, J.E.L. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. Objective: This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy

  7. Pilot Control Behavior Discrepancies Between Real and Simulated Flight Caused by Limited Motion Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, P.M.T.

    2011-01-01

    Flight simulators provide a flexible, efficient, and safe environment for research and training at much lower costs than real flight. The ultimate validity of any simulation would be achieved when – for a particular task – human cognitive and psychomotor behavior in the simulator corresponds precise

  8. A Waitlist-Controlled Trial of Behavioral Parent Training for Fathers of Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E.; Cunningham, Charles E.; Yu, Jihnhee; Gangloff, Brian; Buck, Melina; Linke, Stuart; Gormley, Matthew; Gera, Shradha

    2012-01-01

    Fathers, in general, have been underrepresented in studies of parent training outcome for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a behavioral parent training program developed expressly for fathers. The present investigation randomly assigned 55 fathers of children…

  9. Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Female Patients With Eating Disorders: Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurne, ter E.D.; Haan, de H.A.; Postel, M.G.; Palen, van der Job; VanDerNagel, Joanneke E.L.; Jong, de Cor A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. Objective: This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therap

  10. Peripheral electrical stimulation in Alzheimer's disease - A randomized controlled trial on cognition and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, KRA; Scheltens, P; Luijpen, MW; Sergeant, JA; Scherder, EJA

    2005-01-01

    In a number of studies, peripheral electrical nerve stimulation has been applied to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients who lived in a nursing home. Improvements were observed in memory, verbal fluency, affective behavior, activities of daily living and on the rest-activity rhythm and pupillary light

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD in Children and Adolescents: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Patrick; Yule, William; Perrin, Sean; Tranah, Troy; Dagleish, Tim; Clark, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of individual trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children and young people. Method: Following a 4-week symptom-monitoring baseline period, 24 children and young people (8-18 years old) who met full "DSM-IV" PTSD diagnostic criteria after…

  12. Internet-based exposure and behavioral activation for complicated grief and rumination: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Eisma; P.A. Boelen; J. van den Bout; W. Stroebe; H.A. Schut; J. Lancee; M.S. Stroebe

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness and feasibility of therapist-guided Internet-delivered exposure (EX) and behavioral activation (BA) for complicated grief and rumination. Forty-seven bereaved individuals with elevated levels of complicated grief and grief rumination were randomly assigned to th

  13. Internet-Based Exposure and Behavioral Activation for Complicated Grief and Rumination : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisma, M.C.; Boelen, P.A.; van den Bout, J.; Stroebe, Wolfgang; Schut, H.A.W.; Lancee, Jaap; Stroebe, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness and feasibility of therapist-guided Internet-delivered exposure (EX) and behavioral activation (BA) for complicated grief and rumination. Forty-seven bereaved individuals with elevated levels of complicated grief and grief rumination were randomly assigned to th

  14. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Family Cognitive-Behavioral Preventive Intervention for Children of Depressed Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compas, Bruce E.; Forehand, Rex; Keller, Gary; Champion, Jennifer E.; Rakow, Aaron; Reeslund, Kristen L.; McKee, Laura; Fear, Jessica M.; Colletti, Christina J. M.; Hardcastle, Emily; Merchant, Mary Jane; Roberts, Lori; Potts, Jennifer; Garai, Emily; Coffelt, Nicole; Roland, Erin; Sterba, Sonya K.; Cole, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A family cognitive-behavioral preventive intervention for parents with a history of depression and their 9-15-year-old children was compared with a self-study written information condition in a randomized clinical trial (n = 111 families). Outcomes were assessed at post-intervention (2 months), after completion of 4 monthly booster sessions (6…

  15. BMI, Body Image, Emotional Well-Being and Weight-Control Behaviors in Urban African American Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Delenya; Belcher, Harolyn M.E.; Young, Allen; Gibson, Lillian Williams; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Trent, Maria

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE While urban African American adolescents face significant health disparities associated with overweight and obesity that follow them into adulthood; there is limited data on body image, emotional well-being, and weight control behaviors in this population to design effective public health interventions. OBJECTIVE This study was designed to understand the association of weight status to adolescent weight control, body image, and emotional well-being responses, in African American high school students. DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS The study cohort consisted of 776 students, mean age 15.8 years (±1.2). Data from Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services (GAPS) student surveys and anthropometric studies were collected at School-Based Health Centers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Associations between adolescent responses on the GAPS and body mass index (BMI) status (healthy weight: 5th to less than 85th percentile, overweight: 85th to less than 95th percentile, obese: 95th percentile or greater) were estimated using logistic regression and dose- response plots. RESULTS There were statistically significant associations between BMI category and weight control (ranging from a mean 5.18 to 7.68 odds of obesity) and body image (3.40 to 13.26 odds of obesity) responses. Responses to weight control and body image questions exhibited a dose-response for odds of overweight and obesity. Feelings of depressed mood were associated with obesity (1.47 times the odds of obesity compared to students who did not endorse depressed mood; 95% CI, 1.01 to 2.13) but not overweight status. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE Overweight and obese urban African American adolescents are more likely to screen positively on weight control risk behaviors and negative body image questions than their normal weight peers. The weight control and body image measures on the GAPS may provide information to identify youth in need of services and those motivated for brief school-based weight control

  16. Separable roles for attentional control sub-systems in reading tasks: a combined behavioral and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnen, S K Z; Petersen, Steven E; Schlaggar, Bradley L

    2015-05-01

    Attentional control is important both for learning to read and for performing difficult reading tasks. A previous study invoked 2 mechanisms to explain reaction time (RT) differences between reading tasks with variable attentional demands. The present study combined behavioral and neuroimaging measures to test the hypotheses that there are 2 mechanisms of interaction between attentional control and reading; that these mechanisms are dissociable both behaviorally and neuro-anatomically; and that the 2 mechanisms involve functionally separable control systems. First, RT evidence was found in support of the 2-mechanism model, corroborating the previous study. Next, 2 sets of brain regions were identified as showing functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygen level-dependent activity that maps onto the 2-mechanism distinction. One set included bilateral Cingulo-opercular regions and mostly right-lateralized Dorsal Attention regions (CO/DA+). This CO/DA+ region set showed response properties consistent with a role in reporting which processing pathway (phonological or lexical) was biased for a particular trial. A second set was composed primarily of left-lateralized Frontal-parietal (FP) regions. Its signal properties were consistent with a role in response checking. These results demonstrate how the subcomponents of attentional control interact with subcomponents of reading processes in healthy young adults. PMID:24275830

  17. College drinking behaviors: mediational links between parenting styles, impulse control, and alcohol-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patock-Peckham, Julie A; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A

    2006-06-01

    Mediational links between parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive), impulsiveness (general control), drinking control (specific control), and alcohol use and abuse were tested. A pattern-mixture approach (for modeling non-ignorable missing data) with multiple-group structural equation models with 421 (206 female, 215 male) college students was used. Gender was examined as a potential moderator of parenting styles on control processes related to drinking. Specifically, the parent-child gender match was found to have implications for increased levels of impulsiveness (a significant mediator of parenting effects on drinking control). These findings suggest that a parent with a permissive parenting style who is the same gender as the respondent can directly influence control processes and indirectly influence alcohol use and abuse.

  18. The efficiency of direct torque control for electric vehicle behavior improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasbaoui Brahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the electric vehicle motorization control takes a great interest of industrials for commercialized electric vehicles. This paper is one example of the proposed control methods that ensure both safety and stability the electric vehicle by the means of Direct Torque Control (DTC. For motion of the vehicle the electric drive consists of four wheels: two front ones for steering and two rear ones for propulsion equipped with two induction motors, due to their lightweight simplicity and high performance. Acceleration and steering are ensured by the electronic differential, permitting safe and reliable steering at any curve. The direct torque control ensures efficiently controlled vehicle. Electric vehicle direct torque control is simulated in MATLAB SIMULINK environment. Electric vehicle (EV demonstrated satisfactory results in all type of roads constraints: straight, ramp, downhill and bends.

  19. Pilot Control Behavior Model During PIOs%PIO研究中的驾驶员控制行为模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵桂龙; 徐浩军; 蔡军; 裴彬彬

    2012-01-01

    建立科学有效的驾驶员控制行为模型是驾驶员诱发振荡(PIO)研究的基础.首先,根据驾驶员控制模式不同,分别建立了驾驶员的补偿、追踪和同步控制行为模型;其次,通过仿真计算研究了不同驾驶员控制行为模型对飞机PIO易感性的影响,建立含有舵机速率限制环节的人机闭环系统,使用描述函数法预测不同驾驶员控制行为模式下某型飞机的PIO发生频率.仿真结果表明,相对于驾驶员的补偿行为,同步行为更易诱发Ⅱ型PIO.%It is the foundation of the research on Pilot Induced Oscillations ( PIO) to establish scientific and effective pilot control behavior models. Firstly, compensatory, pursuit and synchronous pilot models were built up according to the differences of pilot control modes. Secondly, the impact of different pilot control models on aircraft PIO susceptibility was studied through simulation. The closed-loop aircraft-pilot system including rate limiting element was established. The describing function method was applied to predict PIO frequency of one plane considering different pilot control models. The result showed that compared with compensatory behavior, synchronous behavior is more possible to cause Category II PIO.

  20. Analysis of torque transmitting behavior and wheel slip prevention control during regenerative braking for high speed EMU trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Xu, Guo-Qing; Zheng, Chun-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The wheel-rail adhesion control for regenerative braking systems of high speed electric multiple unit trains is crucial to maintaining the stability, improving the adhesion utilization, and achieving deep energy recovery. There remain technical challenges mainly because of the nonlinear, uncertain, and varying features of wheel-rail contact conditions. This research analyzes the torque transmitting behavior during regenerative braking, and proposes a novel methodology to detect the wheel-rail adhesion stability. Then, applications to the wheel slip prevention during braking are investigated, and the optimal slip ratio control scheme is proposed, which is based on a novel optimal reference generation of the slip ratio and a robust sliding mode control. The proposed methodology achieves the optimal braking performance without the wheel-rail contact information. Numerical simulation results for uncertain slippery rails verify the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  1. Dynamic behavior of microscale particles controlled by standing bulk acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the dynamic behavior of a spherical microparticle submerged in a fluid medium, driven to the node of a standing bulk acoustic wave created by two opposing transducers. We derive the dynamics of the fluid-particle system taking into account the acoustic radiation force and the time-dependent and time-independent drag force acting on the particle. Using this dynamic model, we characterize the transient and steady-state behavior of the fluid-particle system as a function of the particle and fluid properties and the transducer operating parameters. The results show that the settling time and percent overshoot of the particle trajectory are dependent on the ratio of the acoustic radiation force and time-independent damping force. In addition, we show that the particle oscillates around the node of the standing wave with an amplitude that depends on the ratio of the time-dependent drag forces and the particle inertia.

  2. Internet-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Procrastination: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Rozental, Alexander; Carlbring, Per

    2013-01-01

    Background Procrastination, to voluntarily delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse-off for the delay, is a persistent behavior pattern that can cause major psychological suffering. Approximately half of the student population and 15%-20% of the adult population are presumed having substantial difficulties due to chronic and recurrent procrastination in their everyday life. However, preconceptions and a lack of knowledge restrict the availability of adequate care. Cogn...

  3. Incipient corrosion behavior of Haynes 230 under a controlled reducing atmosphere at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Hsiao-Ming; Stubbins, James F.

    2012-08-01

    In situ thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) was used to investigate the incipient corrosion behavior of alloy 230 exposed under a reducing environment in a temperature range of 850-1000 °C. Both oxidation and loss of alloying elements of alloy 230 were observed to occur concurrently in these conditions. The surface oxide which formed on the substrate does not appear to be as effective in providing a protective layer during the incipient corrosion period.

  4. Disease and Behavioral Dynamics for Brucellosis Control in Elk and Cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Fang; Horan, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates private responses and ecological impacts of policies proposed to confront the problem of brucellosis being spread from elk to cattle in Wyoming. The policies consist of combinations of changes in elk feeding and population levels. Farmers’ responses to these dynamics are modeled along with the associated impacts to livestock population dynamics. Our findings suggest that feedbacks between jointly determined disease dynamics and decentralized economic behavior matter, a...

  5. GABAergic Control of Critical Developmental Periods for Anxiety- and Depression-Related Behavior in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Qiuying Shen; Thomas Fuchs; Nadia Sahir; Bernhard Luscher

    2012-01-01

    Vulnerability for anxiety and depressive disorders is thought to have origins in early life and is increasingly recognized to involve deficits in GABAergic neurotransmission. Mice that were rendered heterozygous for the γ2 subunit gene of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) show behavioral, cognitive, neuroendocrine and pharmacologic features expected of a mouse model of melancholic anxious depression, including reduced survival of adult-born hippocampal neurons. Here we embarked on elucidating the...

  6. Predicting Lane Keeping Behavior of Visually Distracted Drivers Using Inverse Suboptimal Control

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Felix; Bieg, Hans-Joachim; Manstetten, Dietrich; Herman, Michael; Stiefelhagen, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Driver distraction strongly contributes to crash-risk. Therefore, assistance systems that warn the driver if her distraction poses a hazard to road safety, promise a great safety benefit. Current approaches either seek to detect critical situations using environmental sensors or estimate a driver's attention state solely from her behavior. However, this neglects that driving situation, driver deficiencies and compensation strategies altogether determine the risk of an accident. This work prop...

  7. Driving Behavior Analysis with Smartphones: Insights from a Controlled Field Study

    OpenAIRE

    Paefgen, Johannes; Kehr, Flavius; Zhai, Yudan; Michahelles, Florian

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate a mobile application that assesses driving behavior based on in-vehicle acceleration measurements and gives corresponding feedback to drivers. In the insurance business, such applications have recently gained traction as a viable alternative to the monitoring of drivers via "black boxes" installed in vehicles, which lacks interaction opportunities and is perceived as privacy intrusive by policyholders. However, pose uncertainty and other noise-inducing factors make smartphones pot...

  8. Dynamic nonlinear feedback for temperature control of continuous stirred reactor with complex behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo A. López Pérez; Ricardo Aguilar‐López

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to present an alternative methodology for the design of a class of integral high order slidingmodecontroller applied to a class of continuous chemical reactor with complex behavior for temperature tracking purposes.The proposed design is based on the differential geometry framework, where the named reaching trajectory contains a highorder sliding mode term in order to diminish chattering. Considering that the proposed technique is model based, an observerbas...

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Family Cognitive-Behavioral Preventive Intervention for Children of Depressed Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Compas, Bruce E.; Forehand, Rex; Keller, Gary; Champion, Jennifer E.; Rakow, Aaron; Reeslund, Kristen L.; McKee, Laura; Fear, Jessica M.; Colletti, Christina J. M.; HARDCASTLE, EMILY; Merchant, Mary Jane; Roberts, Lori; Potts, Jennifer; Garai, Emily; Coffelt, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    A family cognitive-behavioral preventive intervention for parents with a history of depression and their 9–15-year-old children was compared with a self-study written information condition in a randomized clinical trial (n = 111 families). Outcomes were assessed at postintervention (2 months), after completion of 4 monthly booster sessions (6 months), and at 12-month follow-up. Children were assessed by child reports on depressive symptoms, internalizing problems, and externalizing problems; ...

  10. Molecular-Level Tuning of Cellular Autonomy Controls the Collective Behaviors of Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, Théo; Youk, Hyun

    2015-11-25

    A rigorous understanding of how multicellular behaviors arise from the actions of single cells requires quantitative frameworks that bridge the gap between genetic circuits, the arrangement of cells in space, and population-level behaviors. Here, we provide such a framework for a ubiquitous class of multicellular systems-namely, "secrete-and-sense cells" that communicate by secreting and sensing a signaling molecule. By using formal, mathematical arguments and introducing the concept of a phenotype diagram, we show how these cells tune their degrees of autonomous and collective behavior to realize distinct single-cell and population-level phenotypes; these phenomena have biological analogs, such as quorum sensing or paracrine signaling. We also define the "entropy of population," a measurement of the number of arrangements that a population of cells can assume, and demonstrate how a decrease in the entropy of population accompanies the formation of ordered spatial patterns. Our conceptual framework ties together diverse systems, including tissues and microbes, with common principles. PMID:27136241

  11. Differential reinforcement of other behavior and noncontingent reinforcement as control procedures during the modification of a preschooler's compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, E M; Holmberg, M C; LeBlanc, J M

    1975-01-01

    Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) and noncontingent reinforcement were compared as control procedures during the modification of a 3-yr-old preschooler's compliance. The recorded reinforcer was teacher proximity (within 3 ft (0.9) of the subject for at least 5 sec) which was often accompanied by positive verbal comments that varied in content across experimental conditions. The verabal content during contingent reinforcement might have been: "Thank you for picking up the blocks"; during non-contingent reinforcement: "You're wearing a pretty dress"; and during DRO: "I don't blame you for not picking up because it isn't any fun". Contingent reinforcement increased compliance in all manipulation conditions. Noncontingent reinforcement decreased compliance during two reversal conditions. However, the behavior was variable and did not decrease to the low levels reached during the two DRO reversals.

  12. Within-Subject Reversibility of Discriminative Function in the Composite-Stimulus Control of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stanley J.; Kearns, David N.; Antoshina, Maria

    2009-01-01

    According to the composite-stimulus control model (Weiss, 1969, 1972b), an individual discriminative stimulus (S[superscript D]) is composed of that S[superscript D]'s on-state plus the off-states of all other relevant S[superscript D]s. The present experiment investigated the reversibility of composite-stimulus control. Separate groups of rats…

  13. Does executive control relate to sacrificial behavior during conflicts of interests?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, T.M.; Karremans, J.C.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Why is it that some people are better able to sacrifice their own immediate interest for the sake of their partner than others? We conducted two studies to test whether an individual's level of executive control plays a role in answering this question. Study 1 demonstrated that executive control is

  14. Self-control trumps work motivation in predicting job search behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baay, Pieter E.; de Ridder, Denise T D; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.; van der Lippe, T.; van Aken, Marcel A G

    2014-01-01

    Current labor market entrants face an increasingly challenging job search process. Effective guidance of job seekers requires identification of relevant job search skills. Self-control (i.e., the ability to control one's thoughts, actions, and response tendencies in view of a long-term goal, such as

  15. Tracking Controller Design for Diving Behavior of an Unmanned Underwater Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsiang Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study has investigated the almost disturbance decoupling problem of nonlinear uncertain control systems via the fuzzy feedback linearization approach. The significant dedication of this paper is to organize a control algorithm such that the closed-loop system is active for given initial condition and bounded tracking trajectory with the input-to-state stability and almost disturbance decoupling performance. This study presents a feedback linearization controller for diving control of an unmanned underwater vehicle. Unmanned underwater vehicle proposes difficult control subject due to its nonlinear dynamics, uncertain models, and the existence of disturbances that are difficult to measure. In general, while investigating the diving dynamics of an unmanned underwater vehicle, the pitch angle is always assumed to be small. This assumption is a strong restricting constraint in many interesting practical applications and will be relaxed in this study.

  16. Genetic control of courtship behavior in the housefly: evidence for a conserved bifurcation of the sex-determining pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Meier

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster, genes of the sex-determination hierarchy orchestrate the development and differentiation of sex-specific tissues, establishing sex-specific physiology and neural circuitry. One of these sex-determination genes, fruitless (fru, plays a key role in the formation of neural circuits underlying Drosophila male courtship behavior. Conservation of fru gene structure and sex-specific expression has been found in several insect orders, though it is still to be determined whether a male courtship role for the gene is employed in these species due to the lack of mutants and homologous experimental evidence. We have isolated the fru ortholog (Md-fru from the common housefly, Musca domestica, and show the gene's conserved genomic structure. We demonstrate that male-specific Md-fru transcripts arise by conserved mechanisms of sex-specific splicing. Here we show that Md-fru, is similarly involved in controlling male courtship behavior. A male courtship behavioral function for Md-fru was revealed by the behavioral and neuroanatomical analyses of a hypomorphic allele, Md-tra(man , which specifically disrupted the expression of Md-fru in males, leading to severely impaired male courtship behavior. In line with a role in nervous system development, we found that expression of Md-fru was confined to neural tissues in the brain, most prominently in optic neuropil and in peripheral sensory organs. We propose that, like in Drosophila, overt sexual differentiation of the housefly depends on a sex-determining pathway that bifurcates downstream of the Md-tra gene to coordinate dimorphic development of non-neuronal tissues mediated by Md-dsx with that of neuronal tissues largely mediated by Md-fru.

  17. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials examining the effectiveness of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) on psychological and behavioral outcomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heather Ann Hausenblas; Kacey Heekin; Heather Lee Mutchie; Stephen Anton

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Throughout the past three decades, increased scientiifc attention has been given to examining saffron’s (Crocus sativusL.) use as a potential therapeutic or preventive agent for a number of health conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and depression. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this systematic review is to examine and categorize the current state of scientiifc evidence from randomized controled trials (RCTs) regarding the efifcacy of saffron on psychological/behavioral outcomes. SEARCH STRATEGY: Electronic and non-electronic systematic searches were conducted to identify al relevant human clinical research on saffron. The search strategy was extensive and was designed according to the “Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).” Reference lists of articles that met the inclusion criteria were searched. Only English language studies were reviewed. INCLUSION CRITERIA:Saffron trials in combination with other substances and saffron safety studies were considered, in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Included studies must have a control group. Included studies must measure a physiological and/or a behavioral outcome. DATA EXTRACTION AND ANALYSIS:The methodological quality of al included studies was independently evaluated by two reviewers using the Jadad score. Mean scores andP-values of measures were compared both inter- and intra-study for each parameter (i.e., depression). RESULTS:Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. These studies examined the effects of saffron on psychological/behavioral outcomes of: major depressive disorder (n = 6), premenstrual syndrome (n = 1), sexual dysfunction and infertility (n = 4), and weight loss/snacking behaviors (n = 1). The data from these studies support the efifcacy of saffron as compared to placebo in improving the folowing conditions:depressive symptoms (compared to anti-depressants and placebo), premenstrual symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. In addition

  18. Impact of Two Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Interventions on Risky Sexual Behavior: A Three-Arm Cluster Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Michael R.; van Zyl, Michiel A.; Antle, Becky F.; Langley, Cheri N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the efficacy of Reducing the Risk (RTR) and Love Notes (LN) on reducing risky sexual behavior among youths yet to experience or cause a pregnancy. Methods. The four dependent variables were ever had sex, condom use, birth control use, and number of sexual partners at 3- and 6-month follow-up in a 3-arm cluster randomized controlled trial of 1448 impoverished youths, aged 14 to 19 years, in 23 community-based organizations in Louisville, Kentucky, from September 2011 through March 2014. Results. At 3 and 6 months, compared with the control condition, youths in RTR reported fewer sexual partners and greater use of birth control. At 6 months, LN participants reported greater use of birth control and condoms, fewer sexual partners, and were less likely to have ever had sex compared with the control condition. Conclusions. We provided additional evidence for the continued efficacy of RTR and the first rigorous study of LN, which embeds sex education into a larger curriculum on healthy relationships and violence prevention. PMID:27689500

  19. The transcription factor Runx2 is under circadian control in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and functions in the control of rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E Reale

    Full Text Available Runx2, a member of the family of runt-related transcription factors, is rhythmically expressed in bone and may be involved in circadian rhythms in bone homeostasis and osteogenesis. Runx2 is also expressed in the brain, but its function is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in the brain, Runx2 may interact with clock-controlled genes to regulate circadian rhythms in behavior. First, we demonstrated diurnal and circadian rhythms in the expression of Runx2 in the mouse brain. Expression of Runx2 mRNA and protein mirrored that of the core clock genes, Period1 and Period2, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the paraventricular nucleus and the olfactory bulb. The rhythm of Runx2 expression was eliminated in the SCN of Bmal1(-/- mice. Moreover, by crossbreeding mPer2(Luc mice with Runx2(+/- mice and recording bioluminescence rhythms, a significant lengthening of the period of rhythms was detected in cultured SCN of Runx2(-/- animals compared to either Runx2(+/- or Runx2(+/+ mice. Behavioral analyses of Runx2 mutant mice revealed that Runx2(+/- animals displayed a significantly lengthened free-running period of running wheel activity compared to Runx2(+/+ littermates. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for clock gene-mediated rhythmic expression of Runx2, and its functional role in regulating circadian period at the level of the SCN and behavior.

  20. Human activity under high pressure: A case study on fluctuation scaling of air traffic controller's communication behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Zhang, Qiqian; Zhu, Chenping; Hu, Minghua; Duong, Vu

    2016-01-01

    Recent human dynamics research has unmasked astonishing statistical characteristics such as scaling behaviors in human daily activities. However, less is known about the general mechanism that governs the task-specific activities. In particular, whether scaling law exists in human activities under high pressure remains an open question. In air traffic management system, safety is the most important factor to be concerned by air traffic controllers who always work under high pressure, which provides a unique platform to study human activity. Here we extend fluctuation scaling method to study air traffic controller's communication activity by investigating two empirical communication datasets. Taken the number of controlled flights as the size-like parameter, we show that the relationships between the average communication activity and its standard deviation in both datasets can be well described by Taylor's power law, with scaling exponent α ≈ 0.77 ± 0.01 for the real operational data and α ≈ 0.54 ± 0.01 for the real-time training data. The difference between the exponents suggests that human dynamics under pressure is more likely dominated by the exogenous force. Our findings may lead to further understanding of human behavior.

  1. Meta-Analysis of Facial Emotion Recognition in Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia: Comparison With Alzheimer Disease and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Emre; Velakoulis, Dennis; Walterfang, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Behavioral disturbances and lack of empathy are distinctive clinical features of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) in comparison to Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this meta-analytic review was to compare facial emotion recognition performances of bvFTD with healthy controls and AD. The current meta-analysis included a total of 19 studies and involved comparisons of 288 individuals with bvFTD and 329 healthy controls and 162 bvFTD and 147 patients with AD. Facial emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to the healthy controls (d = 1.81) and AD (d = 1.23). In bvFTD, recognition of negative emotions, especially anger (d = 1.48) and disgust (d = 1.41), were severely impaired. Emotion recognition was significantly impaired in bvFTD in comparison to AD in all emotions other than happiness. Impairment of emotion recognition is a relatively specific feature of bvFTD. Routine assessment of social-cognitive abilities including emotion recognition can be helpful in better differentiating between cortical dementias such as bvFTD and AD. PMID:27056068

  2. Stress and counterproductive work behavior: multiple relationships between demands, control, and soldier indiscipline over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jennifer S; Sinclair, Robert R; Mohr, Cynthia D; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Salvi, Angela D; Adler, Amy B

    2009-07-01

    Cognitive Resource Theory (CRT) suggests that under high levels of stress, employees are more prone to committing indiscipline. As few studies have examined this relationship over time, the authors conducted a six-wave longitudinal study examining the relationship of soldiers' indiscipline with work demands and control. The study included archival data collected quarterly over 2 years from 1,701 soldiers representing 10 units in garrison (Germany and Italy), in training rotations (Grafenwoehr, Germany), and on peacekeeping deployments (Kosovo, Kuwait). No main effects were found for work overload, and the findings for the moderating effects of control were contradictory. Within each time point, as work overload increased, soldiers who felt less control committed more indiscipline, supporting CRT. Over time, however, as work overload increased, soldiers who perceived less control 6 months earlier committed less indiscipline. Additionally, the authors found reverse causal effects for control such that prior perceptions of a lack of control were associated with indiscipline and prior incidents of indiscipline with less control. PMID:19586221

  3. Coming to grips with challenging behavior: a cluster randomized controlled trial on the effects of a multidisciplinary care program for challenging behavior in dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Smalbrugge, M.; Eefsting, J.A.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Gerritsen, D.L.; Pot, A.M.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Grip on Challenging Behavior care program was developed using the current guidelines and models on managing challenging behavior in dementia in nursing homes. It was hypothesized that the use of the care program would lead to a decrease in challenging behavior and in the prescription

  4. The Effect of Health Belief Model-Based Education on Knowledge and Prostate Cancer Screening Behaviors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate cancer has been reported as the second leading cause of cancer death among men in 2013. Prevention and early detection of cancer are considered as critical factors in controlling the disease and increasing the survival of patients. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of Health Belief Model (HBM-based education onknowledge and prostate cancer screening behaviors in a randomized controlled trial. Methods: This study was a non-blinded randomized controlled trial. We enrolled 210 men aged 50-70. Balanced block randomization method was used to randomize the final participants who had inclusion criteria into intervention (n=93 and control (n=87 groups. The participants of the intervention group attended training workshops based on HBM. Data were collected using three questionnaires, i.e. demographic questionnaire, Prostate Cancer Screening-Health Belief Model Scale (PCS-HBMS, and the Knowledge about Prostate Cancer Screening questionnaire, all given before and immediately one month after the intervention. Results: The mean scores of the perceived susceptibility, severity, barriers and benefits increased significantly after the intervention (P>0.05 in the intervention group. In the control group, such a difference was reported only for perceived susceptibility (P>0.05. The rate of participation in prostate cancer screening in the intervention group increased from 7.5% to 24% and 43.3% one month and three months after the intervention, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the health education programs designed based on HBM could positively affect prostate cancer preventive behaviors of individuals by improving their knowledge level and leaving positive effects on perceived susceptibility and severity as well as considering the perceived barriers, benefits and health motivations.

  5. Impulse control and underlying functions of the left DLPFC mediate age-related and age-independent individual differences in strategic social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeis, Nikolaus; Bernhardt, Boris C; Singer, Tania

    2012-03-01

    Human social exchange is often characterized by conflicts of interest requiring strategic behavior for their resolution. To investigate the development of the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying strategic behavior, we studied children's decisions while they played two types of economic exchange games with differing demands of strategic behavior. We show an increase of strategic behavior with age, which could not be explained by age-related changes in social preferences but instead by developmental differences in impulsivity and associated brain functions of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Furthermore, observed differences in cortical thickness of lDLPFC were predictive of differences in impulsivity and strategic behavior irrespective of age. We conclude that egoistic behavior in younger children is not caused by a lack of understanding right or wrong, but by the inability to implement behavioral control when tempted to act selfishly; a function relying on brain regions maturing only late in ontogeny.

  6. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  7. Do Online Companies Control the Behavior of Online Consumers?: Exploratory Study on the Impacting Variables from Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNAMALAI MANICKAM SAKKTHIVEL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to design constructs such as internal and external variables and test the impact of the same on online buying behaviour. The constructs focus on the controlling aspect of a company on online consumer purchase. The data were collected from 168 online users and results were tested through simple and multiple linear regression model. The results revealed that both the constructs are consistent and have an impact over online buying behavior. However, the external variables found to have more impact over online purchase that that of the internal variables.

  8. Impulsive choice and response in dopamine agonist-related impulse control behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Reynolds, Brady; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Skaljic, Meliha; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Fernandez, Hubert; Potenza, Marc N; Dolan, Raymond J; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Dopaminergic medication-related Impulse Control Disorders (ICDs) such as pathological gambling and compulsive shopping have been reported in Parkinson disease (PD). Hypothesis We hypothesized that dopamine agonists (DAs) would be associated with greater impulsive choice, or greater discounting of delayed rewards, in PD patients with ICDs (PDI). Methods Fourteen PDI patients, 14 PD controls without ICDs and 16 medication-free matched normal controls were tested on (i) the Experiential Discounting Task (EDT), a feedback-based intertemporal choice task, (ii) spatial working memory and (iii) attentional set shifting. The EDT was used to assess impulsivity choice (hyperbolic K-value), reaction time (RT) and decision conflict RT (the RT difference between high conflict and low conflict choices). PDI patients and PD controls were tested on and off DA. Results On the EDT, there was a group by medication interaction effect [F(1,26)=5.62; p=0.03] with pairwise analyses demonstrating that DA status was associated with increased impulsive choice in PDI patients (p=0.02) but not in PD controls (p=0.37). PDI patients also had faster RT compared to PD controls F(1,26)=7.51 p=0.01]. DA status was associated with shorter RT [F(3,24)=8.39, p=0.001] and decision conflict RT [F(1,26)=6.16, p=0.02] in PDI patients but not in PD controls. There were no correlations between different measures of impulsivity. PDI patients on DA had greater spatial working memory impairments compared to PD controls on DA (t=2.13, df=26, p=0.04). Conclusion Greater impulsive choice, faster RT, faster decision conflict RT and executive dysfunction may contribute to ICDs in PD. PMID:19838863

  9. Behavior of response controlled and seismically isolated buildings during severe earthquakes in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive control techniques have been widely used in Japan since the 1995 Kobe earthquake. Until the end of 2011, nearly 3000 buildings and 4000 private houses are seismically isolated. The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake, which caused casualties more than 18300 people and collapse of 127830 building, allowed testing the effective seismic performance of several base isolated buildings. This is quite important for further dissemination of response control and seismic isolation technologies and to prove their effectiveness

  10. Instrument scanning and controlling: Using eye movement data to understand pilot behavior and strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, A. O.

    1980-01-01

    Eye movement data and other parameters including instrument readings, aircraft state and position variables, and control maneuvers were recorded while pilots flew ILS simulations in a B 737. The experiment itself employed seven airline pilots, each of whom flew approximately 40 approach/landing sequences. The simulator was equipped with a night visual scene but the scene was fogged out down to approximately 60 meters (200 ft). The instrument scanning appeared to follow aircraft parameters not physical position of instruments. One important implication of the results is: pilots look for categories or packets of information. Control inputs were tabulated according to throttle, wheel position, column, and pitch trim changes. Three seconds of eye movements before and after the control input were then obtained. Analysis of the eye movement data for the controlling periods showed clear patterns. The results suggest a set of miniscan patterns which are used according to the specific details of the situation. A model is developed which integrates scanning and controlling. Differentiations are made between monitoring and controlling scans.

  11. The Treatment of Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children: A Controlled Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioral Family Intervention and Standard Pediatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Conducted controlled clinical trial involving 44 children with recurrent abdominal pain randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral family intervention (CBFI) or standard pediatric care (SPC). Both treatments resulted in significant improvements on measures of pain intensity and pain behavior. CBFI group had higher rate of complete elimination of…

  12. Self-Efficacy and Social Support Mediate the Relationship between Internal Health Locus of Control and Health Behaviors in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Joni; Wilcox, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: Internal health locus of control has been associated with positive health outcomes and behaviors. Understanding the mechanisms of this relationship are key to designing and implementing effective health behavior intervention programs. Purpose: The purpose was to examine whether self-efficacy and social support mediate the relationship…

  13. Experimental Evidence for Differential Susceptibility: Dopamine D4 Receptor Polymorphism (DRD4 VNTR) Moderates Intervention Effects on Toddlers' Externalizing Behavior in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Pijlman, Femke T. A.; Mesman, Judi; Juffer, Femmie

    2008-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial we tested the role of genetic differences in explaining variability in intervention effects on child externalizing behavior. One hundred fifty-seven families with 1- to 3-year-old children screened for their relatively high levels of externalizing behavior participated in a study implementing Video-feedback…

  14. Child Effortful Control as a Mediator of Parenting Practices on Externalizing Behavior: Evidence for a Sex-Differentiated Pathway across the Transition from Preschool to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hyein; Olson, Sheryl L.; Sameroff, Arnold J.; Sexton, Holly R.

    2011-01-01

    An explanatory model for children's development of disruptive behavior across the transition from preschool to school was tested. It was hypothesized that child effortful control would mediate the effects of parenting on children's externalizing behavior and that child sex would moderate these relations. Participants were 241 children (123 boys)…

  15. A low-cost, computer-controlled robotic flower system for behavioral experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusela, Erno; Lämsä, Juho

    2016-04-01

    Human observations during behavioral studies are expensive, time-consuming, and error prone. For this reason, automatization of experiments is highly desirable, as it reduces the risk of human errors and workload. The robotic system we developed is simple and cheap to build and handles feeding and data collection automatically. The system was built using mostly off-the-shelf components and has a novel feeding mechanism that uses servos to perform refill operations. We used the robotic system in two separate behavioral studies with bumblebees (Bombus terrestris): The system was used both for training of the bees and for the experimental data collection. The robotic system was reliable, with no flight in our studies failing due to a technical malfunction. The data recorded were easy to apply for further analysis. The software and the hardware design are open source. The development of cheap open-source prototyping platforms during the recent years has opened up many possibilities in designing of experiments. Automatization not only reduces workload, but also potentially allows experimental designs never done before, such as dynamic experiments, where the system responds to, for example, learning of the animal. We present a complete system with hardware and software, and it can be used as such in various experiments requiring feeders and collection of visitation data. Use of the system is not limited to any particular experimental setup or even species. PMID:27066245

  16. The decision to engage cognitive control is driven by expected reward-value: neural and behavioral evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Dixon

    Full Text Available Cognitive control is a fundamental skill reflecting the active use of task-rules to guide behavior and suppress inappropriate automatic responses. Prior work has traditionally used paradigms in which subjects are told when to engage cognitive control. Thus, surprisingly little is known about the factors that influence individuals' initial decision of whether or not to act in a reflective, rule-based manner. To examine this, we took three classic cognitive control tasks (Stroop, Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Go/No-Go task and created novel 'free-choice' versions in which human subjects were free to select an automatic, pre-potent action, or an action requiring rule-based cognitive control, and earned varying amounts of money based on their choices. Our findings demonstrated that subjects' decision to engage cognitive control was driven by an explicit representation of monetary rewards expected to be obtained from rule-use. Subjects rarely engaged cognitive control when the expected outcome was of equal or lesser value as compared to the value of the automatic response, but frequently engaged cognitive control when it was expected to yield a larger monetary outcome. Additionally, we exploited fMRI-adaptation to show that the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC represents associations between rules and expected reward outcomes. Together, these findings suggest that individuals are more likely to act in a reflective, rule-based manner when they expect that it will result in a desired outcome. Thus, choosing to exert cognitive control is not simply a matter of reason and willpower, but rather, conforms to standard mechanisms of value-based decision making. Finally, in contrast to current models of LPFC function, our results suggest that the LPFC plays a direct role in representing motivational incentives.

  17. The decision to engage cognitive control is driven by expected reward-value: neural and behavioral evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Matthew L; Christoff, Kalina

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive control is a fundamental skill reflecting the active use of task-rules to guide behavior and suppress inappropriate automatic responses. Prior work has traditionally used paradigms in which subjects are told when to engage cognitive control. Thus, surprisingly little is known about the factors that influence individuals' initial decision of whether or not to act in a reflective, rule-based manner. To examine this, we took three classic cognitive control tasks (Stroop, Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Go/No-Go task) and created novel 'free-choice' versions in which human subjects were free to select an automatic, pre-potent action, or an action requiring rule-based cognitive control, and earned varying amounts of money based on their choices. Our findings demonstrated that subjects' decision to engage cognitive control was driven by an explicit representation of monetary rewards expected to be obtained from rule-use. Subjects rarely engaged cognitive control when the expected outcome was of equal or lesser value as compared to the value of the automatic response, but frequently engaged cognitive control when it was expected to yield a larger monetary outcome. Additionally, we exploited fMRI-adaptation to show that the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) represents associations between rules and expected reward outcomes. Together, these findings suggest that individuals are more likely to act in a reflective, rule-based manner when they expect that it will result in a desired outcome. Thus, choosing to exert cognitive control is not simply a matter of reason and willpower, but rather, conforms to standard mechanisms of value-based decision making. Finally, in contrast to current models of LPFC function, our results suggest that the LPFC plays a direct role in representing motivational incentives. PMID:23284730

  18. The control of automatic imitation based on bottom-up and top-down cues to animacy: Insights from brain and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapper, A.P.; Ramsey, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Cross, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Humans automatically imitate other people's actions during social interactions, building rapport and social closeness in the process. Although the behavioral consequences and neural correlates of imitation have been studied extensively, little is known about the neural mechanisms that control imitat

  19. Assessing Self-Control and Geosocial Networking App Behavior Among an Online Sample of Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beymer, Matthew R; Rossi, Aimee Drolet; Shu, Suzanne B

    2016-08-01

    Geosocial networking phone applications (GSN apps) used to meet sexual partners have become popular in the men who have sex with men (MSM) communities of the USA since 2009. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of gonorrhea and chlamydia and lower testing frequency for HIV testing among GSN app users when compared to non-users. The present study aims to determine the type, number, and frequency of apps used, as well as the association between dispositional self-control and health-related behaviors. Participants (n = 146) were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk program to respond to a brief GSN app marketing survey. Multivariate regression was used to determine differences in app priorities, length of app use, and number of sexual partners between high self-control and low self-control participants. A majority of the participants reported using Grindr (78 %) followed by Scruff (19 %), Growlr (12 %), and Jack'd (12 %). Most individuals used one app only (58 %), but a significant proportion reported using two apps (28 %) or three or more apps (14 %). Respondents with low self-control were more likely to report a higher number of hours using GSN apps and a higher number of sexual partners, controlling for race/ethnicity, education, employment, and HIV status. Given the popularity of this burgeoning communication medium, these findings have important implications for developing prevention resources for different segments of GSN app users.

  20. Assessing Self-Control and Geosocial Networking App Behavior Among an Online Sample of Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beymer, Matthew R; Rossi, Aimee Drolet; Shu, Suzanne B

    2016-08-01

    Geosocial networking phone applications (GSN apps) used to meet sexual partners have become popular in the men who have sex with men (MSM) communities of the USA since 2009. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of gonorrhea and chlamydia and lower testing frequency for HIV testing among GSN app users when compared to non-users. The present study aims to determine the type, number, and frequency of apps used, as well as the association between dispositional self-control and health-related behaviors. Participants (n = 146) were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk program to respond to a brief GSN app marketing survey. Multivariate regression was used to determine differences in app priorities, length of app use, and number of sexual partners between high self-control and low self-control participants. A majority of the participants reported using Grindr (78 %) followed by Scruff (19 %), Growlr (12 %), and Jack'd (12 %). Most individuals used one app only (58 %), but a significant proportion reported using two apps (28 %) or three or more apps (14 %). Respondents with low self-control were more likely to report a higher number of hours using GSN apps and a higher number of sexual partners, controlling for race/ethnicity, education, employment, and HIV status. Given the popularity of this burgeoning communication medium, these findings have important implications for developing prevention resources for different segments of GSN app users. PMID:27184573

  1. Short cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive training for adults with ADHD – a randomized controlled pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, Maarit; Salakari, Anita; Antila, Mervi; Chydenius, Esa; Partinen, Markku; Kaski, Markus; Vataja, Risto; Kalska, Hely; Iivanainen, Matti

    2010-01-01

    In clinical practice, a growing need exists for effective non-pharmacological treatments of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here, we present the results of a pilot study of 10 adults with ADHD participating in short-term individual cognitive- behavioral therapy (CBT), 9 adults participating in cognitive training (CT), and 10 controls. Self-report questionnaires, independent evaluations, and computerized neurocognitive testing were collected before and after the treatments to evaluate change. There were distinctive pre-hypotheses regarding the treatments, and therefore the statistical comparisons were conducted in pairs: CBT vs control, CT vs control, and CBT vs CT. In a combined ADHD symptom score based on self-reports, 6 participants in CBT, 2 in CT and 2 controls improved. Using independent evaluations, improvement was found in 7 of the CBT participants, 2 of CT participants and 3 controls. There was no treatment-related improvement in cognitive performance. Thus, in the CBT group, some encouraging improvement was seen, although not as clearly as in previous research with longer interventions. In the CT group, there was improvement in the trained tasks but no generalization of the improvement to the tasks of the neurocognitive testing, the self- report questionnaires, or the independent evaluations. These preliminary results warrant further studies with more participants and with more elaborate cognitive testing. PMID:20856608

  2. Genes in the dopaminergic system and delinquent behaviors across the life course: the role of social controls and risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Jason D; Menard, Scott; Roettger, Michael E; Knight, Kelly E; Boutwell, Brian B; Smolen, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    This paper examines the interaction between social control and social risk mechanisms and genes within the dopaminergic system (DAT1 and DRD2) as related to serious and violent forms of delinquent behavior among adolescents and young adults. We use nine waves of data from the National Youth Survey Family Study to examine the relevance of protective or risky social factors at four social levels including school, neighborhood, friends, and family within the gene-environment interaction framework. We extend previous work in this area by providing a testable typology of gene-environment interactions derived from current theories in this area. We find consistent evidence that the associations between putatively risky genotypes and delinquent behavior are suppressed within protective social environments. We also provide some evidence that supports the differential susceptibility hypothesis for these outcomes. Our findings largely confirm the conclusions of previous work and continue to highlight the critical role of the social environment within candidate gene studies of complex behaviors. PMID:25419014

  3. Controlled electrochemical etching of nanoporous Si anodes and its discharge behavior in alkaline Si-air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Soeun; Ocon, Joey D; Abrenica, Graniel Harne A; Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2015-02-11

    We report the fabrication of nanoporous silicon (nPSi) electrodes via electrochemical etching to form a porous Si layer with controllable thickness and pore size. Varying the etching time and ethanolic HF concentration results in different surface morphologies, with various degrees of electrolyte access depending on the pore characteristics. Optimizing the etching condition leads to well-developed nPSi electrodes, which have thick porous layers and smaller pore diameter and exhibit improved discharge behavior as anodes in alkaline Si-air cells in contrast to flat Si anode. Although electrochemical etching is effective in improving the interfacial characteristics of Si in terms of high surface area, we observed that mild anodization occurs and produces an oxide overlayer. We then show that this oxide layer in nPSi anodes can be effectively removed to produce an nPSi anode with good discharge behavior in an actual alkaline Si-air cell. In the future, the combination of high surface area nPSi anodes with nonaqueous electrolytes (e.g., room-temperature ionic liquid electrolyte) to minimize the strong passivation behavior and self-discharge in Si could lead to Si-air cells with a stable voltage profile and high anode utilization. PMID:25594400

  4. Analysis of axial behavior of three piece oil control ring; Kumiawase oil ring no jikuhoko kyodo no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateishi, Y.; Fujimura, K.; Hitosugi, H. [Nippon Piston Ring Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    It is considered that the reduction of oil control ring tension is a major problem in reducing the friction-loss of internal combustion engines. The authors have successfully developed a calculating method for the axial behavior prediction of a three piece type oil control ring as a method used in reduction of lube-oil consumption when lower tension ring is used. By means of the method, the authors found that the effect in reduction of lube-oil consumption was able to be expected by optimizing design parameters of the oil ring, the tension and the seating tab angle of expander-spacer, and the gas pressure on the 3rd land. 3 refs., 14 figs.

  5. Measurement of Work Hardening Behavior of Pure Titanium Sheet Using A Servo-Controlled Tube Bulge Testing Apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaxial stress tests of rolled pure titanium sheet (JIS 1, 0.5 mm thick) have been carried out in order to investigate the anisotropic plastic deformation under biaxial tension. Rolled pure titanium sheet was bent and welded to make tubular specimens. Combined tension-internal pressure was applied to the tubular specimens using the servo-controlled tube bulge testing apparatus developed by one of the authors [Kuwabara, T., Yoshida, K., Narihara, K., Takahashi S., Int. J. Plasticity 21 (1), 101-117 (2002)], so that the strain rate ratio, εφ:εθ, in the axial (φ) and circumferential (θ) directions of the specimen was controlled to be constant. Contours of plastic work at different levels of plastic strain and stress paths under constant strain rate ratios have been observed in the first quadrant of stress space. It is found that the test material exhibits significant differential work hardening behavior with the increase of plastic work.

  6. Measurement of Work Hardening Behavior of Pure Titanium Sheet Using A Servo-Controlled Tube Bulge Testing Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumita, Takeshi; Kuwabara, Toshihiko; Hayashida, Yasuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Biaxial stress tests of rolled pure titanium sheet (JIS ♯1, 0.5 mm thick) have been carried out in order to investigate the anisotropic plastic deformation under biaxial tension. Rolled pure titanium sheet was bent and welded to make tubular specimens. Combined tension-internal pressure was applied to the tubular specimens using the servo-controlled tube bulge testing apparatus developed by one of the authors [Kuwabara, T., Yoshida, K., Narihara, K., Takahashi S., Int. J. Plasticity 21 (1), 101-117 (2002)], so that the strain rate ratio, ɛ˙φ:ɛ˙θ, in the axial (φ) and circumferential (θ) directions of the specimen was controlled to be constant. Contours of plastic work at different levels of plastic strain and stress paths under constant strain rate ratios have been observed in the first quadrant of stress space. It is found that the test material exhibits significant differential work hardening behavior with the increase of plastic work.

  7. Chaotic dynamic behavior analysis and control for a financial risk system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiao-Dan; Liu Xiang-Dong; Zheng Yuan; Liu Cheng

    2013-01-01

    According to the risk management process of financial markets,a financial risk dynamic system is constructed in this paper.Through analyzing the basic dynamic properties,we obtain the conditions for stability and bifurcation of the system based on Hopf bifurcation theory of nonlinear dynamic systems.In order to make the system's chaos disappear,we select the feedback gain matrix to design a class of chaotic controller.Numerical simulations are performed to reveal the change process of financial market risk.It is shown that,when the parameter of risk transmission rate changes,the system gradually comes into chaos from the asymptotically stable state through bifurcation.The controller can then control the chaos effectively.

  8. Dietary Behaviors Predict Glycemic Control in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Sanjeev N.; Volkening, Lisa K.; Anderson, Barbara J.; Nansel, Tonja; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; Wysocki, Tim; Laffel, Lori M. B.; ,

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the association between dietary adherence and glycemic control among youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 119 youth aged 9–14 years (mean ± SD 12.1 ± 1.6 years) with diabetes duration ≥1 year (5.4 ± 3.1 years). Dietary adherence was assessed using the Diabetes Self-Management Profile diet domain. Higher score defined greater dietary adherence. Glycemic control was determined by A1C. RESULTS—Dietary adherenc...

  9. Studies on Behavior and Trend Controlling of Technetium in 1A and Scrubbing Extractor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the concentration of HNO3 on distribution ratio of Tc (Ⅶ) between 30% TBP-kerosene and HNO3 solution at various ratio of U, Zr, Tc is determined. The trend and extraction behavior of Tc in 1A extractor with mixer-settler is studied. The results show that 14.4% and 27.0% of Tc is in 1AP, respectively while the concentrations of HNO3 in 1AF solution are 2 mol/L and 3 mol/L which prepared by chemicals. However after heating pretreatment of 1AF solution , 99.8% of Tc is in 1Ap while concentration of HNO3 in 1AF is 3 mol/L.Meanwhile, The HNO3 driving out method of U-Tc-Zr in efflux 1AP is studied. The aim is

  10. Analysis of mechanical behavior of soft rocks and stability control in deep tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the weakness in mechanical properties of chlorite schist and the high in situ stress in Jinping II hydropower station, the rock mass surrounding the diversion tunnels located in chlorite schist was observed with extremely large deformations. This may significantly increase the risk of tunnel instability during excavation. In order to assess the stability of the diversion tunnels laboratory tests were carried out in association with the petrophysical properties, mechanical behaviors and water-weakening properties of chlorite schist. The continuous deformation of surrounding rock mass, the destruction of the support structure and a large-scale collapse induced by the weak chlorite schist and high in situ stress were analyzed. The distributions of compressive deformation in the excavation zone with large deformations were also studied. In this regard, two reinforcement schemes for the excavation of diversion tunnel bottom section were proposed accordingly. This study could offer theoretical basis for deep tunnel construction in similar geological conditions.

  11. Analysis of mechanical behavior of soft rocks and stability control in deep tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhou; Chuanqing Zhang; Zhen Li; Dawei Hu; Jing Hou

    2014-01-01

    Due to the weakness in mechanical properties of chlorite schist and the high in situ stress in Jinping II hydropower station, the rock mass surrounding the diversion tunnels located in chlorite schist was observed with extremely large deformations. This may significantly increase the risk of tunnel instability during excavation. In order to assess the stability of the diversion tunnels laboratory tests were carried out in association with the petrophysical properties, mechanical behaviors and water-weakening properties of chlorite schist. The continuous deformation of surrounding rock mass, the destruction of the support structure and a large-scale collapse induced by the weak chlorite schist and high in situ stress were analyzed. The distributions of compressive deformation in the excavation zone with large deformations were also studied. In this regard, two reinforcement schemes for the excavation of diversion tunnel bottom section were proposed accordingly. This study could offer theoretical basis for deep tunnel construction in similar geological conditions.

  12. Brief cognitive-behavioral therapy for weight loss in midlife women: a controlled study with follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimenta F

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Filipa Pimenta, Isabel Leal, João Maroco, Catarina RamosPsychology and Health Research Unit, ISPA – Instituto Universitário, Lisbon, PortugalObjective: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT has proven to be effective in weight reduction. This study explores whether individual, 8-session CBT can promote weight loss in midlife women.Methods: Anthropometric (weight, abdominal perimeter, and body mass index calculation, psychological (health-related and sexual quality of life, stress, anxiety, and depression, and behavioral measures (binge eating disorder and restrained, external, and emotional eating were assessed at baseline (T1, posttreatment (T2, and 4-month follow-up (T3, for a total of 21 women at baseline; the CBT group (n = 11 and the control group (n = 10; waiting list were compared.Results: Statistically significant effects that were dependent on the intervention were observed on weight (F = 4.402; P = 0.035; ηp2 = 0.404; π = 0.652 and body mass index (F = 3.804; P = 0.050;ηp2 = 0.369; π = 0.585; furthermore, marginally significant effects were observed on external eating (F = 2.844; P = 0.095; ηp2 = 0.304; π = 0.461. At follow-up, women in the CBT group presented with lower weight, abdominal perimeter, body mass index, and external eating; higher health-related quality-of-life and restrained eating were also observed in this group. Most differences identified were at a marginally significant level. Moreover, at follow-up, none of the participants of the CBT group met the criteria for binge eating disorder, whereas the number of women with binge eating disorder in the control group remained the same through all three assessments.Conclusion: An effective, though small, weight loss was achieved. Changes in quality of life were also observed. Moreover, changes in external eating behavior were successful.Keywords: cognitive-behavioral therapy, control group, follow-up, midlife, weight loss, women

  13. Health-related behavior, profile of health locus of control and acceptance of illness in patients suffering from chronic somatic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Janowski

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to determine health-related behaviors, profile of health locus of control (HLC, and to assess the relationships between these constructs among patients suffering from chronic somatic diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three-hundred adult patients suffering from various chronic diseases participated in the study. The patients' mean age was 54.6 years (SD = 17.57. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences were found between the different clinical groups in health-related behavior, acceptance of illness, internal HLC or chance HLC. Patients with neurologic conditions showed slightly lower powerful others HLC than did some other clinical groups. Health-related behavior was significantly positively related to all three categories of HLC, with most prominent associations observed with powerful others HLC. Only one type of health-related behavior--preventive behavior--correlated significantly and negatively with acceptance of illness. Differences in the frequency of health-related behavior were also found due to gender (women showing more healthy nutritional habits than men, age (older subjects showing more frequent health-promoting behavior, education (higher education was associated with less frequent health-promoting behavior and marital status (widowed subjects reporting more frequent health-promoting behavior. CONCLUSIONS: Health-related behavior in patients with chronic diseases seems to be unrelated to a specific diagnosis; however it shows associations with both internal and external HLC. Sociodemographic factors are also crucial factors determining frequency of health-related behavior in such patients.

  14. Can Genetics Predict Response to Complex Behavioral Interventions? Evidence from a Genetic Analysis of the Fast Track Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dustin; Belsky, Daniel W; Crowley, D Max; Latendresse, Shawn J; Aliev, Fazil; Riley, Brien; Sun, Cuie; Dick, Danielle M; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    Early interventions are a preferred method for addressing behavioral problems in high-risk children, but often have only modest effects. Identifying sources of variation in intervention effects can suggest means to improve efficiency. One potential source of such variation is the genome. We conducted a genetic analysis of the Fast Track randomized control trial, a 10-year-long intervention to prevent high-risk kindergarteners from developing adult externalizing problems including substance abuse and antisocial behavior. We tested whether variants of the glucocorticoid receptor gene NR3C1 were associated with differences in response to the Fast Track intervention. We found that in European-American children, a variant of NR3C1 identified by the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs10482672 was associated with increased risk for externalizing psychopathology in control group children and decreased risk for externalizing psychopathology in intervention group children. Variation in NR3C1 measured in this study was not associated with differential intervention response in African-American children. We discuss implications for efforts to prevent externalizing problems in high-risk children and for public policy in the genomic era.

  15. A temporal predictive code for voice motor control: Evidence from ERP and behavioral responses to pitch-shifted auditory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Sangtian, Stacey; Korzyukov, Oleg; Larson, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    The predictive coding model suggests that voice motor control is regulated by a process in which the mismatch (error) between feedforward predictions and sensory feedback is detected and used to correct vocal motor behavior. In this study, we investigated how predictions about timing of pitch perturbations in voice auditory feedback would modulate ERP and behavioral responses during vocal production. We designed six counterbalanced blocks in which a +100 cents pitch-shift stimulus perturbed voice auditory feedback during vowel sound vocalizations. In three blocks, there was a fixed delay (500, 750 or 1000 ms) between voice and pitch-shift stimulus onset (predictable), whereas in the other three blocks, stimulus onset delay was randomized between 500, 750 and 1000 ms (unpredictable). We found that subjects produced compensatory (opposing) vocal responses that started at 80 ms after the onset of the unpredictable stimuli. However, for predictable stimuli, subjects initiated vocal responses at 20 ms before and followed the direction of pitch shifts in voice feedback. Analysis of ERPs showed that the amplitudes of the N1 and P2 components were significantly reduced in response to predictable compared with unpredictable stimuli. These findings indicate that predictions about temporal features of sensory feedback can modulate vocal motor behavior. In the context of the predictive coding model, temporally-predictable stimuli are learned and reinforced by the internal feedforward system, and as indexed by the ERP suppression, the sensory feedback contribution is reduced for their processing. These findings provide new insights into the neural mechanisms of vocal production and motor control.

  16. Control of Access to Memory: The Use of Task Interference as a Behavioral Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.; Whitney, Susannah J.

    2008-01-01

    Directed forgetting and prospective memory methods were combined to examine differences in the control of memory access. Between studying two lists of target words, participants were either instructed to forget the first list, or to continue remembering the first list. After study participants performed a lexical decision task with an additional…

  17. Exploiting Redundancy for Flexible Behavior: Unsupervised Learning in a Modular Sensorimotor Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Martin V.; Herbort, Oliver; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Autonomously developing organisms face several challenges when learning reaching movements. First, motor control is learned unsupervised or self-supervised. Second, knowledge of sensorimotor contingencies is acquired in contexts in which action consequences unfold in time. Third, motor redundancies must be resolved. To solve all 3 of these…

  18. The hormonal control of begging and early aggressive behavior : Experiments in black-headed gull chicks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothuis, TGG; Ros, AFH; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2005-01-01

    The hormonal control of begging and sibling competition is largely unknown, but recent evidence suggests a role for steroid hormones. We tested the influence of the aromatizable androgen testosterone (T), the non-aromatizable androgen 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and 17 beta-estradiol (E) on b

  19. The Paradoxical Role of Perceived Control in Late Life Health Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith G Chipperfield

    Full Text Available Research has established the health benefits of psychological factors, including the way individuals appraise outcomes. Although many studies confirm that appraising outcomes as controllable is adaptive for health, a paradoxical possibility is largely ignored: Perceived control may be detrimental under some conditions. Our premise was that appraising health as controllable but at the same time ascribing little value to it might signal a dysfunctional psychological mindset that fosters a mistaken sense of invincibility. During face-to-face interviews with a representative sample of older adults (age range = 72-99, we identified individuals with such a potentially maladaptive "invincible" mindset (high perceived control and low health value and compared them to their counterparts on several outcomes. The findings were consistent with our hypotheses. The invincibles denied future risks, they lacked the activating emotion of fear, and they visited their physicians less often over a subsequent five-year period. Moreover, in contrast to their counterparts, the invincibles did not appear strategic in their approach to seeking care: Even poor health did not prompt them to seek the counsel of a physician. The recognition that psychological appraisals are modifiable highlights the promise of remedial methods to alter maladaptive mindsets, potentially improving quality of life.

  20. The Chinese Classroom Paradox: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Teacher Controlling Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Lam, Shui-Fong; Chan, Kam Chi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese classrooms present an intriguing paradox to the claim of self-determination theory that autonomy facilitates learning. Chinese teachers appear to be controlling, but Chinese students do not have poor academic performance in international comparisons. The present study addressed this paradox by examining the cultural differences in…